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Sample records for cells mediates mechanical

  1. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  2. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  3. Mechanisms of cytoskeleton-mediated mechanical signal transmission in cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yongyun; Gouget, Cecile L.M.; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated very rapid long-distance transmission of mechanical forces within cells. Because the speed of this transmission greatly exceeds that of reaction-diffusion signaling, it has been conjectured that it occurs via the propagation of elastic waves through the actin stress fiber network. To explore the plausibility of this conjecture, we recently developed a model of small amplitude stress fiber deformations in prestressed viscoelastic stress fibers subjected to external forces. The model results demonstrated that rapid mechanical signal transmission is only possible when the external force is applied orthogonal to the stress fiber axis and that the dynamics of this transmission are governed by a balance between the prestress in the stress fiber and the stress fiber's material viscosity. The present study, which is a follow-up on our previous model, uses dimensional analysis to: (1) further evaluate the plausibility of the elastic wave conjecture and (2) obtain insight into mechanical signal transmission dynamics in simple stress fiber networks. We show that the elastic wave scenario is likely not the mechanism of rapid mechanical signal transmission in actin stress fibers due to the highly viscoelastic character of these fibers. Our analysis also demonstrates that the time constant characterizing mechanical stimulus transmission is strongly dependent on the topology of the stress fiber network, implying that network organization plays an important role in determining the dynamics of cellular responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:23336020

  4. Mechanisms of cytoskeleton-mediated mechanical signal transmission in cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yongyun; Gouget, Cecile L M; Barakat, Abdul I

    2012-11-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated very rapid long-distance transmission of mechanical forces within cells. Because the speed of this transmission greatly exceeds that of reaction-diffusion signaling, it has been conjectured that it occurs via the propagation of elastic waves through the actin stress fiber network. To explore the plausibility of this conjecture, we recently developed a model of small amplitude stress fiber deformations in prestressed viscoelastic stress fibers subjected to external forces. The model results demonstrated that rapid mechanical signal transmission is only possible when the external force is applied orthogonal to the stress fiber axis and that the dynamics of this transmission are governed by a balance between the prestress in the stress fiber and the stress fiber's material viscosity. The present study, which is a follow-up on our previous model, uses dimensional analysis to: (1) further evaluate the plausibility of the elastic wave conjecture and (2) obtain insight into mechanical signal transmission dynamics in simple stress fiber networks. We show that the elastic wave scenario is likely not the mechanism of rapid mechanical signal transmission in actin stress fibers due to the highly viscoelastic character of these fibers. Our analysis also demonstrates that the time constant characterizing mechanical stimulus transmission is strongly dependent on the topology of the stress fiber network, implying that network organization plays an important role in determining the dynamics of cellular responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

  5. Mechanisms of strain-mediated mesenchymal stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kearney, E M; Prendergast, P J; Campbell, V A

    2008-12-01

    Mechanical conditioning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been adopted widely as a biophysical signal to aid tissue engineering applications. The replication of in vivo mechanical signaling has been used in in vitro environments to regulate cell differentiation, and extracellular matrix synthesis, so that both the chemical and mechanical properties of the tissue-engineered construct are compatible with the implant site. While research in these areas contributes to tissue engineering, the effects of mechanical strain on MSC apoptosis remain poorly defined. To evaluate the effects of uniaxial cyclic tensile strain on MSC apoptosis and to investigate mechanotransduction associated with strain-mediated cell death, MSCs seeded on a 2D silicone membrane were stimulated by a range of strain magnitudes for 3 days. Mechanotransduction was investigated using the stretch-activated cation channel blocker gadolinium chloride, the L-type voltage-activated calcium channel blocker nicardipine, the c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) blocker D-JNK inhibitor 1, and the calpain inhibitor MDL 28170. Apoptosis was assessed through DNA fragmentation using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated-UTP-end nick labeling method. Results demonstrated that tensile strains of 7.5% or greater induce apoptosis in MSCs. L-type voltage-activated calcium channels coupled mechanical stress to activation of calpain and JNK, which lead to apoptosis through DNA fragmentation. The definition of the in vitro boundary conditions for tensile strain and MSCs along with a proposed mechanism for apoptosis induced by mechanical events positively contributes to the development of MSC biology, bioreactor design for tissue engineering, and development of computational methods for mechanobiology.

  6. Signaling mechanisms that mediate invasion in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, L; Marchiani, S; Muratori, M; Carloni, V; Forti, G; Baldi, E

    2004-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells have a less malignant phenotype characterized by reduced migration and invasion. We investigated whether the presence of the androgen receptor could affect EGFR-mediated signaling by evaluating autotransphosphorylation of the receptor as well as activation of the downstream signaling pathway PI3K/AKT. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated a reduction of EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR in PC3-AR cells. In addition, EGF-stimulated PI3K activity, a key signaling pathway for invasion of these cells, was decreased in PC3-AR cells and further reduced by treatment with R1881, indicating decreased functionality of EGFR. Our results suggest that the expression of androgen receptors by transfection in PC3 cells confers a less malignant phenotype by interfering with EGFR autophosphorylation and signaling leading to invasion in response to EGF. We used the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the EGFR gefitinib (also known as Iressa or ZD1839) to further investigate the role of EGFR in the invasion and growth of PC cells. We demonstrate that in the androgen-insensitive cell lines PC3 and DU145 this compound was able to decrease in vitro invasion of Matrigel by inhibiting EGFR autotransphosphorylation and subsequent PI3K activation. Gefitinib may be useful in the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer to limit not only the proliferation but also the invasion of these tumors.

  7. IFNγ Regulates Activated Vδ2+ T Cells through a Feedback Mechanism Mediated by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fechter, Karoline; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Jakobsson, Emma; Ferrin, Izaskun; Lang, Valérie; Sepulveda, Pilar; Pennington, Daniel J.; Trigueros, César

    2017-01-01

    γδ T cells play a role in a wide range of diseases such as autoimmunity and cancer. The majority of circulating human γδ T lymphocytes express a Vγ9Vδ2+ (Vδ2+) T cell receptor (TCR) and following activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we show that IFNγ, produced by Vδ2+ cells, activates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated immunosupression, which in turn exerts a negative feedback mechanism on γδ T cell function ranging from cytokine production to proliferation. Importantly, this modulatory effect is limited to a short period of time (<24 hours) post-T cell activation, after which MSCs can no longer exert their immunoregulatory capacity. Using genetically modified MSCs with the IFNγ receptor 1 constitutively silenced, we demonstrate that IFNγ is essential to this process. Activated γδ T cells induce expression of several factors by MSCs that participate in the depletion of amino acids. In particular, we show that indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme involved in L-tryptophan degradation, is responsible for MSC-mediated immunosuppression of Vδ2+ T cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that γδ T cell responses can be immuno-modulated by different signals derived from MSC. PMID:28076364

  8. Signalling mechanisms mediating Zn2+-induced TRPM2 channel activation and cell death in microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mortadza, Sharifah Syed; Sim, Joan A.; Stacey, Martin; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Excessive Zn2+ causes brain damage via promoting ROS generation. Here we investigated the role of ROS-sensitive TRPM2 channel in H2O2/Zn2+-induced Ca2+ signalling and cell death in microglial cells. H2O2/Zn2+ induced concentration-dependent increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), which was inhibited by PJ34, a PARP inhibitor, and abolished by TRPM2 knockout (TRPM2-KO). Pathological concentrations of H2O2/Zn2+ induced substantial cell death that was inhibited by PJ34 and DPQ, PARP inhibitors, 2-APB, a TRPM2 channel inhibitor, and prevented by TRPM2-KO. Further analysis indicate that Zn2+ induced ROS production, PARP-1 stimulation, increase in the [Ca2+]c and cell death, all of which were suppressed by chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, DPI, a NADPH-dependent oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, GKT137831, a NOX1/4 inhibitor, and Phox-I2, a NOX2 inhibitor. Furthermore, Zn2+-induced PARP-1 stimulation, increase in the [Ca2+]c and cell death were inhibited by PF431396, a Ca2+-sensitive PYK2 inhibitor, and U0126, a MEK/ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our study shows PKC/NOX-mediated ROS generation and PARP-1 activation as an important mechanism in Zn2+-induced TRPM2 channel activation and, TRPM2-mediated increase in the [Ca2+]c to trigger the PYK2/MEK/ERK signalling pathway as a positive feedback mechanism that amplifies the TRPM2 channel activation. Activation of these TRPM2-depenent signalling mechanisms ultimately drives Zn2+-induced Ca2+ overloading and cell death. PMID:28322340

  9. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  10. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  11. Tips, Stalks, Tubes: Notch-Mediated Cell Fate Determination and Mechanisms of Tubulogenesis during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jennifer J.; Tattersall, Ian W.; Kitajewski, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of developing vascular sprouts from existing blood vessels. Luminal endothelial cells convert into “tip” cells that contribute to the development of a multicellular stalk, which then undergoes lumen formation. In this review, we consider a variety of cellular and molecular pathways that mediate these transitions. We focus first on Notch signaling in cell fate determination as a mechanism to define tip and stalk cells. We next discuss the current models of lumen formation and describe new players in this process, such as chloride intracellular channel proteins. Finally, we consider the possible medical therapeutic benefits of understanding these processes and acknowledge potential obstacles in drug development. PMID:22355796

  12. Mechanisms of coronavirus cell entry mediated by the viral spike protein.

    PubMed

    Belouzard, Sandrine; Millet, Jean K; Licitra, Beth N; Whittaker, Gary R

    2012-06-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. To deliver their nucleocapsid into the host cell, they rely on the fusion of their envelope with the host cell membrane. The spike glycoprotein (S) mediates virus entry and is a primary determinant of cell tropism and pathogenesis. It is classified as a class I fusion protein, and is responsible for binding to the receptor on the host cell as well as mediating the fusion of host and viral membranes-A process driven by major conformational changes of the S protein. This review discusses coronavirus entry mechanisms focusing on the different triggers used by coronaviruses to initiate the conformational change of the S protein: receptor binding, low pH exposure and proteolytic activation. We also highlight commonalities between coronavirus S proteins and other class I viral fusion proteins, as well as distinctive features that confer distinct tropism, pathogenicity and host interspecies transmission characteristics to coronaviruses.

  13. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell–cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell–cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX–mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  14. Comparison of molecular mechanisms mediating cell contact phenomena in model developmental systems: an exploration of universality.

    PubMed

    Bowers-Morrow, Vivienne M; Ali, Sinan O; Williams, Keith L

    2004-08-01

    Are there universal molecular mechanisms associated with cell contact phenomena during metazoan ontogenesis? Comparison of adhesion systems in disparate model systems indicates the existence of unifying principles. Requirements for multicellularity are (a) the construction of three-dimensional structures involving a crucial balance between adhesiveness and motility; and (b) the establishment of integration at molecular, cellular, tissue, and organismal levels of organization. Mechanisms for (i) cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion, (ii) cell movement, (iii) cell-cell communication, (iv) cellular responses, (v) regulation of these processes, and (vi) their integration with patterning, growth, and other developmental processes are all crucial to metazoan development, and must have been present for the emergence and radiation of Metazoa. The principal unifying themes of this review are the dynamics and regulation of cell contact phenomena. Our knowledge of the dynamic molecular mechanisms underlying cell contact phenomena remains fragmentary. Here we examine the molecular bases of cell contact phenomena using extant model developmental systems (representing a wide range of phyla) including the simplest i.e. sponges, and the eukaryotic protist Dictyostelium discoideum, the more complex Drosophila melanogaster, and vertebrate systems. We discuss cell contact phenomena in a broad developmental context. The molecular language of cell contact phenomena is complex; it involves a plethora of structurally and functionally diverse molecules, and diverse modes of intermolecular interactions mediated by protein and/or carbohydrate moieties. Reasons for this are presumably the necessity for a high degree of specificity of intermolecular interactions, the requirement for a multitude of different signals, and the apparent requirement for an increasingly large repertoire of cell contact molecules in more complex developmental systems, such as the developing vertebrate nervous

  15. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  16. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  17. Investigating dynamic structural and mechanical changes of neuroblastoma cells associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuqiang; Iu, Catherine Y. Y.; Lui, Cathy N. P.; Zou, Yukai; Fung, Carmen K. M.; Li, Hung Wing; Xi, Ning; Yung, Ken K. L.; Lai, King W. C.

    2014-11-01

    Glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration resulting from excessive activation of glutamate receptors is recognized as one of the major causes of various neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms in the neurodegenerative process remain unidentified. Here, we investigate the real-time dynamic structural and mechanical changes associated with the neurodegeneration induced by the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (a subtype of glutamate receptors) at the nanoscale. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is employed to measure the three-dimensional (3-D) topography and mechanical properties of live SH-SY5Y cells under stimulus of NMDA receptors. A significant increase in surface roughness and stiffness of the cell is observed after NMDA treatment, which indicates the time-dependent neuronal cell behavior under NMDA-mediated neurodegeneration. The present AFM based study further advance our understanding of the neurodegenerative process to elucidate the pathways and mechanisms that govern NMDA induced neurodegeneration, so as to facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Mechanism of arctigenin-mediated specific cytotoxicity against human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Susanti, Siti; Iwasaki, Hironori; Inafuku, Masashi; Taira, Naoyuki; Oku, Hirosuke

    2013-12-15

    The lignan arctigenin (ARG) from the herb Arctium lappa L. possesses anti-cancer activity, however the mechanism of action of ARG has been found to vary among tissues and types of cancer cells. The current study aims to gain insight into the ARG mediated mechanism of action involved in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in lung adenocarcinoma cells. This study also delineates the cancer cell specificity of ARG by comparison with its effects on various normal cell lines. ARG selectively arrested the proliferation of cancer cells at the G0/G1 phase through the down-regulation of NPAT protein expression. This down-regulation occurred via the suppression of either cyclin E/CDK2 or cyclin H/CDK7, while apoptosis was induced through the modulation of the Akt-1-related signaling pathway. Furthermore, a GSH synthase inhibitor specifically enhanced the cytotoxicity of ARG against cancer cells, suggesting that the intracellular GSH content was another factor influencing the susceptibility of cancer cells to ARG. These findings suggest that specific cytotoxicity of ARG against lung cancer cells was explained by its selective modulation of the expression of NPAT, which is involved in histone biosynthesis. The cytotoxicity of ARG appeared to be dependent on the intracellular GSH level.

  19. Reduced expression IRF7 in nasal epithelial cells from smokers as a potential mechanism mediating enhanced susceptibility to influenza

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Smokers are more susceptible to viral infections, including influenza virus, yet the mechanisms mediating this effect are not known. Methods: We have established an in vitro model of differentiated nasal epithelial cells from smokers, which maintain enhanced levels...

  20. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR. PMID:28255564

  1. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; Zhu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR.

  2. "Epithelial Cell TRPV1-Mediated Airway Sensitivity as a Mechanism for Respiratory Symptoms Associated with Gulf War Illness?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    TITLE: “Epithelial Cell TRPV1 -Mediated Airway Sensitivity as a Mechanism for Respiratory Symptoms Associated with Gulf War Illness” PRINCIPAL...66,),&$7,212) E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 01-06-2010 Annual Report 1 JUN 2009 - 31 MAY 2010 Epithelial Cell TRPV1 -Mediated Airway...express functional TRPV1 . More recently we found that these cells also express another important irritant receptor, namely TRPA1. Activation of

  3. A mechanism of hypoxia-mediated escape from adaptive immunity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Ivraym B; Smallwood, Chelsea A; Siemens, D Robert; Graham, Charles H

    2014-02-01

    Immune escape is a fundamental trait of cancer in which mechanistic knowledge is incomplete. Here, we describe a novel mechanism by which hypoxia contributes to tumoral immune escape from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Exposure of human or murine cancer cells to hypoxia for 24 hours led to upregulation of the immune inhibitory molecule programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1; also known as B7-H1), in a manner dependent on the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). In vivo studies also demonstrated cellular colocalization of HIF-1α and PD-L1 in tumors. Hypoxia-induced expression of PD-L1 in cancer cells increased their resistance to CTL-mediated lysis. Using glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), an agonist of nitric oxide (NO) signaling known to block HIF-1α accumulation in hypoxic cells, we prevented hypoxia-induced PD-L1 expression and diminished resistance to CTL-mediated lysis. Moreover, transdermal administration of GTN attenuated tumor growth in mice. We found that higher expression of PD-L1 induced in tumor cells by exposure to hypoxia led to increased apoptosis of cocultured CTLs and Jurkat leukemia T cells. This increase in apoptosis was prevented by blocking the interaction of PD-L1 with PD-1, the PD-L1 receptor on T cells, or by addition of GTN. Our findings point to a role for hypoxia/HIF-1 in driving immune escape from CTL, and they suggest a novel cancer immunotherapy to block PD-L1 expression in hypoxic-tumor cells by administering NO mimetics.

  4. Intracellular mechanisms mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Paul W; Shah, Sumit

    2005-01-01

    Tocotrienols and tocopherols represent the two subgroups that make up the vitamin E family of compounds. However, tocotrienols display significantly more potent apoptotic activity in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells than tocopherols. Studies were conducted to determine the intracellular mechanism(s) mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic +SA mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro. An initial step in apoptosis is the activation of 'initiator' caspases (caspase-8 or -9) that subsequently activate 'effector' caspases (caspase-3, -6 and -7) and induce apoptosis. Treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol (20 microM) resulted in a time-dependent increase in caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity. Combined treatment with specific caspase-8 or caspase-3 inhibitors completely blocked alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis and caspase-8 or caspase-3 activity, respectively. In contrast, alpha-tocotrienol treatment had no effect on caspase-9 activation, and combined treatment with a specific caspase-9 inhibitor did not block alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in (+)SA cells. Since caspase-8 activation is associated with the activation of death receptors, such as Fas, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, studies were conducted to determine the exact death receptor(s) and ligand(s) involved in mediating tocotrienol-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Treatment with Fas-ligand (FasL), Fas-activating antibody, or TRAIL failed to induce cell death in (+)SA neoplastic mammary epithelial cells, suggesting that these cells are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol did not alter the intracellular levels of Fas, FasL, or Fas-associated death domain (FADD) in these cells. Western blot analysis also showed that alpha-tocotrienol did not induce FasL or FADD translocation from the cytosolic to membrane fraction in these cells. Finally

  5. CDI Systems Are Stably Maintained by a Cell-Contact Mediated Surveillance Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Annette J.; Leung, Nicole Y.; Hayes, Christopher S.; Low, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems are widespread amongst Gram-negative bacteria where they play important roles in inter-cellular competition and biofilm formation. CDI+ bacteria use cell-surface CdiA proteins to bind neighboring bacteria and deliver C-terminal toxin domains. CDI+ cells also express CdiI immunity proteins that specifically neutralize toxins delivered from adjacent siblings. Genomic analyses indicate that cdi loci are commonly found on plasmids and genomic islands, suggesting that these Type 5 secretion systems are spread through horizontal gene transfer. Here, we examine whether CDI toxin and immunity activities serve to stabilize mobile genetic elements using a minimal F plasmid that fails to partition properly during cell division. This F plasmid is lost from Escherichia coli populations within 50 cell generations, but is maintained in ~60% of the cells after 100 generations when the plasmid carries the cdi gene cluster from E. coli strain EC93. By contrast, the ccdAB "plasmid addiction" module normally found on F exerts only a modest stabilizing effect. cdi-dependent plasmid stabilization requires the BamA receptor for CdiA, suggesting that plasmid-free daughter cells are inhibited by siblings that retain the CDI+ plasmid. In support of this model, the CDI+ F plasmid is lost rapidly from cells that carry an additional cdiI immunity gene on a separate plasmid. These results indicate that plasmid stabilization occurs through elimination of non-immune cells arising in the population via plasmid loss. Thus, genetic stabilization reflects a strong selection for immunity to CDI. After long-term passage for more than 300 generations, CDI+ plasmids acquire mutations that increase copy number and result in 100% carriage in the population. Together, these results show that CDI stabilizes genetic elements through a toxin-mediated surveillance mechanism in which cells that lose the CDI system are detected and eliminated by their siblings

  6. Molecular mechanisms of CD8+ T cell-mediated delayed hypersensitivity: implications for allergies, asthma, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R S; Askenase, P W

    1999-02-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is defined as the recruitment of T cells into tissues to be activated by antigen-presenting cells to produce cytokines that mediate local inflammation. CD8+ T cells are now known to mediate DTH responses in allergic contact dermatitis, drug eruptions, asthma, and autoimmune diseases. This inflammatory effector capability of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was previously poorly recognized, but there is now considerable evidence that these diseases may be mediated by CD8+ DTH. The difference between CD8+ T cells and CD4+ T cells mediating DTH relates to the molecular mechanisms by which antigens are processed and presented to the T cells. Antigens external to the cell are phagocytosed and processed for presentation on MHC class II molecules (eg, HLA-DR) to CD4+ T cells. In contrast, internal cytoplasmic antigens are processed by the endogenous pathway for presentation on MHC class I molecules (eg, HLA-A, -B, and -C) to CD8+ T cells. External allergens can also enter the endogenous pathway to be presented to CD8+ T cells. These include many contact sensitizers, chemical and protein respiratory allergens, viral antigens, metabolic products of drugs, and autoantigens. The resulting CD8+ T-cell response explains the role of CD8+ T-cell DTH mechanisms in allergic contact dermatitis, asthma, drug eruptions, and autoimmune diseases.

  7. Ceruloplasmin enhances smooth muscle cell- and endothelial cell-mediated low density lipoprotein oxidation by a superoxide-dependent mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Ehrenwald, E.; Fox, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC) stimulate low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by free radical-mediated, transition metal-dependent mechanisms. The physiological source(s) of metal ions is not known; however, purified ceruloplasmin, a plasma protein containing 7 coppers, oxidizes LDL in vitro. We now show that ceruloplasmin also increases LDL oxidation by vascular cells. In metal ion-free medium, human ceruloplasmin increased bovine aortic SMC- and EC-mediated LDL oxidation by up to 30- and 15-fold, respectively. The maximal response was at 100-300 microg ceruloplasmin/ml, a level at or below the unevoked physiological plasma concentration. Oxidant activity was dependent on protein structure as a specific proteolytic cleavage or removal of one of the seven ceruloplasmin copper atoms inhibited activity. Three lines of evidence indicated a critical role for cellular superoxide (O2.) in ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation. First, the rate of production of O2. by cells correlated with their rates of LDL oxidation. Second, superoxide dismutase effectively blocked ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation by both cell types. Finally, O2. production by SMC quantitatively accounted for the observed rate of LDL oxidation. To show this, the course of O2. production by SMC was simulated by repeated addition of xanthine and xanthine oxidase to culture medium under cell-free conditions. Neither ceruloplasmin nor O2. alone increased LDL oxidation, but together they completely reconstituted the oxidation rate of ceruloplasmin-stimulated SMC. These results are the first to show that ceruloplasmin stimulates EC- and SMC-mediated oxidation of LDL and that cell-derived O2. accounts quantitatively for metal-dependent, free radical-initiated oxidation of LDL by these cells.

  8. Distinct Terminal and Cell Body Mechanisms in the Nociceptor Mediate Hyperalgesic Priming

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Araldi, Dioneia

    2015-01-01

    Hyperalgesic priming, a form of neuroplasticity in nociceptors, is a model of the transition from acute to chronic pain in the rat, which involves signaling from the site of an acute tissue insult in the vicinity of the peripheral terminal of a nociceptor to its cell body that, in turn, induces a signal that travels back to the terminal to mediate a marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia. In the present experiments, we studied the underlying mechanisms in the cell body and compared them to the mechanisms in the nerve terminal. Injection of a cell-permeant cAMP analog, 8-bromo cAMP, into the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical hyperalgesia and priming with an onset more rapid than when induced at the peripheral terminal. Priming induced by intraganglion 8-bromo cAMP was prevented by an oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to mRNA for a transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and by an inhibitor of importin, which is required for activated CREB to get into the nucleus. While peripheral administration of 8-bromo cAMP also produced hyperalgesia, it did not produce priming. Conversely, interventions administered in the vicinity of the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor that induces priming—PKCε activator, NGF, and TNF-α—when injected into the ganglion produce hyperalgesia but not priming. The protein translation inhibitor cordycepin, injected at the peripheral terminal but not into the ganglion, reverses priming induced at either the ganglion or peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. These data implicate different mechanisms in the soma and terminal in the transition to chronic pain. PMID:25878283

  9. Distinct terminal and cell body mechanisms in the nociceptor mediate hyperalgesic priming.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luiz F; Araldi, Dioneia; Levine, Jon D

    2015-04-15

    Hyperalgesic priming, a form of neuroplasticity in nociceptors, is a model of the transition from acute to chronic pain in the rat, which involves signaling from the site of an acute tissue insult in the vicinity of the peripheral terminal of a nociceptor to its cell body that, in turn, induces a signal that travels back to the terminal to mediate a marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia. In the present experiments, we studied the underlying mechanisms in the cell body and compared them to the mechanisms in the nerve terminal. Injection of a cell-permeant cAMP analog, 8-bromo cAMP, into the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical hyperalgesia and priming with an onset more rapid than when induced at the peripheral terminal. Priming induced by intraganglion 8-bromo cAMP was prevented by an oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to mRNA for a transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and by an inhibitor of importin, which is required for activated CREB to get into the nucleus. While peripheral administration of 8-bromo cAMP also produced hyperalgesia, it did not produce priming. Conversely, interventions administered in the vicinity of the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor that induces priming-PKCε activator, NGF, and TNF-α-when injected into the ganglion produce hyperalgesia but not priming. The protein translation inhibitor cordycepin, injected at the peripheral terminal but not into the ganglion, reverses priming induced at either the ganglion or peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. These data implicate different mechanisms in the soma and terminal in the transition to chronic pain.

  10. Ionic mechanisms mediating oscillatory membrane potentials in wide-field retinal amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Vigh, Jozsef; Solessio, Eduardo; Morgans, Catherine W; Lasater, Eric M

    2003-07-01

    Particular types of amacrine cells of the vertebrate retina show oscillatory membrane potentials (OMPs) in response to light stimulation. Historically it has been thought the oscillations arose as a result of circuit properties. In a previous study we found that in some amacrine cells, the ability to oscillate was an intrinsic property of the cell. Here we characterized the ionic mechanisms responsible for the oscillations in wide-field amacrine cells (WFACs) in an effort to better understand the functional properties of the cell. The OMPs were found to be calcium (Ca2+) dependent; blocking voltage-gated Ca2+ channels eliminated the oscillations, whereas elevating extracellular Ca2+ enhanced them. Strong intracellular Ca2+ buffering (10 mM EGTA or bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) eliminated any attenuation in the OMPs as well as a Ca2+-dependent inactivation of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Pharmacological and immunohistochemical characterization revealed that WFACs express L- and N-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. Block of the L-type channels eliminated the OMPs, but omega-conotoxin GVIA did not, suggesting a different function for the N-type channels. The L-type channels in WFACs are functionally coupled to a set of calcium-dependent potassium (K(Ca)) channels to mediate OMPs. The initiation of OMPs depended on penitrem-A-sensitive (BK) K(Ca) channels, whereas their duration is under apamin-sensitive (SK) K(Ca) channel control. The Ca2+ current is essential to evoke the OMPs and triggering the K(Ca) currents, which here act as resonant currents, enhances the resonance as an amplifying current, influences the filtering characteristics of the cell membrane, and attenuates the OMPs via CDI of the L-type Ca2+ channel.

  11. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells involves a novel mechanism mediated by clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junmin; Donatelli, Sarah S.; Gilvary, Danielle L.; Tejera, Melba M.; Eksioglu, Erika A.; Chen, Xianghong; Coppola, Domenico; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitute a key checkpoint that impedes tumor immunity against cancer. Chemotherapeutic intervention of MDSCs has gained ground as a strategy for cancer therapy but its mechanism remains obscure.We report here a unique mechanism by which monocytic (M)-MDSCs are spared, allowing them to polarize towards M1 macrophages for reactivation of immunity against breast cancer. We first demonstrated that curcumin, like docetaxel (DTX), can selectively target CD11b+Ly6G+Ly6Clow granulocytic (G)-MDSCs, sparing CD11b+Ly6G−Ly6Chigh M-MDSCs, with reduced tumor burden in 4T1-Neu tumor-bearing mice. Curcumin treatment polarized surviving M-MDSCs toward CCR7+ Dectin-1−M1 cells, accompanied by IFN-γ production and cytolytic function in T cells. Selective M-MDSC chemoresistence to curcumin and DTX was mediated by secretory/cytoplasmic clusterin (sCLU). sCLU functions by trapping Bax from mitochondrial translocation, preventing the apoptotic cascade. Importantly, sCLU was only found in M-MDSCs but not in G-MDSCs. Knockdown of sCLU in M-MDSCs and RAW264.7 macrophages was found to reverse their natural chemoresistance. Clinically, breast cancer patients possess sCLU expression only in mature CD68+ macrophages but not in immature CD33+ immunosuppressive myeloid cells infiltrating the tumors. We thus made the seminal discovery that sCLU expression in M-MDSCs accounts for positive immunomodulation by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27405665

  12. Development of a tailorable and tunable mechanism for cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blocker, Kory M.

    Due to the spatial and temporal control as well as the cell-type specificity necessary to extend gene delivery to therapeutic applications, there exists a need to create systems capable of gene transfer that are well-understood and easily manipulated. Furthermore, the creation of such materials will enable further exploration of the correlation between biochemical cues and the resulting cellular responses. In response to this as yet unmet need, a method to promote cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery was developed for this dissertation. Through the use of non-viral gene delivery, flexibility of the vehicle design was incorporated into the system. Using PNA technology, pDNA was able to be specifically tethered to a self-assembled monolayer via an enzymatically-labile peptide tether. This construct was shown to promote cell-responsive delivery while retaining flexibility over the chemical and physical properties of the vehicle and substrate. By alteration of some design parameters including tether number, pDNA surface coverage, and complexation agent, temporal control over the release profile was demonstrated. Furthermore, the ability to extend the applicability of the system was detailed by transitioning to a poly-D-lysine coated substrate upon which the pDNA is immobilized. This dissertation details proof-of-principle work in the formation of a controlled release gene delivery mechanism that may be used to promote understanding of cellular responses to biochemical signaling as well as be extended to use in tissue engineering applications.

  13. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  14. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E.; Seymour, Colin B.; Rainbow, Andrew J.; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. Methods The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the emitted UV biophotons. Medium was subsequently harvested from UV-exposed bystander cells. The exosomes extracted from this medium were incubated with reporter cell populations. These reporter cells were then assayed for clonogenic survival and mitochondrial membrane potential with and without prior treatment of the exosomes with RNase. Results Clonogenic cell survival was significantly reduced in reporter cells incubated with exosomes extracted from cells exposed to secondarily-emitted UV. These exosomes also induced significant mitochondrial membrane depolarization in receiving reporter cells. Conversely, exosomes extracted from non-UV-exposed cells did not produce bystander effects in reporter cells. The treatment of exosomes with RNase prior to their incubation with reporter cells effectively abolished bystander effects in reporter cells and this suggests a role for RNA in mediating the bystander response elicited by UV biophotons and their produced exosomes. Conclusion This study supports a role for exosomes released from UV biophoton-exposed bystander cells in eliciting bystander responses and also indicates a reconciliation between the UV-mediated bystander effect and the bystander effect which has been suggested in the literature to be mediated by soluble factors. PMID:28278290

  15. Functionalized fullerenes mediate photodynamic killing of cancer cells: Type I versus Type II photochemical mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Pawel; Pawlak, Anna; Satti, Minahil; Lee, Haeryeon; Wharton, Tim; Gali, Hariprasad; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and kill cells. Most clinically studied PS are based on the tetrapyrrole structure of porphyrins, chlorins and related molecules, but new non-tetrapyrrole PS are being sought. Fullerenes are soccer-ball shaped molecules composed of sixty or seventy carbon atoms and have attracted interest in connection with the search for biomedical applications of nanotechnology. Fullerenes are biologically inert unless derivatized with functional groups, whereupon they become soluble and can act as PS. We have compared the photodynamic activity of six functionalized fullerenes with 1, 2, or 3 hydrophilic or 1, 2, or 3 cationic groups. The octanol-water partition coefficients were determined and the relative contributions of Type I photochemistry (photogeneration of superoxide in the presence of NADH) and Type II photochemistry (photogeneration of singlet oxygen) were studied by measurement of oxygen consumption, 1270-nm luminescence and EPR spin-trapping of the superoxide product. We studied three mouse cancer cell lines: (J774, LLC and CT26) incubated for 24 h with fullerenes and illuminated with white light. The order of effectiveness as PS was inversely proportional to the degree of substitution of the fullerene nucleus for both the neutral and cationic series. The mono-pyrrolidinium fullerene was the most active PS against all cell lines and induced apoptosis 4–6 hours after illumination. It produced diffuse intracellular fluorescence when dichlorodihydrofluorescein was added as an ROS probe suggesting a Type I mechanism for phototoxicity. We conclude that certain functionalized fullerenes have potential as novel PDT agents and phototoxicity may be mediated both by superoxide and by singlet oxygen. PMID:17664135

  16. trans-10,cis-12 CLA promotes osteoblastogenesis via SMAD mediated mechanism in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonggun; Park, Yooheon; Park, Yeonhwa

    2014-05-01

    The inverse relationship between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells has been linked to overall bone mass. It has previously been reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits adipogenesis via a peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) mediated mechanism, while it increases osteoblastogenesis via a PPARγ-independent mechanism in mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests potential implication of CLA on improving bone mass. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine involvement of CLA on regulation of osteoblastogenesis in murine mesenchymal stem cells by focusing on the Mothers against decapentaplegic (MAD)-related family of molecules 8 (SMAD8), one of key regulators of osteoblastogenesis. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA, but not the cis-9,trans-11, significantly increased osteoblastogenesis via SMAD8, and inhibited adipogenesis independent of SMAD8, while inhibiting factors regulating osteoclastogenesis in this model. These suggest that CLA may help improve osteoblastogenesis via a SMAD8 mediated mechanism.

  17. trans-10,cis-12 CLA promotes osteoblastogenesis via SMAD mediated mechanism in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonggun; Park, Yooheon; Park, Yeonhwa

    2014-01-01

    The inverse relationship between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells has been linked to overall bone mass. It has previously been reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits adipogenesis via a peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) mediated mechanism, while it increases osteoblastogenesis via a PPARγ-independent mechanism in mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests potential implication of CLA on improving bone mass. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine involvement of CLA on regulation of osteoblastogenesis in murine mesenchymal stem cells by focusing on the Mothers against decapentaplegic (MAD)-related family of molecules 8 (SMAD8), one of key regulators of osteoblastogenesis. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA, but not the cis-9,trans-11, significantly increased osteoblastogenesis via SMAD8, and inhibited adipogenesis independent of SMAD8, while inhibiting factors regulating osteoclastogenesis in this model. These suggest that CLA may help improve osteoblastogenesis via a SMAD8 mediated mechanism. PMID:25035711

  18. Mechanisms of Contact-Mediated Killing of Yeast Cells on Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Davide; Krans, Travis; Santo, Christophe Espírito; Elowsky, Christian G.; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces made of copper or its alloys have strong antimicrobial properties against a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the molecular mode of action responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic copper is not known. Here, we show that dry copper surfaces inactivate Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae within minutes in a process called contact-mediated killing. Cellular copper ion homeostasis systems influenced the kinetics of contact-mediated killing in both organisms. Deregulated copper ion uptake through a hyperactive S. cerevisiae Ctr1p (ScCtr1p) copper uptake transporter in Saccharomyces resulted in faster inactivation of mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Similarly, lack of the C. albicans Crp1p (CaCrp1p) copper-efflux P-type ATPase or the metallothionein CaCup1p caused more-rapid killing of Candida mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Candida and Saccharomyces took up large quantities of copper ions as soon as they were in contact with copper surfaces, as indicated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and by the intracellular copper ion-reporting dye coppersensor-1. Exposure to metallic copper did not cause lethality through genotoxicity, deleterious action on a cell's genetic material, as indicated by a mutation assay with Saccharomyces. Instead, toxicity mediated by metallic copper surfaces targeted membranes in both yeast species. With the use of Live/Dead staining, onset of rapid and extensive cytoplasmic membrane damage was observed in cells from copper surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy using the indicator dye DiSBaC2(3) indicated that cell membranes were depolarized. Also, during contact-mediated killing, vacuoles first became enlarged and then disappeared from the cells. Lastly, in metallic copper-stressed yeasts, oxidative stress in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria was elevated. PMID:21097600

  19. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  20. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Daigneault, Marc; De Silva, Thushan I; Bewley, Martin A; Preston, Julie A; Marriott, Helen M; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Read, Robert C; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+) T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+) T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+) T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+) monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+) T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+) T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  1. An Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism drives antibody-mediated target-receptor signaling in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicholas S; Yang, Becky; Yang, Annie; Loeser, Stefanie; Marsters, Scot; Lawrence, David; Li, Yun; Pitti, Robert; Totpal, Klara; Yee, Sharon; Ross, Sarajane; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Lu, Yanmei; Adams, Cam; Offringa, Rienk; Kelley, Bob; Hymowitz, Sarah; Daniel, Dylan; Meng, Gloria; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2011-01-18

    Antibodies to cell-surface antigens trigger activatory Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated retrograde signals in leukocytes to control immune effector functions. Here, we uncover an FcγR mechanism that drives antibody-dependent forward signaling in target cells. Agonistic antibodies to death receptor 5 (DR5) induce cancer-cell apoptosis and are in clinical trials; however, their mechanism of action in vivo is not fully defined. Interaction of the DR5-agonistic antibody drozitumab with leukocyte FcγRs promoted DR5-mediated tumor-cell apoptosis. Whereas the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab required activatory FcγRs for tumoricidal function, drozitumab was effective in the context of either activatory or inhibitory FcγRs. A CD40-agonistic antibody required similar FcγR interactions to stimulate nuclear factor-κB activity in B cells. Thus, FcγRs can drive antibody-mediated receptor signaling in target cells.

  2. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells.

  3. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells. PMID:27514819

  4. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization.

  5. Hypoxia-induced angiotensin II by the lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism mediates radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guozhu; Liu, Ying; Yao, Qiwei; Zheng, Rong; Zhang, Lanfang; Lin, Jie; Guo, Zhaoze; Du, Shasha; Ren, Chen; Yuan, Quan; Yuan, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a principal determinant of arterial blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance. RAS component dysregulation was recently found in some malignancies and correlated with poor patient outcomes. However, the exact mechanism of local RAS activation in tumors is still unclear. Here, we find that the local angiotensin II predominantly exists in the hypoxic regions of tumor formed by nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, where these tumor cells autocrinely produce angiotensin II by a chymase-dependent rather than an angiotensin converting enzyme-dependent mechanism. We further demonstrate in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 and 5–8F cells that this chymase-dependent effect is mediated by increased levels of lactate, a by-product of glycolytic metabolism. Finally, we show that the enhanced angiotensin II plays an important role in the intracellular accumulation of HIF-1α of hypoxic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells and mediates the radiation-resistant phenotype of these nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Thus, our findings reveal the critical role of hypoxia in producing local angiotensin II by a lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism and highlight the importance of local angiotensin II in regulating radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:28205588

  6. CD8+ T Cell-Independent Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Pennell, Christopher A.; Olin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of preclinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Cancer immunotherapy seeks to recruit an effective immune response to eliminate tumor cells. To date, cancer vaccines have shown only limited effectiveness because of our incomplete understanding of the necessary effector cells and mechanisms that yield efficient tumor clearance. CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity has long been proposed as the primary effector function necessary for tumor regression. However, there is increasing evidence that indicates that components of the immune system other than CD8+ T cells play important roles in tumor eradication and control. The following review should provide an understanding of the mechanisms involved in an effective antitumor response to guide future therapeutic designs. The information provided suggests an alternate means of effective tumor clearance in malignant glioma to the canonical CD8+ cytotoxic T cell mechanism. PMID:26351148

  7. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  8. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  9. Comparative mechanisms of protein transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty Revon; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial and archaeal cell envelopes are complex multilayered barriers that serve to protect these microorganisms from their extremely harsh and often hostile environments. Import of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles into cells is important for biotechnological applications in prokaryotes. In this report, we demonstrate that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), both bacteria-expressed nona-arginine peptide (R9) and synthetic R9 (SR9), are able to deliver noncovalently associated proteins or quantum dots into four representative species of prokaryotes: cyanobacteria (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5α and Arthrobacter ilicis D-50), and archaea (Thermus aquaticus). Although energy-dependent endocytosis is generally accepted as a hallmark that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes, cellular uptake of uncomplexed green fluorescent protein (GFP) by cyanobacteria was mediated by classical endocytosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that macropinocytosis plays a critical and major role in CPP-mediated protein transduction in all four prokaryotes. Membrane damage was not observed when cyanobacterial cells were treated with R9/GFP complexes, nor was cytotoxicity detected when bacteria or archaea were treated with SR9/QD complexes in the presence of macropinocytic inhibitors. These results indicate that the uptake of protein is not due to a compromise of membrane integrity in cyanobacteria, and that CPP can be an effective and safe carrier for membrane trafficking in prokaryotic cells. Our investigation provides important new insights into the transport of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles across the complex membrane systems of prokaryotes.

  10. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of silicon-mediated cadmium tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Sheng, Huachun; Li, Xiuli; Wang, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Silicon (Si) can alleviate cadmium (Cd) stress in rice (Oryza sativa) plants, however, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the single-cell level remains limited. To address these questions, we investigated suspension cells of rice cultured in the dark environment in the absence and presence of Si with either short- (12 h) or long-term (5 d) Cd treatments using a combination of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), fluorescent staining, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). We identified 100 proteins differentially regulated by Si under the short- or long-term Cd stress. 70% of these proteins were down-regulated, suggesting that Si may improve protein use efficiency by maintaining cells in the normal physiological status. Furthermore, we showed two different mechanisms for Si-mediated Cd tolerance. Under the short-term Cd stress, the Si-modified cell walls inhibited the uptake of Cd ions into cells and consequently reduced the expressions of glycosidase, cell surface non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs), and several stress-related proteins. Under the long-term Cd stress, the amount of Cd in the cytoplasm in Si-accumulating (+Si) cells was decreased by compartmentation of Cd into vacuoles, thus leading to a lower expression of glutathione S-transferases (GST). These results provide protein-level insights into the Si-mediated Cd detoxification in rice single cells.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms for cAMP-Mediated Immunoregulation in T cells – Role of Anchored Protein Kinase A Signaling Units

    PubMed Central

    Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Taskén, Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway is one of the most common and versatile signal pathways in eukaryotic cells. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to specific substrates and distinct subcellular compartments providing spatial and temporal specificity for mediation of biological effects channeled through the cAMP/PKA pathway. In the immune system, cAMP is a potent negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation of effector T cells (Teff) acting through a proximal PKA/Csk/Lck pathway anchored via a scaffold consisting of the AKAP Ezrin holding PKA, the linker protein EBP50, and the anchoring protein phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains holding Csk. As PKA activates Csk and Csk inhibits Lck, this pathway in response to cAMP shuts down proximal T cell activation. This immunomodulating pathway in Teff mediates clinically important responses to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression and inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins (PGs), adrenergic stimuli, adenosine, and a number of other ligands. A major inducer of T cell cAMP levels is PG E2 (PGE2) acting through EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors. PGE2 plays a crucial role in the normal physiological control of immune homeostasis as well as in inflammation and cancer immune evasion. Peripherally induced Tregs express cyclooxygenase-2, secrete PGE2, and elicit the immunosuppressive cAMP pathway in Teff as one tumor immune evasion mechanism. Moreover, a cAMP increase can also be induced by indirect mechanisms, such as intercellular transfer between T cells. Indeed, Treg, known to have elevated levels of intracellular cAMP, may mediate their suppressive function by transferring cAMP to Teff through gap junctions, which we speculate could also be regulated by PKA/AKAP complexes. In this review, we present an updated overview on the influence of cAMP-mediated immunoregulatory mechanisms acting through localized cAMP signaling and the therapeutical

  12. FGF2-mediated reciprocal tumor cell-endothelial cell interplay contributes to the growth of chemoresistant cells: a potential mechanism for superficial bladder cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yule; Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Kaijie; Gao, Yang; Zeng, Jin; Shi, Qi; Guo, Peng; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; Li, Lei; He, Dalin

    2016-04-01

    Patients with superficial bladder cancer can be definitively cured by one single transurethral resection (TUR) with additional intravesical chemotherapy; however, up to 75 % of cases display frequent and multiple recurrences. One of the major causes of recurrence is that chemotherapeutic drugs used in intravesical regimens may induce chemoresistance. However, the mechanisms by which these chemoresistant cells develop into recurrent tumors remain unclear. Recent clinical evidence revealed that the expression of pro-angiogenic factor FGF2 was associated with early local relapse in patients with superficial bladder cancer. In this study, we conducted a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of chemoresistant cells mediated bladder cancer recurrence, focusing on FGF2-initiated tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction on chemoresistant cancer cell growth. We found that the expression of FGF2 was increased in chemoresistant bladder cell lines and in bladder tissues after intravesical chemotherapy. Although chemoresistant bladder cells grow slower than parental cells, chemoresistant bladder cancer cells had stronger ability than parental cells to stimulate endothelial cell migration, growth, and tube formation by producing FGF2. Inversely, endothelial cells significantly promoted chemoresistant bladder cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, targeting chemotherapy-induced FGF2 upregulation may provide a promising approach to manage the recurrence of superficial bladder cancer.

  13. The Enemy within: Innate Surveillance-Mediated Cell Death, the Common Mechanism of Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Robert I.; Robertson, Sarah A.; O'Keefe, Louise V.; Fornarino, Dani; Scott, Andrew; Lardelli, Michael; Baune, Bernhard T.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise an array of progressive neurological disorders all characterized by the selective death of neurons in the central nervous system. Although, rare (familial) and common (sporadic) forms can occur for the same disease, it is unclear whether this reflects several distinct pathogenic pathways or the convergence of different causes into a common form of nerve cell death. Remarkably, neurodegenerative diseases are increasingly found to be accompanied by activation of the innate immune surveillance system normally associated with pathogen recognition and response. Innate surveillance is the cell's quality control system for the purpose of detecting such danger signals and responding in an appropriate manner. Innate surveillance is an “intelligent system,” in that the manner of response is relevant to the magnitude and duration of the threat. If possible, the threat is dealt with within the cell in which it is detected, by degrading the danger signal(s) and restoring homeostasis. If this is not successful then an inflammatory response is instigated that is aimed at restricting the spread of the threat by elevating degradative pathways, sensitizing neighboring cells, and recruiting specialized cell types to the site. If the danger signal persists, then the ultimate response can include not only the programmed cell death of the original cell, but the contents of this dead cell can also bring about the death of adjacent sensitized cells. These responses are clearly aimed at destroying the ability of the detected pathogen to propagate and spread. Innate surveillance comprises intracellular, extracellular, non-cell autonomous and systemic processes. Recent studies have revealed how multiple steps in these processes involve proteins that, through their mutation, have been linked to many familial forms of neurodegenerative disease. This suggests that individuals harboring these mutations may have an amplified response to innate-mediated

  14. ECE-1 influences prostate cancer cell invasion via ET-1-mediated FAK phosphorylation and ET-1-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Whyteside, A R; Hinsley, E E; Lambert, L A; McDermott, P J; Turner, A J

    2010-08-01

    Plasma concentrations of the mitogenic peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1) are significantly elevated in men with metastatic prostate cancer (PC). ET-1 also contributes to the transition of hormonally regulated androgen-dependent PC to androgen-independent disease. ET-1 is generated from big-ET-1 by endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE-1). ECE-1 is present in PC cell lines and primary tissue and is elevated in primary malignant stromal cells compared with benign. siRNA or shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous ECE-1 in either the epithelial or stromal compartment significantly reduced PC cell (PC-3) invasion and migration. The re-addition of ET-1 only partially recovered the effect, suggesting ET-1-dependent and -independent functions for ECE-1 in pPC. The ET-1-independent effect of ECE-1 on PC invasion may be due to modulation of downstream signalling events. Addition of an ECE-1 specific inhibitor to PC-3 cells reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a signalling molecule known to play a role in PC. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ECE-1 resulted in a significant reduction in FAK phosphorylation. Accordingly, transient ECE-1 overexpression in PNT1-a cells increased FAK phosphorylation. In conclusion, ECE-1 influences PC cell invasion via both ET-1-mediated FAK phosphorylation and ET-1 independent mechanisms.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C.; Osborne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    abstract A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long‐term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft‐induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM‐MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis‐mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin‐2 (Lcn‐2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft‐induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM‐MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM‐MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell‐induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation‐based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve. Stem Cells 2015;33:3006–3016 PMID:26175331

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C; Osborne, Andrew; Martin, Keith R

    2015-10-01

    A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long-term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft-induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM-MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis-mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft-induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM-MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM-MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell-induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation-based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve.

  17. Mechanism of colon cancer cell apoptosis mediated by pyropheophorbide-a methylester photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Matroule, J Y; Carthy, C M; Granville, D J; Jolois, O; Hunt, D W; Piette, J

    2001-07-05

    Pyropheophorbide-a methylester (PPME) is a second generation of photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We demonstrated that PPME photosensitization triggered apoptosis of colon cancer cells as measured by using several classical parameters such as DNA laddering, PARP cleavage, caspase activation and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c. Preincubation of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) protected against apoptosis mediated by PPME photosensitization showing that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved as second messengers. On the other hand, photosensitization carried out in the presence of deuterium oxide (D2O) which enhances singlet oxygen (1O2) lifetime only increases necrosis without affecting apoptosis. Since PPME was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Golgi system and lysosomes, other messengers than ROS were tested such as calcium, Bid, Bap31, phosphorylated Bcl-2 and caspase-12 but none was clearly identified as being involved in triggering cytochrome c release from mitochondria. On the other hand, we demonstrated that the transduction pathways leading to NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis were clearly independent although NF-kappaB was shown to counteract apoptosis mediated by PPME photosensitization.

  18. Embryonic stem cells improve cardiac function in Doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy mediated through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Singla, Dinender K; Ahmed, Aisha; Singla, Reetu; Yan, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Unfortunately, its use is limited as this drug induces cardiotoxicity and heart failure as a side effect. There is no report that describes whether transplanted embryonic stem (ES) cells or their conditioned medium (CM) in DOX-induced cardiomyopathy (DIC) can repair and regenerate myocardium. Therefore, we transplanted ES cells or CM in DIC to examine apoptosis, fibrosis, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and myofibrillar loss and their associated Akt and ERK pathway. Moreover, we also determined activation of endogenous c-kit(+ve) cardiac stem cells (CSCs), levels of HGF and IGF-1, growth factors required for c-kit cell activation, and their differentiation into cardiac myocytes, which also contributes in cardiac regeneration and improved heart function. We generated DIC in C57Bl/6 mice (cumulative dose of DOX 12 mg/kg body weight, IP), and animals were treated with ES cells, CM, or cell culture medium in controls. Two weeks post-DIC, ES cells or CM transplanted hearts showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in cardiac apoptotic nuclei and their regulation with Akt and ERK pathway. Cardiac fibrosis observed in the ES cell or CM groups was significantly less compared with DOX and cell culture medium groups (p < 0.05). Next, cytoplasmic vacuolization and myofibrillar loss was reduced (p < 0.05) following treatment with ES cells or CM. Moreover, our data also demonstrated increased levels of c-kit(+ve) CSCs in ES cells or CM hearts and differentiated cardiac myocytes from these CSCs, suggesting endogenous cardiac regeneration. Importantly, the levels of HFG and IGF-1 were significantly increased in ES cells or CM transplanted hearts. In conclusion, we reported that transplanted ES cells or CM in DIC hearts significantly decreases various adverse pathological mechanisms as well as enhances cardiac regeneration that effectively contributes to improved heart function.

  19. Targeting p53-deficient chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo by ROS-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Gang; Pelicano, Helene; Liao, Jianwei; Huang, Jie; Feng, Li; Keating, Michael J.; Huang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia in Western countries. Loss of p53 function in CLL cells due to chromosome 17p deletion or p53 mutations often leads to a more malignant disease phenotype and is associated with drug resistance and poor clinical outcome. Thus, development of novel therapeutic strategies to effectively target CLL cells with p53 deficiency is clinically important. Here we showed that p53-null CLL cells were highly sensitive to ROS-mediated cell killing due to their intrinsic ROS stress. We further demonstrated that a natural compound phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) was able to effectively kill CLL cells with loss of p53, even under the protection of stromal cells. In p53-defficient CLL cells, PEITC induced a rapid depletion of glutathione and a severe accumulation of ROS, leading to massive leukemia cell death in the stromal microenvironment. The drug-induced cell death was associated with a significant decrease of in MCL-1 survival molecule. We further showed that ROS-mediated cell death was the key mechanism by which PEITC induced cytotoxicity, since such cell death could be prevented by addition of antioxidant NAC. Importantly, in vivo study showed that PEITC was able to induce substantial leukemia cell death in mice. Treatment of CLL mice harboring TCL1-Tg:p53−/− genotype with PEITC significantly prolonged the median survival time of the animals. Our study identifies a vulnerability of p53-null CLL cells with high sensitivity to ROS-generating agents, and suggests that PEITC may potentially be useful for clinical treatment of CLL with 17p deletion and p53 mutations. PMID:27655686

  20. Mechanical unloading of bone in microgravity reduces mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blaber, E A; Dvorochkin, N; Torres, M L; Yousuf, R; Burns, B P; Globus, R K; Almeida, E A C

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical loading of mammalian tissues is a potent promoter of tissue growth and regeneration, whilst unloading in microgravity can cause reduced tissue regeneration, possibly through effects on stem cell tissue progenitors. To test the specific hypothesis that mechanical unloading alters differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell lineages, we studied cellular and molecular aspects of how bone marrow in the mouse proximal femur responds to unloading in microgravity. Trabecular and cortical endosteal bone surfaces in the femoral head underwent significant bone resorption in microgravity, enlarging the marrow cavity. Cells isolated from the femoral head marrow compartment showed significant down-regulation of gene expression markers for early mesenchymal and hematopoietic differentiation, including FUT1(-6.72), CSF2(-3.30), CD90(-3.33), PTPRC(-2.79), and GDF15(-2.45), but not stem cell markers, such as SOX2. At the cellular level, in situ histological analysis revealed decreased megakaryocyte numbers whilst erythrocytes were increased 2.33 fold. Furthermore, erythrocytes displayed elevated fucosylation and clustering adjacent to sinuses forming the marrow-blood barrier, possibly providing a mechanistic basis for explaining spaceflight anemia. Culture of isolated bone marrow cells immediately after microgravity exposure increased the marrow progenitor's potential for mesenchymal differentiation into in-vitro mineralized bone nodules, and hematopoietic differentiation into osteoclasts, suggesting an accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors during exposure to microgravity. These results support the idea that mechanical unloading of mammalian tissues in microgravity is a strong inhibitor of tissue growth and regeneration mechanisms, acting at the level of early mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

  1. Comprehensive profiling reveals mechanisms of SOX2-mediated cell fate specification in human ESCs and NPCs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenlin; Yang, Xiaoqin; Sun, Yiyang; Yu, Hongyao; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    SOX2 is a key regulator of multiple types of stem cells, especially embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Understanding the mechanism underlying the function of SOX2 is of great importance for realizing the full potential of ESCs and NPCs. Here, through genome-wide comparative studies, we show that SOX2 executes its distinct functions in human ESCs (hESCs) and hESC-derived NPCs (hNPCs) through cell type- and stage-dependent transcription programs. Importantly, SOX2 suppresses non-neural lineages in hESCs and regulates neurogenesis from hNPCs by inhibiting canonical Wnt signaling. In hESCs, SOX2 achieves such inhibition by direct transcriptional regulation of important Wnt signaling modulators, WLS and SFRP2. Moreover, SOX2 ensures pluripotent epigenetic landscapes via interacting with histone variant H2A.Z and recruiting polycomb repressor complex 2 to poise developmental genes in hESCs. Together, our results advance our understanding of the mechanism by which cell type-specific transcription factors control lineage-specific gene expression programs and specify cell fate. PMID:26809499

  2. Cytotoxicity mechanism of α-MMC in normal liver cells through LRP1 mediated endocytosis and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Shen, Fubing; Zhang, Min; He, Qianchuan; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Xiaoping; Yang, Shuxia; Liu, Yang; Deng, Nianhua; Zheng, Juecun; Zhu, Lixia; Liu, Xiaolan

    2016-05-16

    Alpha-momorcharin (α-MMC), a type I ribosome-inactivating protein isolated from Momordica charantia, is a potential drug candidate with strong anti-tumor activity. However, α-MMC has a severe hepatotoxicity when applied in vivo, which may greatly hinders its use in clinic in the future. The biological mechanism of hepatotoxicity induced by α-MMC is largely unknown, especially the mechanism by which α-MMC enters the hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated α-MMC-induced cytotoxicity in normal liver L02 cell line as well as the mechanism underlying it. As expected, α-MMC is more toxic in L02 cells than in various normal cells from other organs. The cytotoxic effect of α-MMC on L02 cells is found to be mediated through cell apoptosis as detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Importantly, α-MMC was shown to bind to a specific receptor on cell membrane, as the density of the cell membrane receptor is closely related to both the amount of α-MMC endocytosed and the cytotoxicity in different cell lines. By using LRP1 competitive inhibitor α2-M or siRNA targeting LRP1, we further identified that LRP1 protein served as the membrane receptor for α-MMC. Both α2-M and siRNA targeting LRP1 can significantly inhibit α-MMC's endocytosis as well as its cytotoxicity in L02 cells. In addition, it was found that α-MMC can activate the JNK signalling pathways via LRP1 in L02 cells. As JNK activation often leads to cell apoptosis, the activation of JNK may play an important role in α-MMC-induced cytotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that LRP1 mediates the cytotoxicity of α-MMC through (1) endocytosis and induced apoptosis and (2) the activation of the JNK pathway. Our findings shed light on the fundamental mechanism of hepatotoxicity of α-MMC and offer reference to understand its mechanism of lymphocytotoxicity and neurotoxicity.

  3. CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells mediate mechanical inflammatory pain hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Chiu, Isaac M.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Pain hypersensitivity at the site of inflammation as a result of chronic immune diseases, pathogenic infection, and tissue injury is a common medical condition. However, the specific contributions of the innate and adaptive immune system to the generation of pain during inflammation have not been systematically elucidated. We therefore set out to characterize the cellular and molecular immune response in two widely used preclinical models of inflammatory pain: (i) intraplantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) as a model of adjuvant- and pathogen-based inflammation and (ii) a plantar incisional wound as a model of tissue injury-based inflammation. Our findings reveal differences in temporal patterns of immune cell recruitment and activation states, cytokine production, and pain in these two models, with CFA causing a nonresolving granulomatous inflammatory response whereas tissue incision induced resolving immune and pain responses. These findings highlight the significant differences and potential clinical relevance of the incisional wound model compared with the CFA model. By using various cell-depletion strategies, we find that, whereas lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G (Ly)6G+CD11b+ neutrophils and T-cell receptor (TCR) β+ T cells do not contribute to the development of thermal or mechanical pain hypersensitivity in either model, proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells were necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity during incisional pain, and, to a lesser extent, CFA-induced inflammation. However, inflammatory (CCR2+Ly6Chi) monocytes were not responsible for these effects. The finding that a population of proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells contribute to mechanical inflammatory pain provides a potential cellular target for its treatment in wound inflammation. PMID:26598697

  4. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mouse spleen cells: a potential mechanism for cannabinoid-mediated immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Schatz, A R; Kessler, F K; Kaminski, N E

    1992-01-01

    The ability of delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) to modulate adenylate cyclase activity in mouse spleen cells was investigated. These studies were prompted by the recent identification and cloning of a G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor localized in certain regions of the brain and the potential for a common mechanism between cannabinoid-mediated CNS effects and immunosuppression. Temporal addition studies were initially performed to identify the period of time when spleen cells in culture were most susceptible to the inhibitory effects of delta 9-THC, as measured by the day 5 IgM antibody forming cell response. delta 9-THC was only inhibitory when added to spleen cell cultures during the first 2 hr following antigen sensitization. In light of this time course, adenylate cyclase activity was measured in spleen cells incubated in the presence of 22 microM delta 9-THC for 5 min and subsequently stimulated with forskolin. delta 9-THC treated spleen cells demonstrated a 33% inhibition and a 66% inhibition in intracellular cAMP after a 5 or 15 min stimulation with forskolin, respectively. These studies suggest that inhibition of immune function by delta 9-THC may be mediated through the inhibition of intracellular cAMP early after antigen stimulation.

  5. Catecholamines as immunomodulators: a role for adrenoceptor-mediated mechanisms in fine tuning of T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Leposavić, Gordana; Pilipović, Ivan; Radojević, Katarina; Pesić, Vesna; Perisić, Milica; Kosec, Dusko

    2008-12-15

    In its simplest form, effective T cell-mediated immunity emanates from the expansion of specific T cells activated in response to antigen. In establishing and maintaining the peripheral T-cell pool, the thymus plays a critical role. It does so by providing a microenvironment within which T-cell precursors proliferate, differentiate and undergo selection processes to create a fully functional population of major histocompatibility complex restricted, self-tolerant T cells. The control of the thymic function involves intrathymic, as well as sympathetic nervous and endocrine system signalling. In addition to postganglionic noradrenergic fibres, both thymic lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells, including epithelial cells and macrophages, have been demonstrated to express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and suggested to form a local non-neural catecholaminergic cell network. A higher level of noradrenaline has been found in male than in female rat thymi, and a role of gonadal hormones in providing this dimorphism has been demonstrated. In addition, thymic lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells, including those expressing TH, have been found to bear beta- and alpha1-adrenoceptors (ARs) and a role of gonadal hormones in regulation of, at least, beta-AR density and signalling has been suggested. These findings have also entailed conclusion that catecholamines (CAs) influence T-cell development, not only via neurocrine/endocrine, but also via autocrine/paracrine action. Generally, CAs have been shown to exert an inhibitory influence on thymopoiesis. Role of alpha1- and beta-AR-mediated mechanisms in maintaining thymic homeostasis and in fine tuning of both conventional and regulatory T-cell development is discussed in the manuscript.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Involvement of Glial Cells in Brain Plastic Remodeling in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Khaspekov, L G; Frumkina, L E

    2017-03-01

    In this review we summarize published data on the involvement of glial cells in molecular mechanisms underlying brain plastic reorganization in epilepsy. The role of astrocytes as glial elements in pathological plasticity in epilepsy is discussed. Data on the involvement of aquaporin-4 in epileptogenic plastic changes and on participation of microglia and extracellular matrix in dysregulation of synaptic transmission and plastic remodeling in epileptic brain tissue are reviewed.

  7. A high-affinity and specific carrier-mediated mechanism for uptake of thiamine pyrophosphate by human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Said, Hamid M

    2012-08-01

    All mammals require exogenous sources of thiamine (vitamin B1), as they lack the ability to synthesize the vitamin. These sources are dietary and bacterial (the latter is in reference to the vitamin, which is synthesized by the normal microflora of the large intestine). Bacterially generated thiamine exists in the free, as well as the pyrophosphorylated [thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)], form. With no (or very little) phosphatase activity in the colon, we hypothesized that the bacterially generated TPP can also be taken up by colonocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined [(3)H]TPP uptake in the human-derived, nontransformed colonic epithelial NCM460 cells and purified apical membrane vesicles isolated from the colon of human organ donors. Uptake of TPP by NCM460 cells occurred without metabolic alterations in the transported substrate and 1) was pH- and Na(+)-independent, but energy-dependent, 2) was saturable as a function of concentration (apparent K(m) = 0.157 ± 0.028 μM), 3) was highly specific for TPP and not affected by free thiamine (or its analogs) or by thiamine monophosphate and unrelated folate derivatives, 4) was adaptively regulated by extracellular substrate (TPP) level via what appears to be a transcriptionally mediated mechanism(s), and 5) appeared to be influenced by an intracellular Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated regulatory pathway. These findings suggest the involvement of a carrier-mediated mechanism for TPP uptake by colonic NCM460 cells, which was further confirmed by results from studies of native human colonic apical membrane vesicles. The results also suggest that the bacterially synthesized TPP in the large intestine is bioavailable and may contribute to overall body homeostasis of vitamin B1 and, especially, to the cellular nutrition of the local colonocytes.

  8. Amiloride-Insensitive Salt Taste Is Mediated by Two Populations of Type III Taste Cells with Distinct Transduction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Sunil K.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Responses in the amiloride-insensitive (AI) pathway, one of the two pathways mediating salty taste in mammals, are modulated by the size of the anion of a salt. This “anion effect” has been hypothesized to result from inhibitory transepithelial potentials (TPs) generated across the lingual epithelium as cations permeate through tight junctions and leave their larger and less permeable anions behind (Ye et al., 1991). We tested directly the necessity of TPs for the anion effect by measuring responses to NaCl and Na-gluconate (small and large anion sodium salts, respectively) in isolated taste cells from mouse circumvallate papillae. Using calcium imaging, we identified AI salt-responsive type III taste cells and demonstrated that they compose a subpopulation of acid-responsive taste cells. Even in the absence of TPs, many (66%) AI salt-responsive type III taste cells still exhibited the anion effect, demonstrating that some component of the transduction machinery for salty taste in type III cells is sensitive to anion size. We hypothesized that osmotic responses could explain why a minority of type III cells (34%) had AI salt responses but lacked anion sensitivity. All AI type III cells had osmotic responses to cellobiose, which were significantly modulated by extracellular sodium concentration, suggesting the presence of a sodium-conducting osmotically sensitive ion channel. However, these responses were significantly larger in AI type III cells that did not exhibit the anion effect. These findings indicate that multiple mechanisms could underlie AI salt responses in type III taste cells, one of which may contribute to the anion effect. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the mechanisms underlying salty taste will help inform strategies to combat the health problems associated with NaCl overconsumption by humans. Of the two pathways underlying salty taste in mammals, the amiloride-insensitive (AI) pathway is the least understood. Using calcium imaging of

  9. The rapid rejection of allogeneic lymphocytes by a non-adaptive, cell-mediated mechanism (NK activity).

    PubMed Central

    Rolstad, B; Fossum, S; Bazin, H; Kimber, I; Marshall, J; Sparshott, S M; Ford, W L

    1985-01-01

    The fate of allogeneic lymphocytes (AO or DA) transferred to non-immune PVG recipients was studied in the light of previous evidence (Heslop & McNeilage, 1983; Rolstad & Ford, 1983) that allogeneic lymphocytes can be rapidly destroyed in certain strain combinations of rats and mice by a mechanism that is distinct from either T-cell mediated immunity or an alloantibody response. AO lymphocytes injected into PVG recipients were discriminated from syngeneic lymphocytes within 15-30 min of i.v. injection, as testified by the excess release of 51Cr into the lymph plasma of the recipient. The following experiments were intended to distinguish between natural antibody and natural killer (NK) cells as the mechanism responsible for the allogeneic lymphocyte cytotoxicity (ALC) displayed by PVG rats. Nude rats treated from birth with anti-mu chain serum and shown to be lacking B and T lymphocytes, as well as being profoundly deficient in immunoglobulin, displayed more aggressive ALC than did control nude rats which, in turn, showed stronger ALC than did euthymic rats. Serum from PVG nude rats exerted no inhibitory or destructive effect on allogeneic lymphocytes in an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity system, an assay of graft-versus-host activity, or when injected into 3-4-week-old PVG rats which had not yet developed ALC. Treatment of nude rats with anti-asialo GM 1 antiserum depressed ALC and NK activity in parallel, thus adding to a wide range of circumstances in which ALC and NK activity are closely correlated. In conclusion, ALC is implemented by a non-adaptive, cell-mediated mechanism independent of immunoglobulin, but the precise identity of the effector cell in the recipients' lymphatic tissues remains to be settled. Images Figure 2 PMID:3972430

  10. Targeting B cells in immune-mediated inflammatory disease: a comprehensive review of mechanisms of action and identification of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Dörner, Thomas; Kinnman, Nils; Tak, Paul P

    2010-03-01

    B cell-depletion therapy, particularly using anti-CD20 treatment, has provided proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response may result in clinical improvements in immune-mediated inflammatory disease. In this review, the mechanisms of action of B cell-targeting drugs are investigated, and potential biomarkers associated with response to treatment in patients with autoimmune diseases are identified. Most available data relate to B cell depletion using anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Treatment leads to significant clinical benefit, but apparently fails to deplete long-lived plasma cells, and discontinuation is associated with relapse. Biomarkers commonly used in studies of B cell-targeted therapies include rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies, and immunoglobulin (Ig) levels. More recently, there has been interest in markers such as B cell phenotype analysis, and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)/a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), the latter particularly in studies of the IgG Fc-transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) fusion protein (atacicept) and anti-BLyS therapy (belimumab). Data from clinical trials of B cell-depleting agents in RA suggest that specific autoantibodies, BLyS, APRIL, and circulating and synovial B lineage cell levels may have potential as biomarkers predictive of response to treatment. Further trials validating these markers against clinical outcomes in RA are required. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Fc receptors and levels of circulating immune cells (including B cells and natural killer cells) may be relevant markers.

  11. Viral infection transiently reverses activation receptor-mediated NK cell hyporesponsiveness in an MHC class I-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Budhaditya; Bolanos, Fred D; Tripathy, Sandeep K

    2013-05-01

    Continuous engagement of the Ly49H activating receptor with its ligand (m157) in a transgenic mouse expressing m157 (m157-Tg) results in hyporesponsiveness of Ly49H(+) NK cells. The same interaction, during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, leads to activation of Ly49H(+) NK cells. MCMV infection results in decreased MHC class I (MHC-I) expression on the infected cell as well as inflammatory responses, both of which do not take place in the uninfected m157-Tg mouse, potentially allowing for activation of NK cells in the context of MCMV infection. In this study, we demonstrated that viral infection transiently reverses activation receptor-mediated NK cell hyporesponsiveness in an MHC-I-independent mechanism. Furthermore, Ly49H(+) NK cells in an MHC-I-deficient environment remained hyporesponsive in the context of m157 expression, even when mature WT splenocytes were transferred into m157-Tg mice in an MHC-I-deficient environment. However, the administration of cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, and IFN-β resulted in a partial recovery from activation receptor-induced hyporesponsiveness. Thus, the release of the aforementioned cytokines during MCMV infection and not the downregulation of MHC-I expression appears to be responsible for partial resolution of Ly49H receptor-induced NK cell hyporesponsiveness.

  12. Mechanisms of pressure-mediated cell death and injury in Escherichia coli: from fundamentals to food applications

    PubMed Central

    Gänzle, Michael; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is commercially applied to extend the shelf life of foods, and to improve food safety. Current applications operate at ambient temperature and 600 MPa or less. However, bacteria that may resist this pressure level include the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and strains of Escherichia coli, including shiga-toxin producing E. coli. The resistance of E. coli to pressure is variable between strains and highly dependent on the food matrix. The targeted design of processes for the safe elimination of E. coli thus necessitates deeper insights into mechanisms of interaction and matrix-strain interactions. Cellular targets of high pressure treatment in E. coli include the barrier properties of the outer membrane, the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane as well as the activity of membrane-bound enzymes, and the integrity of ribosomes. The pressure-induced denaturation of membrane bound enzymes results in generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent cell death caused by oxidative stress. Remarkably, pressure resistance at the single cell level relates to the disposition of misfolded proteins in inclusion bodies. While the pressure resistance E. coli can be manipulated by over-expression or deletion of (stress) proteins, the mechanisms of pressure resistance in wild type strains is multi-factorial and not fully understood. This review aims to provide an overview on mechanisms of pressure-mediated cell death in E. coli, and the use of this information for optimization of high pressure processing of foods. PMID:26157424

  13. New animal model to study epigenetic mechanisms mediating altered gravity effects upon cell growth and morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Radugina, Elena A.; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Almeida, Eduardo

    The gravitational field and its variations act as a major environmental factor that can impact morphogenesis developing through epigenetic molecular mechanisms. The mechanisms can be thoroughly investigated by using adequate animal models that reveal changes in the morpho-genesis of a growing organ as a function of gravitational effects. Two cooperative US/Russian experiments on Foton-M2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007) were the first to demonstrate differences in the shape of regenerating tails of space-flown and ground control newts. The space-flown and aquarium (simulated microgravity) animals developed lancet-shaped tails whereas 1 g con-trols (kept in space-type habitats) showed hook-like regenerates. These visual observations were supported by computer-aided processing of the images and statistical analysis of the results. Morphological examinations and cell proliferation measurements using BrdU demon-strated dorsal-ventral asymmetry as well as enhanced epithelial growth on the dorsal area of regenerating tails in 1 g newts. These findings were reproduced in laboratory tests on newts kept at 1 g and in large water tanks at cut g. The 1 g animals showed statistically significant deviations of the lancet-like tail shape typically seen in aquarium animals. Such modifications were found as early as regeneration stages III-IV and proved irreversible. The authors believe that the above phenomenon detected in newts used in many space experiments can serve as an adequate model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying gravitational effects upon animal morphogenesis.

  14. Autotaxin Regulates Maintenance of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells through Lysophosphatidic Acid-Mediated Autocrine Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun Jin; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Dae Kyoung; Lee, Soo In; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Lee, Jeong Hee; Choi, Kyung Un; Lee, Jae Won; Mok, Hyuck Jun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Aoki, Junken; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian cancer shows high mortality due to development of resistance to chemotherapy and relapse. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been suggested to be a major contributor in developing drug resistance and relapse in ovarian cancer. In this study, we isolated CSCs through sphere culture of A2780, SKOV3, OVCAR3 epithelial ovarian cancer cells and primary ovarian cancer cells from patients. We identified heat-stable factors secreted from ovarian CSCs stimulated migration and proliferation of CSCs. Mass spectrometry and ELISA analysis revealed that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was significantly elevated in CSC culture media compared with non-CSC culture media. Treatment of CSCs with LPA resulted in augmented CSC characteristics such as sphere-forming ability, resistance to anticancer drugs, tumorigenic potential in xenograft transplantation, and high expression of CSC-associated genes, including OCT4, SOX2, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1. Treatment of CSCs with LPA receptor 1-specific inhibitors or silencing of LPA receptor 1 expression abrogated the LPA-stimulated CSC properties. Autotaxin, an LPA-producing enzyme, is highly secreted from ovarian CSCs, and pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of autotaxin markedly attenuated the LPA-producing, tumorigenic, and drug resistance potentials of CSCs. Clinicopathological analysis showed a significant survival disadvantage of patients with positive staining of autotaxin. In addition, we further identified that AKT1 activity was upregulated in ovarian CSCs through an LPA-dependent mechanism and silencing of AKT1 expression led to suppression of CSC characteristics. These results suggest that autotaxin-LPA-LPA receptor 1-AKT1 signaling axis is critical for maintaining CSC characteristics through an autocrine loop and provide a novel therapeutic target for ovarian CSCs.

  15. Amphiphilic Lipopeptide-Mediated Transport of Insulin and Cell Membrane Penetration Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Lei; Han, Mei; Hu, Jiaoyin; Zhang, Liefeng

    2015-12-03

    Arginine octamer (R8) and its derivatives were developed in this study for the enhanced mucosal permeation of insulin. R8 was substituted with different aminos, then modified with stearic acid (SA). We found that the SAR6EW-insulin complex had stronger intermolecular interactions and higher complex stability. The amphiphilic lipopeptide (SAR6EW) was significantly more efficient for the permeation of insulin than R8 and R6EW both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, different cellular internalization mechanisms were observed for the complexes. When the effectiveness of the complexes in delivering insulin in vivo was examined, it was found that the SAR6EW-insulin complex provided a significant and sustained (six hours) reduction in the blood glucose levels of diabetic rats. The improved absorption could be the comprehensive result of stronger intermolecular interactions, better enzymatic stability, altered internalization pathways, and increased transportation efficacy. In addition, no sign of toxicity was observed after consecutive administrations of SAR6EW. These results demonstrate that SAR6EW is a promising epithelium permeation enhancer for insulin and suggest that the chemical modification of cell-penetrating peptides is a feasible strategy to enhance their potential.

  16. Induction of Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose Derived Stem Cells by Microstructured Nitinol Actuator-Mediated Mechanical Stress

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Sarah; Dudziak, Sonja; Hagemann, Ronny; Barcikowski, Stephan; Fliess, Malte; Israelowitz, Meir; Kracht, Dietmar; Kuhbier, Jörn W.; Radtke, Christine; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of large tissue engineered bone remains a challenge in vitro, therefore the use of hybrid-implants might offer a bridge between tissue engineering and dense metal or ceramic implants. Especially the combination of the pseudoelastic implant material Nitinol (NiTi) with adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) opens new opportunities, as ASCs are able to differentiate osteogenically and therefore enhance osseointegration of implants. Due to limited knowledge about the effects of NiTi-structures manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) on ASCs the study started with an evaluation of cytocompatibility followed by the investigation of the use of SLM-generated 3-dimensional NiTi-structures preseeded with ASCs as osteoimplant model. In this study we could demonstrate for the first time that osteogenic differentiation of ASCs can be induced by implant-mediated mechanical stimulation without support of osteogenic cell culture media. By use of an innovative implant design and synthesis via SLM-technique we achieved high rates of vital cells, proper osteogenic differentiation and mechanically loadable NiTi-scaffolds could be achieved. PMID:23236461

  17. R(+)-methanandamide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human neuroglioma cells via a non-cannabinoid receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramer, R; Brune, K; Pahl, A; Hinz, B

    2001-09-07

    Cannabinoids affect prostaglandin (PG) formation in the central nervous system through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Using H4 human neuroglioma cells, the present study investigates the effect of R(+)-methanandamide (metabolically stable analogue of the endocannabinoid anandamide) on the expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme. Incubation of cells with R(+)-methanandamide was accompanied by concentration-dependent increases in COX-2 mRNA, COX-2 protein, and COX-2-dependent PGE(2) synthesis. Moreover, treatment of cells with R(+)-methanandamide in the presence of interleukin-1beta led to an overadditive induction of COX-2 expression. The stimulatory effect of R(+)-methanandamide on COX-2 expression was mimicked by the structurally unrelated cannabinoid Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Stimulation of both COX-2 mRNA expression and subsequent PGE(2) synthesis by R(+)-methanandamide was not affected by the selective CB(1) receptor antagonist AM-251 or the G(i/o) protein inactivator pertussis toxin. Enhancement of COX-2 expression by R(+)-methanandamide was paralleled by time-dependent phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p42/44 MAPK. Consistent with the activation of both kinases, R(+)-methanandamide-induced COX-2 mRNA expression and PGE(2) formation were abrogated in the presence of specific inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580) and p42/44 MAPK activation (PD98059). Together, our results demonstrate that R(+)-methanandamide induces COX-2 expression in human neuroglioma cells via a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism involving activation of the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, induction of COX-2 expression may represent a novel mechanism by which cannabinoids mediate PG-dependent effects within the central nervous system.

  18. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated matrix

  19. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Janney, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  20. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G R; Janney, R P

    1992-02-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  1. Schwann Cell-Mediated Preservation of Vision in Retinal Degenerative Diseases via the Reduction of Oxidative Stress: A Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    MAHMOUDZADEH, Raziyeh; HEIDARI-KESHEL, Saeed; LASHAY, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    After injury to the central nervous system (CNS), regeneration is often inadequate, except in the case of remyelination. This remyelination capacity of the CNS is a good example of a stem/precursor cell-mediated renewal process. Schwann cells have been found to act as remyelinating agents in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), but several studies have highlighted their potential role in remyelination in the CNS too. Schwann cells are able to protect and support retinal cells by secreting growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Retinal degenerative diseases can be highly debilitating, and they are a major concern in countries with an ageing populations. One of the leading causes of permanent loss of vision in the West is a retinal degenerative disease known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the United States, nearly 1.75 million people over the age of 40 have advanced AMD, and it is estimated that this number will increase to approximately 3 million people by 2020. One of the most common pathways involved in the initiation and development of retinal diseases is the oxidative stress pathway. In patients with diabetes, Schwann cells have been shown to be able to secrete large amounts of antioxidant enzymes that protect the PNS from the oxidative stress that results from fluctuations in blood glucose levels. This antioxidant ability may be involved in the mechanism by which Schwann cells are able to promote reconstruction in the CNS, especially in individuals with retinal injuries and degenerative diseases. PMID:28293647

  2. Murine neural stem cells model Hunter disease in vitro: glial cell-mediated neurodegeneration as a possible mechanism involved.

    PubMed

    Fusar Poli, E; Zalfa, C; D'Avanzo, F; Tomanin, R; Carlessi, L; Bossi, M; Nodari, L Rota; Binda, E; Marmiroli, P; Scarpa, M; Delia, D; Vescovi, A L; De Filippis, L

    2013-11-07

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII or Hunter Syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficit of iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS) activity and characterized by progressive systemic and neurological impairment. As the early mechanisms leading to neuronal degeneration remain elusive, we chose to examine the properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from an animal model of the disease in order to evaluate whether their neurogenic potential could be used to recapitulate the early phases of neurogenesis in the brain of Hunter disease patients. Experiments here reported show that NSCs derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of early symptomatic IDS-knockout (IDS-ko) mouse retained self-renewal capacity in vitro, but differentiated earlier than wild-type (wt) cells, displaying an evident lysosomal aggregation in oligodendroglial and astroglial cells. Consistently, the SVZ of IDS-ko mice appeared similar to the wt SVZ, whereas the cortex and striatum presented a disorganized neuronal pattern together with a significant increase of glial apoptotic cells, suggesting that glial degeneration likely precedes neuronal demise. Interestingly, a very similar pattern was observed in the brain cortex of a Hunter patient. These observations both in vitro, in our model, and in vivo suggest that IDS deficit seems to affect the late phases of neurogenesis and/or the survival of mature cells rather than NSC self-renewal. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFR-α+) glial progenitors appeared reduced in both the IDS-ko NSCs and in the IDS-ko mouse and human Hunter brains, compared with the respective healthy controls. Treatment of mutant NSCs with IDS or PDGF throughout differentiation was able to increase the number of PDGFR-α+ cells and to reduce that of apoptotic cells to levels comparable to wt. This evidence supports IDS-ko NSCs as a reliable in vitro model of the disease, and suggests the rescue of PDGFR-α+ glial cells as a

  3. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation after a Complete Spinal Cord Transection Mediates Neuroprotective and Immunomodulatory Mechanisms to Facilitate Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Griffis, Khris G.; Haggerty-Skeans, James R.; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2016-01-01

    Multiple neural and peripheral cell types rapidly respond to tissue damage after spinal cord injury to form a structurally and chemically inhibitory scar that limits axon regeneration. Astrocytes form an astroglial scar and produce chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), activate microglia, and recruit blood-derived immune cells to the lesion for debris removal. One beneficial therapy, olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation, results in functional improvements and promotes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. The lack of an OEC-specific marker, however, has limited the investigation of mechanisms underlying their proregenerative effects. We compared the effects of enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled fibroblast (FB) and OEC transplants acutely after a complete low-thoracic spinal cord transection in adult rats. We assessed the preservation of neurons and serotonergic axons, the levels of inhibitory CSPGs and myelin debris, and the extent of immune cell activation between 1 and 8 weeks postinjury. Our findings indicate that OECs survive longer than FBs post-transplantation, preserve axons and neurons, and reduce inhibitory molecules in the lesion core. Additionally, we show that OECs limit immune-cell activation and infiltration, whereas FBs alter astroglial scar formation and increase immune-cell infiltration and concomitant secondary tissue damage. Administration of cyclosporine-A to enhance graft survival demonstrated that immune suppression can augment OEC contact-mediated protection of axons and neurons during the first 2 weeks postinjury. Collectively, these data suggest that OECs have neuroprotective and immunomodulatory mechanisms that create a supportive environment for neuronal survival and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal cord injury creates physical and chemical barriers to axon regeneration. We used a complete spinal cord transection model and olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) or

  4. Mechanisms Underlying Helper T cell Plasticity: Implications for Immune-mediated Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Poholek, Amanda; Vahedi, Golnaz; Laurence, Arian; Kanno, Yuka; Milner, Joshua D.; O’Shea, John J.

    2013-01-01

    CD4 helper T cells are critical for proper immune cell homeostasis and host defense, but are also major contributes to immune and inflammatory disease. Arising from a simple, biphasic model of differentiation, Th1 and Th2 cells, a bewildering number of fates seem to possible for helper T cells. To what extent different helper cell subsets maintain their characteristic gene expression profiles or exhibit functional plasticity is a hotly debated topic. In this review, we will discuss how the expression of “signature cytokines” and “master regulator” transcription factors do not neatly conform to a simple T helper paradigm. While this may seem confusing, the good news is that the newly recognized complexity fits better with our understanding of immunopathogenesis. Finally, we will discuss factors include epigenetic regulation and metabolic alterations that contribute to helper cell specific and plasticity. PMID:23622118

  5. Mechanisms of Invariant Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Immunoregulation in Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    immunoregulatory phenotype. Specifically, three non-mutually exclusive hypothesis will be tested –1) that a lipid antigen derived from 4T1 tumor cells can be...made significant progress in demonstrating that lipid antigen/s derived from 4T1 tumors can differentially modulate the maturational markers in...4 INTRODUCTION Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a unique group of immune cells that specifically recognize lipid antigens

  6. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors.

    PubMed

    Almatouq, Abdullah; Babatunde, Akintunde O

    2016-03-29

    This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P) recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, -550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pH(cathode), ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m² power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value.

  7. Cocaine mediated apoptosis of vascular cells as a mechanism for carotid artery dissection leading to ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2011-08-01

    In arterial dissection, blood may enter the arterial wall through an intimal tear, splitting the arterial wall and activating the coagulation cascade at the site of endothelial damage. Dissection of extracranial and intracranial vessels may lead to ischemic stroke through thromboembolic or hemodynamic mechanisms. Major blunt trauma or rapid acceleration-deceleration may cause dissection, but in patients with inherent arterial wall weakness, dissection can occur spontaneously or as a result of minor neck movement. Cocaine use has been associated with dissection of the aortic arch and coronary and renal arteries through cocaine-mediated hypertension. Recent preclinical studies have suggested, however, that cocaine may cause apoptosis of cells in the vascular wall. In this article, we postulate that cocaine may cause apoptosis of vascular endothelial and/or smooth muscle cells, thus weakening the vascular wall and resulting in a dissection-prone state. We review the literature and propose a biological basis for vasculopathy, vascular dissection, and ischemic stroke in the setting of cocaine use. Further research studies on vascular cells, as well as focused analysis of human pathological material, will be important in providing evidence for or against our hypotheses.

  8. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Almatouq, Abdullah; Babatunde, Akintunde O.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P) recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, −550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pHcathode, ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m2 power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value. PMID:27043584

  9. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  10. The Mechanism of Tetinoblastoma Protein-Mediated Terminal Cell Cycle Arrest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    SantaCruz Biotech) or cyclin Dl (AB-3, Neomarker) antibody, c-Fos, c-Jun, Fra-2 and MyoD antibody ( SantaCruz Biotech Inc., USA). Figure 3. The temporal...promoter. Figure 12. Chormatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay for differentiated genuine mouse myoblast cells using MyoD antibody ( SantaCruz Biotech, SC

  11. A mechanism of action for morphine-induced immunosuppression: corticosterone mediates morphine-induced suppression of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Freier, D O; Fuchs, B A

    1994-09-01

    Morphine is a drug of abuse with an ability to down-regulate immune responsiveness that could have potentially serious consequences in both heroin addicts and in the clinical environment. The exact mechanism of action by which morphine induces immunosuppression has yet to be clearly determined. A direct mechanism of action is suggested to operate through lymphocyte opiate receptors, but the nature of such receptors is still in question. The alternative, an indirect mechanism of action is proposed to be mediated by two possible pathways, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation with increased production of adrenal corticosteroids, or activation of the sympathetic nervous system and concomitant catecholamine release. Natural killer (NK) cell activity was used to determine potential indirect mechanisms of action for morphine. NK activity in the B6C3F1 mouse was suppressed between 12 and 48 hr after implantation of 75 mg timed-release morphine pellets. Morphine suppressed NK activity in a dose-responsive manner. The opiate antagonists naloxone and naltrexone completely blocked morphine-induced suppression of NK activity, whereas naloxone methiodide, a congener that crosses the blood-brain barrier much more slowly than naloxone, produced very little blockade. Implantation of the 75-mg morphine pellets produced a significant elevation in serum corticosterone levels. In vitro exposure to corticosterone is known to suppress NK activity directly, whereas in vitro morphine was unable to alter directly NK activity. The glucocorticoid receptor antagonist Roussel-Uclaf 38486 blocked morphine-induced suppression of NK activity in a dose-responsive fashion. Naltrexone (10-mg pellet) antagonized the morphine-induced elevation in serum corticosterone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Microglial VPAC1R mediates a novel mechanism of neuroimmune-modulation of hippocampal precursor cells via IL-4 release

    PubMed Central

    Nunan, Robert; Sivasathiaseelan, Harri; Khan, Damla; Zaben, Malik; Gray, William

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the production of new neurons from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), occurs throughout adulthood in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where it supports learning and memory. The innate and adaptive immune systems are increasingly recognized as important modulators of hippocampal neurogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions. However, the mechanisms by which the immune system regulates hippocampal neurogenesis are incompletely understood. In particular, the role of microglia, the brains resident immune cell is complex, as they have been reported to both positively and negatively regulate neurogenesis. Interestingly, neuronal activity can also regulate the function of the immune system. Here, we show that depleting microglia from hippocampal cultures reduces NSPC survival and proliferation. Furthermore, addition of purified hippocampal microglia, or their conditioned media, is trophic and proliferative to NSPCs. VIP, a neuropeptide released by dentate gyrus interneurons, enhances the proliferative and pro-neurogenic effect of microglia via the VPAC1 receptor. This VIP-induced enhancement is mediated by IL-4 release, which directly targets NSPCs. This demonstrates a potential neuro-immuno-neurogenic pathway, disruption of which may have significant implications in conditions where combined cognitive impairments, interneuron loss, and immune system activation occurs, such as temporal lobe epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24801739

  13. Microglial VPAC1R mediates a novel mechanism of neuroimmune-modulation of hippocampal precursor cells via IL-4 release.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Robert; Sivasathiaseelan, Harri; Khan, Damla; Zaben, Malik; Gray, William

    2014-08-01

    Neurogenesis, the production of new neurons from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), occurs throughout adulthood in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where it supports learning and memory. The innate and adaptive immune systems are increasingly recognized as important modulators of hippocampal neurogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions. However, the mechanisms by which the immune system regulates hippocampal neurogenesis are incompletely understood. In particular, the role of microglia, the brains resident immune cell is complex, as they have been reported to both positively and negatively regulate neurogenesis. Interestingly, neuronal activity can also regulate the function of the immune system. Here, we show that depleting microglia from hippocampal cultures reduces NSPC survival and proliferation. Furthermore, addition of purified hippocampal microglia, or their conditioned media, is trophic and proliferative to NSPCs. VIP, a neuropeptide released by dentate gyrus interneurons, enhances the proliferative and pro-neurogenic effect of microglia via the VPAC1 receptor. This VIP-induced enhancement is mediated by IL-4 release, which directly targets NSPCs. This demonstrates a potential neuro-immuno-neurogenic pathway, disruption of which may have significant implications in conditions where combined cognitive impairments, interneuron loss, and immune system activation occurs, such as temporal lobe epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Norgestrel and gestodene stimulate breast cancer cell growth through an oestrogen receptor mediated mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Catherino, W. H.; Jeng, M. H.; Jordan, V. C.

    1993-01-01

    There is great concern over the long-term influence of oral contraceptives on the development of breast cancer in women. Oestrogens are known to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells, and this laboratory has previously reported (Jeng & Jordan, 1991) that the 19-norprogestin norethindrone could stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We studied the influence of the 19-norprogestins norgestrel and gestodene compared to a 'non' 19-norprogestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) on MCF-7 cell proliferation. The 19-norprogestins stimulated proliferation at a concentration of 10(-8) M, while MPA could not stimulate proliferation at concentrations as great as 3 x 10(-6) M. The stimulatory activity of the 19-norprogestins could be blocked by the antioestrogen ICI 164,384, but not by the antiprogestin RU486. Transfection studies with the reporter plasmids containing an oestrogen response element or progesterone response element (vitERE-CAT, pS2ERE-CAT, and PRE15-CAT) were performed to determine the intracellular action of norgestrel and gestodene. The 19-norprogestins stimulated the vitERE-CAT activity maximally at 10(-6) M, and this stimulation was inhibited by the addition of ICI 164,384. MPA did not stimulate vitERE-CAT activity. A single base pair alteration in the palindromic sequence of vitERE (resulting in the pS2ERE) led to a dramatic decrease in CAT expression by the 19-norprogestins, suggesting that the progestin activity required specific response element base sequencing. PRE15-CAT activity was stimulated by norgestrel, gestodene and MPA at concentrations well below growth stimulatory activity. This stimulation could be blocked by RU486. These studies suggest that the 19-norprogestins norgestrel and gestodene stimulate MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth by activating the oestrogen receptor. PMID:8494728

  15. Shear-mediated platelet activation in the free flow: Perspectives on the emerging spectrum of cell mechanobiological mechanisms mediating cardiovascular implant thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Marvin J; Sheriff, Jawaad; Hutchinson, Marcus; Tran, Phat; Bajaj, Naing; Garcia, Joe G N; Scott Saavedra, S; Bluestein, Danny

    2017-01-04

    Shear-mediated platelet activation (SMPA) is central in thrombosis of implantable cardiovascular therapeutic devices. Despite the morbidity and mortality associated with thrombosis of these devices, our understanding of mechanisms operative in SMPA, particularly in free flowing blood, remains limited. Herein we present and discuss a range of emerging mechanisms for consideration for "free flow" activation under supraphysiologic shear. Further definition and manipulation of these mechanisms will afford opportunities for novel pharmacologic and mechanical strategies to limit SMPA and enhance overall implant device safety.

  16. Mechanisms of hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling in differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Yu; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Lu, Chong; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Xiao-Chen

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} A hypothesis that the differentiation of PDEC is through MAPKs or PI3K/AKT pathways. {yields} Determine if kinases (ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and AKT) are activated in these pathways. {yields} Determine signal pathway(s) that may effect on HGF-induced differentiation of PDEC. {yields} PI3K-AKT pathway is involved in the differentiation of PDECs induced by HGF. {yields} MEK-ERK pathway effect on the proliferation of PDECs but not the differentiation. -- Abstract: Pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs) were induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in our previous study, but the mechanism through which this induction occurs is still unknown. HGF is a ligand that activates a tyrosine kinase encoded by the c-Met proto-oncogene. This activation is followed by indirect activation of multiple downstream signal transduction pathways (including MAPKs and the PI3K/AKT signaling pathways) that initiate various biological effects. Therefore, we speculated that the differentiation of PDECs is through either the MAPK signaling pathway or the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. To test this hypothesis, isolated PDECs from adult rats were stimulated by adding HGF to their medium for 28 days. Then, the expression levels of several protein kinases, including MAPKs (ERK1/2, p38, and JNK) and AKT, were determined by Western blotting to determine if specific protein kinases are activated in these pathways. Subsequently, re-isolated from adult rats and cultured PDECs were pre-treated with specific inhibitors of proteins shown to be activated in these signaling pathways; these cells were then induced to differentiate by the addition of HGF. The expression levels of protein kinases were determined by Western blotting, and the differentiation rate of insulin-positive cells was determined by flow cytometry. The change of PDEC differentiation rates were compared between the groups in which cells with or without inhibitors

  17. Microalgae mediated bio-electrocatalytic fuel cell facilitates bioelectricity generation through oxygenic photomixotrophic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Venkata Subhash, G; Chandra, Rashmi; Venkata Mohan, S

    2013-05-01

    Electrogenic activity of oxygenic photo-bioelectrocatalytic fuel cell (PhFCOX) under mixotrophic mode was evaluated using atmospheric CO2 and domestic wastewater as carbon sources for harnessing bioelectricity with mixed microalgae as anodic biocatalyst. PhFCOX operation showed good electrogenic activity (3.55 μW/m(2)) associated with higher biomass growth (2.87 g/l) and chlorophyll content (5.12 mg/l). Electrogenic activity was relatively higher during the day time (46 mV; 0.6 mA) compared to the night (6 mV; 0.01 mA). Performance of PhFCOX undergoing oxygenic photosynthesis (DO; 3.5 mg/l) was compared with the mixotrophic fuel cell (PhFCAX) with photosynthetic bacteria as biocatalyst under anoxygenic conditions (DO; 0.45 mg/l). The dissolved oxygen produced during photolysis of water in oxygenic photosynthesis is a major limiting factor affecting the electrogenic activity. Voltammetric and amperometric analysis along with electron transfer kinetics (Tafel analysis) supported the bio-electrochemical behavior of PhFCOX and PhFCAX.

  18. Two distinct mechanisms mediate the involvement of bone marrow cells in islet remodeling: neogenesis of insulin-producing cells and support of islet recovery.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Sadikov, Tamila; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that small-sized bone marrow cells (BMCs) isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate and contribute to regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we assess some of the characteristics of these cells compared to elutriated hematopoietic progenitors (R/O) and whole BMCs in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced chemical diabetes. The GFP(bright)CD45(+) progeny of whole BMCs and R/O progenitors progressively infiltrate the pancreas with evolution of donor chimerism; are found at islet perimeter, vascular, and ductal walls; and have a modest impact on islet recovery from injury. In contrast, Fr25lin(-) cells incorporate in the islets, convert to GFP(dim)CD45(-)PDX-1(+) phenotypes, produce proinsulin, and secrete insulin with significant contribution to stabilization of glucose homeostasis. The elutriated Fr25lin(-) cells express low levels of CD45 and are negative for SCA-1 and c-kit, as removal of cells expressing these markers did not impair conversion to produce insulin. BMCs mediate two synergistic mechanisms that contribute to islet recovery from injury: support of islet remodeling by hematopoietic cells and neogenesis of insulin-producing cells from stem cells.

  19. Complement-mediated cell death induced by rituximab in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is mediated in vitro by a caspase-independent mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bellosillo, B; Villamor, N; López-Guillermo, A; Marcé, S; Esteve, J; Campo, E; Colomer, D; Montserrat, E

    2001-11-01

    Mechanisms involving the in vitro effect of rituximab in cells from 55 patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders were investigated. No cytotoxic effect was observed when cells were incubated with rituximab alone, but in the presence of human AB serum rituximab induced complement-dependent cell death (R-CDC). A cytotoxic effect was observed in cells from 9 of 33 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 16 of 16 patients with mantle-cell lymphoma, 4 of 4 patients with follicular lymphoma, and 2 of 2 patients with hairy-cell leukemia. R-CDC was observed in cells from patients expressing more than 50 x 10(3) CD20 molecules per cell, and directly correlated with the number of CD20 molecules per cell. Preincubation with anti-CD59 increased the cytotoxic effect of rituximab and sensitized cells from nonsensitive cases. Neither cleavage of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) nor activation of caspase-3 was observed in R-CDC. In addition, no cells with a hypodiploid DNA content were detected and R-CDC was not prevented by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism. Incubation with rituximab in the presence of AB serum induced a rapid and intense production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). R-CDC was blocked by the incubation of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or Tiron, 2 ROS scavengers, indicating that the cytotoxic effect was due to the generation of superoxide (O) radicals. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that CD20, CD59, and complement have a role in the in vitro cytotoxic effect of rituximab, which is mediated by a caspase-independent process that involves ROS generation.

  20. Intestinal tuft cells regulate the ATM mediated DNA Damage response via Dclk1 dependent mechanism for crypt restitution following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Weygant, Nathaniel; Qu, Dongfeng; Berry, William L.; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Ali, Naushad; Rao, Chinthalapally; Huycke, Mark; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2016-01-01

    Crypt epithelial survival and regeneration after injury require highly coordinated complex interplay between resident stem cells and diverse cell types. The function of Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulating intestinal epithelial DNA damage response for cell survival/self-renewal after radiation-induced injury is unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were isolated and purified and utilized for experimental analysis. We found that small intestinal crypts of VillinCre;Dclk1f/f mice were hypoplastic and more apoptotic 24 h post-total body irradiation, a time when stem cell survival is p53-independent. Injury-induced ATM mediated DNA damage response, pro-survival genes, stem cell markers, and self-renewal ability for survival and restitution were reduced in the isolated intestinal epithelial cells. An even greater reduction in these signaling pathways was observed 3.5 days post-TBI, when peak crypt regeneration occurs. We found that interaction with Dclk1 is critical for ATM and COX2 activation in response to injury. We determined that Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulate the whole intestinal epithelial cells following injury through paracrine mechanism. These findings suggest that intestinal tuft cells play an important role in regulating the ATM mediated DNA damage response, for epithelial cell survival/self-renewal via a Dclk1 dependent mechanism, and these processes are indispensable for restitution and function after severe radiation-induced injury. PMID:27876863

  1. Oxidative stress and mitochondria-mediated cell death mechanisms triggered by the familial Danish dementia ADan amyloid.

    PubMed

    Todd, Krysti; Ghiso, Jorge; Rostagno, Agueda

    2016-01-01

    Familial Danish Dementia (FDD), an early-onset non-amyloid-β (Aβ) cerebral amyloidosis, is neuropathologically characterized by widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy, parenchymal amyloid and preamyloid deposits, as well as neurofibrillary degeneration indistinguishable to that seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main amyloid subunit composing FDD lesions, a 34-amino acid de-novo generated peptide ADan, is the direct result of a genetic defect at the 3'-end of the BRI2 gene and the physiologic action of furin-like proteolytic processing at the C-terminal region of the ADan precursor protein. We aimed to study the impact of the FDD mutation, the additional formation of the pyroglutamate (pE) posttranslational modification as well as the relevance of C-terminal truncations -all major components of the heterogeneous FDD deposits- on the structural and neurotoxic properties of the molecule. Our data indicates that whereas the mutation generated a β-sheet-rich hydrophobic ADan subunit of high oligomerization/fibrillization propensity and the pE modification further enhanced these properties, C-terminal truncations had the opposite effect mostly abolishing these features. The potentiation of pro-amyloidogenic properties correlated with the initiation of neuronal cell death mechanisms involving oxidative stress, perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and downstream activation of caspase-mediated apoptotic pathways. The amyloid-induced toxicity was inhibited by targeting specific components of these detrimental cellular pathways, using reactive oxygen scavengers and monoclonal antibodies recognizing the pathological amyloid subunit. Taken together, the data indicate that the FDD mutation and the pE posttranslational modification are both primary elements driving intact ADan into an amyloidogenic/neurotoxic pathway while truncations at the C-terminus eliminate the pro-amyloidogenic characteristics of the molecule

  2. A novel profibrotic mechanism mediated by TGF-β-stimulated collagen prolyl hydroxylase expression in fibrotic lung mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongfeng; Xu, Wei; Chen, Hui; Warburton, David; Dong, Rachel; Qian, Bangping; Selman, Moisés; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Shi, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a severe chronic lung disease with a high mortality rate. Excessive TGF-β signaling is recognized as a central player in lung fibrosis. However, the related mechanisms remain unclear. Herein we used a novel Tbx4 lung enhancer-driven Tet-On transgenic system to inhibit TGF-β signaling in mouse lung resident mesenchymal cells at different stages of bleomycin-induced fibrosis by conditionally knocking out TGF-β receptor II or expressing a dominant-negative TGF-β receptor II. Abrogation of mesenchymal TGF-β signaling markedly attenuated bleomycin-induced fibrotic pathology, which was independent of altered early inflammation. Furthermore, a novel TGF-β downstream target gene P4HA3 (an α-subunit of collagen prolyl hydroxylase) was identified, and its expression was significantly increased in fibroblastic foci of both bleomycin-induced fibrotic mouse lungs and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients’ lungs. The relationship between activated TGF-β signaling, upregulation of P4HA3, as well as increased hydroxyproline/collagen production was further verified in cultured lung fibroblasts. Moreover, inhibition of collagen prolyl hydroxylase by pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate attenuated both TGF-β-stimulated collagen production in cultured fibroblasts and bleomycin-induced mouse lung fibrosis. These data indicate that increased expression and activity of collagen prolyl hydroxylase is one of the important mechanisms underlying TGF-β-mediated profibrotic effects. Inhibition of collagen prolyl hydroxylase may be a new promising approach for preventing and treating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25779936

  3. Mechanism of nuclear factor of activated T-cells mediated FasL expression in corticosterone -treated mouse Leydig tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Wei-Ran; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qian; Gao, Hui-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Background Fas and FasL is important mediators of apoptosis. We have previously reported that the stress levels of corticosterone (CORT, glucocorticoid in rat) increase expression of Fas/FasL and activate Fas/FasL signal pathway in rat Leydig cells, which consequently leads to apoptosis. Moreover, our another study showed that nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) may play a potential role in up-regulation of FasL during CORT-treated rat Leydig cell. It is not clear yet how NFAT is involved in CORT-induced up-regulation of FasL. The aim of the present study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms of NFAT-mediated FasL expression in CORT-treated Leydig cells. Results Western blot analysis showed that NFAT2 expression is present in mouse Leydig tumor cell (mLTC-1). CORT-induced increase in FasL expression in mLTC-1 was ascertained by Western Blot analysis and CORT-induced increase in apoptotic frequency of mLTC-1 cells was detected by FACS with annexin-V labeling. Confocal imaging of NFAT2-GFP in mLTC-1 showed that high level of CORT stimulated NFAT translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NFAT2 significantly attenuated CORT-induced up-regulation of FasL expression in mLTC. These results corroborated our previous finding that NFAT2 is involved in CORT-induced FasL expression in rat Leydig cells and showed that mLTC-1 is a suitable model for investigating the mechanism of CORT-induced FasL expression. The analysis of reporter constructs revealed that the sequence between -201 and +71 of mouse FasL gene is essential for CORT-induced FasL expression. The mutation analysis demonstrated that CORT-induced FasL expression is mediated via an NFAT binding element located in the -201 to +71 region. Co-transfection studies with an NFAT2 expression vector and reporter construct containing -201 to +71 region of FasL gene showed that NFAT2 confer a strong inducible activity to the FasL promoter at its regulatory region. In

  4. Investigation of Biophysical Mechanisms in Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Manipulation of Cells Using a Multimodal Holographic and Fluorescence Imaging Setup

    PubMed Central

    Rakoski, Mirko S.; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin) served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy. PMID:25909631

  5. Investigation of biophysical mechanisms in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation of cells using a multimodal holographic and fluorescence imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Stefan; Antonopoulos, Georgios C; Rakoski, Mirko S; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin) served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy.

  6. Ionic channel mechanisms mediating the intrinsic excitability of Kenyon cells in the mushroom body of the cricket brain.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shigeki; Murata, Kaoru; Tanaka, Aiko; Kakuta, Eri; Tanemura, Saori; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Nakamura, Atsunao; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Hasebe, Masaharu; Kosakai, Kumiko; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsic neurons within the mushroom body of the insect brain, called Kenyon cells, play an important role in olfactory associative learning. In this study, we examined the ionic mechanisms mediating the intrinsic excitability of Kenyon cells in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. A perforated whole-cell clamp study using β-escin indicated the existence of several inward and outward currents. Three types of inward currents (INaf, INaP, and ICa) were identified. The transient sodium current (INaf) activated at -40 mV, peaked at -26 mV, and half-inactivated at -46.7 mV. The persistent sodium current (INaP) activated at -51 mV, peaked at -23 mV, and half-inactivated at -30.7 mV. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 1 μM) completely blocked both INaf and INaP, but 10nM TTX blocked INaf more potently than INaP. Cd(2+) (50 μM) potently blocked INaP with little effect on INaf. Riluzole (>20 μM) nonselectively blocked both INaP and INaf. The voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa) activated at -30 mV, peaked at -11.3 mV, and half-inactivated at -34 mV. The Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil (100 μM) blocked ICa in a use-dependent manner. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings showed the presence of a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel, and the activity of this channel was decreased by removing the extracellular Ca(2+) or adding verapamil or nifedipine, and increased by adding the Ca(2+) agonist Bay K8644, indicating that Ca(2+) entry via the L-type Ca(2+) channel regulates BK channel activity. Under the current-clamp condition, membrane depolarization generated membrane oscillations in the presence of 10nM TTX or 100 μM riluzole in the bath solution. These membrane oscillations disappeared with 1 μM TTX, 50 μM Cd(2+), replacement of external Na(+) with choline, and blockage of Na(+)-activated K(+) current (IKNa) with 50 μM quinidine, indicating that membrane oscillations are primarily mediated by INaP in cooperation with IKNa. The plateau potentials observed either in

  7. Distinct kinetic and mechanical properties govern mucin 16- and podocalyxin-mediated tumor cell adhesion to E- and L-selectin in shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Daniel J.; Wirtz, Denis; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Selectin-mediated tumor cell tethering to host cells, such as vascular endothelial cells, is a critical step in the process of cancer metastasis. We recently identified sialofucosylated mucin16 (MUC16) and podocalyxin (PODXL) as the major functional E- and L-selectin ligands expressed on the surface of metastatic pancreatic cancer cells. While the biophysics of leukocyte binding to selectins has been well studied, little is known about the mechanics of selectin-mediated adhesion pertinent to cancer metastasis. We thus sought to evaluate the critical parameters of selectin-mediated pancreatic tumor cell tethering and rolling. Using force spectroscopy, we characterized the binding interactions of MUC16 and PODXL to E- and L-selectin at the single-molecule level. To further analyze the response of these molecular interactions under physiologically relevant regimes, we used a microfluidic assay in conjunction with a mathematical model to study the biophysics of selectin-ligand binding as a function of fluid shear stress. We demonstrate that both MUC16 and PODXL-E-selectin-mediated interactions are mechanically stronger than like L-selectin interactions at the single-molecule level, and display a higher binding frequency at all contact times. The single-molecule kinetic and micromechanical properties of selectin-ligand bonds, along with the number of receptor-ligand bonds needed to initiate tethering, regulate the average velocity of ligand-coated microspheres rolling on selectin-coated surfaces in shear flow. Understanding the biophysics of selectin-ligand bonds and their responses to physiologically relevant shear stresses is vital for developing diagnostic assays and/or preventing the metastatic spread of tumor cells by interfering with selectin-mediated adhesion. PMID:26329844

  8. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  9. IL-12-dependent innate immunity arrests endothelial cells in G0-G1 phase by a p21(Cip1/Waf1)-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Napione, Lucia; Strasly, Marina; Meda, Claudia; Mitola, Stefania; Alvaro, Maria; Doronzo, Gabriella; Marchiò, Serena; Giraudo, Enrico; Primo, Luca; Arese, Marco; Bussolino, Federico

    2012-12-01

    Innate immunity may activate paracrine circuits able to entail vascular system in the onset and progression of several chronic degenerative diseases. In particular, interleukin (IL)-12 triggers a genetic program in lymphomononuclear cells characterized by the production of interferon-γ and specific chemokines resulting in an angiostatic activity. The aim of this study is to identify molecules involved in the regulation of cell cycle in endothelial cells co-cultured with IL-12-stimulated lymphomonuclear cells. By using a transwell mediated co-culture system we demonstrated that IL-12-stimulated lymphomonuclear cells induce an arrest of endothelial cells cycle in G1, which is mainly mediated by the up-regulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1), an inhibitor of cyclin kinases. This effect requires the activation of STAT1, PKCδ and p38 MAPK, while p53 is ineffective. In accordance, siRNA-dependent silencing of these molecules in endothelial cells inhibited the increase of p21(Cip1/Waf1) and the modification in cell cycle promoted by IL-12-stimulated lymphomonuclear cells. These results indicate that the angiostatic action of IL-12-stimulated lymphomononuclear cells may lie in the capability to arrest endothelial cells in G1 phase through a mechanisms mainly based on the specific up-regulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1) induced by the combined activity of STAT1, PKCδ and p38 MAPK.

  10. From AIDS to parasite infection: pathogen-mediated subversion of programmed cell death as a mechanism for immune dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Ameisen, J C; Estaquier, J; Idziorek, T

    1994-12-01

    Premature cell death can result either from cell injury or degeneration, leading to necrosis, or from the activation of a physiological cell-suicide process, termed programmed cell death or apoptosis, that is regulated by intercellular signalling. This process plays an essential role in the selection of developing lymphocytes, and is also involved in the function of the mature adaptative immune system. A growing number of experimental findings during the last 4 years has provided support to our hypothesis that inappropriate HIV-mediated dysregulation of programmed T-cell death is relevant to AIDS pathogenesis. A series of recent experimental results also supports the general concept that the persistence and pathogenesis of several infectious pathogens, ranging from retroviruses to parasites, may be related to their capacity to dysregulate programmed cell death in various cell populations including lymphocytes. Subversion by pathogens of the physiological control of programmed cell death provides a paradigm for the pathogenesis of a wide range of infectious diseases that involve immune dysregulation and suggests therapeutic potential for the in vivo modulation of cell signalling.

  11. Molecular mechanisms regulating CD13-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mallika; Gerber, Claire; Rahman, M Mamunur; Vernier, Kaitlyn M; Pereira, Flavia E; Subramani, Jaganathan; Caromile, Leslie A; Shapiro, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    CD13/Aminopeptidase N is a transmembrane metalloproteinase that is expressed in many tissues where it regulates various cellular functions. In inflammation, CD13 is expressed on myeloid cells, is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation and mediates monocyte/endothelial adhesion by homotypic interactions. In animal models the lack of CD13 alters the profiles of infiltrating inflammatory cells at sites of ischaemic injury. Here, we found that CD13 expression is enriched specifically on the pro-inflammatory subset of monocytes, suggesting that CD13 may regulate trafficking and function of specific subsets of immune cells. To further dissect the mechanisms regulating CD13-dependent trafficking we used the murine model of thioglycollate-induced sterile peritonitis. Peritoneal monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells were significantly decreased in inflammatory exudates from global CD13KO animals when compared with wild-type controls. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of wild-type and CD13KO primary myeloid cells, or wild-type myeloid cells pre-treated with CD13-blocking antibodies into thioglycollate-challenged wild-type recipients demonstrated fewer CD13KO or treated cells in the lavage, suggesting that CD13 expression confers a competitive advantage in trafficking. Similarly, both wild-type and CD13KO cells were reduced in infiltrates in CD13KO recipients, confirming that both monocytic and endothelial CD13 contribute to trafficking. Finally, murine monocyte cell lines expressing mouse/human chimeric CD13 molecules demonstrated that the C-terminal domain of the protein mediates CD13 adhesion. Therefore, this work verifies that the altered inflammatory trafficking in CD13KO mice is the result of aberrant myeloid cell subset trafficking and further defines the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. PMID:24627994

  12. Smokeless Tobacco Extract (STE)-Induced Toxicity in Mammalian Cells is Mediated by the Disruption of Cellular Microtubule Network: A Key Mechanism of Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Subhendu; Ganguli, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco usage is a growing public health problem worldwide. The molecular mechanism(s) underlying smokeless tobacco associated tissue damage remain largely unidentified. In the present study we have tried to explore the effects of aqueous extract of smokeless tobacco (STE) on tubulin-microtubule, the major cytoskeleton protein that maintains cells morphology and participates in cell division. Exposure to STE resulted in dose-dependent cytotoxicity in a variety of mammalian transformed cell lines such as human lung epithelial cells A549, human liver epithelial cells HepG2, and mouse squamous epithelial cells HCC7, as well as non-tumorogenic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBMC. Cellular morphology of STE-treated cells was altered and the associated disruption of microtubule network indicates that STE targets tubulin-microtubule system in both cell lines. Furthermore it was also observed that STE-treatment resulted in the selective degradation of cellular tubulin, whereas actin remains unaltered. In vitro, polymerization of purified tubulin was inhibited by STE with the IC50 value∼150 µg/ml and this is associated with the loss of reactive cysteine residues of tubulin. Application of thiol-based antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly abrogates STE-mediated microtubule damage and associated cytotoxicity in both A549 and HepG2 cells. These results suggest that microtubule damage is one of the key mechanisms of STE-induced cytotoxity in mammalian cells. PMID:23874548

  13. Smokeless tobacco extract (STE)-induced toxicity in mammalian cells is mediated by the disruption of cellular microtubule network: a key mechanism of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Das, Amlan; Bhattacharya, Abhijit; Chakrabarty, Subhendu; Ganguli, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco usage is a growing public health problem worldwide. The molecular mechanism(s) underlying smokeless tobacco associated tissue damage remain largely unidentified. In the present study we have tried to explore the effects of aqueous extract of smokeless tobacco (STE) on tubulin-microtubule, the major cytoskeleton protein that maintains cells morphology and participates in cell division. Exposure to STE resulted in dose-dependent cytotoxicity in a variety of mammalian transformed cell lines such as human lung epithelial cells A549, human liver epithelial cells HepG2, and mouse squamous epithelial cells SCC7, [corrected] as well as non-tumorogenic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBMC. Cellular morphology of STE-treated cells was altered and the associated disruption of microtubule network indicates that STE targets tubulin-microtubule system in both cell lines. Furthermore it was also observed that STE-treatment resulted in the selective degradation of cellular tubulin, whereas actin remains unaltered. In vitro, polymerization of purified tubulin was inhibited by STE with the IC50 value∼150 µg/ml and this is associated with the loss of reactive cysteine residues of tubulin. Application of thiol-based antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly abrogates STE-mediated microtubule damage and associated cytotoxicity in both A549 and HepG2 cells. These results suggest that microtubule damage is one of the key mechanisms of STE-induced cytotoxity in mammalian cells.

  14. Control of cell cycle by metabolites of prostaglandin D2 through a non-cAMP mediated mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Fukushima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dehydration products of PGD2, 9-deoxy-9 prostaglandin D2(PGJ2), 9-deoxy-delta 9, delta 12, delta 13 dehydroprostaglandin D2 (delta 12 PGJ2), and PGA2 all contain an unsaturated cyclopentenone structure which is characteristic of prostaglandins which effectively inhibit cell growth. It has been suggested that the action of the inhibitory prostaglandins may be through a cAMP mechanism. In this study, we use S49 wild type (WT) and adenylate cyclase variant (cyc-) cells to show that PGD2 and PGJ2 are not acting via a cyclic AMP mechanism. First, the increase in cyclic AMP in wild type S-49 cells is not proportional to its effects on DNA synthesis. More importantly, when S-49 cyc- cells were exposed to PGJ2, the adenylate cyclase (cyc-) mutant had decreased DNA synthesis with no change in its nominal cAMP content. Short-term (2 hours or less) exposure of the cyc- cells to prostaglandin J2 caused an inhibition of DNA synthesis. PGJ2 caused cytolysis at high concentrations. Long-term exposure (>14 hrs) of the cells to PGJ2, delta 12PGJ2 or delta 12, delta 14PGJ2 caused a cell cycle arrest in G1 demonstrating a cell cycle specific mechanism of action for growth inhibition by naturally occurring biological products independent of cAMP.

  15. Expression of the proteoglycan syndecan-4 and the mechanism by which it mediates stress fiber formation in folliculostellate cells in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Kouki, Tom; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ly, Floren; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Folliculostellate (FS) cells in the anterior pituitary gland appear to have multifunctional properties. FS cells connect to each other at gap junctions and thereby form a histological and functional network. We have performed a series of studies on network formation in FS cells and recently reported that FS cells markedly prolong their cytoplasmic processes and form numerous interconnections with neighboring FS cells in the presence of laminin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) component of the basement membrane. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of this extension of FS cell cytoplasmic processes under the influence of laminin and found that laminin promoted stress fiber formation within FS cells. Next, we noted that formation of stress fibers in FS cells was mediated by syndecan-4, a transmembrane proteoglycan that binds ECM and soluble factors via their extracellular glycosaminoglycan chain. We then observed that expressions of syndecan-4 and α-actinin (a microfilament bundling protein that cross-links actin stress fibers in FS cells) were upregulated by laminin. Using specific siRNA of syndecan-4, actin polymerization of FS cells was inhibited. Our findings suggest that FS cells received a signal from laminin-syndecan-4 interaction, which resulted in morphological changes, and that the formation of a morphological and functional network in FS cells was transduced by a syndecan-4-dependent mechanism in the presence of ECM.

  16. Impact of a cell phone intervention on mediating mechanisms of smoking cessation in individuals living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Vidrine, Damon J; Arduino, Roberto C; Gritz, Ellen R

    2006-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that smokers living with HIV/AIDS have a significantly increased risk of numerous adverse health outcomes (both AIDS- and non-AIDS-related) compared with HIV-positive nonsmokers. Therefore, efforts to design and implement effective cessation programs for this ever-growing special population are warranted. The present study assessed the effects of a cell phone intervention (CPI) on hypothesized mediators (i.e., changes in depression, anxiety, social support, and self-efficacy) demonstrated to influence cessation outcomes in other populations. Ninety-five participants from an inner-city AIDS clinic were randomized to receive either the CPI or recommended standard of care (RSOC) smoking cessation treatment. Participants randomized to the RSOC group (n=47) received brief advice to quit, a 10-week supply of nicotine patches, and self-help materials. Participants randomized to the CPI group (n=48) received RSOC components plus a series of eight proactive counseling sessions delivered via cell phones. A series of regression analyses (linear and logistic) was used to assess the relationships between treatment group, the hypothesized mediators, and biochemically confirmed smoking cessation outcomes. Results indicated that the CPI group experienced greater reductions in anxiety and depression, and increases in self-efficacy compared with the RSOC group. Further, changes in depression, anxiety, and self-efficacy weakened the association between treatment group and cessation outcome. The mediator hypothesis, however, for social support was rejected, as the difference score was not significantly associated with treatment group. These results suggest that the efficacy of the CPI is at least partially mediated by its ability to decrease symptoms of distress while increasing self-efficacy.

  17. NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species: A new mechanism for X-ray-induced HeLa cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qing; He Xiaoqing; Liu Yongsheng; Du Bingbing; Wang Xiaoyan; Zhang Weisheng; Jia Pengfei; Dong Jingmei; Ma Jianxiu; Wang Xiaohu; Li Sha; Zhang Hong

    2008-12-19

    Oxidative damage is an important mechanism in X-ray-induced cell death. Radiolysis of water molecules is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to X-ray-induced cell death. In this study, we showed by ROS detection and a cell survival assay that NADPH oxidase has a very important role in X-ray-induced cell death. Under X-ray irradiation, the upregulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase membrane subunit gp91{sup phox} was dose-dependent. Meanwhile, the cytoplasmic subunit p47{sup phox} was translocated to the cell membrane and localized with p22{sup phox} and gp91{sup phox} to form reactive NADPH oxidase. Our data suggest, for the first time, that NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS is an important contributor to X-ray-induced cell death. This suggests a new target for combined gene transfer and radiotherapy.

  18. Mechanism of mammalian cell lysis mediated by peptide defensins. Evidence for an initial alteration of the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, A

    1991-01-01

    Defensins induce ion channels in model lipid bilayers and permeabilize the membranes of Escherichia coli. We investigated whether similar membrane-active events occur during defensin-mediated cytolysis of tumor cells. Although defensin-treated K562 targets did not release chromium-labeled cytoplasmic components for 5-6 h, they experienced a rapid collapse (within minutes) of the membrane potential, efflux of rubidium, and influx of trypan blue. Defensin treatment also blunted the subsequent acidification response induced by nigericin, thereby further supporting the notion of enhanced transmembrane ion flow during exposure. These initial effects on the plasma membrane were not sufficient for subsequent lysis; a second phase of injury was required which involved the continued presence of defensin. The rapid membrane permeabilization phase was inhibited by azide/2-deoxyglucose, cytochalasin B, and increased concentrations of extracellular potassium and was unaffected by actinomycin-D, cycloheximide, and varying the calcium concentration. In contrast, the second phase was unaffected by cytochalasin B, inhibited by azide/2-deoxyglucose, enhanced by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, and varied with calcium concentration. These results indicate the initial adverse effect of defensins on mammalian cells occurs at the cell membrane. It is possible that the second phase of injury is mediated intracellularly by defensin that has been internalized through this leaky membrane. PMID:2056135

  19. Mobilization of Intracellular Copper by Gossypol and Apogossypolone Leads to Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Cell Death: Putative Anticancer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Haseeb; Azim, Shafquat; Khan, Husain Yar; Ullah, Mohammad Fahad; Wu, Daocheng; Singh, Ajay Pratap; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-06-20

    There is compelling evidence that serum, tissue and intracellular levels of copper are elevated in all types of cancer. Copper has been suggested as an important co-factor for angiogenesis. It is also a major metal ion present inside the nucleus, bound to DNA bases, particularly guanine. We have earlier proposed that the interaction of phenolic-antioxidants with intracellular copper leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately serve as DNA cleaving agents. To further validate our hypothesis we show here that the antioxidant gossypol and its semi-synthetic derivative apogossypolone induce copper-mediated apoptosis in breast MDA-MB-231, prostate PC3 and pancreatic BxPC-3 cancer cells, through the generation of ROS. MCF10A breast epithelial cells refractory to the cytotoxic property of these compounds become sensitized to treatment against gossypol, as well as apogossypolone, when pre-incubated with copper. Our present results confirm our earlier findings and strengthen our hypothesis that plant-derived antioxidants mobilize intracellular copper instigating ROS-mediated cellular DNA breakage. As cancer cells exist under significant oxidative stress, this increase in ROS-stress to cytotoxic levels could be a successful anticancer approach.

  20. Mechanisms underlying aspirin-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of cyclooxygenase-2 negative colon cancer cell line SW480

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Yu; Huang, Jie-An; Liang, Zhi-Hai; Jiang, Hai-Xing; Tang, Guo-Du

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) on proliferation and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cell line SW480 and its mechanism. METHODS: Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 negative colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was treated with aspirin at concentrations of 2.5 mmol/L, 5.0 mmol/L, 10.0 mmol/L for different periods in vitro. Anti-proliferation effect of aspirin on SW480 was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were observed by flow cytometry (FCM). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used for morphological study. Apoptosis-associated genes were detected by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. RESULTS: Aspirin inhibited SW480 proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with different concentrations of aspirin significantly increased the proportions of cells at the G0/G1 phase and decreased the proportions of cells at the S- and G2/M phases in a concentration-dependent manner. Aspirin not only induced apoptosis but also caused cell necrosis at a high concentration as well. After treatment with aspirin, SW480 cells displayed typically morphological features of apoptosis and necrosis under TEM, and increased the Bcl-2 expression in cells, but the expression of Bax was down regulated. CONCLUSION: Aspirin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of SW480 cells. Its anti-tumor mechanism may arrest cell cycle and shift Bax/Bcl-2 balance in cells. PMID:18636671

  1. Akt-mediated liver growth promotes induction of cyclin E through a novel translational mechanism and a p21-mediated cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Nelsen, Christopher J; Hanse, Eric A; Goggin, Melissa M; Anttila, Chelsea K; Peterson, Mark; Bitterman, Peter B; Raghavan, Arvind; Crary, Gretchen S; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2007-07-20

    The control of hepatocyte growth is relevant to the processes of liver regeneration, development, metabolic homeostasis, and cancer. A key component of growth control is the protein kinase Akt, which acts downstream of mitogens and nutrients to affect protein translation and cell cycle progression. In this study, we found that transient transfection of activated Akt triggered a 3-4-fold increase in liver size within days but only minimal hepatocyte proliferation. Akt-induced liver growth was associated with marked up-regulation of cyclin E but not cyclin D1. Analysis of liver polyribosomes demonstrated that the post-transcriptional induction of cyclin E was associated with increased translational efficiency of this mRNA, suggesting that cell growth promotes expression of this protein through a translational mechanism that is distinct from the cyclin D-E2F pathway. Treatment of Akt-transfected mice with rapamycin only partially inhibited liver growth and did not prevent the induction of cyclin E protein, indicating that target of rapamycin activity is not necessary for this response. In the enlarged livers, cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes were present in high abundance but were inactive due to increased binding of p21 to these complexes. Akt transfection of p21(-/-) mice promoted liver growth, activation of Cdk2, and enhanced hepatocyte proliferation. In conclusion, growth promotes cyclin E expression through a novel translational mechanism in the liver, suggesting a new link between cell growth and the cell cycle machinery. Furthermore, p21 suppresses proliferation in the overgrown livers and may play a role in preventing cell cycle progression in response to organ size homeostatic mechanisms.

  2. Amyloid-β peptide on sialyl-Lewis(X)-selectin-mediated membrane tether mechanics at the cerebral endothelial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Askarova, Sholpan; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Grace Y; Meininger, Gerald A; Lee, James C-M

    2013-01-01

    Increased deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) at the cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) surface has been implicated in enhancement of transmigration of monocytes across the brain blood barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy (QIM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) with cantilevers biofunctionalized by sialyl-Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) were employed to investigate Aβ-altered mechanics of membrane tethers formed by bonding between sLe(x) and p-selectin at the CEC surface, the initial mechanical step governing the transmigration of monocytes. QIM results indicated the ability for Aβ to increase p-selectin expression at the cell surface and promote actin polymerization in both bEND3 cells (immortalized mouse CECs) and human primary CECs. AFM data also showed the ability for Aβ to increase cell stiffness and adhesion probability in bEND3 cells. On the contrary, Aβ lowered the overall force of membrane tether formation (Fmtf ), and produced a bimodal population of Fmtf , suggesting subcellular mechanical alterations in membrane tethering. The lower Fmtf population was similar to the results obtained from cells treated with an F-actin-disrupting drug, latrunculin A. Indeed, AFM results also showed that both Aβ and latrunculin A decreased membrane stiffness, suggesting a lower membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, a factor resulting in lower Fmtf . In addition, these cerebral endothelial alterations induced by Aβ were abrogated by lovastatin, consistent with its anti-inflammatory effects. In sum, these results demonstrated the ability for Aβ to enhance p-selectin expression at the CEC surface and induce cytoskeleton reorganization, which in turn, resulted in changes in membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tethering, mechanical factors important in transmigration of monocytes through the BBB.

  3. Urokinase-mediated recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and their suppressive mechanisms are blocked by MUC1/sec

    PubMed Central

    Ilkovitch, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The transmembrane isoform of mucin 1 (MUC1/TM) is a well-recognized tumor antigen, contributing to tumorigenesis and immune evasion. Although MUC1/TM has been correlated with malignancy, we have previously reported on antitumor properties and prevention of tumor development by a secreted splice variant of MUC1 (MUC1/sec). Because myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play a critical role in tumor-induced immunosuppression, we investigated their recruitment by tumor cells expressing either MUC1/TM or MUC1/sec. DA-3 tumor cells expressing MUC1/sec recruit dramatically lower levels of MDSCs, relative to MUC1/TM-expressing DA-3 cells. Because MUC1/sec was previously shown to down-regulate tumor expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a protease linked to tumor aggressiveness and metastasis, the potential role of uPA in MDSC recruitment was investigated. Tumor-derived uPA is capable of recruiting MDSCs, and correlates with tumor development. In addition to diminishing recruitment of MDSCs, the effect of MUC1/sec on MDSC-suppressive mechanisms was investigated. MUC1/sec, or its unique immunoenhancing peptide, is capable of blocking expression of arginase 1 and production of reactive oxygen species in MDSCs, implicated in the suppression of T cells. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism of MDSC recruitment, and provide evidence that MUC1/sec has antitumor properties affecting MDSCs. PMID:19196663

  4. Urokinase-mediated recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and their suppressive mechanisms are blocked by MUC1/sec.

    PubMed

    Ilkovitch, Dan; Lopez, Diana M

    2009-05-07

    The transmembrane isoform of mucin 1 (MUC1/TM) is a well-recognized tumor antigen, contributing to tumorigenesis and immune evasion. Although MUC1/TM has been correlated with malignancy, we have previously reported on antitumor properties and prevention of tumor development by a secreted splice variant of MUC1 (MUC1/sec). Because myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play a critical role in tumor-induced immunosuppression, we investigated their recruitment by tumor cells expressing either MUC1/TM or MUC1/sec. DA-3 tumor cells expressing MUC1/sec recruit dramatically lower levels of MDSCs, relative to MUC1/TM-expressing DA-3 cells. Because MUC1/sec was previously shown to down-regulate tumor expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a protease linked to tumor aggressiveness and metastasis, the potential role of uPA in MDSC recruitment was investigated. Tumor-derived uPA is capable of recruiting MDSCs, and correlates with tumor development. In addition to diminishing recruitment of MDSCs, the effect of MUC1/sec on MDSC-suppressive mechanisms was investigated. MUC1/sec, or its unique immunoenhancing peptide, is capable of blocking expression of arginase 1 and production of reactive oxygen species in MDSCs, implicated in the suppression of T cells. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism of MDSC recruitment, and provide evidence that MUC1/sec has antitumor properties affecting MDSCs.

  5. Increased intestinal endotoxin absorption during enteric nematode but not protozoal infections through a mast cell-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Farid, Ayman Samir; Jimi, Fumiko; Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko; Horii, Yoichiro

    2008-06-01

    It is known that hypersensitivity reactions in the gastrointestinal tract, which are primarily mediated by mast cells, are associated with a secretory response of the epithelium and often increased permeability to macromolecules. Studies to date have not examined the effects of hyperpermeability on the absorption of toxic substances normally present in the intestinal lumen such as bacterial LPS. In the present study, we observed that Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice decreases the mRNA expression of intestinal epithelial cell junctional molecules (occludin and zonula occludens 1) and increases portal endotoxin levels 4 h after intragastric administration of LPS (20 mg/kg body weight). Furthermore, an increase in the flux of immunoglobulin G into the intestinal lumen was observed 10 days postinfection (PI). An increased rate of LPS absorption was also seen in mice infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis on day 14 PI and rats concurrently infected with S. venezuelensis and N. brasiliensis on day 20 PI. On the other hand, infection with Eimeria vermiformis and Eimeria pragensis was not observed to enhance LPS absorption 4 h after intragastric administration of LPS (20 mg/kg body weight), although E. vermiformis infection did inhibit the epithelial cell mRNA expression of zonula occludens 1, but not occludin, on day 9 PI, resulting in a reduced immunoglobulin G flux than that produced by S. venezuelensis infection. Our results suggest that mastocytosis accompanying intestinal nematode infection increases the intestinal absorption of LPS into the portal circulation by suppressing the expression of tight junction molecules.

  6. Mechanism of riboflavin uptake by cultured human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells: possible regulation by an intracellular Ca2+-calmodulin-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Said, Hamid M; Wang, Shuling; Ma, Thomas Y

    2005-07-15

    In mammalian cells (including those of the ocular system), the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) assumes an essential role in a variety of metabolic reactions and is critical for normal cellular functions, growth and development. Cells of the human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) play an important role in providing a sufficient supply of RF to the retina, but nothing is known about the mechanism of the vitamin uptake by these cells and its regulation. Our aim in the present study was to address this issue using the hRPE ARPE-19 cells as the retinal epithelial model. Our results show RF uptake in the hRPE to be: (1) energy and temperature dependent and occurring without metabolic alteration in the transported substrate, (2) pH but not Na+ dependent, (3) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 80 +/- 14 nM, (4) trans-stimulated by unlabelled RF and its structural analogue lumiflavine, (5) cis-inhibited by the RF structural analogues lumiflavine and lumichrome but not by unrelated compounds, and (6) inhibited by the anion transport inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (SITS) as well as by the Na+ -H+ exchange inhibitor amiloride and the sulfhydryl group inhibitor p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate (p-CMPS). Maintaining the hRPE cells in a RF-deficient medium led to a specific and significant up-regulation in RF uptake which was mediated via changes in the number and affinity of the RF uptake carriers. While modulating the activities of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)-, protein kinase C (PKC)-, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK)-, and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated pathways were found to have no role in regulating RF uptake, a role for the Ca2+ -calmodulin-mediated pathway was observed. These studies demonstrate for the first time the involvement of a specialized carrier-mediated mechanism for RF uptake by hRPE cells and show that the process is

  7. Stress-mediated progression of solid tumors: effect of mechanical stress on tissue oxygenation, cancer cell proliferation and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mpekris, Fotios; Angeli, Stelios; Pirentis, Athanassios P.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen supply plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation. While vascular density increases at the early stages of carcinogenesis, mechanical solid stresses developed during growth compress tumor blood vessels and, thus, drastically reduce the supply of oxygen, but also the delivery of drugs at inner tumor regions. Among other effects, hypoxia and reduced drug delivery compromise the efficacy of radiation and chemo/nano therapy, respectively. In the present study, we developed a mathematical model of tumor growth to investigate the interconnections among tumor oxygenation that supports cancer cell proliferation, the heterogeneous accumulation of mechanical stresses owing to tumor growth, the non-uniform compression of intratumoral blood vessels due to the mechanical stresses, and the insufficient delivery of oxygen and therapeutic agents because of vessel compression. We found that the high vascular density and increased cancer cell proliferation often observed in the periphery compared to the interior of a tumor can be attributed to heterogeneous solid stress accumulation. Highly vascularized peripheral regions are also associated with greater oxygenation compared with the compressed, less vascularized inner regions. We also modeled the delivery of drugs of two distinct sizes, namely chemotherapy and nanomedicine. Model predictions suggest that drug delivery is affected negatively by vessel compression independently of the size of the therapeutic agent. Finally, we demonstrated the applicability of our model to actual geometries, employing a breast tumor model derived from MR images. PMID:25968141

  8. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the ‘normal’ small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  9. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-12-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the 'normal' small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  10. Inter-tissue mechanical stress affects Frizzled-mediated planar cell polarity in the Drosophila notum epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Olguín, Patricio; Glavic, Alvaro; Mlodzik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Summary Frizzled/Planar Cell Polarity (Fz/PCP) signaling controls the orientation of sensory bristles and cellular hairs (trichomes) along the antero-posterior axis of the Drosophila thorax (notum) [1–4]. A subset of the trichome-producing notum cells differentiate as “tendon cells”, serving as attachment sites for the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) to the exoskeleton [5]. Through the analysis of chascon (chas), a gene identified by its ability to disrupt Fz/PCP signaling under overexpression conditions, and jitterbug (jbug)/filamin [6], we show that maintenance of antero-posterior planar polarization requires the notum epithelia to balance mechanical stress generated by the attachment of the IFMs. chas is expressed in notum tendon cells and its loss-of-function disturbs cellular orientation at and near the regions where IFMs attach to the epidermis. This effect is independent of the Fz/PCP and fat (ft)/dachsous (ds) systems [7]. The chas phenotype arises during normal shortening of the IFMs [8] and is suppressed by genetic ablation of the IFMs. chas acts through jbug/filamin and cooperates with MyosinII to modulate the mechano-response of notum tendon cells. These observations support the notion that the ability of epithelia to respond to mechanical stress generated by interaction(s) with other tissues during development/organogenesis influences the maintenance of its shape and PCP features. PMID:21276726

  11. A tale of two plaques: convergent mechanisms of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April W; Voyles, Stephanie V; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Fuller, Erin N; Rutledge, John C

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis and atherosclerosis are diseases in which effector T lymphocytes such as Helper T cells type 1 (Th1) and 17 (Th17) play integral roles in disease pathogenesis and progression. Regulatory T cells (Treg) also exert clinically important anti-inflammatory effects that are pathologically altered in psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We review the immunological pathways involving Th1, Th17 and Treg cells that are common to psoriasis and atherosclerosis. These shared pathways provide the basis for mechanisms that may explain the epidemiologic observation that patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of heart disease. Improved understanding of these pathways will guide future experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutics that prevent or treat cardiovascular complications in patients with psoriasis.

  12. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  13. The influence of ascorbic acid, TGF-beta1, and cell-mediated remodeling on the bulk mechanical properties of 3-D PEG-fibrinogen constructs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter D; Peyton, Shelly R; VanStrien, Amy J; Putnam, Andrew J

    2009-08-01

    Two-dimensional cell culture studies have shown that matrix rigidity can influence cell function, but little is known about how matrix physical properties, and their changes with time, influence cell function in 3-D. Biosynthetic hydrogels based on PEGylated fibrinogen permit the initial decoupling of matrix chemical and mechanical properties, and are thus potentially attractive for addressing this question. However, the mechanical stability of these gels due to passive hydrolysis and cell-mediated remodeling has not previously been addressed. Here, we show that the bulk mechanical properties of acellular PEG-fibrinogen hydrogels significantly decrease over time in PBS regardless of matrix cross-linking density in 7 days. To compensate, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were encapsulated and stimulated to produce their own matrix using ascorbic acid or TGF-beta1. Ascorbic acid treatment improved the mechanical properties of the constructs after 14 days in less cross-linked matrices, but TGF-beta1 did not. The increase in matrix modulus of the constructs was not due to an increase in type I collagen deposition, which remained low and pericellular regardless of cross-link density or the soluble factor applied. Instead, ascorbic acid, but not TGF-beta1, preferentially enhanced the contractile SMC phenotype in the less cross-linked gels. Inhibition of contractility reduced cell spreading and the expression of contractile markers, and eliminated any beneficial increase in matrix modulus induced by cell-generated contraction of the gels. Together, these data show that PEG-fibrinogen hydrogels are susceptible to both hydrolysis and proteolysis, and suggest that some soluble factors may stimulate matrix remodeling by modulating SMC phenotype instead of inducing ECM synthesis in a 3-D matrix.

  14. CD3ζ-based chimeric antigen receptors mediate T cell activation via cis- and trans-signalling mechanisms: implications for optimization of receptor structure for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, J S; Ladell, K; Sheard, V E; Miners, K; Hawkins, R E; Price, D A; Gilham, D E

    2014-02-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can mediate redirected lysis of tumour cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-independent manner, thereby enabling autologous adoptive T cell therapy for a variety of malignant neoplasms. Currently, most CARs incorporate the T cell receptor (TCR) CD3ζ signalling chain; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for CAR-mediated T cell activation are unclear. In this study, we used a series of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mutant and transmembrane-modified receptors to demonstrate that CARs activate T cells both directly via the antigen-ligated signalling chain and indirectly via associated chains within the TCR complex. These observations allowed us to generate new receptors capable of eliciting polyfunctional responses in primary human T cells. This work increases our understanding of CAR function and identifies new avenues for the optimization of CAR-based therapeutic interventions.

  15. IL-15 Mediates Mitochondrial Activity through a PPARδ-Dependent-PPARα-Independent Mechanism in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mediators of metabolic processes, to increase energy expenditure, have become a focus for therapies of obesity. The discovery of cytokines secreted from the skeletal muscle (SKM), termed “myokines,” has garnered attention due to their positive effects on metabolic processes. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a myokine that has numerous positive metabolic effects and is linked to the PPAR family of mitochondrial regulators. Here, we aimed to determine the importance of PPARα and/or PPARδ as targets of IL-15 signaling. C2C12 SKM cells were differentiated for 6 days and treated every other day with IL-15 (100 ng/mL), a PPARα inhibitor (GW-6471), a PPARδ inhibitor (GSK-3787), or both IL-15 and the inhibitors. IL-15 increased mitochondrial activity and induced PPARα, PPARδ, PGC1α, PGC1β, UCP2, and Nrf1 expression. There was no effect of inhibiting PPARα, in combination with IL-15, on the aforementioned mRNA levels except for PGC1β and Nrf1. However, with PPARδ inhibition, IL-15 failed to induce the expression levels of PGC1α, PGC1β, UCP2, and Nrf1. Further, inhibition of PPARδ abolished IL-15 induced increases in citrate synthase activity, ATP production, and overall mitochondrial activity. IL-15 had no effects on mitochondrial biogenesis. Our data indicates that PPARδ activity is required for the beneficial metabolic effects of IL-15 signaling in SKM. PMID:27738421

  16. VEGFR2-mediated vascular dilation as a mechanism of VEGF-induced anemia and bone marrow cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sharon; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Danfang; Chen, Fang; Hosaka, Kayoko; Feng, Ninghan; Seki, Takahiro; Andersson, Patrik; Li, Jingrong; Zang, Jingwu; Sun, Baocun; Cao, Yihai

    2014-10-23

    Molecular mechanisms underlying tumor VEGF-induced host anemia and bone marrow cell (BMC) mobilization remain unknown. Here, we report that tumor VEGF markedly induced sinusoidal vasculature dilation in bone marrow (BM) and BMC mobilization to tumors and peripheral tissues in mouse and human tumor models. Unexpectedly, anti-VEGFR2, but not anti-VEGFR1, treatment completely blocked VEGF-induced anemia and BMC mobilization. Genetic deletion of Vegfr2 in endothelial cells markedly ablated VEGF-stimulated BMC mobilization. Conversely, deletion of the tyrosine kinase domain from Vegfr1 gene (Vegfr1(TK-/-)) did not affect VEGF-induced BMC mobilization. Analysis of VEGFR1(+)/VEGFR2(+) populations in peripheral blood and BM showed no significant ratio difference between VEGF- and control tumor-bearing animals. These findings demonstrate that vascular dilation through the VEGFR2 signaling is the mechanism underlying VEGF-induced BM mobilization and anemia. Thus, our data provide mechanistic insights on VEGF-induced BMC mobilization in tumors and have therapeutic implications by targeting VEGFR2 for cancer therapy.

  17. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Øvrevik, Johan; Refsnes, Magne; Låg, Marit; Holme, Jørn A.; Schwarze, Per E.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events. PMID:26147224

  18. An Analysis of Pathological Activities of CCN Proteins in Joint Disorders: Mechanical Stretch-Mediated CCN2 Expression in Cultured Meniscus Cells.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    The multifunctional growth factor CYR61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) 2, also known as connective tissue growth factor, regulates cellular proliferation, differentiation, and tissue regeneration. Recent literatures have described important roles of CCN2 in the meniscus metabolism. However, the mechanical stress-mediated transcriptional regulation of CCN2 in the meniscus remains unclear. The meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous tissue that controls complex biomechanics of the knee joint. Therefore, the injured unstable meniscus has a poor healing potential especially in the avascular inner region. In addition, dysfunction of the meniscus correlates with the progression of degenerative knee joint disorders and joint space narrowing. Here, we describe an experimental approach that investigates the distinct cellular behavior of inner and outer meniscus cells in response to mechanical stretch. Our experimental model can analyze the relationships between stretch-induced CCN2 expression and its functional role in the meniscus homeostasis.

  19. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  20. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  1. Vascular Endothelial Cells Mediate Mechanical Stimulation-Induced Enhancement of Endothelin Hyperalgesia via Activation of P2X2/3 Receptors on Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Green, Paul G.; Bogen, Oliver; Alvarez, Pedro; Levine, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is unique amongst a broad range of hyperalgesic agents in that it induces hyperalgesia in rats that is markedly enhanced by repeated mechanical stimulation at the site of administration. Antagonists to the ET-1 receptors, ETA and ETB, attenuated both initial as well as stimulation-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia (SIEH) by endothelin. However, administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to attenuate ETA receptor expression on nociceptors attenuated ET-1 hyperalgesia, but had no effect on SIEH suggesting that this is mediated via a non-neuronal cell. Since vascular endothelial cells are both stretch-sensitive and express ETA and ETB receptors, we tested the hypothesis that SIEH is dependent on endothelial cells by impairing vascular endothelial function with octoxynol-9 administration; this procedure eliminated SIEH without attenuating ET-1 hyperalgesia. A role for protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), a second messenger implicated in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain, was explored. Intrathecal antisense for PKCε did not inhibit either ET-1 hyperalgesia or SIEH, suggesting no role for neuronal PKCε; however, administration of a PKCε inhibitor at the site of testing selectively attenuated SIEH. Compatible with endothelial cells releasing ATP in response to mechanical stimulation, P2X2/3 receptor antagonists eliminated SIEH. The endothelium also appears to contribute to hyperalgesia in two ergonomic pain models (eccentric exercise and hind limb vibration) and in model of endometriosis. We propose that SIEH is produced by an effect of ET-1 on vascular endothelial cells, sensitizing its release of ATP in response to mechanical stimulation; ATP in turn acts at the nociceptor P2X2/3 receptor. PMID:23407944

  2. Valproic Acid Upregulates NKG2D Ligand Expression through an ERK-dependent Mechanism and Potentially Enhances NK Cell-mediated Lysis of Myeloma1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaosong; Tao, Yi; Hou, Jun; Meng, Xiuqin; Shi, Jumei

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of the antitumor immune response through the engagement of NKG2D receptors with their ligands (L) on targets represents a promising therapeutic approach against cancer. In this study, we tested the effect of valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, on the expression of NKG2D ligands in myeloma cells. We demonstrated that VPA was able to upregulate both protein and mRNA expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain (MIC) A/B and UL16-binding protein (ULBP) 2 without any significant effect on the expression of ULBP1, ULBP3, and ULBP4 or induction of other natural killer (NK) cell ligands, such as NKp30-L, NKp44-L, and NKp46-L in myeloma cells. A 51Cr release assay and degranulation assay indicated that the induction of MICA/B and ULBP2 augmented NK cell-mediated lysis of myeloma cells, which was abolished by the addition of a blocking NKG2D antibody. Activation of constitutively phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by VPA is essential for the up-regulation of MICA/B and ULBP2 expressions. Inhibition of ERK using ERK inhibitor PD98059 decreased both MICA/B and ULBP2 expressions and NK cell cytotoxicity. Furthermore, overexpression of constitutively active ERK in ARK resulted in increased MICA/B and ULBP2 expressions and enhanced NK cell lysis. These data indicate that increased sensitivity of VPA-treated myeloma cells to NK cell lysis is caused by higher NKG2D ligand expression, resulting from more active ERK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence that targeting ERK signaling pathway may be an additional mechanism supporting the antimyeloma activity of HDAC inhibitors and suggest its possible immunotherapeutic value for myeloma treatment. PMID:23308050

  3. The Ang II-induced growth of vascular smooth muscle cells involves a phospholipase D-mediated signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Freeman, E J

    2000-02-15

    Angiotensin (Ang) II acts as a mitogen in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) via the activation of multiple signaling cascades, including phospholipase C, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. However, increasing evidence supports signal-activated phospholipases A(2) and D (PLD) as additional mechanisms. Stimulation of PLD results in phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, and PA has been linked to cell growth. However, the direct involvement of PA or its metabolite diacylglycerol (DAG) in Ang II-induced growth is unclear. PLD activity was measured in cultured rat VSMC prelabeled with [(3)H]oleic acid, while the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine was used to monitor growth. We have previously reported the Ang II-dependent, AT(1)-coupled stimulation of PLD and growth in VSMC. Here, we show that Ang II (100 nM) and exogenous PLD (0.1-100 units/mL; Streptomyces chromofuscus) stimulated thymidine incorporation (43-208% above control). PA (100 nM-1 microM) also increased thymidine incorporation to 135% of control. Propranolol (100 nM-10 microM), which inhibits PA phosphohydrolase, blocked the growth stimulated by Ang II, PLD, or PA by as much as 95%, an effect not shared by other beta-adrenergic antagonists. Propranolol also increased the production of PA in the presence of Ang II by 320% and reduced DAG and arachidonic acid (AA) accumulation. The DAG lipase inhibitor RHC-80267 (1-10 microM) increased Ang II-induced DAG production, while attenuating thymidine incorporation and release of AA. Thus, it appears that activation of PLD, formation of PA, conversion of PA to DAG, and metabolism of DAG comprise an important signaling cascade in Ang II-induced growth of VSMC.

  4. Oridonin, a novel lysine acetyltransferases inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells through p53- and caspase-3-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Diao, Hua; Li, Guangming; Xu, Ling; Wang, Ting; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wenying; Ma, Jia-Li; Yu, Heguo; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has been reported to involve in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases including cancer. In our screening study to identify natural compounds with lysine acetyltransferase inhibitor (KATi) activity, oridonin was found to possess acetyltransferase-inhibitory effects on multiple acetyltransferases including P300, GCN5, Tip60, and pCAF. In gastric cancer cells, oridonin treatment inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and down-regulated the expression of p53 downstream genes, whereas p53 inhibition by PFT-α reversed the antiproliferative effects of oridonin. Moreover, oridonin treatment induced cell apoptosis, increased the levels of activated caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in gastric cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Caspase-3 inhibition by Ac-DEVD-CHO reversed the proapoptosis effect of oridonin. In conclusion, our study identified oridonin as a novel KATi and demonstrated its tumor suppressive effects in gastric cancer cells at least partially through p53-and caspase-3-mediated mechanisms. PMID:26980707

  5. Hydroxyl radical mediates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and keratinocytes through Bcl-2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Nimmannit, Ubonthip; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Leonard, Stephen S; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Wang, Liying; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2011-08-01

    Induction of massive apoptosis of hair follicle cells by chemotherapy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), but the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not well understood. The present study investigated the apoptotic effect of cisplatin in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and HaCaT keratinocytes, and determined the identity and role of specific reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in the process. Treatment of the cells with cisplatin induced ROS generation and a parallel increase in caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of ROS generation by antioxidants inhibited the apoptotic effect of cisplatin, indicating the role of ROS in the process. Studies using specific ROS scavengers further showed that hydroxyl radical, but not hydrogen peroxide or superoxide anion, is the primary oxidative species responsible for the apoptotic effect of cisplatin. Electron spin resonance studies confirmed the formation of hydroxyl radicals induced by cisplatin. The mechanism by which hydroxyl radical mediates the apoptotic effect of cisplatin was shown to involve down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 through ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Bcl-2 was also shown to have a negative regulatory role on hydroxyl radical. Together, our results indicate an essential role of hydroxyl radical in cisplatin-induced cell death of hair follicle cells through Bcl-2 regulation. Since CIA is a major side effect of cisplatin and many other chemotherapeutic agents with no known effective treatments, the knowledge gained from this study could be useful in the design of preventive treatment strategies for CIA through localized therapy without compromising the chemotherapy efficacy.

  6. Cell mechanics: a dialogue.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiaxiang; Li, Yizeng; Vig, Dhruv K; Sun, Sean X

    2017-03-01

    Under the microscope, eukaryotic animal cells can adopt a variety of different shapes and sizes. These cells also move and deform, and the physical mechanisms driving these movements and shape changes are important in fundamental cell biology, tissue mechanics, as well as disease biology. This article reviews some of the basic mechanical concepts in cells, emphasizing continuum mechanics description of cytoskeletal networks and hydrodynamic flows across the cell membrane. We discuss how cells can generate movement and shape changes by controlling mass fluxes at the cell boundary. These mass fluxes can come from polymerization/depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton, as well as osmotic and hydraulic pressure-driven flow of water across the cell membrane. By combining hydraulic pressure control with force balance conditions at the cell surface, we discuss a quantitative mechanism of cell shape and volume control. The broad consequences of this model on cell mechanosensation and tissue mechanics are outlined.

  7. Cell mechanics: a dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiaxiang; Li, Yizeng; Vig, Dhruv K.; Sun, Sean X.

    2017-03-01

    Under the microscope, eukaryotic animal cells can adopt a variety of different shapes and sizes. These cells also move and deform, and the physical mechanisms driving these movements and shape changes are important in fundamental cell biology, tissue mechanics, as well as disease biology. This article reviews some of the basic mechanical concepts in cells, emphasizing continuum mechanics description of cytoskeletal networks and hydrodynamic flows across the cell membrane. We discuss how cells can generate movement and shape changes by controlling mass fluxes at the cell boundary. These mass fluxes can come from polymerization/depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton, as well as osmotic and hydraulic pressure-driven flow of water across the cell membrane. By combining hydraulic pressure control with force balance conditions at the cell surface, we discuss a quantitative mechanism of cell shape and volume control. The broad consequences of this model on cell mechanosensation and tissue mechanics are outlined.

  8. Magnesium modification of a calcium phosphate cement alters bone marrow stromal cell behavior via an integrin-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiaoyu; Lin, Dan; Shi, Hengsong; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Wei; Zhou, Huanjun; Guo, Han; Qian, Jiangchao; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-06-01

    The chemical composition, structure and surface characteristics of biomaterials/scaffold can affect the adsorption of proteins, and this in turn influences the subsequent cellular response and tissue regeneration. With magnesium/calcium phosphate cements (MCPC) as model, the effects of magnesium (Mg) on the initial adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the underlying mechanism were investigated. A series of MCPCs with different magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) content (0∼20%) in calcium phosphate cement (CPC) were synthesized. MCPCs with moderate proportion of MPC (5% and 10%, referred to as 5MCPC and 10MCPC) were found to effectively modulate the orientation of the adsorbed fibronectin (Fn) to exhibit enhanced receptor binding affinity, and to up-regulate integrin α5β1 expression of BMSCs, especially for 5MCPC. As a result, the attachment, morphology, focal adhesion formation, actin filaments assembly and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on 5MCPC were strongly enhanced. Further in vivo experiments confirmed that 5MCPC induced promoted osteogenesis in comparison to ot her CPC/MCPCs. Our results also suggested that the Mg on the underlying substrates but not the dissolved Mg ions was the main contributor to the above positive effects. Based on these results, it can be inferred that the specific interaction of Fn and integrin α5β1 had predominant effect on the MCPC-induced enhanced cellular response of BMSCs. These results provide a new strategy to regulate BMSCs adhesion and osteogenic differentiation by adjusting the Mg/Ca content and distribution in CPC, guiding the development of osteoinductive scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

  9. Polymeric mechanical amplifiers of immune cytokine-mediated apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Webster, Jamie; Chung, Amanda; Guimarães, Pedro P. G.; Khan, Omar F.; Langer, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Physical forces affect tumour growth, progression and metastasis. Here, we develop polymeric mechanical amplifiers that exploit in vitro and in vivo physical forces to increase immune cytokine-mediated tumour cell apoptosis. Mechanical amplifiers, consisting of biodegradable polymeric particles tethered to the tumour cell surface via polyethylene glycol linkers, increase the apoptotic effect of an immune cytokine on tumour cells under fluid shear exposure by as much as 50% compared with treatment under static conditions. We show that targeted polymeric particles delivered to tumour cells in vivo amplify the apoptotic effect of a subsequent treatment of immune cytokine, reduce circulating tumour cells in blood and overall tumour cell burden by over 90% and reduce solid tumour growth in combination with the antioxidant resveratrol. The work introduces a potentially new application for a broad range of micro- and nanoparticles to maximize receptor-mediated signalling and function in the presence of physical forces.

  10. Polymeric mechanical amplifiers of immune cytokine-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Webster, Jamie; Chung, Amanda; Guimarães, Pedro P. G.; Khan, Omar F.; Langer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Physical forces affect tumour growth, progression and metastasis. Here, we develop polymeric mechanical amplifiers that exploit in vitro and in vivo physical forces to increase immune cytokine-mediated tumour cell apoptosis. Mechanical amplifiers, consisting of biodegradable polymeric particles tethered to the tumour cell surface via polyethylene glycol linkers, increase the apoptotic effect of an immune cytokine on tumour cells under fluid shear exposure by as much as 50% compared with treatment under static conditions. We show that targeted polymeric particles delivered to tumour cells in vivo amplify the apoptotic effect of a subsequent treatment of immune cytokine, reduce circulating tumour cells in blood and overall tumour cell burden by over 90% and reduce solid tumour growth in combination with the antioxidant resveratrol. The work introduces a potentially new application for a broad range of micro- and nanoparticles to maximize receptor-mediated signalling and function in the presence of physical forces. PMID:28317839

  11. Mediation of cimetidine secretion by P-glycoprotein and a novel H(+)-coupled mechanism in cultured renal epithelial monolayers of LLC-PK1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, A. J.; Brown, C. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that the weak base, cimetidine, is actively secreted by the renal proximal tubule. In this study we have examined the transport of cimetidine by renal LLC-PK1 epithelial cell monolayers. 2. In LLC-PK1 cell monolayers the basal-to-apical flux of cimetidine was significantly greater than the apical-to basal flux, consistent with net secretion of cimetidine in a basal-to-apical direction. 3. Net secretion of cimetidine was significantly (70%) reduced by the addition of either 100 microM verapamil or 100 microM nifedipine to the apical membrane. The reduction in net secretion was the result of an inhibition of basal-to-apical flux; these agents had no effect upon flux in the apical-to-basal direction. These results suggest that cimetidine secretion is mediated primarily by P-glycoprotein located in the apical membrane. In addition we found no evidence of a role for organic cation antiport in the secretion of cimetidine. 4. In the presence of an inwardly directed proton gradient across the apical membrane (pH 6.0), cimetidine secretion was significantly reduced compared to that measured at an apical pH of 7.4. The reduction in net secretion at pH 6.0 was the result of a stimulation of cimetidine uptake across the apical membrane. This pH-dependent uptake mechanism was sensitive to inhibition by DIDS (100 microM). 5. Experiments with BCECF (2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein) loaded monolayers demonstrated that cimetidine influx across the apical membrane was associated with proton flow into the cell and was sensitive to inhibition by DIDS. 6. These results suggest that net secretion of cimetidine across the apical membrane is a function of the relative magnitudes of cimetidine secretion mediated by P-glycoprotein and cimetidine absorption mediated by a novel proton-coupled, DIDS-sensitive transport mechanism. PMID:8882608

  12. Neuroprotective Mechanisms Mediated by CDK5 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Gohar; Greig, Nigel H.; Anwar, Firoz; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Zamzami, Mazin A.; Al-Talhi, Hasan A.; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase belonging to the family of cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture, CDK5 plays an important role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, neurotransmitter release, neuron migration and neurite outgrowth. Although various reports have shown links between neurodegeneration and deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases, the specific role of CDK5 inhibition in causing neuroprotection in cases of neuronal insult or in neurodegenerative diseases is not well-understood. This article discusses current evidence for the involvement of CDK5 deregulation in neurodegenerative disorders and neurodegeneration associated with stroke through various mechanisms. These include upregulation of cyclin D1 and overactivation of CDK5 mediated neuronal cell death pathways, aberrant hyperphosphorylation of human tau proteins and/or neurofilament proteins, formation of neurofibrillary lesions, excitotoxicity, cytoskeletal disruption, motor neuron death (due to abnormally high levels of CDK5/p25) and colchicine-induced apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons. A better understanding of the role of CDK5 inhibition in neuroprotective mechanisms will help scientists and researchers to develop selective, safe and efficacious pharmacological inhibitors of CDK5 for therapeutic use against human neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neuronal loss associated with stroke. PMID:26601962

  13. CD95/CD95L-mediated apoptosis of the hepatic stellate cell. A mechanism terminating uncontrolled hepatic stellate cell proliferation during hepatic tissue repair.

    PubMed Central

    Saile, B.; Knittel, T.; Matthes, N.; Schott, P.; Ramadori, G.

    1997-01-01

    During liver tissue repair, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a pericyte-like mesenchymal liver cell population, transform from a "quiescent" status ("resting" HSC) into myofibroblast-like cells ("activated" HSC) with the latter representing the principle matrix synthesizing cell of the liver. Presently, the mechanisms that terminate HSC cell proliferation when tissue repair is concluded are poorly understood. Controlled cell death known as apoptosis could be a mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Therefore, apoptosis and its regulation were studied in HSC using an in vitro and in vivo approach. Spontaneous apoptosis became detectable in parallel with HSC activation because resting cells (2 days after isolation) displayed no sign of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was present in 8% (+/- 5%) of "transitional" cells (day 4) and in 18% (+/- 8%) of fully activated cells (day 7). Both CD95 (APO-1/Fas) and CD95L (APO-1-/Fas-ligand) became increasingly expressed during the course of activation. Apoptosis could be fully blocked by CD95-blocking antibodies in normal cells and HSC already entering the apoptotic cycle. Using CD95-activating antibodies, transition of more than 95% cells into apoptosis was evident at each activation step. The apoptosis-regulating proteins Bcl-2 and p53 could not be detected in resting cells but were found in increasing amounts at days 4 and 7 of cultivation. Whereas p53 expression was induced by the CD95-activating antibody, no change was inducible in Bcl-2 expression. The Bcl-2-related protein bax could be found at days 2 and 4 in similar expression, was considerably up-regulated at day 7, but was not regulated by CD95-agonistic antibodies. In vivo, acute tissue damage was first accompanied by activation and proliferation of HSC displaying no sign of apoptosis. In the recovery phase, apoptotic HSC were detectable in parallel to a reduction in the total number of HSC present in the liver tissue. The data demonstrate that apoptosis becomes detectable

  14. The apoptotic effect of nanosilver is mediated by a ROS- and JNK-dependent mechanism involving the mitochondrial pathway in NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chun-Feng; Huang, Shing; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2008-07-10

    Nanomaterials and nanoparticles have received considerable attention recently because of their unique properties and diverse biotechnology and life sciences applications. Nanosilver products, which have well-known antimicrobial properties, have been used extensively in a range of medical settings. Despite the widespread use of nanosilver products, relatively few studies have been undertaken to determine the biological effects of nanosilver exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of nanosilver and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of nanosilver. Here, we show that nanosilver is cytotoxic, inducing apoptosis in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells. Treatment with nanosilver induced the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and translocation of Bax to mitochondria, indicating that nanosilver-mediated apoptosis is mitochondria-dependent. Nanosilver-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and JNK activation, and inhibition of either ROS or JNK attenuated nanosilver-induced apoptosis. In nanosilver-resistant HCT116 cells, up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 appeared to be associated with a diminished apoptotic response. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a molecular mechanism of nanosilver cytotoxicity, showing that nanosilver acts through ROS and JNK to induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway.

  15. IL-4 inhibits TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibition of RANKL expression in TNF-α-activated stromal cells and direct inhibition of TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors via a T-cell-independent mechanism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshiya; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Hakami, Zaki Weli; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2012-10-01

    It has been reported that osteoclastogenesis is induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Interleukin (IL)-4 is the most important cytokine involved in humoral immunity. However, no studies have investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. TNF-α was administered with and without IL-4 into the supracalvariae of mice. The number of osteoclasts and the levels of mRNA for cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphate, both osteoclast markers, in mice administered TNF-α and IL-4 were lower than those in mice administered TNF-α alone. The level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase form 5b (TRACP5b) as a marker of bone resorption in mice administered both TNF-α and IL-4 was also lower. We showed that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in osteoclast precursors in vitro. Expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in TNF-α-activated stromal cells was also inhibited. Furthermore, we investigated whether IL-4 had effects on both stromal cells and osteoclast precursors in TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. Using mice whose stromal cells and osteoclast precursors were chimeric for the presence of TNF receptors, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells, and TNF-α-responsive osteoclast precursors in vivo. IL-4 also inhibited TNF-α-induced RANKL expression in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells in vivo. This event is dependent on p38 inhibition in vitro. Additionally, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in T cell-depleted mice. In summary, we conclude that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibiting expression of RANKL in TNF-α-activated stromal cells, and directly inhibited TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors in vivo via a T cell-independent mechanism.

  16. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  17. Humoral and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the production of pathology in avirulent Semliki Forest virus encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, M L

    1980-01-01

    Seven days after peripheral inoculation with an avirulent strain of Semliki Forest virus, the brains of CBA and nude mice exhibited a mononuclear inflammation and spongiform degeneration. Mice that had received cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg) 24 h after infection showed no pathology until day 11. However, immunofluorescence studies of the brains of immunosuppressed, infected mice demonstrated viral antigen within the soma and processes of neurons at earlier periods. The brain lesions could be reconstituted on day 7 in immunosuppressed, infected recipients with 6-day immune spleen cells. Immune spleen cells depleted of T lymphocytes, the non-immunoglobulin-bearing population deficient in B lymphocytes, or immune sera plus nonimmune bone marrow cells could also reconstitute the lesions. However, inflammation and spongiform changes were reduced when donor immune cells were depleted of either T or B lymphocytes. When both T and B lymphocytes were removed from the donor immune population, recipient brains did not show pathology. The results demonstrate that either antibody or immune T cells can trigger pathology, but there is also participation of nonimmune bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, probably of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6254882

  18. Prostate Cancer Cell Growth: Role of Neurotensin in Mediating Effect of Dietary Fat and Mechanism of Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    S6-kinase, and in 24 hrs by a stimulation of DNA synthesis . We found that NT and EGF stimulated 3H-AA release form PC3 cells and that lipoxygenase (LOX...inhibitors blocked basal and NT-induced DNA synthesis . This suggests that EGF and NT act by way of PLA2 f-Lox and 12-LOX. Cell growth responses...depend on the hormonal milieu. In the presence of a Gs stimulus, NT enhances cAMP production and his results in an inhibition of DNA synthesis . Thus, NT

  19. Estrogen Receptor α Mediates Proliferation of Osteoblastic Cells Stimulated by Estrogen and Mechanical Strain, but Their Acute Down-regulation of the Wnt Antagonist Sost Is Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β*

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Gabriel L.; Meakin, Lee B.; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Zebda, Noureddine; Sunters, Andrew; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Stein, Gary S.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lanyon, Lance E.; Price, Joanna S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical strain and estrogens both stimulate osteoblast proliferation through estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated effects, and both down-regulate the Wnt antagonist Sost/sclerostin. Here, we investigate the differential effects of ERα and -β in these processes in mouse long bone-derived osteoblastic cells and human Saos-2 cells. Recruitment to the cell cycle following strain or 17β-estradiol occurs within 30 min, as determined by Ki-67 staining, and is prevented by the ERα antagonist 1,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole dihydrochloride. ERβ inhibition with 4-[2-phenyl-5,7-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazolo[1,5-β]pyrimidin-3-yl] phenol (PTHPP) increases basal proliferation similarly to strain or estradiol. Both strain and estradiol down-regulate Sost expression, as does in vitro inhibition or in vivo deletion of ERα. The ERβ agonists 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile and ERB041 also down-regulated Sost expression in vitro, whereas the ERα agonist 4,4′,4″-[4-propyl-(1H)-pyrazol-1,3,5-triyl]tris-phenol or the ERβ antagonist PTHPP has no effect. Tamoxifen, a nongenomic ERβ agonist, down-regulates Sost expression in vitro and in bones in vivo. Inhibition of both ERs with fulvestrant or selective antagonism of ERβ, but not ERα, prevents Sost down-regulation by strain or estradiol. Sost down-regulation by strain or ERβ activation is prevented by MEK/ERK blockade. Exogenous sclerostin has no effect on estradiol-induced proliferation but prevents that following strain. Thus, in osteoblastic cells the acute proliferative effects of both estradiol and strain are ERα-mediated. Basal Sost down-regulation follows decreased activity of ERα and increased activity of ERβ. Sost down-regulation by strain or increased estrogens is mediated by ERβ, not ERα. ER-targeting therapy may facilitate structurally appropriate bone formation by enhancing the distinct ligand-independent, strain-related contributions to proliferation

  20. Heterogeneous populations of cells mediate spontaneous synchronous bursting in the developing hippocampus through a frequency-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Menendez de la Prida, L; Sanchez-Andres, J V

    2000-01-01

    Under normal conditions, hippocampal slices from newborn rats and rabbits (postnatal days 0-8) show spontaneous synchronous bursts known as giant depolarizing potentials. These bursts are recorded from CA3, CA1 and the fascia dentata in both intact slices and isolated hipocampal regions. Giant depolarizing potentials are network-driven events resulting from the synergistic activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxadepropionate and GABA(A) receptors, the latter playing an excitatory role. Recently, we showed that they spontaneously emerge in an all-or-none manner after the increase of synaptic and cellular activity beyond a threshold frequency [Menendez de la Prida L. and Sanchez-Andres J. V. (1999) J. Neurophysiol. 82, 202-208]. Under this framework, background levels of spontaneous activity at individual neurons build up network synchronization 100-300ms prior to the onset of giant depolarizing potentials. However, the role of distinct cellular populations and connectivity in determining the threshold frequency has not been examined. By performing simultaneous intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells, non-pyramidal cells and interneurons, we investigated their participation in the generation of giant depolarizing potentials. Electrodes containing Neurobiotin were used to examine the cellular morphology. We found that giant depolarizing potentials were not initiated from a single pacemaker cellular group; instead, they involved recurrent cooperation among these groups, which contributed differently according to their intrinsic firing capability. In all the neurons examined, the onset of these bursts took place in an all-or-none frequency-dependent manner, both spontaneously (depending on the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials) or when triggered by extracellular stimulation. The CA3 threshold of frequency was at 12Hz in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, while in the fascia dentata it was 17Hz. The

  1. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  2. Potent Elastase Inhibitors from Cyanobacteria: Structural Basis and Mechanisms Mediating Cytoprotective and Anti-inflammatory Effects in Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Lilibeth A.; Taori, Kanchan; Biggs, Jason S.; Jakoncic, Jean; Ostrov, David A.; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    We discovered new structural diversity to a prevalent, yet medicinally underappreciated, cyanobacterial protease inhibitor scaffold and undertook comprehensive protease profiling to reveal potent and selective elastase inhibition. SAR and X-ray cocrystal structure analysis allowed a detailed assessment of critical and tunable structural elements. To realize the therapeutic potential of these cyclodepsipeptides, we probed the cellular effects of a novel and representative family member, symplostatin 5 (1), which attenuated the downstream cellular effects of elastase in an epithelial lung airway model system, alleviating clinical hallmarks of chronic pulmonary diseases such as cell death, cell detachment and inflammation. This compound attenuated the effects of elastase on receptor activation, proteolytic processing of the adhesion protein ICAM-1, NF-κB activation and transcriptomic changes, including the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1A, IL1B and IL8. Compound 1 exhibited activity comparable to the clinically-approved elastase inhibitor sivelestat in short-term assays and demonstrated superior sustained activity in longer-term assays. PMID:23350733

  3. Novel CAR-mediated mechanism for synergistic activation of two distinct elements within the human cytochrome P450 2B6 gene in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Swales, Karen; Kakizaki, Satoru; Yamamoto, Yukio; Inoue, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Negishi, Masahiko

    2005-02-04

    The constitutive active receptor (CAR) regulates the induction of the cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) gene by phenobarbital-type inducers, such as 1,4 bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) via the distal phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM, at -1732/-1685 bp). Activation of the PBREM by TCPOBOP generated a 10-fold induction of CYP2B6 mRNA in HepG2 cells stably expressing mouse CAR (Ym17). Co-treatment with the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA) synergistically increased this induction over 100-fold without directly activating CAR or the PBREM. Although OA synergy required the presence of PBREM, deletion assays delineated the OA-responsive activity to a proximal 24-bp (-256/-233) sequence (OARE) in the CYP2B6 promoter. CAR did not directly bind to the OARE in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. However, both DNA affinity and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed a significant increase in CAR association with the OARE after co-treatment with TCPOBOP and OA, indicating the indirect binding of CAR to the OARE. The two cis-acting elements, the distal PBREM and the proximal OARE, within the chromatin structure are both regulated by CAR in response to TCPOBOP and OA, respectively, to maximally induce the CYP2B6 promoter. This functional interaction between the two sites expands the current understanding of the mechanism of CAR-mediated inducible transcription.

  4. MicroRNA-mediated somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-02-01

    Since the first report of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), much focus has been placed on iPSCs due to their great therapeutic potential for diseases such as abnormal development, degenerative disorders, and even cancers. Subsequently, Takahashi and Yamanaka took a novel approach by using four defined transcription factors to generate iPSCs in mice and human fibroblast cells. Scientists have since been trying to refine or develop better approaches to reprogramming, either by using different combinations of transcription factors or delivery methods. However, recent reports showed that the microRNA expression pattern plays a crucial role in somatic cell reprogramming and ectopic introduction of embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs revert cells back to an ESC-like state, although, the exact mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. This review describes recent work that has focused on microRNA-mediated approaches to somatic cell reprogramming as well as some of the pros and cons to these approaches and a possible mechanism of action. Based on the pivotal role of microRNAs in embryogenesis and somatic cell reprogramming, studies in this area must continue in order to gain a better understanding of the role of microRNAs in stem cells regulation and activity.

  5. Mechanical plasticity of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Navid; Gerum, Richard; Kuhn, Michael; Spörrer, Marina; Lippert, Anna; Schneider, Werner; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Under mechanical loading, most living cells show a viscoelastic deformation that follows a power law in time. After removal of the mechanical load, the cell shape recovers only incompletely to its original undeformed configuration. Here, we show that incomplete shape recovery is due to an additive plastic deformation that displays the same power-law dynamics as the fully reversible viscoelastic deformation response. Moreover, the plastic deformation is a constant fraction of the total cell deformation and originates from bond ruptures within the cytoskeleton. A simple extension of the prevailing viscoelastic power-law response theory with a plastic element correctly predicts the cell behaviour under cyclic loading. Our findings show that plastic energy dissipation during cell deformation is tightly linked to elastic cytoskeletal stresses, which suggests the existence of an adaptive mechanism that protects the cell against mechanical damage.

  6. Chronic infection by Leishmania amazonensis mediated through MAPK ERK mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pedro A; Petersen, Christine A

    2014-08-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is an intracellular protozoan parasite responsible for chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). CL is a neglected tropical disease responsible for infecting millions of people worldwide. L. amazonensis promotes alteration of various signaling pathways that are essential for host cell survival. Specifically, through parasite-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), L. amazonensis inhibits cell-mediated parasite killing and promotes its own survival by co-opting multiple host cell functions. In this review, we highlight Leishmania-host cell signaling alterations focusing on those specific to (1) motor proteins, (2) prevention of NADPH subunit phosphorylation impairing reactive oxygen species production, and (3) localized endosomal signaling to up-regulate ERK phosphorylation. This review will focus upon mechanisms and possible explanations as to how Leishmania spp. evades the various layers of defense employed by the host immune response.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency impairs muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone regeneration via cellular autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Lu, Aiping; Kozemchak, Adam; Tang, Ying; Poddar, Minakshi; Sun, Xuying; Cummins, James H; Huard, Johnny

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression by donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC)-mediated bone regeneration utilizing a critical size calvarial defect model. We found that BMP4/green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transduced MDSCs formed significantly less bone in COX-2 knock-out (Cox-2KO) than in COX-2 wild-type (WT) mice. BMP4/GFP-transduced Cox-2KO MDSCs also formed significantly less bone than transduced WT MDSCs when transplanted into calvarial defects created in CD-1 nude mice. The impaired bone regeneration in the Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP group is associated with downregulation of BMP4-pSMAD1/5 signaling, decreased osteogenic differentiation and lowered proliferation capacity after transplantation, compared with WT MDSCBMP4/GFP cells. The Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP group demonstrated a reduction in cell survival and direct osteogenic differentiation in vitro These effects were mediated in part by the downregulation of Igf1 and Igf2. In addition, the Cox-2KO MDSCBMP4/GFP cells recruited fewer macrophages than the WT MDSC/BMP4/GFP cells in the early phase after injury. We concluded that the bone regeneration capacity of Cox-2KO MDSCs was impaired because of a reduction in cell proliferation and survival capacities, reduction in osteogenic differentiation and a decrease in the ability of the cells to recruit host cells to the injury site.

  8. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  9. A dual-mediated liposomal drug delivery system targeting the brain: rational construction, integrity evaluation across the blood–brain barrier, and the transporting mechanism to glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiao-Na; Wang, Gui-Ling; Hei, Yu; Meng, Shuai; Yang, Ling-Fei; Yuan, Lan; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    As the global population ages, cancer rates increase worldwide, and degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), brain tumors, and inflammation threaten human health more frequently. We designed a dual-mediated (receptor-mediated and adsorption-mediated) liposome, named transferrin–cell penetrating peptide–sterically stabilized liposome (TF-CPP-SSL), to improve therapy for gliomas through combining molecular recognition of transferrin receptors (TF-Rs) on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells with the internalization and lysosomal escaping ability of CPP. Based on the systematic investigation of structure–activity relations on the cellular level, we constructed TF-CPP-SSL rationally by conjugating TF and CPP moieties to the liposomes via PEG3.4K and PEG2.0K, respectively, and found the optimum densities of TF and CPP were 1.8% and 4%, respectively. These liposomes had the highest targeting efficacy for brain microvascular endothelial cell and C6 cell uptake but avoided capture by normal cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology and coculture models of BBB and glioma C6 cells indicated that TF-CPP-SSL was transported across the BBB without drug leakage, liposome breakup, or cleavage of ligand. TF-CPP-SSL offered advantages for crossing the BBB and entering into glioma C6 cells. Real-time confocal viewing revealed that TF-CPP-SSL was entrapped in endosomes of glioma C6 cells and then escaped from lysosomes successfully to release the liposomal contents into the cytosol. Entrapped contents, such as doxorubicin, could then enter the nucleus to exert pharmacological effects.

  10. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  11. Mechanisms of PDL1-mediated regulation of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Indira; Gubbels Bupp, Melanie; Dada, Shirine; Fife, Brian; Tang, Qizhi; Ansari, Mohammed Javeed; Trikudanathan, Subbulaxmi; Vadivel, Nidyanandh; Fiorina, Paolo; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Atkinson, Mark; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2007-10-01

    The PD-1-PDL1 pathway plays a critical role in regulating autoimmune diabetes as blockade or deficiency of PD-1 or PDL1 results in accelerated disease in NOD mice. We explored the cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of these autoimmune responses by investigations involving various gene-deficient mice on the NOD background. Administration of blocking anti-PDL1 antibody to CD4+ T cell-deficient, CD8+ T cell-deficient and B cell-deficient mice demonstrated that PDL1-mediated regulation of autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is critical for diabetes development. This concept was confirmed by adoptive transfer studies utilizing lymphocytes from BDC2.5 and 4.1 (CD4+) TCR transgenic mice and 8.3 (CD8+) TCR transgenic mice; efforts showing increased proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following PDL1 blockade in vivo. Furthermore, we observed that anti-PDL1-mediated acceleration is dependent upon events occurring in the pancreatic lymph nodes during early disease stages, but becomes independent of the pancreatic lymph nodes during later disease stages. These data provide strong evidence that PDL1 regulates autoimmune diabetes by limiting the expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ autoreactive T cells, and define the timing and locale of PDL1-mediated regulation of type 1 diabetes.

  12. Photodynamic Action Mechanism Mediated by Zinc(II) 2,9,16,23-Tetrakis[4-(N-methylpyridyloxy)]phthalocyanine in Candida albicans Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, María Albana; Alvarez, María Gabriela; Durantini, Edgardo N

    2015-01-01

    The photoreaction type I/type II pathways mediated by zinc(II) 2,9,16,23-tetrakis[4-(N-methylpyridyloxy)]phthalocyanine (ZnPPc(4+) ) was studied in Candida albicans cells. This photosensitizer was strongly bound to C. albicans cells at short times. After 30 min irradiation, 5 μM ZnPPc(4+) produced ~5 log decrease in cell viability. Different probes were used to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell suspensions (~10(6) CFU mL(-1) ). Singlet molecular oxygen, O2 ((1) Δg ), was observed by the reaction with 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA) and tetrasodium 2,2-(anthracene-9,10-diyl)bis(methylmalonate) (ABMM), whereas the nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) method was used to sense superoxide anion radical (O2·-). Moreover, the effects produced by an anoxic atmosphere and cell suspensions in D2 O, as well as the addition of sodium azide and mannitol as ROS trapping were evaluated in the PDI of C. albicans. These investigation indicates that O2 ((1) Δg ) is generated in the cells, although a minor extension other radical species can also be involved in the PDI of C. albicans mediated by ZnPPc(4+) .

  13. An antioxidant agent prevents NO sub 2 -induced inhibition of mast cell mediator release: Evidence that the mechanism involves free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu; Shiraishi, Fujio; Wakamori, Kazuo Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo )

    1990-12-01

    Previously we established that in vitro NO{sub 2} exposure induced inhibition of histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (PMC) stimulated with secretagogues such as compound 48/80 or substance P. To further explore the effects of NO{sub 2} exposure on mast cells, we investigated whether the addition of an antioxidant agent, 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), can prevent NO{sub 2}-induced inhibition of mediator release from PMC. Histamine release from 5 ppm NO{sub 2}-exposed PMC stimulated with 20 {mu}M substance P was also significantly inhibited compared with that from the controls. {beta}-Hexosaminidase release from 5 ppm NO{sub 2}-exposed PMC stimulated with 20 {mu}M substance P was also significantly inhibited. However, the inhibition of both histamine and {beta}-hexosaminidase release from exposed PMC was diminished by the addition of 5 mM 2-ME during NO{sub 2} exposure. Although IgE-mediated histamine release from NO{sub 2} exposed PMC was markedly inhibited, the addition of 5 mM 2-ME during NO{sub 2} exposure induced no inhibition of histamine release. These results suggest a possible relationship between NO{sub 2}-induced inhibition of mast cell mediator release and production of free radicals by the action of NO{sub 2}.

  14. [Tc1-mediated contact sensitivity reaction, its mechanism and regulation].

    PubMed

    Zemelka-Wiącek, Magdalena; Szczepanik, Marian

    2014-07-04

    The contact hypersensitivity reaction (CHS) to haptens is a classic example of cell-mediated immune response. In the effector phase, two stages can be distinguished: an early component, that appears only 2 hours after subsequent contact with the hapten, and the late component that develops approximately 24 hours later which is mediated by TCRαβ+ cells. The effector lymphocytes may be CD4+ T helper 1 (Th1) cells or CD8+ T cytotoxic 1 (Tc1) cells, which depends on the employed hapten and/or mice strain. NKT lymphocytes play the crucial role in the CHS initiation, by supporting B1 cells in the antigen-specific IgM antibodies production. The development of an early component is essential for the recruitment of T effector (Teff) cells to the side of hapten deposition and for the complete expansion of inflammatory reaction. The CHS reaction is under T regulatory (Treg) cells control, both in the induction phase as well as in the effector phase. A new view of a negative regulation of the Tc1 mediated CHS response is based on the suppression induced by epicutaneous (EC) application of protein antigen. The DNP-BSA skin application, on a gauze patch, leads to a state of immunosuppression. This maneuver results in rising the population of Treg cells with TCRαβ+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ phenotype. The mechanism of suppression requires direct contact between Treg cells and Teff cells and the participation of CTLA-4 molecule is also necessary. The described method of evoking immune tolerance via EC immunization may contribute to elaborate a new method of allergic contact dermatitis therapy. This is because of its effectiveness, ease of induction and non-invasive protein antigen application.

  15. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBC) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis following transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor/recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Study design and results Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; IgM and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes/macrophages, other immune cells and complement; monocyte monolayer assay (MMA); antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC); and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Conclusion Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B antibodies in the IVIG products. PMID:26174897

  16. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  17. Alpha B-crystallin induction in skeletal muscle cells under redox imbalance is mediated by a JNK-dependent regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fittipaldi, Simona; Mercatelli, Neri; Dimauro, Ivan; Jackson, Malcolm J; Paronetto, Maria Paola; Caporossi, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    The small heat shock protein α-B-crystallin (CRYAB) is critically involved in stress-related cellular processes such as differentiation, apoptosis, and redox homeostasis. The up-regulation of CRYAB plays a key role in the cytoprotective and antioxidant response, but the molecular pathway driving its expression in muscle cells during oxidative stress still remains unknown. Here we show that noncytotoxic exposure to sodium meta-arsenite (NaAsO2) inducing redox imbalance is able to increase the CRYAB content of C2C12 myoblasts in a transcription-dependent manner. Our in silico analysis revealed a genomic region upstream of the Cryab promoter containing two putative antioxidant-responsive elements motifs and one AP-1-like binding site. The redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and the AP-1 component c-Jun were found to be up-regulated in NaAsO2-treated cells, and we demonstrated a specific NaAsO2-mediated increase of c-Jun and Nrf2 binding activity to the genomic region identified, supporting their putative involvement in CRYAB regulation following a shift in redox balance. These changes also correlated with a specific phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK kinases, the well-known molecular mediators of signaling pathways leading to the activation of these transcription factors. Pretreatment of C2C12 cells with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 induced a decrease in c-Jun and Nrf2 content and was able to counteract the NaAsO2-mediated increase in CRYAB expression. Thus these data show a direct role of JNK in CRYAB regulation under redox imbalance and also point to a previously unrecognized link between c-Jun and Nrf2 transcription factors and redox-induced CRYAB expression in muscle cells.

  18. Force nanoscopy of cell mechanics and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-05-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to mechanical stimuli in their environment and have several evolved mechanisms to sense and respond to these cues. It is becoming increasingly recognized that many cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, possess a diverse set of proteins to translate mechanical cues into biochemical signalling and to mediate cell surface interactions such as cell adhesion. Moreover, the mechanical properties of cells are involved in regulating cell function as well as serving as indicators of disease states. Importantly, the recent development of biophysical tools and nanoscale methods has facilitated a deeper understanding of the role that physical forces play in modulating cell mechanics and cell adhesion. Here, we discuss how atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been used to investigate cell mechanics and cell adhesion at the single-cell and single-molecule levels. This knowledge is critical to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, and mechanoresponse in living cells. While pushing living cells with the AFM tip provides a means to quantify their mechanical properties and examine their response to nanoscale forces, pulling single surface proteins with a functionalized tip allows one to understand their role in sensing and adhesion. The combination of these nanoscale techniques with modern molecular biology approaches, genetic engineering and optical microscopies provides a powerful platform for understanding the sophisticated functions of the cell surface machinery, and its role in the onset and progression of complex diseases.

  19. PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 pathway mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress response is involved in osteodifferentiation of human periodontal ligament cells under cyclic mechanical force.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang-Yan; Wei, Fu-Lan; Hu, Li-Hua; Wang, Chun-Ling

    2016-08-01

    To prevent excess accumulation of unfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), eukaryotic cells have signaling pathways from the ER to the cytosol or nucleus. These processes are known as the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) response. Protein kinase R like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the ERS response and it directly phosphorylate α-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), resulting in translational attenuation. Phosphorylated eIF2α specifically promoted the translation of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). ATF4 is a known important transcription factor which plays a pivotal role in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Furthermore, ATF4 is a downstream target of PERK. Studies have shown that PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 signal pathway mediated by ERS was involved in osteoblastic differentiation of osteoblasts. We have known that orthodontic tooth movement is a process of periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) osteodifferentiation and alveolar bone remodeling under mechanical force. However, the involvement of PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 signal pathway mediated by ERS in osteogenic differentiation of PDLCs under mechanical force has not been unclear. In our study, we applied the cyclic mechanical force at 10% elongation with 0.5Hz to mimic occlusal force, and explored whether PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 signaling pathway mediated by ERS involved in osteogenic differentiation of PDLCs under mechanical force. Firstly, cyclic mechanical force will induce ERS and intensify several osteoblast marker genes (ATF4, OCN, and BSP). Next, we found that PERK overexpression increased eIF2α phosphorylation and expression of ATF4, furthermore induced BSP, OCN expression, thus it will promote osteodifferentiation of hPDLCs; mechanical force could promote this effect. However, PERK(-/-) cells showed the opposite changes, which will inhibit osteodifferentiation of hPDLCs. Taken together, our study proved that PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 signaling pathway

  20. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  1. Psychological stress impairs the local CD8+ T cell response to mucosal HSV-1 infection and allows for increased pathogenicity via a glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ashcraft, Kathleen A; Hunzeker, John; Bonneau, Robert H

    2008-08-01

    Psychological stress and its associated increases in corticosterone are generally immunosuppressive and contribute to increased herpes simplex virus (HSV)-associated pathogenicity. However, the impact of stress on local control of the initial mucosal-based HSV infection has not been elucidated, nor have the ramifications of such failures of the immune response in terms of viral spread. To address these gaps in knowledge, the studies described herein sought to determine how psychological stress and associated increases in corticosterone may increase susceptibility to HSV encephalitis by allowing for increased viral titers at the site of initial infection. We have shown that in mice intranasally infected with HSV-1, a cell-mediated immune response occurs in the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN), and superficial cervical lymph nodes (CLN). However, psychological stress induced by restraint decreased the number of lymphocytes in these tissues in HSV-infected mice. Surprisingly, the effects of this restraint stress on HSV-specific CTL function varied by immune tissue. Increased viral titers were found in the nasal cavity of stressed mice, an observation which correlated with an increased CD8+ cell response in the CLN. These findings led us to extend our studies to also determine the ramifications of decreased numbers of locally derived lymphocytes on viral titers following infection. Using an approach in which the NALT was surgically removed prior to infection, we confirmed that decreased numbers of NALT-derived lymphocytes at the time of infection allows for increased viral replication. We conclude that the increased viral titers observed in mice experiencing psychological stress are the consequence of a glucocorticoid-mediated reduction in the numbers of lymphocytes responsible for resolving the initial infection.

  2. Altered iron homeostasis involvement in arsenite-mediated cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Eckard, Jonathan; Chen, Haobin; Costa, Max; Frenkel, Krystyna; Huang, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposure to low doses of arsenite causes transformation of human osteogenic sarcoma (HOS) cells. Although oxidative stress is considered important in arsenite-induced cell transformation, the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which arsenite transforms human cells are still unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether altered iron homeostasis, known to affect cellular oxidative stress, can contribute to the arsenite-mediated cell transformation. Using arsenite-induced HOS cell transformation as a model, it was found that total iron levels are significantly higher in transformed HOS cells in comparison to parental control HOS cells. Under normal iron metabolism conditions, iron homeostasis is tightly controlled by inverse regulation of ferritin and transferrin receptor (TfR) through iron regulatory proteins (IRP). Increased iron levels in arsenite transformed cells should theoretically lead to higher ferritin and lower TfR in these cells than in controls. However, the results showed that both ferritin and TfR are decreased, apparently through two different mechanisms. A lower ferritin level in cytoplasm was due to the decreased mRNA in the arsenite-transformed HOS cells, while the decline in TfR was due to a lowered IRP-binding activity. By challenging cells with iron, it was further established that arsenite-transformed HOS cells are less responsive to iron treatment than control HOS cells, which allows accumulation of iron in the transformed cells, as exemplified by significantly lower ferritin induction. On the other hand, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an antioxidant previously shown to suppress As-mediated cell transformation, prevents As-mediated ferritin depletion. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered iron homeostasis contributes to arsenite-induced oxidative stress and, thus, may be involved in arsenite-mediated cell transformation. PMID:16443159

  3. Cu(II)-coumestrol interaction leads to ROS-mediated DNA damage and cell death: a putative mechanism for anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Atif; Singh, Swarnendra; Naseem, Imrana

    2016-07-01

    Phytoestrogens have attracted considerable interest as natural alternatives to hormone replacement therapy and their potential as cancer therapeutic agents. Among phytoestrogens, coumestrol has shown multipharmacological properties such as antiinflammatory, neuroprotective, osteoblastic differentiation and anticancer. Though several studies have described anticancer effects of coumestrol, a clear underlying molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Unlike normal cells, cancer cells contain elevated copper levels that play an integral role in angiogenesis. Copper is an important metal ion associated with the chromatin DNA, particularly with guanine. Thus, targeting copper in cancer cells can serve as effective anticancer strategy. Using human peripheral lymphocytes, we assessed lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis by coumestrol in the presence of exogenously added Cu(II) in cells to simulate malignancy-like condition. Results showed that Cu(II)-coumestrol interaction leads to lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation (markers of oxidative stress), DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in treated lymphocytes. Further, incubation of lymphocytes with ROS scavengers and membrane-permeant copper chelator, neocuproine, resulted in inhibition of DNA damage and apoptosis. This suggests that coumestrol engages in redox cycling of Cu(II) to generate ROS that leads to DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that coumestrol targets cellular copper to induce prooxidant death in malignant cells. We believe that such a prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity of coumestrol. These findings will provide significant insights into the development of new chemical molecules with better copper-chelating and prooxidant properties against cancer cells.

  4. hCG-induced Sprouty2 mediates amphiregulin-stimulated COX-2/PGE2 up-regulation in human granulosa cells: a potential mechanism for the OHSS

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Fang, Lanlan; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Sun, Ying-Pu; Leung, Peter C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Sprouty2 (SPRY2) is an important intracellular regulator for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated ERK1/2 signaling. In human granulosa cells, although SPRY2 is expressed, its regulation and function remains complete unknown and must be defined. Our previous study has shown that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)/luteinizing hormone (LH) up-regulates the expression levels of EGF-like growth factor, amphiregulin (AREG), which subsequently contributes to the hCG/LH-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hCG on SPRY2 expression and the role of hCG-induced SPRY2 in AREG-stimulated COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in human granulosa cells. Our results demonstrated that the expression of SPRY2 was up-regulated by hCG treatment. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA knockdown, we showed that activation of ERK1/2 signaling was required for hCG-induced up-regulation of SPRY2 expression. Further, SPRY2 knockdown attenuated the AREG-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production by inhibiting AREG-activated ERK1/2 signaling. Interestingly, we showed that SPRY2 expression levels were significantly increased in granulosa cells of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) patients. These results for the first time elucidate the physiological roles of SPRY2 in human granulosa cells and suggest that aberrant expression of SPRY2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of OHSS. PMID:27539669

  5. Mechanical Properties of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Robert; Becerril, Joseph; Jeevarajan, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Many physiologic and pathologic processes alter the biomechanical properties of the tissue they affect, and these changes may be manifest at the single cell level. The normal and abnormal mechanical properties of a given cell type can be established with the aid of an atomic force microscope (AFM), nonetheless, consistency in the area of the tip has been a mayor limitation of using the AFM for quantitative measurements of mechanical properties. This project attempts to overcome this limitation by using materials with a known elastic modulus, which resembles the one of the cell, to create force-deformation curves to calculate the area of indentation by means of Hooke s Law (sigma = E(epsilon)), which states that stress (sigma) is proportional to the strain (epsilon) where the constant of proportionality, E, is called the Young s modulus, also referred as the elastic modulus. Hook s Law can be rearranged to find the area of indentation (Area= Force/ E(epsilon)), where the indentation force is defined by the means of the added mass spring calibration method.

  6. Adipokines and the cardiovascular system: mechanisms mediating health and disease.

    PubMed

    Northcott, Josette M; Yeganeh, Azadeh; Taylor, Carla G; Zahradka, Peter; Wigle, Jeffrey T

    2012-08-01

    This review focuses on the role of adipokines in the maintenance of a healthy cardiovascular system, and the mechanisms by which these factors mediate the development of cardiovascular disease in obesity. Adipocytes are the major cell type comprising the adipose tissue. These cells secrete numerous factors, termed adipokines, into the blood, including adiponectin, leptin, resistin, chemerin, omentin, vaspin, and visfatin. Adipose tissue is a highly vascularised endocrine organ, and different adipose depots have distinct adipokine secretion profiles, which are altered with obesity. The ability of many adipokines to stimulate angiogenesis is crucial for adipose tissue expansion; however, excessive blood vessel growth is deleterious. As well, some adipokines induce inflammation, which promotes cardiovascular disease progression. We discuss how these 7 aforementioned adipokines act upon the various cardiovascular cell types (endothelial progenitor cells, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, cardiomyocytes, and cardiac fibroblasts), the direct effects of these actions, and their overall impact on the cardiovascular system. These were chosen, as these adipokines are secreted predominantly from adipocytes and have known effects on cardiovascular cells.

  7. Mechanism of protection from graft-vs-host disease in murine mixed allogeneic chimeras. I. Development of a null cell population suppressive of cell-mediated lympholysis responses and derived from the syngeneic bone marrow component

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Eisenthal, A.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-05-01

    Splenocyte populations from whole body-irradiated recipients of mixed T cell-depleted (TCD) syngeneic and allogeneic (complete H-2 disparity) bone marrow, or of TCD syngeneic marrow alone, contain cells with the ability to suppress the generation of cell-mediated lympholysis responses in vitro. This activity, which is present by 8 days after bone marrow transplantation and persists for several weeks, has been analyzed for possible veto-like or other specificity. Although reproducible patterns of suppression were observed, depending both on host strain and on the genetic combination of the response examined, the overall suppression in vitro most closely resembles that which has been ascribed to natural suppressor cells in other systems. The suppression appears to be mediated by a non-T cell, non-B cell, nonadherent, asialo GM1-negative population. Cold target inhibition and CTL activity of chimeric cells have been ruled out as factors contributing to the observed suppression. Significantly, in mixed chimeras, suppression was found to be mediated exclusively by cells which were syngeneic to the recipient in both recipient strains tested. The rapid development of this suppressive activity may explain the resistance to graft-vs-host disease conferred on whole body-irradiated mice by the addition of TCD syngeneic marrow to an allogeneic graft-vs-host disease-producing inoculum.

  8. High-content live-cell imaging assay used to establish mechanism of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)--mediated inhibition of platelet production.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Devine, Matthew T; Jurak Begonja, Antonija; Tibbitts, Jay; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-09-06

    Proplatelet production represents a terminal stage of megakaryocyte development during which long, branching processes composed of platelet-sized swellings are extended and released into the surrounding culture. Whereas the cytoskeletal mechanics driving these transformations have been the focus of many studies, significant limitations in our ability to quantify the rate and extent of proplatelet production have restricted the field to qualitative analyses of a limited number of cells over short intervals. A novel high-content, quantitative, live-cell imaging assay using the IncuCyte system (Essen BioScience) was therefore developed to measure the rate and extent of megakaryocyte maturation and proplatelet production under live culture conditions for extended periods of time. As proof of concept, we used this system in the present study to establish a mechanism by which trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), an Ab-drug conjugate currently in clinical development for cancer, affects platelet production. High-content analysis of primary cell cultures revealed that T-DM1 is taken up by mouse megakaryocytes, inhibits megakaryocyte differentiation, and disrupts proplatelet formation by inducing abnormal tubulin organization and suppressing microtubule dynamic instability. Defining the pathways by which therapeutics such as T-DM1 affect megakaryocyte differentiation and proplatelet production may yield strategies to manage drug-induced thrombocytopenias.

  9. Plasmodesmata-Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication in the Shoot Apical Meristem: How Stem Cells Talk

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Munenori; Jackson, David

    2017-01-01

    Positional information is crucial for the determination of plant cell fates, and it is established based on coordinated cell-to-cell communication, which in turn is essential for plant growth and development. Plants have evolved a unique communication pathway, with tiny channels called plasmodesmata (PD) spanning the cell wall. PD interconnect most cells in the plant and generate a cytoplasmic continuum, to mediate short- and long-distance trafficking of various molecules. Cell-to-cell communication through PD plays a role in transmitting positional signals, however, the regulatory mechanisms of PD-mediated trafficking are still largely unknown. The induction and maintenance of stem cells in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) depends on PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication, hence, it is an optimal model for dissecting the regulatory mechanisms of PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication and its function in specifying cell fates. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge of PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication in the SAM, and discuss mechanisms underlying molecular trafficking through PD and its role in plant development. PMID:28257070

  10. Cell mechanics: integrating cell responses to mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Janmey, Paul A; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cell structure and function, and the mechanical properties of cells are essential to the mechanisms by which cells sense forces, transmit them to the cell interior or to other cells, and transduce them into chemical signals that impact a spectrum of cellular responses. Comparison of the mechanical properties of intact cells with those of the purified cytoskeletal biopolymers that are thought to dominate their elasticity reveal the extent to which the studies of purified systems can account for the mechanical properties of the much more heterogeneous and complex cell. This review summarizes selected aspects of current work on cell mechanics with an emphasis on the structures that are activated in cell-cell contacts, that regulate ion flow across the plasma membrane, and that may sense fluid flow that produces low levels of shear stress.

  11. Prostaglandin E2 activates the mTORC1 pathway through an EP4/cAMP/PKA- and EP1/Ca2+-mediated mechanism in the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PANC-1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Hua; Young, Steven H; Sinnett-Smith, James; Chou, Caroline Ei Ne; Moro, Aune; Hertzer, Kathleen M; Hines, Oscar Joe; Rozengurt, Enrique; Eibl, Guido

    2015-11-15

    Obesity, a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, is associated with inflammation and insulin resistance. Proinflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and elevated insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1), related to insulin resistance, are shown to play critical roles in pancreatic cancer progression. We aimed to explore a potential cross talk between PGE2 signaling and the IGF-1/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in pancreatic cancer, which may be a key to unraveling the obesity-cancer link. In PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells, we showed that PGE2 stimulated mTORC1 activity independently of Akt, as evaluated by downstream signaling events. Subsequently, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrated that PGE2-induced mTORC1 activation is mediated by the EP4/cAMP/PKA pathway, as well as an EP1/Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. The cooperative roles of the two pathways were supported by the maximal inhibition achieved with the combined pharmacological blockade, and the coexistence of highly expressed EP1 (mediating the Ca(2+) response) and EP2 or EP4 (mediating the cAMP/PKA pathway) in PANC-1 cells and in the prostate cancer line PC-3, which also robustly exhibited PGE2-induced mTORC1 activation, as identified from a screen in various cancer cell lines. Importantly, we showed a reinforcing interaction between PGE2 and IGF-1 on mTORC1 signaling, with an increase in IL-23 production as a cellular outcome. Our data reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of PGE2-stimulated mTORC1 activation mediated by EP4/cAMP/PKA and EP1/Ca(2+) signaling, which may be of great importance in elucidating the promoting effects of obesity in pancreatic cancer. Ultimately, a precise understanding of these molecular links may provide novel targets for efficacious interventions devoid of adverse effects.

  12. Cationic lipid-nanoceria hybrids, a novel nonviral vector-mediated gene delivery into mammalian cells: investigation of the cellular uptake mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Das, Joydeep; Han, Jae Woong; Choi, Yun-Jung; Song, Hyuk; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Seo, Han Geuk; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising technique for the treatment of various diseases. The development of minimally toxic and highly efficient non-viral gene delivery vectors is the most challenging undertaking in the field of gene therapy. Here, we developed dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DODAB)–nanoceria (CeO2) hybrids as a new class of non-viral gene delivery vectors. These DODAB-modified CeO2 nanoparticles (CeO2/DODAB) could effectively compact the pDNA, allowing for highly efficient gene transfection into the selected cell lines. The CeO2/DODAB nanovectors were also found to be non-toxic and did not induce ROS formation as well as any stress responsive and pro-survival signaling pathways. The overall vector performance of CeO2/DODAB nanohybrids was comparable with lipofectamine and DOTAP, and higher than calcium phosphate and DEAE-dextran for transfecting small plasmids. The increased cellular uptake of the nanovector/DNA complexes through clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis and subsequent release from the endosomes further support the increased gene transfection efficiency of the CeO2/DODAB vectors. Besides, CeO2/DODAB nanovectors could transfect genes in vivo without any sign of toxicity. Taken together, this new nano-vector has the potential to be used for gene delivery in biomedical applications. PMID:27380727

  13. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:24567781

  14. Prostate apoptosis response 4 (PAR4) expression modulates WNT signaling pathways in MCF7 breast cancer cells: A possible mechanism underlying PAR4-mediated docetaxel chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    De Bessa Garcia, Simone Aparecida; Pavanelli, Ana Carolina; Melo, Natália Cruz E; Nagai, Maria Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    Docetaxel is an effective drug for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, the exact mechanisms and/or markers associated with chemosensitivity or resistance to docetaxel remain unclear. We previously showed that the expression of prostate apoptosis response 4 (PAR4) inhibits the growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells and increases their sensitivity to docetaxel. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we evaluated transcriptome changes in MCF7 cells expressing increased levels of PAR4 and control cells before and after docetaxel treatment. Some of the top gene networks generated from the differentially expressed genes were related to the wingless-type MMTV integration 1 (WNT) canonical (WNT/β-catenin) and non-canonical (β-catenin-independent) pathways. The Human WNT signaling pathway RT2 profiler™ PCR array was used to validate the effects of PAR4 on the expression pattern of genes involved in the WNT pathway. CACNAD2A3, GDF5 and IL6 were upregulated and NANOG was downregulated in the MCF7 breast cancer cells expressing increased levels of PAR4 after treatment with docetaxel, likely indicating inactivation of the WNT/β-catenin pathway. Upregulation of FGF7, LEF1 and TWIST1 indicated activation of the WNT/β-catenin pathway. Although preliminary, our findings could be of particular interest for understanding the action of PAR4 in chemosensitivity, particularly to increase the specificity and effectiveness of drug treatment and overcome resistance to chemotherapy. Further studies are needed to better understand the biological roles of PAR4 in the regulation of WNT pathways in breast cancer cells in response to docetaxel and other chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:28259909

  15. A novel mechanism of FSH regulation of DNA synthesis in the granulosa cells of hamster preantral follicles. Involvement of a protein kinase C mediated MAP kinase 3/1 self- activation loop

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peixin; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2006-01-01

    Summary FSH- or EGF-induced granulosa cell proliferation in intact preantral follicles depends on a novel PKC-mediated MAPK3/1 self-activation loop. The objective was to reveal whether a PKC-mediated self-sustaining MAPK3/1 activation loop was necessary for FSH- or EGF-induced DNA synthesis in the granulosa cells of intact preantral follicles. For this purpose, hamster preantral follicles were cultured with FSH or EGF in the presence of selective kinase inhibitors. FSH or EGF phosphorylated RAF1, MAP2K1 and MAPK3/1. However, relatively higher dose of EGF was necessary to sustain the MAPK3/1 activity, which was essential for CDK4 activation and DNA synthesis. In intact preantral follicles, FSH or EGF stimulated DNA synthesis only in the granulosa cells. Sustained activation of MAPK3/1 beyond 3h was independent of EGFR kinase activity, but dependent on PKC activity, which appeared to form a self-sustaining MAPK3/1 activation loop by activating RAF1, MAP2K1 and PLA2G4. Inhibition of PKC activity as late as 4h after the administration of FSH or EGF arrested DNA synthesis, which corresponded with attenuated phosphorylation of RAF1 and MAPK3/1, thus suggesting an essential role of PKC in MAPK3/1 activation. Collectively, these data present a novel self-sustaining mechanism comprised of MAPK3/1, PLA2G4, PKC and RAF1 for CDK4 activation leading to DNA synthesis in granulosa cells. Either FSH or EGF can activate the loop to activate CDK4 and initiate DNA synthesis; however, consistent with our previous findings, FSH effect seems to be mediated by EGF, which initiates the event by stimulating EGFR kinase. PMID:16525034

  16. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells is mediated via caspase-dependent and independent mechanisms involving calpain and caspase-3 proteases as well as apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and this process is inhibited by equine estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, YueMei; Bhavnani, Bhagu R

    2006-01-01

    Background Glutamate, a major excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter, causes apoptotic neuronal cell death at high concentrations. Our previous studies have shown that depending on the neuronal cell type, glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death was associated with regulation of genes such as Bcl-2, Bax, and/or caspase-3 and mitochondrial cytochrome c. To further delineate the intracellular mechanisms, we have investigated the role of calpain, an important calcium-dependent protease thought to be involved in apoptosis along with mitochondrial apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and caspase-3 in primary cortical cells and a mouse hippocampal cell line HT22. Results Glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells was associated with characteristic DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, activation of calpain and caspase-3 as well as the upregulation and/or translocation of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nuclei. Our results reveal that primary cortical cells and HT22 cells display different patterns of regulation of these genes/proteins. In primary cortical cells, glutamate induces activation of calpain, caspase-3 and translocation of AIF from mitochondria to cytosol and nuclei. In contrast, in HT22 cells, only the activation of calpain and upregulation and translocation of AIF occurred. In both cell types, these processes were inhibited/reversed by 17β-estradiol and Δ8,17β-estradiol with the latter being more potent. Conclusion Depending upon the neuronal cell type, at least two mechanisms are involved in glutamate-induced apoptosis: a caspase-3-dependent pathway and a caspase-independent pathway involving calpain and AIF. Since HT22 cells lack caspase-3, glutamate-induced apoptosis is mediated via the caspase-independent pathway in this cell line. Kinetics of this apoptotic pathway further indicate that calpain rather than caspase-3, plays a critical role in the glutamate-induced apoptosis. Our studies further indicate that glutamate- induced changes

  17. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. )

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Type 8 Interferes with a Novel C/EBPβ-Mediated Mechanism of Keratinocyte CCL20 Chemokine Expression and Langerhans Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Doorbar, John; Pfister, Herbert; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Majewski, Sławomir; Keates, Andrew C.; Smola, Sigrun

    2012-01-01

    Infection with genus beta human papillomaviruses (HPV) is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and 8 in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a genetic skin disease. So far, it has been unknown how these viruses overcome cutaneous immune control allowing their persistence in lesional epidermis of these patients. Here we demonstrate that Langerhans cells, essential for skin immunosurveillance, are strongly reduced in HPV8-positive lesional epidermis from EV patients. Interestingly, the same lesions were largely devoid of the important Langerhans cells chemoattractant protein CCL20. Applying bioinformatic tools, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and functional studies we identified the differentiation-associated transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) as a critical regulator of CCL20 gene expression in normal human keratinocytes. The physiological relevance of this finding is supported by our in vivo studies showing that the expression patterns of CCL20 and nuclear C/EBPβ converge spatially in the most differentiated layers of human epidermis. Our analyses further identified C/EBPβ as a novel target of the HPV8 E7 oncoprotein, which co-localizes with C/EBPβ in the nucleus, co-precipitates with it and interferes with its binding to the CCL20 promoter in vivo. As a consequence, the HPV8 E7 but not E6 oncoprotein suppressed C/EBPβ-inducible and constitutive CCL20 gene expression as well as Langerhans cell migration. In conclusion, our study unraveled a novel molecular mechanism central to cutaneous host defense. Interference of the HPV8 E7 oncoprotein with this regulatory pathway allows the virus to disrupt the immune barrier, a major prerequisite for its epithelial persistence and procarcinogenic activity. PMID:22911498

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Cyclodextrin Mediated Cholesterol Extraction

    PubMed Central

    López, Cesar A.; de Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2011-01-01

    The depletion of cholesterol from membranes, mediated by β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is well known and documented, but the molecular details of this process are largely unknown. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have been able to study the CD mediated extraction of cholesterol from model membranes, in particular from a pure cholesterol monolayer, at atomic resolution. Our results show that efficient cholesterol extraction depends on the structural distribution of the CDs on the surface of the monolayer. With a suitably oriented dimer, cholesterol is extracted spontaneously on a nanosecond time scale. Additional free energy calculations reveal that the CDs have a strong affinity to bind to the membrane surface, and, by doing so, destabilize the local packing of cholesterol molecules making their extraction favorable. Our results have implications for the interpretation of experimental measurements, and may help in the rational design of efficient CD based nano-carriers. PMID:21455285

  20. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  1. Mechanisms of p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Np63-9, p73-2, and p73-31 were as previously described (13, 68, 69). EB and H1299 cells were maintained in Dul- becco’s modified Eagle medium...cotransfected by using the calcium phosphate method into MCF7, H1299 , or EB cells. A dual luciferase assay was performed in triplicate according to the...to activate the IGFBP3 promoter in EB colon and H1299 non- small cell lung carcinoma cells. We found the same pattern of activation in EB and H1299

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2016-03-09

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4⁺ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4⁺ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation.

  3. Post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantion immune-mediated cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Panagiotis D; Resnick, Igor B; Or, Reuven; Elad, Sharon; Zilberman, Irina; Yoffe, Luba; Levovic, Alexander; Miron, Svetlana; Gesundheit, Benjamin; Slavin, Shimon; Shapira, Michael-Yechiel

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated cytopenias after allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be categorized as either alloimmune when host or donor immunity reacts against donor or host elements, respectively, or autoimmune when donor immunity reacts against donor hematopoietic tissue, owing to poorly understood mechanisms that result in severe impairment of central and peripheral tolerance. Immune cytopenias are manifested as monolineage or more rarely as bilineage cytopenias, and are usually mediated through humoral immune mechanisms. On the contrary, immune-mediated pancytopenia is a rare event with only few cases reported in the literature. The exact pathogenesis of immune pancytopenia is not well known although it is possible that cellular immunity may play a significant role. The importance of these syndromes lies in the fact that they can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Differential diagnosis from other causes of post-transplant pancytopenia is of extreme value because these disorders can respond to various treatment modalities.

  4. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  5. ARID1B-mediated disorders: Mutations and possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Joe C. H.; White, Susan M; Lockhart, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mutations in the gene encoding AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1B (ARID1B) were recently associated with multiple syndromes characterized by developmental delay and intellectual disability, in addition to nonsyndromic intellectual disability. While the majority of ARID1B mutations identified to date are predicted to result in haploinsufficiency, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms have yet to be fully understood. ARID1B is a DNA-binding subunit of the Brahma-associated factor chromatin remodelling complexes, which play a key role in the regulation of gene activity. The function of remodelling complexes can be regulated by their subunit composition, and there is some evidence that ARID1B is a component of the neuron-specific chromatin remodelling complex. This complex is involved in the regulation of stem/progenitor cells exiting the cell cycle and differentiating into postmitotic neurons. Recent research has indicated that alterations in the cell cycle contribute to the underlying pathogenesis of syndromes associated with ARID1B haploinsufficiency in fibroblasts derived from affected individuals. This review describes studies linking ARID1B to neurodevelopmental disorders and it summarizes the function of ARID1B to provide insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying ARID1B-mediated disorders. In conclusion, ARID1B is likely to play a key role in neurodevelopment and reduced levels of wild-type protein compromise normal brain development. Additional studies are required to determine the mechanisms by which impaired neural development contributes to the intellectual disability and speech impairment that are consistently observed in individuals with ARID1B haploinsufficiency. PMID:25674384

  6. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  7. Microarray and Pathway Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms Underlying Cannabinoid-Mediated Modulation of LPS-Induced Activation of BV-2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Juknat, Ana; Kozela, Ewa; Rimmerman, Neta; Levy, Rivka; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel; Vogel, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids are known to exert immunosuppressive activities. However, the mechanisms which contribute to these effects are unknown. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to activate BV-2 microglial cells, we examined how Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana, and cannabidiol (CBD) the non-psychoactive component, modulate the inflammatory response. Microarray analysis of genome-wide mRNA levels was performed using Illumina platform and the resulting expression patterns analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to identify functional subsets of genes, and the Ingenuity System Database to denote the gene networks regulated by CBD and THC. From the 5338 transcripts that were differentially expressed across treatments, 400 transcripts were found to be upregulated by LPS, 502 by CBD+LPS and 424 by THC+LPS, while 145 were downregulated by LPS, 297 by CBD+LPS and 149 by THC+LPS, by 2-fold or more (p≤0.005). Results clearly link the effects of CBD and THC to inflammatory signaling pathways and identify new cannabinoid targets in the MAPK pathway (Dusp1, Dusp8, Dusp2), cell cycle related (Cdkn2b, Gadd45a) as well as JAK/STAT regulatory molecules (Socs3, Cish, Stat1). The impact of CBD on LPS-stimulated gene expression was greater than that of THC. We attribute this difference to the fact that CBD highly upregulated several genes encoding negative regulators of both NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activities, such as Trib3 and Dusp1 known to be modulated through Nrf2 activation. The CBD-specific expression profile reflected changes associated with oxidative stress and glutathione depletion via Trib3 and expression of ATF4 target genes. Furthermore, the CBD affected genes were shown to be controlled by nuclear factors usually involved in regulation of stress response and inflammation, mainly via Nrf2/Hmox1 axis and the Nrf2/ATF4-Trib3 pathway. These observations indicate that CBD, and less so THC, induce a cellular stress response and

  8. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  9. Mechanism of enhanced responses after combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in carcinoma cells involves C/EBP-mediated transcriptional upregulation of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinate (ALA) is widely accepted as an effective treatment for superficial carcinomas and pre-cancers. However, PDT is still suboptimal for deeper tumors, mainly due to inadequate ALA penetration and subsequent conversion to PpIX. We are interested in improving the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for deep tumors, using a combination approach (cPDT) in which target protoporphyrin (PpIX) levels are significantly enhanced by differentiation caused by giving Vitamin D or methotrexate (MTX) for 3 days prior to ALAPDT. In LNCaP and MEL cells, a strong correlation between inducible differentiation and expression of C/EBP transcription factors, as well as between differentiation and mRNA levels of CPO (a key heme-synthetic enzyme), indicates the possibility of CPO transcriptional regulation by the C/EBPs. Sequence analysis of the first 1300 base pairs of the murine CPO upstream region revealed 15 consensus C/EBP binding sites. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) proved that these sites form specific complexes that have strong, moderate or weak affinities for C/EBPs. However, in the context of the full-length CPO promoter, inactivation of any type of site (strong or weak) reduced CPO promoter activity (luciferase assay) to nearly the same extent, suggesting cooperative interactions. A comparative analysis of murine and human CPO promoters revealed possible protein-protein interactions between C/EBPs and several neighboring transcription factors such as NFkB, Sp1, AP-1, CBP/p300 and CREB (an enhanceosome complex). Overall, these results confirm that C/EBP's are important for CPO expression via complex mechanisms which upregulate PpIX and enhance the outcome of cPDT.

  10. Acetylcholine released by endothelial cells facilitates flow‐mediated dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Calum; Lee, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The endothelium plays a pivotal role in the vascular response to chemical and mechanical stimuli.The endothelium is exquisitely sensitive to ACh, although the physiological significance of ACh‐induced activation of the endothelium is unknown.In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of flow‐mediated endothelial calcium signalling.Our data establish that flow‐mediated endothelial calcium responses arise from the autocrine action of non‐neuronal ACh released by the endothelium. Abstract Circulating blood generates frictional forces (shear stress) on the walls of blood vessels. These frictional forces critically regulate vascular function. The endothelium senses these frictional forces and, in response, releases various vasodilators that relax smooth muscle cells in a process termed flow‐mediated dilatation. Although some elements of the signalling mechanisms have been identified, precisely how flow is sensed and transduced to cause the release of relaxing factors is poorly understood. By imaging signalling in large areas of the endothelium of intact arteries, we show that the endothelium responds to flow by releasing ACh. Once liberated, ACh acts to trigger calcium release from the internal store in endothelial cells, nitric oxide production and artery relaxation. Flow‐activated release of ACh from the endothelium is non‐vesicular and occurs via organic cation transporters. ACh is generated following mitochondrial production of acetylCoA. Thus, we show ACh is an autocrine signalling molecule released from endothelial cells, and identify a new role for the classical neurotransmitter in endothelial mechanotransduction. PMID:27730645

  11. Molecular mechanism of statin-mediated LOX-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Biocca, Silvia; Iacovelli, Federico; Matarazzo, Sara; Vindigni, Giulia; Oteri, Francesco; Desideri, Alessandro; Falconi, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    Statins are largely used in clinics in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases for their effect on lowering circulating cholesterol. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for ox-LDL, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders. We have recently shown that chronic exposure of cells to lovastatin disrupts LOX-1 receptor cluster distribution in plasma membranes, leading to a marked loss of LOX-1 function. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism of statin-mediated LOX-1 inhibition and we demonstrate that all tested statins are able to displace the binding of fluorescent ox-LDL to LOX-1 by a direct interaction with LOX-1 receptors in a cell-based binding assay. Molecular docking simulations confirm the interaction and indicate that statins completely fill the hydrophobic tunnel that crosses the C-type lectin-like (CTLD) recognition domain of LOX-1. Classical molecular dynamics simulation technique applied to the LOX-1 CTLD, considered in the entire receptor structure with or without a statin ligand inside the tunnel, indicates that the presence of a ligand largely increases the dimer stability. Electrophoretic separation and western blot confirm that different statins binding stabilize the dimer assembly of LOX-1 receptors in vivo. The simulative and experimental results allow us to propose a CTLD clamp motion, which enables the receptor-substrate coupling. These findings reveal a novel and significant functional effect of statins.

  12. In Search of the Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Inhibitory Effect of the GnRH Antagonist Degarelix on Human Prostate Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Monica; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Patterson, Nathan H.; Chaurand, Pierre; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor (GnRHR) antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i) the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii) MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii) the clusters of genes affected by degarelix suggest that

  13. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  14. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of Urtica dioica radix on human colon (HT29) and gastric (MKN45) cancer cells mediated through oxidative and apoptotic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, S; Moradzadeh, M; Mousavi, S H; Sadeghnia, H R

    2016-10-15

    Defects in the apoptotic pathways are responsible for both the colorectal cancer pathogenesis and resistance to therapy. In this study, we examined the level of cellular oxidants, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by hydroalcoholic extract of U. dioica radix (0-2000 µg/mL) and oxaliplatin (0-1000 µg/mL, as positive control) in human gastric (MKN45) and colon (HT29) cancer, as well as normal human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Exposure to U. dioica or oxaliplatin showed a concentration dependent suppression in cell survival with IC50 values of 24.7, 249.9 and 857.5 µg/mL for HT29, MKN45 and HFF cells after 72 h treatment, respectively. ROS formation and lipid peroxidation were also concentration-dependently increased following treatment with U. dioica, similar to oxaliplatin. In addition, the number of apoptotic cells significantly increased concomitantly with concentration of U. dioica as compared with control cells, which is similar to oxaliplatin and serum-deprived cancer cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that U. dioica inhibited proliferation of gastric and colorectal cancer cells while posing no significant toxic effect on normal cells. U. dioica not only increased levels of oxidants, but also induced concomitant increase of apoptosis. The precise signaling pathway by which U. dioica induce apoptosis needs further research.

  16. PERK-mediated Autophagy in Osteosarcoma Cells Resists ER Stress-induced Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guang-rong; Yu, Nai-chun; Xue, Xiang; Li, Zong-guang

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a bone cancer that develops commonly in children and adolescents. However, osteosarcoma treatments often fail by the development of chemoresistance to apoptosis, and the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we propose that autophagy is responsible for osteosarcomatous resistance to apoptosis. We implicate PERK-mediated autophagy as a significant contributor to apoptosis resistance due to ER stress in osteosarcoma cells. By immunostainings and western blots, we identified that PERK activated osteosarcomatous autophagy via inhibiting mTORC1 pathway, thereby preventing cell apoptosis. While using RNAi, we knocked down PERK and found that autophagy was suppressed, result in osteosarcomatous apoptosis. Our results identify a novel role of PERK-mediated autophagy as a significant mechanism for osteosarcoma cell survival. These results will help to understand the mechanism of chemoresistance in osteosarcoma cells, and indicate a novel target for improving osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:26078722

  17. PERK-mediated Autophagy in Osteosarcoma Cells Resists ER Stress-induced Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guang-rong; Yu, Nai-chun; Xue, Xiang; Li, Zong-guang

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a bone cancer that develops commonly in children and adolescents. However, osteosarcoma treatments often fail by the development of chemoresistance to apoptosis, and the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we propose that autophagy is responsible for osteosarcomatous resistance to apoptosis. We implicate PERK-mediated autophagy as a significant contributor to apoptosis resistance due to ER stress in osteosarcoma cells. By immunostainings and western blots, we identified that PERK activated osteosarcomatous autophagy via inhibiting mTORC1 pathway, thereby preventing cell apoptosis. While using RNAi, we knocked down PERK and found that autophagy was suppressed, result in osteosarcomatous apoptosis. Our results identify a novel role of PERK-mediated autophagy as a significant mechanism for osteosarcoma cell survival. These results will help to understand the mechanism of chemoresistance in osteosarcoma cells, and indicate a novel target for improving osteosarcoma therapy.

  18. Immunological Mechanisms Mediating Hantavirus Persistence in Rodent Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Easterbrook, Judith D.; Klein, Sabra L.

    2008-01-01

    Hantaviruses, similar to several emerging zoonotic viruses, persistently infect their natural reservoir hosts, without causing overt signs of disease. Spillover to incidental human hosts results in morbidity and mortality mediated by excessive proinflammatory and cellular immune responses. The mechanisms mediating the persistence of hantaviruses and the absence of clinical symptoms in rodent reservoirs are only starting to be uncovered. Recent studies indicate that during hantavirus infection, proinflammatory and antiviral responses are reduced and regulatory responses are elevated at sites of increased virus replication in rodents. The recent discovery of structural and non-structural proteins that suppress type I interferon responses in humans suggests that immune responses in rodent hosts could be mediated directly by the virus. Alternatively, several host factors, including sex steroids, glucocorticoids, and genetic factors, are reported to alter host susceptibility and may contribute to persistence of hantaviruses in rodents. Humans and reservoir hosts differ in infection outcomes and in immune responses to hantavirus infection; thus, understanding the mechanisms mediating viral persistence and the absence of disease in rodents may provide insight into the prevention and treatment of disease in humans. Consideration of the coevolutionary mechanisms mediating hantaviral persistence and rodent host survival is providing insight into the mechanisms by which zoonotic viruses have remained in the environment for millions of years and continue to be transmitted to humans. PMID:19043585

  19. Mechanics of Nascent Cell Adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2009-03-01

    Cells have the ability to sense and respond to mechanical and biochemical cues from their environment. In neurons, the binding and restraint of transmembrane cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) can trigger acute periods of axon growth. Preceding growth, the cell must create a stiff mechanical linkage between the CAM and the cytoskeleton. Using holographic optical tweezers, we manipulate CAM-coated beads on the membrane of the cell. We investigate the dynamics of the mechanical properties of this linkage as a function of time, applied force, and CAM density. We find that CAM-coated beads exhibit stochastic intermittent binding to the cytoskeleton. In time, we observed that the adhesions stiffen and their mechanical properties depend on the applied force. Treatment of cells with small molecules that alter cytoskeletal dynamics are used to probe the roles of actin filament assembly and myosin motor activity in adhesion formation.

  20. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  1. Dscam-Mediated Cell Recognition Regulates Neural Circuit Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Daisuke; Millard, S. Sean; Wojtowicz, Woj M.; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    The Dscam family of immunoglobulin cell surface proteins mediates recognition events between neurons that play an essential role in the establishment of neural circuits. The Drosophila Dscam1 locus encodes tens of thousands of cell surface proteins via alternative splicing. These isoforms exhibit exquisite isoform-specific binding in vitro that mediates homophilic repulsion in vivo. These properties provide the molecular basis for self-avoidance, an essential developmental mechanism that allows axonal and dendritic processes to uniformly cover their synaptic fields. In a mechanistically similar fashion, homophilic repulsion mediated by Drosophila Dscam2 prevents processes from the same class of cells from occupying overlapping synaptic fields through a process called tiling. Genetic studies in the mouse visual system support the view that vertebrate DSCAM also promotes both self-avoidance and tiling. By contrast, DSCAM and DSCAM-L promote layer-specific targeting in the chick visual system, presumably through promoting homophilic adhesion. The fly and mouse studies underscore the importance of homophilic repulsion in regulating neural circuit assembly, whereas the chick studies suggest that DSCA Mproteins may mediate a variety of different recognition events during wiring in a context-dependent fashion. PMID:18837673

  2. Oxidative stress-mediated, post-translational loss of MafA protein as a contributing mechanism to loss of insulin gene expression in glucotoxic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jamie S; Stein, Roland; Robertson, R Paul

    2005-03-25

    Glucose toxicity in pancreatic islet beta cells causes loss of insulin gene expression, content, and secretion due to loss of binding of transcription factors, most notably PDX-1 and RIPE-3b1 activator, to the promoter region of the insulin gene. Recently, RIPE-3b1 activator was cloned and identified as the mammalian homologue of avian MafA/Maf-L (MafA). This enabled us to carry out more extensive studies of the role of MafA in glucotoxicity than were hitherto possible. Northern analysis of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells revealed normal amounts of MafA mRNA, but Western analysis demonstrated a 97 +/- 1% reduction in MafA protein (p < 0.0001). The proteasome is a likely site for MafA degradation as lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, caused an accumulation of MafA protein. Antioxidants have previously been shown to prevent the adverse effects of glucose toxicity on beta cell function both in vivo and in vitro. In the current study, chronic culturing of HIT-T15 cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented loss of MafA protein (late passage = 18.9 +/- 10.4% of early passage, p < 0.001; late passage with NAC = 68.7 +/- 19.7% of early passage, p = not significant) and loss of DNA binding (late passage = 63.7 +/- 9% of early passage, p < 0.02; late passage with NAC = 116 +/- 10% of early passage, p = not significant). Additionally, transient transfection of PDX-1 or MafA cDNA into glucotoxic cells increased PDX-1 and MafA protein levels and individually increased insulin promoter activity (untreated = 34%, PDX-1 = 70%, MafA = 78%; percentage of activity of early passage cells), whereas the combined transfection of MafA and PDX-1 completely restored insulin promoter activity. This recovery of promoter activity following transient transfection had no effect on endogenous insulin mRNA. However, adenoviral infection of MafA and PDX-1 significantly increased endogenous insulin mRNA levels by 93% (121 +/- 9 versus 233 +/- 18 density light units; n = 5

  3. Mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lechler, R; Marelli-Berg, F M

    1997-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the control of self-reactivity involves peripheral mechanisms that supplement thymic negative selection. It is now generally accepted that T-cell activation depends upon both T-cell receptor engagement and the delivery of B7-mediated costimulation by specialized antigen presenting cells (APC). In contrast, failure to deliver B7-mediated costimulation can result in the induction of antigen-specific non-responsiveness. In physiological terms, costimulation-deficient antigen presentation is the prerogative of those cells that do not express B7 molecules, even during inflammatory conditions, such as tissue parenchymal cells. The consequences of such costimulation-deficient antigen presentation are illustrated by the allospecific tolerance that is observed in animal models of transplantation following the depletion of bone marrow-derived APC from an allograft. In this paper the possible role of antigen presentation by tissue parenchymal cells in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance is discussed, with particular attention to the important contribution that the liver may make to these events.

  4. Non-small cell lung cancer-derived soluble mediators enhance apoptosis in activated T lymphocytes through an I kappa B kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Batra, Raj K; Lin, Ying; Sharma, Sherven; Dohadwala, Mariam; Luo, Jie; Pold, Mehis; Dubinett, Steven M

    2003-02-01

    T lymphocyte survival is critical for the development and maintenance of an effective host antitumor immune response; however, the tumor environment can negatively impact T-cell survival. Lymphocytes exposed to tumor supernatants (TSNs) were evaluated for apoptosis after mitogen stimulation. TSN was observed to significantly enhance phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin- and anti-CD3-stimulated lymphocyte apoptosis. Enhanced lymphocyte apoptosis was associated with an impairment of nuclear factor kappa B nuclear translocation and diminished I kappa B alpha degradation. In lymphocytes stimulated after exposure to TSNs, cytoplasmic I kappa B alpha persisted as a result of alterations in I kappa B kinase (IKK) activity. Accordingly, although there were no apparent differences in IKK component concentrations, lymphocytes preexposed to TSNs exhibited markedly reduced IKK activity. We conclude that non-small cell lung cancer-derived soluble factors promote apoptosis in activated lymphocytes by an IKK-dependent pathway.

  5. Distinct Neural Mechanisms Mediate Olfactory Memory Formation at Different Timescales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Ann Marie; Magidson, Phillip D.; Linster, Christiane; Wilson, Donald A.; Cleland, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Habituation is one of the oldest forms of learning, broadly expressed across sensory systems and taxa. Here, we demonstrate that olfactory habituation induced at different timescales (comprising different odor exposure and intertrial interval durations) is mediated by different neural mechanisms. First, the persistence of habituation memory is…

  6. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 enhances histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA-induced cell death of chronic myeloid leukemia cells by an ROS-mediated mechanism and downregulation of the Bcr-Abl fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, WENJING; ZHU, WEIWEI; MA, LIYA; XIAO, FENG; QIAN, WENBIN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been progress in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, novel therapeutic strategies are required in order to address the emerging problem of imatinib resistance. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and proteasome inhibitors are promising alternatives, and may be amenable to integration with current therapeutic approaches. However, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between these two agents remain unclear. The present study assessed the cytotoxic effect of the HDACi, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), in combination with the proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, in imatinib-sensitive K562 and imatinib-resistant K562G cells, and investigated the mechanism underlying this effect. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method and protein expression levels were determined by western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation levels were observed under a fluorescence microscope The results indicated that SAHA and MG-132 act in a synergistic manner to induce cell death in K562 and K562G cells. This effect was associated with Bcr-Abl downregulation and the production of ROS. Notably, the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, almost fully reversed the cell death and Bcr-Abl downregulation that was induced by the combination of SAHA and MG-132. By contrast, the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only partially reversed the cell death induced by these two drugs in CML cells. These results indicated that increased intracellular ROS levels are important in the induction of cell death and the downregulation of Bcr-Abl. In conclusion, the present results suggested that combined SAHA and MG-132 may be a promising treatment for CML. PMID:26722260

  7. Cell cycle specificity of Fas-mediated apoptosis in WIL-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, I V; Nikonova, L V; Beletsky, I P

    1997-07-21

    Antibodies to Fas/APO1 receptor induce effective apoptosis in WIL-2 cells of the human B-lymphoid line. Quantitative assessment of the extent of the death in cells synchronized by thymidine block revealed a significant increase in their sensitivity to the cytocidal effect mediated by Fas/APO1 during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Western analysis of the content of the p53 antigen in the cytoplasm and nuclei of the cells showed that the Fas/APO1-induced death is accompanied by massive translocation of the p53 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. These findings suggest that cell vulnerability to the Fas/APO1-mediated apoptosis is subjected to regulation by cell cycle-dependent mechanisms, one of which is probably the function of the p53 antigen.

  8. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  9. The mechanics of cell crawling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles; Mogilner, Alex; Oster, George

    2004-03-01

    Crawling eukaryotic cells play many roles in biology. White blood cells chemotactically track down pathogens. Fibroblasts crawl and pull skin back together during wound healing. Cancer cells become metastatic and migrate to other points in the body. Therefore, understanding the physical mechanism driving crawling motility is very important. In crawling cells, a polymer meshwork, usually composed of actin filaments, provides both the structural integrity of the cell and is reponsible for the force production during migration. We present a theory that describes the dynamics of this actin gel and apply it to the crawling motility of nematode sperm cells. This model maintains the shape of the cell during crawling as occurs during the migration of Ascaris suum spermatozoa and also produces forces comparable to what has been measured in other crawling cells.

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells adhere to physiologic STAT3- vs STAT5-dependent hematopoietic programming, establishing diverse tumor-mediated mechanisms of immunologic escape.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Peter A; Ko, Jennifer S; Storkus, Walter J; Spencer, Christopher D; Bradley, Judy M; Gorman, Jessica E; McCurry, Dustin B; Zorro-Manrique, Soroya; Dominguez, Anna Lucia; Pathangey, Latha B; Rayman, Patricia A; Rini, Brian I; Gendler, Sandra J; Finke, James H

    2012-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, is astonishingly effective in its capacity to reduce MDSCs in peripheral tissues such as blood (human) and spleen (mouse), restoring responsiveness of bystander T lymphocytes to TcR stimulation. Sunitinib blocks proliferation of undifferentiated MDSCs and decreases survival of more differentiated neutrophilic MDSC (n-MDSC) progeny. Ironically, sunitinib's profound effects are observed even in a total absence of detectable anti-tumor therapeutic response. This is best explained by the presence of disparate MDSC-conditioning stimuli within individual body compartments, allowing sensitivity and resistance to sunitinib to coexist within the same mouse or patient. The presence or absence of GM-CSF is likely the major determinant in each compartment, given that GM-CSF's capacity to preempt STAT3-dependent with dominant STAT5-dependent hematopoietic programming confers sunitinib resistance and redirects differentiation from the n-MDSC lineage to the more versatile monocytoid (m-MDSC) lineage. The clinical sunitinib experience underscores that strategies for MDSC and Treg depletions must be mindful of disparities among body compartments to avoid sanctuary effects. Ironically, m-MDSCs manifesting resistance to sunitinib also have the greatest potential to differentiate into tumoricidal accessory cells, by virtue of their capacity to respond to T cell-secreted IFN-γ or to TLR agonists with nitric oxide and peroxynitrate production.

  11. Superoxide anion is a natural inhibitor of FAS-mediated cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Clément, M V; Stamenkovic, I

    1996-01-01

    The cell surface receptor Fas is a major trigger of apoptosis. However, expression of the Fas receptor in many tumor cell types does not correlate with sensitivity to Fas-mediated cell death. Because a prooxidant state is a common feature of tumor cells, we examined the role of intracellular reactive oxygen intermediates in the regulation of Fas-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results show that an oxidative stress induced by increasing the intracellular superoxide anion (O2-) concentration can abrogate Fas-mediated apoptosis in cells which are constitutively sensitive to Fas. Conversely, an O2- concentration decrease is observed to sensitize cells which are naturally resistant to Fas signals. These observations suggest that intracellular O2- may play a key role in regulating cell sensitivity to a potentially lethal signal and provide tumor cells with a natural, inducible mechanism of resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Images PMID:8617197

  12. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  13. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  14. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  15. Minimal synthetic cells to study integrin-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Frohnmayer, Johannes P; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Eberhard, Christian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Mollenhauer, Christine; Boehm, Heike; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-10-12

    To shed light on cell-adhesion-related molecular pathways, synthetic cells offer the unique advantage of a well-controlled model system with reduced molecular complexity. Herein, we show that liposomes with the reconstituted platelet integrin αIIb β3 as the adhesion-mediating transmembrane protein are a functional minimal cell model for studying cellular adhesion mechanisms in a defined environment. The interaction of these synthetic cells with various extracellular matrix proteins was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The data indicated that integrin was functionally incorporated into the lipid vesicles, thus enabling integrin-specific adhesion of the engineered liposomes to fibrinogen- and fibronectin-functionalized surfaces. Then, we were able to initiate the detachment of integrin liposomes from these surfaces in the presence of the peptide GRGDSP, a process that is even faster with our newly synthesized peptide mimetic SN529, which specifically inhibits the integrin αIIb β3 .

  16. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  17. Suppression of autophagy exacerbates Mefloquine-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-05-02

    Mefloquine is an effective treatment drug for malaria. However, it can cause several adverse side effects, and the precise mechanism associated with the adverse neurological effects of Mefloquine is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mefloquine on autophagy in neuroblastoma cells. Mefloquine treatment highly induced the formation of autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, Mefloquine-induced autophagy was efficiently suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor and by down regulation of ATG6. The autophagy was also completely blocked in ATG5 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy significantly intensified Mefloquine-mediated cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings suggest that suppression of autophagy may exacerbate Mefloquine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

  18. Mechanical tension drives cell membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ren, Yixin; Ng, Win Pin; Li, Shuo; Son, Sungmin; Kee, Yee-Seir; Zhang, Shiliang; Zhang, Guofeng; Fletcher, Daniel A; Robinson, Douglas N; Chen, Elizabeth H

    2015-03-09

    Membrane fusion is an energy-consuming process that requires tight juxtaposition of two lipid bilayers. Little is known about how cells overcome energy barriers to bring their membranes together for fusion. Previously, we have shown that cell-cell fusion is an asymmetric process in which an "attacking" cell drills finger-like protrusions into the "receiving" cell to promote cell fusion. Here, we show that the receiving cell mounts a Myosin II (MyoII)-mediated mechanosensory response to its invasive fusion partner. MyoII acts as a mechanosensor, which directs its force-induced recruitment to the fusion site, and the mechanosensory response of MyoII is amplified by chemical signaling initiated by cell adhesion molecules. The accumulated MyoII, in turn, increases cortical tension and promotes fusion pore formation. We propose that the protrusive and resisting forces from fusion partners put the fusogenic synapse under high mechanical tension, which helps to overcome energy barriers for membrane apposition and drives cell membrane fusion.

  19. Single cell mechanics of keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Lulevich, Valentin; Yang, Hsin-ya; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Liu, Gang-yu

    2010-11-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell type of the uppermost layer of human skin, the epidermis. Using AFM-based single cell compression, the ability of individual keratinocytes to resist external pressure and global rupturing forces is investigated and compared with various cell types. Keratinocytes are found to be 6-70 times stiffer than other cell types, such as white blood, breast epithelial, fibroblast, or neuronal cells, and in contrast to other cell types they retain high mechanic strength even after the cell's death. The absence of membrane rupturing peaks in the force-deformation profiles of keratinocytes and their high stiffness during a second load cycle suggests that their unique mechanical resistance is dictated by the cytoskeleton. A simple analytical model enables the quantification of Young's modulus of keratinocyte cytoskeleton, as high as 120-340 Pa. Selective disruption of the two major cytoskeletal networks, actin filaments and microtubules, does not significantly affect keratinocyte mechanics. F-actin is found to impact cell deformation under pressure. During keratinocyte compression, the plasma membrane stretches to form peripheral blebs. Instead of blebbing, cells with depolymerized F-actin respond to pressure by detaching the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton underneath. On the other hand, the compression force of keratinocytes expressing a mutated keratin (cell line, KEB-7) is 1.6-2.2 times less than that for the control cell line that has normal keratin networks. Therefore, we infer that the keratin intermediate filament network is responsible for the extremely high keratinocyte stiffness and resilience. This could manifest into the rugged protective nature of the human epidermis.

  20. Cooperative cell invasion: matrix metalloproteinase–mediated incorporation between cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Camilla B.; O’Neill, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Progression to metastatic disease is a leading cause of cancer death. Tumors are a complex mixture of cell types, both genetically heterogeneous malignant cells and associated nonmalignant cells. Models mimicking this heterogeneous cell environment have revealed that invasive cell populations can induce dissemination by otherwise poorly/noninvasive tumor cells, known as cooperative invasion. Neuroblastoma tumors arise in children and are characterized by mixed cellular populations in vivo, consisting chiefly of neuronal (N)-type and substrate (S)-type cells. The S-type cells have all the hallmarks of invasive leader cell populations and have been coisolated with N-type cells from metastatic bone lesions, but to date their ability to induce cooperative invasion has not been investigated. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the invasive behavior of mixed N-type and S-type multicellular spheroids embedded in three-dimensional collagen gels. Our analyses show that S-type cells induce invasion of either single cells or small cell clusters of N-type cells. In contrast to other reports of cooperative invasion in which mixed cultures exhibit a follow-the-leader mechanism, we show coincident emergence of S- and N-type cells from mixed spheroids. Our data suggest mutual effects between the two cell types. Thus, whereas coculture with S-type cells induces N-type invasion, coculture with N-type cells slows S-type invasion. Using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors and cell incorporation assays, we demonstrate that MMP activity is required for S-type cells to insert into layers of N-type cells. Our study therefore highlights an important role for S-type neuroblastoma cells in the invasion process and reveals a new mechanism of cooperative invasion. PMID:27605703

  1. Cell mechanics and the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2010-01-01

    The ability of a eukaryotic cell to resist deformation, to transport intracellular cargo and to change shape during movement depends on the cytoskeleton, an interconnected network of filamentous polymers and regulatory proteins. Recent work has demonstrated that both internal and external physical forces can act through the cytoskeleton to affect local mechanical properties and cellular behaviour. Attention is now focused on how cytoskeletal networks generate, transmit and respond to mechanical signals over both short and long timescales. An important insight emerging from this work is that long-lived cytoskeletal structures may act as epigenetic determinants of cell shape, function and fate. PMID:20110992

  2. Mechanisms of Growth Factor Attenuation of Cell Death in Chemotherapy Treated Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    cells treated with chemotherapy or radiation. To this end, we have focused on the survival kinase, Akt and also the kinase which conveys cell death messages...these cells are resistant to the cell death pathway that is typically activated with chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Therefore, we are currently...studying new mechanisms for Akt mediated cell survival. Our work to identify how JNK conveys cell death signals in response to UV or chemotherapy

  3. Fas involvement in Ca(2+)-independent T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity remain poorly defined at the molecular level. To investigate some of these mechanisms, we used as target cells, on the one hand, thymocytes from lpr and gld mouse mutants, and on the other hand, L1210 cells transfected or not with the apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule. These independent mutant or transfectant-based approaches both led to the conclusion that Fas was involved in the Ca(2+)-independent component of cytotoxicity mediated by at least two sources of T cells, namely nonantigen-specific in vitro activated hybridoma cells, and antigen-specific in vivo raised peritoneal exudate lymphocytes. Thus, in these cases, T cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved transduction via Fas of the target cell death signal.

  4. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Characterization of the effector cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Bracco, M M; Isturiz, M A; Manni, J A

    1976-01-01

    Isolated human mononuclear cells were fractionated according to their membrane characteristics or physical properties. Adherent cells were depleted by filtration through glass columns; phagocytic cells were removed by iron treatment and cell subpopulations capable of forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes (E), erythrocyte-antibody-complement (EAC) and chicken erythrocyte-antibody complexes (CEA) were separated by centrifugation of Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. The functional activity of the cell subpopulations obtained was assayed by testing PHA-induced cytoxicity (PIC), antibody-dependent cytoxicity (ADCC) and blast transformation by PHA. The results of this study demonstrate that: (1) cells reacting in PIC and ADCC assays are different, adherent and phagocytic cells being necessary for full expression of PIC and not for ADCC; (2) PHA induces direct blast transformation of purified E-RFC in the absence of PIC cytotoxic cells; (3) cell populations specifically enriched in E or EAC rosette-forming cells are not cytotoxic neither in the PHA nor in antibody mediated cytotoxic assays; (4) cells participating in ADCC can be selectively purified by centrifugation of CEA rosettes. PMID:1254320

  5. Novel Lipid Mediators and Resolution Mechanisms in Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Because inflammation is appreciated as a unifying basis of many widely occurring diseases, the mechanisms involved in its natural resolution are of considerable interest. Using contained, self-limited inflammatory exudates and a systems approach, novel lipid-derived mediators and pathways were uncovered in the resolution of inflammatory exudates. These new families of local mediators control both the duration and magnitude of acute inflammation as well as the return of the site to homeostasis in the process of catabasis. This new genus of specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) includes essential fatty acid–derived lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and, most recently, maresins. These families were named based on their unique structures and potent stereoselective actions. The temporally initiated biosynthesis of SPM and their direct impact on leukocyte trafficking and macrophage-directed clearance mechanisms provide clear evidence that resolution is an active, programmed response at the tissue level. Moreover, SPM that possess anti-inflammatory (ie, limiting PMN infiltration) and proresolving (enhance macrophage uptake and clearance of apoptotic PMN and microbial particles) actions as well as stimulating mucosal antimicrobial responses demonstrate that anti-inflammation and proresolution are different responses of the host and novel defining properties of these molecules. The mapping of new resolution circuits has opened the possibility for understanding mechanisms that lead from acute to chronic inflammation, or to the resolution thereof, as well as to potential, resolution-based immunopharmacological therapies. PMID:20813960

  6. Mechanosensitive pannexin-1 channels mediate microvascular metastatic cell survival.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Paul W; Zhang, Steven; Soong, T David; Halberg, Nils; Goodarzi, Hani; Mangrum, Creed; Wu, Y Gloria; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-07-01

    During metastatic progression, circulating cancer cells become lodged within the microvasculature of end organs, where most die from mechanical deformation. Although this phenomenon was first described over a half-century ago, the mechanisms enabling certain cells to survive this metastasis-suppressive barrier remain unknown. By applying whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing technology to isogenic cancer cells of differing metastatic capacities, we identified a mutation encoding a truncated form of the pannexin-1 (PANX1) channel, PANX1(1-89), as recurrently enriched in highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PANX1(1-89) functions to permit metastatic cell survival during traumatic deformation in the microvasculature by augmenting ATP release from mechanosensitive PANX1 channels activated by membrane stretch. PANX1-mediated ATP release acts as an autocrine suppressor of deformation-induced apoptosis through P2Y-purinergic receptors. Finally, small-molecule therapeutic inhibition of PANX1 channels is found to reduce the efficiency of breast cancer metastasis. These data suggest a molecular basis for metastatic cell survival on microvasculature-induced biomechanical trauma.

  7. Phosphoinositide-mediated oligomerization of a defensin induces cell lysis

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Ivan KH; Baxter, Amy A; Lay, Fung T; Mills, Grant D; Adda, Christopher G; Payne, Jennifer AE; Phan, Thanh Kha; Ryan, Gemma F; White, Julie A; Veneer, Prem K; van der Weerden, Nicole L; Anderson, Marilyn A; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) such as defensins are ubiquitously found innate immune molecules that often exhibit broad activity against microbial pathogens and mammalian tumor cells. Many CAPs act at the plasma membrane of cells leading to membrane destabilization and permeabilization. In this study, we describe a novel cell lysis mechanism for fungal and tumor cells by the plant defensin NaD1 that acts via direct binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). We determined the crystal structure of a NaD1:PIP2 complex, revealing a striking oligomeric arrangement comprising seven dimers of NaD1 that cooperatively bind the anionic headgroups of 14 PIP2 molecules through a unique ‘cationic grip’ configuration. Site-directed mutagenesis of NaD1 confirms that PIP2-mediated oligomerization is important for fungal and tumor cell permeabilization. These observations identify an innate recognition system by NaD1 for direct binding of PIP2 that permeabilizes cells via a novel membrane disrupting mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01808.001 PMID:24692446

  8. Quinolone resistance in bacteria: emphasis on plasmid-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Zhi

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial resistance to quinolones/fluoroquinolones has emerged rapidly and such resistance has traditionally been attributed to the chromosomally mediated mechanisms that alter the quinolone targets (i.e. DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV) and/or overproduce multidrug resistance efflux pumps. However, the discovery of the plasmid-borne quinolone resistance determinant, named qnr, has substantially broadened our horizon on the molecular mechanisms of quinolone resistance. Several recent reports of Qnr or its homologues encoded by transferable plasmids in Gram-negative bacteria isolated worldwide highlight the significance of the emerging plasmid-mediated mechanism(s). This also alerts us to the potential rapid dissemination of quinolone resistance determinants. Qnr belongs to the pentapeptide repeat family and protects DNA gyrase from the action of quinolone agents including the newer fluoroquinolones. This protection interplays with chromosomal mechanisms to raise significantly the resistance levels. The qnr-bearing strains generate quinolone-resistant mutants at a much higher frequency than those qnr-free strains. Furthermore, the qnr-plasmids are integron-associated and carry multiple resistance determinants providing resistance to several classes of antimicrobials including beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. The high quinolone resistance rates in Escherichia coli are used to address issues of quinolone resistance, and possible strategies for minimising quinolone resistance are discussed.

  9. TLR5 mediates CD172α(+) intestinal lamina propria dendritic cell induction of Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Chen, Feidi; Wu, Wei; Cao, Anthony T; Xue, Xiaochang; Yao, Suxia; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Li, Yan-Qing; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-02-24

    Multiple mechanisms exist in regulation of host responses to massive challenges from microbiota to maintain immune homeostasis in the intestines. Among these is the enriched Th17 cells in the intestines, which regulates intestinal homeostasis through induction of antimicrobial peptides and secretory IgA among others. However, the means by which Th17 cells develop in response to microbiota is still not completely understood. Although both TLR5 and CD172α(+) lamina propria dendritic cells (LPDC) have been shown to promote Th17 cell development, it is still unclear whether TLR5 mediates the CD172α(+)LPDC induction of Th17 cells. By using a microbiota antigen-specific T cell reporter mouse system, we demonstrated that microbiota antigen-specific T cells developed into Th17 cells in the intestinal LP, but not in the spleen when transferred into TCRβxδ(-/-) mice. LPDCs expressed high levels of TLR5, and most CD172α(+)LPDCs also co-expressed TLR5. LPDCs produced high levels of IL-23, IL-6 and TGFβ when stimulated with commensal flagellin and promoted Th17 cell development when cultured with full-length CBir1 flagellin but not CBir1 peptide. Wild-type CD172α(+), but not CD172α(-), LPDCs induced Th17 cells, whereas TLR5-deficient LPDC did not induce Th17 cells. Our data thereby demonstrated that TLR5 mediates CD172α(+)LPDC induction of Th17 cells in the intestines.

  10. Cell Cholesterol Homeostasis: Mediation by Active Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Theodore L.; Lange, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the major pathways mediating cell cholesterol homeostasis respond to a common signal: active membrane cholesterol. Active cholesterol is that fraction which exceeds the complexing capacity of the polar bilayer lipids. Increments in plasma membrane cholesterol exceeding this threshold have an elevated chemical activity (escape tendency) and redistribute via diverse transport proteins to both circulating plasma lipoproteins and intracellular organelles. Active cholesterol prompts several feedback responses thereby. It is the substrate for its own esterification and for the synthesis of regulatory side-chain oxysterols. It also stimulates manifold pathways that down-regulate the biosynthesis, curtail the ingestion and increase the export of cholesterol. Thus, the abundance of cholesterol is tightly coupled to that of its polar lipid partners through active cholesterol. PMID:20843692

  11. Shifting foundations: the mechanical cell wall and development.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A; Jönsson, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The cell wall has long been acknowledged as an important physical mediator of growth in plants. Recent experimental and modelling work has brought the importance of cell wall mechanics into the forefront again. These data have challenged existing dogmas that relate cell wall structure to cell/organ growth, that uncouple elasticity from extensibility, and those which treat the cell wall as a passive and non-stressed material. Within this review we describe experiments and models which have changed the ways in which we view the mechanical cell wall, leading to new hypotheses and research avenues. It has become increasingly apparent that while we often wish to simplify our systems, we now require more complex multi-scale experiments and models in order to gain further insight into growth mechanics. We are currently experiencing an exciting and challenging shift in the foundations of our understanding of cell wall mechanics in growth and development.

  12. Biomineralization mediated by anaerobic methane-consuming cell consortia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Li, Yi-Liang; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Li, Han; Lin, Yang-Ting; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2014-07-16

    Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) play a significant role in global carbon cycles. These organisms consume more than 90% of ocean-derived methane and influence the landscape of the seafloor by stimulating the formation of carbonates. ANME frequently form cell consortia with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) of the family Deltaproteobacteria. We investigated the mechanistic link between ANME and the natural consortium by examining anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) metabolism and the deposition of biogenetic minerals through high-resolution imaging analysis. All of the cell consortia found in a sample of marine sediment were encrusted by a thick siliceous envelope consisting of laminated and cementing substances, whereas carbonate minerals were not found attached to cells. Beside SRB cells, other bacteria (such as Betaproteobacteria) were found to link with the consortia by adhering to the siliceous crusts. Given the properties of siliceous minerals, we hypothesize that ANME cell consortia can interact with other microorganisms and their substrates via their siliceous envelope, and this mechanism of silicon accumulation may serve in clay mineral formation in marine sedimentary environments. A mechanism for biomineralization mediated by AOM consortia was suggested based on the above observations.

  13. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A.; Sundier, Stephanie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26375864

  14. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Short, Kurt W; Head, W Steve; Piston, David W

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.

  15. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kerry M; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (via trans interactions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (via cis interactions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition between cis and trans interactions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19058.001 PMID:27644106

  16. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  17. Metalloprotease-mediated tumor cell shedding of B7-H6, the ligand of the natural killer cell-activating receptor NKp30.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, Eva; Fiegler, Nathalie; Arnold, Annette; Altevogt, Peter; Rose-John, Stefan; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Sucker, Antje; Paschen, Annette; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Textor, Sonja; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2014-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are potent immune effector cells capable of mediating antitumor responses. Thus, during immunoediting, tumor cell populations evolve strategies to escape NK-cell-mediated recognition. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of immune escape involving tumor cell shedding of B7-H6, a ligand for the activating receptor NKp30 that mediates NK-cell binding and NK-cell-mediated killing. Tumor cells from different cancer entities released B7-H6 by ectodomain shedding mediated by the cell surface proteases "a disintegrin and metalloproteases" (ADAM)-10 and ADAM-17, as demonstrated through the use of pharmacologic inhibitors or siRNA-mediated gene attenuation. Inhibiting this proteolytic shedding process increased the levels of B7-H6 expressed on the surface of tumor cells, enhancing NKp30-mediated activation of NK cells. Notably, we documented elevated levels of soluble B7-H6 levels in blood sera obtained from a subset of patients with malignant melanoma, compared with healthy control individuals, along with evidence of elevated B7-H6 expression in melanoma specimens in situ. Taken together, our results illustrated a novel mechanism of immune escape in which tumor cells impede NK-mediated recognition by metalloprotease-mediated shedding of B7-H6. One implication of our findings is that therapeutic inhibition of specific metalloproteases may help support NK-cell-based cancer therapy.

  18. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical homeostasis - a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations - is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs)1-5. Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths via either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modeling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviors in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells. PMID:27240108

  19. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shinuo; Shao, Yue; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical homeostasis--a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations--is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths through either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modelling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviours in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight the previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells.

  20. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  1. Liver progenitor cells-mediated liver regeneration in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Haitao; Wang, Zhijun; Song, Yuhu

    2016-05-01

    Cirrhosis is defined as the histological development of regenerative nodules surrounded by fibrous bands in response to chronic liver injury. In cirrhotic liver where hepatocytes proliferation is compromised, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated and then differentiated into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, leading to the generation of regenerative nodules and functional restoration. Here, we summarize and discuss recent findings on the mechanisms underlying LPCs-mediated regeneration in liver cirrhosis. Firstly, we provide recent research on the mechanism underlying LPCs activation in severe or chronic liver injury. Secondly, we present new and exciting data on exploring the origin of LPCs, which reveal that the hepatocytes give rise to duct-like progenitors that then differentiate back into hepatocytes in chronic liver injury or liver cirrhosis. Finally, we highlight recent findings from the literature exploring the role of LPCs niche in directing the behavior and fate of LPCs. This remarkable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of LPCs-mediated regeneration in liver cirrhosis will provide a basis for translating this knowledge into clinical application.

  2. FTY720 increases CD74 expression and sensitizes mantle cell lymphoma cells to milatuzumab-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Alinari, Lapo; Mahoney, Emilia; Patton, John; Zhang, Xiaoli; Huynh, Lenguyen; Earl, Christian T.; Mani, Rajeswaran; Mao, Yicheng; Yu, Bo; Quinion, Carl; Towns, William H.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Goldenberg, David M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell malignancy with a short median survival despite multimodal therapy. FTY720, an immunosuppressive drug approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, promotes MCL cell death concurrent with down-modulation of phospho-Akt and cyclin D1 and subsequent cell-cycle arrest. However, the mechanism of FTY720-mediated MCL cell death remains to be fully clarified. In the present study, we show features of autophagy blockage by FTY720 treatment, including accumulation of autolysosomes and increased LC3-II and p62 levels. We also show that FTY720-induced cell death is mediated by lysosomal membrane permeabilization with subsequent translocation of lysosomal hydrolases to the cytosol. FTY720-mediated disruption of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway led to increased levels of CD74, a potential therapeutic target in MCL that is degraded in the lysosomal compartment. This finding provided rationale for examining combination therapy with FTY720 and milatuzumab, an anti-CD74 mAb. Treatment of MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells with FTY720 and milatuzumab resulted in statistically significant enhanced cell death, which was synergistic in blastic variant MCL cell lines. Significant in vivo therapeutic activity of combination treatment was also demonstrated in a preclinical, in vivo model of MCL. These findings support clinical evaluation of this combination in patients with MCL. PMID:22042694

  3. Differences in kinase-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression in normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Stevenson, A.P.; Kraemer, P.M.; Bustos, L.D.; Dickson, J.A.; Bradbury, E.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Staurosporine (Stsp), a general protein kinase inhibitor, was used to investigate the role of kinase-mediated mechanisms in regulating mammalian cell proliferation. Low levels of Stsp (1-2nM) prevented nontransformed cells from entering S phase, indicating that protein phosphorylation processes are essential for commitment of DNA replication in normal cells. Cells resumed cycling when Stsp was removed. The period of sensitivity of nontransformed human diploid fibroblasts to low levels of the drug commenced 3 h later than the G0/G1 boundary and extended through the G1/S boundary. The initial block point at 3 h corresponds neither to the serum nor the amino acid restriction point. In contrast, neither low nor high concentrations (100nm) of Stsp affected G1 progression of transformed cells. High drug concentrations blocked normal cells in G1 and G2 but affected only G2-progression in transformed cells. These results indicate that kinase-mediated regulation of DNA replication is lost as a result of neoplastic transformation, but the G2-arrest mechanism remains intact.

  4. SNARE complex-mediated degranulation in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Woska, Joseph R; Gillespie, Marc E

    2012-04-01

    Mast cell function and dysregulation is important in the development and progression of allergic and autoimmune disease. Identifying novel proteins involved in mast cell function and disease progression is the first step in the design of new therapeutic strategies. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are a family of proteins demonstrated to mediate the transport and fusion of secretory vesicles to the membrane in mast cells, leading to the subsequent release of the vesicle cargo through an exocytotic mechanism. The functional role[s] of specific SNARE family member complexes in mast cell degranulation has not been fully elucidated. Here, we review recent and historical data on the expression, formation and localization of various SNARE proteins and their complexes in murine and human mast cells. We summarize the functional data identifying the key SNARE family members that appear to participate in mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, we discuss the utilization of RNA interference (RNAi) methods to validate SNARE function and the use of siRNA as a therapeutic approach to the treatment of inflammatory disease. These studies provide an overview of the specific SNARE proteins and complexes that serve as novel targets for the development of new therapies to treat allergic and autoimmune disease.

  5. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weifeng; Wang, Xinshuai; Sun, Junjun; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Wensheng; Song, Junxin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging between 7 and 9 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. PMID:28176967

  6. Wdr1-mediated cell shape dynamics and cortical tension are essential for epidermal planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Pasolli, H. Amalia; Chai, Sophia; Nikolova, Maria; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    During mouse development, core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins become polarized in the epidermal plane to guide angling/morphogenesis of hair follicles. How PCP is established is poorly understood. Here, we identify a key role for Wdr1 (also known as Aip1), an F-actin-binding protein that enhances cofilin/destrin-mediated F-actin disassembly. We show that cofilin and destrin function redundantly in developing epidermis, but their combined depletion perturbs cell adhesion, cytokinesis, apicobasal polarity and PCP. Although Wdr1 depletion accentuates single-loss-of-cofilin/destrin phenotypes, alone it resembles core PCP mutations. Seeking a mechanism, we find that Wdr1 and cofilin/destrin-mediated actomyosin remodelling are essential for generating or maintaining cortical tension within the developing epidermal sheet and driving the cell shape and planar orientation changes that accompany establishment of PCP in mammalian epidermis. Our findings suggest intriguing evolutionary parallels but mechanistic modifications to the distal wing hinge-mediated mechanical forces that drive cell shape change and orient PCP in the Drosophila wing disc. PMID:25915128

  7. Altered heme-mediated modulation of dendritic cell function in sickle cell alloimmunization

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yunfeng; Shi, Patricia; Mitchell, W. Beau; Cohen, Devin; Chou, Stella T.; Manwani, Deepa; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Transfusions are the main treatment for patients with sickle cell disease. However, alloimmunization remains a major life-threatening complication for these patients, but the mechanism underlying pathogenesis of alloimmunization is not known. Given the chronic hemolytic state characteristic of sickle cell disease, resulting in release of free heme and activation of inflammatory cascades, we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory response to heme is compromised in alloimmunized sickle patients, increasing their risk of alloimmunization. Heme-exposed monocyte-derived dendritic cells from both non-alloimmunized sickle patients and healthy donors inhibited priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ type 1 T cells, and exhibited significantly reduced levels of the maturation marker CD83. In contrast, in alloimmunized patients, heme did not reverse priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells or their maturation. Furthermore, heme dampened NF-κB activation in non-alloimmunized, but not in alloimmunized monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Heme-mediated CD83 inhibition depended on Toll-like receptor 4 but not heme oxygenase 1. These data suggest that extracellular heme limits CD83 expression on dendritic cells in non-alloimmunized sickle patients through a Toll-like receptor 4-mediated pathway, involving NF-κB, resulting in dampening of pro-inflammatory responses, but that in alloimmunized patients this pathway is defective. This opens up the possibility of developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent sickle cell alloimmunization. PMID:27229712

  8. Nanomedicine-mediated cancer stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Song; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most tumours are heterogeneous and contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that exhibit distinctive self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation capabilities, which are believed to play a crucial role in tumour progression, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis in multiple malignancies. Given that the existence of CSCs is a primary obstacle to cancer therapy, a tremendous amount of effort has been put into the development of anti-CSC strategies, and several potential approaches to kill therapeutically-resistant CSCs have been explored, including inhibiting ATP-binding cassette transporters, blocking essential signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and survival of CSCs, targeting CSCs surface markers and destroying the tumour microenvironment. Meanwhile, an increasing number of therapeutic agents (e.g. small molecule drugs, nucleic acids and antibodies) to selectively target CSCs have been screened or proposed in recent years. Drug delivery technology-based approaches hold great potential for tackling the limitations impeding clinical applications of CSC-specific agents, such as poor water solubility, short circulation time and inconsistent stability. Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. In this review, we summarise the distinctive biological processes related to CSCs to highlight strategies against inherently drug-resistant CSCs. We then focus on some representative examples that give a glimpse into state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed for CSCs elimination. A perspective on innovative therapeutic

  9. Probing the mechanisms of silicon-mediated pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kunzheng; Gao, Dan; Chen, Jining; Luo, Shiming

    2009-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant mineral element in soil, it has important role in alleviating various environmental stresses and enhancing plant resistance against pathogen, but the exact mechanism by which Si mediates pathogen resistance remains unclear. One of the resistance mechanisms is related to silicon deposition in leaf that acts as a physical barrier to hinder pathogen penetration. But more evidence show that silicon can induce defense responses that are functionally similar to systemic acquired resistance, Si-treated plants can significantly increase antioxidant enzyme activities and the production of antifungal compounds such as phenolic metabolism product, phytoalexins and pathogenesis-related proteins etc. Molecular and biochemical detections show that Si can activate the expression of defense-related genes and may play important role in the transduction of plant stress signal such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene.

  10. Receptor- and reactive intermediate-mediated mechanisms of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; Lee, Crystal J J; McCallum, Gordon P; Perstin, Julia; Harper, Patricia A

    2010-01-01

    Drugs and environmental chemicals can adversely alter the development of the fetus at critical periods during pregnancy, resulting in death, or in structural and functional birth defects in the surviving offspring. This process of teratogenesis may not be evident until a decade or more after birth. Postnatal functional abnormalities include deficits in brain function, a variety of metabolic diseases, and cancer. Due to the high degree of fetal cellular division and differentiation, and to differences from the adult in many biochemical pathways, the fetus is highly susceptible to teratogens, typically at low exposure levels that do not harm the mother. Insights into the mechanisms of teratogenesis come primarily from animal models and in vitro systems, and involve either receptor-mediated or reactive intermediate-mediated processes. Receptor-mediated mechanisms involving the reversible binding of xenobiotic substrates to a specific receptor are exemplified herein by the interaction of the environmental chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or "dioxin") with the cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which translocates to the nucleus and, in association with other proteins, binds to AH-responsive elements (AHREs) in numerous genes, initiating changes in gene transcription that can perturb development. Alternatively, many xenobiotics are bioactivated by fetal enzymes like the cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) to highly unstable electrophilic or free radical reactive intermediates. Electrophilic reactive intermediates can covalently (irreversibly) bind to and alter the function of essential cellular macromolecules (proteins, DNA), causing developmental anomalies. Free radical reactive intermediates can enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules and/or altered signal transduction. The teratogenicity of reactive intermediates is determined to a large extent

  11. Mechanisms mediating parallel action monitoring in fronto-striatal circuits.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Ness, Vanessa; Lukas, Carsten; Hoffmann, Rainer; Stüwe, Sven; Falkenstein, Michael; Saft, Carsten

    2012-08-01

    Flexible response adaptation and the control of conflicting information play a pivotal role in daily life. Yet, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms mediating parallel control of these processes. We examined these mechanisms using a multi-methodological approach that integrated data from event-related potentials (ERPs) with structural MRI data and source localisation using sLORETA. Moreover, we calculated evoked wavelet oscillations. We applied this multi-methodological approach in healthy subjects and patients in a prodromal phase of a major basal ganglia disorder (i.e., Huntington's disease), to directly focus on fronto-striatal networks. Behavioural data indicated, especially the parallel execution of conflict monitoring and flexible response adaptation was modulated across the examined cohorts. When both processes do not co-incide a high integrity of fronto-striatal loops seems to be dispensable. The neurophysiological data suggests that conflict monitoring (reflected by the N2 ERP) and working memory processes (reflected by the P3 ERP) differentially contribute to this pattern of results. Flexible response adaptation under the constraint of high conflict processing affected the N2 and P3 ERP, as well as their delta frequency band oscillations. Yet, modulatory effects were strongest for the N2 ERP and evoked wavelet oscillations in this time range. The N2 ERPs were localized in the anterior cingulate cortex (BA32, BA24). Modulations of the P3 ERP were localized in parietal areas (BA7). In addition, MRI-determined caudate head volume predicted modulations in conflict monitoring, but not working memory processes. The results show how parallel conflict monitoring and flexible adaptation of action is mediated via fronto-striatal networks. While both, response monitoring and working memory processes seem to play a role, especially response selection processes and ACC-basal ganglia networks seem to be the driving force in mediating parallel conflict

  12. Lico A Enhances Nrf2-Mediated Defense Mechanisms against t-BHP-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death via Akt and ERK Activation in RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongming; Ren, Hua; Wang, Lidong; Chen, Wei; Ci, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Licochalcone A (Lico A) exhibits various biological properties, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In this study, we investigated the antioxidative potential and mechanisms of Lico A against tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (t-BHP-) induced oxidative damage in RAW 264.7 cells. Our results indicated that Lico A significantly inhibited t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion but increased the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit and the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) subunit genes expression. Additionally, Lico A dramatically upregulated the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which were associated with inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation, decreasing Keap1 protein expression and increasing antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activity. Lico A also obviously induced the activation of serine/threonine kinase (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but PI3K/Akt and ERK inhibitors treatment displayed clearly decreased levels of LicoA-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 expression, respectively. Furthermore, Lico A treatment markedly attenuated t-BHP-induced oxidative damage, which was reduced by treatment with PI3K/Akt, ERK, and HO-1 inhibitors. Therefore, Lico A might have a protective role against t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity by modulating HO-1 and by scavenging ROS via the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK/Nrf2 signaling pathways. PMID:26576227

  13. Lico A Enhances Nrf2-Mediated Defense Mechanisms against t-BHP-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death via Akt and ERK Activation in RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongming; Ren, Hua; Wang, Lidong; Chen, Wei; Ci, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Licochalcone A (Lico A) exhibits various biological properties, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In this study, we investigated the antioxidative potential and mechanisms of Lico A against tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (t-BHP-) induced oxidative damage in RAW 264.7 cells. Our results indicated that Lico A significantly inhibited t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion but increased the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit and the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) subunit genes expression. Additionally, Lico A dramatically upregulated the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which were associated with inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation, decreasing Keap1 protein expression and increasing antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activity. Lico A also obviously induced the activation of serine/threonine kinase (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but PI3K/Akt and ERK inhibitors treatment displayed clearly decreased levels of LicoA-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 expression, respectively. Furthermore, Lico A treatment markedly attenuated t-BHP-induced oxidative damage, which was reduced by treatment with PI3K/Akt, ERK, and HO-1 inhibitors. Therefore, Lico A might have a protective role against t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity by modulating HO-1 and by scavenging ROS via the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK/Nrf2 signaling pathways.

  14. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  15. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  16. The mechanisms of exocytosis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Upon activation through high affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI), mast cells (MCs) can release up to 100% of their content of preformed mediators stored in cytoplasmic secretory granules by compound exocytosis. This causes Type I immediate hypersensitivity reactions and, in the case of inappropriate activation by allergens, the symptoms of allergy. Recent work has uncovered a central role of SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF) Attachment Protein (SNAP) Receptors) proteins in regulating the numerous membrane fusion events during exocytosis. This has defined a series of new molecular actors in MC exocytosis that participate in the regulation of membrane fusion and the connection of the fusion machinery with early signaling events. The purpose of this chapter is to describe these proteins and provide a brief overview on their mechanism of action.

  17. Dihydroceramide accumulation mediates cytotoxic autophagy of cancer cells via autolysosome destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Fabriàs, Gemma; Dávila, David; Salanueva, Íñigo J.; Casas, Josefina; Montes, L. Ruth; Antón, Zuriñe; García-Taboada, Elena; Salazar-Roa, María; Lorente, Mar; Nylandsted, Jesper; Armstrong, Jane; López-Valero, Israel; McKee, Christopher S.; Serrano-Puebla, Ana; García-López, Roberto; González-Martínez, José; Abad, José L.; Hanada, Kentaro; Boya, Patricia; Goñi, Félix; Guzmán, Manuel; Lovat, Penny; Jäättelä, Marja; Alonso, Alicia; Velasco, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is considered primarily a cell survival process, although it can also lead to cell death. However, the factors that dictate the shift between these 2 opposite outcomes remain largely unknown. In this work, we used Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the main active component of marijuana, a compound that triggers autophagy-mediated cancer cell death) and nutrient deprivation (an autophagic stimulus that triggers cytoprotective autophagy) to investigate the precise molecular mechanisms responsible for the activation of cytotoxic autophagy in cancer cells. By using a wide array of experimental approaches we show that THC (but not nutrient deprivation) increases the dihydroceramide:ceramide ratio in the endoplasmic reticulum of glioma cells, and this alteration is directed to autophagosomes and autolysosomes to promote lysosomal membrane permeabilization, cathepsin release and the subsequent activation of apoptotic cell death. These findings pave the way to clarify the regulatory mechanisms that determine the selective activation of autophagy-mediated cancer cell death. PMID:27635674

  18. Dihydroceramide accumulation mediates cytotoxic autophagy of cancer cells via autolysosome destabilization.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Fabriàs, Gemma; Dávila, David; Salanueva, Íñigo J; Casas, Josefina; Montes, L Ruth; Antón, Zuriñe; García-Taboada, Elena; Salazar-Roa, María; Lorente, Mar; Nylandsted, Jesper; Armstrong, Jane; López-Valero, Israel; McKee, Christopher S; Serrano-Puebla, Ana; García-López, Roberto; González-Martínez, José; Abad, José L; Hanada, Kentaro; Boya, Patricia; Goñi, Félix; Guzmán, Manuel; Lovat, Penny; Jäättelä, Marja; Alonso, Alicia; Velasco, Guillermo

    2016-11-01

    Autophagy is considered primarily a cell survival process, although it can also lead to cell death. However, the factors that dictate the shift between these 2 opposite outcomes remain largely unknown. In this work, we used Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the main active component of marijuana, a compound that triggers autophagy-mediated cancer cell death) and nutrient deprivation (an autophagic stimulus that triggers cytoprotective autophagy) to investigate the precise molecular mechanisms responsible for the activation of cytotoxic autophagy in cancer cells. By using a wide array of experimental approaches we show that THC (but not nutrient deprivation) increases the dihydroceramide:ceramide ratio in the endoplasmic reticulum of glioma cells, and this alteration is directed to autophagosomes and autolysosomes to promote lysosomal membrane permeabilization, cathepsin release and the subsequent activation of apoptotic cell death. These findings pave the way to clarify the regulatory mechanisms that determine the selective activation of autophagy-mediated cancer cell death.

  19. What is antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA)?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole

    2005-05-01

    Antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an immunological pathology associated with the production of neutralizing Abs that inhibit the erythropoietic activity of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) and recombinant erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Although this disorder occurs very rarely, the number of reported cases has increased dramatically in recent years, predominantly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anaemia receiving subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of one particular formulation of recombinant epoetin-alpha. This disorder is differentiated from classic forms of PRCA that are caused by chemical toxaemia (i.e. erythroblastopenia induced by chemical compounds), lymphoproliferative neoplasms, thymoma, human parvovirus B19 and certain autoimmune disorders. Patients with Ab-mediated PRCA develop resistance to EPO and severe anaemia that follows a period of successful erythropoietic response, and exhibit characteristic decreases in blood haemoglobin (Hb) level and in the number of circulating reticulocytes. However, it is not yet possible to predict which patients will develop PRCA or when in the course of their treatments PRCA may develop. Laboratory confirmation of Ab-mediated PRCA requires bone marrow examination demonstrating few or no erythroid precursors and the presence of serum anti-EPO Abs using a validated assay. These neutralizing anti-EPO Abs recognize the protein core of the EPO molecule; carbohydrate groups on EPO can affect the binding of Abs but are themselves not immunological determinants. Animal models are being developed to increase further our understanding of the immunological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of Ab-mediated PRCA.

  20. Nrf2 mediates redox adaptation in NOX4-overexpressed non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qipeng; Yao, Bei; Li, Ning; Ma, Lei; Deng, Yanchao; Yang, Yang; Zeng, Cheng; Yang, Zhicheng; Liu, Bing

    2017-02-11

    The redox adaptation mechanisms in cancer cells are very complex and remain largely unclear. Our previous studies have confirmed that NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is abundantly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and confers apoptosis resistance on NSCLC cells. However, the comprehensive mechanisms for NOX4-mediated oxidative resistance of cancer cells remain still undentified. The present study found that NOX4-derived H2O2 enhanced the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) stability via disruption of redox-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulated its activity through activation of PI3K signaling. Specifically, the results showed that ectopic NOX4 expression did not induce apoptosis of A549 cells; however, inhibition of Nrf2 resulted in obvious apoptotic death of NOX4-overexpressed A549 cells, accompanied by a significant increase in H2O2 level and decrease in GSH content. Besides, inhibition of Nrf2 could suppress cell growth and efficiently reverse the enhancement effect of NOX4 on cell growth. The in vivo data confirmed that inhibition of Nrf2 could interfere apoptosis resistance in NOX4-overexpressed A549 tumors and led to cell growth inhibition. In conclusion, these results reveal that Nrf2 is critically involved in redox adaptation regulation in NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. Therefore, NOX4 and Nrf2 may be promising combination targets against malignant progression of NSCLC.

  1. Cell mechanics in biomedical cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the deformation behaviours of cellular entities, such as coated microbubbles and liposomes subject to a cavitation flow, become increasingly important for the advancement of ultrasonic imaging and drug delivery. Numerical simulations for bubble dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents based on the boundary integral method are presented in this work. The effects of the encapsulating shell are estimated by adapting Hoff's model used for thin-shell contrast agents. The viscosity effects are estimated by including the normal viscous stress in the boundary condition. In parallel, mechanical models of cell membranes and liposomes as well as state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative measurement of viscoelasticity for a single cell or coated microbubbles are reviewed. The future developments regarding modelling and measurement of the material properties of the cellular entities for cutting-edge biomedical applications are also discussed. PMID:26442142

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Song, Kwon-Ho; Motomura, Muneo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Gu, Yeun-Hwa; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Moon, Tae-Chul; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active ingredient of propolis, has several interesting biological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and carcinostatic activities. Recently, several groups have reported that CAPE is cytotoxic to tumor cells but not to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells. Treatment of U937 cells with CAPE decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation assay revealed the typical ladder profile of oligonucleosomal fragments in CAPE-treated U937 cells. In addition, as evidenced by the nuclear DAPI staining experiment, we observed that the nuclear condensation, a typical phenotype of apoptosis, was found in U937 cells treated with 5 microg/ml of CAPE. Therefore, it was suggested that CAPE is a potent agent inducing apoptosis in U937 cells. Apoptotic action of the CAPE was accompanied by release of cytochrome C, reduction of Bcl-2 expression, increase of Bax expression, activation/cleavage of caspase-3 and activation/cleavage of PARP in U937 cells, but not by Fas protein, an initial mediator in the death signaling, or by phospho-eIF2 alpha and CHOP, crucial mediators in ER-mediated apoptosis. From the results, it was concluded that CAPE induces the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not death receptors- or ER-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

  3. Differences and Similarities in TRAIL- and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Necroptotic Signaling in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Stephan; Fuchslocher Chico, Johaiber; Saggau, Carina; Fritsch, Jürgen; Föll, Alexandra; Plenge, Johannes; Arenz, Christoph; Pinkert, Thomas; Kalthoff, Holger; Trauzold, Anna; Schmitz, Ingo; Schütze, Stefan; Adam, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a type of regulated necrosis (RN) called necroptosis was identified to be involved in many pathophysiological processes and emerged as an alternative method to eliminate cancer cells. However, only a few studies have elucidated components of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis useful for anticancer therapy. Therefore, we have compared this type of cell death to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated necroptosis and found similar signaling through acid and neutral sphingomyelinases, the mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi, Atg5, and vacuolar H+-ATPase. Notably, executive mechanisms of both TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis are independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), and depletion of p38α increases the levels of both types of cell death. Moreover, we found differences in signaling between TNF- and TRAIL-mediated necroptosis, e.g., a lack of involvement of ubiquitin carboxyl hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and Atg16L1 in executive mechanisms of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis. Furthermore, we discovered indications of an altered involvement of mitochondrial components, since overexpression of the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 protected Jurkat cells from TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis, and overexpression of Bcl-XL diminished only TRAIL-induced necroptosis in Colo357 cells. Furthermore, TRAIL does not require receptor internalization and endosome-lysosome acidification to mediate necroptosis. Taken together, pathways described for TRAIL-mediated necroptosis and differences from those for TNF-mediated necroptosis might be unique targets to increase or modify necroptotic signaling and eliminate tumor cells more specifically in future anticancer approaches. PMID:27528614

  4. Conservation of miRNA-mediated silencing mechanisms across 600 million years of animal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Marta; Kirchner, Marieluise; Aharoni, Reuven; Ciolli Mattioli, Camilla; van den Bruck, David; Gutkovitch, Nadya; Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Selbach, Matthias; Moran, Yehu; Chekulaeva, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Our current knowledge about the mechanisms of miRNA silencing is restricted to few lineages such as vertebrates, arthropods, nematodes and land plants. miRNA-mediated silencing in bilaterian animals is dependent on the proteins of the GW182 family. Here, we dissect the function of GW182 protein in the cnidarian Nematostella, separated by 600 million years from other Metazoa. Using cultured human cells, we show that Nematostella GW182 recruits the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complexes via its tryptophan-containing motifs, thereby inhibiting translation and promoting mRNA decay. Further, similarly to bilaterians, GW182 in Nematostella is recruited to the miRNA repression complex via interaction with Argonaute proteins, and functions downstream to repress mRNA. Thus, our work suggests that this mechanism of miRNA-mediated silencing was already active in the last common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria. PMID:27604873

  5. Conservation of miRNA-mediated silencing mechanisms across 600 million years of animal evolution.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Marta; Kirchner, Marieluise; Aharoni, Reuven; Ciolli Mattioli, Camilla; van den Bruck, David; Gutkovitch, Nadya; Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Selbach, Matthias; Moran, Yehu; Chekulaeva, Marina

    2017-01-25

    Our current knowledge about the mechanisms of miRNA silencing is restricted to few lineages such as vertebrates, arthropods, nematodes and land plants. miRNA-mediated silencing in bilaterian animals is dependent on the proteins of the GW182 family. Here, we dissect the function of GW182 protein in the cnidarian Nematostella, separated by 600 million years from other Metazoa. Using cultured human cells, we show that Nematostella GW182 recruits the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complexes via its tryptophan-containing motifs, thereby inhibiting translation and promoting mRNA decay. Further, similarly to bilaterians, GW182 in Nematostella is recruited to the miRNA repression complex via interaction with Argonaute proteins, and functions downstream to repress mRNA. Thus, our work suggests that this mechanism of miRNA-mediated silencing was already active in the last common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria.

  6. Genetic Mechanisms in Apc-Mediated Mammary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraguchi, Mari; Ohene-Baah, Nana Yaw; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Bronson, Roderick Terry; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2009-01-01

    Many components of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway also play critical roles in mammary tumor development, yet the role of the tumor suppressor gene APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) in breast oncongenesis is unclear. To better understand the role of Apc in mammary tumorigenesis, we introduced conditional Apc mutations specifically into two different mammary epithelial populations using K14-cre and WAP-cre transgenic mice that express Cre-recombinase in mammary progenitor cells and lactating luminal cells, respectively. Only the K14-cre–mediated Apc heterozygosity developed mammary adenocarcinomas demonstrating histological heterogeneity, suggesting the multilineage progenitor cell origin of these tumors. These tumors harbored truncation mutation in a defined region in the remaining wild-type allele of Apc that would retain some down-regulating activity of β-catenin signaling. Activating mutations at codons 12 and 61 of either H-Ras or K-Ras were also found in a subset of these tumors. Expression profiles of acinar-type mammary tumors from K14-cre; ApcCKO/+ mice showed luminal epithelial gene expression pattern, and clustering analysis demonstrated more correlation to MMTV-neu model than to MMTV-Wnt1. In contrast, neither WAP-cre–induced Apc heterozygous nor homozygous mutations resulted in predisposition to mammary tumorigenesis, although WAP-cre–mediated Apc deficiency resulted in severe squamous metaplasia of mammary glands. Collectively, our results suggest that not only the epithelial origin but also a certain Apc mutations are selected to achieve a specific level of β-catenin signaling optimal for mammary tumor development and explain partially the colon- but not mammary-specific tumor development in patients that carry germline mutations in APC. PMID:19197353

  7. Mechanisms of cell survival in myocardial hibernation.

    PubMed

    Depre, Christophe; Vatner, Stephen F

    2005-04-01

    Myocardial hibernation represents a condition of regional ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic coronary artery disease, which reverses gradually after revascularization. The precise mechanism mediating the regional dysfunction is still debated. One hypothesis suggests that chronic hypoperfusion results in a self-protecting downregulation in myocardial function and metabolism to match the decreased oxygen supply. An alternative hypothesis suggests that the myocardium is subject to repetitive episodes of ischemic dysfunction resulting from an imbalance between myocardial metabolic demand and supply that eventually creates a sustained depression of contractility. It is generally agreed that hibernating myocardium is submitted repeatedly to ischemic stress, and therefore one question persists: how do myocytes survive in the setting of chronic ischemia? The hallmark of hibernating myocardium is a maintained viability of the dysfunctional myocardium which relies on an increased uptake of glucose. We propose that, in addition to this metabolic adjustment, there must be molecular switches that confer resistance to ischemia in hibernating myocardium. Such mechanisms include the activation of a genomic program of cell survival as well as autophagy. These protective mechanisms are induced by ischemia and remain activated chronically as long as either sustained or intermittent ischemia persists.

  8. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIA-BLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  9. CRISPR mediated somatic cell genome engineering in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Véron, Nadège; Qu, Zhengdong; Kipen, Phoebe A S; Hirst, Claire E; Marcelle, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Gene-targeted knockout technologies are invaluable tools for understanding the functions of genes in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9 system of RNA-guided genome editing is revolutionizing genetics research in a wide spectrum of organisms. Here, we combined CRISPR with in vivo electroporation in the chicken embryo to efficiently target the transcription factor PAX7 in tissues of the developing embryo. This approach generated mosaic genetic mutations within a wild-type cellular background. This series of proof-of-principle experiments indicate that in vivo CRISPR-mediated cell genome engineering is an effective method to achieve gene loss-of-function in the tissues of the chicken embryo and it completes the growing genetic toolbox to study the molecular mechanisms regulating development in this important animal model.

  10. A possible mechanism in DHEA-mediated protection against osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Jun; Tang, Lu-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Xin-Die; Ding, Qian-Hai; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its ester form, DHEA-S, are the most abundant steroids in human plasma. Our previous studies showed that DHEA protects against osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this paper was to explore the possible mechanisms that underlie DHEA-mediated protection against OA. We tested the expression of β-catenin, it was increased significantly in OA. Rabbit cartilage was treated with various concentrations of DHEA in both IL-1β-induced rabbit chondrocytes and in rabbit cartilage from the anterior cruciate ligament transaction-induced OA model. We found DHEA decreased the expression of β-catenin. Then we further activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by β-catenin transfection and inactivated it by the inhibitor Dickkopf1 in chondrocytes to reveal its role in the pathogenesis of OA. It turns out the protective effect of DHEA was significantly decreased when Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated, while inactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling enhanced the effects of DHEA. Therefore, we hypothesize that DHEA probably exerted its chondroprotective effect by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in DHEA-mediated protection against OA.

  11. CD8+ T-cell interaction with HCV replicon cells: evidence for both cytokine- and cell-mediated antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhu, Haizhen; Tu, Zhengkun; Xu, Yi-Ling; Nelson, David R

    2003-06-01

    The interaction between the host immune response and infected hepatocytes plays a central role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The lack of a suitable animal or in vitro model has hindered our understanding of the host T-cell/HCV interaction. Our aim was to develop an in vitro model to study the mechanisms of HCV-specific T-cell-mediated antiviral and cytolytic function. The HCV replicon was HLA typed and lymphocytes were obtained from an HLA class I-matched subject. CD8(+) T cells were expanded with 2 HCV-specific/HLA-restricted peptides for NS3. Lymphocyte preparations were cocultured with HCV replicon (FCA1) and control (Huh7) cells labeled with (51)Cr. After a 48-hour incubation, the cells were harvested for RNA extraction. Standard blocking assays were performed in the presence of anti-interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and anti-FasL. Cytolytic activity was measured by (51)Cr release. HCV replicon cells express homozygous HLA-A11 alleles and present HCV nonstructural proteins. HCV-specific expansion of CD8(+) cells led to a 10-fold decrease in HCV replication by Northern blot analysis and 21% specific lysis of FCA1 cells (compared with 2% of control Huh7 cells). Twenty percent of this antiviral activity was independent of T-cell binding, suggesting cytokine-mediated antiviral activity. The CD8(+) antiviral effect was markedly reduced by blocking either IFN-gamma or FasL but was unaffected by blocking TNF-alpha. In conclusion, HCV-specific CD8(+) cells inhibit viral RNA replication by cytokine-mediated and direct cytolytic effects. This T-cell/HCV subgenomic replicon system represents a model for the investigation of CD8 cell interaction with HCV-infected hepatocytes.

  12. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, K N

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms of tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate were investigated with the CBS-QB3 method. Either the protonation of peroxynitrite or a reaction with carbon dioxide gives a reactive peroxide intermediate. Peroxynitrous acid-mediated nitration of phenol occurs via unimolecular decomposition to give nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Nitrosoperoxycarbonate also undergoes unimolecular decomposition to give carbonate and nitrogen dioxide radicals. The reactions of tyrosine with the hydroxyl or carbonate radicals give a phenoxy radical intermediate. The reaction of the nitrogen dioxide with this radical intermediate followed by tautomerization gives nitrated tyrosine in both cases. According to CBS-QB3 calculations, the rate-limiting step for the nitration of phenol is the decomposition of peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

  13. Engineering nanomaterials to address cell-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sean; Liu, Yu-Gang; Scott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder with a pathophysiology driven by both innate and adaptive immunity and a primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) worldwide. Vascular inflammation and accumulation of foam cells and their products induce maturation of atheromas, or plaques, which can rupture by metalloprotease action, leading to ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. Diverse immune cell populations participate in all stages of plaque maturation, many of which directly influence plaque stability and rupture via inflammatory mechanisms. Current clinical treatments for atherosclerosis focus on lowering serum levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using therapeutics such as statins, administration of antithrombotic drugs, and surgical intervention. Strategies that address cell-mediated inflammation are lacking, and consequently have recently become an area of considerable research focus. Nanomaterials have emerged as highly advantageous tools for these studies, as they can be engineered to target specific inflammatory cell populations, deliver therapeutics of wide-ranging solubilities and enhance analytical methods that include imaging and proteomics. Furthermore, the highly phagocytic nature of antigen presenting cells (APCs), a diverse cell population central to the initiation of immune responses and inflammation, make them particularly amenable to targeting and modulation by nanoscale particulates. Nanomaterials have therefore become essential components of vaccine formulations and treatments for inflammation-driven pathologies like autoimmunity, and present novel opportunities for immunotherapeutic treatments of CVD. Here, we review recent progress in the design and use of nanomaterials for therapeutic assessment and treatment of atherosclerosis. We will focus on promising new approaches that utilize nanomaterials for cell-specific imaging, gene therapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27135051

  14. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jue Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  15. Molecular mechanism of protopanaxadiol saponin fraction-mediated anti-inflammatory actions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanyan; Lee, Jongsung; Rhee, Man Hee; Yu, Tao; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Kim, Yong; Yoon, Keejung; Kim, Ji Hye; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Hong, Sungyoul; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Background Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is a representative traditional herbal medicine with many different pharmacological properties including anticancer, anti-atherosclerosis, anti-diabetes, and anti-inflammatory activities. Only a few studies have explored the molecular mechanism of KRG-mediated anti-inflammatory activity. Methods We investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the protopanaxadiol saponin fraction (PPD-SF) of KRG using in vitro and in vivo inflammatory models. Results PPD-SF dose-dependently diminished the release of inflammatory mediators [nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2], and downregulated the mRNA expression of their corresponding genes (inducible NO synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cyclooxygenase-2), without altering cell viability. The PPD-SF-mediated suppression of these events appeared to be regulated by a blockade of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-kappa-B activator)-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which are linked to the activation of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) and interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3). Moreover, this fraction also ameliorated HCl/ethanol/-induced gastritis via suppression of phospho-JNK2 levels. Conclusion These results strongly suggest that the anti-inflammatory action of PPD-SF could be mediated by a reduction in the activation of p38-, JNK2-, and TANK-binding-kinase-1-linked pathways and their corresponding transcription factors (ATF2 and IRF3). PMID:25535478

  16. Human Dendritic Cells Mitigate NK-Cell Dysfunction Mediated by Nonselective JAK1/2 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Curran, Shane A; Shyer, Justin A; St Angelo, Erin T; Talbot, Lillian R; Sharma, Sneh; Chung, David J; Heller, Glenn; Hsu, Katharine C; Betts, Brian C; Young, James W

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have achieved positive responses in myeloproliferative neoplasms, but at the expense of decreased natural killer (NK) cell numbers and compromised function. Selective JAK2 inhibition may also have a role in preventing and treating graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although JAK inhibitors can impair monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDC) activation and function and suppress effector T-cell responses, the effects on NK cells and the relevant mechanisms remain undefined. Using common γc cytokines and distinct human dendritic cell (DC) subtypes, we compared the effects of a JAK2-specific (TG101348) with a less selective JAK1/2 (ruxolitinib) inhibitor on NK-cell activation and function. Ruxolitinib treatment completely blocked IL2, IL15, and DC-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, along with the capacity of NK cells to secrete IFNγ or lyse NK cell-sensitive targets. Only NK-cell proliferation stimulated by moDCs resisted ruxolitinib treatment. In contrast, TG101348 treatment of stimulated NK cells resulted in far less functional compromise. TG101348 completely inhibited only soluble IL15-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, which Langerhans-type DCs (LCs), presenting membrane-bound IL15 in trans, could salvage. These results demonstrate that ruxolitinib's nonselective inhibition of JAK1/2 results in profound NK-cell dysfunction by blocking downstream pSTAT5, hence providing a persuasive rationale for the development of selective JAK2 inhibitors for immunotherapeutic applications. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(1); 52-60. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Mechanisms of abscisic acid-mediated control of stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Munemasa, Shintaro; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Waadt, Rainer; Brandt, Benjamin; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-12-01

    Drought stress triggers an increase in the level of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), which initiates a signaling cascade to close stomata and reduce water loss. Recent studies have revealed that guard cells control cytosolic ABA concentration through the concerted actions of biosynthesis, catabolism as well as transport across membranes. Substantial progress has been made at understanding the molecular mechanisms of how the ABA signaling core module controls the activity of anion channels and thereby stomatal aperture. In this review, we focus on our current mechanistic understanding of ABA signaling in guard cells including the role of the second messenger Ca(2+) as well as crosstalk with biotic stress responses.

  18. Mediators in cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.J.; Maizel, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among seven sections. The section headings are: Cell Cycle and Control of Cell Growth, Growth Factors for Nonlymphoid Cells, Colony-Stimulating Factors, Stem Cells and Hematopoiesis, Lymphoid Growth Factors, Growth Factors in Neoplasia, Interferon, and Differentiation in Normal and Neoplastic Cells.

  19. Mast Cell Mediators: Their Differential Release and the Secretory Pathways Involved

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Tae Chul; Befus, A. Dean; Kulka, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are widely distributed throughout the body and are common at mucosal surfaces, a major host–environment interface. MC are functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous depending on the microenvironment in which they mature. Although MC have been classically viewed as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic diseases, they are also recognized as important in host defense, innate and acquired immunity, homeostatic responses, and immunoregulation. MC activation can induce release of pre-formed mediators such as histamine from their granules, as well as release of de novo synthesized lipid mediators, cytokines, and chemokines that play diverse roles, not only in allergic reactions but also in numerous physiological and pathophysiological responses. Indeed, MC release their mediators in a discriminating and chronological manner, depending upon the stimuli involved and their signaling cascades (e.g., IgE-mediated or Toll-like receptor-mediated). However, the precise mechanisms underlying differential mediator release in response to these stimuli are poorly known. This review summarizes our knowledge of MC mediators and will focus on what is known about the discriminatory release of these mediators dependent upon diverse stimuli, MC phenotypes, and species of origin, as well as on the intracellular synthesis, storage, and secretory processes involved. PMID:25452755

  20. Quantification of Grain Boundary Mediated Plasticity Mechanisms in Nanocrystalline Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarino, Jason F.

    Nanocrystalline metals have been a topic of great discussion over recent years due to their exceptional strengths and novel grain boundary-mediated deformation mechanisms. Their microstructures are known to evolve through dynamic processes such as grain boundary migration and grain rotation, but how the collective interaction of these mechanisms alter the microstructure on a larger scale is not completely understood. In this thesis, we present coupled atomistic modeling and experimental tasks that aim to understand how the grain structure, grain boundaries, and associated grain boundary network change during nanocrystalline plasticity. Due to the complex three-dimensional nature of these mechanisms and the limited spatial and temporal resolution of current in-situ experimental techniques, we turn to atomistic modeling to help understand the dynamics by which these mechanisms unfold. In order to provide a quantitative analysis of this behavior, we develop a tool which fully characterizes nanocrystalline microstructures in atomistic models and subsequently tracks their evolution during molecular dynamics simulations. We then use this algorithm to quantitatively track grain structure and boundary network evolution in plastically deformed nanocrystalline Al, finding that higher testing temperature and smaller average grain size results in increased evolution of grain structure with evidence of larger scale changes to the grain boundary network also taking place. This prompts us to extend our analysis technique to include full characterization of grain boundary networks and rigorous topographical feature identification. We then employ this tool on simulations of Al subject to monotonic tension, cycling loading, and simple annealing, and find that each case results in different evolution of the grain boundary network. Finally, our computational work is complemented synergistically by experimental analyses which track surface microstructure evolution during sliding wear

  1. Mechanism of HSV infection through soluble adapter-mediated virus bridging to the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Tahara, Hideaki; Kuwano, Michihiko; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2011-04-25

    Herpes simplex virus entry into cells requires the binding of envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to an entry receptor. Depending on the cell, entry occurs by different mechanisms, including fusion at the cell surface or endocytosis. Here we examined the entry mechanism through a non-HSV receptor mediated by a soluble bi-specific adapter protein composed of recognition elements for gD and the EGF receptor (EGFR). Virus entered into endosomes using either EGF or an EGFR-specific single chain antibody (scFv) for receptor recognition. Infection was less efficient with the EGF adapter which could be attributed to its weaker binding to a viral gD. Infection mediated by the scFv adapter was pH sensitive, indicating that gD-EGFR bridging alone was insufficient for capsid release from endosomes. We also show that the scFv adapter enhanced infection of EGFR-expressing tumor tissue in vivo. Our results indicate that adapters may retarget HSV infection without drastically changing the entry mechanism.

  2. Adherence of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli to Bovine Recto-anal Junction Squamous Epithelial Cells Appears to Be Mediated by Mechanisms Distinct from Those Used by O157

    PubMed Central

    Hovde, Carolyn J.; John, Manohar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study presents evidence that the pattern (diffuse or aggregative) of adherence of clinically relevant non-O157 Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells is similar to that of E. coli O157, although the mechanisms of adherence appear to be distinct. Our results further suggest that novel adhesins, and not Intimin, are likely involved in non-O157 STEC adherence to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells. These findings have important implications for the development of efficacious modalities for blocking adherence of non-O157 STEC to bovine gastrointestinal epithelial cells. PMID:23510495

  3. Evidence for the mechanism of action of the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated decrease of nuclear estrogen receptor levels in wild-type and mutant mouse Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zacharewski, T; Harris, M; Safe, S

    1991-06-15

    Treatment of wild-type Hepa 1c1c7 cells with 1 nM [3H]-17 beta-estradiol resulted in the rapid accumulation of the nuclear estrogen receptor complex whose levels were maximized within 1 hr. Cotreatment of the cells with 10 nM 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and [3H]-17 beta-estradiol did not affect the nuclear estrogen receptor levels 1 hr after addition of the radioligand; however, pretreatment of the cells for 1, 6, 24 or 42 hr with 10 nM TCDD prior to the addition of the radiolabeled hormone caused a greater than 50% decrease in nuclear estrogen receptor levels (determined by velocity sedimentation analysis) 1 hr after the addition of [3H]-17 beta-estradiol. In parallel experiments in which 10 nM TCDD was added 6 hr prior to the radiolabeled hormone, TCDD caused a 63 and 74% decrease in immunodetectable cytosolic and nuclear estrogen receptor protein levels, respectively, in the wild-type Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The nuclear estrogen receptor was also detected in two Hepa 1c1c7 mutant (class 1 and class 2) cell lines which have been characterized previously as TCDD non-responsive due to either decreased aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor levels or a defect in the accumulation of transcriptionally active nuclear Ah receptor complexes, respectively. Treatment of these mutant cell lines with TCDD and [3H]-17 beta-estradiol (as described above) caused only a minimum (class 1) or non-detectable (class 2) decrease in nuclear estrogen receptor binding activity or immunodetectable protein levels. These results, coupled with the structure-dependent differences in the activities of TCDD (a strong Ah receptor agonist) and 2,8-dichlordibenzo-p-dioxin (a weak Ah receptor agonist) in this assay system, support a role for the Ah receptor in the TCDD-mediated decrease of the nuclear estrogen receptor in mouse Hepa 1c1c7 cells. In addition, actinomycin D and cycloheximide both inhibited the TCDD-mediated decrease of nuclear estrogen receptor levels in the Hepa 1c1c7 wild

  4. Role of carbohydrate-mediated adherence in cytopathogenic mechanisms of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Jefferson, D M; Panjwani, N

    1998-06-19

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a vision-threatening corneal infection. The mannose-binding protein of Acanthamoeba is thought to mediate adhesion of parasites to host cells. We characterized the amoeba lectin with respect to its carbohydrate binding properties and the role in amoeba-induced cytopathic effect (CPE). Sugar inhibition assays revealed that the amoeba lectin has the highest affinity for alpha-Man and Man(alpha1-3)Man units. In vitro cytopathic assays indicated that mannose-based saccharides which inhibit amoeba adhesion to corneal epithelial cells were also potent inhibitors of amoeba-induced CPE. Another major finding was that N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) which does not inhibit adhesion of amoeba to host cells is also an inhibitor of amoeba-induced CPE. The Acanthamoebae are thought to produce CPE by secreting cytotoxic proteinases. By zymography, one metalloproteinase and three serine proteinases were detected in the conditioned media obtained after incubating amoebae with the host cells. The addition of free alpha-Man and GlcNAc to the co-culture media inhibited the secretion of the metalloproteinase and serine proteinases, respectively. In summary, we have shown that the lectin-mediated adhesion of the Acanthamoeba to host cells is a prerequisite for the amoeba-induced cytolysis of target cells and have implicated a contact-dependent metalloproteinase in the cytopathogenic mechanisms of Acanthamoeba.

  5. Mechanisms of N-acetyl cysteine-mediated protection from 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, Avina; Cacalano, Nicholas A; Hume, Wyatt R; Jewett, Anahid

    2008-10-01

    Resin-based materials are now commonly used in dentistry in restorative materials as well as in endodontic sealers. These materials have been shown to be cytotoxic. The mechanisms by which resin-based materials mediate their adverse effects have not been completely elucidated. Here we show that 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) induces apoptotic cell death in oral keratinocytes and immune cells through the intrinsic cell death pathway. Functional loss and cell death induced by HEMA was significantly inhibited in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment. In addition, HEMA induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and an increase in cleaved caspases was potently inhibited in the presence of NAC treatment. Overall, the results reported in this article indicate that NAC is an effective chemoprotectant that can safely be used to protect the pulp and the surrounding tissues from adverse effects of dental restorative and endodontic materials.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor-mediated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review, we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor mediated tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics. PMID:24066765

  8. P-cadherin-mediated Rho GTPase regulation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellières, Elsa; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This commentary addresses the role of P-cadherin in collective cell migration (CCM), a cooperative and coordinated migration mode, used by cells during normal and pathological migration processes. We discuss how cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions (CCJs) play a critical role in CCM through their ability to regulate Rho GTPase-dependent pathways and how this leads to the generation and orientation of mechanical forces. We will also highlight the key function of P-cadherin (a poor prognostic marker in several tumors) in promoting collective cell movement in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. PMID:27152729

  9. Mechanisms of PD-L1/PD-1-mediated CD8 T-cell dysfunction in the context of aging-related immune defects in the Eµ-TCL1 CLL mouse model.

    PubMed

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Riches, John C; Miller, Shaun; Day, William P; Kotsiou, Eleni; Neuberg, Donna; Croce, Carlo M; Capasso, Melania; Gribben, John G

    2015-07-09

    T-cell defects, immune suppression, and poor antitumor immune responses are hallmarks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory signaling has emerged as a major immunosuppressive mechanism. However, the effect of different microenvironments and the confounding influence of aging are poorly understood. The current study uses the Eμ-TCL1 mouse model, which replicates human T-cell defects, as a preclinical platform to longitudinally examine patterns of T-cell dysfunction alongside developing CLL and in different microenvironments, with a focus on PD-1/PD-L1 interactions. The development of CLL was significantly associated with changes in T-cell phenotype across all organs and function. Although partly mirrored in aging wild-type mice, CLL-specific T-cell changes were identified. Murine CLL cells highly expressed PD-L1 and PD-L2 in all organs, with high PD-L1 expression in the spleen. CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells from leukemic and aging healthy mice highly expressed PD-1, identifying aging as a confounder, but adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated CLL-specific PD-1 induction. Direct comparisons of PD-1 expression and function between aging CLL mice and controls identified PD-1(+) T cells in CLL as a heterogeneous population with variable effector function. This is highly relevant for therapeutic targeting of CD8(+) T cells, showing the potential of reprogramming and selective subset expansion to restore antitumor immunity.

  10. Continuing to illuminate the mechanisms underlying UV-mediated melanomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, Ryan W; Liu-Smith, Feng; Meyskens, Frank L

    2014-09-05

    The incidence of melanoma is one of the fastest growing of all tumor types in the United States and the number of cases worldwide has doubled in the past 30 years. Melanoma, which arises from melanocytes, is an extremely aggressive tumor that invades the vascular and lymphatic systems to establish tumors elsewhere in the body. Melanoma is a particularly resilient cancer and systemic therapy approaches have achieved minimal success against metastatic melanoma resulting in only a few FDA-approved treatments with limited benefit. Leading treatments offer minimal efficacy with response rates generally under 15% in the long term with no clear effect on melanoma-related mortality. Even the recent success of the specific BRAF mutant inhibitor vemurafenib has been tempered somewhat since acquired resistance is rapidly observed. Thus, understanding the mechanism(s) of melanoma carcinogenesis is paramount to combating this deadly disease. Not only for the treatment of melanoma but, ultimately, for prevention. In this report, we will summarize our work to date regarding the characterization of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-mediated melanomagenesis and highlight several promising avenues of ongoing research.

  11. Memantine Induces NMDAR1-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death in Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Wan-Soo; Yeom, Mi-Young; Kang, Eun-Sun; Chung, Yong-An; Chung, Dong-Sup; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Objective Autophagy is one of the key responses of cells to programmed cell death. Memantine, an approved anti-dementia drug, has an antiproliferative effect on cancer cells but the mechanism is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to test the possibility of induction of autophagic cell death by memantine in glioma cell lines. Methods Glioma cell lines (T-98 G and U-251 MG) were used for this study. Results The antiproliferative effect of memantine was shown on T-98 G cells, which expressed N-methyl-D-aspartate 1 receptor (NMDAR1). Memantine increased the autophagic-related proteins as the conversion ratio of light chain protein 3-II (LC3-II)-/LC3-I and the expression of beclin-1. Memantine also increased formation of autophagic vacuoles observed under a transmission electron microscope. Transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knock down NMDAR1 in the glioma cells induced resistance to memantine and decreased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio in T-98 G cells. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that in glioma cells, memantine inhibits proliferation and induces autophagy mediated by NMDAR1. PMID:28264232

  12. Ca-Mediated Electroformation of Cell-Sized Lipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Fei; Yang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Cell-sized lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are formed when lipid molecules self-assemble to construct a single bilayer compartment with similar morphology to living cells. The physics of self-assembly process is only generally understood and the size distribution of GUVs tends to be very polydisperse. Herein we report a strategy for the production of controlled size distributions of GUVs by a novel mechanism dissecting the mediation ability of calcium (Ca) on the conventional electroformation of GUVs. We finely construct both of the calcium ion (Ca2+) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) mineral adsorption layers on a lipid film surface respectively during the electroformation of GUVs. It is found that Ca2+ Slip plane polarized by alternating electric field could induce a pattern of electroosmotic flow across the surface, and thus confine the fusion and growth of GUVs to facilitate the formation of uniform GUVs. The model is further improved by directly using CaCO3 that is in situ formed on a lipid film surface, providing a GUV population with narrow polydispersity. The two models deciphers the new biological function of calcium on the birth of cell-like lipid vesicles, and thus might be potentially relevant to the construction of new model to elucidate the cellular development process. PMID:25950604

  13. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  14. Interleukin-22 promotes intestinal-stem-cell-mediated epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lindemans, Caroline A; Calafiore, Marco; Mertelsmann, Anna M; O'Connor, Margaret H; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Jenq, Robert R; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F; Smith, Odette M; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas E; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E; Shroyer, Noah F; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hanash, Alan M

    2015-12-24

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Using ex vivo organoid cultures, here we show that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury, increase the growth of mouse small intestine organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both mouse and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced STAT3 phosphorylation in Lgr5(+) ISCs, and STAT3 was crucial for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after mouse allogeneic bone marrow transplantation enhanced the recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft-versus-host disease. ATOH1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independently of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support the intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration.

  15. Mast cell chymase induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis by disrupting NF-{kappa}B-mediated survival signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Leskinen, Markus J.; Heikkilae, Hanna M.; Speer, Mei Y.; Hakala, Jukka K.; Laine, Mika; Kovanen, Petri T.; Lindstedt, Ken A. . E-mail: ken.lindstedt@wri.fi

    2006-05-01

    Chymase released from activated mast cells induces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in vitro by degrading the pericellular matrix component fibronectin, so causing disruption of focal adhesion complexes and Akt dephosphorylation, which are necessary for cell adhesion and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of chymase-mediated apoptosis downstream of Akt have remained elusive. Here, we show by means of RT-PCR, Western blotting, EMSA, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, that chymase induces SMC apoptosis by disrupting NF-{kappa}B-mediated survival signaling. Following chymase treatment, the translocation of active NF-{kappa}B/p65 to the nucleus was partly abolished and the amount of nuclear p65 was reduced. Pretreatment of SMCs with chymase also inhibited LPS- and IL-1{beta}-induced nuclear translocation of p65. The chymase-induced degradation of p65 was mediated by active caspases. Loss of NF-{kappa}B-mediated transactivation resulted in downregulation of bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, leading to mitochondrial swelling and release of cytochrome c. The apoptotic process involved activation of both caspase 9 and caspase 8. The results reveal that, by disrupting the NF-{kappa}B-mediated survival-signaling pathway, activated chymase-secreting mast cells can mediate apoptosis of cultured arterial SMCs. Since activated mast cells colocalize with apoptotic SMCs in vulnerable areas of human atherosclerotic plaques, they may participate in the weakening and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques.

  16. Mechanisms underlying heterologous skin scaffold-mediated tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Kallyne K. O.; Moraes, Andréia R.; Miranda, Aline C.; Greco, Rebecca; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Greco, Karin V.; Oliani, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility of two newly developed porcine skin scaffolds was assessed after 3, 14, 21 and 90 days of implantation in rats. Both scaffolds showed absence of cells, preservation of ECM and mechanical properties comparable to non-decellularised skin before implantation. Host cell infiltration was much prominent on both scaffolds when compared to Permacol (surgical control). At day 3, the grafts were surrounded by polymorphonuclear cells, which were replaced by a notable number of IL-6-positive cells at day 14. Simultaneously, the number of pro-inflammatory M1-macrophage was enhanced. Interestingly, a predominant pro-remodeling M2 response, with newly formed vessels, myofibroblasts activation and a shift on the type of collagen expression was sequentially delayed (around 21 days). The gene expression of some trophic factors involved in tissue remodeling was congruent with the cellular events. Our findings suggested that the responsiveness of macrophages after non-crosslinked skin scaffolds implantation seemed to intimately affect various cell responses and molecular events; and this range of mutually reinforcing actions was predictive of a positive tissue remodeling that was essential for the long-standing success of the implants. Furthermore, our study indicates that non-crosslinked biologic scaffold implantation is biocompatible to the host tissue and somehow underlying molecular events involved in tissue repair. PMID:27725772

  17. Caudatin Inhibits Human Glioma Cells Growth Through Triggering DNA Damage-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Yang, Ming-feng; Fan, Cun-dong; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    Caudatin, one of the species of C-21 steroidal glycosides mainly isolated from the root of Cynanchum bungei Decne, exhibits potent anticancer activities. However, the mechanism remains poorly defined. In the present study, the growth inhibitory effect and mechanism of caudatin on human glioma cells were evaluated in vitro. The results revealed that caudatin time- and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and U87 cells growth. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that caudatin-induced growth inhibition against U251 and U87 cells was mainly achieved by the induction of G0/G1 and S-phase cell cycle arrest through triggering DNA damage, as convinced by the up-regulation of p53, p21, and histone phosphorylation, as well as the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, caudatin treatment also triggered the activation of ERK and inactivation of AKT pathway. LY294002 (an AKT inhibitor) addition enhanced caudation-induced AKT inhibition, indicating that caudatin inhibited U251 cells growth in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that caudatin may act as a novel cytostatic reagent against human glioma cells through the induction of DNA damage-mediated cell cycle arrest with the involvement of modulating MAPK and AKT pathways.

  18. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  19. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  20. The canonical Wg signaling modulates Bsk-mediated cell death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Chen, C; Wu, C; Yang, Y; Li, W; Xue, L

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is an essential regulatory mechanism for removing unneeded cells in animal development and tissue homeostasis. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway has pivotal roles in the regulation of cell death in response to various intrinsic and extrinsic stress signals. The canonical Wingless (Wg) signaling has been implicated in cell proliferation and cell fate decisions, whereas its role in cell death remains largely elusive. Here, we report that activated Bsk (the Drosophila JNK homolog) induced cell death is mediated by the canonical Wg signaling. First, loss of Wg signaling abrogates Bsk-mediated caspase-independent cell death. Second, activation of Wg signaling promotes cell death in a caspase-independent manner. Third, activation of Bsk signaling results in upregulated transcription of wingless (wg) gene. Finally, Wg pathway participates in the physiological function of Bsk signaling in development. These findings not only reveal a previously undiscovered role of Wg signaling in Bsk-mediated cell death, but also provide a novel mechanism for the interplay between the two important signaling pathways in development. PMID:25855961

  1. A new mechanism for spatial pattern formation via lateral and protrusion-mediated lateral signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Ginger L.; Baum, Buzz

    2016-01-01

    Tissue organization and patterning are critical during development when genetically identical cells take on different fates. Lateral signalling plays an important role in this process by helping to generate self-organized spatial patterns in an otherwise uniform collection of cells. Recent data suggest that lateral signalling can be mediated both by junctional contacts between neighbouring cells and via cellular protrusions that allow non-neighbouring cells to interact with one another at a distance. However, it remains unclear precisely how signalling mediated by these distinct types of cell–cell contact can physically contribute to the generation of complex patterns without the assistance of diffusible morphogens or pre-patterns. To explore this question, in this work we develop a model of lateral signalling based on a single receptor/ligand pair as exemplified by Notch and Delta. We show that allowing the signalling kinetics to differ at junctional versus protrusion-mediated contacts, an assumption inspired by recent data which show that the cleavage of Notch in several systems requires both Delta binding and the application of mechanical force, permits individual cells to act to promote both lateral activation and lateral inhibition. Strikingly, under this model, in which Delta can sequester Notch, a variety of patterns resembling those typical of reaction–diffusion systems is observed, together with more unusual patterns that arise when we consider changes in signalling kinetics, and in the length and distribution of protrusions. Importantly, these patterns are self-organizing—so that local interactions drive tissue-scale patterning. Together, these data show that protrusions can, in principle, generate different types of patterns in addition to contributing to long-range signalling and to pattern refinement. PMID:27807273

  2. Nicotine-Mediated Ca(2+)-Influx Induces IL-8 Secretion in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Kou; Tsujino, Ichiro; Koshi, Ryosuke; Sugano, Naoyuki; Sato, Shuichi; Asano, Masatake

    2016-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the most important risk factors for the development of various diseases. Nicotine is the most extensively investigated component of cigarette smoke, and a comprehensive analysis of the genes induced by nicotine stimulation revealed that interleukin-8 (IL-8) was induced in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell (OSCC). Based on this background, the signaling mechanisms of nicotine-mediated IL-8 induction in OSCC was investigated. Augmented IL-8 secretion by Ca9-22 cells was blocked by the NF-κB inhibitor L-1-4'-tosylamino-phenylethyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-specific inhibitor α-bungarotoxin (αBtx). The downstream signaling pathway was further examined by pre-incubating the cells with inhibitors against mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), protein kinase C (PKC), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMK II). Only the CaMK II inhibitor was found to exert an inhibitory effect on nicotine-mediated IL-8 secretion. Pre-treatment of the Ca9-22 cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM drastically inhibited IL-8 secretion. Although nicotine stimulation induced the phosphorylation of the NF-κB p65 subunit, pre-treatment with BAPTA-AM was found to inhibit this activity significantly. CaMK II-dependent p65 phosphorylation was confirmed by pre-incubation of the cells with CaMK II inhibitor. The results from this study indicate that the binding of nicotine to nAChR induces Ca(2+) influx, which results in the activation and phosphorylation of CaMK II and NF-κB p65, respectively. Nicotine-mediated IL-8 induction should be a trigger for the initiation of various diseases.

  3. Structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 potently inhibits tumor growth mainly through ROS-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Jing; Yu, Bin; Wang, Jun-Wei; Qi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Kai; Huang, Xin; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells always have increased ROS levels, thus making them more vulnerable to persistent endogenous oxidative stress. The biochemical difference between cancer and normal cells could be exploited to achieve selective cancer cell killing by exogenous ROS-producing agents. Herein we described a structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 and its anticancer efficacy. By241 exhibited potent inhibition against human cancer cells and less toxic to normal cells. By241 concentration-dependently induced apoptosis of MGC-803 and EC9706 cells, accompanied with the mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ROS levels. NAC can completely restore the decreased cell viability of MGC-803 cells caused by by241, suggesting ROS-mediated mechanisms. The expression levels of proteins involved in the mitochondrion-related pathways were detected, showing increased expression of proapoptotic proteins and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and activation of caspases-9/-3, but without activating caspase-8 expression. Pretreatment with Z-VAD-FMK partially rescued by241-induced apoptosis of MGC-803 cells. Additionally, by241 inhibited mTOR, activated p53 and its downstream proteins, cleaved MDM2 and PI3K/AKT as well as NF-κB signaling pathway. In vivo experiments showed that by241 did not have significant acute oral toxicity and exerted good anticancer efficacy against MGC-803 bearing mice models. Therefore, by241 may serve as a lead for further development for cancer therapy. PMID:27527552

  4. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  5. Ultrasound Microbubble Treatment Enhances Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Fluid-Phase Uptake through Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Farnaz; Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Karshafian, Raffi

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to tumors is limited by several factors, including drug permeability of the target cell plasma membrane. Ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is a promising strategy to overcome these limitations. USMB treatment elicits enhanced cellular uptake of materials such as drugs, in part as a result of sheer stress and formation of transient membrane pores. Pores formed upon USMB treatment are rapidly resealed, suggesting that other processes such as enhanced endocytosis may contribute to the enhanced material uptake by cells upon USMB treatment. How USMB regulates endocytic processes remains incompletely understood. Cells constitutively utilize several distinct mechanisms of endocytosis, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for the internalization of receptor-bound macromolecules such as Transferrin Receptor (TfR), and distinct mechanism(s) that mediate the majority of fluid-phase endocytosis. Tracking the abundance of TfR on the cell surface and the internalization of its ligand transferrin revealed that USMB acutely enhances the rate of CME. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy experiments revealed that USMB treatment altered the assembly of clathrin-coated pits, the basic structural units of CME. In addition, the rate of fluid-phase endocytosis was enhanced, but with delayed onset upon USMB treatment relative to the enhancement of CME, suggesting that the two processes are distinctly regulated by USMB. Indeed, vacuolin-1 or desipramine treatment prevented the enhancement of CME but not of fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB, suggesting that lysosome exocytosis and acid sphingomyelinase, respectively, are required for the regulation of CME but not fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB treatment. These results indicate that USMB enhances both CME and fluid phase endocytosis through distinct signaling mechanisms, and suggest that strategies for potentiating the enhancement of endocytosis upon USMB treatment may improve targeted

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysregulation in 3-bromopyruvate induced cell death in hepatoma cells : ROS-mediated cell death by 3-BrPA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Su; Ahn, Keun Jae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Hye Mi; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Jae Myun; Kim, Se Jong; Park, Jeon Han

    2008-12-01

    Hexokinase type II (HK II) is the key enzyme for maintaining increased glycolysis in cancer cells where it is overexpressed. 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), an inhibitor of HK II, induces cell death in cancer cells. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of 3-BrPA-induced cell death, we used the hepatoma cell lines SNU449 (low expression of HKII) and Hep3B (high expression of HKII). 3-BrPA induced ATP depletion-dependent necrosis and apoptosis in both cell lines. 3-BrPA increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to mitochondrial dysregulation. NAC (N-acetyl-L: -cysteine), an antioxidant, blocked 3-BrPA-induced ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cell death. 3-BrPA-mediated oxidative stress not only activated poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) but also translocated AIF from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Taken together, 3-BrPA induced ATP depletion-dependent necrosis and apoptosis and mitochondrial dysregulation due to ROS production are involved in 3-BrPA-induced cell death in hepatoma cells.

  7. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  8. Chirality-Induced Budding: A Raft-Mediated Mechanism for Endocytosis and Morphology of Caveolae?

    PubMed Central

    Sarasij, R. C.; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2007-01-01

    The formation of transport carriers (spherical vesicles and tubules) involves membrane budding, growth, and ultimately fission. We propose a mechanism of membrane budding, wherein the tilt and chirality of constituent molecules, confined to a patch of area A, induces buds of ∼50–100 nm that are comparable to vesicles involved in endocytosis. Because such chiral and tilted lipid molecules are likely to exist in “rafts”, we suggest the involvement of this mechanism in generating membrane buds in the clathrin and dynamin-independent, raft-component mediated endocytosis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. We argue that caveolae, permanent cell surface structures with characteristic morphology and enriched in raft constituents, are also likely to be formed by this mechanism. Thus, molecular chirality and tilt, and its expression over large spatial scales may be a common organizing principle in membrane budding of transport carriers. PMID:17237196

  9. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by kainic acid mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through a NF-kappaB dependent mechanism in C6 glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hana; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Jung Yeon; Choi, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ju Hie; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo; Choe, Wonchae; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Ha, Joohun; Kang, Insug

    2008-07-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Kainic acid (KA), a prototype excitotoxin is known to induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain. In this study, we examined the role of AMPK in KA-induced BDNF expression in C6 glioma cells. We showed that KA and KA receptor agonist induced activation of AMPK and KA-induced AMPK activation was blocked by inhibition of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) {beta}. We then showed that inhibition of AMPK by compound C, a selective inhibitor of AMPK, or small interfering RNA of AMPK{alpha}1 blocked KA-induced BDNF mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition of AMPK blocked KA-induced phosphorylation of CaMKII and I kappaB kinase (IKK) in C6 cells. Finally, we showed that inhibition of AMPK reduced DNA binding and transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) in KA-treated cells. These results suggest that AMPK mediates KA-induced BDNF expression by regulating NF-{kappa}B activation.

  10. Myc inhibits JNK-mediated cell death in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiuhong; Feng, Yu; Chen, Xinhong; Li, Wenzhe; Xue, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The proto-oncogene Myc is well known for its roles in promoting cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. However, in this study, we found from a genetic screen that Myc inhibits, rather than promotes, cell death triggered by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in Drosophila. Firstly, expression of Drosophila Myc (dMyc) suppresses, whereas loss of dMyc enhances, ectopically activated JNK signaling-induced cell death. Secondly, dMyc impedes physiologically activated JNK pathway-mediated cell death. Thirdly, loss of dMyc triggers JNK pathway activation and JNK-dependent cell death. Finally, the mammalian cMyc gene, when expressed in Drosophila, impedes activated JNK signaling-induced cell death. Thus, besides its well-studied apoptosis promoting function, Myc also antagonizes JNK-mediated cell death in Drosophila, and this function is likely conserved from fly to human.

  11. UCP2- and non-UCP2-mediated electric current in eukaryotic cells exhibits different properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruihua; MoYung, K C; Zhang, M H; Poon, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Using live eukaryotic cells, including cancer cells, MCF-7 and HCT-116, normal hepatocytes and red blood cells in anode and potassium ferricyanide in cathode of MFC could generate bio-based electric current. Electrons and protons generated from the metabolic reaction in both cytosol and mitochondria contributing to the leaking would mediate the generation of electric current. Both resveratrol (RVT) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) used to induce proton leak in mitochondria were found to promote electric current production in all cells except red blood cells without mitochondria. Proton leak might be important for electric current production by bringing the charge balance in cells to enhance the further electron leak. The induced electric current by RVT can be blocked by Genipin, an inhibitor of UCP2-mediated proton leak, while that induced by DNP cannot. RVT could reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in cells better than that of DNP. In addition, RVT increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while DNP decreased it. Results highly suggested the existence of at least two types of electric current that showed different properties. They included UCP2-mediated and non-UCP2-mediated electric current. UCP2-mediated electric current exhibited higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction effect per unit electric current production than that of non-UCP2-mediated electric current. Higher UCP2-mediated electric current observed in cancer cells might contribute to the mechanism of drug resistence. Correlation could not be established between electric current production with either ROS and MMP without distinguishing the types of electric current.

  12. Surface charge of gold nanoparticles mediates mechanism of toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeublin, Nicole M.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Schrand, Amanda M.; Miller, John M.; Hutchison, Jim; Schlager, John J.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-02-01

    Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the event that they come into contact with a biological system. In the present study, we have investigated whether modulating the surface charge of 1.5 nm Au NPs induced changes in cellular morphology, mitochondrial function, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular calcium levels, DNA damage-related gene expression, and of p53 and caspase-3 expression levels after exposure in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The evaluation of three different Au NPs (positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged) showed that cell morphology was disrupted by all three NPs and that they demonstrated a dose-dependent toxicity; the charged Au NPs displayed toxicity as low as 10 µg ml-1 and the neutral at 25 µg ml-1. Furthermore, there was significant mitochondrial stress (decreases in MMP and intracellular Ca2+ levels) following exposure to the charged Au NPs, but not the neutral Au NPs. In addition to the differences observed in the MMP and Ca2+ levels, up or down regulation of DNA damage related gene expression suggested a differential cell death mechanism based on whether or not the Au NPs were charged or neutral. Additionally, increased nuclear localization of p53 and caspase-3 expression was observed in cells exposed to the charged Au NPs, while the neutral Au NPs caused an increase in both nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 expression. In conclusion, these results indicate that surface charge is a major determinant of how Au NPs impact cellular processes, with the charged NPs inducing cell death through apoptosis and neutral NPs leading to necrosis.Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the

  13. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27909729

  14. Prazosin induces p53-mediated autophagic cell death in H9C2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Fan; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Su, Ming-Jai

    2011-08-01

    Prazosin, a quinazoline-based α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, is known to induce cell death, and this effect is independent of its α-blockade activity. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved are still not fully understood. In this study, we found that prazosin, but not doxazosin, could induce patterns of autophagy in H9C2 cells, including intracellular vacuole formation, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) conversion, and acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) augmentation. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated proteins showed that exposure to prazosin increased the levels of phospho-p53 and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but dramatically decreased the levels of phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phospho-protein kinase B (Akt), and phospho-ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). Furthermore, although pretreatments with the pharmacological autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α suppressed prazosin-induced AVO formation, they did not reverse prazosin-induced decline in cell viability but enhanced prazosin-induced caspase-3 activation. From these results we suggest that prazosin induces autophagic cell death via a p53-mediated mechanism. When the autophagy pathway was inhibited, prazosin still induced programmed cell death, at least in part through apoptotic caspase-3 cascade enhancement. Thus, our results indicate a potential new target in prazosin-induced cell death.

  15. Hypoxia-mediated autophagic flux inhibits silver nanoparticle-triggered apoptosis in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kang, Min-Hee; Han, Jae Woong; Das, Joydeep; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Seo, Han Geuk; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors are frequently associated with resistance to chemotherapy because the fraction of hypoxic tumor cells is substantial. To understand the underlying mechanism of hypoxia on silver nanoparticle (AgNPs)-induced apoptosis, the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a hallmark of hypoxia, was measured in the presence and absence of AgNPs. The results showed that HIF-1α expression was upregulated after AgNPs treatment under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Cell viability assays showed that AgNPs promoted cell death in cancer cells but not in non-cancer cells, as cancer cells are slightly more acidic than normal cells. However, reactive oxygen species generation induced by AgNPs in lung cancer cells caused high susceptibility to oxidative stress, whereas pre-exposure to hypoxia blocked AgNPs-induced oxidative stress. Notably, HIF-1α inhibited AgNPs-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis by regulating autophagic flux through the regulation of ATG5, LC3-II, and p62. Further, cell viability after treatment of cancer cells with AgNPs under hypoxic conditions was lower in HIF-1α siRNA-transfected cells than in control siRNA-transfected cells, indicating that HIF-1α knockdown enhances hypoxia induced decrease in cell viability. Our results suggest that hypoxia-mediated autophagy may be a mechanism for the resistance of AgNPs-induced apoptosis and that strategies targeting HIF-1α may be used for cancer therapy. PMID:26867977

  16. Sphingosine-1-phosphate and other lipid mediators generated by mast cells as critical players in allergy and mast cell function.

    PubMed

    Kulinski, Joseph M; Muñoz-Cano, Rosa; Olivera, Ana

    2016-05-05

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), platelet activating factor (PAF) and eicosanoids are bioactive lipid mediators abundantly produced by antigen-stimulated mast cells that exert their function mostly through specific cell surface receptors. Although it has long been recognized that some of these bioactive lipids are potent regulators of allergic diseases, their exact contributions to disease pathology have been obscured by the complexity of their mode of action and the regulation of their metabolism. Indeed, the effects of such lipids are usually mediated by multiple receptor subtypes that may differ in their signaling mechanisms and functions. In addition, their actions may be elicited by cell surface receptor-independent mechanisms. Furthermore, these lipids may be converted into metabolites that exhibit different functionalities, adding another layer of complexity to their overall biological responses. In some instances, a second wave of lipid mediator synthesis by both mast cell and non-mast cell sources may occur late during inflammation, bringing about additional roles in the altered environment. New evidence also suggests that bioactive lipids in the local environment can fine-tune mast cell maturation and phenotype, and thus their responsiveness. A better understanding of the subtleties of the spatiotemporal regulation of these lipid mediators, their receptors and functions may aid in the pursuit of pharmacological applications for allergy treatments.

  17. Structural mechanisms of PriA-mediated DNA replication restart.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Basudeb; George, Nicholas P; Thurmes, Tiffany M; Zhou, Ruobo; Jani, Niketa; Wessel, Sarah R; Sandler, Steven J; Ha, Taekjip; Keck, James L

    2014-01-28

    Collisions between cellular DNA replication machinery (replisomes) and damaged DNA or immovable protein complexes can dissociate replisomes before the completion of replication. This potentially lethal problem is resolved by cellular "replication restart" reactions that recognize the structures of prematurely abandoned replication forks and mediate replisomal reloading. In bacteria, this essential activity is orchestrated by the PriA DNA helicase, which identifies replication forks via structure-specific DNA binding and interactions with fork-associated ssDNA-binding proteins (SSBs). However, the mechanisms by which PriA binds replication fork DNA and coordinates subsequent replication restart reactions have remained unclear due to the dearth of high-resolution structural information available for the protein. Here, we describe the crystal structures of full-length PriA and PriA bound to SSB. The structures reveal a modular arrangement for PriA in which several DNA-binding domains surround its helicase core in a manner that appears to be poised for binding to branched replication fork DNA structures while simultaneously allowing complex formation with SSB. PriA interaction with SSB is shown to modulate SSB/DNA complexes in a manner that exposes a potential replication initiation site. From these observations, a model emerges to explain how PriA links recognition of diverse replication forks to replication restart.

  18. Statistical mechanics of DNA-mediated colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2006-10-01

    We present a statistical mechanical model of aggregation in colloidal systems with DNA-mediated interactions. We obtain a general result for the two-particle binding energy in terms of the hybridization free energy ΔG of DNA and two model-dependent properties: the average number of available DNA bridges ⟨N⟩ and the effective DNA concentration ceff . We calculate these parameters for a particular DNA bridging scheme. The fraction of all the n -mers, including the infinite aggregate, are shown to be universal functions of a single parameter directly related to the two-particle binding energy. We explicitly take into account the partial ergodicity of the problem resulting from the slow DNA binding-unbinding dynamics, and introduce the concept of angular localization of DNA linkers. In this way, we obtain a direct link between DNA thermodynamics and the global aggregation and melting properties in DNA-colloidal systems. The results of the theory are shown to be in quantitative agreement with two recent experiments with particles of micron and nanometer size.

  19. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  20. Mechanisms of sulindac-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Barbara; Barbier, Valerie; Brickner, Howard; Welsh, John; Fotedar, Arun; McClelland, Michael

    2005-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the chemopreventive effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac remains unclear. Its active metabolite, sulindac sulfide, induces cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. We now show that in murine thymocytes, sulindac sulfide-induced cell death is p53, bax, Fas, and FasL independent. In contrast, bcl2 transgenic thymocytes are resistant to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that sulindac sulfide-induced cell cycle arrest in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is partly mediated by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21waf1/cip1. Furthermore, MEFs deficient in p21 or Rb are more susceptible to sulindac sulfide-induced cell death. These results suggest that sulindac may selectively target premalignant cells with cell cycle checkpoint deficits.

  1. Asparagine deprivation mediated by Salmonella asparaginase causes suppression of activation-induced T cell metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Torres, AnnMarie; Luke, Joanna D; Kullas, Amy L; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Botbol, Yair; Koller, Antonius; Tonge, Peter J; Chen, Emily I; Macian, Fernando; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2016-02-01

    Salmonellae are pathogenic bacteria that induce immunosuppression by mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Previously, we showed that a putative type II l-asparaginase produced by Salmonella Typhimurium inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence in a murine model of infection. Here, we report that this putative L-asparaginase exhibits L-asparagine hydrolase activity required for Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cells. We show that L-asparagine is a nutrient important for T cell activation and that L-asparagine deprivation, such as that mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase, causes suppression of activation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, autophagy, Myc expression, and L-lactate secretion. We also show that L-asparagine deprivation mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase causes suppression of cellular processes and pathways involved in protein synthesis, metabolism, and immune response. Our results advance knowledge of a mechanism used by Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cell responses and mediate virulence, and provide new insights into the prerequisites of T cell activation. We propose a model in which l-asparagine deprivation inhibits T cell exit from quiescence by causing suppression of activation-induced metabolic reprogramming.

  2. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles.

  3. Monolithic and mechanical multijunction space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1992-01-01

    High-efficiency, lightweight, radiation-resistant solar cells are essential to meet the large power requirements of future space missions. Single-junction cells are limited in efficiency. Higher cell efficiencies could be realized by developing multijunction, multibandgap solar cells. Monolithic and mechanically stacked tandem solar cells surpassing single-junction cell efficiencies have been fabricated. This article surveys the current status of monolithic and mechanically stacked multibandgap space solar cells, and outlines problems yet to be resolved. The monolithic and mechanically stacked cells each have their own problems related to size, processing, current and voltage matching, weight, and other factors. More information is needed on the effect of temperature and radiation on the cell performance. Proper reference cells and full-spectrum range simulators are also needed to measure efficiencies correctly. Cost issues are not addressed, since the two approaches are still in the developmental stage.

  4. Galangin attenuates mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Bae, Yunju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-07-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. In this study, we investigated anti-allergic inflammatory effect of galangin and underlying mechanisms of action using in vitro and in vivo models. Galangin inhibited histamine release by the reduction of intracellular calcium in phorbol 12-mystate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells (HMC-1). Galangin decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and IL-8. The inhibitory effect of galangin on theses pro-inflammatory cytokines was related with c-Jun N-terminal kinases, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, and caspase-1. Furthermore, galangin attenuated IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the expression of histamine receptor 1 at the inflamed tissue. The inhibitory effects of galangin were more potent than cromolyn, a known anti-allergic drug. Our results showed that galangin down-regulates mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions by blocking histamine release and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In light of in vitro and in vivo anti-allergic inflammatory effects, galangin could be a beneficial anti-allergic inflammatory agent.

  5. Morphogenesis of protrusions from confined lipid bilayers mediated by mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Marino; Staykova, Margarita; Rahimi, Mohammad; Stone, Howard A.

    2012-02-01

    Biological membranes adopt a wide range of shapes that structure and give functionality to cells, compartmentalizing the cytosol, forming organelles, or regulating their area. The formation, stabilization, and remodeling of these structures is generally attributed to localized forces or to biochemical processes (insertion of proteins, active compositional regulation). Noting that in the crowded intra and extra-cellular environments membranes are highly constrained, we explore to what extent can mechanics explain the shape of protrusions out of confined membranes. For this purpose, we developed an in-vitro system coupling a lipid bilayer to the strain-controlled deformation of an elastic sheet (Staykova et al, PNAS 108, 2011). We show that upon contracting the elastic support, tubular or spherical protrusions grow out of the adhered membrane, which can be reversibly controlled with strain and osmolarity without resorting to localized forces or chemical alterations of the bilayer. The morphologies produced by our minimal system are ubiquitous in cells, suggesting mechanics may be a simple and generic organizing principle. We can understand most of our observations in terms of a phase diagram accounting for elasticity, adhesion, and the limited amount of area and volume available.

  6. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  7. Inflammation and Proliferation Act Together to Mediate Intestinal Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Swain, John R.; Wong, Melissa H.

    2009-01-01

    Cell fusion between circulating bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and non-hematopoietic cells is well documented in various tissues and has recently been suggested to occur in response to injury. Here we illustrate that inflammation within the intestine enhanced the level of BMDC fusion with intestinal progenitors. To identify important microenvironmental factors mediating intestinal epithelial cell fusion, we performed bone marrow transplantation into mouse models of inflammation and stimulated epithelial proliferation. Interestingly, in a non-injury model or in instances where inflammation was suppressed, an appreciable baseline level of fusion persisted. This suggests that additional mediators of cell fusion exist. A rigorous temporal analysis of early post-transplantation cellular dynamics revealed that GFP-expressing donor cells first trafficked to the intestine coincident with a striking increase in epithelial proliferation, advocating for a required fusogenic state of the host partner. Directly supporting this hypothesis, induction of augmented epithelial proliferation resulted in a significant increase in intestinal cell fusion. Here we report that intestinal inflammation and epithelial proliferation act together to promote cell fusion. While the physiologic impact of cell fusion is not yet known, the increased incidence in an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment suggests a potential role for cell fusion in mediating the progression of intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:19657387

  8. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  9. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  10. The double-edge role of B cells in mediating antitumor T-cell immunity: Pharmacological strategies for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Guo, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence reveals the controversial role of B cells in antitumor immunity, but the underlying mechanisms have to be explored. Three latest articles published in the issue 521 of Nature in 2015 reconfirmed the puzzling topic and put forward some explanations of how B cells regulate antitumor T-cell responses both positively and negatively. This paper attempts to demonstrate that different B-cell subpopulations have distinct immunological properties and that they are involved in either antitumor responses or immunosuppression. Recent studies supporting the positive and negative roles of B cells in tumor development were summarized comprehensively. Several specific B-cell subpopulations, such as IgG(+), IgA(+), IL-10(+), and regulatory B cells, were described in detail. The mechanisms underlying the controversial B-cell effects were mainly attributed to different B-cell subpopulations, different B-cell-derived cytokines, direct B cell-T cell interaction, different cancer categories, and different malignant stages, and the immunological interaction between B cells and T cells is mediated by dendritic cells. Promising B-cell-based antitumor strategies were proposed and novel B-cell regulators were summarized to present interesting therapeutic targets. Future investigations are needed to make sure that B-cell-based pharmacological strategies benefit cancer immunotherapy substantially.

  11. Lenalidomide Induces Interleukin-21 Production by T Cells and Enhances IL21-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells.

    PubMed

    Browning, Rebekah L; Byrd, William H; Gupta, Nikhil; Jones, Jeffrey; Mo, Xiaokui; Hertlein, Erin; Yu, Lianbo; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Byrd, John C

    2016-08-01

    The immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide has demonstrated efficacy in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), despite a lack of direct cytotoxic effects in vitro The mechanism of lenalidomide efficacy in vivo is thought to occur via a combination of enhanced immune activity and an alteration of tumor cell-microenvironment interactions. We demonstrate in whole blood from patients with CLL that lenalidomide significantly depletes malignant B cells. Lenalidomide also induced production of interleukin-21 (IL21) and its mRNA in T cells from patients with CLL. In addition, lenalidomide enhanced upregulation of functional IL21 receptor (IL21R) on the cell surface and increased receptor mRNA in vitro The in vitro combination of IL21 and lenalidomide enhanced IL21-mediated cytotoxicity toward CLL cells through a variety of mechanisms. We show association of cell death with upregulation of Bid by IL21, enhanced upregulation of Bid by the combination therapy, and diminished Lck and downstream BCR signaling activation of Syk and PLCG2. Collectively, we demonstrated an immune cell-tumor cell interaction through lenalidomide-mediated induction of IL21 and IL21R, with enhanced IL21-mediated cytotoxicity, which provides justification for this combination in clinical trials for patients with CLL. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 698-707. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Mechanisms of a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy involving atmospheric pressure plasma-mediated apoptosis and DNA strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed for a variety of biomedical applications due to its chemically reactive components. Recently, the plasma has emerged as a promising novel cancer therapy based on its ability to selectively ablate cancer cells while leaving normal cells essentially unaffected. The therapeutic effect of plasma is attributed to intracellular generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway via severe DNA strand break formation. However, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for appropriate activation of these physiological events and which pathway is more crucial for plasma-mediated cytotoxicity have not been clarified. Understanding the molecular link between ROS/RNS-mediated apoptosis and DNA damage-involved chromosome instability is critical for the development of more efficacious therapeutic strategies for selective killing of diverse cancer cells.

  13. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  14. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making. PMID:24198613

  15. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  16. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  17. Human glycated albumin affects glucose metabolism in L6 skeletal muscle cells by impairing insulin-induced insulin receptor substrate (IRS) signaling through a protein kinase C alpha-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miele, Claudia; Riboulet, Audrey; Maitan, Maria Alessandra; Oriente, Francesco; Romano, Chiara; Formisano, Pietro; Giudicelli, Jean; Beguinot, Francesco; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2003-11-28

    Nonenzymatic glycation is increased in diabetes and leads to increased levels of glycated proteins. Most studies have focused on the role of glycation products in vascular complications. Here, we have investigated the action of human glycated albumin (HGA) on insulin signaling in L6 skeletal muscle cells. Exposure of these cells to HGA inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthase activity by 95 and 80%, respectively. These effects were time- and dose-dependent, reaching a maximum after 12 h incubation with 0.1 mg/ml HGA. In contrast, exposure of the cells to HGA had no effect on thymidine incorporation. Further, HGA reduced insulin-stimulated serine phosphorylation of PKB and GSK3, but did not alter ERK1/2 activation. HGA did not affect either insulin receptor kinase activity or insulin-induced Shc phosphorylation on tyrosine. In contrast, insulin-dependent IRS-1 and IRS-2 tyrosine phosphorylation was severely reduced in cells preincubated with HGA for 24 h. Insulin-stimulated association of PI3K with IRS-1 and IRS-2, and PI3K activity were reduced by HGA in parallel with the changes in IRS tyrosine phosphorylation, while Grb2-IRS association was unchanged. In L6 myotubes, exposure to HGA increased PKC activity by 2-fold resulting in a similar increase in Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2. These phosphorylations were blocked by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BDM). BDM also blocked the action of HGA on insulin-stimulated PKB and GSK3 alpha. Simultaneously, BDM rescued insulin-stimulation of glucose uptake and glycogen synthase activity in cells exposed to HGA. The use of antibodies specific to PKC isoforms shows that this effect appears to be mediated by activated PKC alpha, independent of reactive oxygen species production. In summary, in L6 skeletal muscle cells, exposure to HGA leads to insulin resistance selectively in glucose metabolism with no effect on growth-related pathways regulated by the hormone.

  18. Mechanics Regulates Fate Decisions of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yubing; Villa-Diaz, Luis G.; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Chen, Weiqiang; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Fu, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has attracted much attention given their great potential for tissue regenerative therapy and fundamental developmental biology studies. Yet, there is still limited understanding of how mechanical signals in the local cellular microenvironment of hESCs regulate their fate decisions. Here, we applied a microfabricated micromechanical platform to investigate the mechanoresponsive behaviors of hESCs. We demonstrated that hESCs are mechanosensitive, and they could increase their cytoskeleton contractility with matrix rigidity. Furthermore, rigid substrates supported maintenance of pluripotency of hESCs. Matrix mechanics-mediated cytoskeleton contractility might be functionally correlated with E-cadherin expressions in cell-cell contacts and thus involved in fate decisions of hESCs. Our results highlighted the important functional link between matrix rigidity, cellular mechanics, and pluripotency of hESCs and provided a novel approach to characterize and understand mechanotransduction and its involvement in hESC function. PMID:22615930

  19. Cell mechanics: principles, practices, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Harris, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Cells generate and sustain mechanical forces within their environment as part of their normal physiology. They are active materials that can detect mechanical stimulation by the activation of mechanosensitive signaling pathways, and respond to physical cues through cytoskeletal re-organization and force generation. Genetic mutations and pathogens that disrupt the cytoskeletal architecture can result in changes to cell mechanical properties such as elasticity, adhesiveness, and viscosity. On the other hand, perturbations to the mechanical environment can affect cell behavior. These transformations are often a hallmark and symptom of a variety of pathologies. Consequently, there are now a myriad of experimental techniques and theoretical models adapted from soft matter physics and mechanical engineering to characterize cell mechanical properties. Interdisciplinary research combining modern molecular biology with advanced cell mechanical characterization techniques now paves the way for furthering our fundamental understanding of cell mechanics and its role in development, physiology, and disease. We describe a generalized outline for measuring cell mechanical properties including loading protocols, tools, and data interpretation.We summarize recent advances in the field and explain how cell biomechanics research can be adopted by physicists, engineers, biologists, and clinicians alike.

  20. Cell mechanics: principles, practices, and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Harris, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Cells generate and sustain mechanical forces within their environment as part of their normal physiology. They are active materials that can detect mechanical stimulation by the activation of mechanosensitive signaling pathways, and respond to physical cues through cytoskeletal re-organization and force generation. Genetic mutations and pathogens that disrupt the cytoskeletal architecture can result in changes to cell mechanical properties such as elasticity, adhesiveness, and viscosity. On the other hand, perturbations to the mechanical environment can affect cell behavior. These transformations are often a hallmark and symptom of a variety of pathologies. Consequently, there are now a myriad of experimental techniques and theoretical models adapted from soft matter physics and mechanical engineering to characterize cell mechanical properties. Interdisciplinary research combining modern molecular biology with advanced cell mechanical characterization techniques now paves the way for furthering our fundamental understanding of cell mechanics and its role in development, physiology, and disease. We describe a generalized outline for measuring cell mechanical properties including loading protocols, tools, and data interpretation. We summarize recent advances in the field and explain how cell biomechanics research can be adopted by physicists, engineers, biologists, and clinicians alike. PMID:25269160

  1. Probing cell mechanical properties with microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowat, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting flow on the micron-scale is emerging as a method to probe cell mechanical properties with 10-1000x advances in throughput over existing technologies. The mechanical properties of cells and the cell nucleus are implicated in a wide range of biological contexts: for example, the ability of white blood cells to deform is central to immune response; and malignant cells show decreased stiffness compared to benign cells. We recently developed a microfluidic device to probe cell and nucleus mechanical properties: cells are forced to deform through a narrow constrictions in response to an applied pressure; flowing cells through a series of constrictions enables us to probe the ability of hundreds of cells to deform and relax during flow. By tuning the constriction width so it is narrower than the width of the cell nucleus, we can specifically probe the effects of nuclear physical properties on whole cell deformability. We show that the nucleus is the rate-limiting step in cell passage: inducing a change in its shape to a multilobed structure results in cells that transit more quickly; increased levels of lamin A, a nuclear protein that is key for nuclear shape and mechanical stability, impairs the passage of cells through constrictions. We are currently developing a new class of microfluidic devices to simultaneously probe the deformability of hundreds of cell samples in parallel. Using the same soft lithography techniques, membranes are fabricated to have well-defined pore distribution, width, length, and tortuosity. We design the membranes to interface with a multiwell plate, enabling simultaneous measurement of hundreds of different samples. Given the wide spectrum of diseases where altered cell and nucleus mechanical properties are implicated, such a platform has great potential, for example, to screen cells based on their mechanical phenotype against a library of drugs.

  2. Myeloma cells resistance to NK cell lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minjie; Gao, Lu; Yang, Guang; Tao, Yi; Hou, Jun; Xu, Hongwei; Hu, Xiaojing; Han, Ying; Zhang, Qianqiao; Zhan, Fenghuang; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2014-07-01

    The anti-multiple myeloma (MM) potential of natural killer (NK) cells has been of rising interest in recent years. However, the molecular mechanism of NK cell cytotoxicity to myeloma cells remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expressions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-G in patient myeloma cells, and determined their relevance in patient tumor-cell susceptibility to NK cell cytotoxicity. Our results showed that patient myeloma cells (n = 12) were relatively resistant to NK-92 cell lysis, compared with myeloma cell lines (n = 7, P < 0.01). Gene expression profiling and flow cytometry analysis showed that both mRNA and protein of HLA class I were highly expressed in 12 patient myeloma cells. Interestingly, no or low HLA-G surface expression was detected, although multiple HLA-G transcripts were detected in these myeloma cells. NK cell function assay showed that down-regulating HLA class I expression on patient cells by acid treatment significantly increased the susceptibility of MM cells to NK-mediated lysis. Furthermore, we found that the blocking of membrane-bound HLA class I rather than HLA-G using antibodies on myeloma samples markedly increased their susceptibility to NK-mediated killing. These results demonstrated that the resistance of patient MM cells to NK lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism, suggesting that HLA class I may be involved in protecting MM cells from NK-mediated attack and contribute to their immune escape in vivo.

  3. Angiogenesis mediated by soluble forms of E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Alisa E.; Halloran, Margaret M.; Haskell, Catherine J.; Shah, Manisha R.; Polverini, Peter J.

    1995-08-01

    ENDOTHELIAL adhesion molecules facilitate the entry of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. This in turn promotes neovascularization, a process central to the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, tumour growth and wound repair1. Here we test the hypothesis that soluble endothelial adhesion molecules promote angiogenesis2á¤-4. Human recombinant soluble E-selectin and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 induced chemotaxis of human endothelial cells in vitro and were angiogenic in rat cornea. Soluble E-selectin acted on endothelial cells in part through a sialyl Lewis-X-dependent mechanism, while soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 acted on endothelial cells in part through a very late antigen (VLA)-4 dependent mechanism. The chemotactic activity of rheumatoid synovial fluid for endothelial cells, and also its angiogenic activity, were blocked by antibodies to either soluble E-selectin or soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. These results suggest a novel function for soluble endothelial adhesion molecules as mediators of angiogenesis.

  4. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  5. Role of STAT3 Phosphorylation in Ethanol-Mediated Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Poornima devi; Nandabalan, Sangeetha Kadapakkam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in ethanol (EtOH)-mediated proliferation of breast cancer cells. Methods EtOH concentration was optimized by studying its effect on cell proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA MB-231 cells. We used flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis to evaluate the increased proliferation caused by the optimized concentrations of EtOH. The mechanism of EtOH-mediated proliferation was determined using reactive oxygen species (ROS) release assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot studies. Gene silencing followed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies and inhibitor studies indicated the involvement of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in EtOH-mediated breast cancer proliferation. Results Exposure to EtOH caused an increase in cell proliferation and an accumulation of cells in S-phase in MCF-7 (347 µM EtOH) and MDA MB-231 (173 µM EtOH) cells. Additionally, increased release of ROS and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α, confirmed that the proliferation was induced by the ROS-linked inflammatory response in breast cancer. The proinflammatory response was followed by phosphorylation of STAT3. The importance of STAT3 activation in EtOH-mediated proliferation was confirmed through the silencing of STAT3, followed by an investigation on the expression of cyclins and matrix metalloproteinases. Finally, studies using specific inhibitors indicated that the EtOH-mediated effect on STAT3 activation could be regulated by phosphoinositide-3-kinase and Janus kinase 2. Conclusion The study demonstrates the involvement of STAT3 signaling in EtOH-mediated breast cancer proliferation. PMID:27382387

  6. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jarsch, Iris K; Daste, Frederic; Gallop, Jennifer L

    2016-08-15

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists.

  7. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Daste, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists. PMID:27528656

  8. Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C displays a repressor activity mediated by T-cell intracellular antigen-1-related/like protein to modulate Fas exon 6 splicing through a mechanism involving Hu antigen R.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, José M

    2010-12-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen (TIA)-proteins are known regulators of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, pull-down experiments and mass spectrometry indicate that TIAR/TIAL1 and hnRNP C1/C2 are associated in HeLa nuclear extracts. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed this interaction. Interestingly, binding requires the glutamine-rich (Q-rich) C-terminal domain of TIAR and the leucine-rich plus acidic residues-rich C-terminal domains of hnRNP C1/C2. This interaction also occurs in an RNA-dependent manner. Recombinant GFP-TIAR and RFP-hnRNP C1 proteins display partial nuclear co-localization when overexpressed in HeLa cells, and this requires the Q-rich domain of TIAR. hnRNP C1 overexpression in the presence of rate-limiting amounts of TIAR in HeLa and HEK293 cells affects alternative splicing of Fas and FGFR2 minigenes, promoting Fas exon 6 and FGFR2 exon K-SAM skipping, respectively. The repressor activity of hnRNP C1 on Fas exon 6 splicing is mediated by Hu antigen R (HuR). Experiments involving tethering approaches showed that the repressor capacity of hnRNP C1 is associated with an exonic splicing silencer in Fas exon 6. This effect was reversed by splice-site strengthening and is linked to its basic leucine zipper-like motif. These results suggest that hnRNP C1/C2 acts as a bridge between HuR and TIAR to modulate alternative Fas splicing.

  9. Layers of dendritic cell-mediated T cell tolerance, their regulation and the prevention of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian T.; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The last decades of Nobel prize-honored research have unequivocally proven a key role of dendritic cells (DCs) at controlling both T cell immunity and tolerance. A tight balance between these opposing DC functions ensures immune homeostasis and host integrity. Its perturbation could explain pathological conditions such as the attack of self tissues, chronic infections, and tumor immune evasion. While recent insights into the complex DC network help to understand the contribution of individual DC subsets to immunity, the tolerogenic functions of DCs only begin to emerge. As these consist of many different layers, the definition of a “tolerogenic DC” is subjected to variation. Moreover, the implication of DCs and DC subsets in the suppression of autoimmunity are incompletely resolved. In this review, we point out conceptual controversies and dissect the various layers of DC-mediated T cell tolerance. These layers include central tolerance, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), anergy/deletion and negative feedback regulation. The mode and kinetics of antigen presentation is highlighted as an additional factor shaping tolerance. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between layers of tolerance as well as their differential regulation during inflammation. Furthermore, potential technical caveats of DC depletion models are considered. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of DC-mediated tolerance and its role for the suppression of autoimmunity. Understanding the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance and their complex interplay is fundamental for the development of selective therapeutic strategies, e.g., for the modulation of autoimmune responses or for the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:22783257

  10. Layers of dendritic cell-mediated T cell tolerance, their regulation and the prevention of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian T; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The last decades of Nobel prize-honored research have unequivocally proven a key role of dendritic cells (DCs) at controlling both T cell immunity and tolerance. A tight balance between these opposing DC functions ensures immune homeostasis and host integrity. Its perturbation could explain pathological conditions such as the attack of self tissues, chronic infections, and tumor immune evasion. While recent insights into the complex DC network help to understand the contribution of individual DC subsets to immunity, the tolerogenic functions of DCs only begin to emerge. As these consist of many different layers, the definition of a "tolerogenic DC" is subjected to variation. Moreover, the implication of DCs and DC subsets in the suppression of autoimmunity are incompletely resolved. In this review, we point out conceptual controversies and dissect the various layers of DC-mediated T cell tolerance. These layers include central tolerance, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), anergy/deletion and negative feedback regulation. The mode and kinetics of antigen presentation is highlighted as an additional factor shaping tolerance. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between layers of tolerance as well as their differential regulation during inflammation. Furthermore, potential technical caveats of DC depletion models are considered. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of DC-mediated tolerance and its role for the suppression of autoimmunity. Understanding the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance and their complex interplay is fundamental for the development of selective therapeutic strategies, e.g., for the modulation of autoimmune responses or for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  11. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  12. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  13. Mechanically Induced Actin-mediated Rocketing of Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Anderson, Kurt I.; Engel, Ulrike; Gerisch, Günther

    2006-01-01

    Actin polymerization can be induced in Dictyostelium by compressing the cells to bring phagosomes filled with large particles into contact with the plasma membrane. Asymmetric actin assembly results in rocketing movement of the phagosomes. We show that the compression-induced assembly of actin at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane involves the Arp2/3 complex. We also identify two other proteins associated with the mechanically induced actin assembly. The class I myosin MyoB accumulates at the plasma membrane–phagosome interface early during the initiation of the response, and coronin is recruited as the actin filaments are disassembling. The forces generated by rocketing phagosomes are sufficient to push the entire microtubule apparatus forward and to dislocate the nucleus. PMID:16971511

  14. Caloric restriction as a mechanism mediating resistance to environmental disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frame, L T; Hart, R W; Leakey, J E

    1998-01-01

    It has been observed that susceptibility to many degenerative diseases increases concurrently with industrialization and rising living standards. Although epidemiologic studies suggest that specific environmental and dietary factors may be important, caloric intake alone (as reflected in body size) may account for much of the differential risk observed among diverse human populations. It has been suggested from animal studies that caloric intake may be the primary effector for many hormonal, metabolic, physiologic, and behavioral responses that coordinate reproductive strategy to apparent availability of food. When caloric intake is excessive, particularly at critical developmental stages, physiologic priorities are set for body growth and fecundity rather than for endurance and longevity. The converse occurs during periods of famine, thus increasing the probability that sufficient individuals survive to restore the population when conditions improve. Calorically restricted rodents have significantly longer reproductive and total life spans than their ad libitum-fed controls and exhibit a spectrum of biochemical and physiologic alterations that characterize their adaptation to reduced intake. These include reduced stature, hypercorticism in the absence of elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, increased metabolic efficiency, decreased mitogenic response coupled with increased rates of apoptosis, reduced inflammatory response, induction of stress proteins and DNA repair enzymes, altered drug-metabolizing enzyme expression, and modified cell-mediated immune function. The overall profile of these changes is one of improved defense against environmental stress. This has been suggested as the mechanistic basis for the protective effects of low body weight on radiation and chemically induced cancers in experimental animals. It may also explain the significantly higher thresholds of acute toxicity observed when calorically restricted rodents are exposed to certain

  15. ECHIDNA-mediated post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers for differential cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Jonsson, Kristoffer; McFarlane, Heather E; Johnson, Errin; Gendre, Delphine; Swarup, Ranjan; Friml, Jirí; Samuels, Lacey; Robert, Stéphanie; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2013-10-01

    The plant hormone indole-acetic acid (auxin) is essential for many aspects of plant development. Auxin-mediated growth regulation typically involves the establishment of an auxin concentration gradient mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters. The localization of auxin carriers and their amount at the plasma membrane are controlled by membrane trafficking processes such as secretion, endocytosis, and recycling. In contrast to endocytosis or recycling, how the secretory pathway mediates the localization of auxin carriers is not well understood. In this study we have used the differential cell elongation process during apical hook development to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers in Arabidopsis. We show that differential cell elongation during apical hook development is defective in Arabidopsis mutant echidna (ech). ECH protein is required for the trans-Golgi network (TGN)-mediated trafficking of the auxin influx carrier AUX1 to the plasma membrane. In contrast, ech mutation only marginally perturbs the trafficking of the highly related auxin influx carrier LIKE-AUX1-3 or the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED-3, both also involved in hook development. Electron tomography reveals that the trafficking defects in ech mutant are associated with the perturbation of secretory vesicle genesis from the TGN. Our results identify differential mechanisms for the post-Golgi trafficking of de novo-synthesized auxin carriers to plasma membrane from the TGN and reveal how trafficking of auxin influx carriers mediates the control of differential cell elongation in apical hook development.

  16. Calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by in vitro cultured mantle cells from Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei; Li, Shiguo; Xiang, Liang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-08-07

    Formation of the molluscan shell is believed to be an extracellular event mediated by matrix proteins. We report calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by Pinctada fucata mantle cells. Crystals only appeared when mantle cells were present in the crystallization solution. These crystals were piled up in highly ordered units and showed the typical characteristics of biomineralization products. A thin organic framework was observed after dissolving the crystals in EDTA. Some crystals had etched surfaces with a much smoother appearance than other parts. Mantle cells were observed to be attached to some of these smooth surfaces. These results suggest that mantle cells may be directly involved in the nucleation and remodeling process of calcium carbonate mineralization. Our result demonstrate the practicability of studying the mantle cell mechanism of biomineralization and contribute to the overall understanding of the shell formation process.

  17. In vivo mechanical loading rapidly activates β-catenin signaling in osteocytes through a prostaglandin mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lara-Castillo, N; Kim-Weroha, N A; Kamel, M A; Javaheri, B; Ellies, D L; Krumlauf, R E; Thiagarajan, G; Johnson, M L

    2015-07-01

    The response of the skeleton to loading appears to be mediated through the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and osteocytes have long been postulated to be the primary mechanosensory cells in bone. To examine the kinetics of the mechanoresponse of bone and cell types involved in vivo, we performed forearm loading of 17-week-old female TOPGAL mice. β-catenin signaling was observed only in embedded osteocytes, not osteoblasts, at 1h post-loading, spreading to additional osteocytes and finally to cells on the bone surface by 24h. This early activation at 1h appeared to be independent of receptor (Lrp5/6) mediated activation as it occurred in the presence of the inhibitors sclerostin and/or Dkk1. The COX-2 inhibitor, Carprofen, blocked the activation of β-catenin signaling and decline in sclerostin positive osteocytes post-loading implying an important role for prostaglandin. In vitro, PI3K/Akt activation was shown to be required for β-catenin nuclear translocation downstream from prostaglandin in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells supporting this mechanism. Downstream targets of β-catenin signaling, sclerostin and Dkk1, were also examined and found to be significantly downregulated in osteocytes in vivo at 24h post-loading. The pattern of initially activated osteocytes appeared random and in order to understand this heterogeneous expression, a novel finite element model of the strain field in the ulna was developed, which predicts highly variable local magnitudes of strain experienced by osteocytes. In summary, both in vivo and in vitro models show the rapid activation of β-catenin in response to load through the early release of prostaglandin and that strain fields in the bone are extremely heterogeneous resulting in heterogeneous activation of the β-catenin pathway in osteocytes in vivo.

  18. In Vivo Mechanical Loading Rapidly Activates β–catenin Signaling in Osteocytes through a Prostaglandin Mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Castillo, N; Kim-Weroha, NA; Kamel, MA; Javaheri, B; Ellies, DL; Krumlauf, RE; Thiagarajan, G; Johnson, ML

    2015-01-01

    The response of the skeleton to loading appears to be mediated through the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and osteocytes have long been postulated to be the primary mechanosensory cells in bone. To examine the kinetics of the mechanoresponse of bone and cell types involved in the in vivo, we performed forearm loading of 17-week-old female TOPGAL mice. β-catenin signaling was observed only in embedded osteocytes, not osteoblasts, at 1 hour post loading, spreading to additional osteocytes and finally to cells on the bone surface by 24 hrs. This early activation at 1 hour appeared to be independent of receptor (Lrp5/6) mediated activation as it occurred in the presence of the inhibitors sclerostin and/or Dkk1. The COX-2 inhibitor, Carprofen, blocked the activation of β-catenin signaling and decline in sclerostin positive osteocytes post-loading implying an important role for prostaglandin. In vitro, PI3K/Akt activation was shown to be required for β-catenin nuclear translocation downstream from prostaglandin in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells supporting this mechanism. Downstream targets of β-catenin signaling, sclerostin and Dkk1, were also examined and found to be significantly down regulated in osteocytes in vivo at 24 hours post-loading. The pattern of initially activated osteocytes appeared random and in order to understand this heterogeneous expression, a novel finite element model of the strain field in the ulna was developed, which predicts highly variable local magnitudes of strain experienced by osteocytes. In summary, both in vivo and in vitro models show the rapid activation of β-catenin in response to load through the early release of prostaglandin and that strain fields in the bone are extremely heterogeneous resulting in heterogeneous activation of the β-catenin pathway in osteocytes in vivo. PMID:25836764

  19. Mechanisms of T regulatory cell function.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yarkoni, Shai

    2008-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a pivotal role in tolerance to self-antigens and tissue grafts, and suppression of autoimmune reactions. These cells modulate the intensity and quality of immune reactions through attenuation of the cytolytic activities of reactive immune cells. Treg cells operate primarily at the site of inflammation where they modulate the immune reaction through three major mechanisms: a) direct killing of cytotoxic cells through cell-to-cell contact, b) inhibition of cytokine production by cytotoxic cells, in particular interleukin-2, c) direct secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines, in particular TGF-beta and interleukin-10. In addition to differential contributions of these mechanisms under variable inflammatory conditions, mechanistic complexity and diversity evolves from the diverse tasks performed by various Treg cell subsets in different stages of the immune reaction. Here we attempt to integrate the current experimental evidence to delineate the major suppressive pathways of Treg cells.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of CRISPR-mediated microbial immunity.

    PubMed

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Sinkunas, Tomas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) infect bacteria in order to replicate and burst out of the host, killing the cell, when reproduction is completed. Thus, from a bacterial perspective, phages pose a persistent lethal threat to bacterial populations. Not surprisingly, bacteria evolved multiple defense barriers to interfere with nearly every step of phage life cycles. Phages respond to this selection pressure by counter-evolving their genomes to evade bacterial resistance. The antagonistic interaction between bacteria and rapidly diversifying viruses promotes the evolution and dissemination of bacteriophage-resistance mechanisms in bacteria. Recently, an adaptive microbial immune system, named clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and which provides acquired immunity against viruses and plasmids, has been identified. Unlike the restriction–modification anti-phage barrier that subjects to cleavage any foreign DNA lacking a protective methyl-tag in the target site, the CRISPR–Cas systems are invader-specific, adaptive, and heritable. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of interference/immunity provided by different CRISPR–Cas systems.

  1. The Smac Mimetic BV6 Improves NK Cell-Mediated Killing of Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells by Simultaneously Targeting Tumor and Effector Cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kyra; Tognarelli, Sara; Roesler, Stefanie; Boedicker, Cathinka; Schubert, Ralf; Steinle, Alexander; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common cancer of connective tissues in pediatrics, is often resistant to conventional therapies. One underlying mechanism of this resistance is the overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins, leading to a dysfunctional cell death program within tumor cells. Smac mimetics (SM) are small molecules that can reactivate the cell death program by antagonizing IAP proteins and thereby compensating their overexpression. Here, we report that SM sensitize two RMS cell lines (RD and RH30) toward natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing on the one hand, and increase the cytotoxic potential of NK cells on the other. The SM-induced sensitization of RH30 cells toward NK cell-mediated killing is significantly reduced through blocking tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on NK cells prior to coculture. In addition, the presence of zVAD.fmk, a pancaspase inhibitor, rescues tumor cells from the increase in killing, indicating an apoptosis-dependent cell death. On the NK cell side, the presence of SM in addition to IL-2 during the ex vivo expansion leads to an increase in their cytotoxic activity against RH30 cells. This effect is mainly TNFα-dependent and partially mediated by NK cell activation, which is associated with transcriptional upregulation of NF-κB target genes such as IκBα and RelB. Taken together, our findings implicate that SM represent a novel double-hit strategy, sensitizing tumor and activating NK cells with one single drug.

  2. Neuropeptide-mediated excitability: a key triggering mechanism for seizure generation in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Baram, Tallie Z.; Hatalski, Carolyn G.

    2012-01-01

    Most human seizures occur early in life, consistent with established excitability-promoting features of the developing brain. Surprisingly, the majority of developmental seizures are not spontaneous but are provoked by injurious or stressful stimuli. What mechanisms mediate ‘triggering’ of seizures and limit such reactive seizures to early postnatal life? Recent evidence implicates the excitatory neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Stress activates expression of the CRH gene in several limbic regions, and CRH-expressing neurons are strategically localized in the immature rat hippocampus, in which this neuropeptide increases the excitability of pyramidal cells in vitro. Indeed, in vivo, activation of CRH receptors – maximally expressed in hippocampus and amygdala during the developmental period which is characterized by peak susceptibility to ‘provoked’ convulsions – induces severe, age-dependent seizures. Thus, converging data indicate that activation of expression of CRH constitutes an important mechanism for generating developmentally regulated, triggered seizures, with considerable clinical relevance. PMID:9829688

  3. Neurobiology of microglial action in CNS injuries: receptor-mediated signaling mechanisms and functional roles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoming; Liou, Anthony K.F.; Leak, Rehana K.; Xu, Mingyue; An, Chengrui; Suenaga, Jun; Shi, Yejie; Gao, Yanqin; Zheng, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the first line of immune defense against central nervous system (CNS) injuries and disorders. These highly plastic cells play dualistic roles in neuronal injury and recovery and are known for their ability to assume diverse phenotypes. A broad range of surface receptors are expressed on microglia and mediate microglial ‘On’ or ‘Off’ responses to signals from other host cells as well as invading microorganisms. The integrated actions of these receptors result in tightly regulated biological functions, including cell mobility, phagocytosis, the induction of acquired immunity, and trophic factor/inflammatory mediator release. Over the last few years, significant advances have been made towards deciphering the signaling mechanisms related to these receptors and their specific cellular functions. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of the surface receptors involved in microglial activation, with an emphasis on their engagement of distinct functional programs and their roles in CNS injuries. It will become evident from this review that microglial homeostasis is carefully maintained by multiple counterbalanced strategies, including, but not limited to, ‘On’ and ‘Off’ receptor signaling. Specific regulation of theses microglial receptors may be a promising therapeutic strategy against CNS injuries. PMID:24923657

  4. Molecular mechanism underlying juvenile hormone-mediated repression of precocious larval–adult metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Jouraku, Akiya; Ito, Yuka; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) represses precocious metamorphosis of larval to pupal and adult transitions in holometabolous insects. The early JH-inducible gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) plays a key role in the repression of metamorphosis as a mediator of JH action. Previous studies demonstrated that Kr-h1 inhibits precocious larval–pupal transition in immature larva via direct transcriptional repression of the pupal specifier Broad-Complex (BR-C). JH was recently reported to repress the adult specifier gene Ecdysone-induced protein 93F (E93); however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that JH suppressed ecdysone-inducible E93 expression in the epidermis of the silkworm Bombyx mori and in a B. mori cell line. Reporter assays in the cell line revealed that the JH-dependent suppression was mediated by Kr-h1. Genome-wide ChIP-seq analysis identified a consensus Kr-h1 binding site (KBS, 14 bp) located in the E93 promoter region, and EMSA confirmed that Kr-h1 directly binds to the KBS. Moreover, we identified a C-terminal conserved domain in Kr-h1 essential for the transcriptional repression of E93. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism in which JH-inducible Kr-h1 directly binds to the KBS site upstream of the E93 locus to repress its transcription in a cell-autonomous manner, thereby preventing larva from bypassing the pupal stage and progressing to precocious adult development. These findings help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating the metamorphic genetic network, including the functional significance of Kr-h1, BR-C, and E93 in holometabolous insect metamorphosis. PMID:28096379

  5. Mechanisms Mediating the Vesicant Actions of Sulfur Mustard after Cutaneous Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Shakarjian, Michael P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gray, Joshua P.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Gordon, Marion K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heindel, Ned D.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a chemical weapon first employed during World War I, targets the skin, eyes, and lung. It remains a significant military and civilian threat. The characteristic response of human skin to SM involves erythema of delayed onset, followed by edema with inflammatory cell infiltration, the appearance of large blisters in the affected area, and a prolonged healing period. Several in vivo and in vitro models have been established to understand the pathology and investigate the mechanism of action of this vesicating agent in the skin. SM is a bifunctional alkylating agent which reacts with many targets including lipids, proteins, and DNA, forming both intra- and intermolecular cross-links. Despite the relatively nonselective chemical reactivity of this agent, basal keratinocytes are more sensitive, and blistering involves detachment of these cells from their basement membrane adherence zones. The sequence and manner in which these cells die and detach is still unresolved. Much has been discovered over the past two decades with respect to the mechanisms of SM-induced cytotoxicity and the intracellular and extracellular targets of this vesicant. In this review, the effects of SM exposure on the skin are described, as well as potential mechanisms mediating its actions. Successful therapy for SM poisoning will depend on following new mechanistic leads to develop drugs that target one or more of its sites of action. PMID:19833738

  6. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  7. Improvement of Transmembrane Transport Mechanism Study of Imperatorin on P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Drug Transport.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zheng-Gen; Tang, Tao; Guan, Xue-Jing; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Yang, Ming; Liang, Xin-Li

    2016-11-24

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affects the transport of many drugs; including puerarin and vincristine. Our previous study demonstrated that imperatorin increased the intestinal absorption of puerarin and vincristine by inhibiting P-gp-mediated drug efflux. However; the underlying mechanism was not known. The present study investigated the mechanism by which imperatorin promotes P-gp-mediated drug transport. We used molecular docking to predict the binding force between imperatorin and P-gp and the effect of imperatorin on P-gp activity. P-gp efflux activity and P-gp ATPase activity were measured using a rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) accumulation assay and a Pgp-Glo™ assay; respectively. The fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was used to assess cellular membrane fluidity in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Western blotting was used to analyze the effect of imperatorin on P-gp expression; and P-gp mRNA levels were assessed by qRT-PCR. Molecular docking results demonstrated that the binding force between imperatorin and P-gp was much weaker than the force between P-gp and verapamil (a P-gp substrate). Imperatorin activated P-gp ATPase activity; which had a role in the inhibition of P-gp activity. Imperatorin promoted Rh-123 accumulation in MDCK-MDR1 cells and decreased cellular membrane fluidity. Western blotting demonstrated that imperatorin inhibited P-gp expression; and qRT-PCR revealed that imperatorin down-regulated P-gp (MDR1) gene expression. Imperatorin decreased P-gp-mediated drug efflux by inhibiting P-gp activity and the expression of P-gp mRNA and protein. Our results suggest that imperatorin could down-regulate P-gp expression to overcome multidrug resistance in tumors.

  8. Mediation of Autophagic Cell Death by Type 3 Ryanodine Receptor (RyR3) in Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Min; Jeong, Eun-Ji; Park, Hyunhee; An, Hyun-Kyu; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death (ACD). Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs—especially RyR3—were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished ACD of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology. PMID:27199668

  9. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel M.; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Simon, M. Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm3) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1–6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  10. Cancer Cell Glycocalyx Mediates Mechanostransduction and Flow-Regulated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Henry; Palomino, Rocio; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Munn, Lance L.; Tarbell, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells are covered by a surface proteoglycan (glycocalyx) layer, and it is known that blood vessel-lining endothelial cells use the glycocalyx to sense and transduce the shearing forces of blood flow into intracellular signals. Tumor cells in vivo are exposed to forces from interstitial fluid flow that may affect metastatic potential but are not reproduced by most in vitro cell motility assays. We hypothesized that glycocalyx-mediated mechanotransduction of interstitial flow shear stress is an un-recognized factor that can significantly enhance metastatic cell motility and play a role in augmentation of invasion. Involvement of MMP levels, cell adhesion molecules (CD44, α3 integrin), and glycocalyx components (heparan sulfate and hyaluronan) were investigated in a cell/collagen gel suspension model designed to mimic the interstitial flow microenvironment. Physiologic levels of flow upregulated MMP levels and enhanced the motility of metastatic cells. Blocking the flow-enhanced expression of MMP actvity or adhesion molecules (CD44 and integrins) resulted in blocking the flow-enhanced migratory activity. The presence of a glycocalyx-like layer was verified around tumor cells, and the degradation of this layer by hyaluronidase and heparinase blocked the flow-regulated invasion. This study shows for the first time that interstitial flow enhancement of metastatic cell motility can be mediated by the cell surface glycocalyx – a potential target for therapeutics. PMID:24077103

  11. Th17 Pathway–Mediated Immunopathogenesis of Schizophrenia: Mechanisms and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Monojit; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly complex and severe neuropsychiatric disorder with an unknown etiopathology. Evidence for a dysregulated immune system in both the risk for and progression of schizophrenia has recently been overwhelming. Importantly, chronic low-grade inflammation both in the periphery and central nervous system has been shown to contribute predominantly to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in a subset of individuals. Inflammation in the central nervous system is mediated by a range of proinflammatory cytokines, resident immune cells such as microglia, and brain infiltrating peripheral immunocompetent cells, such as T lymphocytes. Recently, Th17 cells, a subset of T helper cells have emerged as crucial players in mucosal defense against infections. It is linked to atopic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. The risk factors/mechanisms leading to low-grade inflammation in schizophrenia are diverse and include infectious agents, stress, trauma, environmental toxins, genetic vulnerability, physical inactivity, obesity, poor diet, and sleep disruption. Herein, we propose that fetal programming of cellular immune components driven by intrauterine adversity can lead to the generation of long-lasting effector/memory Th17 cells. Th17 cells can disrupt the blood-brain barrier, infiltrate the central nervous system, and, along with other cytokines and microglia, lead to neuroprogression through neuroinflammation in schizophrenia. PMID:24711545

  12. α-Galactosylceramide-induced airway eosinophilia is mediated through the activation of NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Hui; Wang, Tzu-Chun; Jen, Hsiao-Yu; Yu, Alice L; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-04-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells bridge innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in the expansion of Ag-specific B and T cell responses. α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), the most studied glycolipid that activates iNKT cells, has been proposed to be an effective adjuvant against infections and tumors. We found that the activation of iNKT cells by intranasal injection of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilia in naive mice. Eosinophils, which mediate tissue damage and dysfunction by secreting mediators, play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how eosinophils are recruited to the lung by α-GalCer. Our results demonstrated that α-GalCer-induced eosinophil inflammation was mediated through iNKT cells. These cells secreted IL-5 to recruit eosinophils directly to the lung and/or secreted IL-4 and IL-13 to recruit eosinophils indirectly by inducing lung epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblast to secrete the eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin. In addition, in the OVA-alum murine model of allergic asthma, α-GalCer administration in OVA-immunized mice also increased airway eosinophilia after challenge. Given our findings, intranasal administration of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilic inflammation in both naive and allergic mice. Hence, it remains to be determined whether the activation of iNKT cells would be applicable in therapeutics for human diseases.

  13. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  14. β-arrestin-1 mediates the TCR-triggered re-routing of distal receptors to the immunological synapse by a PKC-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Arenas, Elena; Calleja, Enrique; Martínez-Martín, Nadia; Gharbi, Severine I; Navajas, Rosana; García-Medel, Noel; Penela, Petronila; Alcamí, Antonio; Mayor, Federico; Albar, Juan P; Alarcón, Balbino

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptors (TCR) recognize their antigen ligand at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells, known as the immunological synapse (IS). The IS provides a means of sustaining the TCR signal which requires the continual supply of new TCRs. These are endocytosed and redirected from distal membrane locations to the IS. In our search for novel cytoplasmic effectors, we have identified β-arrestin-1 as a ligand of non-phosphorylated resting TCRs. Using dominant-negative and knockdown approaches we demonstrate that β-arrestin-1 is required for the internalization and downregulation of non-engaged bystander TCRs. Furthermore, TCR triggering provokes the β-arrestin-1-mediated downregulation of the G-protein coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4, but not of other control receptors. We demonstrate that β-arrestin-1 recruitment to the TCR, and bystander TCR and CXCR4 downregulation, are mechanistically mediated by the TCR-triggered PKC-mediated phosphorylation of β-arrestin-1 at Ser163. This mechanism allows the first triggered TCRs to deliver a stop migration signal, and to promote the internalization of distal TCRs and CXCR4 and their translocation to the IS. This receptor crosstalk mechanism is critical to sustain the TCR signal. PMID:24502978

  15. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S.

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Mechanisms of acetylcholine-mediated vasodilatation in young and aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Holowatz, Lacy A; Thompson, Caitlin S; Minson, Christopher T; Kenney, W Larry

    2005-01-01

    Thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodilatation (VD) is attenuated in aged skin. While acetylcholine (ACh) plays a role in thermally mediated VD, the precise mechanisms through which ACh-mediated VD acts and whether those downstream mechanisms change with ageing are unclear. We tested the hypotheses that both nitric oxide (NO)- and prostanoid-mediated pathways contribute to exogenous ACh-mediated VD, and that both are attenuated with advanced age. Twelve young (Y: 23 ± 1 years) and 10 older (O: 69 ± 1 years) subjects underwent infusions of 137.5 μm ACh at four intradermal microdialysis sites: control (C, Ringer solution), NO synthase inhibited (NOS-I, 10 mml-NAME), cyclooxygenase inhibited (COX-I, 10 mm ketorolac) and NOS-I + COX-I. Red blood cell flux was monitored using laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated (laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVCmax) (28 mm sodium nitroprusside + local heating to 43°C). Baseline %CVCmax was increased in the O at COX-I sites (COX-I 16 ± 1, NOS-I + COX-I 16 ± 2 versus C 10 ± 1%CVCmax; P < 0.001) but not in the young, suggesting an age-related shift toward COX vasoconstrictors contributing to basal cutaneous vasomotor tone. There was no difference in peak %CVCmax during ACh infusion between age groups, and the response was unchanged by NOS-I (O: NOS-I 35 ± 5 versus C 38 ± 5%CVCmax; P = 0.84) (Y: NOS-I 41 ± 4 versus C 39 ± 4%CVCmax; P = 0.67). COX-I and NOS-I + COX-I attenuated the peak CVC response to ACh in both groups (COX-I O: 29 ± 3, Y: 22 ± 2%CVCmaxversus C; P < 0.001 both groups; NOS-I + COX-I O: 32 ± 3 versus Y: 29 ± 2%CVCmax; versus C; P < 0.001 both groups). ACh mediates cutaneous VD through prostanoid and non-NO-, non-prostanoid-dependent pathways. Further, older subjects have a diminished prostanoid contribution to ACh-mediated VD. PMID:15661816

  17. Natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity is increased by a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2017-01-02

    This study investigated the effects of a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus (AGAF) on natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the possible underlying mechanisms. This study reported that sustained exposure to AGAF increased NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as characterized according to the cellular lactic dehydrogenase leakage from K562 leukemia cells. Additionally, antibody neutralization studies have reported that interferon (IFN)-γ, but not perforin or tumor necrosis factor-α, released by NK-92MI NK cells is crucial in enhancing cytotoxicity through an autocrine loop. In this study, AGAF was further demonstrated to induce IFN-γ expression, increasing the susceptibility to NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity through the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB pathways. A pharmacological study revealed that Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of the signal transducers and of transcription 3 signaling are involved in IFN-γ-induced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  18. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Mediates Microtubule Destabilization To Promote Cell Motility and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Laura M.; Stakaityte, Gabriele; Wood, Jennifer, J.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Griffiths, David A.; Howell, Gareth J.; Wheat, Rachel; Blair, G. Eric; Steven, Neil M.; Macdonald, Andrew; Blackbourn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive skin cancer of neuroendocrine origin with a high propensity for recurrence and metastasis. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes the majority of MCC cases due to the expression of the MCPyV small and large tumor antigens (ST and LT, respectively). Although a number of molecular mechanisms have been attributed to MCPyV tumor antigen-mediated cellular transformation or replication, to date, no studies have investigated any potential link between MCPyV T antigen expression and the highly metastatic nature of MCC. Here we use a quantitative proteomic approach to show that MCPyV ST promotes differential expression of cellular proteins implicated in microtubule-associated cytoskeletal organization and dynamics. Intriguingly, we demonstrate that MCPyV ST expression promotes microtubule destabilization, leading to a motile and migratory phenotype. We further highlight the essential role of the microtubule-associated protein stathmin in MCPyV ST-mediated microtubule destabilization and cell motility and implicate the cellular phosphatase catalytic subunit protein phosphatase 4C (PP4C) in the regulation of this process. These findings suggest a possible molecular mechanism for the highly metastatic phenotype associated with MCC. IMPORTANCE Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes the majority of cases of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), an aggressive skin cancer with a high metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to virally induced cancer development have yet to be fully elucidated. In particular, no studies have investigated any potential link between the virus and the highly metastatic nature of MCC. We demonstrate that the MCPyV small tumor antigen (ST) promotes the destabilization of the host cell microtubule network, which leads to a more motile and migratory cell phenotype. We further show that MCPyV ST induces this process by regulating the phosphorylation status of the cellular microtubule

  19. Diversity of cell-mediated adhesions in breast cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2007-12-01

    Due to their three dimensional (3D) architecture, multicellular tumor spheroids mimic avascular tumor areas comprising the establishment of diffusion gradients, reduced proliferation rates and increased drug resistance. We have shown recently that the spontaneous formation of spheroids is restricted to a limited number of cell lines whereas the majority grow only as aggregates of cells with loose cell-cell contacts when cultured in 3D. However, by the addition of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM, Matrigel), aggregates can be transformed into spheroids with diffusion barriers and development of quiescent therapy-resistant cells. In this report, we investigated adhesion molecules responsible for rBM-driven versus spontaneous spheroid formation in a diverse population of eight breast tumor cell lines relevant for in vitro and in vivo antitumor drug testing. Inhibition of spheroid formation was monitored in the presence of adhesion molecule functional blocking antibodies and after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of E- and N-cadherin and integrin beta1 adhesion receptors. We identified that E-cadherin mediates the spontaneous formation of spheroids in MCF7, BT-474, T-47D and MDA-MB-361 cells, whereas N-cadherin is responsible for tight packing of MDA-MB-435S cells. In contrast, the matrix protein-induced transformation of 3D aggregates into spheroids in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells is mediated primarily by the collagen I/integrin beta1 interaction with no cadherin involvement. A combination of both, homophilic E-cadherin and integrin beta1/collagen I interaction establishes spheroids in MDA-MB-468 cells. These findings indicate that an evolutionary diverse and complex pattern of interacting cell surface proteins exists in breast cancer cells that determines the 3D growth characteristic in vitro, thereby influencing small molecule or antibody permeation in preclinical in vitro and in vivo tumor models.

  20. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-07-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3'UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation.

  1. Identifying ECM Mediators of Tumor Cell Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    proliferating cells. f) At time of euthanasia, stage of estrous will be determined by vaginal smear so that inter- animal variation due to estrous...ratio of the number of distinct peptides identified for each protein divided by the total number of peptides identified in the two hour run are...displayed as the peptide count ratio. Using this peptide counting label-free quantification approach, surprisingly, suggested that the three fibrillar

  2. Identifying ECM Mediators of Tumor Cell Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    oil). d) At end of 4 week treatment (Gp2) and after 1 month post-weaning (Gp3), all groups will be euthanized. e) Two hours prior to euthanasia ...inject rats with 50 mg/BrdU i.p. for incorporation into actively proliferating cells. f) At time of euthanasia , stage of estrous will be determined...of New Mexico , ‘Plasticity of the mammary gland extracellular matrix and breast cancer progression’. Albuquerque, New Mexico , Sept 22, 2006

  3. Downregulation of Mcl-1 potentiates HDACi-mediated apoptosis in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Walewska, R; Dyer, M J S; Cohen, G M

    2008-04-01

    Mcl-1 is an antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, whose degradation is supposedly required for the induction of apoptosis. However, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce apoptosis primarily through the Bak/Mcl-1/Noxa and Bim pathways without decreasing Mcl-1. To investigate this discrepancy, we examined the role of Mcl-1 on HDACi-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of either class I or class II HDAC by selective HDACi caused an upregulation of Mcl-1 mRNA and protein. Downregulation of Mcl-1 by three structurally unrelated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors potentiated HDACi-mediated apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemic (CLL) cells and K562 cells. Sensitivity to HDACi-induced apoptosis was increased approximately 10-fold by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Nanomolar concentrations of HDACi, approximately 300-fold lower than that required to induce apoptosis alone, sensitized cells to TRAIL, emphasizing that the mechanism(s) whereby HDACi induce apoptosis is clearly distinct from those by which they sensitize to TRAIL. Furthermore, knockdown of Mcl-1-potentiated HDACi-mediated apoptosis in K562 cells. Thus, HDACi-mediated Mcl-1 upregulation plays an important antiapoptotic regulatory role in limiting the efficacy of HDACi-induced apoptosis, which can be overcome by combination with an agent that downregulates Mcl-1. Thus, a clinical trial in some cancers is warranted using a combination of an HDACi with agents that downregulate Mcl-1.

  4. Inhibitory effect of vanillic acid on methylglyoxal-mediated glycation in apoptotic Neuro-2A cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shang-Ming; Hsu, Chin-Lin; Chuang, Hong-Chih; Shih, Ping-Hsiao; Wu, Chi-Hao; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2008-11-01

    Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound generated as an intermediate of glycolysis during the physical glycation in the diabetic condition. It is considered to be a potent precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation. Methylglyoxal itself and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs have been commonly implicated in the development of diabetic neuropathy. Our previous study indicated that vanillic acid showed an inhibitory effect against methylglyoxal-mediated Neuro-2A cell apoptosis, suggesting that vanillic acid might possess cytoprotective properties in the prevention of diabetic neuropathy complication. In this study, the effects of vanillic acid on the methylglyoxal-mediated glycation system involved in the progression of Neuro-2A cell apoptosis were further investigated. Our findings indicated that methylglyoxal-induced Neuro-2A cell apoptosis was mediated through the possible glycation mechanism of oxidative stress, activation of the MAPK signaling pathway (p38 and JNK) and oxidation-sensitive protein expression (PKC and p47(phox)) and methylglyoxal-derived N-epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) formation. Vanillic acid, however, suppressed methylglyoxal-induced Neuro-2A cell apoptosis via inhibition of glycation mechanisms including ROS, p38 and JNK, PKC and p47(phox), and methylglyoxal-derived CML formation. In the present study, we established the first evidence that vanillic acid might contribute to the prevention of the development of diabetic neuropathy by blocking the methylglyoxal-mediated intracellular glycation system.

  5. Flotillins control zebrafish epiboly through their role in cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Morris, Eduardo A Rios; Bodin, Stéphane; Delaval, Bénédicte; Comunale, Franck; Georget, Virginie; Costa, Manoel L; Lutfalla, Georges; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2017-02-22

    Zebrafish gastrulation and particularly epiboly that involves coordinated movements of several cell layers is a dynamic process for which regulators remain to be identified. We show here that Flotillin 1 and 2, ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins, are required for epiboly. Flotillins knockdown compromised embryo survival, strongly delayed epiboly and impaired deep cell radial intercalation and directed collective migration without affecting enveloping layer cell movement. At the molecular level, we identified that Flotillins are required for the formation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions. These results provide the first in vivo evidence that Flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions to allow epiboly progression.

  6. Kinesin-1 heavy chain mediates microtubule sliding to drive changes in cell shape.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Amber L; Kim, Hwajin; Srinivasan, Divya; Lakonishok, Margot; Larson, Adam G; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2010-07-06

    Microtubules are typically observed to buckle and loop during interphase in cultured cells by an unknown mechanism. We show that lateral microtubule movement and looping is a result of microtubules sliding against one another in interphase Drosophila S2 cells. RNAi of the kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC), but not dynein or the kinesin-1 light chain, eliminates these movements. KHC-dependent microtubule sliding powers the formation of cellular processes filled with parallel microtubule bundles. The growth of these cellular processes is independent of the actin cytoskeleton. We further observe cytoplasmic microtubule sliding in Xenopus and Ptk2 cells, and show that antibody inhibition of KHC in mammalian cells prevents sliding. We therefore propose that, in addition to its well established role in organelle transport, an important universal function of kinesin-1 is to mediate cytoplasmic microtubule-microtubule sliding. This provides the cell with a dedicated mechanism to transport long and short microtubule filaments and drive changes in cell shape.

  7. New frontiers in transfusion biology: Identification and significance of mediators of morbidity and mortality in stored red cell concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Grimshaw, Katie; Sahler, Julie; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Red cell transfusions are associated with inflammation and thrombosis, both arterial and venous, the mechanisms of which are not understood. Although a necessary life saving procedure in modern medicine, transfusions have rarely been subjected to modern assessments of efficacy and safety, including randomized trials. Storage of red blood cells induces changes, including the release of free hemoglobin and the accumulation of biologically active soluble mediators and microparticles. These mediators likely play a direct role in the inflammatory and pro-thrombotic properties of red cell transfusions. Methods such as leukoreduction, washing of red cells and rejuvenation may improve the quality of red cell transfusions. PMID:21496049

  8. Taxanes enhance trastuzumab-mediated ADCC on tumor cells through NKG2D-mediated NK cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Di Modica, Martina; Sfondrini, Lucia; Regondi, Viola; Varchetta, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Mariani, Gabriella; Bianchi, Giulia Valeria; Generali, Daniele; Balsari, Andrea; Triulzi, Tiziana; Tagliabue, Elda

    2016-01-05

    Recent clinical data indicate a synergistic therapeutic effect between trastuzumab and taxanes in neoadjuvantly treated HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) patients. In HER2+ BC experimental models and patients, we investigated whether this synergy depends on the ability of drug-induced stress to improve NK cell effectiveness and thus trastuzumab-mediated ADCC. HER2+ BC cell lines BT474 and MDAMB361 treated with docetaxel showed up-modulation of NK activator ligands both in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by a 15-40% increase in in vitro trastuzumab-mediated ADCC; antibodies blocking the NKG2D receptor significantly reduced this enhancement. NKG2D receptor expression was increased by docetaxel treatment in circulating and splenic NK cells from mice xenografted with tumor cells, an increase related to expansion of the CD11b+Ly6G+ cell population. Accordingly, NK cells derived from HER2+ BC patients after treatment with taxane-containing therapy expressed higher levels of NKG2D receptor than before treatment. Moreover, plasma obtained from these patients recapitulated the modulation of NKG2D on healthy donors' NK cells, improving their trastuzumab-mediated activity in vitro. This enhancement occurred mainly using plasma from patients with low NKG2D basal expression. Our results indicate that taxanes increase tumor susceptibility to ADCC by acting on tumor and NK cells, and suggest that taxanes concomitantly administered with trastuzumab could maximize the antibody effect, especially in patients with low basal immune effector cytotoxic activity.

  9. AMPK-mediated autophagy inhibits apoptosis in cisplatin-treated tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Harhaji-Trajkovic, L; Vilimanovich, U; Kravic-Stevovic, T; Bumbasirevic, V; Trajkovic, V

    2009-09-01

    The role of autophagy in cisplatin anticancer action was investigated using human U251 glioma, rat C6 glioma and mouse L929 fibrosarcoma cell lines. A dose- and time-dependent induction of autophagy was observed in tumour cells following cisplatin treatment, as demonstrated by up-regulation of autophagy-inducing protein beclin-1 and subsequent appearance of acridine orange-stained acidic autophagic vesicles. The presence of autophagosomes in cisplatin-treated cells was also confirmed by electron microscopy. Inhibition of autophagy with lysosomal inhibitors bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, or a PI3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin, markedly augmented cisplatin-triggered oxidative stress and caspase activation, leading to an increase in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The mechanisms underlying the protective effect of autophagy apparently involved the interference with cisplatin-induced modulation of Bcl-2 family proteins, as inhibition of autophagy potentiated cisplatin-mediated up-regulation of proapoptotic Bax and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Autophagy induction in cisplatin-treated cells was preceded by activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and concomitant down-regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase. The ability of cisplatin to trigger autophagy was reduced by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated AMPK silencing, while transfection with mTOR siRNA was sufficient to trigger autophagy in tumour cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated AMPK down-regulation and AMPK inhibitor compound C increased cisplatin-induced tumour cell death, while mTOR siRNA and AMPK activator metformin protected tumour cells from cisplatin. Taken together, these data suggest that cisplatin-triggered activation of AMPK and subsequent suppression of mTOR activity can induce an autophagic response that protects tumour cells from cisplatin-mediated apoptotic death.

  10. Riluzole mediates anti-tumor properties in breast cancer cells independent of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Cecilia L; Nassar, Mahdy A; Hachem, Ali H; Bukhsh, Miriam A; Jafry, Waris S; Khansa, Rafa M; Gorski, David H

    2016-06-01

    Riluzole, the only drug approved by the FDA for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inhibits melanoma proliferation through its inhibitory effect on glutamatergic signaling. We demonstrated that riluzole also inhibits the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and described a role for metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) in regulating TNBC cell growth and progression. However, the role of GRM1 in mediating riluzole's effects in breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we seek to determine how much of riluzole's action in breast cancer is mediated through GRM1. We investigated anti-tumor properties of riluzole in TNBC and ER+ cells using cell growth, invasion, and soft-agar assays and compared riluzole activity with GRM1 levels. Using Lentiviral vectors expressing GRM1 or shGRM1, these studies were repeated in cells expressing high or low GRM1 levels where the gene was either silenced or overexpressed. Riluzole inhibited proliferation, invasion, and colony formation in both TNBC and ER+ cells. There was a trend between GRM1 expression in TNBC cells and their response to riluzole in both cell proliferation and invasion assays. However, silencing and overexpression studies had no effect on cell sensitivity to riluzole. Our results clearly suggest a GRM1-independent mechanism through which riluzole mediates its effects on breast cancer cells. Understanding the mechanism by which riluzole mediates breast cancer progression will be useful in identifying new therapeutic targets for treating TNBC and in facilitating stratification of patients in clinical trials using riluzole in conjunction with conventional therapy.

  11. Cell mechanics and human disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Subra

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will provide summary of our very recent studies exploring the effects of biochemical factors, influenced by foreign organisms or in vivo processes, on intracellular structural reorganization, single-cell mechanical response and motility of a population of cells in the context of two human diseases: malaria induced by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites that invade red blood cells, and gastrointestinal cancer metastasis involving epithelial cells. In both cases, particular attention will be devoted to systematic changes induced in specific molecular species in response to controlled alterations in disease state. The role of critical proteins in influencing the mechanical response of human red bloods during the intra-erythrocytic development of P. falciparum merozoites has also been assessed quantitatively using specific protein knock-out experiments by recourse to gene inactivation methods. Single-cell mechanical response characterization entails such tools as optical tweezers and mechanical plate stretchers whereas cell motility assays and cell-population biorheology characterization involves microfluidic channels. The experimental studies are accompanied by three-dimensional computational simulations at the continuum and mesoscopic scales of cell deformation. An outcome of such combined experimental and computational biophysical studies is the realization of how chemical factors influence single-cell mechanical response, cytoadherence, the biorheology of a large population of cells through microchannels representative of in vivo conditions, and the onset and progression of disease states.

  12. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  13. Degradation-mediated cellular traction directs stem cell fate in covalently crosslinked three-dimensional hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetan, Sudhir; Guvendiren, Murat; Legant, Wesley R.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-05-01

    Although cell-matrix adhesive interactions are known to regulate stem cell differentiation, the underlying mechanisms, in particular for direct three-dimensional encapsulation within hydrogels, are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that in covalently crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is directed by the generation of degradation-mediated cellular traction, independently of cell morphology or matrix mechanics. hMSCs within HA hydrogels of equivalent elastic moduli that permit (restrict) cell-mediated degradation exhibited high (low) degrees of cell spreading and high (low) tractions, and favoured osteogenesis (adipogenesis). Moreover, switching the permissive hydrogel to a restrictive state through delayed secondary crosslinking reduced further hydrogel degradation, suppressed traction, and caused a switch from osteogenesis to adipogenesis in the absence of changes to the extended cellular morphology. Furthermore, inhibiting tension-mediated signalling in the permissive environment mirrored the effects of delayed secondary crosslinking, whereas upregulating tension induced osteogenesis even in the restrictive environment.

  14. Mast Cell Mediator Responses and Their Suppression by Pathogenic and Commensal Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hae Woong; Abraham, Soman N.

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are selectively found at the host environment interface and are capable of secreting a wide array of pharmacologically active mediators, many of which are prepackaged in granules. Over the past two decades, it has become clear that these cells have the capacity to recognize a range of infectious agents allowing them to play a key role in initiating and modulating early immune responses to infectious agents. However, a number of pathogenic and commensal microbes appear to have evolved distinct mechanisms to suppress MC mediator release to avoid elimination in the host. Understanding how these microbes suppress MC functions may have significant therapeutic value to relieve inflammatory disorders mediated by MCs. PMID:24636146

  15. Enzyme- and affinity biomolecule-mediated polymerization systems for biological signal amplification and cell screening.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Klara H; Nash, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-mediated polymerization and polymerization-based signal amplification have emerged as two closely related techniques that are broadly applicable in the nanobio sciences. We review recent progress on polymerization systems mediated by biological molecules (e.g., affinity molecules and enzymes), and highlight newly developed formats and configurations of these systems to perform such tasks as non-instrumented biodetection, synthesis of core-shell nanomaterials, isolation of rare cells, and high-throughput screening. We discuss useful features of biologically mediated polymerization systems, such as multiple mechanisms of amplification (e.g., enzymatic, radical chain propagation), and the ability to localize structures at interfaces and at cell surfaces with microscopic spatial confinement. We close with a perspective on desirable improvements that need to be addressed to adapt these molecular systems to future applications.

  16. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research.

  17. Class A scavenger receptor-mediated cell adhesion requires the sequential activation of Lyn and PI3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Dejan M; Cholewa, Jill; Gass, Cecelia; Gong, Ming C; Post, Steven R

    2007-04-01

    Class A scavenger receptors (SR-A) participate in multiple macrophage functions including macrophage adhesion to modified proteins. SR-A-mediated adhesion may therefore contribute to chronic inflammation by promoting macrophage accumulation at sites of protein modification. The mechanisms that couple SR-A binding to modified proteins with increased cell adhesion have not been defined. In this study, SR-A expressing HEK cells and SR-A+/+ or SR-A-/- macrophages were used to delineate the signaling pathways required for SR-A-mediated adhesion to modified protein. Inhibiting G(i/o) activation, which decreases initial SR-A-mediated cell attachment, did not prevent the subsequent spreading of attached cells. In contrast, inhibition of Src kinases or PI3-kinase abolished SR-A-dependent cell spreading without affecting SR-A-mediated cell attachment. Consistent with these results, the Src kinase Lyn and PI3-kinase were sequentially activated during SR-A-mediated cell spreading. Furthermore, activation of both Lyn and PI3-kinase was required for enhancing paxillin phosphorylation. Activation of a Src kinase-PI3-kinase-Akt pathway was also observed in cells expressing a truncated SR-A protein that does not internalize indicating that SR-A-mediated activation of intracellular signaling cascades following adhesion to MDA-BSA is independent of receptor internalization. Thus SR-A binding to modified protein activates signaling cascades that have distinct roles in regulating initial cell attachment and subsequent cell spreading.

  18. Distinct Requirements for HIV-Cell Fusion and HIV-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Naoyuki; Marin, Mariana; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Desai, Tanay M.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    Whether HIV-1 enters cells by fusing with the plasma membrane or with endosomes is a subject of active debate. The ability of HIV-1 to mediate fusion between adjacent cells, a process referred to as “fusion-from-without” (FFWO), shows that this virus can fuse with the plasma membrane. To compare FFWO occurring at the cell surface with HIV-cell fusion through a conventional entry route, we designed an experimental approach that enabled the measurements of both processes in the same sample. The following key differences were observed. First, a very small fraction of viruses fusing with target cells participated in FFWO. Second, whereas HIV-1 fusion with adherent cells was insensitive to actin inhibitors, post-CD4/coreceptor binding steps during FFWO were abrogated. A partial dependence of HIV-cell fusion on actin remodeling was observed in CD4+ T cells, but this effect appeared to be due to the actin dependence of virus uptake. Third, deletion of the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 gp41 dramatically enhanced the ability of the virus to promote FFWO, while having a modest effect on virus-cell fusion. Distinct efficiencies and actin dependences of FFWO versus HIV-cell fusion are consistent with the notion that, except for a minor fraction of particles that mediate fusion between the plasma membranes of adjacent cells, HIV-1 enters through an endocytic pathway. We surmise, however, that cell-cell contacts enabling HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane could be favored at the sites of high density of target cells, such as lymph nodes. PMID:25589785

  19. Kupffer cells of cirrhotic rat livers sensitize colon cancer cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Song, E; Chen, J; Ouyang, N; Wang, M; Exton, M S; Heemann, U

    2001-05-04

    Metastasis of colorectal carcinomas rarely occurs in cirrhotic livers. Our study investigated the influence of activated Kupffer cells from cirrhotic rat livers on hepatic colonization and FasR-mediated apoptosis of colon cancer cells. A rat colon cancer cell line, RCN-9, was used to inoculate rat livers. Treatment with conditioned media of Kupffer cells isolated from CCl(4)-induced cirrhotic rat livers (cirrhotic KCM) significantly reduced the incidence of hepatic colonization of RCN-9 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity of Kupffer cells and tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) on RCN-9 cells was evaluated using [(3)H]-release assay. RCN-9 cells were resistant to cytotoxicity mediated by cirrhotic Kupffer cells, but were sensitized to TIL-mediated killing after treatment with cirrhotic KCM. The specific killing induced by TILs was FasR-mediated, as it was inhibited by ZB4, an antagonistic anti-FasR antibody. In agreement, cirrhotic KCM increased recombinant Fas ligand-induced apoptosis of RCN-9 cells, and up-regulated FasR expression on RCN-9 cells as evaluated by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. These findings suggest that Kupffer cells in cirrhotic livers sensitize metastatic colon cancer cells to FasR-mediated apoptosis by up-regulating the receptors, which thus prepare them to be eliminated by infiltrating lymphocytes.

  20. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Lo, Hau-Yin; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs). In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1) by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α) by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation. PMID:27171144

  1. Regulation of autoimmune diabetes by complete Freund's adjuvant is mediated by NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Fang; Qin, Huilian; Trudeau, Jacqueline; Dutz, Jan; Tan, Rusung

    2004-01-15

    Autoimmune (type 1) diabetes results from a loss of beta cells that is mediated by self-reactive T cells. Previous studies have shown that a single injection of CFA prevents diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, but the mechanism(s) of protection remain unknown. We show here that NOD mice immunized with CFA have a markedly reduced incidence of diabetes and that this reduced incidence is associated with a decrease in the number of beta cell-specific, autoreactive CTL. In addition, the adoptive transfer of diabetes into syngeneic NOD/SCID recipients was prevented by CFA immunization, and the protective effects of CFA were lost when cells expressing the NK cell marker, asialo GM1, were removed from both donor cells and recipient mice. Returning a population of CD3-DX5+ cells to the adoptive transfer restored the protective effects of CFA. Therefore, NK cells mediate the protective effects of CFA possibly through the down-regulation of autoreactive CTL and stimulation of NK cells represents a novel approach to the prevention of autoimmune diabetes.

  2. Toxin-mediated gene regulatory mechanism in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The dangerous human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus relies heavily on toxins to cause disease, but toxin production can put a strong burden on the bacteria’s energy balance. Thus, controlling the synthesis of proteins solely needed in times of toxin production represents a way for the bacteria to avoid wasting energy. One hypothetical manner to accomplish this sort of regulation is by gene regulatory functions of the toxins themselves. There have been several reports about gene regulation by toxins in S. aureus, but these were never verified on the molecular level. In our study published in MBio [Joo et al., 7(5). pii: e01579-16], we show that phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), important peptide toxins of S. aureus, release a repressor from the promoter of the operon encoding the toxin export system, thereby enabling toxin secretion. This study describes the first molecular regulatory mechanism exerted by an S. aureus toxin, setting a paradigmatic example of how S. aureus toxins may influence cell functions to adjust them to times of toxin production.

  3. NF-κB p65 recruited SHP regulates PDCD5-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Murshed, Farhan; Farhana, Lulu; Dawson, Marcia I; Fontana, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Transcription factor NF-κB promotes cell proliferation in response to cell injury. Increasing evidence, however, suggests that NF-κB can also play an apoptotic role depending on the stimulus and cell type. We have previously demonstrated that novel retinoid 4-[3-Cl-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3-Cl-AHPC)-mediated apoptosis in breast carcinoma