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Sample records for cells regulating immune

  1. The molecular cues regulating immune cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    TAKEDA, Akira; SASAKI, Naoko; MIYASAKA, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Lymphocyte recirculation between the blood and the lymphoid/non-lymphoid tissues is an essential homeostatic mechanism that regulates humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. This system promotes the encounter of naïve T and B cells with their specific cognate antigen presented by dendritic cells, and with the regulatory cells with which they need to interact to initiate, maintain, and terminate immune responses. The constitutive lymphocyte trafficking is mediated by particular types of blood vessels, including the high endothelial venules (HEVs) in lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches, and the flat-walled venules in non-lymphoid tissues including the skin. The lymphocyte migration across HEVs involves tethering/rolling, arrest/firm adhesion/intraluminal crawling, and transendothelial migration. On the other hand, relatively little is known about how lymphocytes and other types of cells migrate across the venules of non-lymphoid tissues. Here we summarize recent findings about the molecular mechanisms that govern immune cell trafficking, including the roles of chemokines and lysophospholipids in regulating immune cell motility and endothelial permeability. PMID:28413196

  2. Programmed Cell Death of Dendritic Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is essential for the maintenance of lymphocyte homeostasis and immune tolerance. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most efficient antigen presenting cells, represent a small cell population in the immune system. However, DCs play major roles in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Programmed cell death in DCs is essential for regulating DC homeostasis and consequently, the scope of immune responses. Interestingly, different DC subsets show varied turnover rates in vivo. The conventional DCs are relatively short-lived in most lymphoid organs, while plasmacytoid DCs are long-lived cells. Mitochondrion-dependent programmed cell death plays an important role in regulating spontaneous DC turnover. Antigen-specific T cells are also capable of killing DCs, thereby providing a mechanism for negative feedback regulation of immune responses. It has been shown that a surplus of DCs due to defects in programmed cell death leads to overactivation of lymphocytes and the onset of autoimmunity. Studying programmed cell death in DCs will shed light on the roles for DC turnover in the regulation of the duration and magnitude of immune responses in vivo, and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. PMID:20636805

  3. Endogenous opioid peptides in regulation of innate immunity cell functions.

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Baeva, T A

    2011-03-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides comprise a group of bioregulatory factors involved in regulation of functional activity of various physiological systems of an organism. One of most important functions of endogenous opioids is their involvement in the interaction between cells of the nervous and immune systems. Summary data on the effects of opioid peptides on regulation of functions of innate immunity cells are presented.

  4. "Natural Regulators": NK Cells as Modulators of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Iona S; Coudert, Jerome D; Andoniou, Christopher E; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known as frontline responders capable of rapidly mediating a response upon encountering transformed or infected cells. Recent findings indicate that NK cells, in addition to acting as innate effectors, can also regulate adaptive immune responses. Here, we review recent studies on the immunoregulatory function of NK cells with a specific focus on their ability to affect the generation of early, as well as long-term antiviral T cell responses, and their role in modulating immune pathology and disease. In addition, we summarize the current knowledge of the factors governing regulatory NK cell responses and discuss origin, tissue specificity, and open questions about the classification of regulatory NK cells as classical NK cells versus group 1 innate lymphoid cells.

  5. Hepatic immune regulation by stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Schildberg, Frank A; Sharpe, Arlene H; Turley, Shannon J

    2015-02-01

    A metabolic organ, the liver also has a central role in tolerance induction. Stromal cells lining the hepatic sinusoids, such as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), are the first liver cells to encounter gut-derived and systemic antigens, thereby shaping local and systemic tolerance. Recent studies have demonstrated that stromal cells can modulate immune responses by antigen-dependent and independent mechanisms. Stromal cells interfere with the function of other antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induce non-responsive T cells as well as regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The immunosuppressive microenvironment thus created provides a means to protect the liver from tissue damage. Such tolerized surroundings, however, can be exploited by certain pathogens, promoting persistent liver infections.

  6. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of the adaptive immune system by innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a group of lymphocytes that promote rapid cytokine-dependent innate immunity, inflammation and tissue repair. In addition, a growing body of evidence suggests ILCs can influence adaptive immune cell responses. During fetal development a subset of ILCs orchestrate the generation and maturation of secondary lymphoid tissues. Following birth, ILCs continue to modulate adaptive immune cell responses indirectly through interactions with stromal cells in lymphoid tissues and epithelial cells at barrier surfaces. In this review we summarize the current understanding of how ILCs modulate the magnitude and quality of adaptive immune cell responses, and in particular focus on recent evidence suggesting that ILCs can also directly regulate CD4+ T cells. Further, we discuss the implications that these pathways may have on human health and disease. PMID:24594491

  8. TIGIT predominantly regulates the immune response via regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kurtulus, Sema; Sakuishi, Kaori; Ngiow, Shin-Foong; Joller, Nicole; Tan, Dewar J; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Anderson, Ana C

    2015-11-02

    Coinhibitory receptors are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Upregulation of these receptors on effector T cells terminates T cell responses, while their expression on Tregs promotes their suppressor function. Understanding the function of coinhibitory receptors in effector T cells and Tregs is crucial, as therapies that target coinhibitory receptors are currently at the forefront of treatment strategies for cancer and other chronic diseases. T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is a recently identified coinhibitory receptor that is found on the surface of a variety of lymphoid cells, and its role in immune regulation is just beginning to be elucidated. We examined TIGIT-mediated immune regulation in different murine cancer models and determined that TIGIT marks the most dysfunctional subset of CD8+ T cells in tumor tissue as well as tumor-tissue Tregs with a highly active and suppressive phenotype. We demonstrated that TIGIT signaling in Tregs directs their phenotype and that TIGIT primarily suppresses antitumor immunity via Tregs and not CD8+ T cells. Moreover, TIGIT+ Tregs upregulated expression of the coinhibitory receptor TIM-3 in tumor tissue, and TIM-3 and TIGIT synergized to suppress antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how TIGIT regulates immune responses in chronic disease settings.

  9. TIGIT predominantly regulates the immune response via regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurtulus, Sema; Sakuishi, Kaori; Ngiow, Shin-Foong; Joller, Nicole; Tan, Dewar J.; Teng, Michele W.L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Coinhibitory receptors are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Upregulation of these receptors on effector T cells terminates T cell responses, while their expression on Tregs promotes their suppressor function. Understanding the function of coinhibitory receptors in effector T cells and Tregs is crucial, as therapies that target coinhibitory receptors are currently at the forefront of treatment strategies for cancer and other chronic diseases. T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is a recently identified coinhibitory receptor that is found on the surface of a variety of lymphoid cells, and its role in immune regulation is just beginning to be elucidated. We examined TIGIT-mediated immune regulation in different murine cancer models and determined that TIGIT marks the most dysfunctional subset of CD8+ T cells in tumor tissue as well as tumor-tissue Tregs with a highly active and suppressive phenotype. We demonstrated that TIGIT signaling in Tregs directs their phenotype and that TIGIT primarily suppresses antitumor immunity via Tregs and not CD8+ T cells. Moreover, TIGIT+ Tregs upregulated expression of the coinhibitory receptor TIM-3 in tumor tissue, and TIM-3 and TIGIT synergized to suppress antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how TIGIT regulates immune responses in chronic disease settings. PMID:26413872

  10. Siglec regulation of immune cell function in disease

    PubMed Central

    Macauley, Matthew S.; Crocker, Paul R.; Paulson, James C.

    2014-01-01

    All mammalian cells display a diverse array of glycan structures that differ from those found on microbial pathogens. Siglecs are a family of sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like receptors that participate in the discrimination of ‘self’ and ‘non-self’ and regulate the functions of cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems through recognition of their glycan ligands. In this review, we describe the recent advances in our understanding of the roles of Siglecs in the regulation of immune cell functions in infectious diseases, inflammation, neurodegeneration, autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:25234143

  11. Hypoxia-dependent regulation of inflammatory pathways in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cormac T.; Doherty, Glen; Fallon, Padraic G.; Cummins, Eoin P.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation underpins a diverse range of diseases where effective therapy remains an unmet clinical need. Hypoxia is a prominent feature of the inflammatory microenvironment that regulates key transcription factors including HIF and NF-κB in both innate and adaptive immune cells. In turn, altered activity of the pathways controlled by these factors can affect the course of inflammation through the regulation of immune cell development and function. In this review, we will discuss these pathways and the oxygen sensors that confer hypoxic sensitivity in immune cells. Furthermore, we will describe how hypoxia-dependent pathways contribute to immunity and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets in inflammatory and infectious disease. PMID:27454299

  12. [Understanding of immune system by visualization of spatiotemporal regulation of immune cells in the entire body].

    PubMed

    Tomura, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Immune system is high-dimensional integrated system distributed in the whole body. Many kinds of, total 10(11) of immune cells are regulated by receiving appropriate signals in appropriate places. We have been attempting to understand immune system by revealing spatiotemporal regulation of immune cells at the whole body level by "Visualization of immune response in vivo". Photoconvertible protein, "Kaede"-Tg mice allowed us to monitor cell-replacement and cell-movement in the whole body by marking cells with color of Kaede from green to red with exposure to violet light. It is applicable to small cell number populations in both lymphoid organs and also peripheral tissues under both normal and pathophysiological conditions. By using this system, we have demonstrated novel findings that "Naive CD4(+) T cell recirculation is an active process that they recirculate through lymphoid organs to seek limited niche for interacting with endogenous antigens and upregulate their function." and "Activated regulatory T cells emigrating from cutaneous immune response is responsible for termination of immune reponse." I will introduce these new tools of us and would like to discuss what is needed to understand immune system in the entire body.

  13. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  14. Ocular molecules and cells that regulate immune responses in situ.

    PubMed

    Streilein, J W; Cousins, S; Williamson, J S

    1990-10-01

    Regulation of T cell-dependent immune responses is mediated in part by bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) that (a) process and present antigens which engage the T cell receptor and (b) secrete cytokines that influence the threshold of T cell activation. The anterior chamber of the eye is lined by the corneal endothelium (which rests on a stroma and epithelium that is devoid of class II MHC + APC) and iris/ciliary body (which contain significant numbers of bone marrow-derived cells, one third of which are class II MHC +). When tested in vitro, these potential APCs fail to present antigens in a form that activates T cells. Moreover, iris/ciliary body cells actually suppress activation of T cells exposed to antigens on conventional APC. In addition, aqueous humor under normal circumstances contains factors (one of which is TGFB) that are potent inhibitors of antigen-driven T cell activation, but spare other aspects of T cell function. Evidence suggests that the bone marrow-derived cells in iris/ciliary body are the source of this factor. Thus, the anterior chamber contains powerful forces that can prevent induction and can suppress expression of T cell mediated immunity. It is proposed that these forces are responsible for immunologic privilege and anterior chamber associated immune deviation, and for suppressing pathologic proliferation and inflammation in the anterior segment of the eye.

  15. Transcriptional regulator Id2 mediates CD8+ T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Cannarile, Michael A; Lind, Nicholas A; Rivera, Richard; Sheridan, Alison D; Camfield, Kristin A; Wu, Bei Bei; Cheung, Kitty P; Ding, Zhaoqing; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2006-12-01

    Transcriptional programs that initiate and sustain the proliferation, differentiation and survival of CD8(+) T cells during immune responses are not completely understood. Here we show that inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2), an antagonist of E protein transcription factors, was upregulated in CD8(+) T cells during infection and that expression of Id2 was maintained in memory CD8(+) T cells. Although Id2-deficient naive CD8(+) T cells recognized antigen and proliferated normally early after infection, effector CD8(+) T cells did not accumulate because the cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis. Id2-deficient CD8(+) T cells responding to infection had changes in the expression of genes that influence survival and had altered memory formation. Our data emphasize the importance of Id2 in regulating gene expression by CD8(+) T cells and the magnitude of effector responses, suggesting a mechanism involving Id protein- and E protein-mediated survival and differentiation of mature T cells.

  16. Cell Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zebell, Sophia G.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell-cycle. PMID:26468745

  17. Cell-Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zebell, Sophia G; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-10-14

    Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell-cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of PD-1 in regulating T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyun-Tak; Ahmed, Rafi; Okazaki, Taku

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is a member of the CD28 superfamily that delivers negative signals upon interaction with its two ligands, PD-L1 or PD-L2. PD-1 and its ligands are broadly expressed and exert a wider range of immunoregulatory roles in T cells activation and tolerance compared with other CD28 members. Subsequent studies show that PD-1-PD-L interaction regulates the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance and protect tissues from autoimmune attack. PD-1 and its ligands are also involved in attenuating infectious immunity and tumor immunity, and facilitating chronic infection and tumor progression. The biological significance of PD-1 and its ligand suggests the therapeutic potential of manipulation of PD-1 pathway against various human diseases. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of PD-1 and its ligands ranging from discovery to clinical significance.

  19. Immune regulation of epithelial cell function: Implications for GI pathologies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mammalian immune system is a complex and dynamic network that recognizes, responds, and adapts to numerous foreign and self molecules. CD4+ T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses, and upon stimulation by antigen, naive CD4+ T cells proliferate and differentiate into various T cell subsets...

  20. Regulation of intestinal immune system by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young

    2015-02-01

    Innate immune cells survey antigenic materials beneath our body surfaces and provide a front-line response to internal and external danger signals. Dendritic cells (DCs), a subset of innate immune cells, are critical sentinels that perform multiple roles in immune responses, from acting as principal modulators to priming an adaptive immune response through antigen-specific signaling. In the gut, DCs meet exogenous, non-harmful food antigens as well as vast commensal microbes under steady-state conditions. In other instances, they must combat pathogenic microbes to prevent infections. In this review, we focus on the function of intestinal DCs in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. Specifically, we describe how intestinal DCs affect IgA production from B cells and influence the generation of unique subsets of T cell.

  1. [Bone and Stem Cells. Immune cell regulation by the bone marrow niche].

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in the bone marrow and give rise to all blood cell types. The maintenance and the differentiation of blood cells including immune cells are essential for host defense and oxygen delivery. HSCs are maintained in microenvironments called stem cell niches, which consists of various cell types in bone marrow. Recently, new visualization technologies and assay systems brought advances in studies on the stem cell niche. In addition, several reports demonstrated that osteoblasts and osteocytes regulate not only HSC homeostasis but also immune cell differentiation, suggesting a close relationship between bone cells and HSCs.

  2. Immune Influence on Adult Neural Stem Cell Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Pamela A.; Palmer, Theo D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) lie at the heart of central nervous system development and repair, and deficiency or dysregulation of NSCs or their progeny can have significant consequences at any stage of life. Immune signaling is emerging as one of the influential variables that define resident NSC behavior. Perturbations in local immune signaling accompany virtually every injury or disease state and signaling cascades that mediate immune activation, resolution, or chronic persistence influence resident stem and progenitor cells. Some aspects of immune signaling are beneficial, promoting intrinsic plasticity and cell replacement, while others appear to inhibit the very type of regenerative response that might restore or replace neural networks lost in injury or disease. Here we review known and speculative roles that immune signaling plays in the postnatal and adult brain, focusing on how environments encountered in disease or injury may influence the activity and fate of endogenous or transplanted NSCs. PMID:19840551

  3. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  4. RAGE Regulates Immune Cell Infiltration and Angiogenesis in Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    McVicar, Carmel; Ward, Michael; Colhoun, Liza; Quinn, Michael; Bierhaus, Angelika; Xu, Heping; Stitt, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose RAGE regulates pro-inflammatory responses in diverse cells and tissues. This study has investigated if RAGE plays a role in immune cell mobilization and choroidal neovascular pathology that is associated with the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD). Methods RAGE null (RAGE−/−) mice and age-matched wild type (WT) control mice underwent laser photocoagulation to generate choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions which were then analyzed for morphology, S100B immunoreactivity and inflammatory cell infiltration. The chemotactic ability of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) towards S100B was investigated. Results RAGE expression was significantly increased in the retina during CNV of WT mice (p<0.001). RAGE−/− mice exhibited significantly reduced CNV lesion size when compared to WT controls (p<0.05). S100B mRNA was upregulated in the lasered WT retina but not RAGE−/− retina and S100B immunoreactivity was present within CNV lesions although levels were less when RAGE−/− mice were compared to WT controls. Activated microglia in lesions were considerably less abundant in RAGE−/− mice when compared to WT counterparts (p<0.001). A dose dependent chemotactic migration was observed in BMDMs from WT mice (p<0.05–0.01) but this was not apparent in cells isolated from RAGE−/− mice. Conclusions RAGE-S100B interactions appear to play an important role in CNV lesion formation by regulating pro-inflammatory and angiogenic responses. This study highlights the role of RAGE in inflammation-mediated outer retinal pathology. PMID:24586862

  5. The evolving paradigm of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of immunity by cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, M; Rodvold, J J; Mahadevan, N R

    2016-01-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) has been thought to influence tumorigenesis mainly through cell-intrinsic, pro-survival effects. In recent years, however, new evidence has emerged showing that the UPR is also the source of cell-extrinsic effects, particularly directed at those immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. Here we will review and discuss this new body of information with focus on the role of cell-extrinsic effects on innate and adaptive immunity, suggesting that the transmission of ER stress from cancer cells to myeloid cells in particular is an expedient used by cancer cells to control the immune microenvironment, which acquires pro-inflammatory as well as immune-suppressive characteristics. These new findings can now be seen in the broader context of similar phenomena described in Caenorhabditis elegans, and an analogy with quorum sensing and 'community effects' in prokaryotes and eukaryotes can be drawn, arguing that a cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of heterologous cells may be phylogenetically conserved. Finally, we will discuss the role of aneuploidy as an inducer of proteotoxic stress and potential initiator of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation. In presenting these new views, we wish to bring attention to the cell-extrinsic regulation of tumor growth, including tumor UPR-based cell-nonautonomous signaling as a mechanism of maintaining tumor heterogeneity and resistance to therapy, and suggest therapeutically targeting such mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment.

  6. Rapid transit in the immune cells: the role of mRNA turnover regulation.

    PubMed

    Khabar, Khalid S A

    2007-06-01

    There have been recent, significant advances about the role of mRNA turnover in controlling gene expression in immune cells. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression contributes to the characteristics of many of the processes underlying the immune response by ensuring early, rapid, and transient action. The emphasis of this review is on current work that deals with the regulation of mRNA decay during innate immunity against microbes and T cell activation as a model of the adaptive response.

  7. Immune Regulation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Disis, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune system cells play a major role in regulating the growth of cancer. Although it is commonly thought that an immune response localized to the tumor will inhibit cancer growth, it is clear that some types of inflammation induced in a tumor may also lead to cancer proliferation, invasion, and dissemination. Recent evidence suggests, however, that some patients with cancer can mount an antitumor immune response that has the potential to control or eliminate cancer. Indeed, a so-called “immune response” signature has been described in malignancy that is associated with improved outcomes in several tumor types. Moreover, the presence of specific subsets of T cells, which have the capability to penetrate tumor stroma and infiltrate deep into the parenchyma, identifies patients with an improved prognosis. Immune-based therapies have the potential to modulate the tumor microenvironment by eliciting immune system cells that will initiate acute inflammation that leads to tissue destruction. PMID:20516428

  8. Regulation of immune cell homeostasis and function by coronin 1.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Rajesh; Pieters, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Coronin 1 is the most recent candidate in the list of genes causing severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. A distinctive feature of the SCID induced by coronin 1 deficiency is selective naïve T cell lymphopenia in the presence of a normal thymus as well as normal B cell and natural killer cell numbers (T(-)B(+)NK(+)). Coronin 1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved coronin protein family, members of which are widely expressed across the eukaryotic kingdom. Mammals express seven coronin molecules, numbered from coronin 1 to 7. The different coronin proteins have a distinct but overlapping tissue expression and have been reported to be involved in a wide array of cellular functions including calcium homeostasis, cytoskeletal dynamics, immune and inflammatory responses, neuromuscular transmission as well as cognition and behavior. In this minireview, we describe the role of coronin 1 in the maintenance of immune cell diversity and function.

  9. Hepatic Stellate Cells Regulate Immune Response via Induction of Myeloid Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hong-Shiue; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Yang, Horng-Ren; Wang, Lianfu; Arakawa, Yusuke; Brown, Kathleen; Wu, Qingyu; Lin, Feng; Peters, Marion; Fung, John J.; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang

    2011-01-01

    Although organ transplants have been applied for decades, outcomes of somatic cell transplants remain disappointing, presumably due to lack of appropriate supporting stromal cells. Thus, cotransplantation with liver stromal cells, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), achieves long-term survival of islet allografts in mice via induction of effector T cell apoptosis and generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. In this study, we provide evidence both in vitro and in vivo that HSC can promote generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). HSC-induced MDSC demonstrate potent immune inhibitory activity. Induction of MDSC is dependent on intact IFN-γ signaling pathway in HSC, and is mediated by soluble factors, suggesting that the specific tissue stromal cells, such as HSC, play a crucial role in regulating immune response via inflammation-induced generation of MDSC. Large amounts of MDSC can be propagated in vitro from bone marrow derived myeloid precursor cells under the influence of HSC. Cotransplantation with in vitro generated MDSC can effectively protects islet allografts from host immune attack. Local delivery of potent immune suppressor cells for cell transplants holds a great clinical application potential. PMID:21374665

  10. CCN1: a novel inflammation-regulated biphasic immune cell migration modulator.

    PubMed

    Löbel, Madlen; Bauer, Sandra; Meisel, Christian; Eisenreich, Andreas; Kudernatsch, Robert; Tank, Juliane; Rauch, Ursula; Kühl, Uwe; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Poller, Wolfgang; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the effect of CCN1 on the migration of human immune cells. The molecule CCN1, produced by fibroblasts and endothelial cells, is considered as an important matrix protein promoting tissue repair and immune cell adhesion by binding various integrins. We recently reported that CCN1 therapy is able to suppress acute inflammation in vivo. Here, we show that CCN1 binds to various immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and monocytes. The addition of CCN1 in vitro enhances both actin polymerization and transwell migration. Prolonged incubation with CCN1, however, results in the inhibition of migration of immune cells by a mechanism that involves downregulation of PI3Kγ, p38, and Akt activation. Furthermore, we observed that immune cells themselves produce constitutively CCN1 and secretion is induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In line with this finding, patients suffering from acute inflammation had enhanced serum levels of CCN1. These findings extend the classical concept of CCN1 as a locally produced cell matrix adhesion molecule and suggest that CCN1 plays an important role in regulating immune cell trafficking by attracting and locally immobilizing immune cells.

  11. Human gastric epithelial cells contribute to gastric immune regulation by providing retinoic acid to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bimczok, D; Kao, J Y; Zhang, M; Cochrun, S; Mannon, P; Peter, S; Wilcox, C M; Mönkemüller, K E; Harris, P R; Grams, J M; Stahl, R D; Smith, P D; Smythies, L E

    2015-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule retinol (ROL), and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of ROL synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation.

  12. Identifying Regulators of the Immune Response to Dying Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Cytotoxic T cells are responsible for carrying out antigen-mediated immune responses against virally-infected and malignant cells. In both cases, cytotoxic T cells are stimulated by interacting with antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). Infected cells produce virus-specific antigens and pathogen associated molecular patterns, which are recognized by DCs and lead to robust T cell activation. Dead or dying uninfected cells, on the other hand, release damage associated molecular patterns, but their release does not always appear to be sufficient to induce cytotoxic T cell activity. Tim Greten, M.D., of CCR’s Medical Oncology Branch, and a group of international collaborators set out to understand how immune responses against dying cancer cells are regulated. These processes are likely to be important for improving the efficacy of cancer treatment vaccines, which induce an immune reaction against a patient’s cancer cells.

  13. Wnt Signaling in Dendritic Cells: Its Role in Regulation of Immunity and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Swafford, Daniel; Manicassamy, Santhakumar

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental puzzle in immunology is how the immune system launches robust immunity against pathogens while maintaining a state of tolerance to the body's own tissues and the trillions of commensal microorganisms and food antigens that confront them every day. Innate immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, play a fundamental role in this process. Emerging studies have highlighted that the Wnt signaling pathway, particularly in DCs, plays a major role in regulating tolerance versus immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of how Wnt-signaling shapes the immune response and, in addition, highlight unanswered questions, the solution of which will be imperative in the rational exploitation of this pathway in vaccine design and immune therapy. PMID:25977193

  14. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  15. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  16. IL-35-producing B cells are critical regulators of immunity during autoimmune and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ping; Roch, Toralf; Lampropoulou, Vicky; O'Connor, Richard A; Stervbo, Ulrik; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Dang, Van Duc; Jaimes, Yarúa; Daridon, Capucine; Li, Rui; Jouneau, Luc; Boudinot, Pierre; Wilantri, Siska; Sakwa, Imme; Miyazaki, Yusei; Leech, Melanie D; McPherson, Rhoanne C; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus; Hoehlig, Kai; Meinl, Edgar; Grützkau, Andreas; Grün, Joachim R; Horn, Katharina; Kühl, Anja A; Dörner, Thomas; Bar-Or, Amit; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Anderton, Stephen M; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-03-20

    B lymphocytes have critical roles as positive and negative regulators of immunity. Their inhibitory function has been associated primarily with interleukin 10 (IL-10) because B-cell-derived IL-10 can protect against autoimmune disease and increase susceptibility to pathogens. Here we identify IL-35-producing B cells as key players in the negative regulation of immunity. Mice in which only B cells did not express IL-35 lost their ability to recover from the T-cell-mediated demyelinating autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast, these mice displayed a markedly improved resistance to infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as shown by their superior containment of the bacterial growth and their prolonged survival after primary infection, and upon secondary challenge, compared to control mice. The increased immunity found in mice lacking IL-35 production by B cells was associated with a higher activation of macrophages and inflammatory T cells, as well as an increased function of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs). During Salmonella infection, IL-35- and IL-10-producing B cells corresponded to two largely distinct sets of surface-IgM(+)CD138(hi)TACI(+)CXCR4(+)CD1d(int)Tim1(int) plasma cells expressing the transcription factor Blimp1 (also known as Prdm1). During EAE, CD138(+) plasma cells were also the main source of B-cell-derived IL-35 and IL-10. Collectively, our data show the importance of IL-35-producing B cells in regulation of immunity and highlight IL-35 production by B cells as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune and infectious diseases. This study reveals the central role of activated B cells, particularly plasma cells, and their production of cytokines in the regulation of immune responses in health and disease.

  17. Natural genetic variation profoundly regulates gene expression in immune cells and dictates susceptibility to CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Bearoff, F; Del Rio, R; Case, L K; Dragon, J A; Nguyen-Vu, T; Lin, C-Y; Blankenhorn, E P; Teuscher, C; Krementsov, D N

    2016-12-01

    Regulation of gene expression in immune cells is known to be under genetic control, and likely contributes to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). How this occurs in concert across multiple immune cell types is poorly understood. Using a mouse model that harnesses the genetic diversity of wild-derived mice, more accurately reflecting genetically diverse human populations, we provide an extensive characterization of the genetic regulation of gene expression in five different naive immune cell types relevant to MS. The immune cell transcriptome is shown to be under profound genetic control, exhibiting diverse patterns: global, cell-specific and sex-specific. Bioinformatic analysis of the genetically controlled transcript networks reveals reduced cell type specificity and inflammatory activity in wild-derived PWD/PhJ mice, compared with the conventional laboratory strain C57BL/6J. Additionally, candidate MS-GWAS (genome-wide association study candidate genes for MS susceptibility) genes were significantly enriched among transcripts overrepresented in C57BL/6J cells compared with PWD. These expression level differences correlate with robust differences in susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the principal model of MS, and skewing of the encephalitogenic T-cell responses. Taken together, our results provide functional insights into the genetic regulation of the immune transcriptome, and shed light on how this in turn contributes to susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

  18. Natural genetic variation profoundly regulates gene expression in immune cells and dictates susceptibility to CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bearoff, Frank; del Rio, Roxana; Case, Laure K.; Dragon, Julie A.; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Lin, Chin-Yo; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.; Teuscher, Cory; Krementsov, Dimitry N.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression in immune cells is known to be under genetic control, and likely contributes to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). How this occurs in concert across multiple immune cell types is poorly understood. Using a mouse model that harnesses the genetic diversity of wild-derived mice, more accurately reflecting genetically diverse human populations, we provide an extensive characterization of the genetic regulation of gene expression in five different naïve immune cell types relevant to MS. The immune cell transcriptome is shown to be under profound genetic control, exhibiting diverse patterns: global, cell-specific, and sex-specific. Bioinformatic analysis of the genetically-controlled transcript networks reveals reduced cell type-specificity and inflammatory activity in wild-derived PWD/PhJ mice, compared with the conventional laboratory strain C57BL/6J. Additionally, candidate MS-GWAS genes were significantly enriched among transcripts overrepresented in C57BL/6J cells compared to PWD. These expression level differences correlate with robust differences in susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the principal model of MS, and skewing of the encephalitogenic T cell responses. Taken together, our results provide functional insights into the genetic regulation of the immune transcriptome, and shed light on how this in turn contributes to susceptibility to autoimmune disease. PMID:27653816

  19. The role of natural killer cells in tumor control--effectors and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Morgan E; Smyth, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the primary effector cells of the innate immune system and have a well-established role in tumor rejection in a variety of spontaneous and induced cancer models. NK cell function is regulated by a complex balance of inhibitory and activating signals that allow them to selectively target and kill cells that display an abnormal pattern of cell surface molecules, while leaving normal healthy cells unharmed. In this review we discuss NK cell function, the role of NK cells in cancer therapies, the emerging concept of bi-directional cross-talk between NK cells and dendritic cells, and the implications of these interactions for tumor immunotherapy.

  20. Neuronal influence behind the central nervous system regulation of the immune cells.

    PubMed

    Chavarría, Anahí; Cárdenas, Graciela

    2013-09-02

    Central nervous system (CNS) has a highly specialized microenvironment, and despite being initially considered an immune privileged site, this immune status is far from absolute because it varies with age and brain topography. The brain monitors immune responses by several means that act in parallel; one pathway involves afferent nerves (vagal nerve) and the other resident cells (neurons and glia). These cell populations exert a strong role in the regulation of the immune system, favoring an immune-modulatory environment in the CNS. Neurons control glial cell and infiltrated T-cells by contact-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Contact-dependent mechanisms are provided by several membrane immune modulating molecules such as Sema-7A, CD95L, CD22, CD200, CD47, NCAM, ICAM-5, and cadherins; which can inhibit the expression of microglial inflammatory cytokines, induce apoptosis or inactivate infiltrated T-cells. On the other hand, soluble neuronal factors like Sema-3A, cytokines, neurotrophins, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters attenuate microglial and/or T-cell activation. In this review, we focused on all known mechanism driven only by neurons in order to control the local immune cells.

  1. Neuronal influence behind the central nervous system regulation of the immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Anahí; Cárdenas, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) has a highly specialized microenvironment, and despite being initially considered an immune privileged site, this immune status is far from absolute because it varies with age and brain topography. The brain monitors immune responses by several means that act in parallel; one pathway involves afferent nerves (vagal nerve) and the other resident cells (neurons and glia). These cell populations exert a strong role in the regulation of the immune system, favoring an immune-modulatory environment in the CNS. Neurons control glial cell and infiltrated T-cells by contact-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Contact-dependent mechanisms are provided by several membrane immune modulating molecules such as Sema-7A, CD95L, CD22, CD200, CD47, NCAM, ICAM-5, and cadherins; which can inhibit the expression of microglial inflammatory cytokines, induce apoptosis or inactivate infiltrated T-cells. On the other hand, soluble neuronal factors like Sema-3A, cytokines, neurotrophins, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters attenuate microglial and/or T-cell activation. In this review, we focused on all known mechanism driven only by neurons in order to control the local immune cells. PMID:24032006

  2. Human mesenchymal stromal cells modulate T-cell immune response via transcriptomic regulation.

    PubMed

    Vellasamy, Shalini; Tong, Chih Kong; Azhar, Nur Atiqah; Kodiappan, Radha; Chan, Soon Choy; Veerakumarasivam, Abhi; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified as pan-immunosuppressant in various in vitro and in vivo inflammatory models. Although the immunosuppressive activity of MSCs has been explored in various contexts, the precise molecular signaling pathways that govern inhibitory functions remain poorly elucidated. By using a microarray-based global gene expression profiling system, this study aimed to decipher the underlying molecular pathways that may mediate the immunosuppressive activity of umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) on activated T cells. In the presence of UC-MSCs, the proliferation of activated T cells was suppressed in a dose-depended manner by cell-to-cell contact mode via an active cell-cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The microarray analysis revealed that particularly, IFNG, CXCL9, IL2, IL2RA and CCND3 genes were down-regulated, whereas IL11, VSIG4, GFA1, TIMP3 and BBC3 genes were up-regulated by UC-MSCs. The dysregulated gene clusters associated with immune-response-related ontologies, namely, lymphocyte proliferation or activation, apoptosis and cell cycle, were further analyzed. Among the nine canonical pathways identified, three pathways (namely T-helper cell differentiation, cyclins and cell cycle regulation, and gap/tight junction signalling pathways) were highly enriched with these dysregulated genes. The pathways represent putative molecular pathways through which UC-MSCs elicit immunosuppressive activity toward activated T cells. This study provides a global snapshot of gene networks and pathways that contribute to the ability of UC-MSCs to suppress activated T cells. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Riether, C; Schürch, C M; Ochsenbein, A F

    2015-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare, multipotent cells that generate via progenitor and precursor cells of all blood lineages. Similar to normal hematopoiesis, leukemia is also hierarchically organized and a subpopulation of leukemic cells, the leukemic stem cells (LSCs), is responsible for disease initiation and maintenance and gives rise to more differentiated malignant cells. Although genetically abnormal, LSCs share many characteristics with normal HSCs, including quiescence, multipotency and self-renewal. Normal HSCs reside in a specialized microenvironment in the bone marrow (BM), the so-called HSC niche that crucially regulates HSC survival and function. Many cell types including osteoblastic, perivascular, endothelial and mesenchymal cells contribute to the HSC niche. In addition, the BM functions as primary and secondary lymphoid organ and hosts various mature immune cell types, including T and B cells, dendritic cells and macrophages that contribute to the HSC niche. Signals derived from the HSC niche are necessary to regulate demand-adapted responses of HSCs and progenitor cells after BM stress or during infection. LSCs occupy similar niches and depend on signals from the BM microenvironment. However, in addition to the cell types that constitute the HSC niche during homeostasis, in leukemia the BM is infiltrated by activated leukemia-specific immune cells. Leukemic cells express different antigens that are able to activate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. It is well documented that activated T cells can contribute to the control of leukemic cells and it was hoped that these cells may be able to target and eliminate the therapy-resistant LSCs. However, the actual interaction of leukemia-specific T cells with LSCs remains ill-defined. Paradoxically, many immune mechanisms that evolved to activate emergency hematopoiesis during infection may actually contribute to the expansion and differentiation of LSCs, promoting leukemia progression. In this review, we

  4. Going both ways: Immune regulation via CD1d-dependent NKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Dale I.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    NKT cells are a unique T lymphocyte sublineage that has been implicated in the regulation of immune responses associated with a broad range of diseases, including autoimmunity, infectious diseases, and cancer. In stark contrast to both conventional T lymphocytes and other types of Tregs, NKT cells are reactive to the nonclassical class I antigen–presenting molecule CD1d, and they recognize glycolipid antigens rather than peptides. Moreover, they can either up- or downregulate immune responses by promoting the secretion of Th1, Th2, or immune regulatory cytokines. This review will explore the diverse influences of these cells in various disease models, their ability to suppress or enhance immunity, and the potential for manipulating these cells as a novel form of immunotherapy. PMID:15545985

  5. Immune Regulation of Intrahepatic Regulatory T Cells in Fibrotic Livers of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Lou, Jinli; Bai, Li; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Sujun; Duan, Zhongping

    2017-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is the result of chronic inflammation and repair, and many immune cells contribute to the process. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediate immune tolerance and are highly expressed in liver fibrosis. However, few reports have studied the specific effects of Tregs on regulating immune cells in liver fibrosis. The present study aimed to investigate the regulation of Tregs on intrahepatic immune cells in liver fibrosis by depleting Tregs in mice. Material/Methods Liver fibrosis was induced by carbon tetrachloride, and an anti-CD25 mAb (PC61) was used to deplete Tregs. Liver fibrosis and injury were reflected by immunofluorescence staining and alanine aminotransferase level. The expressions of immune cell Tregs and cytokines were detected by flow cytometry and/or real-time PCR. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentration was measured by ELISA. Results Tregs were rich in fibrotic livers; after Tregs depletion, the intrahepatic CD4+ T cell and Kupffer cells (KC) populations did not change compared with liver fibrosis, but CD8+ T cells were slightly elevated. However, natural killer (NK) cells and IFN-γ levels were significantly decreased in fibrosis and increased after Tregs depletion. Interesting, we found Tregs promoted KC M1/M2 balance to M2, because inducible nitric oxide synthase (M1) was increased but arginase-1 (M2) was reduced after depleting Tregs. Furthermore, in isolated KCs from livers, IL-12 (M1) was increased, but TGF-β (M2) was reduced after depleting Tregs, compared with fibrotic livers. Conclusions Tregs are involved in the immune regulation of liver fibrosis, primarily by suppressing NK cells and M1 KCs, and mildly suppressing CD8+ T cells. PMID:28235976

  6. Invariant natural killer T cells in adipose tissue: novel regulators of immune-mediated metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, M; Kalkhoven, E; Boes, M

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) represents a microenvironment where intersection takes place between immune processes and metabolic pathways. A variety of immune cells have been characterized in AT over the past decades, with the most recent addition of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. As members of the T cell family, iNKT cells represent a subset that exhibits both innate and adaptive characteristics and directs ensuing immune responses. In disease conditions, iNKT cells have established roles that include disorders in the autoimmune spectrum in malignancies and infectious diseases. Recent work supports a role for iNKT cells in the maintenance of AT homeostasis through both immune and metabolic pathways. The deficiency of iNKT cells can result in AT metabolic disruptions and insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent work on iNKT cells in immune regulation, with an emphasis on AT-resident iNKT cells, and identify the potential mechanisms by which adipocytes can mediate iNKT cell activity.

  7. CD8+NKT-like cells regulate the immune response by killing antigen-bearing DCs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Xi; Li, Zhengyuan; Chai, Yijie; Jiang, Yunfeng; Wang, Qian; Ji, Yewei; Zhu, Zhongli; Wan, Ying; Yuan, Zhenglong; Chang, Zhijie; Zhang, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    CD1d-dependent NKT cells have been extensively studied; however, the function of CD8+NKT-like cells, which are CD1d-independent T cells with NK markers, remains unknown. Here, we report that CD1d-independent CD8+NKT-like cells, which express both T cell markers (TCRβ and CD3) and NK cell receptors (NK1.1, CD49b and NKG2D), are activated and significantly expanded in mice immunized with GFP-expressing dendritic cells. Distinct from CD1d-dependent NKT cells, CD8+NKT-like cells possess a diverse repertoire of TCRs and secrete high levels of IFN-gamma but not IL-4. CD8+NKT-like cell development is normal in CD1d−/− mice, which suggests that CD8+NKT-like cells undergo a unique development pathway that differs from iNKT cells. Further functional analyses show that CD8+NKT-like cells suppress T-cell responses through elimination of dendritic cells in an antigen-specific manner. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+NKT-like cells into RIP-OVA mice prevented subsequent development of diabetes in the animals induced by activated OT-I CD8 T cells. Our study suggests that CD8+NKT-like cells can function as antigen-specific suppressive cells to regulate the immune response through killing antigen-bearing DCs. Antigen-specific down regulation may provide an active and precise method for constraining an excessive immune response and avoiding bypass suppression of necessary immune responses to other antigens. PMID:26369936

  8. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chenjie; Pemberton, Joshua G.; Lillico, Dustin M. E.; Zwozdesky, Myron A.; Stafford, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s), and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs), which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well as unique

  9. Neurotrophin Receptor p75NTR Regulates Immune Function of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bandoła, Joanna; Richter, Cornelia; Ryser, Martin; Jamal, Arshad; Ashton, Michelle P.; von Bonin, Malte; Kuhn, Matthias; Dorschner, Benjamin; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Navratiel, Katrin; Roeder, Ingo; Dahl, Andreas; Hedrich, Christian M.; Bonifacio, Ezio; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Neurotrophins and their receptors control the function of neuronal tissue. In addition, they have been demonstrated to be part of the immune response but little is known about the effector immune cells involved. We report, for the first time, the expression and immune-regulatory function of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) by the antigen-presenting pDCs, mediated by toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 activation and differential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 and 7. The modulation of p75NTR on pDCs significantly influences disease progression of asthma in an ovalbumin-induced mouse model mediated by the TLR9 signaling pathway. p75NTR activation of pDCs from patients with asthma increased allergen-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in nerve growth factor concentration-dependent manner. Further, p75NTR activation of pDCs delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in RIP-CD80GP mice and aggravated graft-versus-host disease in a xenotransplantation model. Thus, p75NTR signaling on pDCs constitutes a new and critical mechanism connecting neurotrophin signaling and immune response regulation with great therapeutic potential for a variety of immune disorders. PMID:28861085

  10. Neurotrophin Receptor p75NTR Regulates Immune Function of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bandoła, Joanna; Richter, Cornelia; Ryser, Martin; Jamal, Arshad; Ashton, Michelle P; von Bonin, Malte; Kuhn, Matthias; Dorschner, Benjamin; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Navratiel, Katrin; Roeder, Ingo; Dahl, Andreas; Hedrich, Christian M; Bonifacio, Ezio; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Neurotrophins and their receptors control the function of neuronal tissue. In addition, they have been demonstrated to be part of the immune response but little is known about the effector immune cells involved. We report, for the first time, the expression and immune-regulatory function of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) by the antigen-presenting pDCs, mediated by toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 activation and differential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 and 7. The modulation of p75NTR on pDCs significantly influences disease progression of asthma in an ovalbumin-induced mouse model mediated by the TLR9 signaling pathway. p75NTR activation of pDCs from patients with asthma increased allergen-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in nerve growth factor concentration-dependent manner. Further, p75NTR activation of pDCs delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in RIP-CD80GP mice and aggravated graft-versus-host disease in a xenotransplantation model. Thus, p75NTR signaling on pDCs constitutes a new and critical mechanism connecting neurotrophin signaling and immune response regulation with great therapeutic potential for a variety of immune disorders.

  11. mTOR Promotes Antiviral Humoral Immunity by Differentially Regulating CD4 Helper T Cell and B Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lilin; Lee, Junghwa; Xu, Lifan; Mohammed, Ata-Ur-Rasheed; Li, Weiyan; Hale, J Scott; Tan, Wendy G; Wu, Tuoqi; Davis, Carl W; Ahmed, Rafi; Araki, Koichi

    2017-02-15

    mTOR has important roles in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, but whether and how mTOR modulates humoral immune responses have yet to be fully understood. To address this issue, we examined the effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, on B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Rapamycin treatment resulted in suppression of virus-specific B cell responses by inhibiting proliferation of germinal center (GC) B cells. In contrast, the number of memory CD4 T cells was increased in rapamycin-treated mice. However, the drug treatment caused a striking bias of CD4 T cell differentiation into Th1 cells and substantially impaired formation of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which are essential for humoral immunity. Further experiments in which mTOR signaling was modulated by RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that B cells were the primary target cells of rapamycin for the impaired humoral immunity and that reduced Tfh formation in rapamycin-treated mice was due to lower GC B cell responses that are essential for Tfh generation. Additionally, we found that rapamycin had minimal effects on B cell responses activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which stimulates B cells in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting that rapamycin specifically inhibits B cell responses induced by B cell receptor stimulation with antigen. Together, these findings demonstrate that mTOR signals play an essential role in antigen-specific humoral immune responses by differentially regulating B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute viral infection and that rapamycin treatment alters the interplay of immune cell subsets involved in antiviral humoral immunity. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase involved in a variety of cellular activities. Although its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, is currently used as an immunosuppressive drug in transplant patients, it has been reported that rapamycin can also stimulate pathogen

  12. Mucosal innate immune cells regulate both gut homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Continuous exposure of intestinal mucosal surfaces to diverse microorganisms and their metabolites reflects the biological necessity for a multifaceted, integrated epithelial and immune cell-mediated regulatory system. The development and function of the host cells responsible for the barrier function of the intestinal surface (e.g., M cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and columnar epithelial cells) are strictly regulated through both positive and negative stimulation by the luminal microbiota. Stimulation by damage-associated molecular patterns and commensal bacteria-derived microbe-associated molecular patterns provokes the assembly of inflammasomes, which are involved in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. Mucosal immune cells located beneath the epithelium play critical roles in regulating both the mucosal barrier and the relative composition of the luminal microbiota. Innate lymphoid cells and mast cells, in particular, orchestrate the mucosal regulatory system to create a mutually beneficial environment for both the host and the microbiota. Disruption of mucosal homeostasis causes intestinal inflammation such as that seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we review the recent research on the biological interplay among the luminal microbiota, epithelial cells, and mucosal innate immune cells in both healthy and pathological conditions.

  13. IFNγ-responsive nonhematopoietic cells regulate the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Ernst, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and in mice requires interferon gamma (IFNγ). While IFNγ has been studied extensively for its effects on macrophages in tuberculosis, we determined that protective immunity to tuberculosis also requires IFNγ responsive nonhematopoietic cells. Bone marrow chimeric mice with IFNγ-unresponsive lung epithelial and endothelial cells exhibited earlier mortality and higher bacterial burdens than control mice, underexpressed indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (Ido) in lung endothelium and epithelium and overexpressed IL-17 with massive neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We also found that the products of IDO catabolism of tryptophan selectively inhibit IL-17 production by Th17 cells, by inhibiting the action of IL-23. These results reveal a previously-unsuspected role for IFNγ responsiveness in nonhematopoietic cells in regulation of immunity to M. tuberculosis, and reveal a novel mechanism for IDO inhibition of Th17 responses. PMID:20064452

  14. Expression and Regulation of Cholecystokinin Receptor in the Chicken's Immune Organs and Cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Kassas, Seham; Odemuyiwa, Solomon; Hajishengallis, George; Connell, Terry D; Nashar, Toufic O

    2017-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide that affects growth rate in chickens by regulating appetite. CCK peptides exert their function by binding to two identified receptors, CCKAR and CCKBR in the GI tract and the brain, respectively, as well as in other organs. In mammals, CCK/CCKAR interactions affect a number of immunological parameters, including regulation of lymphocytes and functioning of monocytes. Thus, food intake and growth can potentially be altered by infection and the resulting inflammatory immune response. It is uncertain, however, whether chicken express CCKAR in immune organs and cells, and, if so, whether CCKAR expression is regulated by pathogen derived inflammatory stimuli. Herein, we identify expression of CCKAR protein in chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) including monocytes, and expression of the CCKAR gene in PBMC, thymus, bursa, and spleen, in selected commercial and pure chicken breeds. Further, stimulation with various types of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxins or lipopolysaccharide significantly regulated expression of CCKAR on monocytes in the different breeds. Ligation of CCKAR with antibodies in PBMC induced mobilization of Ca2+, indicating that CCKAR is signal competent. Injection with polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic analogue of double stranded viral RNA that binds Toll-Like Receptor-3 (TLR3), also regulated gene expressions of CCKAR and proinflammatory cytokines, in the different breeds. Interestingly, variations in the expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the different breeds were highly correlated with CCKAR expression levels. Taken together, these findings indicate that the physiological function of CCKAR in the chicken is tightly regulated in immune organs and cells by external inflammatory stimuli, which in turn regulate growth. This is the first report CCKAR expression in immune organs and cells, in any species, and the initial observation that CCKAR is regulated by

  15. Dynamic Regulation of Tandem 3' Untranslated Regions in Zebrafish Spleen Cells during Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Wang, Ruihua; Yan, Xinyu; Li, Yuxin; Feng, Yuchao; Wang, Shaozhou; Yang, Xia; Chen, Liutao; Li, Jun; You, Leiming; Chen, Shangwu; Luo, Guangbin; Xu, Anlong

    2016-01-15

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) has been found to be involved in tumorigenesis, development, and cell differentiation, as well as in the activation of several subsets of immune cells in vitro. Whether APA takes place in immune responses in vivo is largely unknown. We profiled the variation in tandem 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) in pathogen-challenged zebrafish and identified hundreds of APA genes with ∼ 10% being immune response genes. The detected immune response APA genes were enriched in TLR signaling, apoptosis, and JAK-STAT signaling pathways. A greater number of microRNA target sites and AU-rich elements were found in the extended 3' UTRs than in the common 3' UTRs of these APA genes. Further analysis suggested that microRNA and AU-rich element-mediated posttranscriptional regulation plays an important role in modulating the expression of APA genes. These results indicate that APA is extensively involved in immune responses in vivo, and it may be a potential new paradigm for immune regulation.

  16. T cell proliferation and adaptive immune responses are critically regulated by protein phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fang-Hsuean; Hsiao, Wan-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chun; Chan, Yi-Chiao; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clonal expansion of activated T cells is pivotal for the induction of protective immunity. Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine phosphatase with reported functions in thymocyte development and DNA damage responses. However, the role of PP4 in T cell immunity has not been thoroughly investigated. In this report, our data showed that T cell-specific ablation of PP4 resulted in defective adaptive immunity, impaired T cell homeostatic expansion, and inefficient T cell proliferation. This hypo-proliferation was associated with a partial G1-S cell cycle arrest, enhanced transcriptions of CDK inhibitors and elevated activation of AMPK. In addition, resveratrol, a known AMPK activator, induced similar G1-S arrests, while lentivirally-transduced WT or constitutively-active AMPKα1 retarded the proliferation of WT T cells. Further investigations showed that PP4 co-immunoprecipitated with AMPKα1, and the over-expression of PP4 inhibited AMPK phosphorylation, thereby implicating PP4 for the negative regulation of AMPK. In summary, our results indicate that PP4 is an essential modulator for T cell proliferation and immune responses; they further suggest a potential link between PP4 functions, AMPK activation and G1-S arrest in activated T cells. PMID:26940341

  17. Myeloid 12/15-LOX regulates B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. The myeloid enzyme 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX), which generates bioactive oxidized lipids, has been implicated in numerous inflammatory diseases, with several studies demonstrating an improvement in pathology in mice lacking the enzyme. However, the ability of 12/15-LOX to directly regulate B cell function has not been studied. Methods. The influence of 12/15-LOX on B cell phenotype and function, and IgM generation, was compared using wildtype (WT) and 12/15-LOX (Alox15-/-) deficient mice. The proliferative and functional capacity of splenic CD19+ B cells was measured in vitro in response to various toll-like receptor agonists. Results. WT and Alox15-/- displayed comparable responses. However in vivo, splenic B cell numbers were significantly elevated in Alox15-/- mice with a corresponding elevation in titres of total IgM in lung, gut and serum, and lower serum IgM directed against the 12/15-LOX product, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phosphatidylethanolamine (HETE-PE). Discussion. Myeloid 12/15-LOX can regulate B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo, potentially contributing to its ability to regulate inflammatory disease. Furthermore, the alterations seen in 12/15-LOX deficiency likely result from changes in the equilibrium of the immune system that develop from birth. Further studies in disease models are warranted to elucidate the contribution of 12/15-LOX mediated alterations in B cell numbers and innate immune antibody generation to driving inflammation in vivo. PMID:28239665

  18. Myeloid 12/15-LOX regulates B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lauder, Sarah N; Tyrrell, Victoria J; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Gray, David; Collins, Peter; Jones, Simon A; Taylor, Philip R; O'Donnell, Valerie

    2017-01-04

    Background. The myeloid enzyme 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX), which generates bioactive oxidized lipids, has been implicated in numerous inflammatory diseases, with several studies demonstrating an improvement in pathology in mice lacking the enzyme. However, the ability of 12/15-LOX to directly regulate B cell function has not been studied. Methods. The influence of 12/15-LOX on B cell phenotype and function, and IgM generation, was compared using wildtype (WT) and 12/15-LOX (Alox15(-/-)) deficient mice. The proliferative and functional capacity of splenic CD19(+) B cells was measured in vitro in response to various toll-like receptor agonists. Results. WT and Alox15(-/-) displayed comparable responses. However in vivo, splenic B cell numbers were significantly elevated in Alox15(-/-) mice with a corresponding elevation in titres of total IgM in lung, gut and serum, and lower serum IgM directed against the 12/15-LOX product, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phosphatidylethanolamine (HETE-PE). Discussion. Myeloid 12/15-LOX can regulate B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo, potentially contributing to its ability to regulate inflammatory disease. Furthermore, the alterations seen in 12/15-LOX deficiency likely result from changes in the equilibrium of the immune system that develop from birth. Further studies in disease models are warranted to elucidate the contribution of 12/15-LOX mediated alterations in B cell numbers and innate immune antibody generation to driving inflammation in vivo.

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-11-08

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells' growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells' behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  20. Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and regulation of T cell immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor, Andrew . E-mail: amellor@mcg.edu

    2005-12-09

    Regulation of adaptive immune responses is critically important to allow the adaptive immune system to eradicate infections while causing minimal collateral damage to infected tissues, as well as preventing autoimmune disease mediated by self-reactive lymphocytes. Tumors and pathogens that cause persistent infections can subvert immunoregulatory processes to protect themselves from destruction by T cells, to the detriment of patients. A growing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that specialized subsets of dendritic cells expressing indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), which catalyzes oxidative catabolism of tryptophan, play critical roles in regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses. IDO-dependent T cell suppression by dendritic cells suggests that biochemical changes due to tryptophan catabolism have profound effects on T cell proliferation, differentiation, effector functions, and viability. This has critical implications for immunotherapeutic manipulations designed for patients with cancer and chronic infectious diseases. In this review, I focus on dendritic cells that can express IDO, and which acquire potent T cell regulatory functions as a consequence.

  1. TRAF3 regulates the effector function of regulatory T cells and humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae-Hoon; Hu, Hongbo; Jin, Jin; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Xiao, Yichuan; Gilbert, Brian E.; Brink, Robert; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control different aspects of immune responses, but how the effector functions of Treg cells are regulated is incompletely understood. Here we identified TNF receptor–associated factor 3 (TRAF3) as a regulator of Treg cell function. Treg cell–specific ablation of TRAF3 impaired CD4 T cell homeostasis, characterized by an increase in the Th1 type of effector/memory T cells. Moreover, the ablation of TRAF3 in Treg cells resulted in increased antigen-stimulated activation of follicular T helper cells (TFH cells), coupled with heightened formation of germinal centers and production of high-affinity IgG antibodies. Although the loss of TRAF3 did not reduce the overall frequency of Treg cells, it attenuated the antigen-stimulated production of follicular Treg cells (TFR cells). TRAF3 signaling in Treg cells was required to maintain high level expression of inducible co-stimulator (ICOS), which in turn was required for TFR cell generation and inhibition of antibody responses. These findings establish TRAF3 as a mediator of Treg cell function in the regulation of antibody responses and suggest a role for TRAF3 in mediating ICOS expression in Treg cells. PMID:24378539

  2. STIM1 controls T cell-mediated immune regulation and inflammation in chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Weidinger, Carl; Shaw, Patrick; Vaeth, Martin; Ribierre, Theo; Liu, Menghan; Fergus, Tawania; Kozhaya, Lina; McVoy, Lauren; Unutmaz, Derya; Ernst, Joel D; Feske, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic infections induce a complex immune response that controls pathogen replication, but also causes pathology due to sustained inflammation. Ca2+ influx mediates T cell function and immunity to infection, and patients with inherited mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+ channel ORAI1 or its activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) are immunodeficient and prone to chronic infection by various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, we demonstrate that STIM1 is required for T cell-mediated immune regulation during chronic Mtb infection. Compared with WT animals, mice with T cell-specific Stim1 deletion died prematurely during the chronic phase of infection and had increased bacterial burdens and severe pulmonary inflammation, with increased myeloid and lymphoid cell infiltration. Although STIM1-deficient T cells exhibited markedly reduced IFN-γ production during the early phase of Mtb infection, bacterial growth was not immediately exacerbated. During the chronic phase, however, STIM1-deficient T cells displayed enhanced IFN-γ production in response to elevated levels of IL-12 and IL-18. The lack of STIM1 in T cells was associated with impaired activation-induced cell death upon repeated TCR engagement and pulmonary lymphocytosis and hyperinflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Chronically Mtb-infected, STIM1-deficient mice had reduced levels of inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) due to a T cell-intrinsic requirement for STIM1 in iTreg differentiation and excessive production of IFN-γ and IL-12, which suppress iTreg differentiation and maintenance. Thus, STIM1 controls multiple aspects of T cell-mediated immune regulation to limit injurious inflammation during chronic infection.

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity. PMID:27834810

  4. [Ultraviolet: a regulator of immunity].

    PubMed

    Komura, Kazuhiro

    2008-06-01

    Humans establish acquired immune systems during the growth, which can sufficiently eliminate pathogen avoiding immune responses to self, such as allergy and autoimmunity. An imbalance of the acquired immune system leads up to immune-mediated disorders. Ultraviolet (UV) exposure helps to establish the normal peripheral tolerance to contact allergen avoiding excessive immune responses. By contrast, UV develops kinds of autoimmune diseases on rare occasions, suggesting that abnormality in the process of UV-induced peripheral tolerance may induce these diseases. To elucidate the mechanism of UV-induced tolerance is possible to provide a new approach for the management of immune diseases. In the current review, focus is on the suggested players of UV-induced tolerance, blocking mechanisms on the elicitation phase of contact hypersensitivity, and the association between UV and autoimmunity. The major impact in basic immunology in this area is the discovery of cell surface marker of regulatory T cells. Therefore, we first discuss about the association of regulatory/suppressor T cells with UV-induced tolerance. Since the elicitation phase depends on cellular influx into the inflammatory sites, which is tightly regulated by adhesion molecules, we also focused on the role of adhesion molecules. Finally, this paper also includes statistical findings concerning the association between UV-radiation and the prevalence of a myositis specific autoantibody. Thus, UV is one of the nice regulators of an immune network and the knowledge of UV-mediated immune regulation will be translated into new therapeutic strategies to human immune-mediated disorders.

  5. Two macrophage migration inhibitory factors regulate starfish larval immune cell chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ryohei; Tamaki, Kana; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Immune cell recruitment is critical step in the inflammatory response and associated diseases. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood in invertebrates. Mesenchyme cells of the starfish larvae, which allowed Metchnikoff to complete his landmark experiments, are important model for analysis of immune cell migration. The present study investigated the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)--an evolutionarily conserved cytokine that is functionally similar to chemokines--in the larvae of the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera, which were found to possess two orthologs, ApMIF1 and ApMIF2. ApMIF1 and ApMIF2 clustered with mammalian MIF and its homolog D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT), respectively, in the phylogenetic analysis. In contrast to the functional similarity between mammalian MIF and DDT, ApMIF1 knockdown resulted in the excessive recruitment of mesenchyme cells in vivo, whereas ApMIF2 deficiency inhibited the recruitment of these cells to foreign bodies. Mesenchyme cells migrated along a gradient of recombinant ApMIF2 in vitro, whereas recombinant ApMIF1 completely blocked ApMIF2-induced directed migration. Moreover, the expression patterns of ApMIF1 and ApMIF2 messenger RNA in bacteria-challenged mesenchyme cells were consistent with in vivo observations of cell behaviors. These results indicate that ApMIF1 and ApMIF2 act as chemotactic inhibitory and stimulatory factors, respectively, and coordinately regulate mesenchyme cell recruitment during the immune response in starfish larvae. This is the first report describing opposing functions for MIF- and DDT-like molecules. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying immune regulation in invertebrates.

  6. Epithelial-cell-intrinsic IKK-beta expression regulates intestinal immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zaph, Colby; Troy, Amy E; Taylor, Betsy C; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Guild, Katherine J; Du, Yurong; Yost, Evan A; Gruber, Achim D; May, Michael J; Greten, Florian R; Eckmann, Lars; Karin, Michael; Artis, David

    2007-03-29

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) provide a primary physical barrier against commensal and pathogenic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but the influence of IECs on the development and regulation of immunity to infection is unknown. Here we show that IEC-intrinsic IkappaB kinase (IKK)-beta-dependent gene expression is a critical regulator of responses of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells in the GI tract. Mice with an IEC-specific deletion of IKK-beta show a reduced expression of the epithelial-cell-restricted cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin in the intestine and, after infection with the gut-dwelling parasite Trichuris, fail to develop a pathogen-specific CD4+ T helper type 2 (T(H)2) response and are unable to eradicate infection. Further, these animals show exacerbated production of dendritic-cell-derived interleukin-12/23p40 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, increased levels of CD4+ T-cell-derived interferon-gamma and interleukin-17, and develop severe intestinal inflammation. Blockade of proinflammatory cytokines during Trichuris infection ablates the requirement for IKK-beta in IECs to promote CD4+ T(H)2 cell-dependent immunity, identifying an essential function for IECs in tissue-specific conditioning of dendritic cells and limiting type 1 cytokine production in the GI tract. These results indicate that the balance of IKK-beta-dependent gene expression in the intestinal epithelium is crucial in intestinal immune homeostasis by promoting mucosal immunity and limiting chronic inflammation.

  7. CD22 Regulates Adaptive and Innate Immune Responses of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Rademacher, Christoph; Paulson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    B cells sense microenvironments through the B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). While signals from BCR and TLRs synergize to distinguish self from nonself, inappropriate regulation can result in development of autoimmune disease. Here we show that CD22, an inhibitory co-receptor of BCR, also negatively regulates TLR signaling in B cells. CD22-deficient (Cd22–/–) B cells exhibit hyperactivation in response to ligands of TLRs 3, 4 and 9. Evidence suggests that this results from impaired induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3, well-known suppressors of TLR signaling. Antibody-mediated sequestration of CD22 on wild-type (WT) B cells augments proliferation by TLR ligands. Conversely, expression of CD22 in a Cd22–/– B cell line blunts responses to TLR ligands. We also show that lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription by nuclear factor-κB is inhibited by ectopic expression of CD22 in a TLR4 reporter cell line. Taken together, these results suggest that negative regulation of TLR signaling is an intrinsic property of CD22. Since TLRs and BCR activate B cells through different signaling pathways, and are differentially localized in B cells, CD22 exhibits a broader regulation of receptors that mediate adaptive and innate immune responses of B cells than previously recognized. PMID:21178327

  8. Sustained Immune Complex-Mediated Reduction in CD16 Expression after Vaccination Regulates NK Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Martin R; Lusa, Chiara; Sherratt, Sam; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Behrens, Ron; Riley, Eleanor M

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking of FcγRIII (CD16) by immune complexes induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by natural killer (NK) cells, contributing to control of intracellular pathogens; this pathway can also be targeted for immunotherapy of cancerous or otherwise diseased cells. However, downregulation of CD16 expression on activated NK cells may limit or regulate this response. Here, we report sustained downregulation of CD16 expression on NK cells in vivo after intramuscular (but not intranasal) influenza vaccination. CD16 downregulation persisted for at least 12 weeks after vaccination and was associated with robust enhancement of influenza-specific plasma antibodies after intramuscular (but not intranasal) vaccination. This effect could be emulated in vitro by co-culture of NK cells with influenza antigen and immune serum and, consistent with the sustained effects after vaccination, only very limited recovery of CD16 expression was observed during long-term in vitro culture of immune complex-treated cells. CD16 downregulation was most marked among normally CD16(high) CD57(+) NK cells, irrespective of NKG2C expression, and was strongly positively associated with degranulation (surface CD107a expression). CD16 downregulation was partially reversed by inhibition of ADAM17 matrix metalloprotease, leading to a sustained increase in both CD107a and CD25 (IL-2Rα) expression. Both the degranulation and CD25 responses of CD57+ NK cells were uniquely dependent on trivalent influenza vaccine-specific IgG. These data support a role for CD16 in early activation of NK cells after vaccination and for CD16 downregulation as a means to modulate NK cell responses and maintain immune homeostasis of both antibody and T cell-dependent pathways.

  9. Sustained Immune Complex-Mediated Reduction in CD16 Expression after Vaccination Regulates NK Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Goodier, Martin R.; Lusa, Chiara; Sherratt, Sam; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Behrens, Ron; Riley, Eleanor M.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking of FcγRIII (CD16) by immune complexes induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by natural killer (NK) cells, contributing to control of intracellular pathogens; this pathway can also be targeted for immunotherapy of cancerous or otherwise diseased cells. However, downregulation of CD16 expression on activated NK cells may limit or regulate this response. Here, we report sustained downregulation of CD16 expression on NK cells in vivo after intramuscular (but not intranasal) influenza vaccination. CD16 downregulation persisted for at least 12 weeks after vaccination and was associated with robust enhancement of influenza-specific plasma antibodies after intramuscular (but not intranasal) vaccination. This effect could be emulated in vitro by co-culture of NK cells with influenza antigen and immune serum and, consistent with the sustained effects after vaccination, only very limited recovery of CD16 expression was observed during long-term in vitro culture of immune complex-treated cells. CD16 downregulation was most marked among normally CD16high CD57+ NK cells, irrespective of NKG2C expression, and was strongly positively associated with degranulation (surface CD107a expression). CD16 downregulation was partially reversed by inhibition of ADAM17 matrix metalloprotease, leading to a sustained increase in both CD107a and CD25 (IL-2Rα) expression. Both the degranulation and CD25 responses of CD57+ NK cells were uniquely dependent on trivalent influenza vaccine-specific IgG. These data support a role for CD16 in early activation of NK cells after vaccination and for CD16 downregulation as a means to modulate NK cell responses and maintain immune homeostasis of both antibody and T cell-dependent pathways. PMID:27725819

  10. Immune-checkpoint proteins VISTA and PD-1 nonredundantly regulate murine T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Chen, Wenna; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Schenk, Austin D.; Miller, Halli E.; Guleria, Indira; Barth, Richard J.; Huang, Yina H.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    V-domain immunoglobulin suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA) is a negative immune-checkpoint protein that suppresses T-cell responses. To determine whether VISTA synergizes with another immune-checkpoint, programmed death 1 (PD-1), this study characterizes the immune responses in VISTA-deficient, PD-1-deficient (KO) mice and VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. Chronic inflammation and spontaneous activation of T cells were observed in both single KO mice, demonstrating their nonredundancy. However, the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice exhibited significantly higher levels of these phenotypes than the single KO mice. When bred onto the 2D2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice, which are predisposed to development of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the CNS, the level of disease penetrance was significantly enhanced in the double KO mice compared with in the single KO mice. Consistently, the magnitude of T-cell response toward foreign antigens was synergistically higher in the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. A combinatorial blockade using monoclonal antibodies specific for VISTA and PD-L1 achieved optimal tumor-clearing therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the nonredundant role of VISTA that is distinct from the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in controlling T-cell activation. These findings provide the rationale to concurrently target VISTA and PD-1 pathways for treating T-cell-regulated diseases such as cancer. PMID:25964334

  11. Immune-checkpoint proteins VISTA and PD-1 nonredundantly regulate murine T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Chen, Wenna; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A; Schenk, Austin D; Miller, Halli E; Guleria, Indira; Barth, Richard J; Huang, Yina H; Wang, Li

    2015-05-26

    V-domain immunoglobulin suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA) is a negative immune-checkpoint protein that suppresses T-cell responses. To determine whether VISTA synergizes with another immune-checkpoint, programmed death 1 (PD-1), this study characterizes the immune responses in VISTA-deficient, PD-1-deficient (KO) mice and VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. Chronic inflammation and spontaneous activation of T cells were observed in both single KO mice, demonstrating their nonredundancy. However, the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice exhibited significantly higher levels of these phenotypes than the single KO mice. When bred onto the 2D2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice, which are predisposed to development of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the CNS, the level of disease penetrance was significantly enhanced in the double KO mice compared with in the single KO mice. Consistently, the magnitude of T-cell response toward foreign antigens was synergistically higher in the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. A combinatorial blockade using monoclonal antibodies specific for VISTA and PD-L1 achieved optimal tumor-clearing therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the nonredundant role of VISTA that is distinct from the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in controlling T-cell activation. These findings provide the rationale to concurrently target VISTA and PD-1 pathways for treating T-cell-regulated diseases such as cancer.

  12. The innate immune cell response to bacterial infection in larval zebrafish is light-regulated.

    PubMed

    Du, Lucia Y; Darroch, Hannah; Keerthisinghe, Pramuk; Ashimbayeva, Elina; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Warman, Guy; Cheeseman, James; Hall, Christopher J

    2017-10-04

    The circadian clock, which evolved to help organisms harmonize physiological responses to external conditions (such as the light/dark cycle, LD), is emerging as an important regulator of the immune response to infection. Gaining a complete understanding of how the circadian clock influences the immune cell response requires animal models that permit direct observation of these processes within an intact host. Here, we investigated the use of larval zebrafish, a powerful live imaging system, as a new model to study the impact of a fundamental zeitgeber, light, on the innate immune cell response to infection. Larvae infected during the light phase of the LD cycle and in constant light condition (LL) demonstrated enhanced survival and bacterial clearance when compared with larvae infected during the dark phase of the LD cycle and in constant dark condition (DD). This increased survival was associated with elevated expression of the zebrafish orthologues of the mammalian pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, Tumour necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-8 and Interferon-γ, and increased neutrophil and macrophage recruitment. This study demonstrates for the first time that the larval zebrafish innate immune response to infection is enhanced during light exposure, suggesting that, similar to mammalian systems, the larval zebrafish response to infection is light-regulated.

  13. Characterization of Plant Cell Wall Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns Regulating Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bacete, Laura; Mélida, Hugo; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Molina, Antonio; Miedes, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is one of the first defensive barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. Plant cell wall is considered a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defense mechanisms. The wall is a potential source of a diverse set of Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs), which are signalling molecules that trigger immune responses. However, just a few active wall ligands, such as oligogalacturonic acids (OGs), have been characterized so far. To identify additional wall-derived DAMPs, we obtained different plant wall fractions and tested their capacity to trigger immune responses using a calcium read-out system. To characterize the active DAMPs structures present in these fractions, we applied Glycome Profiling, a technology that uses a large and diverse set of specific monoclonal antibodies against wall carbohydrate ligands. The methods describe here can be used in combination with other biochemical approaches to identify and purify new plant cell wall DAMPs.

  14. MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY. The microbiota regulates type 2 immunity through RORγt⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnmacht, Caspar; Park, Joo-Hong; Cording, Sascha; Wing, James B; Atarashi, Koji; Obata, Yuuki; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; Marques, Rute; Dulauroy, Sophie; Fedoseeva, Maria; Busslinger, Meinrad; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Boneca, Ivo G; Voehringer, David; Hase, Koji; Honda, Kenya; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Eberl, Gérard

    2015-08-28

    Changes to the symbiotic microbiota early in life, or the absence of it, can lead to exacerbated type 2 immunity and allergic inflammations. Although it is unclear how the microbiota regulates type 2 immunity, it is a strong inducer of proinflammatory T helper 17 (T(H)17) cells and regulatory T cells (T(regs)) in the intestine. Here, we report that microbiota-induced T(regs) express the nuclear hormone receptor RORγt and differentiate along a pathway that also leads to T(H)17 cells. In the absence of RORγt(+) T(regs), T(H)2-driven defense against helminths is more efficient, whereas T(H)2-associated pathology is exacerbated. Thus, the microbiota regulates type 2 responses through the induction of type 3 RORγt(+) T(regs) and T(H)17 cells and acts as a key factor in balancing immune responses at mucosal surfaces. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses.

  16. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Róisín M.; Finlay, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  17. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christina L.; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R.; Glover, Sarah C.; Wallet, Mark A.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs’ innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs’ soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/− Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate

  18. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christina L; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R; Glover, Sarah C; Wallet, Mark A; Wallet, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs' innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs' soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/- Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate a

  19. Monocytes and Macrophages Regulate Immunity through Dynamic Networks of Survival and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Arti; Eubank, Timothy D.; Doseff, Andrea I.

    2010-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are central cells of the innate immune system, responsible for defending against diverse pathogens. While they originate from a common myeloid precursor and share functions in innate immunity, each has a very distinct life span finely tuned by the apoptotic caspases. Normally, circulating monocytes are short-lived and undergo spontaneous apoptosis on a daily basis. Macrophages, however, have a longer life span. In chronic inflammatory diseases and, as recently recognized, in the tumor microenvironment, the inhibition of the apoptotic program promotes monocyte survival contributing to the accumulation of macrophages and the persistence of an inflammatory milieu. A complex network of differentiation factors and inflammatory stimuli determine monocyte/macrophage life span by blocking the apoptotic pathway and activating a myriad of survival pathways. Our understanding of apoptosis has flourished over the last decade, and its relevance in the regulation of the immune system is now indisputable. Nevertheless, how the complicated networks of survival and apoptotic regulators are integrated to determine cellular life span remains elusive. This review summarizes the contribution of the caspases and their regulators in monocyte/macrophage cell fate and discusses how these molecules orchestrate the initiation, maintenance, and resolution of inflammation. More provocatively, we discuss possible strategies to control inflammation by manipulating leukocyte life span. PMID:20375558

  20. Regulation of herpes simplex virus-specific cell-mediated immunity by a specific suppressor factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horohov, D W; Wyckoff, J H; Moore, R N; Rouse, B T

    1986-01-01

    Our study was designed to investigate the nature of an antigen-specific suppressor factor generated by antigen-stimulated herpes simplex virus (HSV)-immune splenocytes. Factor SF-200, a 90,000- to 100,000-dalton fraction obtained after Sephacryl gel filtration, suppressed the generation of HSV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and lymphoproliferative responses. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis of SF-200 indicated that it contained an I-J+, anti-idiotypic protein. It was possible to adsorb the suppressor activity of SF-200 to an anti-I-J immunoaffinity column. The suppressor activity could be eluted from the immunoaffinity column with a low-pH buffer. The acid-eluted material was determined to be both I-J+ and reactive with anti-HSV antiserum by Western blot analysis. Both SF-200 and the I-J+ suppressor activity suppressed only HSV-specific cell-mediated immunity responses. However, it was possible to generate nonspecific suppressor activity by incubating the I-J+ suppressor factor with Lyt 1+ splenocytes from HSV-immune mice. The implication of these results with respect to the model for a suppressor cell circuit regulating HSV-specific cell-mediated immunity responses is discussed. Images PMID:3009850

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinfeng; Song, Mengjia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism play an important role as signaling messengers in immune system. ROS elevated in the tumor microenvironment are associated with tumor-induced immunosuppression. T cell-based therapy has been recently approved to be effective for cancer treatment. However, T cells often become dysfunctional after reaching the tumor site. It has been reported that ROS participate extensively in T cells activation, apoptosis, and hyporesponsiveness. The sensitivity of T cells to ROS varies among different subsets. ROS can be regulated by cytokines, amino acid metabolism, and enzymatic activity. Immunosuppressive cells accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and induce apoptosis and functional suppression of T cells by producing ROS. Thus, modulating the level of ROS may be important to prolong survival of T cells and enhance their antitumor function. Combining T cell-based therapy with antioxidant treatment such as administration of ROS scavenger should be considered as a promising strategy in cancer treatment, aiming to improve antitumor T cells immunity. PMID:27547291

  2. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  3. Tomato MAPKKKε is a positive regulator of cell-death signaling networks associated with plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Melech-Bonfil, Shiri; Sessa, Guido

    2010-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are fundamental components of the signaling pathways associated with plant immunity. Despite the large number of MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKK) encoded in the plant genome, only very few of them have an assigned function. Here, we identified MAPKKK gene of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), SIMAPKKKε, which is required for hypersensitive response cell death and disease resistance against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Silencing of SIMAPKKKε compromised tomato resistance to Xanthomonas campestris and Pseudomonas syringae strains, resulting in the appearance of disease symptoms and enhanced bacterial growth. In addition, silencing of NbMAPKKKε in Nicotiana benthamiana plants significantly inhibited the cell death triggered by expression of different R gene/effector gene pairs. Conversely, overexpression of either the full-length SIMAPKKKε gene or its kinase domain in N. benthamiana leaves caused pathogen-independent activation of cell death that required an intact kinase catalytic domain. Moreover, by suppressing the expression of various MAPKK and MAPK genes and overexpressing the SIMAPKKKε kinase domain, we identified a signaling cascade acting downstream of SIMAPKKKε that includes MEK2, WIPK and SIPK. Additional epistasis experiments revealed that SIPKK functions as a negative regulator of SIMAPKKKε-mediated cell death. Our results provide evidence that SIMAPKKKε is a signaling molecule that positively regulates cell death networks associated with plant immunity.

  4. Immune inhibitory molecules LAG-3 and PD-1 synergistically regulate T-cell function to promote tumoral immune escape.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seng-Ryong; Turnis, Meghan E; Goldberg, Monica V; Bankoti, Jaishree; Selby, Mark; Nirschl, Christopher J; Bettini, Matthew L; Gravano, David M; Vogel, Peter; Liu, Chih Long; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Grosso, Joseph F; Netto, George; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Chaux, Alcides; Utz, Paul J; Workman, Creg J; Pardoll, Drew M; Korman, Alan J; Drake, Charles G; Vignali, Dario A A

    2012-02-15

    Inhibitory receptors on immune cells are pivotal regulators of immune escape in cancer. Among these inhibitory receptors, CTLA-4 (targeted clinically by ipilimumab) serves as a dominant off-switch while other receptors such as PD-1 and LAG-3 seem to serve more subtle rheostat functions. However, the extent of synergy and cooperative interactions between inhibitory pathways in cancer remain largely unexplored. Here, we reveal extensive coexpression of PD-1 and LAG-3 on tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in three distinct transplantable tumors. Dual anti-LAG-3/anti-PD-1 antibody treatment cured most mice of established tumors that were largely resistant to single antibody treatment. Despite minimal immunopathologic sequelae in PD-1 and LAG-3 single knockout mice, dual knockout mice abrogated self-tolerance with resultant autoimmune infiltrates in multiple organs, leading to eventual lethality. However, Lag3(-/-)Pdcd1(-/-) mice showed markedly increased survival from and clearance of multiple transplantable tumors. Together, these results define a strong synergy between the PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibitory pathways in tolerance to both self and tumor antigens. In addition, they argue strongly that dual blockade of these molecules represents a promising combinatorial strategy for cancer.

  5. Role of gamma delta T cells in immunity to infectious diseases and the regulation of hematolymphoid cell development.

    PubMed

    Carding, S R

    1998-01-01

    My research interests are twofold. The first is to define the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate hematopoietic cell development. In particular, the role that the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL2) plays in regulating the development and selection of lymphocyte progenitor cells, and in myelopoiesis are primary areas of research. The second is to understand the role that gamma delta T cells play in pathogen-induced immune responses and autoimmunity. Their involvement in the immune response to the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes in mice and Mycobacteria tuberculosis (Mtb) in humans, in T cell-mediated inflammatory bowel disease in humans, and the nature of the antigens they recognize during these responses are major areas of interest. Research material includes patient-derived tissues as well as both conventional and genetically engineered (transgenic) strains of mice.

  6. Preconditioning of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Enhance Their Regulation of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ogay, Vyacheslav; Nurgozhin, Talgat; Jumabay, Medet

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted the attention of researchers and clinicians for their ability to differentiate into a number of cell types, participate in tissue regeneration, and repair the damaged tissues by producing various growth factors and cytokines, as well as their unique immunoprivilege in alloreactive hosts. The immunomodulatory functions of exogenous MSCs have been widely investigated in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases and transplantation research. However, a harsh environment at the site of tissue injury/inflammation with insufficient oxygen supply, abundance of reactive oxygen species, and presence of other harmful molecules that damage the adoptively transferred cells collectively lead to low survival and engraftment of the transferred cells. Preconditioning of MSCs ex vivo by hypoxia, inflammatory stimulus, or other factors/conditions prior to their use in therapy is an adaptive strategy that prepares MSCs to survive in the harsh environment and to enhance their regulatory function of the local immune responses. This review focuses on a number of approaches in preconditioning human MSCs with the goal of augmenting their capacity to regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27822228

  7. Serotonergic chemosensory neurons modify the C. elegans immune response by regulating G-protein signaling in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alexandra; Laurenson-Schafer, Henry; Partridge, Frederick A; Hodgkin, Jonathan; McMullan, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems influence each other, allowing animals to rapidly protect themselves from changes in their internal and external environment. However, the complex nature of these systems in mammals makes it difficult to determine how neuronal signaling influences the immune response. Here we show that serotonin, synthesized in Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons, modulates the immune response. Serotonin released from these cells acts, directly or indirectly, to regulate G-protein signaling in epithelial cells. Signaling in these cells is required for the immune response to infection by the natural pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum. Here we show that serotonin signaling suppresses the innate immune response and limits the rate of pathogen clearance. We show that C. elegans uses classical neurotransmitters to alter the immune response. Serotonin released from sensory neurons may function to modify the immune system in response to changes in the animal's external environment such as the availability, or quality, of food.

  8. Role of ion channels in regulating Ca²⁺ homeostasis during the interplay between immune and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bose, T; Cieślar-Pobuda, A; Wiechec, E

    2015-02-19

    Ion channels are abundantly expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells, thereby regulating the Ca(2+) influx and downstream signaling pathways of physiological processes. The immune system is specialized in the process of cancer cell recognition and elimination, and is regulated by different ion channels. In comparison with the immune cells, ion channels behave differently in cancer cells by making the tumor cells more hyperpolarized and influence cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore, ion channels comprise an important therapeutic target in anti-cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the implication of ion channels in regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis during the crosstalk between immune and cancer cell as well as their role in cancer progression.

  9. Role of ion channels in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis during the interplay between immune and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bose, T; Cieślar-Pobuda, A; Wiechec, E

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are abundantly expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells, thereby regulating the Ca2+ influx and downstream signaling pathways of physiological processes. The immune system is specialized in the process of cancer cell recognition and elimination, and is regulated by different ion channels. In comparison with the immune cells, ion channels behave differently in cancer cells by making the tumor cells more hyperpolarized and influence cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore, ion channels comprise an important therapeutic target in anti-cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the implication of ion channels in regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis during the crosstalk between immune and cancer cell as well as their role in cancer progression. PMID:25695601

  10. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor of Sciaenops ocellatus regulates immune cell trafficking and is involved in pathogen-induced immune response.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Reng; Li, Jun; Xiao, Zhi-Zhong; Sun, Li

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multi-functional cytokine involved in immunoregulation and inflammation. In this study, we examined the expression and biological function of a MIF, SoMIF, from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. SoMIF is composed of 115 residues and shares 85-99% overall sequence identities with the MIF of a number of teleost. SoMIF expression was detected in a wide range of tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection in a time-dependent manner. In head kidney (HK) leukocytes, pathogen infection induced SoMIF expression, and the expressed SoMIF was secreted into the extracellular milieu. Recombinant SoMIF (rSoMIF) purified from Escherichia coli inhibited the migration of both HK monocytes and lymphocytes, and this inhibitory effect was abolished by the presence of anti-rSoMIF antibodies. When rSoMIF was administered into red drum, it stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species in HK monocytes both in the presence and absence of pathogen infection. In vivo infection study showed that compared to untreated fish, fish pre-treated with rSoMIF before bacterial infection exhibited significantly lower bacterial loads in blood, kidney, spleen, and liver. Taken together, these results indicate that SoMIF is a secreted protein that regulates immune cell trafficking and is involved in pathogen-induced immune response.

  11. SAFB1 Mediates Repression of Immune Regulators and Apoptotic Genes in Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hammerich-Hille, Stephanie; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Tsimelzon, Anna; Creighton, Chad J.; Jiang, Shiming; Polo, Jose M.; Melnick, Ari; Meyer, Rene; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2010-01-01

    The scaffold attachment factors SAFB1 and SAFB2 are paralogs, which are involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, differentiation, and stress response. They have been shown to function as estrogen receptor corepressors, and there is evidence for a role in breast tumorigenesis. To identify their endogenous target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we utilized a combined approach of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and gene expression array studies. By performing ChIP-on-chip on microarrays containing 24,000 promoters, we identified 541 SAFB1/SAFB2-binding sites in promoters of known genes, with significant enrichment on chromosomes 1 and 6. Gene expression analysis revealed that the majority of target genes were induced in the absence of SAFB1 or SAFB2 and less were repressed. Interestingly, there was no significant overlap between the genes identified by ChIP-on-chip and gene expression array analysis, suggesting regulation through regions outside the proximal promoters. In contrast to SAFB2, which shared most of its target genes with SAFB1, SAFB1 had many unique target genes, most of them involved in the regulation of the immune system. A subsequent analysis of the estrogen treatment group revealed that 12% of estrogen-regulated genes were dependent on SAFB1, with the majority being estrogen-repressed genes. These were primarily genes involved in apoptosis, such as BBC3, NEDD9, and OPG. Thus, this study confirms the primary role of SAFB1/SAFB2 as corepressors and also uncovers a previously unknown role for SAFB1 in the regulation of immune genes and in estrogen-mediated repression of genes. PMID:19901029

  12. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; He, C; Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-09-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  13. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:26080708

  14. N-acetylcysteine protects mice from lethal endotoxemia by regulating the redox state of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Victor, Victor M; Rocha, Milagros; De la Fuente, Monica

    2003-09-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with inflammation leads to oxidative stress, which is involved with the high mortality from several diseases such as endotoxic shock and can be controlled to a certain degree by antioxidants. The immune cells use ROS in order to support their functions and, therefore, need adequate levels of antioxidant defenses in order to avoid the harmful effect of an excessive ROS production. In the present work, the effect of the administration of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the redox state of peritoneal macrophages and lymphocytes from mice with lethal endotoxic shock (100 mg/kg i.p. of lipopolysaccharide, LPS), was studied. In both types of immune cells at 0, 2, 4, 12 and 24 h after LPS injection, an increase of ROS, of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), the lipid peroxidation (malonaldehyde levels, MDA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and the oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH) ratio, as well as a decrease of enzymatic antioxidant defenses, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity, was observed. The injection of NAC (150 mg/kg i.p. at 30 min after LPS injection) decreased the ROS, the TNFalpha the MDA levels, iNOS expression and the GSSG/GSH ratio, and increased the antioxidant defenses in both macrophages and lymphocytes. Moreover, the NAC treatment prevented the activation of nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), which regulates ROS, inflammatory cytokines and antioxidant levels. Our present results provide evidence that both cell types have a relevant role in the pathogenesis of endotoxic shock, and that NAC, by improving the redox state of these immune cells, could increase mouse survival. Thus, antioxidants could offer an alternative treatment of human endotoxic shock.

  15. B cell depleting therapy regulates splenic and circulating T follicular helper cells in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Audia, Sylvain; Rossato, Marzia; Trad, Malika; Samson, Maxime; Santegoets, Kim; Gautheron, Alexandrine; Bekker, Cornelis; Facy, Olivier; Cheynel, Nicolas; Ortega-Deballon, Pablo; Boulin, Mathieu; Berthier, Sabine; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Martin, Laurent; Ciudad, Marion; Janikashvili, Nona; Saas, Philippe; Radstake, Timothy; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    B cells are involved in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) pathophysiology by producing antiplatelet auto-antibodies. However more than a half of ITP patients do not respond to B cell depletion induced by rituximab (RTX). The persistence of splenic T follicular helper cells (TFH) that we demonstrated to be expanded during ITP and to support B cell differentiation and antiplatelet antibody-production may participate to RTX inefficiency. Whereas it is well established that the survival of TFH depends on B cells in animal models, nothing is known in humans yet. To determine the effect of B cell depletion on human TFH, we quantified B cells and TFH in the spleen and in the blood from ITP patients treated or not with RTX. We showed that B cell depletion led to a dramatic decrease in splenic TFH and in CXCL13 and IL-21, two cytokines predominantly produced by TFH. The absolute count of circulating TFH and serum CXCL13 also decreased after RTX treatment, whatever the therapeutic response. Therefore, we showed that the maintenance of TFH required B cells and that TFH are not involved in the inefficiency of RTX in ITP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Estradiol selectively regulates innate immune function by polarized human uterine epithelial cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, JV; Wright, JA; Shen, L; Smith, JM; Ghosh, M; Rossoll, RM; Wira, CR

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the role of E2 in regulating innate immune protection by human uterine epithelial cells (UECs). Recognizing that UECs produce cytokines and chemokines to recruit and activate immune cells as well as viral and bacterial antimicrobials, we sought to examine the effect of E2 on constitutive and Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist (lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and poly (I:C))-induced immune responses. The secretion by polarized UECs in culture of interleukin (IL)-6, macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) was examined as well as the mRNA expression of human β-defensin-2 (HBD2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-8, and nuclear factor (NF)-kB. When incubated with E2 for 24–48 h, we found that E2 stimulated UEC secretion of SLPI (fourfold) and mRNA expression of HBD2 (fivefold). Moreover, when antibacterial activity in UEC secretions was measured using Staphylococcus aureus, E2 increased the secretion of soluble factor(s) with antibacterial activity. In contrast, E2 had no effect on constitutive secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by UECs but completely inhibited LPS- and poly (I:C)-induced secretion of MIF, IL-6, and IL-8. Estradiol also reversed the stimulatory effects of IL-1β on mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, and NF-kB by 85, 95, and 70%, respectively. As SLPI is known to inhibit NF-kB expression, these findings suggest that E2 inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines may be mediated through SLPI regulation of NF-kB. Overall, these findings indicate that the production of cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobials by UECs are differentially regulated by E2. Further, it suggests that with E2 regulation, epithelial cells that line the uterine cavity have evolved immunologically to be sensitive to viral and bacterial infections as well as the constraints of procreation. PMID:19079193

  17. Vitamin A and immune regulation: role of retinoic acid in gut-associated dendritic cell education, immune protection and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Barbara; Villablanca, Eduardo J; De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Sen; Mora, J Rodrigo

    2012-02-01

    The vitamin A (VA) metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (RA) plays a key role in mucosal immune responses. RA is produced by gut-associated dendritic cells (DC) and is required for generating gut-tropic lymphocytes and IgA-antibody-secreting cells (IgA-ASC). Moreover, RA modulates Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell (T(REG)) and Th17 effector T cell differentiation. Thus, although RA could be used as an effective "mucosal adjuvant" in vaccines, it also appears to be required for establishing intestinal immune tolerance. Here we discuss the roles proposed for RA in shaping intestinal immune responses and tolerance at the gut mucosal interface. We also focus on recent data exploring the mechanisms by which gut-associated DC acquire RA-producing capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Expansion induced microRNA changes in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells reveals interplay between immune regulation and cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Lotta; Parmar, Amarjit; Greco, Dario; Korhonen, Matti; Lehenkari, Petri; Saavalainen, Päivi; Laitinen, Saara

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are currently used in many cell based therapies. Prior to use in therapy, extensive expansion is required. We used microarray profiling to investigate expansion induced miRNA and mRNA expression changes of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) derived from old and young donors. The expression levels of 36 miRNAs were altered in cells derived from the old and respectively 39 miRNAs were altered in cells derived from young donors. Of these, only 12 were differentially expressed in both young and old donor BM-MSCs, and their predicted target mRNAs, were mainly linked to cell proliferation and senescence. Further qPCR verification showed that the expression of miR-1915-3p, miR-1207, miR-3665, and miR-762 correlated with the expansion time at passage 8. Previously described BM-MSC-specific miRNA fingerprints were also detected but these remained unchanged during expansion. Interestingly, members of well-studied miR-17/92 cluster, involved in cell cycle regulation, aging and also development of immune system, were down-regulated specifically in cells from old donors. The role of this cluster in MSC functionality is worth future studies since it links expansion, aging and immune system together. PMID:27852979

  19. Innate immunity regulates adaptive immune response: lessons learned from studying the interplay between NK and CD8+ T cells during MCMV infection.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Maja; Arapović, Jurica; Traven, Luka; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2012-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in early immune response against cytomegalovirus infection. A large and mounting body of data indicate that these cells are involved in the regulation of the adaptive immune response as well. By using mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a model, several groups provided novel insights into the role of NK cells in the development and kinetics of antiviral CD8(+) T cell response. Depending on infection conditions, virus strain and the genetic background of mice used, NK cells are either positive or negative regulators of the CD8(+) T cell response. At present, there is no unique explanation for the observed differences between various experimental systems used. In this review we discuss the mechanisms involved in the interplay between NK and CD8(+) T cells in the early control of MCMV infection.

  20. Innate immunity regulates adaptive immune response: lessons learned from studying the interplay between NK and CD8+ T cells during MCMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Maja; Arapović, Jurica; Traven, Luka; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in early immune response against cytomegalovirus infection. A large and mounting body of data indicate that these cells are involved in the regulation of the adaptive immune response as well. By using mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a model, several groups provided novel insights into the role of NK cells in the development and kinetics of antiviral CD8+ T cell response. Depending on infection conditions, virus strain and the genetic background of mice used, NK cells are either positive or negative regulators of the CD8+ T cell response. At present, there is no unique explanation for the observed differences between various experimental systems used. In this review we discuss the mechanisms involved in the interplay between NK and CD8+ T cells in the early control of MCMV infection. PMID:22965169

  1. SARS-CoV regulates immune function-related gene expression in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wanchung; Yen, Yu-Ting; Singh, Sher; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2012-08-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis, and monocytes/macrophages are the key players in the pathogenesis of SARS. In this study, we compared the transcriptional profiles of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-infected monocytic cells against that infected by coronavirus 229E (CoV-229E). Total RNA was extracted from infected DC-SIGN-transfected monocytes (THP-1-DC-SIGN) at 6 and 24 h after infection, and the gene expression was profiled in oligonucleotide-based microarrays. Analysis of immune-related gene expression profiles showed that at 24 h after SARS-CoV infection: (1) IFN-α/β-inducible and cathepsin/proteasome genes were downregulated; (2) hypoxia/hyperoxia-related genes were upregulated; and (3) TLR/TLR-signaling, cytokine/cytokine receptor-related, chemokine/chemokine receptor-related, lysosome-related, MHC/chaperon-related, and fibrosis-related genes were differentially regulated. These results elucidate that SARS-CoV infection regulates immune-related genes in monocytes/macrophages, which may be important to the pathogenesis of SARS.

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen F Presents Peptides and Regulates Immunity through Interactions with NK Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Dulberger, Charles L; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Hölzemer, Angelique; Neu, Karlynn E; Liu, Victor; Steinbach, Adriana M; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Sulak, Michael; Jabri, Bana; Lynch, Vincent J; Altfeld, Marcus; Hildebrand, William H; Adams, Erin J

    2017-06-20

    Evidence is mounting that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-F (human leukocyte antigen F) regulates the immune system in pregnancy, infection, and autoimmunity by signaling through NK cell receptors (NKRs). We present structural, biochemical, and evolutionary analyses demonstrating that HLA-F presents peptides of unconventional length dictated by a newly arisen mutation (R62W) that has produced an open-ended groove accommodating particularly long peptides. Compared to empty HLA-F open conformers (OCs), HLA-F tetramers bound with human-derived peptides differentially stained leukocytes, suggesting peptide-dependent engagement. Our in vitro studies confirm that NKRs differentiate between peptide-bound and peptide-free HLA-F. The complex structure of peptide-loaded β2m-HLA-F bound to the inhibitory LIR1 revealed similarities to high-affinity recognition of the viral MHC-I mimic UL18 and a docking strategy that relies on contacts with HLA-F as well as β2m, thus precluding binding to HLA-F OCs. These findings provide a biochemical framework to understand how HLA-F could regulate immunity via interactions with NKRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Unique properties of decidual T cells and their role in immune regulation during human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tilburgs, T; Claas, F H J; Scherjon, S A

    2010-03-01

    Maternal lymphocytes at the fetal-maternal interface play a key role in the immune acceptance of the allogeneic fetus. Most studies focus on decidual NK cells and their interaction with fetal trophoblasts, whereas limited data are available on the mechanisms of fetus specific immune recognition and immune regulation by decidual T cells at the fetal-maternal interface. The aim of this review is to describe the phenotypic characteristics of decidual T cell subsets present at the fetal-maternal interface, their interaction with HLA-C expressed by fetal trophoblasts and their role in immune recognition and regulation at the fetal-maternal interface during human pregnancy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tetraspanin-3 regulates protective immunity against Eimeria tenella infection following immunization with dendritic cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    del Cacho, Emilio; Gallego, Margarita; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Quilez, Joaquin; Lillehoj, Erik P; Sánchez-Acedo, Caridad

    2013-09-23

    The effects of immunization with dendritic cell (DC) exosomes, which had been incubated with a tetraspanin-3 (Tspan-3) blocking antibody (Ab) or with an isotype-matched non-immune IgG, were studied using an experimental model of Eimeria tenella avian coccidiosis. Purified exosomes from cecal tonsil and splenic DCs expressed Tspan-3 protein. Chickens injected with exosomes incubated with the control IgG and derived from cecal tonsil DCs preloaded in vitro with E. tenella Ag had Ag-immunostaining cells in the ceca, but not the spleen. Conversely, Ag-containing cells were found only in the spleen, but not the ceca, of chickens given IgG treated splenic DC exosomes. Interestingly, chickens that received exosomes incubated with Tspan-3 Ab had Ag-containing cells observed in both lymphoid organs following administration of exosomes from either DC population. After injection of exosomes non-incubated with Tspan-3 Ab, greater numbers of cells secreting interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-16, interferon-γ, and E. tenella-reactive Abs were observed in the cecal tonsils of chickens immunized with cecal DC exosomes compared with the spleen. By contrast, more cytokine-and Ab-producing cells were present in the spleen of chickens given splenic DC exosomes compared with the ceca. Incubation with Tspan-3 Ab gave similar numbers of cytokine- and Ab-producing cells in the cecal tonsils and spleen regardless of the source of exosomes. Immunization with E. tenella Ag-loaded cecal tonsil DC exosomes increased in vivo resistance against subsequent E. tenella infection. Increased protection against infection following cecal DC exosome immunization was partially blocked by incubation of exosomes with Tspan-3 Ab. These results suggest that Tspan-3 is involved in the tissue distribution, as well as cytokine and Ab production, following DC exosome administration, and that Tspan-3 contributes to in vivo protection against experimental E. tenella challenge infection following exosomal immunization.

  5. Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria beneficially regulate immune response triggered by poly(I:C) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shoichi; Villena, Julio; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Tohno, Masanori; Fujie, Hitomi; Chiba, Eriko; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Suda, Yoshihito; Kawai, Yasushi; Saito, Tadao; Alvarez, Susana; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-11-03

    This study analyzed the functional expression of TLR3 in various gastrointestinal tissues from adult swine and shows that TLR3 is expressed preferentially in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), CD172a(+)CD11R1(high) and CD4(+) cells from ileal Peyer's patches. We characterized the inflammatory immune response triggered by TLR3 activation in a clonal porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells) and in PIE-immune cell co-cultures, and demonstrated that these systems are valuable tools to study in vitro the immune response triggered by TLR3 on IEC and the interaction between IEC and immune cells. In addition, we selected an immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria strain, Lactobacillus casei MEP221106, able to beneficially regulate the anti-viral immune response triggered by poly(I:C) stimulation in PIE cells. Moreover, we deepened our understanding of the possible mechanisms of immunobiotic action by demonstrating that L. casei MEP221106 modulates the interaction between IEC and immune cells during the generation of a TLR3-mediated immune response.

  6. Immune tolerance induction by integrating innate and adaptive immune regulators

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Ricordi, Camillo; Chen, Zhibin

    2009-01-01

    A diversity of immune tolerance mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from immune damage. Immune regulatory cells are critical contributors to peripheral tolerance. These regulatory cells, exemplified by the CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and a recently identified population named myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulate immune responses and limiting immune-mediated pathology. In a chronic inflammatory setting, such as allograft-directed immunity, there may be a dynamic “crosstalk” between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage. CTLA4-B7-based interaction between the two branches may function as a molecular “bridge” to facilitate such “crosstalk”. Understanding the interplays among Treg cells, innate suppressors and pathogenic effector T (Teff) cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immunosuppressive elements in the innate and adaptive immune system. Successful development of localized strategies of regulatory cell therapies could circumvent the requirement for very high number of cells and decrease the risks associated with systemic immunosuppression. To realize the potential of innate and adaptive immune regulators for the still-elusive goal of immune tolerance induction, adoptive cell therapies may also need to be coupled with agents enhancing endogenous tolerance mechanisms. PMID:19919733

  7. Basophil-derived IL-6 regulates TH17 cell differentiation and CD4 T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yuk, Chae Min; Park, Hyeung Ju; Kwon, Bo-In; Lah, Sang Joon; Chang, Jun; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Park, Su-Hyung; Hong, Seokchan; Lee, Seung-Hyo

    2017-01-01

    Basophils are rare, circulating granulocytes proposed to be involved in T helper (TH) type 2 immunity, mainly through secretion of interleukin (IL)-4. In addition to IL-4, basophils produce IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) crosslinking. Differentiation of TH17 cells requires IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, but whether basophils play a significant role in TH17 induction is unknown. Here we show a role for basophils in TH17 cell development by using in vitro T cell differentiation and in vivo TH17-mediated inflammation models. Bone marrow derived-basophils (BMBs) and splenic basophils produce significant amounts of IL-6 as well as IL-4 following stimulation with IgE crosslink or cholera toxin (CT). In addition, through IL-6 secretion, BMBs cooperate with dendritic cells to promote TH17 cell differentiation. In the TH17 lung inflammation model, basophils are recruited to the inflamed lungs following CT challenge, and TH17 responses are significantly reduced in the absence of basophils or IL-6. Furthermore, reconstitution with wild-type, but not IL-6-deficient, basophils restored CT-mediated lung inflammation. Lastly, basophil-deficient mice showed reduced phenotypes of TH17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, our results indicate that basophils are an important inducer of TH17 cell differentiation, which is dependent on IL-6 secretion. PMID:28134325

  8. Tumor-derived exosomes regulate expression of immune function-related genes in human T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Laurent; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Simms, Patricia; Gooding, William E.; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEX) suppress functions of immune cells. Here, changes in the gene profiles of primary human T lymphocytes exposed in vitro to exosomes were evaluated. CD4+ Tconv, CD8+ T or CD4+ CD39+ Treg were isolated from normal donors’ peripheral blood and co-incubated with TEX or exosomes isolated from supernatants of cultured dendritic cells (DEX). Expression levels of 24–27 immune response-related genes in these T cells were quantified by qRT-PCR. In activated T cells, TEX and DEX up-regulated mRNA expression levels of multiple genes. Multifactorial data analysis of ΔCt values identified T cell activation and the immune cell type, but not exosome source, as factors regulating gene expression by exosomes. Treg were more sensitive to TEX-mediated effects than other T cell subsets. In Treg, TEX-mediated down-regulation of genes regulating the adenosine pathway translated into high expression of CD39 and increased adenosine production. TEX also induced up-regulation of inhibitory genes in CD4+ Tconv, which translated into a loss of CD69 on their surface and a functional decline. Exosomes are not internalized by T cells, but signals they carry and deliver to cell surface receptors modulate gene expression and functions of human T lymphocytes. PMID:26842680

  9. Tumor-derived exosomes regulate expression of immune function-related genes in human T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laurent; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Simms, Patricia; Gooding, William E; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2016-02-04

    Tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEX) suppress functions of immune cells. Here, changes in the gene profiles of primary human T lymphocytes exposed in vitro to exosomes were evaluated. CD4(+) Tconv, CD8(+) T or CD4(+) CD39(+) Treg were isolated from normal donors' peripheral blood and co-incubated with TEX or exosomes isolated from supernatants of cultured dendritic cells (DEX). Expression levels of 24-27 immune response-related genes in these T cells were quantified by qRT-PCR. In activated T cells, TEX and DEX up-regulated mRNA expression levels of multiple genes. Multifactorial data analysis of ΔCt values identified T cell activation and the immune cell type, but not exosome source, as factors regulating gene expression by exosomes. Treg were more sensitive to TEX-mediated effects than other T cell subsets. In Treg, TEX-mediated down-regulation of genes regulating the adenosine pathway translated into high expression of CD39 and increased adenosine production. TEX also induced up-regulation of inhibitory genes in CD4(+) Tconv, which translated into a loss of CD69 on their surface and a functional decline. Exosomes are not internalized by T cells, but signals they carry and deliver to cell surface receptors modulate gene expression and functions of human T lymphocytes.

  10. Mathematical model reveals how regulating the three phases of T-cell response could counteract immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H; Melensi, Matteo; Lorz, Alexander; Delitala, Marcello

    2015-10-01

    T cells are key players in immune action against the invasion of target cells expressing non-self antigens. During an immune response, antigen-specific T cells dynamically sculpt the antigenic distribution of target cells, and target cells concurrently shape the host's repertoire of antigen-specific T cells. The succession of these reciprocal selective sweeps can result in 'chase-and-escape' dynamics and lead to immune evasion. It has been proposed that immune evasion can be countered by immunotherapy strategies aimed at regulating the three phases of the immune response orchestrated by antigen-specific T cells: expansion, contraction and memory. Here, we test this hypothesis with a mathematical model that considers the immune response as a selection contest between T cells and target cells. The outcomes of our model suggest that shortening the duration of the contraction phase and stabilizing as many T cells as possible inside the long-lived memory reservoir, using dual immunotherapies based on the cytokines interleukin-7 and/or interleukin-15 in combination with molecular factors that can keep the immunomodulatory action of these interleukins under control, should be an important focus of future immunotherapy research.

  11. Mathematical model reveals how regulating the three phases of T-cell response could counteract immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H; Melensi, Matteo; Lorz, Alexander; Delitala, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    T cells are key players in immune action against the invasion of target cells expressing non-self antigens. During an immune response, antigen-specific T cells dynamically sculpt the antigenic distribution of target cells, and target cells concurrently shape the host’s repertoire of antigen-specific T cells. The succession of these reciprocal selective sweeps can result in ‘chase-and-escape’ dynamics and lead to immune evasion. It has been proposed that immune evasion can be countered by immunotherapy strategies aimed at regulating the three phases of the immune response orchestrated by antigen-specific T cells: expansion, contraction and memory. Here, we test this hypothesis with a mathematical model that considers the immune response as a selection contest between T cells and target cells. The outcomes of our model suggest that shortening the duration of the contraction phase and stabilizing as many T cells as possible inside the long-lived memory reservoir, using dual immunotherapies based on the cytokines interleukin-7 and/or interleukin-15 in combination with molecular factors that can keep the immunomodulatory action of these interleukins under control, should be an important focus of future immunotherapy research. PMID:26119966

  12. Genetic factors regulating lung vasculature and immune cell functions associate with resistance to pneumococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Magda S; Simon, Michelle; Kumar, Saumya; Fernandes, Vitor E; Sylvius, Nicolas; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Denny, Paul; Andrew, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide. The susceptibility to pneumococcal infections is controlled by as yet unknown genetic factors. To elucidate these factors could help to develop new medical treatments and tools to identify those most at risk. In recent years genome wide association studies (GWAS) in mice and humans have proved successful in identification of causal genes involved in many complex diseases for example diabetes, systemic lupus or cholesterol metabolism. In this study a GWAS approach was used to map genetic loci associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal infection in 26 inbred mouse strains. As a result four candidate QTLs were identified on chromosomes 7, 13, 18 and 19. Interestingly, the QTL on chromosome 7 was located within S. pneumoniae resistance QTL (Spir1) identified previously in a linkage study of BALB/cOlaHsd and CBA/CaOlaHsd F2 intercrosses. We showed that only a limited number of genes encoded within the QTLs carried phenotype-associated polymorphisms (22 genes out of several hundred located within the QTLs). These candidate genes are known to regulate TGFβ signalling, smooth muscle and immune cells functions. Interestingly, our pulmonary histopathology and gene expression data demonstrated, lung vasculature plays an important role in resistance to pneumococcal infection. Therefore we concluded that the cumulative effect of these candidate genes on vasculature and immune cells functions as contributory factors in the observed differences in susceptibility to pneumococcal infection. We also propose that TGFβ-mediated regulation of fibroblast differentiation plays an important role in development of invasive pneumococcal disease. Gene expression data submitted to the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus Accession No: GSE49533 SNP data submitted to NCBI dbSNP Short Genetic Variation http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/SNP/snp_viewTable.cgi?handle=MUSPNEUMONIA.

  13. Tetraspanin-3 regulates protective immunity against Eimera tenella infection following immunization with dendritic cell-derived exosomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of immunization with dendritic cell (DC) exosomes, which had been incubated or non-incubated with an anti-tetraspanin-3 (Tspan-3) blocking antibody (Ab), were studied using an experimental model of Eimeria tenella avian coccidiosis. Purified exosomes from cecal tonsil and splenic DCs exp...

  14. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Monica I.; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response. PMID:25742773

  15. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Monica I; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response.

  16. Immune cells and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Both innate and adaptive immune cells are involved in the mechanisms of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and activation, through the production and release of a large spectrum of pro-angiogenic mediators. These may create the specific microenvironment that favours an increased rate of tissue vascularization. In this review, we will focus on the immune cell component of the angiogenic process in inflammation and tumour growth. As angiogenesis is the result of a net balance between the activities exerted by positive and negative regulators, we will also provide information on some antiangiogenic properties of immune cells that may be utilized for a potential pharmacological use as antiangiogenic agents in inflammation as well as in cancer. PMID:19538473

  17. Immune cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2009-09-01

    Both innate and adaptive immune cells are involved in the mechanisms of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and activation, through the production and release of a large spectrum of pro-angiogenic mediators. These may create the specific microenvironment that favours an increased rate of tissue vascularization. In this review, we will focus on the immune cell component of the angiogenic process in inflammation and tumour growth. As angiogenesis is the result of a net balance between the activities exerted by positive and negative regulators, we will also provide information on some antiangiogenic properties of immune cells that may be utilized for a potential pharmacological use as antiangiogenic agents in inflammation as well as in cancer.

  18. Regulating the adaptive immune response to blood-stage malaria: role of dendritic cells and CD4⁺Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Mary M; Ing, Rebecca; Berretta, Floriana; Miu, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Although a clearer understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in protection and immunopathology during blood-stage malaria has emerged, the mechanisms involved in regulating the adaptive immune response especially those required to maintain a balance between beneficial and deleterious responses remain unclear. Recent evidence suggests the importance of CD11c⁺ dendritic cells (DC) and CD4⁺Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells in regulating immune responses during infection and autoimmune disease, but information concerning the contribution of these cells to regulating immunity to malaria is limited. Here, we review recent findings from our laboratory and others in experimental models of malaria in mice and in Plasmodium-infected humans on the roles of DC and natural regulatory T cells in regulating adaptive immunity to blood-stage malaria.

  19. Ubiquitin makes its mark on immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Malynn, Barbara A.; Ma, Averil

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination, the covalent attachment of ubiquitin molecules to proteins, is emerging as a widely utilized mechanism for rapidly regulating cell signaling. Recent studies indicate that ubiquitination plays potent roles in regulating a variety of signals in both innate and adaptive immune cells. Here, we will review recent studies of ubiquitin ligases, ubiquitin chain linkages and ubiquitin binding proteins that highlight the diversity and specificity of ubiquitin dependent functions in immune cells. We will also review studies that shed light on how ubiquitination signals are integrated in cell-type specific fashion to regulate the immune system in vivo. PMID:21168777

  20. Neuro-immune dysfunction during brain aging: new insights in microglial cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Matt, Stephanie M; Johnson, Rodney W

    2016-02-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are at the center of communication between the central nervous system and immune system. While these brain-immune interactions are balanced in healthy adulthood, the ability to maintain homeostasis during aging is impaired. Microglia develop a loss of integrated regulatory networks including aberrant signaling from other brain cells, immune sensors, and epigenetic modifiers. The low-grade chronic neuroinflammation associated with this dysfunctional activity likely contributes to cognitive deficits and susceptibility to age-related pathologies. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for neuro-immune dysregulation with age is crucial for providing targeted therapeutic strategies to support brain repair and healthy aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuro-immune Dysfunction During Brain Aging: New Insights in Microglial Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Stephanie M.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are at the center of communication between the central nervous system and immune system. While these brain-immune interactions are balanced in healthy adulthood, the ability to maintain homeostasis during aging is impaired. Microglia develop a loss of integrated regulatory networks including aberrant signaling from other brain cells, immune sensors, and epigenetic modifiers. The low-grade chronic neuroinflammation associated with this dysfunctional activity likely contributes to cognitive deficits and susceptibility to age-related pathologies. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for neuro-immune dysregulation with age is crucial for providing targeted therapeutic strategies to support brain repair and healthy aging. PMID:26595306

  2. IL-28B down-regulates regulatory T cells but does not improve the protective immunity following tuberculosis subunit vaccine immunization

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanping; Ma, Xingming; Liu, Xun; Lu, Xiaoling; Niu, Hongxia; Yu, Hongjuan; Bai, Chunxiang; Peng, Jinxiu; Xian, Qiaoyang; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which could be down-regulated by IL-28B, were reported to suppress T-cell-mediated immunity. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-28B on the immune responses and protective efficacy of a tuberculosis (TB) subunit vaccine. First, a recombinant adenoviral vector expressing mouse IL-28B (rAd-mIL-28B) was constructed; then C57BL/6 mice were immunized with subunit vaccine ESAT6-Ag85B-Mpt64(190–198)-Mtb8.4-HspX (EAMMH) and rAd-mIL-28B together thrice or primed with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Gue′rin (BCG) and boosted by EAMMH and rAd-mIL-28B twice. At last the immune responses were evaluated, and the mice primed with BCG and boosted by subunit vaccines were challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv to evaluate the protective efficacy. The results showed that rAd-mIL-28B treatment significantly down-regulated the frequency of Tregs at 4 weeks after the last immunization but did not increase the Th1-type immune responses. Moreover, in the regimen of BCG priming and EAMMH boosting, rAd-mIL-28B treatment did not increase the antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses, and consequently did not reduce the bacteria load following H37Rv challenge. Instead, it induced more serious pathology reaction. In conclusion, IL-28B down-regulates Tregs following EAMMH vaccination but does not improve the protective immune responses. PMID:26521300

  3. IL-28B down-regulates regulatory T cells but does not improve the protective immunity following tuberculosis subunit vaccine immunization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanping; Ma, Xingming; Liu, Xun; Lu, Xiaoling; Niu, Hongxia; Yu, Hongjuan; Bai, Chunxiang; Peng, Jinxiu; Xian, Qiaoyang; Wang, Yong; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which could be down-regulated by IL-28B, were reported to suppress T-cell-mediated immunity. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-28B on the immune responses and protective efficacy of a tuberculosis (TB) subunit vaccine. First, a recombinant adenoviral vector expressing mouse IL-28B (rAd-mIL-28B) was constructed; then C57BL/6 mice were immunized with subunit vaccine ESAT6-Ag85B-Mpt64(190-198)-Mtb8.4-HspX (EAMMH) and rAd-mIL-28B together thrice or primed with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Gue'rin (BCG) and boosted by EAMMH and rAd-mIL-28B twice. At last the immune responses were evaluated, and the mice primed with BCG and boosted by subunit vaccines were challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv to evaluate the protective efficacy. The results showed that rAd-mIL-28B treatment significantly down-regulated the frequency of Tregs at 4 weeks after the last immunization but did not increase the Th1-type immune responses. Moreover, in the regimen of BCG priming and EAMMH boosting, rAd-mIL-28B treatment did not increase the antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses, and consequently did not reduce the bacteria load following H37Rv challenge. Instead, it induced more serious pathology reaction. In conclusion, IL-28B down-regulates Tregs following EAMMH vaccination but does not improve the protective immune responses.

  4. Innate immunity and the regulation and mobilization of keratinocyte stem cells: are the old players playing a new game?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok; Morris, Rebecca J

    2012-09-01

    The skin provides an anatomical barrier to physical, chemical and biological agents. Hence, it is not surprising that it has well-developed innate immunity. What we find surprising is that the CD49f(+) /CD34(+) hair follicle stem cells should have an enriched expression profile of so many genes involved in innate immunity. Do these stem cells require extra protection from environmental insults? Or, could there be a new role for these genes? To probe these questions, we first summarize the roles of some key players in epidermal innate immunity. We next focus on their expression in CD49f(+) /CD34(+) hair follicle stem cells. Then, we consider recent data suggesting a new role for these 'old players' in the regulation and mobilization of haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we hypothesize that the 'old players' in these hair follicle stem cells may be playing a 'new game'.

  5. The plasmacytoid dendritic cell as the Swiss army knife of the immune system: Molecular regulation of their multifaceted functions

    PubMed Central

    Karrich, Julien J.; Jachimowski, Loes C. M.; Uittenbogaart, Christel H.; Blom, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) have been regarded as the “professional type I interferon producing cells” of the immune system following viral recognition that relies on the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9. Furthermore, pDC link the innate and adaptive immune systems via cytokine production and antigen presentation. More recently their ability to induce tolerance and cytotoxicity has been added to their “immune skills”. Such broad range of actions, resembling the diverse functional features of a Swiss army knife, requires strong and prompt molecular regulation to prevent detrimental effects, including autoimmune pathogenesis or tumor escape. Over the last decades, we and others have started to unravel some aspects of the signaling pathways that regulate the various functions of human pDC. Here we review aspects of the molecular regulatory mechanisms to control pDC function in light of their multifaceted roles during immunity, autoimmunity, and cancer. PMID:25480956

  6. Regulation of vesicular traffic at the T cell immune synapse: lessons from the primary cilium.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Onnis, Anna; Baldari, Cosima T

    2015-03-01

    The signals that orchestrate the process of T cell activation are coordinated at the specialized interface that forms upon contact with an antigen presenting cell displaying a specific MHC-associated peptide ligand, known as the immune synapse. The central role of vesicular traffic in the assembly of the immune synapse has emerged only in recent years with the finding that sustained T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling involves delivery of TCR/CD3 complexes from an intracellular pool associated with recycling endosomes. A number of receptors as well as membrane-associated signaling mediators have since been demonstrated to exploit this process to localize to the immune synapse. Here, we will review our current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for TCR recycling, with a focus on the intraflagellar transport system, a multimolecular complex that is responsible for the assembly and function of the primary cilium which we have recently implicated in polarized endosome recycling to the immune synapse.

  7. MyD88 Shapes Vaccine Immunity by Extrinsically Regulating Survival of CD4+ T Cells during the Contraction Phase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Hung, Chiung Yu; Sinha, Meenal; Lee, Linda M.; Wiesner, Darin L.; LeBert, Vanessa; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Suresh, Marulasiddappa; DeFranco, Anthony L.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Klein, Bruce S.; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Soaring rates of systemic fungal infections worldwide underscore the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity is essential. We previously reported that Th17 cells are required for vaccine immunity to the systemic dimorphic fungi of North America, and that Card9 and MyD88 signaling are required for the development of protective Th17 cells. Herein, we investigated where, when and how MyD88 regulates T cell development. We uncovered a novel mechanism in which MyD88 extrinsically regulates the survival of activated T cells during the contraction phase and in the absence of inflammation, but is dispensable for the expansion and differentiation of the cells. The poor survival of activated T cells in Myd88-/- mice is linked to increased caspase3-mediated apoptosis, but not to Fas- or Bim-dependent apoptotic pathways, nor to reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Moreover, TLR3, 7, and/or 9, but not TLR2 or 4, also were required extrinsically for MyD88-dependent Th17 cell responses and vaccine immunity. Similar MyD88 requirements governed the survival of virus primed T cells. Our data identify unappreciated new requirements for eliciting adaptive immunity and have implications for designing vaccines. PMID:27542117

  8. New differentiation pathway for double-negative regulatory T cells that regulates the magnitude of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong; Yang, Wei; Degauque, Nicolas; Tian, Yan; Mikita, Allison

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that in peripheral lymphoid tissues of normal mice and healthy humans, 1% to 5% of αβ T-cell receptor–positive (TCR+) T cells are CD4−CD8− (double-negative [DN]) T cells, capable of down-regulating immune responses. However, the origin and developmental pathway of DN T cells is still not clear. In this study, by monitoring CD4 expression during T-cell proliferation and differentiation, we identified a new differentiation pathway for the conversion of CD4+ T cells to DN regulatory T cells. We showed that the converted DN T cells retained a stable phenotype after restimulation and that furthermore, the disappearance of cell-surface CD4 molecules on converted DN T cells was a result of CD4 gene silencing. The converted DN T cells were resistant to activation-induced cell death (AICD) and expressed a unique set of cell-surface markers and gene profiles. These cells were highly potent in suppressing alloimmune responses both in vitro and in vivo in an antigen-specific manner. Perforin was highly expressed by the converted DN regulatory T cells and played a role in DN T-cell–mediated suppression. Our findings thus identify a new differentiation pathway for DN regulatory T cells and uncover a new intrinsic homeostatic mechanism that regulates the magnitude of immune responses. This pathway provides a novel, cell-based, therapeutic approach for preventing allograft rejection. PMID:17197428

  9. Sirtuin 1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Owczarczyk, Anna B; Schaller, Matthew A; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J; Lombard, David B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 small interfering RNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+)) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+) mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses.

  10. Neuroendocrine regulation and tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Toni, R; Mirandola, P; Gobbi, G; Vitale, M

    2007-01-01

    The morphogenetic events leading to the transendothelial passage of lymphoid and tumoral cells are analyzed in light of a very recent and global theory of intercellular communication designated as the Triune Information Network (TIN). The TIN system is based on the assumption that cell-cell interactions primarily occur through cell surface informations or topobiological procesess, whose mechanisms rely upon expression of adhesion molecules, and are regulated by an array of locally-borne (autocrine/paracrine signals and autonomic inputs) and distantly-borne (endocrine secretions) messages. The final aim of the TIN is to control homeostatic functions crucial for the organism survival, like morphogenesis. Knowledge of the TIN signals involved in lymphoid and tumoral cell intravasation might offer a new perspetive to study the mechanisms of tumor immunity. Recognition of tumor target cells by immune cytotoxic effectors, in fact, can be considered a notable case of TIN-mediated cell to cell interaction. In particular, Natural Killer (NK) cells play a role in the cell-mediated control of tumor growth and metastatic spreading. Cell targeting and killing are dependent on the different NK cell receptors and on the efficacy of NK cells after cytokine and monoclonal antibody administration in cancer therapy. Since efficacy of NK cell-based immunotheraphy has been proven in KIR-mismatch regimens or in TRAIL-dependent apoptosis, the ability to manipulate the balance of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells and of their cognate ligands as well as the sensitivity of tumor cells to apoptosis, opens new perspectives for NK cell based immunotherapy.

  11. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase regulates anti-tumor immunity in lung cancer by metabolic reprogramming of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Cara C.; Wang, Yong; Hough, Kenneth P.; Sawant, Anandi; Grant, Stefan C.; Thannickal, Victor J.; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Deshane, Jessy S.

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been implicated in immune evasion by tumors. Upregulation of this tryptophan (Trp)-catabolizing enzyme, in tumor cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor microenvironment (TME), leads to Trp depletion that impairs cytotoxic T cell responses and survival; however, exact mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We previously reported that a combination therapy of gemcitabine and a superoxide dismutase mimetic promotes anti-tumor immunity in a mouse model of lung cancer by inhibiting MDSCs, enhancing polyfunctional response of CD8+ memory T cells, and extending survival. Here, we show that combination therapy targets IDO signaling, specifically in MDSCs, tumor cells, and CD8+ T cells infiltrating the TME. Deficiency of IDO caused significant reduction in tumor burden, tumor-infiltrating MDSCs, GM-CSF, MDSC survival and infiltration of programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1)-expressing CD8+ T cells compared to controls. IDO−/− MDSCs downregulated nutrient-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, but IDO−/− CD8+ T cells showed AMPK activation associated with enhanced effector function. Our studies provide proof-of-concept for the efficacy of this combination therapy in inhibiting IDO and T cell exhaustion in a syngeneic model of lung cancer and provide mechanistic insights for IDO-dependent metabolic reprogramming of MDSCs that reduces T cell exhaustion and regulates anti-tumor immunity. PMID:27705910

  12. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase regulates anti-tumor immunity in lung cancer by metabolic reprogramming of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Cara C; Wang, Yong; Hough, Kenneth P; Sawant, Anandi; Grant, Stefan C; Thannickal, Victor J; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Deshane, Jessy S

    2016-11-15

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been implicated in immune evasion by tumors. Upregulation of this tryptophan (Trp)-catabolizing enzyme, in tumor cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor microenvironment (TME), leads to Trp depletion that impairs cytotoxic T cell responses and survival; however, exact mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We previously reported that a combination therapy of gemcitabine and a superoxide dismutase mimetic promotes anti-tumor immunity in a mouse model of lung cancer by inhibiting MDSCs, enhancing polyfunctional response of CD8+ memory T cells, and extending survival. Here, we show that combination therapy targets IDO signaling, specifically in MDSCs, tumor cells, and CD8+ T cells infiltrating the TME. Deficiency of IDO caused significant reduction in tumor burden, tumor-infiltrating MDSCs, GM-CSF, MDSC survival and infiltration of programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1)-expressing CD8+ T cells compared to controls. IDO-/- MDSCs downregulated nutrient-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, but IDO-/- CD8+ T cells showed AMPK activation associated with enhanced effector function. Our studies provide proof-of-concept for the efficacy of this combination therapy in inhibiting IDO and T cell exhaustion in a syngeneic model of lung cancer and provide mechanistic insights for IDO-dependent metabolic reprogramming of MDSCs that reduces T cell exhaustion and regulates anti-tumor immunity.

  13. p120-Catenin Expressed in Alveolar Type II Cells Is Essential for the Regulation of Lung Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Chignalia, Andreia Z.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Reynolds, Albert B.; Mehta, Dolly; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Malik, Asrar B.; Liu, Yuru

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of the lung alveolar epithelial barrier is required for the gas exchange and is important for immune regulation. Alveolar epithelial barrier is composed of flat type I cells, which make up approximately 95% of the gas-exchange surface, and cuboidal type II cells, which secrete surfactants and modulate lung immunity. p120-catenin (p120; gene symbol CTNND1) is an important component of adherens junctions of epithelial cells; however, its function in lung alveolar epithelial barrier has not been addressed in genetic models. Here, we created an inducible type II cell–specific p120-knockout mouse (p120EKO). The mutant lungs showed chronic inflammation, and the alveolar epithelial barrier was leaky to 125I-albumin tracer compared to wild type. The mutant lungs also demonstrated marked infiltration of inflammatory cells and activation of NF-κB. Intracellular adhesion molecule 1, Toll-like receptor 4, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were all up-regulated. p120EKO lungs showed increased expression of the surfactant proteins Sp-B, Sp-C, and Sp-D, and displayed severe inflammation after pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with wild type. In p120-deficient type II cell monolayers, we observed reduced transepithelial resistance compared to control, consistent with formation of defective adherens junctions. Thus, although type II cells constitute only 5% of the alveolar surface area, p120 expressed in these cells plays a critical role in regulating the innate immunity of the entire lung. PMID:25773174

  14. Induced Sézary syndrome PBMCs poorly express immune response genes up-regulated in stimulated memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Chong, Benjamin F; Dantzer, Patrick; Germeroth, Thomas; Hafner, Mikehl; Wilson, Adam J; Xiao, Guanghua; Wong, Henry K

    2010-10-01

    Dysfunctions in memory T cells contribute to various inflammatory autoimmune diseases and neoplasms. We hypothesize that investigating the differences of genetic profiles between resting and activated naïve and memory T cells may provide insight into the characterization of abnormal memory T cells in diseases, such as Sézary syndrome (SS), a neoplasm composed of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) cells. We determined genes distinctively expressed between resting and activated naive and memory cells. Levels of up-regulated genes in resting and activated memory cells were measured in SS PBMCs, which were largely comprised of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) cells, to quantitatively assess how different Sézary cells were from memory cells. We compared gene expression profiles using high-density oligo-microarrays between resting and activated naïve and memory CD4(+) T cells. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Levels of genes up-regulated in activated and resting memory T cells were determined in SS PBMCs by qRT-PCR. Activated memory cells expressed greater numbers of immune-mediated genes involved in effector function compared to naïve cells in our microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. Nine out of 14 genes with enhanced levels in activated memory cells had reduced levels in SS PBMCs (p<0.05). Activation of memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells revealed a diverging gap in gene expression between these subsets, with memory cells expressing immune-related genes important for effector function. Many of these genes were markedly depressed in SS patients, implying Sézary cells are markedly impaired in mounting immune responses compared to memory cells. Copyright © 2010 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of B lymphocytes and plasma cells by innate immune mechanisms and stromal cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Maseda, Damian; Bonami, Rachel H; Crofford, Leslie J

    2016-01-01

    B cells mediate multiple functions that influence immune and inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis. Production of a diverse array of autoantibodies can happen at different stages of the disease, and are important markers of disease outcome. In turn, the magnitude and quality of acquired humoral immune responses is strongly dependent on signals delivered by innate immune cells. Additionally, the milieu of cells and chemokines that constitute a niche for plasma cells rely strongly on signals provided by stromal cells at different anatomical locations and times. The chronic inflammatory state therefore importantly impacts the developing humoral immune response and its intensity and specificity. We focus this review on B cell biology and the role of the innate immune system in the development of autoimmunity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24734886

  16. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 Attenuates Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunosuppression and Regulates Th17/Treg Cell Immune Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junhua; Nie, Shaoping; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Junyi; Xiong, Tao; Gong, Deming; Xie, Mingyong

    2016-02-17

    The balance of T helper cells 17 (Th17)/regulatory T cells (Treg) plays a key role in maintaining a normal immune response. It is well-known that cyclophosphamide (CTX) applied at high dose often damages the immune system by inhibiting immune cell proliferation. In this study, the immunomodulating effects of Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 in CTX-induced immunosuppression mice were investigated. Results showed that the levels of cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-21 were significantly increased after 10 days of treatment with a high dose of NCU116 (46.92 ± 4.28 and 119.92 ± 10.89, respectively) compared with the model group (36.20 ± 2.63, 61.00 ± 6.92, respectively), and the levels of cytokines IL-23 and TGF-β3 of the three NCU116 treatment groups were significantly higher than that of the model group (90.48 ± 6.33 and 140.45 ± 14.30, respectively) (p < 0.05) and close to 62 and 69% of the normal group's level (140.98 ± 14.74 and 266.95 ± 23.11, respectively) at 10 days. The bacterium was also found to increase the expression levels of Th17 immune response and Treg immune response specific transcription factors RORγt and Foxp3. In addition, the bacterium significantly increased the number of CD4(+)T cells and dendrtic cells (DCs) and up-regulated mRNA expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These findings demonstrated that NCU116 has the potential ability to enhance intestinal mucosa immunity and regulate the Th17/Treg balance, which may be attributed to the TLR pathway in DCs.

  17. Sinonasal solitary chemosensory cells "taste" the upper respiratory environment to regulate innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Cohen, Noam A

    2014-01-01

    It is not fully understood how sinonasal epithelial cells detect the presence of pathogens and activate innate defense responses necessary for protecting the upper airway from infection. One mechanism is through bitter taste receptors (T2Rs), which are expressed in the sinonasal cavity. One T2R isoform, T2R38, is expressed in ciliated cells and detects quorum-sensing molecules from gram-negative bacteria, activating antimicrobial nitric oxide production. More recent studies have examined the role of T2Rs expressed in a sinonasal cell type that has only recently been identified in humans, the solitary chemosensory cell (SCC). We sought to provide an overview of SCCs and taste receptor function in human sinonasal defense as well as implications for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). A literature review of the current knowledge of SCCs and taste receptors in sinonasal physiology and CRS was conducted. Human sinonasal SCCs express both bitter T2R and sweet T1R2/3 receptors. Activation of SCC T2Rs activates a calcium signal that propagates to the surrounding epithelial cells and causes secretion of antimicrobial peptides. T1R2/3 sweet receptor activation by physiological airway surface liquid (ASL) glucose concentrations attenuates the T2R response, likely as a mechanism to prevent full activation of the T2R pathway except during times of infection, when pathogens may consume ASL glucose and reduce its concentration. SCCs appear to be important mediators of upper airway innate immunity, as the SCC T2Rs regulate antimicrobial peptide secretion, but further study is needed to determine the specific T2R isoforms involved as well as whether polymorphisms in these isoforms affect susceptibility to infection or patient outcomes in CRS. The inhibitory role of T1R2/3 sweet receptor suggests that T1R2/3 blockers may have therapeutic potential in some CRS patients, particularly those with diabetes mellitus. However, further clinical study of the relationship between infection and T1R2

  18. Regulation of asymmetric cell division and polarity by Scribble is not required for humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Edwin D; Oliaro, Jane; Kallies, Axel; Belz, Gabrielle T; Filby, Andrew; Hogan, Thea; Haynes, Nicole; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Van Ham, Vanessa; Kinwell, Tanja; Seddon, Benedict; Davies, Derek; Tarlinton, David; Lew, Andrew M; Humbert, Patrick O; Russell, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    The production of protective antibody requires effective signalling of naive B cells following encounter with antigen, and the divergence of responding B lymphocytes into distinct lineages. Polarity proteins have recently been proposed as important mediators of both the initial B cell response, and potentially of asymmetric cell division. Here we show that, although polarity proteins of the Scribble complex, Scribble, Dlg1 and Lgl1, are expressed and polarized during early B cell activation, their deficiency has no effect on the in vivo outcome of immunization or challenge with influenza infection. Furthermore, we find a striking correlation in the differentiation outcome of daughters of single founder B cells in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that B cell differentiation does not require polarity proteins of the Scribble complex, and the findings do not support a role for asymmetric cell division in B cell activation and differentiation.

  19. Dual epithelial and immune cell function of Dvl1 regulates gut microbiota composition and intestinal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Belinson, Haim; Savage, Adam K.; Fadrosh, Douglas; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Lin, Din; Valladares, Ricardo; Nusse, Ysbrand; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Lynch, Susan V.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is controlled by complex interactions between epithelial and immune cells and the resident microbiota. Here, we studied the role of Wnt signaling in GI homeostasis using Disheveled 1 knockout (Dvl1–/–) mice, which display an increase in whole gut transit time. This phenotype is associated with a reduction and mislocalization of Paneth cells and an increase in CD8+ T cells in the lamina propria. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that GI dysfunction requires abnormalities in both epithelial and immune cells. Dvl1–/– mice exhibit a significantly distinct GI microbiota, and manipulation of the gut microbiota in mutant mice rescued the GI transit abnormality without correcting the Paneth and CD8+ T cell abnormalities. Moreover, manipulation of the gut microbiota in wild-type mice induced a GI transit abnormality akin to that seen in Dvl1–/– mice. Together, these data indicate that microbiota manipulation can overcome host dysfunction to correct GI transit abnormalities. Our findings illustrate a mechanism by which the epithelium and immune system coregulate gut microbiota composition to promote normal GI function. PMID:27525310

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Dampening Arthritis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, R. A.; Djouad, F.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that are able to immunomodulate cells from both the innate and the adaptive immune systems promoting an anti-inflammatory environment. During the last decade, MSCs have been intensively studied in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal model of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Based on these studies, MSCs are currently widely used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) characterized by complex deregulation of the immune systems. However, the therapeutic properties of MSCs in arthritis are still controverted. These controversies might be due to the diversity of MSC sources and isolation protocols used, the time, the route and dose of MSC administration, the variety of the mechanisms involved in the MSCs suppressive effects, and the complexity of arthritis pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the role of the interactions between MSCs and the different immune cells associated with arthritis pathogenesis and the possible means described in the literature that could enhance MSCs therapeutic potential counteracting arthritis development and progression. PMID:27847522

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Dampening Arthritis Progression.

    PubMed

    Contreras, R A; Figueroa, F E; Djouad, F; Luz-Crawford, P

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that are able to immunomodulate cells from both the innate and the adaptive immune systems promoting an anti-inflammatory environment. During the last decade, MSCs have been intensively studied in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal model of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Based on these studies, MSCs are currently widely used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) characterized by complex deregulation of the immune systems. However, the therapeutic properties of MSCs in arthritis are still controverted. These controversies might be due to the diversity of MSC sources and isolation protocols used, the time, the route and dose of MSC administration, the variety of the mechanisms involved in the MSCs suppressive effects, and the complexity of arthritis pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the role of the interactions between MSCs and the different immune cells associated with arthritis pathogenesis and the possible means described in the literature that could enhance MSCs therapeutic potential counteracting arthritis development and progression.

  2. Leptin Regulation of Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Caitlin; Petri, William A

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is a regulatory hormone with multiple roles in the immune system. We favor the concept that leptin signaling 'licenses' various immune cells to engage in immune responses and/or to differentiate. Leptin is an inflammatory molecule that is capable of activating both adaptive and innate immunity. It can also 'enhance' immune functions, including inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages, granulocyte chemotaxis, and increased Th17 proliferation. Leptin can also 'inhibit' cells; CD4(+) T cells are inhibited from differentiating into regulatory T cells in the presence of elevated leptin, while NK cells can exhibit impaired cytotoxicity under the same circumstances. Consequently, understanding the effect of leptin signaling is important to appreciate various aspects of immune dysregulation observed in malnutrition, obesity, and autoimmunity.

  3. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells: Key Regulators of Immune Homeostasis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Kyle L; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L

    2015-07-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function.

  4. mTOR regulates neuroprotective effect of immunized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells in optic nerve ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guochun; Tang, Luosheng; Wei, Wei; Li, Zhuo; Li, Yunping; Duan, Xuanchu; Chen, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of targeting CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) remains controversial under the condition of neuroinflammation. This study aims to explore the neuroprotective role of Tregs in optic nerve ischemia (ONI) and evaluate the therapeutic strategy of Tregs transfer with a focus on targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Intraocular pressure was transiently increased in adult C57BL/6 mice to induce ONI. Mucosal tolerance of myelin basic protein (MBP) markedly increased retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival after ONI through enhanced Tregs suppression. mTOR inhibition significantly promoted the frequency of MBP-immunized Tregs in vitro with increased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Transient rapamycin treatment highly promoted the immunosuppressive capacity of Tregs and inhibited retinal inflammation in ONI animals. Intravenous infusion of MBP-immunized Tregs, instead of regular Tregs, beneficially modulated immune activities of host retinal CD11b+ cells and CD4+ effector T cells, leading to significant improvement of RGC survival. Importantly, rapamycin treatment further enhanced the neuroprotective effect of Tregs transfer. Taken together, these findings reveal a fine regulation of mTOR signaling on immunized Tregs after acute retinal injury. Adoptive transfer with targeting-mTOR strategy markedly improves neuronal recovery after ONI, supporting the therapeutic potentials of Tregs in acute and chronic neurological disorder. PMID:27886260

  5. IL-9 promotes IL-13-dependent paneth cell hyperplasia and up-regulation of innate immunity mediators in intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Steenwinckel, Valérie; Louahed, Jamila; Lemaire, Muriel M; Sommereyns, Caroline; Warnier, Guy; McKenzie, Andrew; Brombacher, Frank; Van Snick, Jacques; Renauld, Jean-Christophe

    2009-04-15

    IL-9 contributes to lung inflammatory processes such as asthma, by promoting mast cell differentiation, B cell activation, eosinophilia, and mucus production by lung epithelial cells. The observation that IL-9 overexpressing mice show increased mast cell numbers in the intestinal mucosa suggests that this cytokine might also play a role in intestinal inflammation. In colons from IL-9 transgenic mice, the expression of Muc2, a major intestinal mucin gene, was up-regulated, together with that of CLCA3 chloride channel and resistin like alpha, which are goblet cell-associated genes. Additional IL-9 up-regulated genes were identified and included innate immunity genes such as angiogenin 4 and the PLA2g2a phospholipase A(2), which are typical Paneth cell markers. Histochemical staining of Paneth cells by phloxine/tartrazine showed that IL-9 induces Paneth cell hyperplasia in Lieberkühn glands of the small intestine, and in the colonic mucosa, where this cell type is normally absent. Expression of Paneth cell markers, including angiogenin 4, PLA2g2a, and cryptdins, was induced in the colon of wild-type mice after two to four daily administrations of IL-9. By crossing IL-9 transgenic mice with IL-13(-/-) mice, or by injecting IL-9 into IL-4R(-/-) mice, we showed that IL-13 was required for the up-regulation of these Paneth cell-specific genes by IL-9. Taken together, our data indicate that Paneth cell hyperplasia and expression of their various antimicrobial products contribute to the immune response driven by TH2 cytokines, such as IL-9 and IL-13 in the intestinal mucosa.

  6. The Transcriptomic Response of Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells to Endotoxin: Implications for Hepatic Inflammation and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ashish; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2013-01-01

    With their location in the perisinusoidal space of Disse, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) communicate with all of the liver cell types both by physical association (cell body as well as cytosolic processes penetrating into sinusoids through the endothelial fenestrations) and by producing several cytokines and chemokines. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), circulating levels of which are elevated in liver diseases and transplantation, stimulates HSCs to produce increased amounts of cytokines and chemokines. Although recent research provides strong evidence for the role of HSCs in hepatic inflammation and immune regulation, the number of HSC-elaborated inflammatory and immune regulatory molecules may be much greater then known at the present time. Here we report time-dependent changes in the gene expression profile of inflammatory and immune-regulatory molecules in LPS-stimulated rat HSCs, and their validation by biochemical analyses. LPS strongly up-regulated LPS-response elements (TLR2 and TLR7) but did not affect TLR4 and down-regulated TLR9. LPS also up-regulated genes in the MAPK, NFκB, STAT, SOCS, IRAK and interferon signaling pathways, numerous CC and CXC chemokines and IL17F. Interestingly, LPS modulated genes related to TGFβ and HSC activation in a manner that would limit their activation and fibrogenic activity. The data indicate that LPS-stimulated HSCs become a major cell type in regulating hepatic inflammatory and immunological responses by altering expression of numerous relevant genes, and thus play a prominent role in hepatic pathophysiology including liver diseases and transplantation. PMID:24349206

  7. Immune regulation by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Cain, Derek W; Cidlowski, John A

    2017-04-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids are crucial to various physiological processes, including metabolism, development and inflammation. Since 1948, synthetic glucocorticoids have been used to treat various immune-related disorders. The mechanisms that underlie the immunosuppressive properties of these hormones have been intensely scrutinized, and it is widely appreciated that glucocorticoids have pleiotropic effects on the immune system. However, a clear picture of the cellular and molecular basis of glucocorticoid action has remained elusive. In this Review, we distil several decades of intense (and often conflicting) research that defines the interface between the endocrine stress response and the immune system.

  8. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: Neglected Regulators of the Immune Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Greil, Johann; Ammann, Sandra; Parcina, Marijo

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are a rare subset of leukocytes equipped with Fcγ and Fcε receptors, which exert contrary effects on sensing of microbial nucleic acids by endosomal Toll-like receptors. In this article, we explain how pDC contribute to the immune response to Staphylococcus aureus. Under normal circumstances the pDC participates in the memory response to the pathogen: pDC activation is initiated by uptake of staphylococcal immune complexes with IgG or IgE. However, protein A-expressing S. aureus strains additionally trigger pDC activation in the absence of immunoglobulin. In this context, staphylococci exploit the pDC to induce antigen-independent differentiation of IL-10 producing plasmablasts, an elegant means to propagate immune evasion. We further discuss the role of type I interferons in infection with S. aureus and the implications of these findings for the development of immune based therapies and vaccination. PMID:24904586

  9. MyD88-mediated instructive signals in dendritic cells regulate pulmonary immune responses during respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Brian D; Schaller, Matthew A; Smit, Joost J; Kunkel, Steven L; Neupane, Rupak; Kelley, Lara; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2007-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of respiratory disease in infants worldwide. The induction of innate immunity and the establishment of adaptive immune responses are influenced by the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by TLRs. One of the primary pathways for TLR activation is by MyD88 adapter protein signaling. The present studies indicate that MyD88 deficiency profoundly impacts the pulmonary environment in RSV-infected mice characterized by the accumulation of eosinophils and augmented mucus production. Although there was little difference in CD4 T cell accumulation, there was also a significant decrease in conventional dendritic cells recruitment to the lungs of MyD88(-/-) mice. The exacerbation of RSV pathophysiology in MyD88(-/-) mice was associated with an enhanced Th2 cytokine profile that contributed to an inappropriate immune response. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) isolated from MyD88(-/-) mice were incapable of producing two important Th1 instructive signals, IL-12 and delta-like4, upon RSV infection. Although MyD88(-/-) BMDCs infected with RSV did up-regulate costimulatory molecules, they did not up-regulate class II as efficiently and stimulated less IFN-gamma from CD4(+) T cells in vitro compared with wild-type BMDCs. Finally, adoptive transfer of C57BL/6 BMDCs into MyD88(-/-) mice reconstituted Th1 immune responses in vivo, whereas transfer of MyD88(-/-) BMDCs into wild-type mice skewed the RSV responses toward a Th2 phenotype. Taken together, our data indicate that MyD88-mediated pathways are essential for the least pathogenic responses to this viral pathogen through the regulation of important Th1-associated instructive signals.

  10. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  11. Th1 and Th17 Cells Regulate Innate Immune Responses and Bacterial Clearance during Central Nervous System Infection†

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Monica M.; Kielian, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscesses arise following parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria and are typified by inflammation and edema, which frequently results in a multitude of long-term health problems. The impact of adaptive immunity in shaping continued innate responses during late stage brain abscess formation is not known but is important, since robust innate immunity is required for effective bacterial clearance. To address this issue, brain abscesses were induced in TCR αβ knockout (KO) mice, since CD4+ and NKT cells represented the most numerous T cell infiltrates. TCR αβ KO mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance during later stages of infection, which was associated with alterations in neutrophil and macrophage recruitment as well as perturbations in cytokine/chemokine expression. Adoptive transfer of either Th1 or Th17 cells into TCR αβ KO mice restored bacterial burdens and innate immune cell infiltrates to levels detected in WT animals. Interestingly, adoptively transferred Th17 cells demonstrated plasticity within the CNS compartment and induced distinct cytokine secretion profiles in abscess-associated microglia and macrophages compared to Th1 transfer. Collectively, these studies identify an amplification loop for Th1 and Th17 cells in shaping established innate responses during CNS infection to maximize bacterial clearance and differentially regulate microglial and macrophage secretory profiles. PMID:22190181

  12. Th1 and Th17 cells regulate innate immune responses and bacterial clearance during central nervous system infection.

    PubMed

    Holley, Monica M; Kielian, Tammy

    2012-02-01

    Brain abscesses arise following parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria and are typified by inflammation and edema, which frequently results in a multitude of long-term health problems. The impact of adaptive immunity in shaping continued innate responses during late-stage brain abscess formation is not known but is important, because robust innate immunity is required for effective bacterial clearance. To address this issue, brain abscesses were induced in TCR αβ knockout (KO) mice, because CD4(+) and NKT cells represented the most numerous T cell infiltrates. TCR αβ KO mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance during later stages of infection, which was associated with alterations in neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, as well as perturbations in cytokine/chemokine expression. Adoptive transfer of either Th1 or Th17 cells into TCR αβ KO mice restored bacterial burdens and innate immune cell infiltrates to levels detected in wild-type animals. Interestingly, adoptively transferred Th17 cells demonstrated plasticity within the CNS compartment and induced distinct cytokine secretion profiles in abscess-associated microglia and macrophages compared with Th1 transfer. Collectively, these studies identified an amplification loop for Th1 and Th17 cells in shaping established innate responses during CNS infection to maximize bacterial clearance and differentially regulate microglial and macrophage secretory profiles.

  13. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  14. T cells out of control--impaired immune regulation in the inflamed joint.

    PubMed

    Wehrens, Ellen J; Prakken, Berent J; van Wijk, Femke

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of FOXP3+ regulatory T (T(REG)) cells over 15 years ago, intensive research has focused on their presence, phenotype and function in autoimmune disease. Whether deficiencies in T(REG) cells underlie autoimmune pathology and whether, or how, therapeutic approaches based on these cells might be successful is still the subject of debate. The potential role of T(REG)-cell extrinsic factors, such as proinflammatory cytokines and resistance of effector T cells to suppression, as the cause of regulatory defects in chronic autoimmune inflammation is an intensive area of research. It is now clear that, at the site of inflammation, antigen presenting cells (APCs) and proinflammatory cytokines drive effector T cell skewing and plasticity, and that these T cells can become unresponsive to regulation. In addition, expansion and function of T(REG) cells is affected by the inflammatory environment; indeed, new data suggest that, in certain conditions, T(REG) cells promote inflammation. This Review summarizes the latest findings on changes in effector T cell homeostasis in autoimmune disease and focuses on how mechanisms that normally regulate these cells are affected in the inflamed joints of patients with arthritis. These findings have important clinical implications and will affect the development of new therapeutic strategies for autoimmune arthritis.

  15. Xenobiotic pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates innate immunity via activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaolan; Lei, Ting; Zhang, Kang; Zhao, Wenxiang; Fang, Li; Lai, Baochang; Han, Jie; Xiao, Lei; Wang, Nanping

    2014-10-24

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily and responsible for the detoxification of xenobiotics. Our previously study demonstrated that PXR is expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) and acts as a master regulator of detoxification genes to protect ECs against xenobiotics. Vascular endothelial cells are key sentinel cells to sense the pathogens and xenobiotics. In this study, we examined the potential function of PXR in the regulation of innate immunity in vasculatures. Treatments with PXR agonists or overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in cultured ECs increased gene expression of the key pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLR-2, -4, -9) and NOD-like receptors (NOD-1 and -2 and NLRP3). In particular, PXR agonism triggered the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and the ensuing cleavage and maturation of caspase-1 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Conversely, selective antagonism or gene silencing of PXR abrogated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In addition, we identified NLRP3 as a transcriptional target of PXR by using the promoter-reporter and ChIP assays. In summary, our findings revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of innate immune by PXR, which may act as a master transcription factor controlling the convergence between the detoxification of xenobiotics and the innate immunity against them.

  16. Aqueous Humor Suppression of Dendritic Cell Function Helps Maintain Immune Regulation in the Eye during Human Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Denniston, Alastair K.; Tomlins, Paul; Williams, Geraint P.; Kottoor, Sherine; Khan, Imran; Oswal, Kadambari; Salmon, Mike; Wallace, Graham R.; Rauz, Saaeha; Murray, Philip I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Noninfectious uveitis is characterized by a dysregulated inflammatory or immune response in the eye. It is unclear whether this represents a failure of immune privilege or an overwhelming inflammatory drive that has exceeded the capacity of regulatory mechanisms that are still functioning. The authors investigated immune regulation in the human eye during intraocular inflammation (uveitis) and its impact on dendritic cell (DC) function and subsequent T-cell responses. Methods. Myeloid DCs were isolated from the aqueous humor (AqH) and peripheral blood of patients with active uveitis and characterized by flow cytometry. The effect of uveitis AqH was interrogated in an in vitro model of peripheral blood monocyte-derived DCs from healthy controls. Results. Myeloid DCs isolated from uveitic AqH were characterized by elevated major histocompatibility complex classes I and II (MHC I/II), but reduced CD86 compared with matched peripheral blood DCs. Exposure of peripheral blood monocyte-derived DCs from healthy controls to the inflammatory AqH supernatant recapitulated this phenotype. Despite interferon gamma (IFNγ)–dependent upregulation of MHC I, inflammatory AqH was overall suppressive to DC function, with reduced CD86 expression and diminished T-cell responses. This suppressive effect was equal to or greater than that induced by noninflammatory AqH, but was glucocorticoid independent (in contrast to noninflammatory AqH). Conclusions. These data indicate that the ocular microenvironment continues to regulate DC function during uveitis, despite IFNγ-driven upregulation of MHC expression, supporting the hypothesis that immune regulation within the eye is maintained during inflammation. PMID:22247464

  17. Nitrated Alpha Synuclein Induced Alterations in Microglial Immunity is Regulated by CD4+ T Cell Subsets1

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Ashley D.; Stone, David K.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2009-01-01

    Microglial inflammatory neuroregulatory activities affect the tempo of nigrostriatal degeneration during Parkinson's disease (PD). Such activities are induced, in part, by misfolded, nitrated alpha-synuclein (N-α-syn) within Lewy bodies released from dying or dead dopaminergic neurons. Such pathobiologic events initiate innate and adaptive immune responses affecting neurodegeneration. We posit that the neurobiological activities of activated microglia are affected by cell-protein and cell-cell contacts, in that microglial interactions with N-α-syn and CD4+ T cells substantively alter the microglial proteome. This leads to alterations in cell homeostatic functions and disease. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress N-α-syn microglial induced reactive oxygen species and nuclear factor kappa B activation by modulating redox-active enzymes, cell migration, phagocytosis, and bioenergetic protein expression and cell function. In contrast, CD4+CD25− effector T cells exacerbate microglial inflammation and induce “putative” neurotoxic responses. These data support the importance of adaptive immunity in the regulation of PD-associated microglial inflammation. PMID:19299711

  18. Differential regulation of innate immune cytokine production through pharmacological activation of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) in burn patient immune cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Eitas, Timothy K; Stepp, Wesley; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Long, Clayton; Riley, Caitlin; Callahan, James; Sanchez, Yolanda; Gough, Peter; Knowlin, Laquanda; van Duin, David; Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara; Jones, Samuel; Maile, Robert; Hong, Zhi; Berger, Scott; Cairns, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Burn patients suffer from immunological dysfunction for which there are currently no successful interventions. Similar to previous observations, we find that burn shock patients (≥15% Total Burn Surface Area (TBSA) injury) have elevated levels of the innate immune cytokines Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1)/CC-motif Chemokine Ligand 2(CCL2) early after hospital admission (0-48 Hours Post-hospital Admission (HPA). Functional immune assays with patient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) revealed that burn shock patients (≥15% TBSA) produced elevated levels of MCP-1/CCL2 after innate immune stimulation ex vivo relative to mild burn patients. Interestingly, treatment of patient PBMCs with the Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) agonist, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl), reduced MCP-1 production but not IL-6 or Interleukin-10 (IL-10) secretion. In enriched monocytes from healthy donors, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) also reduced LPS-induced MCP1/CCL2 production but did not alter IL-6 or IL-10 secretion. Similar immunomodulatory effects were observed with Compound 7, which activates the NRF2 pathway through a different and non-covalent Mechanism Of Action (MOA). Hence, our findings with CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) and Compound 7 are likely to reflect a generalizable aspect of NRF2 activation. These observed effects were not specific to LPS-induced immune responses, as NRF2 activation also reduced MCP-1/CCL2 production after stimulation with IL-6. Pharmacological NRF2 activation reduced Mcp-1/Ccl2 transcript accumulation without inhibiting either Il-6 or Il-10 transcript levels. Hence, we describe a novel aspect of NRF2 activation that may contribute to the beneficial effects of NRF2 agonists during disease. Our work also demonstrates that the NRF2 pathway is retained and can be modulated to regulate important immunomodulatory functions in burn patient immune cells.

  19. ADAMTS5 Is a Critical Regulator of Virus-Specific T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Meagan; Ye, Siying; Izzard, Leonard; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Tripp, Ralph A.; Stambas, John

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides physical scaffolding for cellular constituents and initiates biochemical and biomechanical cues that are required for physiological activity of living tissues. The ECM enzyme ADAMTS5, a member of the ADAMTS (A Disintegrin-like and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin-1 motifs) protein family, cleaves large proteoglycans such as aggrecan, leading to the destruction of cartilage and osteoarthritis. However, its contribution to viral pathogenesis and immunity is currently undefined. Here, we use a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to show that ADAMTS5 enzymatic activity plays a key role in the development of influenza-specific immunity. Influenza virus infection of Adamts5-/- mice resulted in delayed virus clearance, compromised T cell migration and immunity and accumulation of versican, an ADAMTS5 proteoglycan substrate. Our research emphasises the importance of ADAMTS5 expression in the control of influenza virus infection and highlights the potential for development of ADAMTS5-based therapeutic strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27855162

  20. S-nitrosylation of NADPH oxidase regulates cell death in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung-Wook; Feechan, Angela; Yin, Minghui; Saidi, Noor B B; Le Bihan, Thierry; Yu, Manda; Moore, John W; Kang, Jeong-Gu; Kwon, Eunjung; Spoel, Steven H; Pallas, Jacqueline A; Loake, Gary J

    2011-10-13

    Changes in redox status are a conspicuous feature of immune responses in a variety of eukaryotes, but the associated signalling mechanisms are not well understood. In plants, attempted microbial infection triggers the rapid synthesis of nitric oxide and a parallel accumulation of reactive oxygen intermediates, the latter generated by NADPH oxidases related to those responsible for the pathogen-activated respiratory burst in phagocytes. Both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates have been implicated in controlling the hypersensitive response, a programmed execution of plant cells at sites of attempted infection. However, the molecular mechanisms that underpin their function and coordinate their synthesis are unknown. Here we show genetic evidence that increases in cysteine thiols modified using nitric oxide, termed S-nitrosothiols, facilitate the hypersensitive response in the absence of the cell death agonist salicylic acid and the synthesis of reactive oxygen intermediates. Surprisingly, when concentrations of S-nitrosothiols were high, nitric oxide function also governed a negative feedback loop limiting the hypersensitive response, mediated by S-nitrosylation of the NADPH oxidase, AtRBOHD, at Cys 890, abolishing its ability to synthesize reactive oxygen intermediates. Accordingly, mutation of Cys 890 compromised S-nitrosothiol-mediated control of AtRBOHD activity, perturbing the magnitude of cell death development. This cysteine is evolutionarily conserved and specifically S-nitrosylated in both human and fly NADPH oxidase, suggesting that this mechanism may govern immune responses in both plants and animals.

  1. Burkholderia pseudomallei Differentially Regulates Host Innate Immune Response Genes for Intracellular Survival in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Shankar, Esaki M.; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis poses a serious threat to humankind. B. pseudomallei secretes numerous virulence proteins that alter host cell functions to escape from intracellular immune sensors. However, the events underlying disease pathogenesis are poorly understood. Methods We determined the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 human lung epithelial cells, and also investigated the early transcriptional responses using an Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 microarray platform, after three hours of exposure to live B. pseudomallei (BCMS) and its secreted proteins (CCMS). Results We found that the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly correlated with increase of multiplicity of infection and duration of contact. Activation of host carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis as well as suppression of amino acid metabolism and innate immune responses both by live bacteria and its secreted proteins were evident. These early events might be linked to initial activation of host genes directed towards bacterial dissemination from lungs to target organs (via proposed in vivo mechanisms) or to escape potential sensing by macrophages. Conclusion Understanding the early responses of A549 cells toward B. pseudomallei infection provide preliminary insights into the likely pathogenesis mechanisms underlying melioidosis, and could contribute to development of novel intervention strategies to combat B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27367858

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate Immunity via Interferon Beta and Indoleamine-2,3-Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Michael B.; Sampayo-Escobar, Viviana; Green, Ryan; Moore, Martin L.; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been reported to infect human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but the consequences are poorly understood. MSCs are present in nearly every organ including the nasal mucosa and the lung and play a role in regulating immune responses and mediating tissue repair. We sought to determine whether RSV infection of MSCs enhances their immune regulatory functions and contributes to RSV-associated lung disease. RSV was shown to replicate in human MSCs by fluorescence microscopy, plaque assay, and expression of RSV transcripts. RSV-infected MSCs showed differentially altered expression of cytokines and chemokines such as IL-1β, IL6, IL-8 and SDF-1 compared to epithelial cells. Notably, RSV-infected MSCs exhibited significantly increased expression of IFN-β (~100-fold) and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) (~70-fold) than in mock-infected MSCs. IDO was identified in cytosolic protein of infected cells by Western blots and enzymatic activity was detected by tryptophan catabolism assay. Treatment of PBMCs with culture supernatants from RSV-infected MSCs reduced their proliferation in a dose dependent manner. This effect on PBMC activation was reversed by treatment of MSCs with the IDO inhibitors 1-methyltryptophan and vitamin K3 during RSV infection, a result we confirmed by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of IDO in MSCs. Neutralizing IFN-β prevented IDO expression and activity. Treatment of MSCs with an endosomal TLR inhibitor, as well as a specific inhibitor of the TLR3/dsRNA complex, prevented IFN-β and IDO expression. Together, these results suggest that RSV infection of MSCs alters their immune regulatory function by upregulating IFN-β and IDO, affecting immune cell proliferation, which may account for the lack of protective RSV immunity and for chronicity of RSV-associated lung diseases such as asthma and COPD. PMID:27695127

  3. The rap GTPases regulate B cell morphology, immune-synapse formation, and signaling by particulate B cell receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Zabetian, Saba; Brugger, Hayley; Weber, Michele; Lei, Victor; Dang-Lawson, May; Tse, Kathy W K; Santamaria, Rene; Batista, Facundo D; Gold, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocytes spread and extend membrane processes when searching for antigens and form immune synapses upon contacting cells that display antigens on their surface. Although these dynamic morphological changes facilitate B cell activation, the signaling pathways underlying these processes are not fully understood. We found that activation of the Rap GTPases was essential for these changes in B cell morphology. Rap activation was important for B cell receptor (BCR)- and lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-induced spreading, for BCR-induced immune-synapse formation, and for particulate BCR ligands to induce localized F-actin assembly and membrane-process extension. Rap activation and F-actin assembly were also required for optimal BCR signaling in response to particulate antigens but not soluble antigens. Thus by controlling B cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization, Rap might play a key role in the activation of B cells by particulate and cell-associated antigens.

  4. Foxp3(+) T cells regulate immunoglobulin a selection and facilitate diversification of bacterial species responsible for immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Shimpei; Maruya, Mikako; Kato, Lucia M; Suda, Wataru; Atarashi, Koji; Doi, Yasuko; Tsutsui, Yumi; Qin, Hongyan; Honda, Kenya; Okada, Takaharu; Hattori, Masahira; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2014-07-17

    Foxp3(+) T cells play a critical role for the maintenance of immune tolerance. Here we show that in mice, Foxp3(+) T cells contributed to diversification of gut microbiota, particularly of species belonging to Firmicutes. The control of indigenous bacteria by Foxp3(+) T cells involved regulatory functions both outside and inside germinal centers (GCs), consisting of suppression of inflammation and regulation of immunoglobulin A (IgA) selection in Peyer's patches, respectively. Diversified and selected IgAs contributed to maintenance of diversified and balanced microbiota, which in turn facilitated the expansion of Foxp3(+) T cells, induction of GCs, and IgA responses in the gut through a symbiotic regulatory loop. Thus, the adaptive immune system, through cellular and molecular components that are required for immune tolerance and through the diversification as well as selection of antibody repertoire, mediates host-microbial symbiosis by controlling the richness and balance of bacterial communities required for homeostasis.

  5. MYC in Regulating Immunity: Metabolism and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaprakasam, J.N. Rashida; Wang, Ruoning

    2017-01-01

    Myelocytomatosis oncogene (MYC) family members, including cellular MYC (c-Myc), neuroblastoma derived MYC (MYCN), and lung carcinoma derived MYC (MYCL), have all been implicated as key oncogenic drivers in a broad range of human cancers. Beyond cancer, MYC plays an important role in other physiological and pathological processes, namely immunity and immunological diseases. MYC largely functions as a transcription factor that promotes the expression of numerous target genes to coordinate death, proliferation, and metabolism at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. It has been shown that the expression of MYC family members is tightly regulated in immune cells during development or upon immune stimulations. Emerging evidence suggests that MYC family members play essential roles in regulating the development, differentiation and activation of immune cells. Through driving the expression of a broad range of metabolic genes in immune cells, MYC family members coordinate metabolic programs to support immune functions. Here, we discuss our understanding of MYC biology in immune system and how modulation of MYC impacts immune metabolism and responses. PMID:28245597

  6. Regulation of immune responses to protein therapeutics by transplacental induction of T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nimesh; Culina, Slobodan; Meslier, Yann; Dimitrov, Jordan; Arnoult, Christophe; Delignat, Sandrine; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Lecerf, Maxime; Justesen, Sune; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Salomon, Benoit L; Scott, David W; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Mallone, Roberto; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2015-02-18

    Central tolerance plays a key role in modulating immune responses to self and exogenous antigens. The absence of self-antigen expression, as in patients with genetic deficiencies, prevents the development of antigen-specific immune tolerance. Hence, a substantial number of patients develop neutralizing antibodies to the corresponding protein therapeutics after replacement treatment. In this context, the administration of missing antigens during fetal development, a key period for self-tolerance establishment, should confer early and long-lasting antigen-specific tolerance. To this end, we exploited the physiological pathway of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) through which maternal immunoglobulins are transplacentally transferred to fetuses. We demonstrate that Fc-fused antigens administered to pregnant mice reach fetal lymphoid organs in an FcRn-dependent manner, accumulate in antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, and promote the generation of both thymic and peripheral antigen-specific regulatory T cells. This strategy was successfully pursued in a mouse model of hemophilia A, where maternofetal transfer of the Fc-fused immunodominant domains of coagulation factor VIII conferred antigen-specific tolerance. Transplacental tolerance induction with Fc-fused proteins may thus prove valuable to prevent alloimmunization after replacement protein therapy for congenital deficiencies.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 Vpr induces differential regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules: Direct effect of Vpr on T cell activation and immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachari, Narasimhan J.; Majumder, Biswanath; Ayyavoo, Velpandi . E-mail: velpandi@pitt.edu

    2007-02-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral proteins disrupt the normal host cellular immune pathways thus exploiting the cellular machinery for replication, survival and to escape host immune attack. Here we evaluated the direct effects of HIV-1 Vpr-mediated immune modulation of infected T cells. Vpr specifically downregulated the expression of CD28 and increased the expression of CTLA-4, whereas no significant difference in the expression of CD25 and HLA-DR was observed. Interferon gamma (IFN-{gamma}) production in T cells was evaluated as a measure of the downstream effector functions. Results indicate that Vpr significantly inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and this may, in part, due to Vpr's ability to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and its transcriptional regulation. Together these results support that HIV-1 Vpr selectively dysregulates the immune functions at multiple levels and exerts its inhibitory effects in the presence of other viral proteins.

  8. Environmental Enrichment Stimulates Immune Cell Secretion of Exosomes That Promote CNS Myelination and May Regulate Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) consists of increased physical, intellectual and social activity, and has wide-ranging effects, including enhancing cognition, learning and memory, and motor coordination. Animal studies have demonstrated that EE improves outcome of brain trauma and neurodegenerative disorders, including demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis, making it a promising therapeutic option. However, the complexity of applying a robust EE paradigm makes clinical use difficult. A better understanding of the signaling involved in EE-based neuroprotection may allow for development of effective mimetics as an alternative. In prior work, we found that exosomes isolated from the serum of rats exposed to EE impact CNS myelination. Exosomes are naturally occurring nanovesicles containing mRNA, miRNA, and protein, which play important roles in cell function, disease, and immunomodulation. When applied to hippocampal slice cultures or nasally administered to naïve rats, EE serum exosomes significantly increase myelin content, oligodendrocyte precursor (OPC) and neural stem cell levels, and reduce oxidative stress. We found that rat EE exosomes were enriched in miR-219, which is necessary and sufficient for OPC differentiation into myelinating cells. Thus, peripherally produced exosomes may be a useful therapy for remyelination. Here, we aim to better characterize the impact of EE on CNS health and to determine the cellular source of nutritive exosomes found in serum. We found that exosomes isolated from various circulating immune cell types all increased slice culture myelin content, contained miR-219, and reduced oxidative stress, suggesting that EE globally alters immune function in a way that supports brain health. PMID:26993508

  9. [Exosomes and Immune Cells].

    PubMed

    Seo, Naohiro

    2017-05-01

    In addition to the cytokines and cytotoxic granules, exosomes have been known as the intercellular communicator and cytotoxic missile of immune cells for the past decade. It has been well known that mature dendritic cell(DC)-derived exosomes participate in the T cell and natural killer(NK)cell activation, while immature DCs secrete tolerogenic exosomes for regulatory T(Treg)cell generation. Treg cell-derived EVs act as a suppressor against pathogenic type-1 T helper(Th1)cell responses. CD8+ T cells produce tumoricidal exosomes for preventing tumor invasion and metastasis transiently after T cell receptor(TCR)-mediated stimulation. Thus, immune cells produce functional exosomes in the activation state- and/or differentiation stage-dependent manner. In this review, the role of immune cell-derived exosomes will be introduced, focusing mainly on immune reaction against tumor.

  10. Semaphorin7A and its receptors: pleiotropic regulators of immune cell function, bone homeostasis, and neural development.

    PubMed

    Jongbloets, Bart C; Ramakers, Geert M J; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    Semaphorins form a large, evolutionary conserved family of cellular guidance signals. The semaphorin family contains several secreted and transmembrane proteins, but only one GPI-anchored member, Semaphorin7A (Sema7A). Although originally identified in immune cells, as CDw108, Sema7A displays widespread expression outside the immune system. It is therefore not surprising that accumulating evidence supports roles for this protein in a wide variety of biological processes in different organ systems and in disease. Well-characterized biological effects of Sema7A include those during bone and immune cell regulation, neuron migration and neurite growth. These effects are mediated by two receptors, plexinC1 and integrins. However, most of what is known today about Sema7A signaling concerns Sema7A-integrin interactions. Here, we review our current knowledge of Sema7A function and signaling in different organ systems, highlighting commonalities between the cellular effects and signaling pathways activated by Sema7A in different cell types. Furthermore, we discuss a potential role for Sema7A in disease and provide directions for further research.

  11. Immune tolerance induced by intravenous transfer of immature dendritic cells via up-regulating numbers of suppressive IL-10(+) IFN-γ(+)-producing CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Ciric, Bogoljub; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2013-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate immunity and immune tolerance in vivo. However, the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intravenous (i.v.) transfer of bone marrow-derived DCs pulsed with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide blocks the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6J mice. i.v. transfer of MOG-pulsed DCs leads to the down-regulation of the production of IL-17A and IFN-γ and up-regulation of IL-10 secretion. The development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is facilitated via up-regulation of FoxP3 expression and production of IL-10. The number of suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells is also improved. The expression of OX40, CD154, and CD28 is down-regulated, but the expression of CD152, CD80, PD-1, ICOS, and BTLA is up-regulated on CD4(+) T cells after i.v. transfer of immature DCs. The expression of CCR4, CCR5, and CCR7 on CD4(+) T cells is also improved. Our results suggest that immature DCs may induce tolerance via facilitating the development of CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs and suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells in vivo.

  12. β-Glucan Size Controls Dectin-1-Mediated Immune Responses in Human Dendritic Cells by Regulating IL-1β Production

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Matthew J.; Webster, Steve J.; Chee, Ronnie; Williams, David L.; Hill Gaston, J. S.; Goodall, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    Dectin-1/CLEC7A is a pattern recognition receptor that recognizes β-1,3 glucans, and its stimulation initiates signaling events characterized by the production of inflammatory cytokines from human dendritic cells (DCs) required for antifungal immunity. β-glucans differ greatly in size, structure, and ability to activate effector immune responses from DC; as such, small particulate β-glucans are thought to be poor activators of innate immunity. We show that β-glucan particle size is a critical factor contributing to the secretion of cytokines from human DC; large β-glucan-stimulated DC generate significantly more IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 compared to those stimulated with the smaller β-glucans. In marked contrast, the secretion of TSLP and CCL22 were found to be insensitive to β-glucan particle size. Furthermore, we show that the capacity to induce phagocytosis, and the relative IL-1β production determined by β-glucan size, regulates the composition of the cytokine milieu generated from DC. This suggests that β-glucan particle size is critically important in orchestrating the nature of the immune response to fungi. PMID:28736555

  13. Selective elimination of idiotype-binding cells in vivo by a drug-idiotype conjugate demonstrates the functional significance of these cells in immune regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hadid, M M; Bankert, R B; Mayers, G L

    1988-01-01

    A receptor-specific cytotoxic drug delivery system has been used to eliminate idiotype-binding cells in vivo to ascertain the possible functional significance of these cells in regulating the humoral immune response to dextran. Protein M104E, a mouse myeloma protein that binds dextran, expresses a private idiotope that is present on a significant proportion of the normal dextran-specific antibody repertoire. Immunocompetent cells that bind and internalize M104E idiotype-bearing molecules were eliminated by the intravenous administration of a single dose of cytosine arabinonucleoside conjugated to purified M104E protein. The administration of this cytotoxic drug-idiotype conjugate had a profound effect upon the expression of the M104E idiotype in euthymic but not in athymic BALB/c mice following immunization with dextran. In euthymic mice, the depletion of the idiotype-binding cells resulted in a marked elevation in the level of M104E idiotype present in the immune sera. Moreover, treated but not control mice developed idiotype-positive molecules that did not bind dextran. These results demonstrate the functional significance of idiotype-binding cells in the regulation of individual clonotypes during an immune response. PMID:2453882

  14. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif-bearing receptors regulate the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-induced activation of immune competent cells.

    PubMed

    Gergely, J; Pecht, I; Sármay, G

    1999-05-03

    ITIM-bearing receptors, a family which only recently has been recognized, play a key role in the regulation of the ITAM-induced activation of immune competent cells. The mechanism of ITM-mediated regulation in various cells was recently clarified. The present review focuses on ITIM bearing membrane proteins that negatively regulate the activation of cells when co-crosslinked with ITAM containing receptors, illustrates the inhibitory processes by the negative regulation of B-, NK-, T-cells and mast cells and summarizes current views on the mechanism of ITIM-mediated inhibition.

  15. Adrenergic regulation of innate immunity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Scanzano, Angela; Cosentino, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system has a major role in the brain-immune cross-talk, but few information exist on the sympathoadrenergic regulation of innate immune system. The aim of this review is to summarize available knowledge regarding the sympathetic modulation of the innate immune response, providing a rational background for the possible repurposing of adrenergic drugs as immunomodulating agents. The cells of immune system express adrenoceptors (AR), which represent the target for noradrenaline and adrenaline. In human neutrophils, adrenaline and noradrenaline inhibit migration, CD11b/CD18 expression, and oxidative metabolism, possibly through β-AR, although the role of α1- and α2-AR requires further investigation. Natural Killer express β-AR, which are usually inhibitory. Monocytes express β-AR and their activation is usually antiinflammatory. On murine Dentritic cells (DC), β-AR mediate sympathetic influence on DC-T cells interactions. In human DC β2-AR may affect Th1/2 differentiation of CD4+ T cells. In microglia and in astrocytes, β2-AR dysregulation may contribute to neuroinflammation in autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease. In conclusion, extensive evidence supports a critical role for adrenergic mechanisms in the regulation of innate immunity, in peripheral tissues as well as in the CNS. Sympathoadrenergic pathways in the innate immune system may represent novel antiinflammatory and immunomodulating targets with significant therapeutic potential. PMID:26321956

  16. Expression and regulation of immune-modulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by human airway epithelial cells and its effect on T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Herb F.; Knox, Alan; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the degradation of tryptophan, which plays a critical role in immune suppression through regulating the production of a series of metabolites that are generally referred to as kynurenines. It has become increasingly clear that epithelial cells (ECs) play an active role in maintaining lung homeostasis by modulating the function of immune cells via producing cytokines, chemokines, and anti-microbial mediators. In this study we assessed the regulation of IDO activity and expression in human primary ECs and EC lines under steady state conditions and in response to bacterial and allergenic stimuli. We also investigated the potential immune modulatory functions of IDO expression in human airway ECs. Our data clearly show that airway ECs produce IDO, which is down-regulated in response to allergens and TLR ligands while up-regulated in response to IFN-γ. Using gene silencing, we further demonstrate that IDO plays a key role in the EC-mediated suppression of antigen-specific and polyclonal proliferation of T cells. Interestingly, our data also show that ECs lose their inhibitory effect on T cell activation in response to different TLR agonists mimicking bacterial or viral infections. In conclusion, our work provides an understanding of how IDO is regulated in ECs as well as demonstrates that “resting” ECs can suppress T cell activation in an IDO dependent manner. These data provide new insight into how ECs, through the production of IDO, can influence downstream innate and adaptive responses as part of their function in maintaining immune homeostasis in the airways. PMID:27613847

  17. Immunomodulation in host-protective immune response against murine tuberculosis through regulation of the T regulatory cell function.

    PubMed

    Das, Shibali; Halder, Kuntal; Goswami, Avranil; Chowdhury, Bidisha Paul; Pal, Nishith K; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is characterized by an infection in lung and spleen. In the present study, we have elucidated the mechanism by which Mycobacterium indicus pranii renders protection in in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We observed that Mycobacterium indicus pranii treated infected C57BL/6 mice showed a strong host-protective Th1 immune response along with a marked decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines, TGF-β, and IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T cells. This Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines was correlated with the reduction in the elevated frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells, along with the reduced TGF-β production from these T regulatory cells in tuberculosis-infected mice. This reduction in the T regulatory cell population was a result of effective modulation of STAT4-STAT5 transcription factor counter-regulation by Mycobacterium indicus pranii, which in turn, reduced the immunosuppressive activity of T regulatory cells. Thus, these findings put forward a detailed mechanistic insight into Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated regulation of the T regulatory cell functioning during experimental murine tuberculosis, which might be helpful in combating Mycobacterium-induced pathogenesis.

  18. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy.

    PubMed

    van de Laar, Lianne; Coffer, Paul J; Woltman, Andrea M

    2012-04-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as tolerogenic immune responses. Because of their limited lifespan, continuous replenishment of DC is required. Whereas the importance of GM-CSF in regulating DC homeostasis has long been underestimated, this cytokine is currently considered a critical factor for DC development under both steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Regulation of cellular actions by GM-CSF depends on the activation of intracellular signaling modules, including JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and canonical NF-κB. By directing the activity of transcription factors and other cellular effector proteins, these pathways influence differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of uncommitted hematopoietic progenitors, and DC subset-specific precursors, thereby contributing to specific aspects of DC subset development. The specific intracellular events resulting from GM-CSF-induced signaling provide a molecular explanation for GM-CSF-dependent subset distribution as well as clues to the specific characteristics and functions of GM-CSF-differentiated DCs compared with DCs generated by fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand. This knowledge can be used to identify therapeutic targets to improve GM-CSF-dependent DC-based strategies to regulate immunity.

  19. Regulation of Immune Cell Infiltration into the CNS by Regional Neural Inputs Explained by the Gate Theory

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Lavannya; Yamada, Moe; Bando, Hidenori; Ogura, Hideki; Atsumi, Toru

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immune-privileged environment protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists of specific endothelial cells that are brought together by tight junctions and tight liner sheets formed by pericytes and astrocytic end-feet. Despite the BBB, various immune and tumor cells can infiltrate the CNS parenchyma, as seen in several autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS), cancer metastasis, and virus infections. Aside from a mechanical disruption of the BBB like trauma, how and where these cells enter and accumulate in the CNS from the blood is a matter of debate. Recently, using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, we found a “gateway” at the fifth lumber cord where pathogenic autoreactive CD4+ T cells can cross the BBB. Interestingly, this gateway is regulated by regional neural stimulations that can be mechanistically explained by the gate theory. In this review, we also discuss this theory and its potential for treating human diseases. PMID:23990699

  20. Regulation of immune cell infiltration into the CNS by regional neural inputs explained by the gate theory.

    PubMed

    Arima, Yasunobu; Kamimura, Daisuke; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Yamada, Moe; Bando, Hidenori; Ogura, Hideki; Atsumi, Toru; Murakami, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immune-privileged environment protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists of specific endothelial cells that are brought together by tight junctions and tight liner sheets formed by pericytes and astrocytic end-feet. Despite the BBB, various immune and tumor cells can infiltrate the CNS parenchyma, as seen in several autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS), cancer metastasis, and virus infections. Aside from a mechanical disruption of the BBB like trauma, how and where these cells enter and accumulate in the CNS from the blood is a matter of debate. Recently, using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, we found a "gateway" at the fifth lumber cord where pathogenic autoreactive CD4+ T cells can cross the BBB. Interestingly, this gateway is regulated by regional neural stimulations that can be mechanistically explained by the gate theory. In this review, we also discuss this theory and its potential for treating human diseases.

  1. A novel "complement-metabolism-inflammasome axis" as a key regulator of immune cell effector function.

    PubMed

    Arbore, Giuseppina; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that induce and regulate the generation of the key pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in response to infectious microbes and cellular stress. The activation of inflammasomes involves several upstream signals including classic pattern or danger recognition systems such as the TLRs. Recently, however, the activation of complement receptors, such as the anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors and the complement regulator CD46, in conjunction with the sensing of cell metabolic changes, for instance increased amino acid influx and glycolysis (via mTORC1), have emerged as additional critical activators of the inflammasome. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge about complement-mediated inflammasome activation, with a specific focus on a novel "complement - metabolism - NLRP3 inflammasome axis."

  2. Cytochrome P450s in human immune cells regulate IL-22 and c-Kit via an AHR feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Effner, Renate; Hiller, Julia; Eyerich, Stefanie; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Brockow, Knut; Triggiani, Massimo; Behrendt, Heidrun; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B.; Buters, Jeroen T. M.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms how environmental compounds influence the human immune system are unknown. The environmentally sensitive transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has immune-modulating functions and responds to small molecules. Cytochrome P4501 enzymes (CYP1) act downstream of the AHR and metabolize small molecules. However, it is currently unknown whether CYP1 activity is relevant for immune modulation. We studied the interdependence of CYP1 and AHR in human primary immune cells using pharmacological methods. CYP1 inhibition increased the expression levels of the stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) and interleukin (IL)-22 but decreased IL-17. Single cell analyses showed that CYP1 inhibition especially promoted CD4+ helper T (Th) cells that co-express c-Kit and IL-22 simultaneously. The addition of an AHR antagonist reversed all these effects. In addition to T cells, we screened other human immune cells for CYP and found cell-specific fingerprints, suggesting that similar mechanisms are present in multiple immune cells. We describe a feedback loop yet unknown in human immune cells where CYP1 inhibition resulted in an altered AHR-dependent immune response. This mechanism relates CYP1-dependent metabolism of environmental small molecules to human immunity. PMID:28276465

  3. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  4. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  5. Rb/E2F1 Regulates the Innate Immune Receptor Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Manabu; Suico, Mary Ann; Koyama, Kosuke; Komatsu, Kensei; Miyakita, Rui; Matsumoto, Chizuru; Kudo, Eriko; Kariya, Ryusho; Goto, Hiroki; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Chiaki; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes regulate the antiviral host defense through molecular mechanisms that are not yet well explored. Here, we show that the tumor suppressor retinoblastoma (Rb) protein positively regulates Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expression, the sensing receptor for viral double-stranded RNA and poly(I·C). TLR3 expression was lower in Rb knockout (Rb−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and in mammalian epithelial cells transfected with Rb small-interfering RNA (siRNA) than in control cells. Consequently, induction of cytokines interleukin-8 and beta interferon after poly(I·C) stimulation was impaired in Rb−/− MEF and Rb siRNA-transfected cells compared to controls. TLR3 promoter analysis showed that Rb modulates the transcription factor E2F1, which directly binds to the proximal promoter of TLR3. Exogenous addition of E2F1 decreased TLR3 promoter activity, while Rb dose dependently curbed the effect of E2F1. Interestingly, poly(I·C) increased the Rb expression, and the poly(I·C)-induced TLR3 expression was impaired in Rb-depleted cells, suggesting the importance of Rb in TLR3 induction by poly(I·C). Together, these data indicated that E2F1 suppresses TLR3 transcription, but during immune stimulation, Rb is upregulated to block the inhibitory effect of E2F1 on TLR3, highlighting a role of Rb-E2F1 axis in the innate immune response in epithelial cells. PMID:22310660

  6. Innate immune control and regulation of influenza virus infections

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Jodi; Heusel, Jonathan W.; Legge, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses are critical for the control and clearance of influenza A virus (IAV) infection. However, in recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that innate immune cells, including natural killer cells, alveolar macrophages (aMφ), and dendritic cells (DC) are essential following IAV infection in the direct control of viral replication or in the induction and regulation of virus-specific adaptive immune responses. This review will discuss the role of these innate immune cells following IAV infection, with a particular focus on DC and their ability to induce and regulate the adaptive IAV-specific immune response. PMID:19643736

  7. Regulation of T Cell Immunity in Atopic Dermatitis by Microbes: The Yin and Yang of Cutaneous Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Tilo; Skabytska, Yuliya; Kaesler, Susanne; Volz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease predominantly mediated by T helper cells. While numerous adaptive immune mechanisms in AD pathophysiology have been elucidated in detail, deciphering the impact of innate immunity in AD pathogenesis has made substantial progress in recent years and is currently a fast evolving field. As innate and adaptive immunity are intimately linked, cross-talks between these two branches of the immune system are critically influencing the resulting immune response and disease. Innate immune recognition of the cutaneous microbiota was identified to substantially contribute to immune homeostasis and shaping of protective adaptive immunity in the absence of inflammation. Disturbances in the composition of the skin microbiome with reduced microbial diversity and overabundance of Staphylococcus spp. have been shown to be associated with AD inflammation. Distinct Staphylococcus aureus associated microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) binding to TLR2 heterodimers could be identified to initiate long-lasting cutaneous inflammation driven by T helper cells and consecutively local immune suppression by induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells further favoring secondary skin infections as often seen in AD patients. Moreover dissecting cellular and molecular mechanisms in cutaneous innate immune sensing in AD pathogenesis paved the way for exploiting regulatory and anti-inflammatory pathways to attenuate skin inflammation. Activation of the innate immune system by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria on AD skin alleviated cutaneous inflammation. The induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells, interleukin-10 expression and regulatory Tr1 cells were shown to mediate this beneficial effect. Thus, activation of innate immunity by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria for induction of regulatory T cell phenotypes seems to be a promising strategy for treatment of inflammatory skin disorders such as AD. These new findings

  8. Huangqin-tang ameliorates dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis by regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying; Lin, Jiantao; Li, Wenyang; Wu, Zhuguo; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Guoliang; Wang, Jian; Ye, Caiguo; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Ding, Congcong; Zheng, Xuebao; Chi, Honggang

    2016-12-16

    Huangqin-tang (HQT) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula widely used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in China. However, the molecular mechanisms by which HQT protects the colon are unclear. We studied the protective effects of HQT and the underlying mechanisms in an experimental mouse model and in vitro. In vivo, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced acute and chronic colitis were significantly ameliorated by HQT as gauged by phenotypic, histopathologic and inflammatory manifestations of the disease. Mechanistically, DSS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling was inhibited by HQT. Moreover, HQT-treated mice demonstrated significant changes in cell apoptosis, expression of apoptosis-associated genes such as caspase-3, bax, bcl-2, and intestinal permeability. HQT also increased occluding and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), inhibited cell proliferation (Ki67), and increased regulatory T cells numbers, protein expression of Foxp3 and IL-10 in the colonic tissue. In vitro, HQT down-regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and supressed the NF-κB signalling pathway in lipopolysaccharides-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our study suggests that HQT plays a critical role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response in colitis and offers novel therapeutic options in the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Huangqin-tang ameliorates dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis by regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ying; Lin, Jiantao; Li, Wenyang; Wu, Zhuguo; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Guoliang; Wang, Jian; Ye, Caiguo; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Ding, Congcong; Zheng, Xuebao; Chi, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Huangqin-tang (HQT) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula widely used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in China. However, the molecular mechanisms by which HQT protects the colon are unclear. We studied the protective effects of HQT and the underlying mechanisms in an experimental mouse model and in vitro. In vivo, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced acute and chronic colitis were significantly ameliorated by HQT as gauged by phenotypic, histopathologic and inflammatory manifestations of the disease. Mechanistically, DSS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling was inhibited by HQT. Moreover, HQT-treated mice demonstrated significant changes in cell apoptosis, expression of apoptosis-associated genes such as caspase-3, bax, bcl-2, and intestinal permeability. HQT also increased occluding and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), inhibited cell proliferation (Ki67), and increased regulatory T cells numbers, protein expression of Foxp3 and IL-10 in the colonic tissue. In vitro, HQT down-regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and supressed the NF-κB signalling pathway in lipopolysaccharides-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our study suggests that HQT plays a critical role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response in colitis and offers novel therapeutic options in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27982094

  10. Differences in the regulation of CD4 and CD8 T-cell clones during immune responses.

    PubMed Central

    Beverley, P C; Maini, M K

    2000-01-01

    The functional units of immune response are lymphocyte clones. Analysis of lymphocyte life span in vivo shows that the overall turnover of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes does not differ greatly. Recently, molecular methods have been developed which allow a global analysis of T-cell clones responding to an antigen in vivo. We have used a sensitive, modified heteroduplex analysis to follow T-cell clones responding to Epstein-Barr virus in acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM). Strikingly, all the many large clones detected in freshly isolated AIM blood were found within the CD8 fraction. CD4 clonal populations responding to the soluble recall antigen tetanus toxoid could only be detected after in vitro re-stimulation. These data imply that CD4 responses may be more polyclonal than those of CD8 cells and that the size of CD4 clones is more tightly regulated. Several molecular mechanisms may contribute to this. Up-regulation of telomerase allows very large expansions of CD8 cells to occur without exhaustion of proliferative capacity. PMID:10794061

  11. Immune Regulation and Antitumor Effect of TIM-1

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Xiong, Ruihua; Li, Xiaodong; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    T cells play an important role in antitumor immunity, and the T cell immunoglobulin domain and the mucin domain protein-1 (TIM-1) on its surface, as a costimulatory molecule, has a strong regulatory effect on T cells. TIM-1 can regulate and enhance type 1 immune response of tumor association. Therefore, TIM-1 costimulatory pathways may be a promising therapeutic target in future tumor immunotherapy. This review describes the immune regulation and antitumor effect of TIM-1. PMID:27413764

  12. Identification of genes expressed by immune cells of the colon that are regulated by colorectal cancer-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Peltekova, Vanya D; Lemire, Mathieu; Qazi, Aamer M; Zaidi, Syed H E; Trinh, Quang M; Bielecki, Ryszard; Rogers, Marianne; Hodgson, Lyndsey; Wang, Mike; D'Souza, David J A; Zandi, Sasan; Chong, Taryne; Kwan, Jennifer Y Y; Kozak, Krystian; De Borja, Richard; Timms, Lee; Rangrej, Jagadish; Volar, Milica; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; Beck, Timothy; Ash, Colleen; Lee, Shawna; Wang, Jianxin; Boutros, Paul C; Stein, Lincoln D; Dick, John E; Gryfe, Robert; McPherson, John D; Zanke, Brent W; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Hudson, Thomas J

    2014-05-15

    A locus on human chromosome 11q23 tagged by marker rs3802842 was associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in a genome-wide association study; this finding has been replicated in case-control studies worldwide. In order to identify biologic factors at this locus that are related to the etiopathology of CRC, we used microarray-based target selection methods, coupled to next-generation sequencing, to study 103 kb at the 11q23 locus. We genotyped 369 putative variants from 1,030 patients with CRC (cases) and 1,061 individuals without CRC (controls) from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry. Two previously uncharacterized genes, COLCA1 and COLCA2, were found to be co-regulated genes that are transcribed from opposite strands. Expression levels of COLCA1 and COLCA2 transcripts correlate with rs3802842 genotypes. In colon tissues, COLCA1 co-localizes with crystalloid granules of eosinophils and granular organelles of mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells and differentiated myeloid-derived cell lines. COLCA2 is present in the cytoplasm of normal epithelial, immune and other cell lineages, as well as tumor cells. Tissue microarray analysis demonstrates the association of rs3802842 with lymphocyte density in the lamina propria (p = 0.014) and levels of COLCA1 in the lamina propria (p = 0.00016) and COLCA2 (tumor cells, p = 0.0041 and lamina propria, p = 6 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, genetic, expression and immunohistochemical data implicate COLCA1 and COLCA2 in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Histologic analyses indicate the involvement of immune pathways.

  13. CD103 or LFA-1 engagement at the immune synapse between cytotoxic T cells and tumor cells promotes maturation and regulates T-cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Boutet, Marie; Vergnon, Isabelle; Schmitt, Alain; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2013-01-15

    T-cell adhesion/costimulatory molecules and their cognate receptors on target cells play a major role in T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activities. Here, we compared the involvement of CD103 and LFA-1, and their respective ligands, in the maturation of the cytotoxic immune synapse (cIS) and in the activation of CTL effector functions. Our results indicate that cytotoxicity toward cancer cells and, to a lesser extent, cytokine production by specific CTL require, together with TCR engagement, the interaction of either CD103 with E-cadherin or LFA-1 with ICAM-1. Flow-based adhesion assay showed that engagement of CD103 or LFA-1, together with TCR, enhances the strength of the T-cell/target cell interaction. Moreover, electron microscopic analyses showed that integrin-dependent mature cIS (mcIS) displays a cohesive ultrastructure, with tight membrane contacts separated by extensive clefts. In contrast, immature cIS (icIS), which is unable to trigger target cell lysis, is loose, with multiple protrusions in the effector cell membrane. Experiments using confocal microscopy revealed polarized cytokine release and degranulation at the mcIS associated with target cell killing, whereas icIS is characterized by failure of IFN-γ and granzyme B relocalization. Thus, interactive forces between CTL and epithelial tumor cells, mainly regulated by integrin engagement, correlate with maturity and the ultrastructure of the cIS and influence CTL effector functions. These results provide new insights into molecular mechanisms regulating antitumor CTL responses and may lead to the development of more efficient cancer immunotherapy strategies.

  14. RNA-seq Analysis of δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-treated T Cells Reveals Altered Gene Expression Profiles That Regulate Immune Response and Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoming; Bam, Marpe; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana has drawn significant public attention and concern both for its medicinal and recreational use. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the main bioactive component in marijuana, has also been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties by virtue of its ability to activate cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB-2) expressed on immune cells. In this study, we used RNA-seq to quantify the transcriptomes and transcript variants that are differentially regulated by THC in super antigen-activated lymph node cells and CD4+ T cells. We found that the expressions of many transcripts were altered by THC in both total lymph node cells and CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the abundance of many miRNA precursors and long non-coding RNAs was dramatically altered in THC-treated mice. For example, the expression of miR-17/92 cluster and miR-374b/421 cluster was down-regulated by THC. On the other hand miR-146a, which has been shown to induce apoptosis, was up-regulated by THC. Long non-coding RNAs that are expressed from the opposite strand of CD27 and Appbp2 were induced by THC. In addition, THC treatment also caused alternative promoter usage and splicing. The functions of those altered transcripts were mainly related to immune response and cell proliferation. PMID:27268054

  15. Stem Cell Therapies for Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Immune Privilege Reinforcement by Fas/FasL Regulating Machinery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi-Jiao; Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    As a main contributing factor to low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the fundamental basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. The pros and cons of current treatment modalities necessitate biological treatment strategies targeting for reversing or altering the degeneration process in terms of molecules or genes. The advances in stem cell research facilitate the studies aiming for possible clinical application of stem cell therapies for IDD. Human NP cells are versatile with cell morphology full of variety, capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix components, engulfing substances by autophagy and phagocytosis, mitochondrial vacuolization indicating dysfunction, expressing Fas and FasL as significant omens of immune privileged sites. Human discs belong to immune privilege organs with functional FasL expression, which can interact with invasive immune cells by Fas-FasL regulatory machinery. IDD is characterized by decreased expression level of FasL with dysfunctional FasL, which in turn unbalances the interaction between NP cells and immune cells. Certain modulation factors might play a role in the process, such as miR-155. Accumulating evidence indicates that Fas-FasL network expresses in a variety of stem cells. Given the expression of functional FasL and insensitive Fas in stem cells (we term as FasL privilege), transplantation of stem cells into the disc may regenerate the degenerative disc by not only differentiating into NP-like cells, increasing extracellular matrix, but also reinforce immune privilege via interaction with immune cells by Fas-FasL network.

  16. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Kumar, Narender; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C; Kwon, Ashley; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  18. The small GTPase Rab8 interacts with VAMP-3 to regulate the delivery of recycling T-cell receptors to the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Galgano, Donatella; Cassioli, Chiara; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Pazour, Gregory J; Baldari, Cosima T

    2015-07-15

    IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, regulates immune synapse assembly in the non-ciliated T-cell by promoting T-cell receptor (TCR) recycling. Here, we have addressed the role of Rab8 (for which there are two isoforms Rab8a and Rab8b), a small GTPase implicated in ciliogenesis, in TCR traffic to the immune synapse. We show that Rab8, which colocalizes with IFT20 in Rab11(+) endosomes, is required for TCR recycling. Interestingly, as opposed to in IFT20-deficient T-cells, TCR(+) endosomes polarized normally beneath the immune synapse membrane in the presence of dominant-negative Rab8, but were unable to undergo the final docking or fusion step. This could be accounted for by the inability of the vesicular (v)-SNARE VAMP-3 to cluster at the immune synapse in the absence of functional Rab8, which is responsible for its recruitment. Of note, and similar to in T-cells, VAMP-3 interacts with Rab8 at the base of the cilium in NIH-3T3 cells, where it regulates ciliary growth and targeting of the protein smoothened. The results identify Rab8 as a new player in vesicular traffic to the immune synapse and provide insight into the pathways co-opted by different cell types for immune synapse assembly and ciliogenesis.

  19. The small GTPase Rab8 interacts with VAMP-3 to regulate the delivery of recycling T-cell receptors to the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Galgano, Donatella; Cassioli, Chiara; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Pazour, Gregory J.; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, regulates immune synapse assembly in the non-ciliated T-cell by promoting T-cell receptor (TCR) recycling. Here, we have addressed the role of Rab8 (for which there are two isoforms Rab8a and Rab8b), a small GTPase implicated in ciliogenesis, in TCR traffic to the immune synapse. We show that Rab8, which colocalizes with IFT20 in Rab11+ endosomes, is required for TCR recycling. Interestingly, as opposed to in IFT20-deficient T-cells, TCR+ endosomes polarized normally beneath the immune synapse membrane in the presence of dominant-negative Rab8, but were unable to undergo the final docking or fusion step. This could be accounted for by the inability of the vesicular (v)-SNARE VAMP-3 to cluster at the immune synapse in the absence of functional Rab8, which is responsible for its recruitment. Of note, and similar to in T-cells, VAMP-3 interacts with Rab8 at the base of the cilium in NIH-3T3 cells, where it regulates ciliary growth and targeting of the protein smoothened. The results identify Rab8 as a new player in vesicular traffic to the immune synapse and provide insight into the pathways co-opted by different cell types for immune synapse assembly and ciliogenesis. PMID:26034069

  20. Clinical relevance of miR-mediated HLA-G regulation and the associated immune cell infiltration in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jasinski-Bergner, Simon; Stoehr, Christine; Bukur, Juergen; Massa, Chiara; Braun, Juliane; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Spath, Verena; Wartenberg, Roland; Legal, Wolfgang; Taubert, Helge; Wach, Sven; Wullich, Bernd; Hartmann, Arndt; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In human tumors of distinct origin including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the non-classical human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is frequently expressed, thereby inhibiting the cytotoxic activity of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Recent studies demonstrated a strong post-transcriptional gene regulation of the HLA-G by miR-152, −148A, −148B and −133A. Standard methods were applied to characterize the expression and function of HLA-G, HLA-G-regulatory microRNAs (miRs) and the immune cell infiltration in 453 RCC lesions using a tissue microarray and five RCC cell lines linking these results to clinical parameters. Direct interactions with HLA-G regulatory miRs and the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (UTR) were detected and the affinities of these different miRs to the HLA-G 3′-UTR compared. qPCR analyses and immunohistochemical staining revealed an inverse expression of miR-148A and −133A with the HLA-G protein in situ and in vitro. Stable miR overexpression caused a downregulation of HLA-G protein enhancing the NK and LAK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in in vitro CD107a activation assays revealing a HLA-G-dependent cytotoxic activity of immune effector cells. A significant higher frequency of CD3+/CD8+ T cell lymphocytes, but no differences in the activation markers CD69, CD25 or in the presence of CD56+, FoxP3+ and CD4+ immune cells were detected in HLA-G+ compared to HLA-G− RCC lesions. This could be associated with higher WHO grade, but not with a disease-specific survival. These data suggest a miR-mediated control of HLA-G expression in RCC, which is associated with a distinct pattern of immune cell infiltration. PMID:26155421

  1. Oxidative stress regulates expression of VEGFR1 in myeloid cells: link to tumor-induced immune suppression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kübler, Hubert; Tseng, Timothy; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Su, Zhen; Kaliberov, Sergei; Heiser, Axel; Rosser, Charles; Dahm, Philip; Siemann, Dietmar; Vieweg, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associates with overproduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) due to the mutation/inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. Herein we demonstrate that implantation of human RCC tumor cells into athymic nude mice promotes the appearance of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1)/CD11b double-positive myeloid cells in peripheral blood. Avastin-mediated VEGF neutralization was capable of significantly reducing the numbers of circulating VEGFR1+ myeloid cells. Conversely, up-regulation of VEGFR1 by myeloid cells could also be achieved in vitro by coculturing bone marrow cells with RCC-conditioned medium or by short-term exposure of naive myeloid cells to oxidative stress. Treatment of myeloid cells with H2O2, lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, or an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase all resulted in increased expression of VEGFR1. Furthermore, after exposure to oxidative stress, myeloid cells acquire immunosuppressive features and become capable of inhibiting T cell proliferation. Data suggest that tumor-induced oxidative stress may promote both VEGFR1 up-regulation and immunosuppressive function in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells. Analysis of tumor tissue and peripheral blood from patients with metastatic RCC revealed that VEGFR1+ cells can be also found in cancer patients. Restoration of immunocompetence in metastatic RCC patients by pharmacological elimination of VEGFR1+ cells may have a significant impact on the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines or other immune-based therapies.

  2. Blood and immune cell engineering: Cytoskeletal contractility and nuclear rheology impact cell lineage and localization: Biophysical regulation of hematopoietic differentiation and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Won; Discher, Dennis E

    2015-06-01

    Clinical success with human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation establishes a paradigm for regenerative therapies with other types of stem cells. However, it remains generally challenging to therapeutically treat tissues after engineering of stem cells in vitro. Recent studies suggest that stem and progenitor cells sense physical features of their niches. Here, we review biophysical contributions to lineage decisions, maturation, and trafficking of blood and immune cells. Polarized cellular contractility and nuclear rheology are separately shown to be functional markers of a hematopoietic hierarchy that predict the ability of a lineage to traffic in and out of the bone marrow niche. These biophysical determinants are regulated by a set of structural molecules, including cytoplasmic myosin-II and nuclear lamins, which themselves are modulated by a diverse range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Small molecules that target these mechanobiological circuits, along with novel bioengineering methods, could prove broadly useful in programming blood and immune cells for therapies ranging from blood transfusions to immune attack of tumors.

  3. MicroRNA-33–dependent regulation of macrophage metabolism directs immune cell polarization in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Ediriweera, Hasini N.; Gundra, U. Mahesh; Sheedy, Frederick J.; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Hutchison, Susan B.; Rinehold, Kaitlyn; van Solingen, Coen; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Cecchini, Katharine; Rayner, Katey J.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Fisher, Edward A.; Loke, P’ng; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism is increasingly recognized as a controller of immune cell fate and function. MicroRNA-33 (miR-33) regulates cellular lipid metabolism and represses genes involved in cholesterol efflux, HDL biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. Here, we determined that miR-33–mediated disruption of the balance of aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation instructs macrophage inflammatory polarization and shapes innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophage-specific Mir33 deletion increased oxidative respiration, enhanced spare respiratory capacity, and induced an M2 macrophage polarization–associated gene profile. Furthermore, miR-33–mediated M2 polarization required miR-33 targeting of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but not cholesterol efflux. Notably, miR-33 inhibition increased macrophage expression of the retinoic acid–producing enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A2 (ALDH1A2) and retinal dehydrogenase activity both in vitro and in a mouse model. Consistent with the ability of retinoic acid to foster inducible Tregs, miR-33–depleted macrophages had an enhanced capacity to induce forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression in naive CD4+ T cells. Finally, treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with miR-33 inhibitors for 8 weeks resulted in accumulation of inflammation-suppressing M2 macrophages and FOXP3+ Tregs in plaques and reduced atherosclerosis progression. Collectively, these results reveal that miR-33 regulates macrophage inflammation and demonstrate that miR-33 antagonism is atheroprotective, in part, by reducing plaque inflammation by promoting M2 macrophage polarization and Treg induction. PMID:26517695

  4. MiR674 inhibits the neuraminidase-stimulated immune response on dendritic cells via down-regulated Mbnl3.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Chen, Ya T; Xia, Jing; Yang, Qian

    2016-08-02

    Neuraminidase (NA), a structural protein of the H9N2 avian influenza virus (H9N2 AIV), can facilitate viral invasion of the upper airway by cleaving the sialic acid moieties on mucin. Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells whose immune functions, such as presenting antigens and activating lymphocytes, can be regulated by microRNAs. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of miRNA-induced repression of immune responses in mouse DCs. First, we screened for and verified the miRNAs induced by NA. Then, we showed that, consistent with the H9N2 virus treatment, the viral NA up-regulated the expression of miR-155, miR-674, and miR-499 in DCs; however, unlike H9N2 virus treatment, the presence of NA was associated with reduced expression of miR-181b1. Our results suggest that NA significantly increased DC surface markers CD80 and MHCII and enhanced the ability of activating lymphocytes and secreting cytokines compared with HA, NP and M2. Meanwhile, we found that miR-674 and miR-155 over-expression increased all surface markers of DC. Nevertheless, by inhibiting the expression of miR-674 and miR-155, NA lost the ability to promote DC maturation. Furthermore, we predicted and demonstrated that Pgm2l1, Aldh18a1, Camk1d, and Mbnl3 were the target genes of miR-674. Among them, Mbnl3 interference strongly blocked the mature DCs. Collectively, our data shed new light on the roles of and mechanisms involved in the repression of DCs by miRNAs, which may contribute to efforts to develop a prophylaxis for the influenza virus.

  5. MiR674 inhibits the neuraminidase-stimulated immune response on dendritic cells via down-regulated Mbnl3

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Chen, Ya T.; Xia, Jing; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA), a structural protein of the H9N2 avian influenza virus (H9N2 AIV), can facilitate viral invasion of the upper airway by cleaving the sialic acid moieties on mucin. Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells whose immune functions, such as presenting antigens and activating lymphocytes, can be regulated by microRNAs. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of miRNA-induced repression of immune responses in mouse DCs. First, we screened for and verified the miRNAs induced by NA. Then, we showed that, consistent with the H9N2 virus treatment, the viral NA up-regulated the expression of miR-155, miR-674, and miR-499 in DCs; however, unlike H9N2 virus treatment, the presence of NA was associated with reduced expression of miR-181b1. Our results suggest that NA significantly increased DC surface markers CD80 and MHCII and enhanced the ability of activating lymphocytes and secreting cytokines compared with HA, NP and M2. Meanwhile, we found that miR-674 and miR-155 over-expression increased all surface markers of DC. Nevertheless, by inhibiting the expression of miR-674 and miR-155, NA lost the ability to promote DC maturation. Furthermore, we predicted and demonstrated that Pgm2l1, Aldh18a1, Camk1d, and Mbnl3 were the target genes of miR-674. Among them, Mbnl3 interference strongly blocked the mature DCs. Collectively, our data shed new light on the roles of and mechanisms involved in the repression of DCs by miRNAs, which may contribute to efforts to develop a prophylaxis for the influenza virus. PMID:27285980

  6. PI3Kα and STAT1 Interplay Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Immune Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Mounayar, Marwan; Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Smith, Brian; Solhjou, Zhabiz; Maarouf, Omar H.; Azzi, Jamil; Chabtini, Lola; Fiorina, Paolo; Kraus, Morey; Briddell, Robert; Fodor, William; Herrlich, Andreas; Abdi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for their use in therapeutic applications. MSC response to specific inflammatory cues allows them to switch between a proinflammatory (MSC1) or anti-inflammatory (MSC2) phenotype. Regulatory mechanisms controlling this switch remain to be defined. One characteristic feature of MSC2 is their ability to respond to IFNγ with induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), representing the key immunoregulatory molecule released by human MSC. Here, we show that STAT1 and PI3Kα pathways interplay regulates IFNγ-induced IDO production in MSC. Chemical phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pan-inhibition, PI3Kα-specific inhibition or shRNA knockdown diminished IFNγ-induced IDO production. This effect involved PI3Kα-mediated upregulation of STAT1 protein levels and phosphorylation at Ser727. Overexpression of STAT1 or of a constitutively active PI3Kα mutant failed to induce basal IDO production, but shifted MSC into an MSC2-like phenotype by strongly enhancing IDO production in response to IFNγ as compared to controls. STAT1 overexpression strongly enhanced MSC-mediated T-cell suppression. The same effect could be induced using short-term pretreatment of MSC with a chemical inhibitor of the counter player of PI3K, phosphatase and tensin homolog. Finally, downregulation of STAT1 abrogated the immunosuppressive capacity of MSC. Our results for the first time identify critical upstream signals for the induced production of IDO in MSCs that could be manipulated therapeutically to enhance their immunosuppressive phenotype. PMID:25753288

  7. Actin- and clathrin-dependent mechanisms regulate interferon gamma release after stimulation of human immune cells with respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Jop; elMoussaoui, Hicham; de Groot, Ronald; de Jonge, Marien I; Ferwerda, Gerben

    2016-03-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause recurrent and severe respiratory tract infections. Cytoskeletal proteins are often involved during viral infections, either for cell entry or the initiation of the immune response. The importance of actin and clathrin dynamics for cell entry and the initiation of the cellular immune response against RSV in human immune cells is not known yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of actin and clathrin on cell entry of RSV and the subsequent effect on T cell activation and interferon gamma release in human immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and purified monocytes were isolated from healthy adults and stimulated in vitro with RSV. Actin and clathrin dynamics were inhibited with respectively cytochalasin D and chlorpromazine. T cell receptor signaling was inhibited with cyclosporin A. Flow cytometry was used to determine the role of actin and clathrin on cell entry and T cell activation by RSV. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to investigate the contribution of actin and clathrin on the release of interferon gamma. Cell entry, virus gene transcription and interferon gamma release are actin-dependent. Post-endocytic processes like the increased expression of major histocompatibility complex II on monocytes , T cell activation and the release of interferon gamma are clathrin-dependent. Finally, T cell receptor signaling affects T cell activation, whereas soluble interleukin 18 is dispensable. Analysis of cell entry and interferon gamma release after infection with RSV reveals the importance of actin- and clathrin-dependent signaling in human immune cells. Insights into the cellular biology of the human immune response against respiratory syncytial virus will provide a better understanding of disease pathogenesis and may prove useful in the development of preventive strategies.

  8. Immune Regulation in T1D and T2D: Prospective Role of Foxp3+ Treg Cells in Disease Pathogenesis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kornete, Mara; Mason, Edward S; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that dysregulated immune responses play key roles in the pathogenesis and complications of type 1 but also type 2 diabetes. Indeed, chronic inflammation and autoimmunity, which are salient features of type 1 diabetes, are now believed to actively contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The accumulation of activated innate and adaptive immune cells in various metabolic tissues results in the release of inflammatory mediators, which promote insulin resistance and β-cell damage. Moreover, these dysregulated immune responses can also mutually influence the prevalence of both type 1 and 2 diabetes. In this review article, we discuss the central role of immune responses in the patho-physiology and complications of type 1 and 2 diabetes, and provide evidence that regulation of these responses, particularly through the action of regulatory T cells, may be a possible therapeutic avenue for the treatment of these disease and their respective complications.

  9. The Short isoform of the CEACAM1 receptor in intestinal T cells regulates mucosal immunity and homeostasis via Tfh cell induction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lanfen; Chen, Zhangguo; Baker, Kristi; Halvorsen, E lizabeth M.; da Cunha, Andre Pires; Flak, Magdalena B.; Gerber, Georg; Huang, Yu-Hwa; Hosomi, Shuhei; Arthur, J anelle C.; Dery, Ken J.; Nagaishi, Takashi; Beauchemin, Nicole; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Ho, Joshua W. K.; Shively, John E.; Jobin, Christian; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L.; Higgins, Darren E.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule like I (CEACAM1) is expressed on activated T cells and signals through either a long (L) cytoplasmic tail containing immune receptor tyrosine based inhibitory motifs, which provide inhibitory function, or a short (S) cytoplasmic tail with an unknown role. Previous studies on peripheral T cells show that CEACAM1-L isoforms predominate with little to no detectable CEACAM1-S isoforms in mouse and human. We show here that this was not the case in tissue resident T cells of intestines and gut associated lymphoid tissues which demonstrated predominant expression of CEACAM1-S isoforms relative to CEACAM1-L isoforms in human and mouse. This tissue resident predominance of CEACAM1-S expression was determined by the intestinal environment where it served a stimulatory function leading to the regulation of T cell subsets associated with generation of secretory IgA immunity, the regulation of mucosal commensalism, and defense of the barrier against enteropathogens. PMID:23123061

  10. Xanthomonas campestris overcomes Arabidopsis stomatal innate immunity through a DSF cell-to-cell signal-regulated virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3.

  11. Triptolide regulates T cell-mediated immunity via induction of CD11c(low) dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-hong; Shang, Pei-zhong; Lu, Qing-jun; Wu, Xu

    2012-07-01

    Triptolide(TPT) isolated from one of the Chinese herbs, Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. F. (TWHF), are known to have a variety of immunomodulatory activities. This study was performed to investigate the effect of TPT on the differentiation of splenic DCs and its influence on T cell-mediated immunity regarding to DC subsets CD11c(low)I-a/e(low)CD45RB(+)(CD11c(low) DCs) and CD11c(high)I-a/e(high)CD45RB(-) (CD11c(high) DCs) in male C57BL/6 mice spleens in vitro. The percentage of CD11c(low) DCs was significantly increased after treatment with TPT compared to their counterparts (CD11c(high) DCs). It was found that unlike the gradually decreasing interleukin (IL)-12 secretion of CD11c(high) DCs induced by TPT, CD11c(low) DCs showed a obvious dose-dependent response between the increasing of IL-10 production and TPT stimulation. After treatment with anti-IL-12R or anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody in CD4(+) T cells+CD11c(high) DCs or CD11c(low) DCs mixed lymphocyte reaction, the induction of these DCs on T cells was inhibited dramatically. These data demonstrated that TPT might induce the differentiation of splenic DCs to CD11c(low) DCs followed by shifting of Th1 to Th2 with enhancement of T lymphocyte immune function in vitro. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Elevated Expression of Programmed Death-1 and Programmed Death Ligand-1 Negatively Regulates Immune Response against Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhifang; Pang, Nannan; Du, Rong; Zhu, Yuejie; Fan, Lingling; Cai, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    The present study is to measure the expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1), as well as its clinical significance in cervical cancer patients. Our results showed that different T cell subsets in patients with cervical cancer had high expression of PD-1, and DCs had high expression of PD-L1. High expression of PD-1 on Treg cells in cervical cancer patients facilitated the production of TGF-β and IL-10 but inhibited the production of IFN-γ. Cervical cancer elevated the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in mRNA level. PD-1 expression in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients was related with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and invasiveness. PD-1/PD-L1 pathway inhibited lymphocyte proliferation but enhanced the secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β in vitro. In summary, our findings demonstrate that elevated levels of PD-1/PD-L1, TGF-β, and IL-10 in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients may negatively regulate immune response against cervical cancer cells and contribute to the progression of cervical cancer. Therefore, PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may become an immunotherapy target in the future. PMID:27721577

  13. The microbiome and regulation of mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Andrew J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a mucosal surface constantly exposed to foreign antigens and microbes, and is protected by a vast array of immunologically active structures and cells. Epithelial cells directly participate in immunological surveillance and direction of host responses in the gut and can express numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR9, and nucleotide oligomerization domain 2, as well as produce chemotactic factors for both myeloid and lymphoid cells following inflammatory stimulation. Within the epithelium and in the underlying lamina propria resides a population of innate lymphoid cells that, following stimulation, can become activated and produce effector cytokines and exert both protective and pathogenic roles during inflammation. Lamina propria dendritic cells play a large role in determining whether the response to a particular antigen will be inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. It is becoming clear that the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome, as a whole community, exerts a profound influence on mucosal immune regulation. The microbiome produces short-chain fatty acids, polysaccharide A, α-galactosylceramide and tryptophan metabolites, which can induce interleukin-22, Reg3γ, IgA and interleukin-17 responses. However, much of what is known about microbiome–host immune interactions has come from the study of single bacterial members of the gastrointestinal microbiome and their impact on intestinal mucosal immunity. Additionally, evidence continues to accumulate that alterations of the intestinal microbiome can impact not only gastrointestinal immunity but also immune regulation at distal mucosal sites. PMID:24329495

  14. Internal complementarities in the immune system: regulation of the expression of helper T-cell idiotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, C; Pereira, P; Bernabé, R; Bandeira, A; Larsson, E L; Cazenave, P A; Coutinho, A

    1984-01-01

    More than half of BALB/c helper T lymphocytes specific for 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified syngeneic spleen cells are inhibited in their proliferative responses to antigen-presenting cells and in their cooperation with B lymphocytes by monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to a TNP-binding BALB/c myeloma protein (MOPC 460). This inhibition is specific for anti-TNP-self helper cells of BALB/c origin and is controlled by IgCh-linked genes, as it is not observed with CB.20 helper cells of the same specificity. In contrast, anti-TNP-self helper cells prepared from BALB/c mice that were chronically suppressed with anti-mu chain antibodies and possessed no B lymphocytes were not inhibited by anti-idiotypic antibodies. We conclude that the B-cell antibody repertoires contribute to the selection of the (idiotypic) T-helper-cell repertoires. PMID:6235521

  15. Regulatory T cells and immune regulation of allergic diseases: roles of IL-10 and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Palomares, O; Martín-Fontecha, M; Lauener, R; Traidl-Hoffmann, C; Cavkaytar, O; Akdis, M; Akdis, C A

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has significantly increased in industrialized countries. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) remains as the only curative treatment. The knowledge about the mechanisms underlying healthy immune responses to allergens, the development of allergic reactions and restoration of appropriate immune responses to allergens has significantly improved over the last decades. It is now well-accepted that the generation and maintenance of functional allergen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells and regulatory B (Breg) cells are essential for healthy immune responses to environmental proteins and successful AIT. Treg cells comprise different subsets of T cells with suppressive capacity, which control the development and maintenance of allergic diseases by various ways of action. Molecular mechanisms of generation of Treg cells, the identification of novel immunological organs, where this might occur in vivo, such as tonsils, and related epigenetic mechanisms are starting to be deciphered. The key role played by the suppressor cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β produced by functional Treg cells during the generation of immune tolerance to allergens is now well established. Treg and Breg cells together have a role in suppression of IgE and induction of IgG4 isotype allergen-specific antibodies particularly mediated by IL-10. Other cell types such as subsets of dendritic cells, NK-T cells and natural killer cells producing high levels of IL-10 may also contribute to the generation of healthy immune responses to allergens. In conclusion, better understanding of the immune regulatory mechanisms operating at different stages of allergic diseases will significantly help the development of better diagnostic and predictive biomarkers and therapeutic interventions.

  16. SH2 domain–containing adaptor protein B expressed in dendritic cells is involved in T-cell homeostasis by regulating dendritic cell–mediated Th2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Src homology 2 domain–containing adaptor protein B (SHB) is widely expressed in immune cells and acts as an important regulator for hematopoietic cell function. SHB silencing induces Th2 immunity in mice. SHB is also involved in T-cell homeostasis in vivo. However, SHB has not yet been studied and addressed in association with dendritic cells (DCs). Materials and Methods The effects of SHB expression on the immunogenicity of DCs were assessed by Shb gene silencing in mouse bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs). After silencing, surface phenotype, cytokine expression profile, and T-cell stimulation capacity of BMDCs were examined. We investigated the signaling pathways involved in SHB expression during BMDC development. We also examined the immunogenicity of SHB-knockdown (SHBKD) BMDCs in a mouse atopic dermatitis model. Results SHB was steadily expressed in mouse splenic DCs and in in vitro–generated BMDCs in both immature and mature stages. SHB expression was contingent on activation of the mitogen- activated protein kinase/Foxa2 signaling pathway during DC development. SHBKD increased the expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules without affecting the cytokine expression of BMDCs. When co-cultured with T cells, SHBKD in BMDCs significantly induced CD4+ T-cell proliferation and the expression of Th2 cytokines, while the regulatory T cell (Treg) population was downregulated. In mouse atopic dermatitis model, mice inoculated with SHBKD DCs developed more severe symptoms of atopic dermatitis compared with mice injected with control DCs. Conclusion SHB expression in DCs plays an important role in T-cell homeostasis in vivo by regulating DC-mediated Th2 polarization. PMID:28168174

  17. Immune regulation by T regulatory cells in HBV related Inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Trehanpati, Nirupama; Vyas, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of cancer death and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the commonest causes in Asians countries. India has the second largest pool after China for hepatitis B infected subjects. HBV clearance is T cell dependent and one of the reason for T cells hypo responsiveness is due to mass production of Tregs through activation of Notch signaling, which suppressCD4/CD8 T cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important to maintain cellular homeostasis; however during viral infection increase of Tregs is inversely proportional to HBV DNA titers. Tregs exert their suppressive effect either via cell to cell contact or through release of IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, IL-35. In CHBV infection, PD1 pathway also gets activated and is involved in promoting tolerance.However with Tregs induction, virus specific T cell responses also get decreased. Circulatory and intra-tumoral Tregs promote development of HBV specific HCC more by decreasing and impairing the effector functions of CD8 T cells. Anti-viral therapies and PD1 blockade strategy had shown the inhibition of Tregs and reduction in HBV DNA. However, inhibition of HBV specific Tregs is major challenge for future therapies. New cytokine blockade therapies have emerged as potential therapeutic potentials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. IL-10-overexpressing B cells regulate innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Stanic, Barbara; van de Veen, Willem; Wirz, Oliver F; Rückert, Beate; Morita, Hideaki; Söllner, Stefan; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-03-01

    Distinct human IL-10-producing B-cell subsets with immunoregulatory properties have been described. However, the broader spectrum of their direct cellular targets and suppressive mechanisms has not been extensively studied, particularly in relation to direct and indirect IL-10-mediated functions. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of IL-10 overexpression on the phenotype and immunoregulatory capacity of B cells. Primary human B cells were transfected with hIL-10, and IL-10-overexpressing B cells were characterized for cytokine and immunoglobulin production by means of specific ELISA and bead-based assays. Antigen presentation, costimulation capacity, and transcription factor signatures were analyzed by means of flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of IL-10-overexpresing B cells on Toll-like receptor-triggered cytokine release from PBMCs, LPS-triggered maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and tetanus toxoid-induced PBMC proliferation were assessed in autologous cocultures. IL-10-overexpressing B cells acquired a prominent immunoregulatory profile comprising upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), the IL-2 receptor α chain (CD25), and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1). Concurrently, their secretion profile was characterized by a significant reduction in levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-8, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α) and augmented production of anti-inflammatory IL-1 receptor antagonist and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, IL-10 overexpression was associated with a decrease in costimulatory potential. IL-10-overexpressing B cells secreted less IgE and potently suppressed proinflammatory cytokines in PBMCs, maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (rendering their profile to regulatory phenotype), and antigen-specific proliferation in vitro. Our data demonstrate an essential role for IL-10 in inducing an

  19. Molecular Regulation of Immune Recognition Molecule Expression by Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    Herceptin was only non . We hypothesize that immunotherapy used in a minimal slightly blocked with the same combination of antibodies. residual disease...patients with metastatic breast cancer must address the issue of residual chemotherapy-resistant cells. Immunotherapy offers the potential of...targets are inherently resistant to killing, and that two distinct mechanisms of ADCC can target immunotherapy to breast cancer cells. 14. GUBJECT

  20. Viewing immune regulation as it happens: in vivo imaging for investigation of regulatory T-cell function.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Michael J; Chow, Zachary

    2017-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play indispensable roles in the immune system, in limiting excessive or inappropriate immune and inflammatory responses. They achieve this function via effects on other immune cells in the secondary lymphoid system, and in peripheral locations such as skin, gut and bone marrow. As for the more extensively studied cellular players in the immune system, particularly dendritic cells and conventional T cells, in vivo imaging of Tregs via two-photon (or multiphoton) microscopy (MPM) has been central to the development of understanding how these cells function. In this brief review, we will describe the studies that have utilised MPM to examine Treg behaviour in vivo. These studies have investigated Treg behaviour in lymph nodes and spleen, as well as in peripheral organs such as skin, small intestine and bone marrow. The findings from these experiments underline how assumptions made about Treg function based on results of in vitro experiments are often not supported by direct visualisation of these cells in their normal in vivo settings. Together this work reveals that only via MPM analysis can Treg function be investigated in the complicated multicellular environments where conventional T cells, antigen-presenting cells and other potential cellular targets of Tregs are present with each undergoing their own specific actions.

  1. Critical role of dendritic cell-derived IL-27 in antitumor immunity through regulating the recruitment and activation of NK and NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jun; Xia, Siyuan; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Song; Wang, Jingya; Zhao, Huiyuan; Wu, Xiaoli; Chen, Xi; Hao, Jianlei; Zhou, Xinglong; Zhu, Zhengmao; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Jian-xin; Wang, Puyue; Wu, Zhenzhou; Zhao, Liqing; Yin, Zhinan

    2013-07-01

    Critical roles of IL-27 in autoimmune diseases and infections have been reported; however, the contribution of endogenous IL-27 to tumor progression remains elusive. In this study, by using IL-27p28 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that IL-27 is critical in protective immune response against methyl-cholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma and transplanted B16 melanoma, and dendritic cells (DCs) are the primary source. DC-derived IL-27 is required for shaping tumor microenvironment by inducing CXCL-10 expression in myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulating IL-12 production from DCs, which lead to the recruitment and activation of NK and NKT cells resulting in immunological control of tumors. Indeed, reconstitution of IL-27 or CXCL-10 in tumor site significantly inhibits tumor growth and restores the number and activation of NK and NKT cells. In summary, our study identifies a previous unknown critical role of DC-derived IL-27 in NK and NKT cell-dependent antitumor immunity through shaping tumor microenvironment, and sheds light on developing novel therapeutic approaches based on IL-27.

  2. Regulation of innate immunity by extracellular nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, Stefania; Gatta, Lucia; Pontecorvo, Laura; Vitiello, Laura; la Sala, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) is the most abundant among extracellular nucleotides and is commonly considered as a classical danger signal, which stimulates immune responses in the presence of tissue injury. In fact, increased nucleotide concentration in the extracellular space is generally closely associated with tissue stress or damage. However non-lytic nucleotide release may also occur in many cell types under a variety of conditions. Extracellular nucleotides are sensed by a class of plasma membrane receptors called P2 purinergic receptors (P2Rs). P2 receptors are expressed by all immunological cells and their activation elicits different responses. Extracellular ATP can act as an initiator or terminator of immune responses being able to induce different effects on immune cells depending on the pattern of P2 receptors engaged, the duration of the stimulus and its concentration in the extracellular milieu. Millimolar (high) concentrations of extracellular ATP, induce predominantly proinflammatory effects, while micromolar (low) doses exert mainly tolerogenic/immunosuppressive action. Moreover small, but significant differences in the pattern of P2 receptor expression in mice and humans confer diverse capacities of ATP in regulating the immune response. PMID:23358447

  3. Effects of IL8 and immune cells on the regulation of luteal progesterone secretion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies suggest that chemokines may mediate the luteolytic action of PGF2a (PGF). Our objective was to identify chemokines induced by PGF in vivo and to determine the effects of IL8 on specific luteal cell types in vitro. Midcycle cows were injected with saline or PGF, ovaries were removed ...

  4. Carbocysteine regulates innate immune responses and senescence processes in cigarette smoke stimulated bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pace, Elisabetta; Ferraro, Maria; Siena, Liboria; Scafidi, Valeria; Gerbino, Stefania; Di Vincenzo, Serena; Gallina, Salvatore; Lanata, Luigi; Gjomarkaj, Mark

    2013-11-25

    Cigarette smoke represents the major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Cigarette smoke extracts (CSE) alter TLR4 expression and activation in bronchial epithelial cells. Carbocysteine, an anti-oxidant and mucolytic agent, is effective in reducing the severity and the rate of exacerbations in COPD patients. The effects of carbocysteine on TLR4 expression and on the TLR4 activation downstream events are largely unknown. This study was aimed to explore whether carbocysteine, in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16-HBE), counteracted some pro-inflammatory CSE-mediated effects. In particular, TLR4 expression, LPS binding, p21 (a senescence marker), IL-8 mRNA and release in CSE-stimulated 16-HBE as well as actin reorganization in neutrophils cultured with supernatants from bronchial epithelial cells which were stimulated with CSE and/or carbocysteine were assessed. TLR4 expression, LPS binding, and p21 expression were assessed by flow cytometry, IL-8 mRNA by Real Time PCR and IL-8 release by ELISA. Actin reorganization, a prerequisite for cell migration, was determined using Atto 488 phalloidin in neutrophils by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. CSE increased: (1) TLR4, LPS binding and p21 expression; (2) IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 release due to IL-1 stimulation; (3) neutrophil migration. Carbocysteine in CSE stimulated bronchial epithelial cells, reduced: (1) TLR4, LPS binding and p21; (2) IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 release due to IL-1 stimulation; (3) neutrophil chemotactic migration. In conclusion, the present study provides compelling evidences that carbocysteine may contribute to control the inflammatory and senescence processes present in smokers.

  5. Comparison of host cell gene expression in cowpox, monkeypox or vaccinia virus-infected cells reveals virus-specific regulation of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal-borne orthopoxviruses, like monkeypox, vaccinia and the closely related cowpox virus, are all capable of causing zoonotic infections in humans, representing a potential threat to human health. The disease caused by each virus differs in terms of symptoms and severity, but little is yet know about the reasons for these varying phenotypes. They may be explained by the unique repertoire of immune and host cell modulating factors encoded by each virus. In this study, we analysed the specific modulation of the host cell’s gene expression profile by cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus infection. We aimed to identify mechanisms that are either common to orthopoxvirus infection or specific to certain orthopoxvirus species, allowing a more detailed description of differences in virus-host cell interactions between individual orthopoxviruses. To this end, we analysed changes in host cell gene expression of HeLa cells in response to infection with cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus, using whole-genome gene expression microarrays, and compared these to each other and to non-infected cells. Results Despite a dominating non-responsiveness of cellular transcription towards orthopoxvirus infection, we could identify several clusters of infection-modulated genes. These clusters are either commonly regulated by orthopoxvirus infection or are uniquely regulated by infection with a specific orthopoxvirus, with major differences being observed in immune response genes. Most noticeable was an induction of genes involved in leukocyte migration and activation in cowpox and monkeypox virus-infected cells, which was not observed following vaccinia virus infection. Conclusion Despite their close genetic relationship, the expression profiles induced by infection with different orthopoxviruses vary significantly. It may be speculated that these differences at the cellular level contribute to the individual characteristics of cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus

  6. miRNA Regulation of Immune Tolerance in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schjenken, John E; Zhang, Bihong; Chan, Hon Y; Sharkey, David J; Fullston, Tod; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-03-01

    To support embryo implantation, the female reproductive tract must provide a tolerogenic immune environment. Seminal fluid contact at conception contributes to activating the endometrial gene expression and immune cell changes required for robust implantation, influencing not only the quality of the ensuing pregnancy but also the health of offspring. miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles in biological processes, including regulation of the immune environment. miRNAs are known to contribute to gene regulation in pregnancy and are altered in pregnancy pathologies. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs participate in establishing immune tolerance at conception, and may contribute to the regulatory effects of seminal fluid in generating tolerogenic dendritic cells and T regulatory cells. This review highlights those miRNAs implicated in programming immune cells that are critical during the peri-conception period and explores how seminal fluid may regulate female tract miRNA expression following coitus.

  7. Rare gross deletion in T-cell immune regulator-1 gene in Iranian family with infantile malignant osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadegan, Mohammad R; Modarresi, Alireza; Khadivi-Zand, Farhad; Velayati, Arash

    2008-10-01

    Infantile malignant osteopetrosis (arOP) is an autosomal recessive disorder. Mutations in the T-cell immune regulator 1 (TCIRG1) gene were found as the cause of arOP. We found the first Iranian patient with a rare gross deletion in this gene. The patient was a 5-year-old girl with macrocephaly, facial dysmorphism, blindness, mental retardation, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and osteosclerotic changes in the skull and limb. Molecular analysis was performed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for exons 10-19 of the TCIRG1 gene followed by whole gene sequencing. She showed a 275 bp unexpected amplified segment. Sequencing revealed a gross deletion in exons 10-15 transcript region of TCIRG1 that affected codon 389 to 518. Various types of mutations in the TCIRG1 gene in arOP have been reported, however, gross deletions are reported rarely. This gross deletion is the first mutation reported among Iranian patients in this gene. This deletion is also the largest deletion of TCIRG1 gene reported to date.

  8. Antithymocyte globulin combined with cyclosporine A down-regulates T helper 1 cells by modulating T cell immune response cDNA 7 in aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Qiao, Jianlin; Zhong, Xiao-min; Wu, Qing-yun; Chen, Wei; Yao, Yao; Niu, Ming-shan; Fu, Chun-ling; Zeng, Ling-yu; Li, Zhen-yu; Xu, Kai-lin

    2015-07-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) combined with cyclosporine A (CsA) has been widely used as a standard regimen in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA), especially in severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Abnormally activated T cells might be the immune pathogenesis of AA. T cell immune response cDNA 7 (TIRC7) has been demonstrated its essential role in T cell activation; however, little is known about the role of TIRC7 in AA. In this study, we documented that TIRC7 levels in CsA group were higher than that in ATG + CsA (AC) group only in the follow-up phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.05); nevertheless, TIRC7 levels in SAA group were elevated than non severe aplastic anemia group not only in the treatment phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.05) but also in the follow-up phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.01). The trend of changes of T helper (Th) 1, Th17 and Th22 levels before and after treatment was similar to the changes of TIRC7 levels in either AC group or CsA group. Thus, TIRC7 might be involved in the pathogenesis of AA and AC might down-regulate Th1 cells by modulating the expression of TIRC7 in AA.

  9. Exosomes and their roles in immune regulation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Gopal, Shashi K; Xu, Rong; Simpson, Richard J; Chen, Weisan

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a subset of extracellular vesicles (EVs), function as a mode of intercellular communication and molecular transfer. Exosomes facilitate the direct extracellular transfer of proteins, lipids, and miRNA/mRNA/DNAs between cells in vitro and in vivo. The immunological activities of exosomes affect immunoregulation mechanisms including modulating antigen presentation, immune activation, immune suppression, immune surveillance, and intercellular communication. Besides immune cells, cancer cells secrete immunologically active exosomes that influence both physiological and pathological processes. The observation that exosomes isolated from immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) modulate the immune response has enforced the way these membranous vesicles are being considered as potential immunotherapeutic reagents. Indeed, tumour- and immune cell-derived exosomes have been shown to carry tumour antigens and promote immunity, leading to eradication of established tumours by CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells, as well as directly suppressing tumour growth and resistance to malignant tumour development. Further understanding of these areas of exosome biology, and especially of molecular mechanisms involved in immune cell targeting, interaction and manipulation, is likely to provide significant insights into immunorecognition and therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the emerging roles of exosomes in immune regulation and the therapeutic potential in cancer.

  10. Fasciola hepatica Immune Regulates CD11c+ Cells by Interacting with the Macrophage Gal/GalNAc Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Carasi, Paula; Frigerio, Sofía; da Costa, Valeria; van Vliet, Sandra; Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; van Kooyk, Yvette; García-Vallejo, Juan J.; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and livestock production. Like other helminths, F. hepatica modulates the host immune response by inducing potent polarized Th2 and regulatory T cell immune responses and by downregulating the production of Th1 cytokines. In this work, we show that F. hepatica glycans increase Th2 immune responses by immunomodulating TLR-induced maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). This process was mediated by the macrophage Gal/GalNAc lectin (MGL) expressed on DCs, which recognizes the Tn antigen (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) on parasite components. More interestingly, we identified MGL-expressing CD11c+ cells in infected animals and showed that these cells are recruited both to the peritoneum and the liver upon F. hepatica infection. These cells express the regulatory cytokines IL-10, TNFα and TGFβ and a variety of regulatory markers. Furthermore, MGL+ CD11c+ cells expand parasite-specific Th2/regulatory cells and suppress Th1 polarization. The results presented here suggest a potential role of MGL in the immunomodulation of DCs induced by F. hepatica and contribute to a better understanding of the molecular and immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by this parasite. PMID:28360908

  11. Fasciola hepatica Immune Regulates CD11c(+) Cells by Interacting with the Macrophage Gal/GalNAc Lectin.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Carasi, Paula; Frigerio, Sofía; da Costa, Valeria; van Vliet, Sandra; Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; van Kooyk, Yvette; García-Vallejo, Juan J; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and livestock production. Like other helminths, F. hepatica modulates the host immune response by inducing potent polarized Th2 and regulatory T cell immune responses and by downregulating the production of Th1 cytokines. In this work, we show that F. hepatica glycans increase Th2 immune responses by immunomodulating TLR-induced maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). This process was mediated by the macrophage Gal/GalNAc lectin (MGL) expressed on DCs, which recognizes the Tn antigen (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) on parasite components. More interestingly, we identified MGL-expressing CD11c(+) cells in infected animals and showed that these cells are recruited both to the peritoneum and the liver upon F. hepatica infection. These cells express the regulatory cytokines IL-10, TNFα and TGFβ and a variety of regulatory markers. Furthermore, MGL(+) CD11c(+) cells expand parasite-specific Th2/regulatory cells and suppress Th1 polarization. The results presented here suggest a potential role of MGL in the immunomodulation of DCs induced by F. hepatica and contribute to a better understanding of the molecular and immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by this parasite.

  12. The Multivesicular Bodies (MVBs)-Localized AAA ATPase LRD6-6 Inhibits Immunity and Cell Death Likely through Regulating MVBs-Mediated Vesicular Trafficking in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Sihui; Liang, Ruihong; Zhou, Xiaogang; Chen, Zhixiong; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Jing; Li, Weitao; He, Min; Yuan, Can; Miyamoto, Koji; Ma, Bingtian; Wang, Jichun; Qin, Peng; Chen, Weilan; Wang, Yuping; Wang, Wenming; Wu, Xianjun; Yamane, Hisakazu; Zhu, Lihuang; Li, Shigui; Chen, Xuewei

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/endosomes-mediated vesicular trafficking may play key roles in plant immunity and cell death. However, the molecular regulation is poorly understood in rice. Here we report the identification and characterization of a MVBs-localized AAA ATPase LRD6-6 in rice. Disruption of LRD6-6 leads to enhanced immunity and cell death in rice. The ATPase activity and homo-dimerization of LRD6-6 is essential for its regulation on plant immunity and cell death. An ATPase inactive mutation (LRD6-6E315Q) leads to dominant-negative inhibition in plants. The LRD6-6 protein co-localizes with the MVBs marker protein RabF1/ARA6 and interacts with ESCRT-III components OsSNF7 and OsVPS2. Further analysis reveals that LRD6-6 is required for MVBs-mediated vesicular trafficking and inhibits the biosynthesis of antimicrobial compounds. Collectively, our study shows that the AAA ATPase LRD6-6 inhibits plant immunity and cell death most likely through modulating MVBs-mediated vesicular trafficking in rice. PMID:27618555

  13. Crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cell and adaptive immune cell in intestinal mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun Tao; Xu, An Tao; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2017-05-01

    Constantly challenged by luminal bacteria, intestinal epithelium forms both a physical and biochemical defense against pathogens. Besides, intestinal epithelium senses dynamic and continuous changes in luminal environment and transmits signals to subjacent immune cells accordingly. It has been long accepted that adaptive immune cells fulfill their roles partly by modulating function of intestinal epithelial cells. Recent studies have brought up the proposal that intestinal epithelial cells also actively participate in the regulation of adaptive immunity, especially CD4+ adaptive T cells, which indicates that there is reciprocal crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cells and adaptive immune cells, and the crosstalk may play important role in intestinal mucosal immunity. This Review makes a comprehensive summary about crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cells and CD4+ adaptive T cells in intestinal immunity. Special attention would be given to their implications in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. The innate immune system recognizes and regulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) expression on MHCIlow tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Riond, Joëlle; Courtiade, Laetitia; Roullet, Nicolas; Gairin, Jean-Edouard

    2008-01-01

    Tumor cells and the immune system play a lethal "pas de deux" during tumor development. However, it is not clear which role the innate immune system plays in these interactions. We studied the interaction of normal spleen cells (NSCs) with tumor cells expressing low levels of MHCI on the cell surface. This interaction induces increased MHCI expression on the MHCIlow tumor cells by a cell-cell contact-dependent, IFN-γ-mediated mechanism. The effector cells responsible for the increased IFN-γ production were identified as CD4+ CD1d-independent NKT cells, NK1.1+ NK cells and CD4+ CD11c+ DCs. The possible three cell collaboration is not activated by MHCIhigh tumor cells or normal fibroblasts. Kinetic experiments showed that the increase in IFN-γ production induced by MHCIlow tumor cells happens in two consecutive waves, an early peak around 12 hours, followed by a second more important peak around day 2-3. Thus, we propose that CD4+ CD1d-independent NKT cells are activated by the MHCIlow tumor cells, they release IFN-γ stimulating DCs to produce IL-12, which in turn activates NK cells to produce large amounts of IFN-γ. The recognition mechanism used by the CD4+ CD1d-independent non-classical NKT cells is unknown. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) blocking experiments using antibodies against either activating or inhibitory receptors or co-receptors on NKT/NK cells gave no conclusive results. Moreover, NSCs from either normal or MHCII-/- mice augmented MHCI expression on MHCIlow tumors, excluding a significant role of CD4-MHCII interactions in the system. Hence the initial recognition mechanism in this system still awaits further experimentation. PMID:18783178

  15. The innate immune system recognizes and regulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) expression on MHCIlow tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bent; Riond, Joëlle; Courtiade, Laetitia; Roullet, Nicolas; Gairin, Jean-Edouard

    2008-09-11

    Tumor cells and the immune system play a lethal "pas de deux" during tumor development. However, it is not clear which role the innate immune system plays in these interactions. We studied the interaction of normal spleen cells (NSCs) with tumor cells expressing low levels of MHCI on the cell surface. This interaction induces increased MHCI expression on the MHCI(low) tumor cells by a cell-cell contact-dependent, IFN-gamma-mediated mechanism. The effector cells responsible for the increased IFN-gamma production were identified as CD4+ CD1d-independent NKT cells, NK1.1+ NK cells and CD4+ CD11c+ DCs. The possible three cell collaboration is not activated by MHCI(high) tumor cells or normal fibroblasts. Kinetic experiments showed that the increase in IFN-gamma production induced by MHCI(low) tumor cells happens in two consecutive waves, an early peak around 12 hours, followed by a second more important peak around day 2-3. Thus, we propose that CD4+ CD1d-independent NKT cells are activated by the MHCI(low) tumor cells, they release IFN-gamma stimulating DCs to produce IL-12, which in turn activates NK cells to produce large amounts of IFN-gamma. The recognition mechanism used by the CD4+ CD1d-independent non-classical NKT cells is unknown. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) blocking experiments using antibodies against either activating or inhibitory receptors or co-receptors on NKT/NK cells gave no conclusive results. Moreover, NSCs from either normal or MHCII(-/-) mice augmented MHCI expression on MHCI(low) tumors, excluding a significant role of CD4-MHCII interactions in the system. Hence the initial recognition mechanism in this system still awaits further experimentation.

  16. Differential innate immune cell signatures and effects regulated by toll-like receptor 4 during murine lung tumor promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Carla-Maria; Xiong, Ka-Na; Velmurugan, Kalpana; Xiong, Julie; Osgood, Ross S.; Bauer, Alison K.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor promotion is an early and critical stage during lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). We previously demonstrated that Tlr4 mutant mice were more susceptible to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-induced pulmonary inflammation and tumor promotion in comparison to Tlr4-sufficient mice. Our study objective was to elucidate the underlying differences in Tlr4 mutant mice in innate immune cell populations, their functional responses, and the influence of these cellular differences on ADC progenitor (type II) cells following BHT-treatment. BALB (Tlr4-sufficient) and C.C3-Tlr4Lps-d/J (BALBLpsd; Tlr4 mutant) mice were treated with BHT (promoter) followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and flow cytometry processing on the lungs. ELISAs, Club cell enrichment, macrophage function and RNA isolation were also performed. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) co-cultured with a type II cell line were used for wound healing assays. Innate immune cells significantly increased in whole lung in BHT treated BALBLpsd mice compared to BALB mice. BHT treated BALBLpsd mice demonstrated enhanced macrophage functionality, increased epithelial wound closure via BMDMs, and increased Club cell number in BALBLpsd mice, all compared to BALB BHT-treated mice. Cytokine/chemokine (Kc, Mcp1) and growth factor (Igf1) levels also significantly differed among the strains and within macrophages, gene expression and cell surface markers collectively demonstrated a more plastic phenotype in BALBLpsd mice. Therefore, these correlative studies suggest that distinct innate immune cell populations are associated with the differences observed in the Tlr4-mutant model. Future studies will investigate the macrophage origins and the utility of the pathways identified herein as indicators of immune system deficiencies and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27093379

  17. VHL promotes immune response against renal cell carcinoma via NF-κB-dependent regulation of VCAM-1.

    PubMed

    Labrousse-Arias, David; Martínez-Alonso, Emma; Corral-Escariz, María; Bienes-Martínez, Raquel; Berridy, Jaime; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Conde, Elisa; García-Bermejo, María-Laura; Giménez-Bachs, José M; Salinas-Sánchez, Antonio S; Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo; Yao, Masahiro; Lasa, Marina; Calzada, María J

    2017-03-06

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is an adhesion molecule assigned to the activated endothelium mediating immune cells adhesion and extravasation. However, its expression in renal carcinomas inversely correlates with tumor malignancy. Our experiments in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cell lines demonstrated that von Hippel Lindau (VHL) loss, hypoxia, or PHD (for prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing proteins) inactivation decreased VCAM-1 levels through a transcriptional mechanism that was independent of the hypoxia-inducible factor and dependent on the nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. Conversely, VHL expression leads to high VCAM-1 levels in ccRCC, which in turn leads to better outcomes, possibly by favoring antitumor immunity through VCAM-1 interaction with the α4β1 integrin expressed in immune cells. Remarkably, in ccRCC human samples with VHL nonmissense mutations, we observed a negative correlation between VCAM-1 levels and ccRCC stage, microvascular invasion, and symptom presentation, pointing out the clinical value of VCAM-1 levels as a marker of ccRCC progression.

  18. Fluoride reduced the immune privileged function of mouse Sertoli cells via the regulation of Fas/FasL system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zilong; Nie, Qingli; Zhang, Lianjie; Niu, Ruiyan; Wang, Jundong; Wang, Shaolin

    2017-02-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated the adverse impacts of fluoride on Sertoli cells (SCs), such as oxidative stress and apoptosis. SCs are the crucial cellular components that can create the immune privileged environment in testis. However, the effect of fluoride on SCs immune privilege is unknown. In this study, mouse SCs were exposed to sodium fluoride with varying concentrations of 10(-5), 10(-4), and 10(-3) mol/L to establish the model of fluoride-treated SCs (F-SCs) in vitro. After 48 h of incubation, F-SCs were transplanted underneath the kidney capsule of mice for 21 days, or cocultured with spleen lymphocytes for another 48 h. Immunohistochemical analysis of GATA4 in SCs grafts underneath kidney capsule presented less SCs distribution and obvious immune cell infiltration in F-SCs groups. In addition, the levels of FasL protein and mRNA in non-cocultured F-SCs decreased with the increase of fluoride concentration. When cocultured with F-SCs, lymphocytes presented significantly high cell viability and low apoptosis in F-SCs groups. Protein and mRNA expressions of FasL in cocultured F-SCs and Fas in lymphocytes were reduced, and the caspase 8 and caspase 3 mRNA levels were also decreased in fluoride groups in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicated that fluoride influenced the testicular immune privilege through disturbing the Fas/FasL system.

  19. Hierarchical signaling transduction of the immune and muscle cell crosstalk in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjun; Hu, Ping

    2017-08-24

    The muscle regeneration is a complicated bioprocess that involved in many cell types, including necrotic muscle cells, satellite cells, mesenchymal cells, pericytes, immune cells, and other cell types present at the injury site. Immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses regulate the progress of muscle regeneration. In this review, we discussed the roles of different immune cells in muscle regeneration. The immune cells regulate muscle regeneration through cytokine production, cell-cell contacts, and general immune environment regulation. We also describe the current known mechanism of how immune cells regulating muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Programmed Death-1 Ligand 2-Mediated Regulation of the PD-L1 to PD-1 Axis Is Essential for Establishing CD4(+) T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Karunarathne, Deshapriya S; Horne-Debets, Joshua M; Huang, Johnny X; Faleiro, Rebecca; Leow, Chiuan Yee; Amante, Fiona; Watkins, Thomas S; Miles, John J; Dwyer, Patrick J; Stacey, Katryn J; Yarski, Michael; Poh, Chek Meng; Lee, Jason S; Cooper, Matthew A; Rénia, Laurent; Richard, Derek; McCarthy, James S; Sharpe, Arlene H; Wykes, Michelle N

    2016-08-16

    Many pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., exploit the interaction of programmed death-1 (PD-1) with PD-1-ligand-1 (PD-L1) to "deactivate" T cell functions, but the role of PD-L2 remains unclear. We studied malarial infections to understand the contribution of PD-L2 to immunity. Here we have shown that higher PD-L2 expression on blood dendritic cells, from Plasmodium falciparum-infected individuals, correlated with lower parasitemia. Mechanistic studies in mice showed that PD-L2 was indispensable for establishing effective CD4(+) T cell immunity against malaria, because it not only inhibited PD-L1 to PD-1 activity but also increased CD3 and inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) expression on T cells. Importantly, administration of soluble multimeric PD-L2 to mice with lethal malaria was sufficient to dramatically improve immunity and survival. These studies show immuno-regulation by PD-L2, which has the potential to be translated into an effective treatment for malaria and other diseases where T cell immunity is ineffective or short-lived due to PD-1-mediated signaling.

  1. How do plants achieve immunity? Defence without specialized immune cells.

    PubMed

    Spoel, Steven H; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-25

    Vertebrates have evolved a sophisticated adaptive immune system that relies on an almost infinite diversity of antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by specialized immune cells that roam the circulatory system. These immune cells provide vertebrates with extraordinary antigen-specific immune capacity and memory, while minimizing self-reactivity. Plants, however, lack specialized mobile immune cells. Instead, every plant cell is thought to be capable of launching an effective immune response. So how do plants achieve specific, self-tolerant immunity and establish immune memory? Recent developments point towards a multilayered plant innate immune system comprised of self-surveillance, systemic signalling and chromosomal changes that together establish effective immunity.

  2. T cell metabolic fitness in antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    T cell metabolism has a central role in supporting and shaping immune responses and may have a key role in antitumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1), to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory T cells are favored in low glucose conditions and may inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here, we review how the tumor microenvironment modifies metabolic and functional pathways in T cells and how these changes may uncover new targets and challenges for cancer immunotherapy and treatment.

  3. Approaches Mediating Oxytocin Regulation of the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Stephani C; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuroendocrine system is mainly composed of the neural structures regulating hormone secretion from the pituitary gland and has been considered as the higher regulatory center of the immune system. Recently, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) emerged as an important component of neuroendocrine-immune network, wherein the oxytocin (OT)-secreting system (OSS) plays an essential role. The OSS, consisting of OT neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, their several accessory nuclei and associated structures, can integrate neural, endocrine, metabolic, and immune information and plays a pivotal role in the development and functions of the immune system. The OSS can promote the development of thymus and bone marrow, perform immune surveillance, strengthen immune defense, and maintain immune homeostasis. Correspondingly, OT can inhibit inflammation, exert antibiotic-like effect, promote wound healing and regeneration, and suppress stress-associated immune disorders. In this process, the OSS can release OT to act on immune system directly by activating OT receptors or through modulating activities of other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and autonomic nervous system indirectly. However, our understandings of the role of the OSS in neuroendocrine regulation of immune system are largely incomplete, particularly its relationship with other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and the vasopressin-secreting system that coexists with the OSS in the HNS. In addition, it remains unclear about the relationship between the OSS and peripherally produced OT in immune regulation, particularly intrathymic OT that is known to elicit central immunological self-tolerance of T-cells to hypophysial hormones. In this work, we provide a brief review of current knowledge of the features of OSS regulation of the immune system and of potential approaches that mediate OSS coordination of the activities of entire neuroendocrine-immune network.

  4. Approaches Mediating Oxytocin Regulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Stephani C.; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuroendocrine system is mainly composed of the neural structures regulating hormone secretion from the pituitary gland and has been considered as the higher regulatory center of the immune system. Recently, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) emerged as an important component of neuroendocrine–immune network, wherein the oxytocin (OT)-secreting system (OSS) plays an essential role. The OSS, consisting of OT neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, their several accessory nuclei and associated structures, can integrate neural, endocrine, metabolic, and immune information and plays a pivotal role in the development and functions of the immune system. The OSS can promote the development of thymus and bone marrow, perform immune surveillance, strengthen immune defense, and maintain immune homeostasis. Correspondingly, OT can inhibit inflammation, exert antibiotic-like effect, promote wound healing and regeneration, and suppress stress-associated immune disorders. In this process, the OSS can release OT to act on immune system directly by activating OT receptors or through modulating activities of other hypothalamic–pituitary–immune axes and autonomic nervous system indirectly. However, our understandings of the role of the OSS in neuroendocrine regulation of immune system are largely incomplete, particularly its relationship with other hypothalamic–pituitary–immune axes and the vasopressin-secreting system that coexists with the OSS in the HNS. In addition, it remains unclear about the relationship between the OSS and peripherally produced OT in immune regulation, particularly intrathymic OT that is known to elicit central immunological self-tolerance of T-cells to hypophysial hormones. In this work, we provide a brief review of current knowledge of the features of OSS regulation of the immune system and of potential approaches that mediate OSS coordination of the activities of entire neuroendocrine–immune

  5. Effects of In Vitro Exposure to Diarrheic Toxin Producer Prorocentrum lima on Gene Expressions Related to Cell Cycle Regulation and Immune Response in Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Background Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP) associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA) causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3–5 mm). The Pacific oysters were fed with three dinoflagellate concentrations: 0.3, 3, and 30×103 cells mL−1 along with a nontoxic control diet of Isochrysis galbana. The effects of P. lima on C. gigas were followed by analyzing expression levels of a total of four genes, three involved in cell cycle regulation and one in immune response by polymerase chain reaction and real time quantitative PCR, where changes in time and cell concentration were found. The highest expression levels were found in oysters fed 3×103 cells mL−1 at 168 h for the cycle regulator p21 protein (9 fold), chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (8 fold), elongation factor 2 (2 fold), and lipopolysaccharide/β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (13 fold above base line). Additionally, the transcript level of all the genes decreased in oysters fed wich the mixed diet 30×103 cells mL−1 of dinoflagellate after 72 h and was lowest in the chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (0.9 fold below baseline). Conclusions On C. gigas the whole cell ingestion of P lima caused a clear mRNA modulation expression of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune system. Over-expression could be related to DNA damage, disturbances in cell cycle continuity, probably a genotoxic effect, as well as an activation of its innate immune system as first line of defense. PMID:24825133

  6. Helminth Infections and Host Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McSorley, Henry J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Helminth parasites infect almost one-third of the world's population, primarily in tropical regions. However, regions where helminth parasites are endemic record much lower prevalences of allergies and autoimmune diseases, suggesting that parasites may protect against immunopathological syndromes. Most helminth diseases are spectral in nature, with a large proportion of relatively asymptomatic cases and a subset of patients who develop severe pathologies. The maintenance of the asymptomatic state is now recognized as reflecting an immunoregulatory environment, which may be promoted by parasites, and involves multiple levels of host regulatory cells and cytokines; a breakdown of this regulation is observed in pathological disease. Currently, there is much interest in whether helminth-associated immune regulation may ameliorate allergy and autoimmunity, with investigations in both laboratory models and human trials. Understanding and exploiting the interactions between these parasites and the host regulatory network are therefore likely to highlight new strategies to control both infectious and immunological diseases. PMID:23034321

  7. Temporal anomaly detection: an artificial immune approach based on T cell activation, clonal size regulation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mário J; Correia, Manuel E

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an artificial immune system (AIS) based on Grossman's tunable activation threshold (TAT) for temporal anomaly detection. We describe the generic AIS framework and the TAT model adopted for simulating T Cells behaviour, emphasizing two novel important features: the temporal dynamic adjustment of T Cells clonal size and its associated homeostasis mechanism. We also present some promising results obtained with artificially generated data sets, aiming to test the appropriateness of using TAT in dynamic changing environments, to distinguish new unseen patterns as part of what should be detected as normal or as anomalous. We conclude by discussing results obtained thus far with artificially generated data sets.

  8. Regulation of chronic inflammatory and immune processes by extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Booker, Cori N.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all cell types release extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are derived either from multivesicular bodies or from the plasma membrane. EVs contain a subset of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids from the cell from which they are derived. EV factors, particularly small RNAs such as miRNAs, likely play important roles in cell-to-cell communication both locally and systemically. Most of the functions associated with EVs are in the regulation of immune responses to pathogens and cancer, as well as in regulating autoimmunity. This Review will focus on the different modes of immune regulation, both direct and indirect, by EVs. The therapeutic utility of EVs for the regulation of immune responses will also be discussed. PMID:27035808

  9. Regulation of chronic inflammatory and immune processes by extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul D; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Booker, Cori N

    2016-04-01

    Almost all cell types release extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are derived either from multivesicular bodies or from the plasma membrane. EVs contain a subset of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids from the cell from which they are derived. EV factors, particularly small RNAs such as miRNAs, likely play important roles in cell-to-cell communication both locally and systemically. Most of the functions associated with EVs are in the regulation of immune responses to pathogens and cancer, as well as in regulating autoimmunity. This Review will focus on the different modes of immune regulation, both direct and indirect, by EVs. The therapeutic utility of EVs for the regulation of immune responses will also be discussed.

  10. Immune Regulation by Pericytes: Modulating Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Rocío; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Sanz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes (PC) are mural cells that surround endothelial cells in small blood vessels. PC have traditionally been credited with structural functions, being essential for vessel maturation and stabilization. However, an accumulating body of evidence suggests that PC also display immune properties. They can respond to a series of pro-inflammatory stimuli and are able to sense different types of danger due to their expression of functional pattern-recognition receptors, contributing to the onset of innate immune responses. In this context, PC not only secrete a variety of chemokines but also overexpress adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 involved in the control of immune cell trafficking across vessel walls. In addition to their role in innate immunity, PC are involved in adaptive immunity. It has been reported that interaction with PC anergizes T cells, which is attributed, at least in part, to the expression of PD-L1. As components of the tumor microenvironment, PC can also modulate the antitumor immune response. However, their role is complex, and further studies will be required to better understand the crosstalk of PC with immune cells in order to consider them as potential therapeutic targets. In any case, PC will be looked at with new eyes by immunologists from now on. PMID:27867386

  11. Regulation of immune responsiveness in vivo by disrupting an early T-cell signaling event using a cell-permeable peptide.

    PubMed

    Guimond, David M; Cam, Nicholas R; Hirve, Nupura; Duan, Wei; Lambris, John D; Croft, Michael; Tsoukas, Constantine D

    2013-01-01

    The inducible T cell kinase (ITK) regulates type 2 (Th2) cytokines that provide defense against certain parasitic and bacterial infections and are involved in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation such as allergic asthma. Activation of ITK requires the interaction of its SH3 domain with the poly-proline region of its signaling partner, the SH2 domain containing leukocyte phosphoprotein of 76 kilodaltons (SLP-76). The specific disruption of the ITK-SH3/SLP-76 poly-proline interaction in vitro by a cell-permeable competitive inhibitor peptide (R9-QQP) interferes with the activation of ITK and the transduction of its cellular functions in T lymphocytes. In the present investigation, we assessed the effects of R9-QQP treatment on the induction of an in vivo immune response as represented by lung inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma. We found that mice treated with R9-QQP and sensitized and challenged with the surrogate allergen ovalbumin (OVA) display significant inhibition of lung inflammation in a peptide-specific manner. Thus, parameters of the allergic response, such as airway hyper-responsiveness, suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration, reduction of bronchial mucus accumulation, and production of relevant cytokines from draining lymph nodes were significantly suppressed. These findings represent the first demonstration of the biological significance of the interaction between ITK and SLP-76 in the induction of an immune response in a whole animal model and specifically underscore the significance of the ITK-SH3 domain interaction with the poly-proline region of SLP-76 in the development of an inflammatory response. Furthermore, the experimental approach of intracellular peptide-mediated inhibition might be applicable to the study of other important intracellular interactions thus providing a paradigm for dissecting signal transduction pathways.

  12. Regulation of Immune Responsiveness In Vivo by Disrupting an Early T-Cell Signaling Event Using a Cell-Permeable Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, David M.; Cam, Nicholas R.; Hirve, Nupura; Duan, Wei; Lambris, John D.; Croft, Michael; Tsoukas, Constantine D.

    2013-01-01

    The inducible T cell kinase (ITK) regulates type 2 (Th2) cytokines that provide defense against certain parasitic and bacterial infections and are involved in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation such as allergic asthma. Activation of ITK requires the interaction of its SH3 domain with the poly-proline region of its signaling partner, the SH2 domain containing leukocyte phosphoprotein of 76 kilodaltons (SLP-76). The specific disruption of the ITK-SH3/SLP-76 poly-proline interaction in vitro by a cell-permeable competitive inhibitor peptide (R9-QQP) interferes with the activation of ITK and the transduction of its cellular functions in T lymphocytes. In the present investigation, we assessed the effects of R9-QQP treatment on the induction of an in vivo immune response as represented by lung inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma. We found that mice treated with R9-QQP and sensitized and challenged with the surrogate allergen ovalbumin (OVA) display significant inhibition of lung inflammation in a peptide-specific manner. Thus, parameters of the allergic response, such as airway hyper-responsiveness, suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration, reduction of bronchial mucus accumulation, and production of relevant cytokines from draining lymph nodes were significantly suppressed. These findings represent the first demonstration of the biological significance of the interaction between ITK and SLP-76 in the induction of an immune response in a whole animal model and specifically underscore the significance of the ITK-SH3 domain interaction with the poly-proline region of SLP-76 in the development of an inflammatory response. Furthermore, the experimental approach of intracellular peptide-mediated inhibition might be applicable to the study of other important intracellular interactions thus providing a paradigm for dissecting signal transduction pathways. PMID:23667652

  13. Hyaluronan as an Immune Regulator in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    NOBLE, PAUL W.; LIANG, JIURONG; JIANG, DIANHUA

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation and turnover of extracellular matrix components are the hallmarks of tissue injury. Fragmented hyaluronan stimulates the expression of inflammatory genes by a variety of immune cells at the injury site. Hyaluronan binds to a number of cell surface proteins on a variety of cell types. Hyaluronan fragments signal through both Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR2 as well as CD44 to stimulate inflammatory genes in inflammatory cells. Hyaluronan is also present on the cell surface of epithelial cells and provides protection against tissue damage by interacting with TLR2 and TLR4 on these parenchymal cells. Hyaluronan and hyaluronan-binding proteins regulate inflammation, tissue injury and repair through regulating inflammatory cell recruitment, release of inflammatory cytokines, and stem cell migration. This review focuses on the role of hyaluronan as an immune regulator in human diseases. PMID:21248167

  14. Erlotinib inhibits T-cell-mediated immune response via down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Qiong; Gu Yanhong; Zheng Wei; Wu Xingxin; Gong Fangyuan; Gu Liyun; Sun Yang; Xu Qiang

    2011-03-01

    Erlotinib is a potent inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase and has been demonstrated to treat advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer to prolong survival after failure of first-line or second-line chemotherapy. However, little is known about its effects on immune system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the immunosuppressive activity of erlotinib on T lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and further explore its potential molecular mechanism. Erlotinib exerted a significant inhibition on the T cell proliferation and activation induced by concanavalin A, anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, staphylococcal enterotoxin B or phorbol myristate acetate respectively in a concentration-dependent manner and it also inhibited the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-2 and IFN-{gamma} of activated T cells. Further study showed that erlotinib caused G0/G1 arrest and suppressed the phosphorylations of c-Raf, ERK and Akt in activated T cells. Moreover, erlotinib significantly ameliorated picryl chloride-induced ear contact dermatitis in a dose-dependent manner in vivo. In summary, these findings suggest that erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. - Graphical abstract: Erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. Display Omitted

  15. Identification of transcriptional regulators in the mouse immune system.

    PubMed

    Jojic, Vladimir; Shay, Tal; Sylvia, Katelyn; Zuk, Or; Sun, Xin; Kang, Joonsoo; Regev, Aviv; Koller, Daphne; Best, Adam J; Knell, Jamie; Goldrath, Ananda; Joic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne; Shay, Tal; Regev, Aviv; Cohen, Nadia; Brennan, Patrick; Brenner, Michael; Kim, Francis; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Wagers, Amy; Heng, Tracy; Ericson, Jeffrey; Rothamel, Katherine; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Bezman, Natalie A; Sun, Joseph C; Min-Oo, Gundula; Kim, Charlie C; Lanier, Lewis L; Miller, Jennifer; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Monach, Paul; Blair, David A; Dustin, Michael L; Shinton, Susan A; Hardy, Richard R; Laidlaw, David; Collins, Jim; Gazit, Roi; Rossi, Derrick J; Malhotra, Nidhi; Sylvia, Katelyn; Kang, Joonsoo; Kreslavsky, Taras; Fletcher, Anne; Elpek, Kutlu; Bellemarte-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Turley, Shannon

    2013-06-01

    The differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into cells of the immune system has been studied extensively in mammals, but the transcriptional circuitry that controls it is still only partially understood. Here, the Immunological Genome Project gene-expression profiles across mouse immune lineages allowed us to systematically analyze these circuits. To analyze this data set we developed Ontogenet, an algorithm for reconstructing lineage-specific regulation from gene-expression profiles across lineages. Using Ontogenet, we found differentiation stage-specific regulators of mouse hematopoiesis and identified many known hematopoietic regulators and 175 previously unknown candidate regulators, as well as their target genes and the cell types in which they act. Among the previously unknown regulators, we emphasize the role of ETV5 in the differentiation of γδ T cells. As the transcriptional programs of human and mouse cells are highly conserved, it is likely that many lessons learned from the mouse model apply to humans.

  16. TH1 and TH2 lymphocyte development and regulation of TH cell-mediated immune responses of the skin.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Tilo; Röcken, Martin; Carballido, José M

    2004-01-01

    Since the first description of the subpopulations of TH1 and TH2 cells, insights into the development and control of these cells as two polarized and physiologically balanced subsets have been generated. In particular, implications of the TH1-TH2 concept for TH cell-mediated skin disorders have been discovered. This article will review the basic factors that control the development of TH1 and TH2 cells, such as the cytokines IL-12 and IL-4 and transcription factors, the possible role of costimulatory molecules, and specialized dendritic cell populations. These regulatory mechanisms will be discussed in the context of polarized TH1 or TH2 skin disorders such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Also presented are the principles that govern how chemokines and chemokine receptors recruit TH1 and TH2 cells to inflammatory sites and how they amplify these polarized TH cell responses. All of these concepts, including a novel role for IL-4-inducing TH1 responses, can contribute to the design of better therapeutic strategies to modulate TH cell-mediated immune responses.

  17. [Psychoneuroimmunology--regulation of immunity at the systemic level].

    PubMed

    Boranić, Milivoj; Sabioncello, Ante; Gabrilovac, Jelka

    2008-01-01

    Innate and acquired immune reactions are controlled by their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, ie. by an array of cytokines that mediate communication among cells of the immune system itself and with other cells and tissues, e. g. in areas of inflammation. In addition, the immune system is also subjected to systemic regulation by the vegetative and endocrine systems since immune cells express receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones. Neuroendocrine signals may enhance or suppress the immune reaction, accelerate or slow it, but do not affect specificity. Various stressful factors, including the psychosocial ones, affect immunity. In turn, cytokines generated by the immune system influence hormonal secretion and central nervous system, producing specific behavioral changes (the "sickness behavior") accompanying infectious and inflammatory diseases. That includes somnolence, loss of apetite, depression or anxiety and decrease of cognitive abilities, attention and memory. Local immune systems in skin and mucosa are also subjected to systemic neuroendocrine regulation and possess intrinsic neuroregulatory networks as well. These mechanisms render skin and respiratory and digestive tracts responsive to various forms of stress. Examples are neurodermitis, asthma and ulcerative colitis. In children, the immune and the neuroendocrine systems are still developing, particularly in fetal, neonatal and early infant periods, and exposure to stressful experiences at that time may result in late consequences in the form of deficient immunity or greater risks for allergic or autoimmune reactions. Recognition of the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms in regulation of immunity helps us understand alterations and disturbances of immune reactions under the influence of stressful factors but so far has not produced reliable therapeutic implications. Psychosocial interventions involving the child and its family may be useful.

  18. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ-inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-08-18

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ-inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ-inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ-dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ-induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2-Irga6 axis of IFN-γ-dependent cell-autonomous immunity.

  19. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ–inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C.; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M.; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ–inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ–inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ–dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ–induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2–Irga6 axis of IFN-γ–dependent cell-autonomous immunity. PMID:26240314

  20. Fas-ligand-mediated paracrine T cell regulation by the receptor NKG2D in tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Groh, Veronika; Smythe, Kimberly; Dai, Zhenpeng; Spies, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Tumor-associated ligands of the activating NKG2D receptor can effectively stimulate T cell responses at early but not late stages of tumor growth. In late-stage human tumor settings, we observed MIC-driven proliferation of NKG2D(+)CD4(+) T cells that produced the cytokine Fas ligand (FasL) as a result of NKG2D costimulation but were themselves protected from Fas-mediated growth arrest. In contrast, FasL suppressed proliferation of T cells in vitro that did not receive NKG2D costimulation. Similar observations with normal peripheral blood NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells demonstrated unrecognized NKG2D-mediated immune functions, whereby FasL release promotes tumor cell death and NKG2D costimulation prolongs T cell survival. These effects, beneficial in conditions of limited NKG2D ligand expression, may be counterweighed when massive expression and shedding of MIC occurs, such as in some late-stage tumors, that causes sustained NKG2D costimulation and population expansion of immunosuppressive T cells.

  1. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  2. Autophagy negatively regulates cell death by controlling NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling during senescence and the innate immune response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kohki; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Kusano, Miyako; Consonni, Chiara; Panstruga, Ralph; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Ken

    2009-09-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular process for vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components. In higher plants, autophagy defects result in early senescence and excessive immunity-related programmed cell death (PCD) irrespective of nutrient conditions; however, the mechanisms by which cells die in the absence of autophagy have been unclear. Here, we demonstrate a conserved requirement for salicylic acid (SA) signaling for these phenomena in autophagy-defective mutants (atg mutants). The atg mutant phenotypes of accelerated PCD in senescence and immunity are SA signaling dependent but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling pathways. Application of an SA agonist induces the senescence/cell death phenotype in SA-deficient atg mutants but not in atg npr1 plants, suggesting that the cell death phenotypes in the atg mutants are dependent on the SA signal transducer NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. We also show that autophagy is induced by the SA agonist. These findings imply that plant autophagy operates a novel negative feedback loop modulating SA signaling to negatively regulate senescence and immunity-related PCD.

  3. Adaptive Immune Regulation of Glial Homeostasis as an Immunization Strategy for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kosloski, Lisa M.; Ha, Duy M.; Stone, David K.; Hutter, Jessica A. L.; Pichler, Michael R.; Reynolds, Ashley D.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Mosley, R. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, notably Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, are amongst the most devastating disorders afflicting the elderly. Currently, no curative treatments or treatments that interdict disease progression exist. Over the past decade, immunization strategies have been proposed to combat disease progression. Such strategies induce humoral immune responses against misfolded protein aggregates to facilitate their clearance. Robust adaptive immunity against misfolded proteins, however, accelerates disease progression, precipitated by induced effector T cell responses that lead to encephalitis and neuronal death. Since then, mechanisms that attenuate such adaptive neurotoxic immune responses have been sought. We propose that shifting the balance between effector and regulatory T cell activity can attenuate neurotoxic inflammatory events. This review summarizes advances in immune regulation to achieve a homeostatic glial response for therapeutic gain. Promising new ways to optimize immunization schemes and measure their clinical efficacy are also discussed. PMID:20524958

  4. Ability of Interleukin-33- and Immune Complex-Triggered Activation of Human Mast Cells to Down-Regulate Monocyte-Mediated Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Felice; Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; Townsend, Michael J; de Paulis, Amato; Marone, Gianni; Huizinga, Tom W J; Pitzalis, Costantino; Toes, René E M

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, their activation by interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been linked to the development of arthritis in animal models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional responses of human mast cells to IL-33 in the context of RA. Human mast cells were stimulated with IL-33 combined with plate-bound IgG or IgG anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and their effects on monocyte activation were evaluated. Cellular interactions of mast cells in RA synovium were assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for mast cell-specific genes was evaluated in synovial biopsy tissue from patients with early RA who were naive to treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. IL-33 induced the up-regulation of Fcγ receptor type IIa and enhanced the activation of mast cells by IgG, including IgG ACPAs, as indicated by the production of CXCL8/IL-8. Intriguingly, mast cell activation triggered with IL-33 and IgG led to the release of mediators such as histamine and IL-10, which inhibited monocyte activation. Synovial mast cells were found in contact with CD14+ monocyte/macrophages. Finally, mRNA levels of mast cell-specific genes were inversely associated with disease severity, and IL-33 mRNA levels showed an inverse correlation with the levels of proinflammatory markers. When human mast cells are activated by IL-33, an immunomodulatory phenotype develops, with human mast cells gaining the ability to suppress monocyte activation via the release of IL-10 and histamine. These findings, together with the presence of synovial mast cell-monocyte interactions and the inverse association between the expression of mast cell genes at the synovial level and disease activity, suggest that these newly described mast cell-mediated inhibitory pathways might have a functional relevance in the pathogenesis of RA. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. [Regulation of allergy by innate immune system].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yutaro; Akira, Shizuo

    2009-11-01

    Allergy is an immune disease including asthma. Activation of Th2 response, such as production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 from CD4+ T cells and IgG1 or IgE from B cells is responsible for allergy. Activation of acquired immune system requires preceding activation of innate immunity, therefore innate immunity may control Th2 response and allergy. Recent studies revealed that dendritic cells, epithelial cells, and basophils play central roles in the initiation of Th2 response. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding on the control of Th2 and allergic responses by innate immune system, and discuss recent findings on house dust mite-induced allergic response based on these understandings.

  6. Identification of transcriptional regulators in the mouse immune system

    PubMed Central

    Jojic, Vladimir; Shay, Tal; Sylvia, Katelyn; Zuk, Or; Sun, Xin; Kang, Joonsoo; Regev, Aviv; Koller, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into immune cells has been extensively studied in mammals, but the transcriptional circuitry controlling it is still only partially understood. Here, the Immunological Genome Project gene expression profiles across mouse immune lineages allowed us to systematically analyze these circuits. Using a computational algorithm called Ontogenet, we uncovered differentiation-stage specific regulators of mouse hematopoiesis, identifying many known hematopoietic regulators, and 175 new candidate regulators, their target genes, and the cell types in which they act. Among the novel regulators, we highlight the role of ETV5 in γδT cells differntiation. Since the transcriptional program of human and mouse cells is highly conserved1, it is likely that many lessons learned from the mouse model apply to humans. PMID:23624555

  7. Antigen processing and immune regulation in the response to tumours.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Emma; James, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The MHC class I and II antigen processing and presentation pathways display peptides to circulating CD8(+) cytotoxic and CD4(+) helper T cells respectively to enable pathogens and transformed cells to be identified. Once detected, T cells become activated and either directly kill the infected / transformed cells (CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes) or orchestrate the activation of the adaptive immune response (CD4(+) T cells). The immune surveillance of transformed/tumour cells drives alteration of the antigen processing and presentation pathways to evade detection and hence the immune response. Evasion of the immune response is a significant event tumour development and considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. To avoid immune recognition, tumours employ a multitude of strategies with most resulting in a down-regulation of the MHC class I expression at the cell surface, significantly impairing the ability of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes to recognize the tumour. Alteration of the expression of key players in antigen processing not only affects MHC class I expression but also significantly alters the repertoire of peptides being presented. These modified peptide repertoires may serve to further reduce the presentation of tumour-specific/associated antigenic epitopes to aid immune evasion and tumour progression. Here we review the modifications to the antigen processing and presentation pathway in tumours and how it affects the anti-tumour immune response, considering the role of tumour-infiltrating cell populations and highlighting possible future therapeutic targets.

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    IVASHKIV, LIONEL B.; PARK, SUNG HO

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in myeloid cells is crucial for cell differentiation and activation in response to developmental and environmental cues. Epigenetic control involves posttranslational modification of DNA or chromatin, and is also coupled to upstream signaling pathways and transcription factors. In this review, we summarize key epigenetic events and how dynamics in the epigenetic landscape of myeloid cells shape the development, immune activation, and innate immune memory. PMID:27337441

  9. Immune privilege of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ichiryu, Naoki; Fairchild, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Immune privilege provides protection to vital tissues or cells of the body when foreign antigens are introduced into these sites. The modern concept of relative immune privilege applies to a variety of tissues and anatomical structures, including the hair follicles and mucosal surfaces. Even sites of chronic inflammation and developing tumors may acquire immune privilege by recruiting immunoregulatory effector cells. Adult stem cells are no exception. For their importance and vitality, many adult stem cell populations are believed to be immune privileged. A preimplantation-stage embryo that derives from a totipotent stem cell (i.e., a fertilized oocyte) must be protected from maternal allo-rejection for successful implantation and development to occur. Embryonic stem cells, laboratory-derived cell lines of preimplantation blastocyst-origin, may, therefore, retain some of the immunological properties of the developing embryo. However, embryonic stem cells and their differentiated tissue derivatives transplanted into a recipient do not necessarily have an ability to subvert immune responses to the extent required to exploit their pluripotency for regenerative medicine. In this review, an extended definition of immune privilege is developed and the capacity of adult and embryonic stem cells to display both relative and acquired immune privilege is discussed. Furthermore, we explore how these intrinsic properties of stem cells may one day be harnessed for therapeutic gain.

  10. Ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) oligopeptides regulate innate and adaptive immune responses in mice via increased macrophage phagocytosis capacity, NK cell activity and Th cells secretion.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Ren, Jin-Wei; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qi-He; Zhao, Jian; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Wang, Jun-Bo; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Li, Yong

    2017-09-06

    Traditionally used as a restorative medicine, ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) has been the most widely used and acclaimed herb in Chinese communities for thousands of years. To investigate the immune-modulating activity of ginseng oligopeptides (GOP), 420 healthy female BALB/c mice were intragastrically administered distilled water (control), whey protein (0.15 g per kg body weight (BW)), and GOP 0.0375, 0.075, 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 g per kg BW for 30 days. Blood samples from mice were collected from the ophthalmic venous plexus and then sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Seven assays were conducted to determine the immunomodulatory effects of GOP on innate and adaptive immune responses, followed by flow cytometry to investigate spleen T lymphocyte sub-populations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays to investigate serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels, and ELISA to investigate intestinally secreted immunoglobulin to study the mechanism of GOP affecting the immune system. Our results showed that GOP was able to enhance innate and adaptive immune responses in mice by improving cell-mediated and humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis capacity and NK cell activity. Notably, the use of GOP revealed a better immune-modulating activity compared to whey protein. We conclude that the immune-modulating activity might be due to the increased macrophage phagocytosis capacity and NK cell activity, and the enhancement of T and Th cells, as well as IL-2, IL-6 and IL-12 secretion and IgA, IgG1 and IgG2b production. These results indicate that GOP could be considered a good candidate that may improve immune functions if used as a dietary supplement, with a dosage that ranges from 0.3 to 0.6 g per kg BW.

  11. OsCUL3a Negatively Regulates Cell Death and Immunity by Degrading OsNPR1 in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingxin; Yu, Ning; Zhao, Chunde; Zhan, Xiaodeng; Wu, Weixun; Chen, Daibo; Wei, Xiangjin; Cheng, Shihua; Cao, Liyong

    2017-01-01

    Cullin3-based RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL3), composed of Cullin3 (CUL3), RBX1, and BTB proteins, are involved in plant immunity, but the function of CUL3 in the process is largely unknown. Here, we show that rice (Oryza sativa) OsCUL3a is important for the regulation of cell death and immunity. The rice lesion mimic mutant oscul3a displays a significant increase in the accumulation of flg22- and chitin-induced reactive oxygen species, and in pathogenesis-related gene expression as well as resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae and Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae. We cloned the OsCUL3a gene via a map-based strategy and found that the lesion mimic phenotype of oscul3a is associated with the early termination of OsCUL3a protein. Interaction assays showed that OsCUL3a interacts with both OsRBX1a and OsRBX1b to form a multisubunit CRL in rice. Strikingly, OsCUL3a interacts with and degrades OsNPR1, which acts as a positive regulator of cell death in rice. Accumulation of OsNPR1 protein is greater in the oscul3a mutant than in the wild type. Furthermore, the oscul3a osnpr1 double mutant does not exhibit the lesion mimic phenotype of the oscul3a mutant. Our data demonstrate that OsCUL3a negatively regulates cell death and immunity by degrading OsNPR1 in rice. PMID:28100706

  12. Transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily member 2 cation channel regulates detrimental immune cell invasion in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Melzer, Nico; Schattling, Benjamin; Göb, Eva; Hicking, Gordon; Arunachalam, Priyadharshini; Bittner, Stefan; Ufer, Friederike; Herrmann, Alexander M; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Gerloff, Christian; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G; Friese, Manuel A; Magnus, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Brain injury during stroke results in oxidative stress and the release of factors that include extracellular Ca(2+), hydrogen peroxide, adenosine diphosphate ribose, and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. These alterations of the extracellular milieu change the activity of transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily member 2 (TRPM2), a nonselective cation channel expressed in the central nervous system and the immune system. Our goal was to evaluate the contribution of TRPM2 to the tissue damage after stroke. In accordance with current quality guidelines, we independently characterized Trpm2 in a murine ischemic stroke model in 2 different laboratories. Gene deficiency of Trpm2 resulted in significantly improved neurological outcome and decreased infarct size. Besides an already known moderate neuroprotective effect of Trpm2 deficiency in vitro, ischemic brain invasion by neutrophils and macrophages was particularly reduced in Trpm2-deficient mice. Bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that Trpm2 deficiency in the peripheral immune system is responsible for the protective phenotype. Furthermore, experiments with mixed bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that Trpm2 is essential for the migration of neutrophils and, to a lesser extent, also of macrophages into ischemic hemispheres. Notably, the pharmacological TRPM2 inhibitor, N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid, was equally protective in the stroke model. Although a neuroprotective effect of TRPM2 in vitro is well known, we can show for the first time that the detrimental role of TRPM2 in stroke primarily depends on its role in activating peripheral immune cells. Targeting TRPM2 systemically represents a promising therapeutic approach for ischemic stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Immune regulation of metabolic homeostasis in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Artis, David

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent disease worldwide. While genetic and environmental factors are known to regulate the development of obesity and associated metabolic diseases, emerging studies indicate that innate and adaptive immune cell responses in adipose tissue have critical roles in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. In the lean state, type 2 cytokine-associated immune cell responses predominate in white adipose tissue and protect against weight gain and insulin resistance through direct effects on adipocytes and elicitation of beige adipose. In obesity, these metabolically beneficial immunologic pathways become dysregulated, and adipocytes and other factors initiate metabolically deleterious type 1 inflammation that impairs glucose metabolism. This review discusses our current understanding of the functions of different types of adipose tissue, how immune cells regulate adipocyte function and metabolic homeostasis in the context of health and disease, and highlights the potential of targeting immuno-metabolic pathways as a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity and associated diseases. PMID:25815992

  14. Chemoattractant Receptors BLT1 and CXCR3 Regulate Antitumor Immunity by Facilitating CD8+ T Cell Migration into Tumors.

    PubMed

    Chheda, Zinal S; Sharma, Rajesh K; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Luster, Andrew D; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapies have shown considerable efficacy for the treatment of various cancers, but a multitude of patients remain unresponsive for various reasons, including poor homing of T cells into tumors. In this study, we investigated the roles of the leukotriene B4 receptor, BLT1, and CXCR3, the receptor for CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, under endogenous as well as vaccine-induced antitumor immune response in a syngeneic murine model of B16 melanoma. Significant accelerations in tumor growth and reduced survival were observed in both BLT1(-/-) and CXCR3(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes revealed significant reduction of CD8(+) T cells in the tumors of BLT1(-/-) and CXCR3(-/-) mice as compared with WT tumors, despite their similar frequencies in the periphery. Adoptive transfer of WT but not BLT1(-/-) or CXCR3(-/-) CTLs significantly reduced tumor growth in Rag2(-/-) mice, a function attributed to reduced infiltration of knockout CTLs into tumors. Cotransfer experiments suggested that WT CTLs do not facilitate the infiltration of knockout CTLs to tumors. Anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) treatment reduced the tumor growth rate in WT mice but not in BLT1(-/-), CXCR3(-/-), or BLT1(-/-)CXCR3(-/-) mice. The loss of efficacy correlated with failure of the knockout CTLs to infiltrate into tumors upon anti-PD-1 treatment, suggesting an obligate requirement for both BLT1 and CXCR3 in mediating anti-PD-1 based antitumor immune response. These results demonstrate a critical role for both BLT1 and CXCR3 in CTL migration to tumors and thus may be targeted to enhance efficacy of CTL-based immunotherapies.

  15. Regulation of immune responses in SJL and F1 hybrid mice by gamma-irradiated syngeneic lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, I.R.; Nagase, F.; Bell, M.K.; Ponzio, N.M.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Syngeneic mixed lymphocyte-stimulating la+ lymphomas of SJL mice (reticulum cell sarcoma(s) (RCS)) were found to modulate immune responses in vivo. Simultaneous injection of 2 X 10(7) gamma-irradiated or glutaraldehyde-fixed RCS cells with the antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP)-Ficoll markedly suppressed the subsequent plaque-forming cell response in the spleen. The suppression of the anti-SRBC response was prevented by pretreatment of the mice with cyclophosphamide, whereas the suppression of the anti-TNP-Ficoll response was not affected. RCS injection induced high interferon serum titers within 24 hours after injection, which were not prevented by pretreatment with cyclophosphamide. Injection of gamma-irradiated RCS cells (gamma-RCS) or RCS cell extract 2 days prior to antigen enhanced the anti-SRBC but markedly suppressed the anti- TNP-Ficoll response. Injection of RCS both on day -2 and day 0 enhanced the anti-SRBC response. SJL mice 8-9 months of age showed much less or no suppression when gamma-RCS cells were injected on day 0. Certain F1 hybrids of SJL also showed the gamma-RCS-induced suppression of the anti-SRBC response. Suppression was seen in SJL X BALB.B but not in SJL X BALB/c mice and in SJL X A.TH but not in SJL X A.TL mice, suggesting an I-region effect. F1 hybrids of SJL by B10 background mice showed no significant suppression. Enhancement of the anti-SRBC response by prior injection of gamma-RCS was seen in all F1 hybrid mice examined.

  16. Endothelial TWIK-related potassium channel-1 (TREK1) regulates immune-cell trafficking into the CNS.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Stefan; Ruck, Tobias; Schuhmann, Michael K; Herrmann, Alexander M; Moha ou Maati, Hamid; Bobak, Nicole; Göbel, Kerstin; Langhauser, Friederike; Stegner, David; Ehling, Petra; Borsotto, Marc; Pape, Hans-Christian; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Heurteaux, Catherine; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Budde, Thomas; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G

    2013-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an integral part of the neurovascular unit (NVU). The NVU is comprised of endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions resting on a parenchymal basement membrane ensheathed by pericytes, smooth muscle cells and a layer of astrocyte end feet. Circulating blood cells, such as leukocytes, complete the NVU. BBB disruption is common in several neurological diseases, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. We analyzed the role of TWIK-related potassium channel-1 (TREK1, encoded by KCNK2) in human and mouse endothelial cells and the BBB. TREK1 was downregulated in endothelial cells by treatment with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Blocking TREK1 increased leukocyte transmigration, whereas TREK1 activation had the opposite effect. We identified altered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling, actin remodeling and upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules as potential mechanisms of increased migration in TREK1-deficient (Kcnk2(-/-)) cells. In Kcnk2(-/-) mice, brain endothelial cells showed an upregulation of the cellular adhesion molecules ICAM1, VCAM1 and PECAM1 and facilitated leukocyte trafficking into the CNS. Following the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by immunization with a myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG)35-55 peptide, Kcnk2(-/-) mice showed higher EAE severity scores that were accompanied by increased cellular infiltrates in the central nervous system (CNS). The severity of EAE was attenuated in mice given the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis drug riluzole or fed a diet enriched with linseed oil (which contains the TREK-1 activating omega-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid). These beneficial effects were reduced in Kcnk2(-/-) mice, suggesting TREK-1 activating compounds may be used therapeutically to treat diseases related to BBB dysfunction.

  17. Moraxella catarrhalis decreases antiviral innate immune responses by down-regulation of TLR3 via inhibition of p53 in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Annina; Haarmann, Helge; Zahradnik, Sabrina; Frenzel, Katrin; Schreiber, Frauke; Klassert, Tilman E; Heyl, Kerstin A; Endres, Anne-Sophie; Schmidtke, Michaela; Hofmann, Jörg; Slevogt, Hortense

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is complicated by infectious exacerbations with acute worsening of respiratory symptoms. Coinfections of bacterial and viral pathogens are associated with more severe exacerbations. Moraxella catarrhalis is one of the most frequent lower respiratory tract pathogens detected in COPD. We therefore studied the impact of M. catarrhalis on the antiviral innate immune response that is mediated via TLR3 and p53. Molecular interactions between M. catarrhalis and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells as well as Beas-2B cells were studied using flow cytometry, quantitative PCR analysis, chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and ELISA. M. catarrhalis induces a significant down-regulation of TLR3 in human bronchial epithelial cells. In M. catarrhalis-infected cells, expression of p53 was decreased. We detected a reduced binding of p53 to the tlr3 promoter, resulting in reduced TLR3 gene transcription. M. catarrhalis diminished the TLR3-dependent secretion of IFN-β, IFN-λ, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8. In addition in M. catarrhalis infected cells, expression of rhinovirus type 1A RNA was increased compared with uninfected cells. M. catarrhalis reduces antiviral defense functions of bronchial epithelial cells, which may increase susceptibility to viral infections.-Heinrich, A., Haarmann, H., Zahradnik, S., Frenzel, K., Schreiber, F., Klassert, T. E., Heyl, K. A., Endres, A.-S., Schmidtke, M., Hofmann, J., Slevogt, H. Moraxella catarrhalis decreases antiviral innate immune responses by down-regulation of TLR3 via inhibition of p53 in human bronchial epithelial cells.

  18. CCR10 regulates balanced maintenance and function of resident regulatory and effector T cells to promote immune homeostasis in the skin.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mingcan; Hu, Shaomin; Fu, Yaoyao; Jin, Wensen; Yi, Qiyi; Matsui, Yurika; Yang, Jie; McDowell, Mary Ann; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana; Xiong, Na

    2014-09-01

    CCR10 and CCL27 make up the most skin-specific chemokine receptor/ligand pair implicated in skin allergy and inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This pair is thought to regulate the migration, maintenance, or both of skin T cells and is suggested to be therapeutic targets for treatment of skin diseases. However, the functional importance of CCR10/CCL27 in vivo remains elusive. We sought to determine the expression and function of CCR10 in different subsets of skin T cells under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions to gain a mechanistic insight into the potential roles of CCR10 during skin inflammation. Using heterozygous and homozygous CCR10 knockout/enhanced green fluorescent protein knockin mice, we assessed the expression of CCR10 on regulatory and effector T cells of healthy and inflamed skin induced by chemicals, pathogens, and autoreactive T cells. In addition, we assessed the effect of CCR10 knockout on the maintenance and functions of different T cells and inflammatory status in the skin during different phases of the immune response. CCR10 expression is preferentially induced on memory-like skin-resident T cells and their progenitors for their maintenance in homeostatic skin but not expressed on most skin-infiltrating effector T cells during inflammation. In CCR10 knockout mice the imbalanced presence and dysregulated function of resident regulatory and effector T cells result in over-reactive and prolonged innate and memory responses in the skin, leading to increased clearance of Leishmania species infection in the skin. CCR10 is a critical regulator of skin immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Immune cell promotion of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the major cause of death from cancer, and immunotherapy and chemotherapy have had limited success in reversing its progression. Data from mouse models suggest that the recruitment of immunosuppressive cells to tumours protects metastatic cancer cells from surveillance by killer cells, which nullifies the effects of immunotherapy and thus establishes metastasis. Furthermore, in most cases, tumour-infiltrating immune cells differentiate into cells that promote each step of the metastatic cascade and thus are novel targets for therapy. In this Review, we describe how tumour-infiltrating immune cells contribute to the metastatic cascade and we discuss potential therapeutic strategies to target these cells. PMID:25614318

  20. Chemoattractant receptors BLT1 and CXCR3 regulate antitumor immunity by facilitating CD8+ T cell migration into tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chheda, Zinal S.; Sharma, Rajesh K.; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Luster, Andrew D.; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapies have shown considerable efficacy for the treatment of various cancers but a multitude of patients remain unresponsive for various reasons including poor homing of T cells into tumors. In this study, we investigated the roles of leukotriene B4 receptor - BLT1; and CXCR3, the receptor for CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 under endogenous as well as vaccine induced anti-tumor immune response in a syngeneic murine model of B16 melanoma. Significant acceleration in tumor growth and reduced survival was observed in both BLT1−/− and CXCR3−/− mice as compared to the WT mice. Analysis of tumor infiltrating leukocytes revealed significant reduction of CD8+ T-cells in the tumors of BLT1−/− and CXCR3−/− mice as compared to WT tumors, despite their similar frequencies in periphery. Adoptive transfer of WT but not BLT1−/− or CXCR3−/− CTLs significantly reduced tumor growth in Rag2−/− mice, a function attributed to reduced infiltration of knockout (KO) CTLs into tumors. Co-transfer experiments suggested that WT CTLs do not facilitate the infiltration of KO CTLs to tumors. Anti-PD-1 treatment reduced the tumor growth rate in WT mice but not in BLT1−/−, CXCR3−/− or BLT1−/−CXCR3−/− mice. The loss of efficacy correlated with failure of the knockout CTLs to infiltrate into tumors upon anti-PD1 treatment, suggesting an obligate requirement for both BLT1 and CXCR3 in mediating anti-PD-1 based anti-tumor immune response. These results demonstrate a critical role for both BLT1 and CXCR3 in CTL migration to tumors and thus may be targeted to enhance efficacy of CTL based immunotherapies. PMID:27465528

  1. Necrotising enterocolitis is characterised by disrupted immune regulation and diminished mucosal regulatory (FOXP3)/effector (CD4, CD8) T cell ratios

    PubMed Central

    Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Koyama, Tatsuki; Rock, Michael T; Correa, Hernan; Goettel, Jeremy A; Matta, Pranathi; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Rosen, Michael J; Engelhardt, Brian G; Moore, Daniel J; Polk, D Brent

    2013-01-01

    Background Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in premature infants. Immaturity of gastrointestinal immune regulation may predispose preterm infants to NEC as FOXP3 T regulatory cells (Treg) are critical for intestinal immune homoeostasis. Objective To investigate the hypothesis that abnormal developmental regulation of lamina propria Treg would define premature infants with NEC. Design Lamina propria mononuclear cell populations from surgically resected ileum from 18 patients with NEC and 30 gestational age-matched non-NEC surgical controls were prospectively isolated. Polychromatic flow cytometry was performed to phenotype and analyse lamina propria T cell populations. The cytokine gene expression profile in NEC tissue was compared with that of non-NEC controls. Results The total number of Treg, CD4, or CD8 T cells in each ileum section was independent of gestational age, age or postmenstrual age and similar between patients with NEC and controls. In contrast, the ratio of Treg to CD4 T cells or Treg to CD8 T cells was significantly lower in NEC ileum than in infants without NEC (medians 2.9% vs 6.6%, p=0.001 and medians 6.6% vs 25.9%, p<0.001, respectively). For any given number of CD4 or CD8 T cells, Treg were, on average, 60% lower in NEC ileum than in controls. NEC tissue cytokine gene expression profiles were characteristic of inhibited Treg development or function. Treg/CD4 and Treg/CD8 ratios recovered between initial resection for NEC and reanastomosis. Conclusion The proportion of lamina propria Treg is significantly reduced in the ileum of premature infants with NEC and may contribute to the excessive inflammatory state of this disease. PMID:22267598

  2. Direct Engagement of TLR4 in Invariant NKT Cells Regulates Immune Diseases by Differential IL-4 and IFN-γ Production in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Young; Oh, Sae Jin; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    During interaction with APCs, invariant (i) NKT cells are thought to be indirectly activated by TLR4-dependently activated APCs. However, whether TLR4 directly activates iNKT cells is unknown. Therefore, the expression and function of TLR4 in iNKT cells were investigated. Flow cytometric and confocal microscopic analysis revealed TLR4 expression on the surface and in the endosome of iNKT cells. Upon LPS stimulation, iNKT cells enhanced IFN-γ production, but reduced IL-4 production, in the presence of TCR signals, depending on TLR4, MyD88, TRIF, and the endosome. However, enhanced TLR4-mediated IFN-γ production by iNKT cells did not affect IL-12 production or CD1d expression by DCs. Adoptive transfer of WT, but not TLR4-deficient, iNKT cells promoted antibody-induced arthritis in CD1d−/− mice, suggesting that endogenous TLR4 ligands modulate iNKT cell function in arthritis. Furthermore, LPS-pretreated WT, but not TLR4-deficient, iNKT cells suppressed pulmonary fibrosis, but worsened hypersensitivity pneumonitis more than untreated WT iNKT cells, indicating that exogenous TLR4 ligands regulate iNKT cell functions in pulmonary diseases. Taken together, we propose a novel direct activation pathway of iNKT cells in the presence of TCR signals via endogenous or exogenous ligand-mediated engagement of TLR4 in iNKT cells, which regulates immune diseases by altering IFN-γ and IL-4 production. PMID:23028952

  3. Cross-Regulation of Two Type I Interferon Signaling Pathways in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Controls Anti-malaria Immunity and Host Mortality.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Cai, Baowei; Wang, Mingjun; Tan, Peng; Ding, Xilai; Wu, Jian; Li, Jian; Li, Qingtian; Liu, Pinghua; Xing, Changsheng; Wang, Helen Y; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2016-11-15

    Type I interferon (IFN) is critical for controlling pathogen infection; however, its regulatory mechanisms in plasmacytoid cells (pDCs) still remain unclear. Here, we have shown that nucleic acid sensors cGAS-, STING-, MDA5-, MAVS-, or transcription factor IRF3-deficient mice produced high amounts of type I IFN-α and IFN-β (IFN-α/β) in the serum and were resistant to lethal plasmodium yoelii YM infection. Robust IFN-α/β production was abolished when gene encoding nucleic acid sensor TLR7, signaling adaptor MyD88, or transcription factor IRF7 was ablated or pDCs were depleted. Further, we identified SOCS1 as a key negative regulator to inhibit MyD88-dependent type I IFN signaling in pDCs. Finally, we have demonstrated that pDCs, cDCs, and macrophages were required for generating IFN-α/β-induced subsequent protective immunity. Thus, our findings have identified a critical regulatory mechanism of type I IFN signaling in pDCs and stage-specific function of immune cells in generating potent immunity against lethal YM infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. miR-142-5p regulates tumor cell PD-L1 expression and enhances anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Long; Xi, Qing; Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Zimu; Liu, Hongkun; Cheng, Yingnan; Guo, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jieyou; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Lijuan; Xue, Zhenyi; Li, Yan; Da, Yurong; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Rongxin

    2017-06-24

    Cancer immunotherapy has many great achievements in recent years. One of the most promising cancer immunotherapies is PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade. miRNAs (MicroRNAs) belongs to small noncoding RNA and can regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'UTR. Many miRNAs can inhibit cancer growth by regulating the PD-L1 expression in cancer cells. Herein, we firstly found that PD-L1 could be the target of miR-142-5p by using bioinformatics methods, then we conduct luciferase activity assay, RT-PCR and western blot experiments to demonstrate that miR-142-5p can regulate PD-L1 expression by binding to its 3'UTR. And in vivo experiments certified that miR-142-5p overexpression can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR experiment demonstrated that miR-142-5p overexpression on tumor cells inhibits the expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells which result in the increase of CD4(+) T lymphocytes and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, the decrease of PD-1(+) T lymphocytes and increase of IFN-γ and TNF-α. So, miR-142-5p overexpression can enhance anti-tumor immunity by blocking PD-L1/PD-1 pathway. Our results identify a novel mechanism by which PD-L1 is regulated by miR-142-5p and overexpression of miR-142-5p could enhance the anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Host's innate immune response to fungal and bacterial agents in vitro: up-regulation of interleukin-15 gene expression resulting in enhanced natural killer cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phay; Ahmad, Rasheed; Xu, Jingwu; Ahmad, Ali; Menezes, José

    2003-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the first line of defence against viral infections. We have shown earlier that exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to viruses results in rapid up-regulation of NK cell activity via interleukin-15 (IL-15) induction, and that this mechanism curtails viral infection in vitro. By using Candida albicans, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, we now show here that exposure of PBMC to fungi and bacteria also results in an immediate increase of NK cytotoxicity. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses as well as the use of antibodies against different cytokines revealed that IL-15 induction played a predominant role in this NK activation. These results indicate that IL-15 is also involved in the innate immune response against fungal and bacterial agents. PMID:12757622

  6. B cells are required for the switch from Th1- to Th2-regulated immune responses to Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, A W; Phillips, R S

    1994-06-01

    . Furthermore, as the progression from a Th1-regulated to a Th2-regulated immune response fails to occur in B-cell-depleted mice, the data suggest that B cells are required for the downregulation of Th1-mediated and/or the generation of Th2-mediated protective immunity to P. c. chabaudi.

  7. Ubiquitin enzymes in the regulation of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Petra; Versteeg, Gijs A.; Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ubiquitination plays a central role in the regulation of various biological functions including immune responses. Ubiquitination is induced by a cascade of enzymatic reactions by E1 ubiquitin activating enzyme, E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, and E3 ubiquitin ligase, and reversed by deubiquitinases. Depending on the enzymes, specific linkage types of ubiquitin chains are generated or hydrolyzed. Because different linkage types of ubiquitin chains control the fate of the substrate, understanding the regulatory mechanisms of ubiquitin enzymes is central. In this review, we highlight the most recent knowledge of ubiquitination in the immune signaling cascades including the T cell and B cell signaling cascades as well as the TNF signaling cascade regulated by various ubiquitin enzymes. Furthermore, we highlight the TRIM ubiquitin ligase family as one of the examples of critical E3 ubiquitin ligases in the regulation of immune responses. PMID:28524749

  8. Lymphatic vessels regulate immune microenvironments in human and murine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lund, Amanda W; Wagner, Marek; Fankhauser, Manuel; Steinskog, Eli S; Broggi, Maria A; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F; Alitalo, Kari; Eikesdal, Hans P; Wiig, Helge; Swartz, Melody A

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic remodeling in tumor microenvironments correlates with progression and metastasis, and local lymphatic vessels play complex and poorly understood roles in tumor immunity. Tumor lymphangiogenesis is associated with increased immune suppression, yet lymphatic vessels are required for fluid drainage and immune cell trafficking to lymph nodes, where adaptive immune responses are mounted. Here, we examined the contribution of lymphatic drainage to tumor inflammation and immunity using a mouse model that lacks dermal lymphatic vessels (K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice). Melanomas implanted in these mice grew robustly, but exhibited drastically reduced cytokine expression and leukocyte infiltration compared with those implanted in control animals. In the absence of local immune suppression, transferred cytotoxic T cells more effectively controlled tumors in K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice than in control mice. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of human melanoma samples revealed that patient immune parameters are markedly stratified by levels of lymphatic markers. This work suggests that the establishment of tumor-associated inflammation and immunity critically depends on lymphatic vessel remodeling and drainage. Moreover, these results have implications for immunotherapies, the efficacies of which are regulated by the tumor immune microenvironment.

  9. Lymphatic vessels regulate immune microenvironments in human and murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Amanda W.; Wagner, Marek; Fankhauser, Manuel; Steinskog, Eli S.; Broggi, Maria A.; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Alitalo, Kari; Eikesdal, Hans P.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic remodeling in tumor microenvironments correlates with progression and metastasis, and local lymphatic vessels play complex and poorly understood roles in tumor immunity. Tumor lymphangiogenesis is associated with increased immune suppression, yet lymphatic vessels are required for fluid drainage and immune cell trafficking to lymph nodes, where adaptive immune responses are mounted. Here, we examined the contribution of lymphatic drainage to tumor inflammation and immunity using a mouse model that lacks dermal lymphatic vessels (K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice). Melanomas implanted in these mice grew robustly, but exhibited drastically reduced cytokine expression and leukocyte infiltration compared with those implanted in control animals. In the absence of local immune suppression, transferred cytotoxic T cells more effectively controlled tumors in K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice than in control mice. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of human melanoma samples revealed that patient immune parameters are markedly stratified by levels of lymphatic markers. This work suggests that the establishment of tumor-associated inflammation and immunity critically depends on lymphatic vessel remodeling and drainage. Moreover, these results have implications for immunotherapies, the efficacies of which are regulated by the tumor immune microenvironment. PMID:27525437

  10. A novel “complement–metabolism–inflammasome axis” as a key regulator of immune cell effector function

    PubMed Central

    Arbore, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that induce and regulate the generation of the key pro‐inflammatory cytokines IL‐1β and IL‐18 in response to infectious microbes and cellular stress. The activation of inflammasomes involves several upstream signals including classic pattern or danger recognition systems such as the TLRs. Recently, however, the activation of complement receptors, such as the anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors and the complement regulator CD46, in conjunction with the sensing of cell metabolic changes, for instance increased amino acid influx and glycolysis (via mTORC1), have emerged as additional critical activators of the inflammasome. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge about complement‐mediated inflammasome activation, with a specific focus on a novel “complement – metabolism – NLRP3 inflammasome axis.” PMID:27184294

  11. In vivo multiphoton imaging of immune cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takaharu; Takahashi, Sonoko; Ishida, Azusa; Ishigame, Harumichi

    2016-11-01

    Multiphoton imaging has been utilized to analyze in vivo immune cell dynamics over the last 15 years. Particularly, it has deepened the understanding of how immune responses are organized by immune cell migration and interactions. In this review, we first describe the following technical advances in recent imaging studies that contributed to the new findings on the regulation of immune responses and inflammation. Improved multicolor imaging of immune cell behavior has revealed that their interactions are spatiotemporally coordinated to achieve efficient and long-term immunity. The use of photoactivatable and photoconvertible fluorescent proteins has increased duration and volume of cell tracking, even enabling the analysis of inter-organ migration of immune cells. In addition, visualization of immune cell activation using biosensors for intracellular calcium concentration and signaling molecule activities has started to give further mechanistic insights. Then, we also introduce recent imaging analyses of interactions between immune cells and non-immune cells including endothelial, fibroblastic, epithelial, and nerve cells. It is argued that future imaging studies that apply updated technical advances to analyze interactions between immune cells and non-immune cells will be important for thorough physiological understanding of the immune system.

  12. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M.; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a “self-eating” survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446072

  13. Immune tolerance negatively regulates B cells in knock-in mice expressing broadly neutralizing HIV antibody 4E10

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Anthony B.; Ota, Takayuki; Skog, Patrick; Dawson, Phillip E.; Zwick, Michael B.; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Nemazee, David

    2013-01-01

    A major goal of HIV research is to develop vaccines reproducibly eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). This has proved to be challenging, however. One suggested explanation for this difficulty is that epitopes seen by bNAbs mimic self, leading to immune tolerance. We generated “knock-in” mice expressing bNAb 4E10, which recognizes the membrane proximal external region of gp41. Unlike b12 knock-in mice, described in the accompanying study, 4E10HL mice were found to undergo profound negative selection of B cells, indicating that 4E10 is, to a physiologically significant extent, autoreactive. Negative selection occurred by various mechanisms including receptor editing, clonal deletion and receptor downregulation. Despite significant deletion, small amounts of IgM and IgG anti-gp41 were found in the sera of 4E10HL mice. On a Rag1−/− background 4E10HL mice had virtually no serum immunoglobulins of any kind. These results are consistent with a model in which B cells with 4E10 specificity are counterselected, raising the question of how 4E10 was generated in the patient from whom it was isolated. This represents the second example of an MPER-directed bNAb that is apparently autoreactive in a physiological setting. The relative conservation in HIV of the 4E10 epitope might reflect the fact that it is under less intense immunological selection as a result of B cell self-tolerance. The safety and desirability of targeting this epitope by a vaccine is discussed in light of the newly-described bNAb 10E8. PMID:23940276

  14. Activation and Regulation of DNA-Driven Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The innate immune system provides early defense against infections and also plays a key role in monitoring alterations of homeostasis in the body. DNA is highly immunostimulatory, and recent advances in this field have led to the identification of the innate immune sensors responsible for the recognition of DNA as well as the downstream pathways that are activated. Moreover, information on how cells regulate DNA-driven immune responses to avoid excessive inflammation is now emerging. Finally, several reports have demonstrated how defects in DNA sensing, signaling, and regulation are associated with susceptibility to infections or inflammatory diseases in humans and model organisms. In this review, the current literature on DNA-stimulated innate immune activation is discussed, and important new questions facing this field are proposed. PMID:25926682

  15. Immune Regulation by Self-Recognition: Novel Possibilities for Anticancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Circulating T cells that specifically target normal self-proteins expressed by regulatory immune cells were first described in patients with cancer, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. The adaptive immune system is distinguished for its ability to differentiate between self-antigens and foreign antigens. Thus, it was remarkable to discover T cells that apparently lacked tolerance to important self-proteins, eg, IDO, PD-L1, and FoxP3, expressed in regulatory immune cells. The ability of self-reactive T cells to react to and eliminate regulatory immune cells can influence general immune reactions. This suggests that they may be involved in immune homeostasis. It is here proposed that these T cells should be termed antiregulatory T cells (anti-Tregs). The role of anti-Tregs in immune-regulatory networks may be diverse. For example, pro-inflammatory self-reactive T cells that react to regulatory immune cells may enhance local inflammation and inhibit local immune suppression. Further exploration is warranted to investigate their potential role under different malignant conditions and the therapeutic possibilities they possess. Utilizing anti-Tregs for anticancer immunotherapy implies the direct targeting of cancer cells in addition to regulatory immune cells. Anti-Tregs provide the immune system with yet another level of immune regulation and contradict the notion that immune cells involved in the adjustment of immune responses only act as suppressor cells. PMID:26063792

  16. Adipocytes as immune regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Silvana A.; Klein, Richard L.; Levingston, Corinne A.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state and adipocytes are capable of contributing to this inflammation by their production of inflammatory mediators. The present study used fibroblast-derived adipocytes and normal spleen cells as a model to determine if adipocytes can also serve as immune regulatory cells by modulating the functions of conventional immune cells. Media conditioned by the adipocytes stimulated release of the Th1-type cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ and GM-CSF from cultures of normal spleen cells. The adipocytes also stimulated spleen cell release of inhibitory cytokines, although to varying degrees. This included IL-10, IL-13 and, to a lesser extent, IL-4. Spleen cell production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and IL-9 was stimulated by adipocytes, although production of the Th17-derived cytokine, IL-17, was not stimulated. The adipocyte-conditioned medium did not stimulate production of predominantly monocytes-derived chemokines CXCL9, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, but stimulated production of the predominantly T-cell-derived chemokine CCL5. In all cases where cytokine/chemokine production from spleen cells was stimulated by adipocytes, it was to a far greater level than was produced by the adipocytes themselves. Studies initiated to determine the identity of the adipocyte-derived mediators showed that the spleen cell modulation could not be attributed to solely adiponectin or leptin. Studies to determine the source of some of the cytokines whose production was stimulated by adipocytes showed that expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was not increased in either CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell. When the splenic T-cells were examined for IFN-γ, the adipocyte stimulation of IFN-γ was within CD8+ T-cells, not CD4+ T-cells. These studies show that adipocytes may be able to serve as immune regulatory cells to stimulate conventional immune cells to release a spectrum of immune mediators. PMID:23587489

  17. Redox Regulation in Plant Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Frederickson Matika, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) occurs rapidly in response to attempted pathogen invasion of potential host plants. Such reduction–oxidation (redox) changes are sensed and transmitted to engage immune function, including the hypersensitive response, a programmed execution of challenged plant cells. Recent Advances: Pathogen elicitors trigger changes in calcium that are sensed by calmodulin, calmodulin-like proteins, and calcium-dependent protein kinases, which activate ROS and RNS production. The ROS and RNS production is compartmentalized within the cell and occurs through multiple routes. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are engaged upstream and downstream of ROS and nitric oxide (NO) production. NO is increasingly recognized as a key signaling molecule, regulating downstream protein function through S-nitrosylation, the addition of an NO moiety to a reactive cysteine thiol. Critical Issues: How multiple sources of ROS and RNS are coordinated is unclear. The putative protein sensors that detect and translate fluxes in ROS and RNS into differential gene expression are obscure. Protein tyrosine nitration following reaction of peroxynitrite with tyrosine residues has been proposed as another signaling mechanism or as a marker leading to protein degradation, but the reversibility remains to be established. Future Directions: Research is needed to identify the full spectrum of NO-modified proteins with special emphasis on redox-activated transcription factors and their cognate target genes. A systems approach will be required to uncover the complexities integral to redox regulation of MAPK cascades, transcription factors, and defense genes through the combined effects of calcium, phosphorylation, S-nitrosylation, and protein tyrosine nitration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1373–1388. PMID:24206122

  18. Multiple Domain Associations within the Arabidopsis Immune Receptor RPP1 Regulate the Activation of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Karl J.; Bentham, Adam; Williams, Simon J.; Kobe, Bostjan; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Upon recognition of pathogen virulence effectors, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins induce defense responses including localized host cell death. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms leading to this response, we examined the Arabidopsis thaliana NLR protein RECOGNITION OF PERONOSPORA PARASITICA1 (RPP1), which recognizes the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effector ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RECOGNIZED1 (ATR1). Expression of the N-terminus of RPP1, including the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (“N-TIR”), elicited an effector-independent cell death response, and we used allelic variation in TIR domain sequences to define the key residues that contribute to this phenotype. Further biochemical characterization indicated that cell death induction was correlated with N-TIR domain self-association. In addition, we demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding (NB)-ARC1 region of RPP1 self-associates and plays a critical role in cell death activation, likely by facilitating TIR:TIR interactions. Structural homology modeling of the NB subdomain allowed us to identify a putative oligomerization interface that was shown to influence NB-ARC1 self-association. Significantly, full-length RPP1 exhibited effector-dependent oligomerization and, although mutations at the NB-ARC1 oligomerization interface eliminated cell death induction, RPP1 self-association was unaffected, suggesting that additional regions contribute to oligomerization. Indeed, the leucine-rich repeat domain of RPP1 also self-associates, indicating that multiple interaction interfaces exist within activated RPP1 oligomers. Finally, we observed numerous intramolecular interactions that likely function to negatively regulate RPP1, and present a model describing the transition to an active NLR protein. PMID:27427964

  19. Differential regulation of C5a receptor 1 in innate immune cells during the allergic asthma effector phase

    PubMed Central

    Schmudde, Inken; Sun, Jing; Vollbrandt, Tillman; König, Peter; Köhl, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    C5a drives airway constriction and inflammation during the effector phase of allergic asthma, mainly through the activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Yet, C5aR1 expression on myeloid and lymphoid cells during the allergic effector phase is ill-defined. Recently, we generated and characterized a floxed green fluorescent protein (GFP)-C5aR1 knock-in mouse. Here, we used this reporter strain to monitor C5aR1 expression in airway, pulmonary and lymph node cells during the effector phase of OVA-driven allergic asthma. C5aR1 reporter and wildtype mice developed a similar allergic phenotype with comparable airway resistance, mucus production, eosinophilic/neutrophilic airway inflammation and Th2/Th17 cytokine production. During the allergic effector phase, C5aR1 expression increased in lung tissue eosinophils but decreased in airway and pulmonary macrophages as well as in pulmonary CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). Surprisingly, expression in neutrophils was not affected. Of note, moDCs but not CD11b+ cDCs from mediastinal lymph nodes (mLN) expressed less C5aR1 than DCs residing in the lung after OVA challenge. Finally, neither CD103+ cDCs nor cells of the lymphoid lineage such as Th2 or Th17-differentiated CD4+ T cells, B cells or type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) expressed C5aR1 under allergic conditions. Our findings demonstrate a complex regulation pattern of C5aR1 in the airways, lung tissue and mLN of mice, suggesting that the C5a/C5aR1 axis controls airway constriction and inflammation through activation of myeloid cells in all three compartments in an experimental model of allergic asthma. PMID:28231307

  20. Prostaglandin E2 and IL-23 plus IL-1β differentially regulate the Th1/Th17 immune response of human CD161(+) CD4(+) memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Barrie, Arthur; Khare, Anupriya; Henkel, Matthew; Zhang, Yingze; Barmada, M Michael; Duerr, Richard; Ray, Anuradha

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin (IL)-23, and IL-1beta (β) propagate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by enhancing the development and function of IL-17 producing CD4(+) T helper (Th17) cells. CD4(+) T cells that express the C-type lectin-like receptor CD161 have been proposed to be the physiologic pool of circulating Th17 cells implicated in IBD. We sought to understand how PGE2, alone and in combination with IL-23 and IL-1β, modulate human peripheral CD161(+) CD4(+) memory T cells. We found that CD161(+) cells comprise a significant proportion of human peripheral CD4(+) memory T cells. PGE2 and IL-23 plus IL-1β synergistically induced early IL-17A secretion from CD161(+) CD4(+) memory T cells and the selective enrichment of IL-17A(+) CD161(+) CD4(+) memory T cells in culture. Conversely, IL-23 plus IL-1β partially opposed the PGE2-mediated repression of early interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secretion from CD161(+) cells, as well as the PGE2-mediated depletion of IFN-γ(+) CD161(+) cells. Our results suggest that PGE2 and IL-23 plus IL-1β induce the Th17 immune response preferentially in CD161(+) CD4(+) memory T cells, while divergently regulating their ability to express IFN-γ. We hypothesize that Th17-mediated chronic inflammation in IBD depends on the net response of CD161(+) CD4(+) memory T cells to both PGE2 and IL-23 plus IL-1β. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. TCF-1-mediated Wnt signaling regulates Paneth cell innate immune defense effectors HD-5 and -6: implications for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Beisner, Julia; Teltschik, Zora; Ostaff, Maureen J; Tiemessen, Machteld M; Staal, Frank J T; Wang, Guoxing; Gersemann, Michael; Perminow, Gori; Vatn, Morten H; Schwab, Matthias; Stange, Eduard F; Wehkamp, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Wnt signaling regulates small intestinal stem cell maintenance and Paneth cell differentiation. In patients with ileal Crohn's disease (CD), a decrease of Paneth cell α-defensins has been observed that is partially caused by impaired TCF-4 and LRP6 function. Here we show reduced expression of the Wnt signaling effector TCF-1 (also known as TCF-7) in patients with ileal CD. Reporter gene assays and in vitro promoter binding analysis revealed that TCF-1 activates α-defensin HD-5 and HD-6 transcription in cooperation with β-catenin and that activation is mediated by three distinct TCF binding sites. EMSA analysis showed binding of TCF-1 to the respective motifs. In ileal CD patients, TCF-1 mRNA expression levels were significantly reduced. Moreover, we found specifically reduced expression of active TCF-1 mRNA isoforms. Tcf-1 knockout mice exhibited reduced cryptdin expression in the jejunum, which was not consistently seen at other small intestinal locations. Our data provide evidence that TCF-1-mediated Wnt signaling is disturbed in small intestinal CD, which might contribute to the observed barrier dysfunction in the disease.

  2. Treatment with IP-10 induces host-protective immune response by regulating the T regulatory cell functioning in Leishmania donovani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Majumdar, Saikat; Adhikari, Anupam; Bhattacharya, Parna; Mukherjee, Asok Kumar; Majumdar, Suchandra Bhattacharyya; Majumdar, Subrata

    2011-11-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by the protozoan parasite, Leishmania donovani, is characterized by an infection in the liver and spleen. The failure of the first-line drugs has led to the development of new strategies for combating VL. Recently, our group has shown that interferon-γ-inducible protein (IP)-10, a CXC chemokine, renders protection against VL. In the present study, we have elucidated the mechanism by which IP-10 renders protection in in vivo L. donovani infection. We observed that IP-10-treated parasitized BALB/c mice showed a strong host-protective T helper cell (Th) 1 immune response along with marked decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines, tumor growth factor (TGF)-β, and interleukin (IL)-10 secreting CD4(+) T cells. This IP-10-mediated decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines was correlated with the reduction in the elevated frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells along with the reduced TFG-β production from these Treg cells in Leishmania-infected mice. This reduction in TGF-β production was due to effective modulation of TGF-β signaling by IP-10, which reduced the immunosuppressive activity of Treg cells. Thus, these findings put forward a detailed mechanistic insight into IP-10-mediated regulation of the Treg cell functioning during experimental VL, which might be helpful in combating Leishmania-induced pathogenesis.

  3. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2016-01-11

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103(+) and CD24(+)CD11b(+) DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell-dependent or -independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64(+) macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid-dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT-specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. © 2016 Ruane et al.

  4. Innate lymphoid cells in inflammation and immunity.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Andrew N J; Spits, Hergen; Eberl, Gerard

    2014-09-18

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were first described as playing important roles in the development of lymphoid tissues and more recently in the initiation of inflammation at barrier surfaces in response to infection or tissue damage. It has now become apparent that ILCs play more complex roles throughout the duration of immune responses, participating in the transition from innate to adaptive immunity and contributing to chronic inflammation. The proximity of ILCs to epithelial surfaces and their constitutive strategic positioning in other tissues throughout the body ensures that, in spite of their rarity, ILCs are able to regulate immune homeostasis effectively. Dysregulation of ILC function might result in chronic pathologies such as allergies, autoimmunity, and inflammation. A new role for ILCs in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis has started to emerge, underlining their importance in fundamental physiological processes beyond infection and immunity.

  5. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  6. The RhoGAP SPIN6 Associates with SPL11 and OsRac1 and Negatively Regulates Programmed Cell Death and Innate Immunity in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinling; Park, Chan Ho; He, Feng; Nagano, Minoru; Wang, Mo; Bellizzi, Maria; Zhang, Kai; Zeng, Xiaoshan; Liu, Wende; Ning, Yuese; Kawano, Yoji; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system in plants plays important roles in plant-microbe interactions and in immune responses to pathogens. We previously demonstrated that the rice U-box E3 ligase SPL11 and its Arabidopsis ortholog PUB13 negatively regulate programmed cell death (PCD) and defense response. However, the components involved in the SPL11/PUB13-mediated PCD and immune signaling pathway remain unknown. In this study, we report that SPL11-interacting Protein 6 (SPIN6) is a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) that interacts with SPL11 in vitro and in vivo. SPL11 ubiquitinates SPIN6 in vitro and degrades SPIN6 in vivo via the 26S proteasome-dependent pathway. Both RNAi silencing in transgenic rice and knockout of Spin6 in a T-DNA insertion mutant lead to PCD and increased resistance to the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The levels of reactive oxygen species and defense-related gene expression are significantly elevated in both the Spin6 RNAi and mutant plants. Strikingly, SPIN6 interacts with the small GTPase OsRac1, catalyze the GTP-bound OsRac1 into the GDP-bound state in vitro and has GAP activity towards OsRac1 in rice cells. Together, our results demonstrate that the RhoGAP SPIN6 acts as a linkage between a U-box E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination pathway and a small GTPase-associated defensome system for plant immunity. PMID:25658451

  7. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G.; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103+ and CD24+CD11b+ DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell–dependent or –independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64+ macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid–dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT–specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  8. A tissue checkpoint regulates type 2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyken, Steven J.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Lee, Jinwoo; Molofsky, Ari B.; Liang, Hong-Erh; Pollack, Joshua L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Marson, Alexander; Erle, David J.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and CD4+ T helper type 2 (Th2) cells are defined by their similar effector cytokines, which together mediate the features of allergic immunity. Here, we show that tissue ILC2s and Th2 cells differentiate independently but share overlapping effector function programs mediated by exposure to the tissue-derived cytokines interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Loss of these three tissue signals does not affect lymph node priming but abrogates terminal differentiation of effector Th2 cells and adaptive lung inflammation in a T cell-intrinsic manner. Our findings suggest how diverse perturbations activate type 2 immunity, uncovering a shared local tissue-elicited checkpoint that can be exploited to control both innate and adaptive allergic inflammation. PMID:27749840

  9. Altered MARCH1 ubiquination-regulated dendritic cell immune functions during the early stage of zymosan-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jiang-yang; Liu, Qian; Wang, Hong-wei; Guo, Huiqin

    2013-02-01

    Using a zymosan-induced mouse model of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), we previously found profound increases in spleen immune cells' expressions of ubiquitin and MHC-II molecules and increased CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) within 24h of zymosan injection. We postulated that the early stage of MODS altered DCs function via an ubiquitination-associated mechanism. We intraperitoneally injected zymosan into 100 male C57BL/6 mice (0.8mg/g) and randomly divided them into 5 groups based on the days after injection (20mice/group): 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 10d. Mice were examined for spleen CD11c+ DC functions at the indicated days. Untreated mice were used for normal spleen tissue and T cell samples. By qPCR, IL-12 and TNF-α mRNA expressions in spleen CD11c+ DCs were significantly increased in MODS 1d mice; on subsequent days post-injection, these mRNA levels gradually returned to control levels. The same patterns were found for MODS mice DCs induction of untreated mouse T cells proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expressions. When T cell functions were examined using MODS 1d DCs with and without MG132 treatment, an inhibitor of ubiquitinated protein degradation, T cell functional activities were enhanced by DCs treated with MG132. MODS 1d DCs also had significantly reduced MARCH1 mRNA expression, a key ubiquitin ligase that regulates DCs MHC-II expression. Silencing DCs MARCH1 expression with siRNA resulted in enhancing their induction of T cell functional activities. Using co-immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and flow cytometry assays, we deduced that MARCH1 ubiquitinated DC surface MHC-II molecules to regulate DC's immune functions in MODS mice. Our results suggest that aberrant degradation of spleen DCs MARCH1-mediated ubiquitinated proteins is involved during the earliest stage of MODS development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Elementary immunology: Na(+) as a regulator of immunity.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Valentin; Neubert, Patrick; Schröder, Agnes; Binger, Katrina; Gebhard, Matthias; Müller, Dominik N; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    The skin can serve as an interstitial Na(+) reservoir. Local tissue Na(+) accumulation increases with age, inflammation and infection. This increased local Na(+) availability favors pro-inflammatory immune cell function and dampens their anti-inflammatory capacity. In this review, we summarize available data on how NaCl affects various immune cells. We particularly focus on how salt promotes pro-inflammatory macrophage and T cell function and simultaneously curtails their regulatory and anti-inflammatory potential. Overall, these findings demonstrate that local Na(+) availability is a promising novel regulator of immunity. Hence, the modulation of tissue Na(+) levels bears broad therapeutic potential: increasing local Na(+) availability may help in treating infections, while lowering tissue Na(+) levels may be used to treat, for example, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases.

  11. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  12. CsMAP34, a teleost MAP with dual role: A promoter of MASP-assisted complement activation and a regulator of immune cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo-fei; Li, Jun; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    In teleost fish, the immune functions of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) associated protein (MAP) and MBL associated serine protease (MASP) are scarcely investigated. In the present study, we examined the biological properties both MAP (CsMAP34) and MASP (CsMASP1) molecules from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). We found that CsMAP34 and CsMASP1 expressions occurred in nine different tissues and were upregulated by bacterial challenge. CsMAP34 protein was detected in blood, especially during bacterial infection. Recombinant CsMAP34 (rCsMAP34) bound C. semilaevis MBL (rCsBML) when the latter was activated by bacteria, while recombinant CsMASP1 (rCsMASP1) bound activated rCsBML only in the presence of rCsMAP34. rCsMAP34 stimulated the hemolytic and bactericidal activities of serum complement, whereas anti-CsMAP34 antibody blocked complement activities. Knockdown of CsMASP1 in C. semilaevis resulted in significant inhibition of complement activities. Furthermore, rCsMAP34 interacted directly with peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and enhanced the respiratory burst, acid phosphatase activity, chemotactic activity, and gene expression of PBL. These results indicate for the first time that a teleost MAP acts one hand as a regulator that promotes the lectin pathway of complement activation via its ability to recruit MBL to MASP, and other hand as a modulator of immune cell activity. PMID:28008939

  13. The Polyadenylation Factor Subunit CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30: A Key Factor of Programmed Cell Death and a Regulator of Immunity in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Garmier, Marie; de Bont, Linda; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile; Bergounioux, Catherine; Delarue, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. Indeed, incompatible plant-pathogen interactions are well known to induce the hypersensitive response, a localized cell death. Mutational analyses have identified several key PCD components, and we recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for the key enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myoinositol synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD, revealing roles for myoinositol or inositol derivatives in the regulation of PCD. Here, we identified a regulator of plant PCD by screening for mutants that display transcriptomic profiles opposing that of the mips1 mutant. Our screen identified the oxt6 mutant, which has been described previously as being tolerant to oxidative stress. In the oxt6 mutant, a transfer DNA is inserted in the CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30 (CPSF30) gene, which encodes a polyadenylation factor subunit homolog. We show that CPSF30 is required for lesion formation in mips1 via SA-dependent signaling, that the prodeath function of CPSF30 is not mediated by changes in the glutathione status, and that CPSF30 activity is required for Pseudomonas syringae resistance. We also show that the oxt6 mutation suppresses cell death in other lesion-mimic mutants, including lesion-simulating disease1, mitogen-activated protein kinase4, constitutive expressor of pathogenesis-related genes5, and catalase2, suggesting that CPSF30 and, thus, the control of messenger RNA 3′ end processing, through the regulation of SA production, is a key component of plant immune responses. PMID:24706550

  14. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Cao, Kai; Cao, Jianchang; Wang, Ying; Shi, Yufang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, our understanding of the regulatory role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in adaptive immune responses through both preclinical and clinical studies has dramatically expanded, providing great promise for treating various inflammatory diseases. Most studies are focused on the modulatory effects of these cells on the properties of T cell-mediated immune responses, including activation, proliferation, survival, and subset differentiation. Interestingly, the immunosuppressive function of MSCs was found to be licensed by IFN-γ and TNF-α produced by T cells and that can be further amplified by cytokines such as IL-17. However, the immunosuppressive function of MSCs can be reversed in certain situation, such as suboptimal levels of inflammatory cytokines, or in the presence of immunosuppressive molecules. Here we review the influence of MSCs on adaptive immune system, especially their bidirectional interaction in tuning the immune microenvironment and subsequently repairing damaged tissue. Understanding MSC-mediated regulation of T cells is expected to provide fundamental information for guiding appropriate applications of MSCs in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Innate Immune Pattern Recognition: A Cell Biological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Sky W.; Bonham, Kevin S.; Zanoni, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Receptors of the innate immune system detect conserved determinants of microbial and viral origin. Activation of these receptors initiates signaling events that culminate in an effective immune response. Recently, the view that innate immune signaling events rely on and operate within a complex cellular infrastructure has become an important framework for understanding the regulation of innate immunity. Compartmentalization within this infrastructure provides the cell with the ability to assign spatial information to microbial detection and regulate immune responses. Several cell biological processes play a role in the regulation of innate signaling responses; at the same time, innate signaling can engage cellular processes as a form of defense or to promote immunological memory. In this review, we highlight these aspects of cell biology in pattern-recognition receptor signaling by focusing on signals that originate from the cell surface, from endosomal compartments, and from within the cytosol. PMID:25581309

  17. Dendritic cells: sentinels of immunity and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kubach, Jan; Becker, Christian; Schmitt, Edgar; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Huter, Eva; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2005-04-01

    The induction of effective antigen-specific T-cell immunity to pathogens without the initiation of autoimmunity has evolved as a sophisticated and highly balanced immunoregulatory mechanism. This mechanism assures the generation of antigen-specific effector cells as well as the induction and maintenance of antigen-specific tolerance to self-structures of the body. As professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, dendritic cells (DC) are ideally positioned throughout the entire body and equipped with a unique capability to transport antigens from the periphery to lymphoid tissues. There is growing evidence that DC, besides their well-known immunostimulatory properties, also induce and regulate T-cell tolerance in the periphery. This regulatory function of DC is strictly dependent on their different stages of maturation and activation. Additionally, immunosuppressive agents and cytokines further influence the functions of maturing DC. The regulatory properties of DC include induction of T-cell anergy, apoptosis, and the generation of T-cells with regulatory capacities. This brief review summarizes the current knowledge about the immunoregulatory role of DC as guardians for the induction of T-cell immunity and tolerance.

  18. Leptin in the regulation of immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Faggioni, R

    2000-10-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, is a pleiotropic molecule that regulates food intake as well as metabolic and endocrine functions. Leptin also plays a regulatory role in immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis. Alterations in immune and inflammatory responses are present in leptin- or leptin-receptor-deficient animals, as well as during starvation and malnutrition, two conditions characterized by low levels of circulating leptin. Both leptin and its receptor share structural and functional similarities with the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. Leptin exerts proliferative and antiapoptotic activities in a variety of cell types, including T lymphocytes, leukemia cells, and hematopoietic progenitors. Leptin also affects cytokine production, the activation of monocytes/macrophages, wound healing, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. Moreover, leptin production is acutely increased during infection and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of leptin in the modulation of the innate immune response, inflammation, and hematopoiesis.

  19. Control of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Weitnauer, M; Mijošek, V; Dalpke, A H

    2016-03-01

    The lung is ventilated by thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbial compounds, most of them harmless contaminants. Airway epithelial cells are known to have innate sensor functions, thus being able to detect microbial danger. To avoid chronic inflammation, the pulmonary system has developed specific means to control local immune responses. Even though airway epithelial cells can act as proinflammatory promoters, we propose that under homeostatic conditions airway epithelial cells are important modulators of immune responses in the lung. In this review, we discuss epithelial cell regulatory functions that control reactivity of professional immune cells within the microenvironment of the airways and how these mechanisms are altered in pulmonary diseases. Regulation by epithelial cells can be divided into two mechanisms: (1) mediators regulate epithelial cells' innate sensitivity in cis and (2) factors are produced that limit reactivity of immune cells in trans.

  20. Metabolic pathways in immune cell activation and quiescence.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Erika L; Pearce, Edward J

    2013-04-18

    Studies of immune system metabolism ("immunometabolism") segregate along two paths. The first investigates the effects of immune cells on organs that regulate whole-body metabolism, such as adipose tissue and liver. The second explores the role of metabolic pathways within immune cells and how this regulates immune response outcome. Distinct metabolic pathways diverge and converge at many levels, and, therefore, cells face choices as to how to achieve their metabolic goals. There is interest in fully understanding how and why immune cells commit to particular metabolic fates and in elucidating the immunologic consequences of reaching a metabolic endpoint by one pathway versus another. This is particularly intriguing, given that metabolic commitment is influenced not only by substrate availability but also by signaling pathways elicited by metabolites. Thus, metabolic choices in cells enforce fate and function, and this area will be the subject of this review.

  1. Autophagy and the regulation of the immune response.

    PubMed

    Valdor, Rut; Macian, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of lysosomal-mediated protein degradation that plays a crucial role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by recycling amino acids, reducing the amount of damaged proteins and regulating protein levels in response to extracellular signals. In the last few years specific functions for different forms of autophagy have been identified in many tissues and organs. In the Immune System, autophagy functions range from the elimination infectious agents and the modulation of the inflammatory response, to the selection of antigens for presentation and the regulation of T cell homeostasis and activation. Here, we review the recent advances that have allowed us to better understand why autophagy is a crucial process in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. Interleukin 27R regulates CD4+ T cell phenotype and impacts protective immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Egidio; Fountain, Jeffrey J.; Liao, Mingfeng; Tighe, Michael; Reiley, William W.; Lai, Rachel P.; Meintjes, Graeme; Pearl, John E.; Chen, Xinchun; Zak, Daniel E.; Thompson, Ethan G.; Aderem, Alan; Ghilardi, Nico; Solache, Alejandra; McKinstry, K. Kai; Strutt, Tara M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Swain, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells mediate protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb); however, the phenotype of protective T cells is undefined, thereby confounding vaccination efforts. IL-27 is highly expressed during human tuberculosis (TB), and absence of IL-27R (Il27ra) specifically on T cells results in increased protection. IL-27R deficiency during chronic Mtb infection does not impact antigen-specific CD4+ T cell number but maintains programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD69, and CD127 expression while reducing T-bet and killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) expression. Furthermore, T-bet haploinsufficiency results in failure to generate KLRG1+, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, and in improved protection. T cells in Il27ra−/− mice accumulate preferentially in the lung parenchyma within close proximity to Mtb, and antigen-specific CD4+ T cells lacking IL-27R are intrinsically more fit than intact T cells and maintain IL-2 production. Improved fitness of IL-27R–deficient T cells is not associated with increased proliferation but with decreased expression of cell death–associated markers. Therefore, during Mtb infection, IL-27R acts intrinsically on T cells to limit protection and reduce fitness, whereas the IL-27R–deficient environment alters the phenotype and location of T cells. The significant expression of IL-27 in TB and the negative influence of IL-27R on T cell function demonstrate the pathway by which this cytokine/receptor pair is detrimental in TB. PMID:26282876

  3. Cannabinoids and Neuro-Inflammation: Regulation of Brain Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Roberta; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Marasco, Daniela; Malfitano, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors are involved in the neuro-pathogenic mechanisms of inflammatory conditions of the central nervous system and their expression can be modulated during diseases. In this manuscript we highlight the function of cannabinoid receptors, their signalling and expression at peripheral and central levels in order to understand their implication in neuro-inflammation and review the effects of cannabinoids in neuro-inflammatory disorders. Brain inflammatory processes are characterized by infiltration of numerous types of cells: both peripheral and brain resident immune cells and other neuronal cells. The disruption of the blood brain barrier favours cell infiltration in the central nervous system with consequent neuronal damage, a common event in many neuro-inflammatory diseases. Cannabinoids affect brain adaptive and immune response, regulate inflammatory mediators and can exert a role in blood brain barrier damage prevention. Various patents describe the beneficial properties of cannabinoids in numerous neurodegenerative diseases with inflammatory components and overall effects support the therapeutic application of cannabinoids.

  4. Mast cells in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jean S; Jawdat, Dunia M

    2004-07-01

    Mast cells have been most extensively studied in their traditional role as an early effector cell of allergic disease. However, in the majority of individuals, it might be the role of this cell as a sentinel in host defense that is most important. Mast cells have been repeatedly demonstrated to play a critical role in defense against bacterial infections, and evidence for their involvement in early responses to viral and fungal pathogens is growing. Mast cells are activated during innate immune responses by multiple mechanisms, including well-established responses to complement components. In addition, novel mechanisms have emerged as a result of the explosion of knowledge in our understanding of pattern-recognition receptors. The mast cell shares many features with other innate immune effector cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages. However, a unique role for mast cells is defined not only by their extensive mediator profile but also by their ability to interact with the vasculature, to expedite selective cell recruitment, and to set the stage for an appropriate acquired response. Copyright 2004 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Ovarian Tumor Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    immunity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Protul A. Shrikant, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : Health Research Inc., Roswell Park Cancer...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Roswell Park Cancer...intraperitoneal injection on day 10 post-tumor challenge. 2. The cells harvested from the tumor draining LN’s, spleen and the tumor site starting on day 2

  6. Immune Surveillance of Unhealthy Cells by Natural Killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Iannello, Alexandre; Raulet, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic and oncogenic insults result in the induction of intrinsic defense mechanisms such as cell death pathways and senescence, and extrinsic pathways that mobilize immune responses to destroy unhealthy cells. Both protective mechanisms presumably evolved to limit the damage these insults could inflict on the host. After viral infection or malignant transformation, unhealthy cells can be directly sensed by natural killer (NK) and some T cells via the activating receptor NKG2D. All NK cells and subsets of T cells express NKG2D. The NKG2D/ligand system represents a major recognition mechanism for detection and elimination of unhealthy cells. Here we discuss different pathways, including stress pathways, that are responsible for cell surface display of ligands for NKG2D, which are self-proteins that are minimally expressed by normal cells. We also discuss new results indicating that efficient elimination of tumor cells that display NKG2D ligands depends on the recruitment of NK cells and other immune cells to the tumor, which can be regulated by distinct mechanisms, including the p53-dependent production of chemokines by senescent tumors. The cooperative effect of pathways that induce the display NKG2D ligands and distinct pathways that mobilize immune cells provides a higher degree of specificity to the NK cell response. PMID:24135717

  7. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  8. Xanthomonas campestris Overcomes Arabidopsis Stomatal Innate Immunity through a DSF Cell-to-Cell Signal-Regulated Virulence Factor1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E.; Torres, Pablo S.; Vojnov, Adrián A.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  9. Immune cell functions in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Plate, J M; Harris, J E

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer kills nearly 29,000 people in the United States annually-as many people as are diagnosed with the disease. Chemotherapeutic treatment is ineffective in halting progression of the disease. Yet, specific immunity to pancreatic tumor cells in subjects with pancreatic cancer has been demonstrated repeatedly during the last 24 years. Attempts to expand and enhance tumor-specific immunity with biotherapy, however, have not met with success. The question remains, "Why can't specific immunity regulate pancreatic cancer growth?" The idea that tumor cells have evolved protective mechanisms against immunity was raised years ago and has recently been revisited by a number of research laboratories. In pancreatic cancer, soluble factors produced by and for the protection of the tumor environment have been detected and are often distributed to the victim's circulatory system where they may effect a more generalized immunosuppression. Yet the nature of these soluble factors remains controversial, since some also serve as tumor antigens that are recognized by the same T cells that may become inactivated by them. Unless the problem of tumor-derived immunosuppressive products is addressed directly through basic and translational research studies, successful biotherapeutic treatment for pancreatic cancer may not be forthcoming.

  10. TRIM14 is a Putative Tumor Suppressor and Regulator of Innate Immune Response in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Josephine; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Wang, Tao; Organ, Shawna L.; Shepherd, Frances A.; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) accounts for 85% of malignant lung tumors and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Our group previously identified Tripartite Motif 14 (TRIM14) as a component of a prognostic multigene expression signature for NSCLC. Little is known about the function of TRIM14 protein in normal or disease states. We investigated the functional and prognostic role of TRIM14 in NSCLC using in vitro and in vivo perturbation model systems. Firstly, a pooled RNAi screen identified TRIM14 to effect cell proliferation/survival in NSCLC cells. Secondly, silencing of TRIM14 expression significantly enhanced tumor growth in NSCLC xenograft mouse models, while exogenous TRIM14 expression attenuated tumorigenesis. In addition, differences in apoptotic activity between TRIM14-deficient and control tumors suggests that TRIM14 tumor suppressor activity may depend on cell death signaling pathways. TRIM14-deficient cell lines showed both resistance to hypoxia-induced cell death and attenuation of interferon response via STAT1 signaling. Consistent with these phenotypes, multivariate analyses on published mRNA expression datasets of over 600 primary NSCLCs demonstrated that low TRIM14 mRNA levels are significantly associated with poorer prognosis in early stage NSCLC patients. Our functional data therefore establish a novel tumor suppressive role for TRIM14 in NSCLC progression. PMID:28059079

  11. Testing the role of the FcγRIIB immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif in regulation of the B cell immune response.

    PubMed

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Shen, Shixue; Manser, Tim

    2015-09-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) of the inhibitory Fc receptor FcγRIIB is critical for mediating attenuation of signaling via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) containing receptors, such as the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), when FcγRIIB is co-cross-linked to these activation receptors. To test the role of the FcγRIIB ITIM motif in regulation of the B cell immune response in vivo, we constructed lines of transgenic mice expressing a form of FcγRIIB with an inactivating tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) mutation in the ITIM motif. Detailed studies of one of these lines, in which the mutant FcγRIIB was expressed on B cells and other cell types that normally express this receptor, were performed. No quantitative differences in germinal center (GC) B cell responses were observed between the mutant FcγRIIB transgenic line and control mice. However, serum antibody and antibody forming cell responses were often observed to be elevated in the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB transgenic mice as compared to controls, though not to the same extent as mice deficient in expression of FcγRIIB. Moreover, primary B cells from the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB line did not display the same level of augmented BCR signaling as primary FcγRIIB deficient B cells under conditions inducing co-cross-linking of FcγRIIB and the BCR. In total, these data suggest that a functional ITIM motif is not required for all in vivo inhibitory activity of this receptor. However, we also found that the transgenic ITIM mutant FcγRIIB receptor was expressed at abnormal levels in several hematopoietic lineages. Thus, confirmation of our findings will require the generation and analysis of mice in which an ITIM mutant form of FcγRIIB is expressed in vivo as is the endogenous receptor.

  12. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases.

  13. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Tsai, Vicky W W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H; Breit, Samuel N; Sawchenko, Paul E; Brown, David A

    2014-03-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity.

  14. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    PubMed

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  15. Adaptive immune-mediated host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii is governed by the NF-κB regulator Bcl-3 in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Ilaria; Claudio, Estefania; Wang, Hongshan; Tang, Wanhu; Ha, Hye-Lin; Saret, Sun; Sher, Alan; Jankovic, Dragana; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The atypical IκB family member Bcl-3 associates with p50/NF-κB1 or p52/NF-κB2 homodimers in nuclei, thereby either positively or negatively modulating transcription in a context-dependent manner. Previously we reported that Bcl-3 was critical for host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii. Bcl-3-deficient mice succumbed within 3-5 weeks after infection, correlating with an apparently impaired Th1-type adaptive immune response. However in which cell type(s) Bcl-3 functioned to assure resistance remained unknown. We now show that Bcl-3 expression in dendritic cells is required to generate a protective Th1-type immune response and confer resistance to T. gondii. Surprisingly, mice lacking Bcl-3 in dendritic cells were as susceptible as mice globally deficient for Bcl-3. Furthermore, early innate defenses were not compromised by the absence of Bcl-3, as initial production of IL-12 by dendritic cells and IFN-γ by NK cells were preserved. However, subsequent production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells was compromised when dendritic cells lacked Bcl-3, and these mice succumbed at a time when T-cell-mediated IFN-γ production was essential for host resistance. These findings demonstrate that Bcl-3 is required in dendritic cells to prime protective T-cell-mediated immunity to T. gondii. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-α release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  17. Immune-based regulation of adult neurogenesis: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Yaniv; Schwartz, Michal

    2008-02-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons from stem/progenitor cells, occurs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus throughout life. Although the exact function of adult hippocampal neurogenesis is currently unknown, recent studies suggest that the newly formed neuronal population plays an important role in hippocampal-dependent cognitive abilities, including declarative memory. The process of adult neurogenesis is greatly influenced by the interaction between cells of the adaptive immune system and CNS-resident immune cells. Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that immune cells contribute to maintaining life-long hippocampal neurogenesis. The regulation of such immune-cell activity is crucial: too little immune activity (as in immune deficiency syndromes) or too much immune activity (as in severe inflammatory diseases) can lead to impaired hippocampal neurogenesis, which could then result in impaired hippocampal-dependent cognitive abilities. From these converging discoveries arise a mechanism that can explain one route by which our body affects our mind.

  18. Human Articular Chondrocytes Regulate Immune Response by Affecting Directly T Cell Proliferation and Indirectly Inhibiting Monocyte Differentiation to Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rui C.; Martinelli, Daniela; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard cell therapy for cartilage lesions. However, in some instances, the heavily compromised health of the patient can either impair or limit the recovery of the autologous chondrocytes and a satisfactory outcome of the implant. Allogeneic human articular chondrocytes (hAC) could be a good alternative, but the possible immunological incompatibility between recipient and hAC donor should be considered. Herein, we report that allogeneic hAC inhibited T lymphocyte response to antigen-dependent and -independent proliferative stimuli. This effect was maximal when T cells and hAC were in contact and it was not relieved by the addition of exogenous lymphocyte growth factor interleukin (IL)-2. More important, hAC impaired the differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes induced with granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-4 (Mo) to professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Indeed, a marked inhibition of the onset of the CD1a expression and an ineffective downregulation of CD14 antigens was observed in Mo–hAC co-cultures. Furthermore, compared to immature or mature DC, Mo from Mo–hAC co-cultures did not trigger an efficacious allo-response. The prostaglandin (PG) E2 present in the Mo–hAC co-culture conditioned media is a putative candidate of the hAC-mediated inhibition of Mo maturation. Altogether, these findings indicate that allogeneic hAC inhibit, rather than trigger, immune response and strongly suggest that an efficient chondrocyte implantation could be possible also in an allogeneic setting. PMID:27822208

  19. Maternal immune stimulation reduces both placental morphologic damage and down-regulated placental growth-factor and cell cycle gene expression caused by urethane: are these events related to reduced teratogenesis?

    PubMed

    Sharova, L V; Sharov, A A; Sura, P; Gogal, R M; Smith, B J; Holladay, S D

    2003-07-01

    Activation of the maternal immune system in mice decreased cleft palate caused by the chemical teratogen, urethane. Direct and indirect mechanisms for this phenomenon have been suggested, including maternal macrophages that cross the placenta to find and eliminate pre-teratogenic cells, or maternal immune proteins (cytokines) that cross placenta to alleviate or partially alleviate toxicant-mediated effects in the developing fetus. A third mechanism to explain improved fetal developmental outcome in teratogen-challenged pregnant mice might involve beneficial effects of immune stimulation on the placenta. In the present experiments, urethane treatment altered placental morphology and impaired placental function, the latter indicated by down-regulated activity of cell cycle genes and of genes encoding cytokines and growth factors. Maternal immune stimulation with either Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) or interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) reduced morphologic damage to the placenta caused by urethane and normalized expression of several genes that were down-regulated by urethane. Urethane treatment also shifted placental cytokine gene expression toward a T cell helper 1 (Th1) profile, while immunostimulation tended to restore a Th2 profile that may be more beneficial to pregnancy and fetal development. These data suggest that the beneficial effects of maternal immune stimulation on fetal development in teratogen-exposed mice may, in part, result from improved placental structure and function.

  20. Regulation of immunity during visceral Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vasco; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Laforge, Mireille; Silvestre, Ricardo; Estaquier, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes of the genus Leishmania are collectively responsible for a heterogeneous group of diseases known as leishmaniasis. The visceral form of leishmaniasis, caused by L. donovani or L. infantum, is a devastating condition, claiming 20,000 to 40,000 lives annually, with particular incidence in some of the poorest regions of the world. Immunity to Leishmania depends on the development of protective type I immune responses capable of activating infected phagocytes to kill intracellular amastigotes. However, despite the induction of protective responses, disease progresses due to a multitude of factors that impede an optimal response. These include the action of suppressive cytokines, exhaustion of specific T cells, loss of lymphoid tissue architecture and a defective humoral response. We will review how these responses are orchestrated during the course of infection, including both early and chronic stages, focusing on the spleen and the liver, which are the main target organs of visceral Leishmania in the host. A comprehensive understanding of the immune events that occur during visceral Leishmania infection is crucial for the implementation of immunotherapeutic approaches that complement the current anti-Leishmania chemotherapy and the development of effective vaccines to prevent disease.

  1. Arginine Metabolism in Myeloid Cells Shapes Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Al-Khami, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    Arginine metabolism has been a key catabolic and anabolic process throughout the evolution of the immune response. Accruing evidence indicates that arginine-catabolizing enzymes, mainly nitric oxide synthases and arginases, are closely integrated with the control of immune response under physiological and pathological conditions. Myeloid cells are major players that exploit the regulators of arginine metabolism to mediate diverse, although often opposing, immunological and functional consequences. In this article, we focus on the importance of arginine catabolism by myeloid cells in regulating innate and adaptive immunity. Revisiting this matter could result in novel therapeutic approaches by which the immunoregulatory nodes instructed by arginine metabolism can be targeted. PMID:28223985

  2. Mast cell: an emerging partner in immune interaction.

    PubMed

    Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; D'Inca, Federica; Danelli, Luca; Betto, Elena; Mion, Francesca; Sibilano, Riccardo; Pucillo, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are currently recognized as effector cells in many settings of the immune response, including host defense, immune regulation, allergy, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. MC pleiotropic functions reflect their ability to secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active products with pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties, in response to multiple signals. Moreover, the modulation of MC effector phenotypes relies on the interaction of a wide variety of membrane molecules involved in cell-cell or cell-extracellular-matrix interaction. The delivery of co-stimulatory signals allows MC to specifically communicate with immune cells belonging to both innate and acquired immunity, as well as with non-immune tissue-specific cell types. This article reviews and discusses the evidence that MC membrane-expressed molecules play a central role in regulating MC priming and activation and in the modulation of innate and adaptive immune response not only against host injury, but also in peripheral tolerance and tumor-surveillance or -escape. The complex expression of MC surface molecules may be regarded as a measure of connectivity, with altered patterns of cell-cell interaction representing functionally distinct MC states. We will focalize our attention on roles and functions of recently discovered molecules involved in the cross-talk of MCs with other immune partners.

  3. Loss of the innate immunity negative regulator IRAK-M leads to enhanced host immune defense against tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qifa; Gan, Lu; Wang, Jianxia; Wilson, Ingred; Li, Liwu

    2010-01-01

    IRAK-M is a negative regulator of innate immunity signaling processes. Although attenuation of innate immunity may help to prevent excessive inflammation, it may also lead to compromised immune surveillance of tumor cells and contribute to tumor formation and growth. Here, we demonstrate that IRAK-M−/− mice are resistant to tumor growth upon inoculation with transplantable tumor cells. Immune cells from IRAK-M−/− mice are responsible for the anti-tumor effect, since adoptive transfer of splenocytes from IRAK-M−/− mice to wild type mice can transfer the tumor-resistant phenotype. Upon tumor cell challenge, there are elevated populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a decreased population of CD4+ CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in IRAK-M −/− splenocytes. Furthermore, we observe that IRAK-M deficiency leads to elevated proliferation and activation of T cells and B cells. Enhanced NFκB activation directly caused by IRAK-M deficiency may explain elevated activation of T and B cells. In addition, macrophages from IRAK-M−/− mice exhibit enhanced phagocytic function toward acetylated LDL and apoptotic thymocytes. Collectively, we demonstrate that IRAK-M is directly involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune signaling processes, and deletion of IRAK-M enhances host anti-tumor immune response. PMID:17477969

  4. Mouse strain-dependent chemokine regulation of the genital tract T helper cell type 1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Darville, T; Andrews, C W; Sikes, J D; Fraley, P L; Braswell, L; Rank, R G

    2001-12-01

    Vaginal infection with the mouse pneumonitis agent of Chlamydia trachomatis (MoPn) produces shorter courses of infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice than in C3H/HeN mice, while C57BL/6 mice are more resistant to oviduct pathology. A robust Th1 response is extremely important in host defense against chlamydia. In this study we examined gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and the T-cell-regulatory chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) to determine if differences in these responses were associated with the differential courses of infection seen in these three strains of mice. Increased and prolonged IFN-gamma responses and lower IL-10 responses were observed in the C57BL/6 strain compared to BALB/c and C3H. Examination of genital tract chemokines revealed a marked predominance of MIP-1alpha over MCP-1 only in the C57 strain. Thus, a pattern of high MIP-1alpha and low MCP-1 levels during the first week of infection is associated with an increased Th1 response and a shorter, more benign chlamydial infection. Inhibition of the MCP-1 response in C3H mice increased their later T-cell production of IFN-gamma but decreased their early IFN-gamma response and had no effect on the course or outcome of infection. Inhibition of MCP-1 is not beneficial in chlamydial infection because of its pleiotropic effects.

  5. Age-related profiling of DNA methylation in CD8+ T cells reveals changes in immune response and transcriptional regulator genes

    PubMed Central

    Tserel, Liina; Kolde, Raivo; Limbach, Maia; Tretyakov, Konstantin; Kasela, Silva; Kisand, Kai; Saare, Mario; Vilo, Jaak; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-01-01

    Human ageing affects the immune system resulting in an overall decline in immunocompetence. Although all immune cells are affected during aging, the functional capacity of T cells is most influenced and is linked to decreased responsiveness to infections and impaired differentiation. We studied age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from younger and older individuals. We observed marked difference between T cell subsets, with increased number of methylation changes and higher methylome variation in CD8+ T cells with age. The majority of age-related hypermethylated sites were located at CpG islands of silent genes and enriched for repressive histone marks. Specifically, in CD8+ T cell subset we identified strong inverse correlation between methylation and expression levels in genes associated with T cell mediated immune response (LGALS1, IFNG, CCL5, GZMH, CCR7, CD27 and CD248) and differentiation (SATB1, TCF7, BCL11B and RUNX3). Our results thus suggest the link between age-related epigenetic changes and impaired T cell function. PMID:26286994

  6. Tomato 14-3-3 protein TFT7 interacts with a MAP kinase kinase to regulate immunity-associated programmed cell death mediated by diverse disease resistance proteins.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Sik; Martin, Gregory B

    2011-04-22

    Programmed cell death (PCD) associated with immunity is triggered when a plant disease resistance (R) protein recognizes a corresponding pathogen virulence protein. In tomato, detection by the host Pto kinase of the Pseudomonas syringae proteins AvrPto or AvrPtoB causes localized PCD. Previously, we reported that both MAPKKKα (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase) and the tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulate Pto-mediated PCD in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, in contrast to MAPKKKα, TFT7 is required for PCD mediated by four other R proteins. Here we investigate why TFT7 is required for PCD induced by diverse R proteins in plants. We discovered that a MAPKK, SlMKK2, which acts downstream of SlMAPKKKα, also interacts with TFT7 in plant cells. Gene silencing experiments revealed that the orthologous genes of both SlMKK2 and TFT7 in N. benthamiana are required for PCD mediated by the same set of R proteins. SlMKK2 and its orthologs contain a 14-3-3 binding site in their N terminus, and Thr(33) in this site is required for interaction with TFT7 in vivo. Like the structurally similar human 14-3-3ε protein, TFT7 forms a homodimer in vivo. Because TFT7 interacts with both SlMAPKKKα and SlMKK2 and also forms a homodimer, we propose that TFT7 may coordinately recruit these client proteins for efficient signal transfer, leading to PCD induction.

  7. Immune Evasion, Immunopathology and the Regulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Gabriele; Cornet, Stéphane; Faivre, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Costs and benefits of the immune response have attracted considerable attention in the last years among evolutionary biologists. Given the cost of parasitism, natural selection should favor individuals with the most effective immune defenses. Nevertheless, there exists huge variation in the expression of immune effectors among individuals. To explain this apparent paradox, it has been suggested that an over-reactive immune system might be too costly, both in terms of metabolic resources and risks of immune-mediated diseases, setting a limit to the investment into immune defenses. Here, we argue that this view neglects one important aspect of the interaction: the role played by evolving pathogens. We suggest that taking into account the co-evolutionary interactions between the host immune system and the parasitic strategies to overcome the immune response might provide a better picture of the selective pressures that shape the evolution of immune functioning. Integrating parasitic strategies of host exploitation can also contribute to understand the seemingly contradictory results that infection can enhance, but also protect from, autoimmune diseases. In the last decades, the incidence of autoimmune disorders has dramatically increased in wealthy countries of the northern hemisphere with a concomitant decrease of most parasitic infections. Experimental work on model organisms has shown that this pattern may be due to the protective role of certain parasites (i.e., helminths) that rely on the immunosuppression of hosts for their persistence. Interestingly, although parasite-induced immunosuppression can protect against autoimmunity, it can obviously favor the spread of other infections. Therefore, we need to think about the evolution of the immune system using a multidimensional trade-off involving immunoprotection, immunopathology and the parasitic strategies to escape the immune response. PMID:25436882

  8. Tumor's other immune targets: dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Esche, C; Lokshin, A; Shurin, G V; Gastman, B R; Rabinowich, H; Watkins, S C; Lotze, M T; Shurin, M R

    1999-08-01

    The induction of apoptosis in T cells is one of several mechanisms by which tumors escape immune recognition. We have investigated whether tumors induce apoptosis in dendritic cells (DC) by co-culture of murine or human DC with different tumor cell lines for 4-48 h. Analysis of DC morphological features, JAM assay, TUNEL, caspase-3-like and transglutaminase activity, Annexin V binding, and DNA fragmentation assays revealed a time- and dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in DC by tumor-derived factors. This finding is both effector and target specific. The mechanism of tumor-induced DC apoptosis involved regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax expression. Double staining of both murine and human tumor tissues confirmed that tumor-associated DC undergo apoptotic death in vivo. DC isolated from tumor tissue showed significantly higher levels of apoptosis as determined by TUNEL assay when compared with DC isolated from spleen. These findings demonstrate that tumors induce apoptosis in DC and suggest a new mechanism of tumor escape from immune recognition. DC protection from apoptosis will lead to improvement of DC-based immunotherapies for cancer and other immune diseases.

  9. Nlrp6 regulates intestinal antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Penghua; Zhu, Shu; Yang, Long; Cui, Shuang; Pan, Wen; Jackson, Ruaidhri; Zheng, Yunjiang; Rongvaux, Anthony; Sun, Qiangming; Yang, Guang; Gao, Shandian; Lin, Rongtuan; You, Fuping; Flavell, Richard; Fikrig, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (Nlrp) 6 maintains gut microbiota homeostasis and regulates antibacterial immunity. We now report a role for Nlrp6 in the control of enteric virus infection. Nlrp6−/− and control mice systemically challenged with encephalomyocarditis virus had similar mortality, however, the gastrointestinal tract of Nlrp6−/− mice exhibited increased viral loads. Nlrp6−/− mice orally infected with encephalomyocarditis virus had increased mortality and viremia compared to controls. Similar results were observed with murine norovirus 1. Nlrp6 bound viral RNA via the RNA helicase Dhx15 and interacted with Mavs to induce type I/III interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). These data demonstrate that Nlrp6 functions with Dhx15 as a viral RNA sensor to induce ISGs, and this effect is especially important in the intestinal tract. PMID:26494172

  10. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of immune checkpoints: another target for cancer immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Ali, Mahmoud A; Matboli, Marwa; Tarek, Marwa; Reda, Maged; Kamal, Kamal M; Nouh, Mahmoud; Ashry, Ahmed M; El-Bab, Ahmed Fath; Mesalam, Hend A; Shafei, Ayman El-Sayed; Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes contribute to carcinogenesis. Understanding the epigenetic and genetic components of tumor immune evasion is crucial. Few cancer genetic mutations have been linked to direct correlations with immune evasion. Studies on the epigenetic modulation of the immune checkpoints have revealed a critical interaction between epigenetic and immune modulation. Epigenetic modifiers can activate many silenced genes. Some of them are immune checkpoints regulators that turn on immune responses and others turn them off resulting in immune evasion. Many forms of epigenetic inheritance mechanisms may play a role in regulation of immune checkpoints including: covalent modifications, noncoding RNA and histone modifications. In this review, we will show how the potential interaction between epigenetic and immune modulation may lead to new approaches for specific epigenome/immunome-targeted therapies for cancer.

  12. Influenza-induced innate immunity: regulators of viral replication, respiratory tract pathology & adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Oslund, Karen L; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus infections usually cause mild to moderately severe respiratory disease, however some infections, like those involving the avian H5N1 virus, can cause massive viral pneumonia, systemic disease and death. The innate immune response of respiratory tract resident cells is the first line of defense and limits virus replication. Enhanced cytokine and chemokine production following infection, however, appears to underlie much of the pathology that develops after infection with highly pathogenic strains. A so-called `cytokine storm' can damage the lung tissue and cause systemic disease, despite the control of viral replication. By summarizing current knowledge of the innate responses mounted to influenza infection, this review highlights the importance of the respiratory tract epithelial cells as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity to influenza virus. PMID:21909336

  13. Regulation of T15 Idiotype Dominance. I. Mice Expressing the xid Immune Defect Provide Normal Help to T15(+) B Cell Precursors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Quintans, J., Z. S. Quan, and Miguel A. Arias. 1982. Mice v/ith the xid defect have helper cells for T15 idiotype dominant anti- phosphorylcholine primary...and socondary plaque-forming cell responses. J. Exp. Mod. 155:1245. REFERENCES 1. Kohlef, H. 1975. The responsa to phosphorylcholine : dissecting...associated with the immune response o( inbred mice to phosphorylcholine . Eur. J. Immunol. 2:319. 4. Cosenza, H., and H. Köhler. 1972. Specific

  14. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation.

  15. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Garcia, Jordan A; Mandl, Judith N; Grodick, Rachael A; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B; Lenardo, Timothy E; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F; Freeman, Alexandra F; Cornall, Richard J; Germain, Ronald N; Mueller, Scott N; Su, Helen C

    2014-12-15

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin.

  16. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G.; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M.; Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Garcia, Jordan A.; Mandl, Judith N.; Grodick, Rachael A.; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B.; Lenardo, Timothy E.; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cornall, Richard J.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  17. Mast Cell: An Emerging Partner in Immune Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; D’Inca, Federica; Danelli, Luca; Betto, Elena; Mion, Francesca; Sibilano, Riccardo; Pucillo, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are currently recognized as effector cells in many settings of the immune response, including host defense, immune regulation, allergy, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. MC pleiotropic functions reflect their ability to secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active products with pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties, in response to multiple signals. Moreover, the modulation of MC effector phenotypes relies on the interaction of a wide variety of membrane molecules involved in cell–cell or cell-extracellular-matrix interaction. The delivery of co-stimulatory signals allows MC to specifically communicate with immune cells belonging to both innate and acquired immunity, as well as with non-immune tissue-specific cell types. This article reviews and discusses the evidence that MC membrane-expressed molecules play a central role in regulating MC priming and activation and in the modulation of innate and adaptive immune response not only against host injury, but also in peripheral tolerance and tumor-surveillance or -escape. The complex expression of MC surface molecules may be regarded as a measure of connectivity, with altered patterns of cell–cell interaction representing functionally distinct MC states. We will focalize our attention on roles and functions of recently discovered molecules involved in the cross-talk of MCs with other immune partners. PMID:22654879

  18. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Regulation of Innate Immune Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eunshil

    2011-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immune cells play a pivotal role in the first line of host defense system. PRRs recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) to initiate and regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. PRRs include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs), which have their own features in ligand recognition and cellular location. Activated PRRs deliver signals to adaptor molecules (MyD88, TRIF, MAL/TIRAP, TRAM, IPS-1) which act as important messengers to activate downstream kinases (IKK complex, MAPKs, TBK1, RIP-1) and transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1, IRF3), which produce effecter molecules including cytokines, chemokines, inflammatory enzymes, and type I interferones. Since excessive PRR activation is closely linked to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators in the prevention of over- or unnecessary activation of PRRs has been widely studied. Intracellular regulators include MyD88s, SOCS1, TOLLIP, A20, and CYLD. Extrinsic regulators have also been identified with their molecular targets in PRR signaling pathways. TLR dimerization has been suggested as an inhibitory target for small molecules such as curcumin, cinnamaldehyde, and sulforaphane. TBK1 kinase can be a target for certain flavonoids such as EGCG, luteolin, quercetin, chrysin, and eriodictyol to regulate TRIF-dependent TLR pathways. This review focuses on the features of PRR signaling pathways and the therapeutic targets of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators in order to provide beneficial strategies for controlling the activity of PRRs and the related inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. PMID:21488180

  19. CpG-induced antitumor immunity requires IL-12 in expansion of effector cells and down-regulation of PD-1.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Liu, Xin; Mansfield, Aaron S; Harrington, Susan M; Li, Yinghua; Yan, Yiyi; Dong, Haidong

    2016-10-25

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, as a ligand of toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, have demonstrated promising antitumor effects in some clinical trials; however, its toxicity and low efficacy as a systemic therapy has limited its therapeutic applications. In order to improve its therapeutic efficacy, we investigated the mechanisms of CpG-induced antitumor immunity in the context of CD8+ T cell responses. We show that IL-12 is required for the expansion of IFN-γ producing tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells capable of rejecting tumors. In addition, CpGs reduced PD-1 expression by effector CD8+ T cells via the IL-12 pathway. The combination of CpG and PD-1 blockade show a synergistic effect in generation of systemic antitumor immunity. Our studies define a critical role of IL-12 in CpG-induced antitumor immunity and provide a rationale for combined therapy with TLR agonists and immune checkpoint blockade in cancer treatment.

  20. Insulin-like growth factors inhibit dendritic cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity through regulating ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Ting; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Li; Chen, Tsung-Ching; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) can promote tumorigenesis via inhibiting the apoptosis of cancer cells. The relationship between IGFs and dendritic cell (DC)-mediated immunity were investigated. Advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma patients were first evaluated to show higher IGF-1 and IGF-2 concentrations in their ascites than early-stage patients. IGFs could suppress DCs' maturation, antigen presenting abilities, and the ability to activate antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell. IGF-treated DCs also secreted higher concentrations of IL-10 and TNF-α. IGF-treated DCs showed decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced p38 dephosphorylation. The percentages of matured DCs in the ascites were significantly lower in the IGF-1 or IGF-2 highly-expressing WF-3 tumor-bearing mice. The IGF1R inhibitor - NVP-AEW541, could block the effects of IGFs to rescue DCs' maturation and to restore DC-mediated antigen-specific immunity through enhancing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation. IGFs can inhibit DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity through suppressing maturation and function and the IGF1R inhibitor could restore the DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of IGFs could be a potential strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  1. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  2. Importins and exportins regulating allergic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankita; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of macromolecules is a well-controlled process involving importins and exportins. These karyopherins recognize and bind to receptor-mediated intracellular signals through specific signal sequences that are present on cargo proteins and transport into and out of the nucleus through nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) present on cargo molecules to be imported while nuclear export signals (NES) on the molecules to be exported are recognized by importins and exportins, respectively. The classical NLS are found on many transcription factors and molecules that are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In addition, several immune modulators, including corticosteroids and vitamin D, elicit their cellular responses by regulating the expression and activity of importin molecules. In this review article, we provide a comprehensive list of importin and exportin molecules and their specific cargo that shuttled between cytoplasm and the nucleus. We also critically review the role and regulation of specific importin and exportin involved in the transport of activated transcription factors in allergic diseases, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the potential target sites for developing better therapeutic approaches.

  3. Roles of CD48 in regulating immunity and tolerance

    PubMed Central

    McArdel, Shannon L.; Terhorst, Cox; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2016-01-01

    CD48, a member of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule family, participates in adhesion and activation of immune cells. Although constitutively expressed on most hematopoietic cells, CD48 is upregulated on subsets of activated cells. CD48 can have activating roles on T cells, antigen presenting cells and granulocytes, by binding to CD2 or bacterial FimH, and through cell intrinsic effects. Interactions between CD48 and its high affinity ligand CD244 are more complex, with both stimulatory and inhibitory outcomes. CD244:CD48 interactions regulate target cell lysis by NK cells and CTLs, which are important for viral clearance and regulation of effector/memory T cell generation and survival. Here we review roles of CD48 in infection, tolerance, autoimmunity, and allergy, as well as the tools used to investigate this receptor. We discuss stimulatory and regulatory roles for CD48, its potential as a therapeutic target in human disease, and current challenges to investigation of this immunoregulatory receptor. PMID:26794910

  4. Dendritic cells and cytokines in immune rejection of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrantini, Maria; Capone, Imerio; Belardelli, Filippo

    2008-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in linking innate and adaptive immunity and, thus, in the generation of a protective immune response against both infectious diseases and tumors. The ability of DCs to prime and expand an immune response is regulated by signals acting through soluble mediators, mainly cytokines and chemokines. Understanding how cytokines influence DC functions and orchestrate the interactions of DCs with other immune cells is strictly instrumental to the progress in cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we will illustrate how certain cytokines and immune stimulating molecules can induce and sustain the antitumor immune response by acting on DCs. We will also discuss these cytokine-DC interactions in the light of clinical results in cancer patients.

  5. Cell-autonomous stress responses in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Julien; Blander, J Magarian

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune response of phagocytes to microbes has long been known to depend on the core signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which lead to expression and production of inflammatory cytokines that counteract infection and induce adaptive immunity. Cell-autonomous responses have recently emerged as important mechanisms of innate immunity. Either IFN-inducible or constitutive, these processes aim to guarantee cell homeostasis but have also been shown to modulate innate immune response to microbes and production of inflammatory cytokines. Among these constitutive cell-autonomous responses, autophagy is prominent and its role in innate immunity has been well characterized. Other stress responses, such as metabolic stress, the ER stress/unfolded protein response, mitochondrial stress, or the DNA damage response, seem to also be involved in innate immunity, although the precise mechanisms by which they regulate the innate immune response are not yet defined. Of importance, these distinct constitutive cell-autonomous responses appear to be interconnected and can also be modulated by microbes and PRRs, which add further complexity to the interplay between innate immune signaling and cell-autonomous responses in the mediation of an efficient innate immune response.

  6. An Interferon Regulated MicroRNA Provides Broad Cell-Intrinsic Antiviral Immunity through Multihit Host-Directed Targeting of the Sterol Pathway.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin A; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Forster, Thorsten; Blanc, Mathieu; Lu, Hongjin; Crick, Peter J; Yutuc, Eylan; Watterson, Steven; Martin, Kimberly; Griffiths, Samantha J; Enright, Anton J; Yamamoto, Mami; Pradeepa, Madapura M; Lennox, Kimberly A; Behlke, Mark A; Talbot, Simon; Haas, Jürgen; Dölken, Lars; Griffiths, William J; Wang, Yuqin; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-03-01

    In invertebrates, small interfering RNAs are at the vanguard of cell-autonomous antiviral immunity. In contrast, antiviral mechanisms initiated by interferon (IFN) signaling predominate in mammals. Whilst mammalian IFN-induced miRNA are known to inhibit specific viruses, it is not known whether host-directed microRNAs, downstream of IFN-signaling, have a role in mediating broad antiviral resistance. By performing an integrative, systematic, global analysis of RNA turnover utilizing 4-thiouridine labeling of newly transcribed RNA and pri/pre-miRNA in IFN-activated macrophages, we identify a new post-transcriptional viral defense mechanism mediated by miR-342-5p. On the basis of ChIP and site-directed promoter mutagenesis experiments, we find the synthesis of miR-342-5p is coupled to the antiviral IFN response via the IFN-induced transcription factor, IRF1. Strikingly, we find miR-342-5p targets mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis using a multihit mechanism suppressing the pathway at different functional levels: transcriptionally via SREBF2, post-transcriptionally via miR-33, and enzymatically via IDI1 and SC4MOL. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and enzymatic assays demonstrate the targeting mechanisms reduce intermediate sterol pathway metabolites and total cholesterol in macrophages. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. The sterol pathway is known to be an integral part of the macrophage IFN antiviral response, and we show that miR-342-5p exerts broad antiviral effects against multiple, unrelated pathogenic viruses such Cytomegalovirus and Influenza A (H1N1). Metabolic rescue experiments confirm the specificity of these effects and demonstrate that unrelated viruses have differential mevalonate and sterol pathway requirements for their replication. This study, therefore, advances the general concept of broad antiviral defense through multihit targeting of a single host pathway.

  7. Interactions of immune cells and lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kataru, Raghu P; Lee, Yulia G; Koh, Gou Young

    2014-01-01

    In addition to fluid and lipid absorption, immune cell trafficking has now become recognized as one of the major functions of the lymphatic system. Recently, several critical roles of the lymphatic vessels (LVs) in modulating immune reactions during both physiological and pathological conditions have been emerging. As LVs serve as conduits for immune cells, they come to closely interact with macrophages/monocytes, dendritic cells, and T and B lymphocytes. Accumulating evidences indicate that reciprocal interactions between the LVs and immune cells exist which cause considerable influence over the process of immune cell migration, LV growth, and ultimately certain immune reactions. This chapter discusses on the interactions of macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells with peripheral LVs and on those of sinusoidal macrophages and T and B lymphocytes with lymph node LVs.

  8. Glycosylation in immune cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Markus; Gleissner, Christian A.; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leukocyte recruitment encompasses cell adhesion and activation steps that enable circulating leukocytes to roll, arrest, and firmly adhere on the endothelial surface before they extravasate into distinct tissue locations. This complex sequence of events relies on adhesive interactions between surface structures on leukocytes and endothelial cells and also on signals generated during the cell-cell contacts. Cell surface glycans play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment. Several glycosyltransferases such as α1,3 fucosyltransferases, α2,3 sialyltransferases, core 2 N-acetylglucosaminlytransferases, β1,4 galactosyltransferases and polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases have been implicated in the generation of functional selectin ligands that mediate leukocyte rolling via binding to selectins. Recent evidence also suggests a role of α2,3 sialylated carbohydrate determinants in triggering chemokine-mediated leukocyte arrest and influencing β1 integrin function. Additional mechanisms by galectin- and siglec-dependent processes contribute to the growing number of reports emphasizing the significant role of glycans for the successful recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Advancing the knowledge on glycan function into appropriate pathology models is likely to suggest interesting new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of immune- and inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:19594631

  9. Immune activation: death, danger and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pulendran, Bali

    2004-01-06

    Dendritic cells are critical for host immunity, and sense microbes with pathogen recognition receptors. New evidence indicates that these cells also sense uric acid crystals in dead cells, suggesting that the immune system is conscious not only of pathogens, but also of death and danger.

  10. Immune cells in term and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; StLouis, Derek; Lehr, Marcus A; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Elly N; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia

    2014-11-01

    Labor resembles an inflammatory response that includes secretion of cytokines/chemokines by resident and infiltrating immune cells into reproductive tissues and the maternal/fetal interface. Untimely activation of these inflammatory pathways leads to preterm labor, which can result in preterm birth. Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity; therefore, the elucidation of the process of labor at a cellular and molecular level is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of preterm labor. Here, we summarize the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the physiological or pathological activation of labor. We review published literature regarding the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the cervix, myometrium, fetal membranes, decidua and the fetus in late pregnancy and labor at term and preterm. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) mediate the process of labor by releasing pro-inflammatory factors such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Adaptive immune cells (T-cell subsets and B cells) participate in the maintenance of fetomaternal tolerance during pregnancy, and an alteration in their function or abundance may lead to labor at term or preterm. Also, immune cells that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems (natural killer T (NKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs)) seem to participate in the pathophysiology of preterm labor. In conclusion, a balance between innate and adaptive immune cells is required in order to sustain pregnancy; an alteration of this balance will lead to labor at term or preterm.

  11. Immune cells in term and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; StLouis, Derek; Lehr, Marcus A; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Elly N; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Labor resembles an inflammatory response that includes secretion of cytokines/chemokines by resident and infiltrating immune cells into reproductive tissues and the maternal/fetal interface. Untimely activation of these inflammatory pathways leads to preterm labor, which can result in preterm birth. Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity; therefore, the elucidation of the process of labor at a cellular and molecular level is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of preterm labor. Here, we summarize the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the physiological or pathological activation of labor. We review published literature regarding the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the cervix, myometrium, fetal membranes, decidua and the fetus in late pregnancy and labor at term and preterm. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) mediate the process of labor by releasing pro-inflammatory factors such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Adaptive immune cells (T-cell subsets and B cells) participate in the maintenance of fetomaternal tolerance during pregnancy, and an alteration in their function or abundance may lead to labor at term or preterm. Also, immune cells that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems (natural killer T (NKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs)) seem to participate in the pathophysiology of preterm labor. In conclusion, a balance between innate and adaptive immune cells is required in order to sustain pregnancy; an alteration of this balance will lead to labor at term or preterm. PMID:24954221

  12. Disruption of immune regulation by microbial pathogens and resulting chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth; Remick, Daniel G; Genco, Caroline A

    2013-07-01

    Activation of the immune response is a tightly regulated, coordinated effort that functions to control and eradicate exogenous microorganisms, while also responding to endogenous ligands. Determining the proper balance of inflammation is essential, as chronic inflammation leads to a wide array of host pathologies. Bacterial pathogens can instigate chronic inflammation via an extensive repertoire of evolved evasion strategies that perturb immune regulation. In this review, we discuss two model pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which efficiently escape various aspects of the immune system within professional and non-professional immune cell types to establish chronic inflammation.

  13. Disruption of Immune Regulation by Microbial Pathogens and Resulting Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Kenneth; Remick, Daniel G.; Genco, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the immune response is a tightly regulated, coordinated effort that functions to control and eradicate exogenous microorganisms, while also responding to endogenous ligands. Determining the proper balance of inflammation is essential, as chronic inflammation leads to a wide array of host pathologies. Bacterial pathogens can instigate chronic inflammation via an extensive repertoire of evolved evasion strategies that perturb immune regulation. In this review, we discuss two model pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which efficiently escape various aspects of the immune system within professional and non-professional immune cell types to establish chronic inflammation. PMID:23255141

  14. Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    AD-All? 395 REGULATION OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM DY HYPOTHALAMIC 1/1 RELEASING HORMONES (U) TEXAS UNIV MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON E M SMITH S1 NOV 6? fW...441F004 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Eric M. Smith...34Hypothalamic releasing hormones , stress, immune system,. L08 ACTH, endorphins, corticosteroids, monokines, neuroimmunomodulation *’" . - " - 19 ABSTRACT

  15. Soluble TNFRp75 regulates host protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Dambuza, Ivy; Abel, Brian; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Sebesho, Boipelo; Randall, Philippa; Burger, Patricia; Fick, Elizabeth; Quesniaux, Valerie F J; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2014-04-01

    Development of host protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is critically dependent on the inflammatory cytokine TNF. TNF signals through 2 receptors, TNFRp55 and TNFRp75; however, the role of TNFRp75-dependent signaling in immune regulation is poorly defined. Here we found that mice lacking TNFRp75 exhibit greater control of M. tuberculosis infection compared with WT mice. TNFRp75-/- mice developed effective bactericidal granulomas and demonstrated increased pulmonary recruitment of activated DCs. Moreover, IL-12p40-dependent migration of DCs to lung draining LNs of infected TNFRp75-/- mice was substantially higher than that observed in WT M. tuberculosis-infected animals and was associated with enhanced frequencies of activated M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-γ-expressing CD4+ T cells. In WT mice, TNFRp75 shedding correlated with markedly reduced bioactive TNF levels and IL-12p40 expression. Neutralization of TNFRp75 in M. tuberculosis-infected WT BM-derived DCs (BMDCs) increased production of bioactive TNF and IL-12p40 to a level equivalent to that produced by TNFRp75-/- BMDCs. Addition of exogenous TNFRp75 to TNFRp75-/- BMDCs infected with M. tuberculosis decreased IL-12p40 synthesis, demonstrating that TNFRp75 shedding regulates DC activation. These data indicate that TNFRp75 shedding downmodulates protective immune function and reduces host resistance and survival; therefore, targeting TNFRp75 may be beneficial for improving disease outcome.

  16. Emerging roles of immune cells in luteal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Shimizu, Takashi; Matsui, Motozumi; Miyamoto, Akio

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian ovary, the corpus luteum (CL) is a unique transient endocrine organ displaying rapid angiogenesis and time-dependent accumulation of immune cells. The CL closely resembles 'transitory tumours', and the rate of luteal growth equals that of the fastest growing tumours. Recently, attention has focused on multiple roles of immune cells in luteal function, not only in luteolysis (CL disruption by immune responses involving T lymphocytes and macrophages), but also in CL development (CL remodelling by different immune responses involving neutrophils and macrophages). Neutrophils and macrophages regulate angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and steroidogenesis by releasing cytokines in the CL. In addition, functional polarisation of neutrophils (proinflammatory N1 vs anti-inflammatory N2) and macrophages (proinflammatory M1 vs anti-inflammatory M2) has been demonstrated. This new concept concurs with the phenomenon of immune function within the luteal microenvironment: active development of the CL infiltrating anti-inflammatory N2 and M2 versus luteal regression together with proinflammatory N1 and M1. Conversely, excessive angiogenic factors and leucocyte infiltration result in indefinite disordered tumour development. However, the negative feedback regulator vasohibin-1 in the CL prevents excessive tumour-like vasculogenesis, suggesting that CL development has well coordinated time-dependent mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the physiological roles of immune cells involved in innate immunity (e.g. neutrophils and macrophages) in the local regulation of CL development with a primary focus on the cow.

  17. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    PubMed

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system.

  18. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  19. Immune regulation of human colonic electrolyte transport in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Stack, W A; Keely, S J; O'Donoghue, D P; Baird, A W

    1995-01-01

    The role of lamina propria cells in regulating human colonic ion transport was investigated in vitro. Normal human colonic mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers, and short circuit current changes (delta SCC) were monitored in response to immune cell activation. Anti-human immunoglobulin E (anti-IgE) and formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine (fMLP) were used to stimulate mast cells and phagocytes respectively. Anti-IgE (100 micrograms/ml) and fMLP (100 microM) evoked rapid onset, inward delta SCC (mean (SEM) max delta SCC 19.3 (2.8) and 29.4 (4.7) microA/0.63 cm2 respectively). A pharmacological approach was used to identify the charge carrying ion species and to characterise mediators involved in the SCC response. Responses to each secretagogue were significantly attenuated by bumetanide, indicating that the delta SCC was at least partly due to electrogenic chloride secretion. Piroxicam reduced the delta SCC to mast cell and phagocyte activation by 91.1 (3.4)% and 48.2 (25.2)% respectively, implicating eicosanoids as mediators of the responses. Mepyramine (100 microM) reduced the SCC responses to anti-IgE by 79.6 (12.0)% but did not significantly alter delta SCC responses to fMLP. Desensitisation to repeated anti-IgE or fMLP stimulation, and cross desensitisation between each of the stimuli, were features of immune cell activation. In summary, we have shown that activation of immune cells can stimulate electrogenic chloride secretion. Such events in vivo will result in gradient driven secretory diarrhoea, which may occur as a protective response to enteric-dwelling parasites, or as a feature of local bowel inflammation. PMID:7698700

  20. Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Sepsis by Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Carson, W F; Kunkel, S L

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis, septic shock, and related inflammatory syndromes are driven by the aberrant expression of proinflammatory mediators by immune cells. During the acute phase of sepsis, overexpression of chemokines and cytokines drives physiological stress leading to organ failure and mortality. Following recovery from sepsis, the immune system exhibits profound immunosuppression, evidenced by an inability to produce the same proinflammatory mediators that are required for normal responses to infectious microorganisms. Gene expression in inflammatory responses is influenced by the transcriptional accessibility of the chromatin, with histone posttranslational modifications determining whether inflammatory gene loci are set to transcriptionally active, repressed, or poised states. Experimental evidence indicates that histone modifications play a central role in governing the cytokine storm of severe sepsis, and that aberrant chromatin modifications induced during the acute phase of sepsis may mediate chronic immunosuppression in sepsis survivors. This review will focus on the role of histone modifications in governing immune responses in severe sepsis, with an emphasis on specific leukocyte subsets and the histone modifications observed in these cells during chronic stages of sepsis. Additionally, the expression and function of chromatin-modifying enzymes (CMEs) will be discussed in the context of severe sepsis, as potential mediators of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in sepsis responses. In summary, this review will argue for the use of chromatin modifications and CME expression in leukocytes as potential biomarkers of immunosuppression in patients with severe sepsis.

  1. Retinoid-X-receptors (α/β) in melanocytes modulate innate immune responses and differentially regulate cell survival following UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Daniel J; Garcia, Gloria; Hyter, Stephen; Jang, Hyo Sang; Chagani, Sharmeen; Liang, Xiaobo; Larue, Lionel; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) induced melanoma formation is becoming crucial with more reported cases each year. Expression of type II nuclear receptor Retinoid-X-Receptor α (RXRα) is lost during melanoma progression in humans. Here, we observed that in mice with melanocyte-specific ablation of RXRα and RXRβ, melanocytes attract fewer IFN-γ secreting immune cells than in wild-type mice following acute UVR exposure, via altered expression of several chemoattractive and chemorepulsive chemokines/cytokines. Reduced IFN-γ in the microenvironment alters UVR-induced apoptosis, and due to this, the survival of surrounding dermal fibroblasts is significantly decreased in mice lacking RXRα/β. Interestingly, post-UVR survival of the melanocytes themselves is enhanced in the absence of RXRα/β. Loss of RXRs α/β specifically in the melanocytes results in an endogenous shift in homeostasis of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in these cells and enhances their survival compared to the wild type melanocytes. Therefore, RXRs modulate post-UVR survival of dermal fibroblasts in a "non-cell autonomous" manner, underscoring their role in immune surveillance, while independently mediating post-UVR melanocyte survival in a "cell autonomous" manner. Our results emphasize a novel immunomodulatory role of melanocytes in controlling survival of neighboring cell types besides controlling their own, and identifies RXRs as potential targets for therapy against UV induced melanoma.

  2. Retinoid-X-Receptors (α/β) in Melanocytes Modulate Innate Immune Responses and Differentially Regulate Cell Survival following UV Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Garcia, Gloria; Hyter, Stephen; Jang, Hyo Sang; Chagani, Sharmeen; Liang, Xiaobo; Larue, Lionel; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) induced melanoma formation is becoming crucial with more reported cases each year. Expression of type II nuclear receptor Retinoid-X-Receptor α (RXRα) is lost during melanoma progression in humans. Here, we observed that in mice with melanocyte-specific ablation of RXRα and RXRβ, melanocytes attract fewer IFN-γ secreting immune cells than in wild-type mice following acute UVR exposure, via altered expression of several chemoattractive and chemorepulsive chemokines/cytokines. Reduced IFN-γ in the microenvironment alters UVR-induced apoptosis, and due to this, the survival of surrounding dermal fibroblasts is significantly decreased in mice lacking RXRα/β. Interestingly, post-UVR survival of the melanocytes themselves is enhanced in the absence of RXRα/β. Loss of RXRs α/β specifically in the melanocytes results in an endogenous shift in homeostasis of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in these cells and enhances their survival compared to the wild type melanocytes. Therefore, RXRs modulate post-UVR survival of dermal fibroblasts in a “non-cell autonomous” manner, underscoring their role in immune surveillance, while independently mediating post-UVR melanocyte survival in a “cell autonomous” manner. Our results emphasize a novel immunomodulatory role of melanocytes in controlling survival of neighboring cell types besides controlling their own, and identifies RXRs as potential targets for therapy against UV induced melanoma. PMID:24810760

  3. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-10-15

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  4. The role of SLAM family receptors in immune cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, Elena A; Li, Shawn S-C

    2006-12-01

    The signaling lymphocyte-activating molecule (SLAM) family immunoreceptors are expressed in a wide array of immune cells, including both T and B lymphocytes. By virtue of their ability to transduce tyrosine phosphorylation signals through the so-called ITSM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif) sequences, they play an important part in regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses. The critical role of the SLAM immunoreceptors in mediating normal immune reactions was highlighted in recent findings that SAP, a SLAM-associated protein, modulates the activities of various immune cells through interactions with different members of the SLAM family expressed in these cells. Importantly, mutations or deletions of the sap gene in humans result in the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and survey the latest developments in signal transduction events triggered by the activation of SLAM family receptors in different cell types.

  5. TGF-β in tolerance, development and regulation of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Chris J.C.; Smyth, Danielle J.; Dresser, David W.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2016-01-01

    The TGF-β superfamily is an ancient metazoan protein class which cuts across cell and tissue differentiation, developmental biology and immunology. Its many members are regulated at multiple levels from intricate control of gene transcription, post-translational processing and activation, and signaling through overlapping receptor structures and downstream intracellular messengers. We have been interested in TGF-β homologues firstly as key players in the induction of immunological tolerance, the topic so closely associated with Ray Owen. Secondly, our interests in how parasites may manipulate the immune system of their host has also brought us to study the TGF-β pathway in infections with longlived, essentially tolerogenic, helminth parasites. Finally, within the spectrum of mammalian TGF-β proteins is an exquisitely tightly-regulated gene, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), whose role in sex determination underpins the phenotype of freemartin calves that formed the focus of Ray’s seminal work on immunological tolerance. PMID:26617281

  6. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:27304965

  7. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-06-13

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity.

  8. Stress hyperglycemia, insulin treatment, and innate immune cells.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Fangming; Stanojcic, Mile; Diao, Li; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia (HG) and insulin resistance are the hallmarks of a profoundly altered metabolism in critical illness resulting from the release of cortisol, catecholamines, and cytokines, as well as glucagon and growth hormone. Recent studies have proposed a fundamental role of the immune system towards the development of insulin resistance in traumatic patients. A comprehensive review of published literatures on the effects of hyperglycemia and insulin on innate immunity in critical illness was conducted. This review explored the interaction between the innate immune system and trauma-induced hypermetabolism, while providing greater insight into unraveling the relationship between innate immune cells and hyperglycemia. Critical illness substantially disturbs glucose metabolism resulting in a state of hyperglycemia. Alterations in glucose and insulin regulation affect the immune function of cellular components comprising the innate immunity system. Innate immune system dysfunction via hyperglycemia is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality in critical illness. Along with others, we hypothesize that reduction in morbidity and mortality observed in patients receiving insulin treatment is partially due to its effect on the attenuation of the immune response. However, there still remains substantial controversy regarding moderate versus intensive insulin treatment. Future studies need to determine the integrated effects of HG and insulin on the regulation of innate immunity in order to provide more effective insulin treatment regimen for these patients.

  9. Balancing Immune Protection and Immune Pathology by CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Susu; Thomas, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immunity contributes to the clearance of virus-infected cells, and CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, its cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced proinflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL antiviral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated non-specific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity. PMID:26904022

  10. Inflammation and breast cancer. Balancing immune response: crosstalk between adaptive and innate immune cells during breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    DeNardo, David G; Coussens, Lisa M

    2007-01-01

    Recent insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying cancer development have revealed that immune cells functionally regulate epithelial cancer development and progression. Moreover, accumulated clinical and experimental data indicate that the outcome of an immune response toward an evolving breast neoplasm is largely determined by the type of immune response elicited. Acute tumor-directed immune responses involving cytolytic T lymphocytes appear to protect against tumor development, whereas immune responses involving chronic activation of humoral immunity, infiltration by Th2 cells, and protumor-polarized innate inflammatory cells result in the promotion of tumor development and disease progression. Herein we review this body of literature and summarize important new findings revealing the paradoxical role of innate and adaptive leukocytes as regulators of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:17705880

  11. Natural killer cell regulation - beyond the receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urlaub, Doris; Fasbender, Frank; Claus, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that are important for early and effective immune responses against infections and cancer. In the last 40 years, many receptors, their corresponding ligands and signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions have been identified. However, we now know that additional processes, such as NK cell education, differentiation and also the formation of NK cell memory, have a great impact on the reactivity of these cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about these modulatory processes. PMID:25374665

  12. MiR-381-3p Regulates the Antigen-Presenting Capability of Dendritic Cells and Represses Antituberculosis Cellular Immune Responses by Targeting CD1c.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Zhou, Chaoying; Xiong, Wenjing; Su, Jing; He, Jianchun; Zhang, Shimeng; Du, Xialin; Liu, Sudong; Wang, Juanjuan; Ma, Li

    2016-07-15

    Tuberculosis is still the widest spread infectious disease in the world, and more in-depth studies are needed on the interaction between the pathogen and the host. Due to the highest lipid components in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the CD1 family that specifically presents antigenic lipids plays important roles in the antituberculosis immunity, especially CD1c, which functions as the intracellular Ag inspector at the full intracellular range. However, downregulation of the CD1c mRNA level has been observed in M. tuberculosis-infected cells, which is consistent with the regulatory mechanism of miRNA on gene expression. In this study, through combinatory analysis of previous miRNA transcriptomic assays and bioinformatic predictions by web-based algorithms, miR-381-3p was predicted to bind the 3'-untranslated region of CD1c gene. In vivo expression of miR-381-3p in dendritic cells (DCs) of TB patients is higher than in DCs of healthy individuals, inversely related to CD1c. Suppression of CD1c expression in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected DCs was accompanied with upregulation of miR-381-3p, whereas inhibition of miR-381-3p could reverse suppression of CD1c expression and promote T cell responses against BCG infection. Further study indicated that miR-381-3p is also one of the mediators of the immune suppressor IL-10. Collectively, these results demonstrated the mechanism that suppression of CD1c by BCG infection is mediated by miR-381-3p. This finding may provide a novel approach to boost immune responses to M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Genipin crosslinking reduced the immunogenicity of xenogeneic decellularized porcine whole-liver matrices through regulation of immune cell proliferation and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujia; Bao, Ji; Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Qiong; Li, Yi; Zhou, Yongjie; Li, Li; Bu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Decellularized xenogeneic whole-liver matrices are plausible biomedical materials for the bioengineering of liver transplantation. A common method to reduce the inflammatory potential of xenogeneic matrices is crosslinking. Nevertheless, a comprehensive analysis of the immunogenic features of cross-linked decellularized tissue is still lacking. We aimed to reduce the immunogenicity of decellularized porcine whole-liver matrix through crosslinking with glutaraldehyde or genipin, a new natural agent, and investigated the mechanism of the immune-mediated responses. The histologic assessment of the host’s immune reaction activated in response to these scaffolds, as well as the M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages, was studied in vivo. The genipin-fixed scaffold elicited a predominantly M2 phenotype response, while the glutaraldehyde-fixed scaffold resulted in disrupted host tissue remodeling and a mixed macrophage polarization profile. The specific subsets of immune cells involved in the responses to the scaffolds were identified in vitro. Crosslinking alleviated the host response by reducing the proliferation of lymphocytes and their subsets, accompanied by a decreased release of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the natural genipin crosslinking could lower the immunogenic potential of xenogeneic decellularized whole-liver scaffolds.

  14. Genipin crosslinking reduced the immunogenicity of xenogeneic decellularized porcine whole-liver matrices through regulation of immune cell proliferation and polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujia; Bao, Ji; Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Qiong; Li, Yi; Zhou, Yongjie; Li, Li; Bu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Decellularized xenogeneic whole-liver matrices are plausible biomedical materials for the bioengineering of liver transplantation. A common method to reduce the inflammatory potential of xenogeneic matrices is crosslinking. Nevertheless, a comprehensive analysis of the immunogenic features of cross-linked decellularized tissue is still lacking. We aimed to reduce the immunogenicity of decellularized porcine whole-liver matrix through crosslinking with glutaraldehyde or genipin, a new natural agent, and investigated the mechanism of the immune-mediated responses. The histologic assessment of the host’s immune reaction activated in response to these scaffolds, as well as the M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages, was studied in vivo. The genipin-fixed scaffold elicited a predominantly M2 phenotype response, while the glutaraldehyde-fixed scaffold resulted in disrupted host tissue remodeling and a mixed macrophage polarization profile. The specific subsets of immune cells involved in the responses to the scaffolds were identified in vitro. Crosslinking alleviated the host response by reducing the proliferation of lymphocytes and their subsets, accompanied by a decreased release of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the natural genipin crosslinking could lower the immunogenic potential of xenogeneic decellularized whole-liver scaffolds. PMID:27098308

  15. Rethinking inflammation: neural circuits in the regulation of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Peder S.; Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Levine, Yaakov A.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neural reflex circuits regulate cytokine release to prevent potentially damaging inflammation and maintain homeostasis. In the inflammatory reflex, sensory input elicited by infection or injury travels through the afferent vagus nerve to integrative regions in the brainstem, and efferent nerves carry outbound signals that terminate in the spleen and other tissues. Neurotransmitters from peripheral autonomic nerves subsequently promote acetylcholine-release from a subset of CD4+ T cells that relay the neural signal to other immune cells, e.g. through activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on macrophages. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of the inflammatory reflex and discuss potential therapeutic implications of current findings in this evolving field. PMID:22725962

  16. Regulatory immune cells and functions in autoimmunity and transplantation immunology.

    PubMed

    Papp, Gabor; Boros, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2017-03-07

    In physiological circumstances, various tolerogenic mechanisms support the protection of self-structures during immune responses. However, quantitative and/or qualitative changes in regulatory immune cells and mediators can evoke auto-reactive immune responses, and upon susceptible genetic background, along with the presence of other concomitant etiological factors, autoimmune disease may develop. In transplant immunology, tolerogenic mechanisms are also critical, since the balance between of alloantigen-reactive effector cells and the regulatory immune cells will ultimately determine whether a graft is accepted or rejected. Better understanding of the immunological tolerance and the potential modulations of immune regulatory processes are crucial for developing effective therapies in autoimmune diseases as well as in organ transplantation. In this review, we focus on the novel insights regarding the impaired immune regulation and other relevant factors contributing to the development of auto-reactive and graft-reactive immune responses in autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection, respectively. We also address some promising approaches for modification of immune-regulatory processes and tolerogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity and solid organ transplantation, which may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  17. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pamela Y; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S; Herbert, De'Broski R; Craft, Joseph E; Flavell, Richard A; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G; Torgerson, Dara G; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-04-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded byTyro3in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell-specificPros1knockouts phenocopied the loss ofTyro3 Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses.

  18. Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, P.B.; Grieninger, G.; Tosato, G.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the conference entitled Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses: Interleukin-L. Topics covered include: Interferon-B{sub 2}/26kDa Protein, Regulation of acute phase liver gene expression, and Genetics and regulation of expression of IL-6.

  19. [The regulation of antitumor immune responses by helper T cells--From the bench research to the discovery of H/K-HELP cancer vaccine].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    During past decades, cancer vaccine therapy has been focused on only the activation of CTL, but its therapeutic effect was not successful though long SD was induced. The failure of cancer vaccine is derived from (i) the existence of a strong tumor escape mechanisms and (ii) the ignorance of helper T cell activation. We have proposed that Th1-dominant immunity played a critical role for overcoming immunosuppressive tumor-escape mechanisms to induce tumor-specific CTL, which are essential for the complete cure of tumor and prevention of tumor recurrence. To apply these basic findings, we started a clinical trial of a novel cancer vaccine/cell therapy (Th1 cell therapy) using H/K-HELP of MAGE-A4 or Survivin cancer antigen. In phase I study, H/K-HELP consisted of both killer and helper epitopes and Th1 adjuvants (OK-432 and Montanide) were subcutaneously administered into cancer patients 4 times at 2 wks intervals. Both MAGE-A4-H/K-HELP and Survivin-H/K-HELP cancer vaccine induced cancer-specific Th1 and Tc1 immune responses and cancer-specific C-fixing antibodies (IgG1 and IgG3) in cancer patients. Moreover, Survivin-H/K-HELP vaccination induced a complete regression of chemo and radio-resistant lateral deep cervical node recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer. H/K-HELP vaccination with Th1 adjuvants or its combination with Th1 cells will become a promising cancer vaccine/cell therapy of human cancer.

  20. Tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulates immunity-associated programmed cell death by enhancing accumulation and signaling ability of MAPKKKalpha

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is triggered when Pto, a serine-threonine protein kinase recognizes either the AvrPto or AvrPtoB effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. This PCD requires MAPKKKalpha as a positive regulator in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. To examine how PCD-eliciting activi...

  1. Functions of innate immune cells and commensal bacteria in gut homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal immune system remains unresponsive to beneficial microbes and dietary antigens while activating pro-inflammatory responses against pathogens for host defence. In intestinal mucosa, abnormal activation of innate immunity, which directs adaptive immune responses, causes the onset and/or progression of inflammatory bowel diseases. Thus, innate immunity is finely regulated in the gut. Multiple innate immune cell subsets have been identified in both murine and human intestinal lamina propria. Some innate immune cells play a key role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis by preventing inappropriate adaptive immune responses while others are associated with the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation through development of Th1 and Th17 cells. In addition, intestinal microbiota and their metabolites contribute to the regulation of innate/adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, perturbation of microbiota composition can trigger intestinal inflammation by driving inappropriate immune responses.

  2. Neural regulation of immunity: molecular mechanisms and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Valentin A; Tracey, Kevin J

    2017-02-01

    Studies bridging neuroscience and immunology have identified neural pathways that regulate immunity and inflammation. Recent research using methodological advances in molecular genetics has improved our understanding of the neural control of immunity. Here we outline mechanistic insights, focusing on translational relevance and conceptual developments. We also summarize findings from recent clinical studies of bioelectronic neuromodulation in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  3. The role of chromatin dynamics in immune cell development.

    PubMed

    Winter, Deborah R; Amit, Ido

    2014-09-01

    In immune cells, as in all mammalian cells, nuclear DNA is wrapped around histones to form nucleosomes. The positioning and modifications of nucleosomes throughout the genome defines the chromatin state of the cell and has a large impact on gene regulation. Chromatin state is dynamic throughout immune cell development and activation. High-throughput open chromatin assays, such as DNase-seq, can be used to find regulatory element across the genome and, when combined with histone modifications, can specify their function. During hematopoiesis, distal regulatory elements, known as enhancers, are established by pioneer factors that alter chromatin state. Some of these enhancers are lost, some are gained, and some are maintained as a memory of the cell's developmental origin. The enhancer landscape is unique to the cell lineage-with different enhancers regulating the same promoter-and determines the mechanism of cell type-specific activation after exposure to stimuli. Histone modification and promoter architecture govern the diverse responses to stimulation. Furthermore, chromatin dynamics may explain the high plasticity of certain tissue-resident immune cell types. Future epigenomic research will depend on the development of more efficient experiments and better methods to associate enhancers with genes. The ultimate goal of mapping genome-wide chromatin state throughout the hematopoietic tree will help illuminate the mechanisms behind immune cell development and function. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. IL-22 is a key player in the regulation of inflammation in fish and involves innate immune cells and PI3K signaling.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria M; Saraceni, Paolo R; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2013-12-01

    IL-22 plays a role in various disorders in mammals, including mucosal-associated infections and inflammatory diseases. No functional IL-22 studies have been conducted on non-mammals to date. In this study, recombinant IL-22 (rIL-22) from turbot was produced to investigate its effects as a bioactive molecule. The expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines was increased after rIL-22 treatment and reduced by pre-treatment with a JAK/STAT inhibitor. The involvement of the PI3K pathway in IL-22 induction was demonstrated. rIL-22 reduced the mortality in Aeromonas salmonicida-infected turbot, while higher Aeromonas hydrophila- or LPS-induced mortality was observed when IL-22 was blocked in zebrafish embryos. IL-22 knockdown increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in bacteria-stimulated fish. In zebrafish, IL-22 expression was detected primarily in the myeloid innate linage. It was found during early developmental stages when the adaptive immune response is not yet functional and in rag1(-)/(-) fish that lack an adaptive immune system. Our results clarify the conserved role of IL-22 in lower vertebrates. We suggest for the first time that IL-22 constitutes a key regulator of inflammatory homeostasis even in distant species such as teleosts, which diverged from mammals more than 350 million years ago.

  5. Antiviral B cell and T cell immunity in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Christopher; Openshaw, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are frequent causes of repeated common colds, bronchitis and pneumonia, which often occur unpredictably as epidemics and pandemics. Despite those decimating effects on health and decades of intensive research, treatments remain largely supportive. The only commonly available vaccines are against influenza virus, and even these need improvement. The lung shares some features with other mucosal sites, but preservation of its especially delicate anatomical structures necessitates a fine balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses; well-timed, appropriately placed and tightly regulated T cell and B cell responses are essential for protection from infection and limitation of symptoms, whereas poorly regulated inflammation contributes to tissue damage and disease. Recent advances in understanding adaptive immunity should facilitate vaccine development and reduce the global effect of respiratory viruses.

  6. Hide-and-seek: the interplay between cancer stem cells and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Mohammad; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Vidovic, Dejan; Thomas, Margaret Lois; Gujar, Shashi; Marcato, Paola

    2016-11-19

    The enhanced ability of cancer stem cells (CSCs) to give rise to new tumors suggests that these cells may also have an advantage in evading immune detection and elimination. This tumor-forming ability, combined with the known plasticity of the immune system, which can play both protumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles, has motivated investigations into the interaction between CSCs and the immune system. Herein, we review the interplay between host immunity and CSCs by examining the immune-related mechanisms that favor CSCs and the CSC-mediated expansion of protumorigenic immune cells. Furthermore, we discuss immune cells, such as natural killer cells, that preferentially target CSCs and the strategies used by CSCs to evade immune detection and destruction. An increased understanding of these interactions and the pathways that regulate them may allow us to harness immune system components to create new adjuvant therapies that eradicate CSCs and improve patient survival.

  7. An update: Epstein-Barr virus and immune evasion via microRNA regulation.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lielian; Yue, Wenxin; Du, Shujuan; Xin, Shuyu; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Lingzhi; Li, Guiyuan; Lu, Jianhong

    2017-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic virus that ubiquitously establishes life-long persistence in humans. To ensure its survival and maintain its B cell transformation function, EBV has developed powerful strategies to evade host immune responses. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful regulators of the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. In this review, we summarize current progress on how EBV utilizes miRNAs for immune evasion. EBV encodes miRNAs targeting both viral and host genes involved in the immune response. The miRNAs are found in two gene clusters, and recent studies have demonstrated that lack of these clusters increases the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell response of infected cells. These reports strongly indicate that EBV miRNAs are critical for immune evasion. In addition, EBV is able to dysregulate the expression of a variety of host miRNAs, which influence multiple immune-related molecules and signaling pathways. The transport via exosomes of EBV-regulated miRNAs and viral proteins contributes to the construction and modification of the inflammatory tumor microenvironment. During EBV immune evasion, viral proteins, immune cells, chemokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and pro-apoptosis molecules are involved. Our increasing knowledge of the role of miRNAs in immune evasion will improve the understanding of EBV persistence and help to develop new treatments for EBV-associated cancers and other diseases.

  8. Autonomic dysfunction, immune regulation, and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    To review existing evidence regarding interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system functions in multiple sclerosis. We reviewed the literature regarding new insights linking autonomic dysfunction to immune deregulation in multiple sclerosis, with particular focus on the specific influence of sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction on inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. Autonomic dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis, representing a significant cause of disability. Several connections between pathologic immune pathways and the autonomic nervous system function were found. Autonomic dysfunction may enhance inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways that are of major importance in multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction can present with highly variable manifestations. Sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction displays different patterns in multiple sclerosis, with specific impact on inflammation and neurodegeneration.

  9. Salicylic acid regulates Plasmodesmata closure during innate immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Sager, Ross; Cui, Weier; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Hua; Lee, Jung-Youn

    2013-06-01

    In plants, mounting an effective innate immune strategy against microbial pathogens involves triggering local cell death within infected cells as well as boosting the immunity of the uninfected neighboring and systemically located cells. Although not much is known about this, it is evident that well-coordinated cell-cell signaling is critical in this process to confine infection to local tissue while allowing for the spread of systemic immune signals throughout the whole plant. In support of this notion, direct cell-to-cell communication was recently found to play a crucial role in plant defense. Here, we provide experimental evidence that salicylic acid (SA) is a critical hormonal signal that regulates cell-to-cell permeability during innate immune responses elicited by virulent bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that direct exogenous application of SA or bacterial infection suppresses cell-cell coupling and that SA pathway mutants are impaired in this response. The SA- or infection-induced suppression of cell-cell coupling requires an enhanced desease resistance1- and nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1-dependent SA pathway in conjunction with the regulator of plasmodesmal gating Plasmodesmata-located protein5. We discuss a model wherein the SA signaling pathway and plasmodesmata-mediated cell-to-cell communication converge under an intricate regulatory loop.

  10. Immune regulation during chronic visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Faleiro, Rebecca J; Kumar, Rajiv; Hafner, Louise M; Engwerda, Christian R

    2014-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a chronic parasitic disease associated with severe immune dysfunction. Treatment options are limited to relatively toxic drugs, and there is no vaccine for humans available. Hence, there is an urgent need to better understand immune responses following infection with Leishmania species by studying animal models of disease and clinical samples from patients. Here, we review recent discoveries in these areas and highlight shortcomings in our knowledge that need to be addressed if better treatment options are to be developed and effective vaccines designed.

  11. Immunization to regulate fertility: biological and cultural frameworks.

    PubMed

    Schrater, A F

    1995-09-01

    Deliberate immunization to control fertility differs from that to control disease. Those differences can be discussed within various frameworks, e.g., intent, recipient population, biological bases, and immunological targets. Others include differing perspectives of developers, providers and users, and rights of the state to impose programs of control. Almost all of the differences are grounded in the social, economic, and gendered aspects of societies. The intent of providing a fertility-regulating vaccine is to prevent pregnancy. In theory, men as well as women could receive such vaccines; in reality, most are designed for women. Traditional vaccines are intended to prevent disease and are generally given to susceptible individuals whether male or female, child or adult. The biological bases of contraceptive vaccines are molecules specific to reproduction. The immune response generated by most anti-fertility vaccines is directed toward 'self', one's own cells and molecules. In contrast, the bases of traditional vaccines are materials derived from non-self, disease-causing microorganisms; the immunological targets are those microorganisms or their toxic products. From a developer perspective vaccines that regulate fertility differ little from those that control disease; both prevent a particular condition. Developers cite these advantages to contraceptive vaccines: non-invasive, no serious side-effects, easy to use, reduced patient failure, and long-lasting but naturally reversible. Because anti-fertility vaccines have been tested only in small-scale clinical trials, information on user reactions and experiences is limited. Not surprisingly, the perspectives of women's health advocates and of potential users (mostly women) often differ markedly from those of developers. Women cite as disadvantages the cryptic nature of immunity which leaves one without an obvious signal for the beginning of protection (against pregnancy) and its decline, and the inability to 'turn

  12. The adaptive immune system as a fundamental regulator of adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2012-09-01

    Over the past decade, chronic inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) has gained acceptance as a lead promoter of insulin resistance in obesity. A great deal of evidence has pointed to the role of adipokines and innate immune cells, in particular, adipose tissue macrophages, in the regulation of fat inflammation and glucose homeostasis. However, more recently, cells of the adaptive immune system, specifically B and T lymphocytes, have emerged as unexpected promoters and controllers of insulin resistance. These adaptive immune cells infiltrate obesity expanded VAT and through cytokine secretion and macrophage modulation dictate the extent of the local inflammatory response, thereby directly impacting insulin resistance. The remarkable ability of our adaptive immune system to regulate insulin sensitivity and metabolism has unmasked a novel physiological function of this system, and promises new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to manage the disease. This review highlights critical roles of adipose tissue lymphocytes in governing glucose homeostasis.

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factors in regulation of immune responses in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia is one of the hallmarks of the tumour microenvironment. It is the result of insufficient blood supply to support proliferating tumour cells. In response to hypoxia, the cellular machinery uses mechanisms whereby the low level of oxygen is sensed and counterbalanced by changing the transcription of numerous genes. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular responses to hypoxia. In recent years ample evidence has indicated that HIF play a prominent role in tumour immune responses. Up-regulation of HIF1α promotes immune suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressive cells (MDSC) and tumour-associated macrophages (TAM) and rapid differentiation of MDSC to TAM. HIF1α does not affect MDSC differentiation to dendritic cells (DC) but instead causes DC activation. HIF inhibit effector functions of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. HIF1α inhibits regulatory T (Treg) cell development by switching the balance towards T helper type 17 cells. However, as a major part of Treg cell differentiation does not take place in the tumour site, a functionally more important role of HIF1α is in the promotion of Treg cell recruitment to the tumour site in response to chemokines. As a result, the presence of Treg cells inside tumours is increased. Hence, HIF play a largely negative role in the regulation of immune responses inside tumours. It appears that therapeutic strategies targeting HIF in the immune system could be beneficial for anti-tumour immune responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mitochondria in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Samuel E; Sena, Laura A; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2015-03-17

    Mitochondria are well appreciated for their role as biosynthetic and bioenergetic organelles. In the past two decades, mitochondria have emerged as signaling organelles that contribute critical decisions about cell proliferation, death, and differentiation. Mitochondria not only sustain immune cell phenotypes but also are necessary for establishing immune cell phenotype and their function. Mitochondria can rapidly switch from primarily being catabolic organelles generating ATP to anabolic organelles that generate both ATP and building blocks for macromolecule synthesis. This enables them to fulfill appropriate metabolic demands of different immune cells. Mitochondria have multiple mechanisms that allow them to activate signaling pathways in the cytosol including altering in AMP/ATP ratio, the release of ROS and TCA cycle metabolites, as well as the localization of immune regulatory proteins on the outer mitochondrial membrane. In this Review, we discuss the evidence and mechanisms that mitochondrial dependent signaling controls innate and adaptive immune responses.

  15. B Cell Immunity in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Gonca E.; Claas, Frans H. J.; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of B cells to alloimmune responses is gradually being understood in more detail. We now know that B cells can perpetuate alloimmune responses in multiple ways: (i) differentiation into antibody-producing plasma cells; (ii) sustaining long-term humoral immune memory; (iii) serving as antigen-presenting cells; (iv) organizing the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs; and (v) secreting pro- as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines. The cross-talk between B cells and T cells in the course of immune responses forms the basis of these diverse functions. In the setting of organ transplantation, focus has gradually shifted from T cells to B cells, with an increased notion that B cells are more than mere precursors of antibody-producing plasma cells. In this review, we discuss the various roles of B cells in the generation of alloimmune responses beyond antibody production, as well as possibilities to specifically interfere with B cell activation. PMID:28119695

  16. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pamela Y.; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A.; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D.; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Herbert, De’Broski R.; Craft, Joseph E.; Flavell, Richard A.; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by Tyro3 in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell–specific Pros1 knockouts phenocopied the loss of Tyro3. Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  17. CD4 T Cells Mediate Both Positive and Negative Regulation of the Immune Response to HIV Infection: Complex Role of T Follicular Helper Cells and Regulatory T Cells in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Xu, Yin; Zaunders, John

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B-cells, and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T follicular helper cells (Tfh). These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B-cell hyperplasia and increased germinal center activity. Antiretroviral therapy may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore, there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B-cell, or Treg dysfunction. PMID:25610441

  18. Host cell autophagy in immune response to zoonotic infections.

    PubMed

    Skendros, Panagiotis; Mitroulis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic targets are sequestered within double-membraned autophagosomes and subsequently delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports the pivotal role of autophagy in host defense against intracellular pathogens implicating both innate and adaptive immunity. Many of these pathogens cause common zoonotic infections worldwide. The induction of the autophagic machinery by innate immune receptors signaling, such as TLRs, NOD1/2, and p62/SQSTM1 in antigen-presenting cells results in inhibition of survival and elimination of invading pathogens. Furthermore, Th1 cytokines induce the autophagic process, whereas autophagy also contributes to antigen processing and MHC class II presentation, linking innate to adaptive immunity. However, several pathogens have developed strategies to avoid autophagy or exploit autophagic machinery to their advantage. This paper focuses on the role of host cell autophagy in the regulation of immune response against intracellular pathogens, emphasizing on selected bacterial and protozoan zoonoses.

  19. Innate immune system cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Espinosa-Luna, Jose E; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María V; Montoya-Díaz, Eduardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall characterized by innate and adaptive immune system involvement. A key component of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation is the persistence of different innate immune cell types including mast cells, neutrophils, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Several endogenous signals such as oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and exogenous signals such as lipopolysaccharides, trigger the activation of these cells. In particular, these signals orchestrate the early and late inflammatory responses through the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and contribute to plaque evolution through the formation of foam cells, among other events. In this review we discuss how innate immune system cells affect atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  20. Haywire Immune Cells May Help Cause Baldness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Faulty immune cells may play a role in hair loss, a new study suggests. In experiments with mice, ... findings suggest that defects in Tregs could cause alopecia areata, a common autoimmune disorder that leads to ...

  1. Divergent roles of immune cells and their mediators in pain.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Ramin; Willemen, Hanneke L D M; Eijkelkamp, Niels

    2017-08-11

    Chronic pain is a major debilitating condition that is difficult to treat. Although chronic pain may appear to be a disorder of the nervous system, crucial roles for immune cells and their mediators have been identified as important contributors in various types of pain. This review focuses on how the immune system regulates pain and discusses the emerging roles of immune cells in the initiation or maintenance of chronic pain. We highlight which immune cells infiltrate damaged nerves, the dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and tissues around free nerve endings and discuss through which mechanisms they control pain. Finally we discuss emerging roles of the immune system in resolving pain and how the immune system contributes to the transition from acute to chronic pain. We propose that targeting some of these immune processes may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of chronic pain. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Jasper J. P.; Martens, Anne W. J.; Bakdash, Ghaith; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a group of immune cells of the lymphoid lineage that do not possess antigen specificity. The group includes natural killer (NK) cells, lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the recently identified ILC1s, ILC2s and ILC3s. Although the role of NK cells in the context of cancer has been well established, the involvement of other ILC subsets in cancer progression and resistance is just emerging. Here, we review the literature on the role of the different ILC subsets in tumor immunity and discuss its implications for cancer treatment and monitoring. PMID:28536374

  3. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jasper J P; Martens, Anne W J; Bakdash, Ghaith; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2016-02-25

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a group of immune cells of the lymphoid lineage that do not possess antigen specificity. The group includes natural killer (NK) cells, lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the recently identified ILC1s, ILC2s and ILC3s. Although the role of NK cells in the context of cancer has been well established, the involvement of other ILC subsets in cancer progression and resistance is just emerging. Here, we review the literature on the role of the different ILC subsets in tumor immunity and discuss its implications for cancer treatment and monitoring.

  4. Patterns of Immune Regulation in Rhesus Macaque and Human Families

    PubMed Central

    Burlingham, William J.; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Kempton, Steve; Haynes, Lynn; Kaufman, Dixon B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naturally acquired immune regulation amongst family members can result in mutual regulation between living related renal transplant donor and recipients. Pretransplant bidirectional regulation predisposed to superior renal allograft outcome in a CAMPATH-1H protocol. We tested whether Rhesus macaques, a large animal model of choice for preclinical transplant studies, share these immunoregulatory properties. Methods Antigen-specific linked suppression was measured by trans vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity [tvDTH] response. Neutralizing antibodies to regulatory cytokines, IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-35 were coinjected to ascertain the role of these cytokines in the regulatory response. Results Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 116 Rhesus macaques in 50 families and 78 human subjects in 25 families were analyzed. Suppression of the recall response of 25% or greater was detected in 30 of 51 (59%) monkeys, and 25 of 36 (69%) human subjects when PBMC were coinjected with antigens of the mother, containing the noninherited maternal antigens. In 33% of Rhesus and 32% of human subjects, linked suppression was also seen when PBMC from the mother was assayed with antigens from offspring. Bidirectional regulation was also seen between greater than 50% of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-identical full siblings; subcellular antigens caused significant linked suppression in 7 of 10 (Rhesus) and 8 of 15 (human) cases, indicating the importance of familial minor H antigens. The lowest incidence of regulation was seen in MHC-1 haplotype mismatched siblings in both species. Linked suppression was most effectively reversed by antibodies that neutralized TGFβ1, and the 2 subunits of IL-35 (Ebi3 and IL12p35). Conclusions Rhesus macaques provide a suitable model for analyzing the impact of bidirectional regulation in living related donor-recipient pairs. PMID:27500222

  5. Hybrid Shell Engineering of Animal Cells for Immune Protections and Regulation of Drug Delivery: Towards the Design of “Artificial Organs”

    PubMed Central

    Dandoy, Philippe; Meunier, Christophe F.; Michiels, Carine; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-01-01

    Background With the progress in medicine, the average human life expectancy is continuously increasing. At the same time, the number of patients who require full organ transplantations is augmenting. Consequently, new strategies for cell transplantation are the subject of great interest. Methodology/Principal Findings This work reports the design, the synthesis and the characterisation of robust and biocompatible mineralised beads composed of two layers: an alginate-silica composite core and a Ca-alginate layer. The adequate choice of materials was achieved through cytotoxicity LDH release measurement and in vitro inflammatory assay (IL-8) to meet the biocompatibility requirements for medical purpose. The results obtained following this strategy provide a direct proof of the total innocuity of silica and alginate networks for human cells as underscored by the non-activation of immune defenders (THP-1 monocytes). The accessible pore size diameter of the mineralised beads synthesized was estimated between 22 and 30 nm, as required for efficient immuno-isolation without preventing the diffusion of nutrients and metabolites. The model human cells, HepG2, entrapped within these hybrid beads display a high survival rate over more than six weeks according to the measurements of intracellular enzymatic activity, respiration rate, as well as the “de novo” biosynthesis and secretion of albumin out of the beads. Conclusions/Significance The current study shows that active mammalian cells can be protected by a silica-alginate hybrid shell-like system. The functionality of the cell strain can be maintained. Consequently, cells coated with an artificial and a biocompatible mineral shell could respond physiologically within the human body in order to deliver therapeutic agents in a controlled fashion (i.e. insulin), substituting the declining organ functions of the patient. PMID:21731637

  6. The tumor suppressor ARF regulates innate immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2011-12-15

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading organisms, and TLRs are the main sensors of microbial components, initiating signaling pathways that induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. An antiviral action for the tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) has been reported; however, the precise role of ARF in innate immunity is unknown. In this study, we show that ARF plays an important role in regulation of inflammatory responses. In peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages from ARF-deficient animals, the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by TLR ligands was severely impaired. The altered responses of ARF(-/-) cells to TLR ligands result from aberrant activation of intracellular signaling molecules including MAPKs, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB activation. Additionally, animals lacking ARF were resistant to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. This impaired activation of inflammation in ARF(-/-) mice was not restricted to TLRs, as it was also shown in response to non-TLR signaling pathways. Thus, ARF(-/-) mice were also unable to trigger a proper inflammatory response in experimental peritonitis or in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced edema. Overexpression of ARF, but not its downstream target p53, rescued the ARF-deficient phenotype, increasing TLR4 levels and restoring inflammatory reaction. An increase in the E2F1 protein levels observed in ARF(-/-) macrophages at basal condition and after LPS stimulation may be involved in the impaired response in this system, as E2F1 has been described as an inflammatory suppressor. These results indicate that tumor suppressor ARF is a new regulator of inflammatory cell signaling.

  7. Protein kinase C in the immune system: from signalling to chromatin regulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Sutton, Christopher Ray; Rao, Sudha

    2015-12-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) form a key family of enzymes involved in signalling pathways that specifically phosphorylates substrates at serine/threonine residues. Phosphorylation by PKC is important in regulating a variety of cellular events such as cell proliferation and the regulation of gene expression. In the immune system, PKCs are involved in regulating signal transduction pathways important for both innate and adaptive immunity, ultimately resulting in the expression of key immune genes. PKCs act as mediators during immune cell signalling through the immunological synapse. PKCs are traditionally known to be cytoplasmic signal transducers and are well embedded in the signalling pathways of cells to mediate the cells' response to a stimulus from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. PKCs are also found to transduce signals within the nucleus, a process that is distinct from the cytoplasmic signalling pathway. There is now growing evidence suggesting that PKC can directly regulate gene expression programmes through a non-traditional role as nuclear kinases. In this review, we will focus on the role of PKCs as key cytoplasmic signal transducers in immune cell signalling, as well as its role in nuclear signal transduction. We will also highlight recent evidence for its newly discovered regulatory role in the nucleus as a chromatin-associated kinase.

  8. Langerhans Cells Orchestrate TFH-Dependent Humoral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Vardam, Trupti; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana

    2017-09-01

    T follicular helper cells contribute to the development of long-lasting humoral immunity by germinal center formation. Somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation take place in germinal centers leading to the generation of memory B cells and plasma cells. As such, T follicular helper cells impact immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity, and cancer. This necessitates further understanding of how T follicular helper cells are regulated in health and disease. The current study by Levin et al. builds on prior work to further substantiate a critical role for skin migratory dendritic cells and in particular Langerhans cells at governing T follicular helper and germinal center formation after intradermal immunization with HIV p24-coated polylactic acid nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2007-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells. Lymphocyte-deficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1-deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25-Foxp3- or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses.

  10. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells1–4. Lymphocytedeficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1–deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25−Foxp3− or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses. PMID:17891146

  11. Regulatory T Cells, a Potent Immunoregulatory Target for CAM Researchers: Modulating Tumor Immunity, Autoimmunity and Alloreactive Immunity (III)

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo; Erde, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are the major arbiter of immune responses, mediating actions through the suppression of inflammatory and destructive immune reactions. Inappropriate Treg cell frequency or functionality potentiates the pathogenesis of myriad diseases with ranging magnitudes of severity. Lack of suppressive capability hinders restraint on immune responses involved in autoimmunity and alloreactivity, while excessive suppressive capacity effectively blocks processes necessary for tumor destruction. Although the etiology of dysfunctional Treg cell populations is under debate, the ramifications, and their mechanisms, are increasingly brought to light in the medical community. Methods that compensate for aberrant immune regulation may not address the underlying complications; however, they hold promise for the alleviation of debilitating immune system-related disorders. The dominant immunoregulatory nature of Treg cells, coupled with recent mechanistic knowledge of natural immunomodulatory compounds, highlights the importance of Treg cells to practitioners and researchers of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). PMID:16951715

  12. MenTORing Immunity: mTOR Signaling in the Development and Function of Tissue-Resident Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Russell G; Pearce, Edward J

    2017-05-16

    Tissue-resident immune cells must balance survival in peripheral tissues with the capacity to respond rapidly upon infection or tissue damage, and in turn couple these responses with intrinsic metabolic control and conditions in the tissue microenvironment. The serine/threonine kinase mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central integrator of extracellular and intracellular growth signals and cellular metabolism and plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review discusses the function of mTOR signaling in the differentiation and function of tissue-resident immune cells, with focus on the role of mTOR as a metabolic sensor and its impact on metabolic regulation in innate and adaptive immune cells. We also discuss the impact of metabolic constraints in tissues on immune homeostasis and disease, and how manipulating mTOR activity with drugs such as rapamycin can modulate immunity in these contexts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effect of dietary selenium on T cell immunity and cancer xenograft in nude mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selenium is known to regulate carcinogenesis and immunity at nutritional and supranutritional levels. Because the immune system provides one of the main body defenses against cancer, we asked whether T cell immunity can modulate selenium chemoprevention. Twenty-four homozygous NU/J nude mice were fe...

  14. Transfer of extracellular vesicles during immune cell-cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Cristina; Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; Mittelbrunn, María; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The transfer of molecules between cells during cognate immune cell interactions has been reported, and recently a novel mechanism of transfer of proteins and genetic material such as small RNA between T cells and APCs has been described, involving exchange of extracellular vesicles (EVs) during the formation of the immunological synapse (IS). EVs – a term that encompasses exosomes and microvesicles – have been implicated in cell-cell communication during immune responses associated with tumors, pathogens, allergies and autoimmune diseases. This review focuses on EV transfer as a mechanism for the exchange of molecules during immune cell-cell interactions. PMID:23278745

  15. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  16. Dendritic cell based genetic immunization stimulates potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 CTL cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Huang, Weiyi

    2008-09-01

    Although antibodies (Abs) produced by B cells can treat cancer in certain models, T cells have been accountable for the major effector to control cancer. Immune recognition toward tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), a melanoma associated antigen up-regulated on the surface of B16F10 melanomas, generally leads to tumor protection mediated by Abs. In this study, immunization with dendritic cells ex vivo transduced with adenovirus encoding TRP-1 stimulates immune activation and potent tumor protection mediated by CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmune consequence. Transfer of CD8 T cells from immunized mice also leads to tumor protection. The immune activation and CD8 T cell mediated tumor protection rely on the CD4 T cell help. Thus DC based genetic immunization targeting TRP-1, an antigen usually causes Ab predominant immune recognition, is capable of stimulating potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

  17. Isolation of Immune Cells for Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Tlili; Paradis, Pierre; Mann, Koren K; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes is a useful technique to characterize the role of the immune system in hypertension and vascular disease. Here we describe as an example the isolation of splenic T regulatory cells from donor mice processed to obtain a single cell suspension, followed by negative and positive selection to obtain CD4(+) T cells and CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells, respectively. Treg cells can be subsequently transferred to recipient animals.

  18. Splicing in immune cells-mechanistic insights and emerging topics.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Annalisa; Glasmacher, Elke

    2017-04-01

    Differential splicing of mRNAs not only enables regulation of gene expression levels, but also ensures a high degree of gene-product diversity. The extent to which splicing of mRNAs is utilized as a mechanism in immune cells has become evident within the last few years. Still, only a few of these mechanisms have been well studied. In this review, we discuss some of the best-understood mechanisms, for instance the differential splicing of CD45 in T cells, as well as immunoglobulin genes in B cells. Beyond that we provide general mechanistic insights on how, when and where this process takes place and discuss the current knowledge regarding these topics in immune cells. We also highlight some of the reported links to immune-related diseases, genome-wide sequencing studies t