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Sample records for cells restore cardiac

  1. Optogenetics-enabled assessment of viral gene and cell therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Boyle, Patrick M.; Chen, Kay; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cardiac pathologies are accompanied by loss of tissue excitability, which leads to a range of heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). In addition to electronic device therapy (i.e. implantable pacemakers and cardioverter/defibrillators), biological approaches have recently been explored to restore pacemaking ability and to correct conduction slowing in the heart by delivering excitatory ion channels or ion channel agonists. Using optogenetics as a tool to selectively interrogate only cells transduced to produce an exogenous excitatory ion current, we experimentally and computationally quantify the efficiency of such biological approaches in rescuing cardiac excitability as a function of the mode of application (viral gene delivery or cell delivery) and the geometry of the transduced region (focal or spatially-distributed). We demonstrate that for each configuration (delivery mode and spatial pattern), the optical energy needed to excite can be used to predict therapeutic efficiency of excitability restoration. Taken directly, these results can help guide optogenetic interventions for light-based control of cardiac excitation. More generally, our findings can help optimize gene therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability. PMID:26621212

  2. Optogenetics-enabled assessment of viral gene and cell therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Boyle, Patrick M; Chen, Kay; Trayanova, Natalia A; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cardiac pathologies are accompanied by loss of tissue excitability, which leads to a range of heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). In addition to electronic device therapy (i.e. implantable pacemakers and cardioverter/defibrillators), biological approaches have recently been explored to restore pacemaking ability and to correct conduction slowing in the heart by delivering excitatory ion channels or ion channel agonists. Using optogenetics as a tool to selectively interrogate only cells transduced to produce an exogenous excitatory ion current, we experimentally and computationally quantify the efficiency of such biological approaches in rescuing cardiac excitability as a function of the mode of application (viral gene delivery or cell delivery) and the geometry of the transduced region (focal or spatially-distributed). We demonstrate that for each configuration (delivery mode and spatial pattern), the optical energy needed to excite can be used to predict therapeutic efficiency of excitability restoration. Taken directly, these results can help guide optogenetic interventions for light-based control of cardiac excitation. More generally, our findings can help optimize gene therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability.

  3. Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells restore cardiac function in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy via trilineage differentiating capacity

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Henry C.; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E.; Oskouei, Behzad N.; Feigenbaum, Gary S.; Rodriguez, Jose E.; Valdes, David; Pattany, Pradip M.; Zambrano, Juan P.; Hu, Qinghua; McNiece, Ian; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying cardiac reparative effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) remain highly controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MSCs regenerate chronically infarcted myocardium through mechanisms comprising long-term engraftment and trilineage differentiation. Twelve weeks after myocardial infarction, female swine received catheter-based transendocardial injections of either placebo (n = 4) or male allogeneic MSCs (200 million; n = 6). Animals underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and in vivo cell fate was determined by co-localization of Y-chromosome (Ypos) cells with markers of cardiac, vascular muscle, and endothelial lineages. MSCs engrafted in infarct and border zones and differentiated into cardiomyocytes as ascertained by co-localization with GATA-4, Nkx2.5, and α-sarcomeric actin. In addition, Ypos MSCs exhibited vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell differentiation, contributing to large and small vessel formation. Infarct size was reduced from 19.3 ± 1.7% to 13.9 ± 2.0% (P < 0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) increased from 35.0 ± 1.7% to 41.3 ± 2.7% (P < 0.05) in MSC but not placebo pigs over 12 weeks. This was accompanied by increases in regional contractility and myocardial blood flow (MBF), particularly in the infarct border zone. Importantly, MSC engraftment correlated with functional recovery in contractility (R = 0.85, P < 0.05) and MBF (R = 0.76, P < 0.01). Together these findings demonstrate long-term MSC survival, engraftment, and trilineage differentiation following transplantation into chronically scarred myocardium. MSCs are an adult stem cell with the capacity for cardiomyogenesis and vasculogenesis which contribute, at least in part, to their ability to repair chronically scarred myocardium. PMID:19666564

  4. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquiz, Juan Manuel

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is affected by photon attenuation and image blurring due to Compton scatter and geometric detector response. Attenuation correction is important to increase diagnostic accuracy of cardiac SPECT. However, in attenuation-corrected scans, scattered photons from radioactivity in the liver could produce a spillover of counts into the inferior myocardial wall. In the clinical setting, blurring effects could be compensated by restoration with Wiener and Metz filters. Inconveniences of these procedures are that the Wiener filter depends upon the power spectra of the object image and noise, which are unknown, while Metz parameters have to be optimized by trial and error. This research develops an alternative restoration procedure based on a multiresolution denoising and regularization algorithm. It was hypothesized that this representation leads to a more straightforward and automatic restoration than conventional filters. The main objective of the research was the development and assessment of the multiresolution algorithm for compensating the liver spillover artifact. The multiresolution algorithm decomposes original SPECT projections into a set of sub-band frequency images. This allows a simple denoising and regularization procedure by discarding high frequency channels and performing inversion only in low and intermediate frequencies. The method was assessed in bull's eye polar maps and short- axis attenuation-corrected reconstructions of a realistic cardiac-chest phantom with a custom-made liver insert and different 99mTc liver-to-heart activity ratios. Inferior myocardial defects were simulated in some experiments. The cardiac phantom in free air was considered as the gold standard reference. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating contrast of short- axis slices and the normalized chi-square measure, defect size and mean and standard deviation of polar map counts. The performance of the multiresolution

  5. Sanguinarine inhibits angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiac cells via restoring reactive oxygen species-mediated decreases in the mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN; JIAO, RONG; MA, ZHEN-GUO; LIU, WEI; WU, QING-QING; YANG, ZHENG; LI, FANG-FANG; YUAN, YUAN; BIAN, ZHOU-YAN; TANG, QI-ZHU

    2015-01-01

    Cell apoptosis induced by Angiotensin II (Ang II) has a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sanguinarine (SAN), a drug which was proved to have anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and immune enhancing effects, can abolish cell apoptosis induced by Ang II. In the present study, H9c2 cardiac cells were stimulated with 10 µM Ang II with or without SAN. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, and changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were assessed using JC-1 staining. Furthermore, mRNA expression of NOX2 was determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. The expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) as well as cleaved (c)-caspase 3 and -9 were detected by western blot analysis, and the activity of caspase 3 and -9 was detected using an ELISA. The results of the present study showed that NOX2 expression and ROS generation induced by Ang II were inhibited by SAN, and the Ang 2-induced MMP loss was also ameliorated. Furthermore, Ang II-induced H9c2 cardiac cell apoptosis as well as c-caspase 3 and -9 levels were significantly reduced by SAN. Investigation of the possible pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of SAN showed that the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased, while that of Bax was increased following stimulation with Ang II, which was reversed following treatment with SAN. In addition, Ang II enhanced the activity of caspase 9 and cleaved downstream caspases such as caspase-3, initiating the caspase cascade, while pre-treatment of H9c2 cardiac cells with SAN blocked these effects. In conclusion, the findings of the present study indicated that SAN inhibits the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac cells induced by Ang II, most likely via restoring

  6. Stem cells in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death among people in industrialized nations. Although the heart has some ability to regenerate after infarction, myocardial restoration is inadequate. Consequently, investigators are currently exploring the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), skeletal myoblasts and adult bone marrow stem cells to limit infarct size. hESCs are pluripotent cells that can regenerate myocardium in infarcted hearts, attenuate heart remodeling and contribute to left ventricle (LV) systolic force development. Since hESCs can form heart teratomas, investigators are differentiating hESCs toward cardiac progenitor cells prior to transplantation into hearts. Large quantities of hESCs cardiac progenitor cells, however, must be generated, immune rejection must be prevented and grafts must survive over the long term to significantly improve myocardial performance. Transplanted autologous skeletal myoblasts can survive in infarcted myocardium in small numbers, proliferate, differentiate into skeletal myofibers and increase the LV ejection fraction. These cells, however, do not form electromechanical connections with host cardiomyocytes. Consequently, electrical re-entry can occur and cause cardiac arrhythmias. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. In several meta-analyses, patients with coronary disease who received autologous bone marrow cells by intracoronary injection show significant 3.7% (range: 1.9-5.4%) increases in LV ejection fraction, decreases in LV end-systolic volume of -4.8 ml (range: -1.4 to -8.2 ml) and reductions in infarct size of 5.5% (-1.9 to -9.1%), without experiencing arrhythmias. Bone marrow cells appear to release biologically active factors that limit myocardial damage. Unfortunately, bone marrow cells from patients with chronic diseases propagate poorly and can die prematurely. Substantial challenges must be addressed and resolved to advance the use of stem cells

  7. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside.

  8. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Franquiz, J M; Shukla, S

    1998-12-01

    In this study we present a multiresolution based method for restoring cardiac SPECT projections. Original projections were decomposed into a set of sub-band frequency images by using analyzing functions localized in both the space and frequency domain. This representation allows a simple denoising and restoration procedure by discarding high-frequency channels and performing inversion only in low frequencies. The method was evaluated in bull's eye reconstructions of a realistic cardiac chest phantom with a custom-made liver insert and 99mTc liver-to-heart activity ratios (LHAR) of 0:1, 1.5:1, 2.5:1, and 3.5:1. The cardiac phantom in free air was used as the reference standard. Reconstructions were performed by filtered backprojection using (1) no correction; (2) restoration without attenuation correction; (3) attenuation correction without restoration; and (4) restoration and attenuation correction. The attenuation correction was carried out with the Chang's method for one iteration. Results were compared with those obtained using an optimized prereconstruction Metz filter. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating the normalized chi-square measure and mean +/- s.d. of bull's eye counts. In reconstructions with high liver activity (LHAR > 2), attenuation correction without restoration severely distorted the polar maps due to the spill-over of liver activity into the inferior myocardial wall. Both restoration methods when combined with an attenuation correction compensated this artifact and yielded uniform polar maps similar to that of the standard reference. There was no visual or quantitative difference between the performance of Metz filtering and multiresolution restoration. However, the main advantage of the multiresolution method is that it states a more concise and straightforward approach to the restoration problem. Multiresolution based methods does not require information about the object image or optimization processes, such as in conventional

  9. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    PubMed

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research.

  10. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  11. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  12. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  13. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  14. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  15. Cardiac regeneration: still a 21st century challenge in search for cardiac progenitors from stem cells and embryos.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tui; Stefanovic, Sonia; Pucéat, Michel

    2010-07-01

    Regeneration of the heart after a stroke would be the best biologic response to restore its function. However, although this phenomenon occurs in primitive organisms, the regenerative potential is lost in mammals. Thus, the search for an appropriate cardiac progenitor with the potential to differentiate into a functional cardiomyocyte in vitro and in vivo has been the subject of intensive investigation. We summarize the cardiogenic transcriptional pathway that constitutes the molecular scaffold to drive pluripotent stem cells toward a cardiac progenitor fate. Then we overview the literature on derivation of cardiac progenitors from both embryos and stem cells.

  16. No evidence of myocardial restoration following transplantation of mononuclear bone marrow cells in coronary bypass grafting surgery patients based upon cardiac SPECT and 18F-PET

    PubMed Central

    Tossios, Paschalis; Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen; Schmidt, Matthias; Scheid, Christof; Ünal, Nermin; Moka, Detlef; Schwinger, Robert HG; Mehlhorn, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis, that intramyocardial injection of mononuclear bone marrow cells combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery improves tissue viability or function in infarct regions with non-viable myocardium as assessed by nuclear imaging techniques. Methods Thus far, 7 patients (60 ± 10 [SD] years) undergoing elective CABG surgery after a myocardial infarction were included in this study. Prior to sternotomy, bone marrow was harvested by sternal puncture. Mononuclear bone marrow cells were isolated by gradient centrifugation and resuspended in 2 ml volume of Hank's buffered salt solution. At the end of CABG surgery 10 injections of 0.2 ml each were applied to the core area and borderzones of the infarct. Global and regional perfusion and viability were evaluated by ECG-gated 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in all study patients < 6 days before and 3 months after the intervention. Results Non-viable segments indicating transmural defects were identified in 5 patients. Two patients were found to have non-transmural defects before surgery. Concomitant surgical revascularisation and bone marrow cell injection was performed in all patients without major complications. The median total injected mononuclear cell number was 7.0 × 107 (range: 0.8–20.4). At 3 months 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT and 18F-FDG-PET scanning showed in 5 patients (transmural defect n = 4; non-transmural defect n = 1) no change in myocardial viability and in two patients (transmural defect n = 1, non-transmural defect n = 1) enhanced myocardial viability by 75%. Overall, global and regional LV ejection fraction was not significantly increased after surgery compared with the preoperative value. Conclusion In CABG surgery patients with non-viable segments the concurrent use of intramyocardial cell transfer did not show any clear improvement in

  17. Mesp1 Marked Cardiac Progenitor Cells Repair Infarcted Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Diaz, Andrea Diaz; Benham, Ashley; Xu, Xueping; Wijaya, Cori S.; Fa’ak, Faisal; Luo, Weijia; Soibam, Benjamin; Azares, Alon; Yu, Wei; Lyu, Qiongying; Stewart, M. David; Gunaratne, Preethi; Cooney, Austin; McConnell, Bradley K.; Schwartz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesp1 directs multipotential cardiovascular cell fates, even though it’s transiently induced prior to the appearance of the cardiac progenitor program. Tracing Mesp1-expressing cells and their progeny allows isolation and characterization of the earliest cardiovascular progenitor cells. Studying the biology of Mesp1-CPCs in cell culture and ischemic disease models is an important initial step toward using them for heart disease treatment. Because of Mesp1’s transitory nature, Mesp1-CPC lineages were traced by following EYFP expression in murine Mesp1Cre/+; Rosa26EYFP/+ ES cells. We captured EYFP+ cells that strongly expressed cardiac mesoderm markers and cardiac transcription factors, but not pluripotent or nascent mesoderm markers. BMP2/4 treatment led to the expansion of EYFP+ cells, while Wnt3a and Activin were marginally effective. BMP2/4 exposure readily led EYFP+ cells to endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling was required to enter the cardiomyocyte fate. Injected mouse pre-contractile Mesp1-EYFP+ CPCs improved the survivability of injured mice and restored the functional performance of infarcted hearts for at least 3 months. Mesp1-EYFP+ cells are bona fide CPCs and they integrated well in infarcted hearts and emerged de novo into terminally differentiated cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells. PMID:27538477

  18. Mesp1 Marked Cardiac Progenitor Cells Repair Infarcted Mouse Hearts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Diaz, Andrea Diaz; Benham, Ashley; Xu, Xueping; Wijaya, Cori S; Fa'ak, Faisal; Luo, Weijia; Soibam, Benjamin; Azares, Alon; Yu, Wei; Lyu, Qiongying; Stewart, M David; Gunaratne, Preethi; Cooney, Austin; McConnell, Bradley K; Schwartz, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Mesp1 directs multipotential cardiovascular cell fates, even though it's transiently induced prior to the appearance of the cardiac progenitor program. Tracing Mesp1-expressing cells and their progeny allows isolation and characterization of the earliest cardiovascular progenitor cells. Studying the biology of Mesp1-CPCs in cell culture and ischemic disease models is an important initial step toward using them for heart disease treatment. Because of Mesp1's transitory nature, Mesp1-CPC lineages were traced by following EYFP expression in murine Mesp1(Cre/+); Rosa26(EYFP/+) ES cells. We captured EYFP+ cells that strongly expressed cardiac mesoderm markers and cardiac transcription factors, but not pluripotent or nascent mesoderm markers. BMP2/4 treatment led to the expansion of EYFP+ cells, while Wnt3a and Activin were marginally effective. BMP2/4 exposure readily led EYFP+ cells to endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling was required to enter the cardiomyocyte fate. Injected mouse pre-contractile Mesp1-EYFP+ CPCs improved the survivability of injured mice and restored the functional performance of infarcted hearts for at least 3 months. Mesp1-EYFP+ cells are bona fide CPCs and they integrated well in infarcted hearts and emerged de novo into terminally differentiated cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells. PMID:27538477

  19. Resident cardiac progenitor cells: at the heart of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bollini, Sveva; Smart, Nicola; Riley, Paul R

    2011-02-01

    Stem cell therapy has recently emerged as an innovative strategy over conventional cardiovascular treatments to restore cardiac function in patients affected by ischemic heart disease. Various stem cell populations have been tested and their potential for cardiac repair has been analyzed. Embryonic stem cells retain the greatest differentiation potential, but concerns persist with regard to their immunogenic and teratogenic effects. Although adult somatic stem cells are not tumourigenic and easier to use in an autologous setting, they exist in small numbers and possess reduced differentiation potential. Traditionally the heart was considered to be a post-mitotic organ; however, this dogma has recently been challenged with the identification of a reservoir of resident stem cells, defined as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). These endogenous progenitors may represent the best candidates for cardiovascular cell therapy, as they are tissue-specific, often pre-committed to a cardiac fate, and display a greater propensity to differentiate towards cardiovascular lineages. This review will focus on current research into the biology of CPCs and their regenerative potential. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  20. Implantation of cardiac progenitor cells using self-assembling peptide improves cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masakuni; Liu, Mei-Lan; Nagai, Toshio; Iwanaga, Koji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Takahashi, Toshinao; Kanda, Masato; Kondo, Naomichi; Wang, Pin; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Komuro, Issei

    2010-12-01

    Implantation of various types of cells into the heart has been reported to be effective for heart failure, however, it is unknown what kinds of cells are most suitable for myocardial repair. To examine which types of cells are most effective, we injected cell-Puramatrix™ (PM) complex into the border area and overlaid the cell-PM patch on the myocardial infarction (MI) area. We compared cardiac morphology and function at 2 weeks after transplantation. Among clonal stem cell antigen-1 positive cardiac progenitors with PM (cSca-1/PM), bone marrow mononuclear cells with PM (BM/PM), skeletal myoblasts with PM (SM/PM), adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal cells with PM (AMC/PM), PM alone (PM), and non-treated MI group (MI), the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was smaller than that of BM/PM, SM/PM, PM and MI. cSca-1/PM and AMC/PM attenuated ventricular enlargement and restored cardiac function in comparison with MI. Capillary density in the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was higher than that of other five groups. The percentage of TUNEL positive cardiomyocytes in the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was lower than that of MI and PM. cSca-1 secreted VEGF and some of them differentiated into cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. These results suggest that transplantation of cSca-1/PM most effectively prevents cardiac remodeling and dysfunction through angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis and myocardial regeneration. PMID:20869968

  1. Factors controlling cardiac neural crest cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Mary R

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac neural crest cells originate as part of the postotic caudal rhombencephalic neural crest stream. Ectomesenchymal cells in this stream migrate to the circumpharyngeal ridge and then into the caudal pharyngeal arches where they condense to form first a sheath and then the smooth muscle tunics of the persisting pharyngeal arch arteries. A subset of the cells continues migrating into the cardiac outflow tract where they will condense to form the aorticopulmonary septum. Cell signaling, extracellular matrix and cell-cell contacts are all critical for the initial migration, pauses, continued migration and condensation of these cells. This Review elucidates what is currently known about these factors. PMID:20890117

  2. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world.

  3. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2015-01-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  4. Translational aspects of cardiac cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Han; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Wu, Benjamin M; Ardehali, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy has been intensely studied for over a decade as a potential treatment for ischaemic heart disease. While initial trials using skeletal myoblasts, bone marrow cells and peripheral blood stem cells showed promise in improving cardiac function, benefits were found to be short-lived likely related to limited survival and engraftment of the delivered cells. The discovery of putative cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells as well as the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells has led to the delivery of cells potentially capable of electromechanical integration into existing tissue. An alternative strategy involving either direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts or stimulation of resident cardiomyocytes to regenerate new myocytes can potentially overcome the limitations of exogenous cell delivery. Complimentary approaches utilizing combination cell therapy and bioengineering techniques may be necessary to provide the proper milieu for clinically significant regeneration. Clinical trials employing bone marrow cells, mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells have demonstrated safety of catheter based cell delivery, with suggestion of limited improvement in ventricular function and reduction in infarct size. Ongoing trials are investigating potential benefits to outcome such as morbidity and mortality. These and future trials will clarify the optimal cell types and delivery conditions for therapeutic effect. PMID:26119413

  5. Cardiac side population cells and Sca-1-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Toshio; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Since the resident cardiac stem/progenitor cells were discovered, their ability to maintain the architecture and functional integrity of adult heart has been broadly explored. The methods for isolation and purification of the cardiac stem cells are crucial for the precise analysis of their developmental origin and intrinsic potential as tissue stem cells. Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is one of the useful cell surface markers to purify the cardiac progenitor cells. Another purification strategy is based on the high efflux ability of the dye, which is a common feature of tissue stem cells. These dye-extruding cells have been called side population cells because they locate in the side of dye-retaining cells after fluorescent cell sorting. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for the isolation of cardiac SP cells and Sca-1 positive cells.

  6. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

  7. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

  8. Methylene blue counteracts H2S toxicity-induced cardiac depression by restoring L-type Ca channel activity.

    PubMed

    Judenherc-Haouzi, Annick; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Sonobe, Takashi; Song, Jianliang; Rannals, Matthew D; Wang, JuFang; Tubbs, Nicole; Cheung, Joseph Y; Haouzi, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We have previously reported that methylene blue (MB) can counteract hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication-induced circulatory failure. Because of the multifarious effects of high concentrations of H2S on cardiac function, as well as the numerous properties of MB, the nature of this interaction, if any, remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify 1) the effects of MB on H2S-induced cardiac toxicity and 2) whether L-type Ca(2+) channels, one of the targets of H2S, could transduce some of the counteracting effects of MB. In sedated rats, H2S infused at a rate that would be lethal within 5 min (24 μM·kg(-1)·min(-1)), produced a rapid fall in left ventricle ejection fraction, determined by echocardiography, leading to a pulseless electrical activity. Blood concentrations of gaseous H2S reached 7.09 ± 3.53 μM when cardiac contractility started to decrease. Two to three injections of MB (4 mg/kg) transiently restored cardiac contractility, blood pressure, and V̇o2, allowing the animals to stay alive until the end of H2S infusion. MB also delayed PEA by several minutes following H2S-induced coma and shock in unsedated rats. Applying a solution containing lethal levels of H2S (100 μM) on isolated mouse cardiomyocytes significantly reduced cell contractility, intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) transient amplitudes, and L-type Ca(2+) currents (ICa) within 3 min of exposure. MB (20 mg/l) restored the cardiomyocyte function, ([Ca(2+)]i) transient, and ICa The present results offer a new approach for counteracting H2S toxicity and potentially other conditions associated with acute inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels. PMID:26962024

  9. Systemic administration of micro-dystrophin restores cardiac geometry and prevents dobutamine-induced cardiac pump failure.

    PubMed

    Townsend, DeWayne; Blankinship, Michael J; Allen, James M; Gregorevic, Paul; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Metzger, Joseph M

    2007-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease of striated muscle deterioration resulting from the loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Most patients develop significant cardiomyopathy, with heart failure being the second leading cause of death in DMD. Compared with the extensive studies on skeletal muscle defects and potential therapy in DMD, very little attention has been directed at the increasing incidence of heart failure in DMD. Here we show that a single systemic injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV2/6) harboring micro-dystrophin leads to extensive cardiac transduction, with micro-dystrophin correctly localized at the periphery of the cardiac myocytes and functionally associated with the sarcolemmal membrane. Significantly, micro-dystrophin gene transfer corrected the baseline end-diastolic volume defect in the mdx mouse heart and prevented cardiac pump failure induced by dobutamine stress testing in vivo, although several parameters of systolic function were not corrected. These results demonstrate that systemic gene delivery of micro-dystrophin can restore ventricular distensibility and protect the mdx myocardium from pump dysfunction during adrenergic stimulation in vivo.

  10. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  11. Improving Cell Engraftment in Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) affects millions of people worldwide. MI causes massive cardiac cell death and heart function decrease. However, heart tissue cannot effectively regenerate by itself. While stem cell therapy has been considered an effective approach for regeneration, the efficacy of cardiac stem cell therapy remains low due to inferior cell engraftment in the infarcted region. This is mainly a result of low cell retention in the tissue and poor cell survival under ischemic, immune rejection and inflammatory conditions. Various approaches have been explored to improve cell engraftment: increase of cell retention using biomaterials as cell carriers; augmentation of cell survival under ischemic conditions by preconditioning cells, genetic modification of cells, and controlled release of growth factors and oxygen; and enhancement of cell survival by protecting cells from excessive inflammation and immune surveillance. In this paper, we review current progress, advantages, disadvantages, and potential solutions of these approaches. PMID:26783405

  12. CARDIAC-LIKE OSCILLATION IN LIVER STEM CELLS INDUCE THEIR ACQUISITION OF CARDIAC PHENOTYPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined in a cardiac microenvironment the plasticity of a liver stem cell line (WB F344) generated from a cloned, single, non-parenchymal epithelial cell from a normal adult male rat. Our previous studies suggested that WB F344 cells acquire a cardiac phenotype in the absenc...

  13. Developmental origin and lineage plasticity of endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maria Paola; Forte, Elvira; Harvey, Richard P; Kovacic, Jason C

    2016-04-15

    Over the past two decades, several populations of cardiac stem cells have been described in the adult mammalian heart. For the most part, however, their lineage origins and in vivo functions remain largely unexplored. This Review summarizes what is known about different populations of embryonic and adult cardiac stem cells, including KIT(+), PDGFRα(+), ISL1(+)and SCA1(+)cells, side population cells, cardiospheres and epicardial cells. We discuss their developmental origins and defining characteristics, and consider their possible contribution to heart organogenesis and regeneration. We also summarize the origin and plasticity of cardiac fibroblasts and circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and consider what role these cells have in contributing to cardiac repair. PMID:27095490

  14. Developmental origin and lineage plasticity of endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maria Paola; Forte, Elvira; Harvey, Richard P; Kovacic, Jason C

    2016-04-15

    Over the past two decades, several populations of cardiac stem cells have been described in the adult mammalian heart. For the most part, however, their lineage origins and in vivo functions remain largely unexplored. This Review summarizes what is known about different populations of embryonic and adult cardiac stem cells, including KIT(+), PDGFRα(+), ISL1(+)and SCA1(+)cells, side population cells, cardiospheres and epicardial cells. We discuss their developmental origins and defining characteristics, and consider their possible contribution to heart organogenesis and regeneration. We also summarize the origin and plasticity of cardiac fibroblasts and circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and consider what role these cells have in contributing to cardiac repair.

  15. In Vivo Tracking of Cell Therapies for Cardiac Diseases with Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Mayra Lorena; da Costa Medeiros, Priscylla; de Souza, Sergio Augusto Lopes; Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Even though heart diseases are amongst the main causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, existing treatments are limited in restoring cardiac lesions. Cell transplantations, originally developed for the treatment of hematologic ailments, are presently being explored in preclinical and clinical trials for cardiac diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the possible efficacy and mechanisms for these therapies and they are the center of continuous investigation. In this scenario, noninvasive imaging techniques lead to greater comprehension of cell therapies. Radiopharmaceutical cell labeling, firstly developed to track leukocytes, has been used successfully to evaluate the migration of cell therapies for myocardial diseases. A substantial rise in the amount of reports employing this methodology has taken place in the previous years. We will review the diverse radiopharmaceuticals, imaging modalities, and results of experimental and clinical studies published until now. Also, we report on current limitations and potential advances of radiopharmaceutical labeling for cell therapies in cardiac diseases. PMID:26880951

  16. Adult c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells are necessary and sufficient for functional cardiac regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Georgina M; Vicinanza, Carla; Smith, Andrew J; Aquila, Iolanda; Leone, Angelo; Waring, Cheryl D; Henning, Beverley J; Stirparo, Giuliano Giuseppe; Papait, Roberto; Scarfò, Marzia; Agosti, Valter; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Indolfi, Ciro; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Torella, Daniele; Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo

    2013-08-15

    The epidemic of heart failure has stimulated interest in understanding cardiac regeneration. Evidence has been reported supporting regeneration via transplantation of multiple cell types, as well as replication of postmitotic cardiomyocytes. In addition, the adult myocardium harbors endogenous c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells (eCSCs), whose relevance for regeneration is controversial. Here, using different rodent models of diffuse myocardial damage causing acute heart failure, we show that eCSCs restore cardiac function by regenerating lost cardiomyocytes. Ablation of the eCSC abolishes regeneration and functional recovery. The regenerative process is completely restored by replacing the ablated eCSCs with the progeny of one eCSC. eCSCs recovered from the host and recloned retain their regenerative potential in vivo and in vitro. After regeneration, selective suicide of these exogenous CSCs and their progeny abolishes regeneration, severely impairing ventricular performance. These data show that c-kit(pos) eCSCs are necessary and sufficient for the regeneration and repair of myocardial damage. PMID:23953114

  17. Cyclosporin in cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jansen Of Lorkeers, S J; Hart, E; Tang, X L; Chamuleau, M E D; Doevendans, P A; Bolli, R; Chamuleau, S A J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy in promoting cardiac repair in the setting of ischemic heart disease. Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that cell therapy improves cardiac function. Whether autologous or allogeneic cells should be used, and the need for immunosuppression in non-autologous settings, is a matter of debate. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used in preclinical trials to reduce cell rejection after non-autologous cell therapy. The direct effect of CsA on the function and survival of stem cells is unclear. Furthermore, the appropriate daily dosage of CsA in animal models has not been established. In this review, we discuss the pros and cons of the use of CsA on an array of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we present a small collection of data put forth by our group supporting the efficacy and safety of a specific daily CsA dosage in a pig model.

  18. Cardiac cell therapy: boosting mesenchymal stem cells effects.

    PubMed

    Samper, E; Diez-Juan, A; Montero, J A; Sepúlveda, P

    2013-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a major problem of world public health and available treatments have limited efficacy. Cardiac cell therapy is a new therapeutic strategy focused on regeneration and repair of the injured cardiac muscle. Among different cell types used, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been widely tested in preclinical studies and several clinical trials have evaluated their clinical efficacy in myocardial infarction. However, the beneficial effects of MSC in humans are limited due to poor engraftment and survival of these cells, therefore ways to overcome these obstacles should improve efficacy. Different strategies have been used, such as genetically modifying MSC, or preconditioning the cells with factors that potentiate their survival and therapeutic mechanisms. In this review we compile the most relevant approaches used to improve MSC therapeutic capacity and to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in MSC mediated cardiac repair.

  19. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  20. Cell-Specific Cardiac Electrophysiology Models

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, Willemijn; Ortega, Francis A.; Kherlopian, Armen R.; Zygmunt, Andrew C.; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional cardiac model-building paradigm involves constructing a composite model using data collected from many cells. Equations are derived for each relevant cellular component (e.g., ion channel, exchanger) independently. After the equations for all components are combined to form the composite model, a subset of parameters is tuned, often arbitrarily and by hand, until the model output matches a target objective, such as an action potential. Unfortunately, such models often fail to accurately simulate behavior that is dynamically dissimilar (e.g., arrhythmia) to the simple target objective to which the model was fit. In this study, we develop a new approach in which data are collected via a series of complex electrophysiology protocols from single cardiac myocytes and then used to tune model parameters via a parallel fitting method known as a genetic algorithm (GA). The dynamical complexity of the electrophysiological data, which can only be fit by an automated method such as a GA, leads to more accurately parameterized models that can simulate rich cardiac dynamics. The feasibility of the method is first validated computationally, after which it is used to develop models of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes that simulate the electrophysiological dynamics significantly better than does a standard guinea pig model. In addition to improving model fidelity generally, this approach can be used to generate a cell-specific model. By so doing, the approach may be useful in applications ranging from studying the implications of cell-to-cell variability to the prediction of intersubject differences in response to pharmacological treatment. PMID:25928268

  1. Stroke and cardiac cell death: Two peas in a pod.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-03-01

    A close pathological link between stroke brain and heart failure may exist. Here, we discuss relevant laboratory and clinical reports demonstrating neural and cardiac myocyte cell death following ischemic stroke. Although various overlapping risk factors exist between cerebrovascular incidents and cardiac incidents, stroke therapy has largely neglected the cardiac pathological consequences. Recent preclinical stroke studies have implicated an indirect cell death pathway, involving toxic molecules, that originates from the stroke brain and produces cardiac cell death. In concert, previous laboratory reports have revealed a reverse cell death cascade, in that cardiac arrest leads to ischemic cell death in the brain. A deeper understanding of the crosstalk of cell death pathways between stroke and cardiac failure will facilitate the development of novel treatments designed to arrest the global pathology of both diseases thereby improving the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with stroke and heart failure.

  2. Bone Marrow Is a Reservoir for Cardiac Resident Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Qi, Xin; Han, Zhibo; Liang, Lu; Kong, Deling; Han, Zhongchao; Zhao, Shihua; He, Zuo-Xiang; Li, Zongjin

    2016-01-01

    Resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) represent a responsive stem cell reservoir within the adult myocardium and have a significant function in myocardial homeostasis and injury. However, the distribution, origin, homing and possible therapeutic benefits of CSCs are still under discussion. Here we investigated whether bone marrow (BM) stem cells could contribute to repopulating the pool of CSCs in heart. The engraftment of BM cells in heart was detected at a low level after BM transplantation (BMT) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) could increase BM cells engraftment but not significant. We clarified that more than 50% CSCs are derived from BM and confirmed that BM-derived CSCs have similar characteristics with the host CSCs. Furthermore, we transplanted BM-derived CSCs into heart ischemia models and presented evidence for the first time that BM-derived CSCs can differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo. In conclusions, BM stem cells could be a potential back-up source of CSCs for restoring heart function after injury or maintaining homeostasis of CSCs. PMID:27345618

  3. Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Garbern, Jessica C.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for cardiac disease is an exciting but highly controversial research area. Strategies such as cell transplantation and reprogramming have demonstrated both intriguing and sobering results. Yet as clinical trials proceed, our incomplete understanding of stem cell behavior is made evident by numerous unresolved matters, such as the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte turnover or the optimal therapeutic strategies to achieve clinical efficacy. In this Perspective, we consider how cardiac stem cell biology has led us into clinical trials, and we suggest that achieving true cardiac regeneration in patients may ultimately require resolution of critical controversies in experimental cardiac regeneration. PMID:23746978

  4. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes: A novel potential therapeutic avenue for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Safari, S; Malekvandfard, F; Babashah, S; Alizadehasl, A; Sadeghizadeh, M; Motavaf, M

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery diseases (CADs) represent a significant cause of death worldwide. During recent decades the rate of cardiovascular mortality has been declined as a result of modern medicine and surgery. However, despite the fact that cardiac cells, including cardiomyocytes (CMCs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and vascular endothelial cells (VEC), can be regenerated by cardiac adult stem cell, the regenerative capacity of these cells are limited and inadequate to functionally regenerate heart damaged tissue. Thus, growth reserve of the heart fails to restore the structural integrity of the myocardium after infarction and healing is associated with scar formation. An explanation for this is that cardiac reside stem cells are present throughout the infarction site but die rapidly by apoptosis. Furthermore, microenvironment surrounding the damage site is not promising for the cells survival and renewal. Hence, recent advances in the stem cell therapy have emerged as an attractive approach to replace the lost cells. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has considered as one of the most promising candidates for regeneration of cardiac cells, lost upon injury. The regenerative capacity of MSCs has primarily been centered on the hypothesis that these cells would engraft, differentiate and replace damaged cardiac cells. However, experimental and clinical observations so far have failed to establish if this differentiated is considerably relevant to MSCs cardiac regenerative properties. Recent reports have suggested that these therapeutic properties, at least in part, are mediated by paracrine factors released from MSCs. This review provides a concise summary of current evidences supporting the paracrine hypothesis of MSCs. In particular, the scope of this review focuses on the role of MSC-derived exosome (MSC-EXs) as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of CADs, particularly ischemic myocardial dysfunctions. PMID:27453275

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells stimulate cardiac stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzistergos, Konstantions E.; Quevedo, Henry; Oskouei, Behzad N.; Hu, Qinghua; Feigenbaum, Gary S.; Margitich, Irene S.; Mazhari, Ramesh; Boyle, Andrew J.; Zambrano, Juan P.; Rodriguez, Jose E.; Dulce, Raul; Pattany, Pradip M.; Valdes, David; Revilla, Concepcion; Heldman, A.W.; McNiece, I.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale The regenerative potential of the heart is insufficient to fully restore functioning myocardium after injury, motivating the quest for a cell-based replacement strategy. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the capacity for cardiac repair that appears to exceed their capacity for differentiation into cardiac myocytes. Objective Here we test the hypothesis that bone marrow derived MSCs stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous cardiac stem cells (CSCs) as part of their regenerative repertoire. Methods And Results Female Yorkshire pigs (n=31) underwent experimental myocardial Infarction (MI); and 3 days later received transendocardial injections of allogeneic male bone marrow-derived MSCs, MSC concentrated conditioned medium (CCM), or placebo (Plasmalyte). A no-injection control group was also studied. MSCs engrafted and differentiated into cardiomyocytes and vascular structures. In addition, endogenous c-kit+ CSCs increased 20-fold in MSC treated animals vs. controls (p<0.001), there was a 6-fold increase in GATA-4+ CSCs in MSC vs. control (p<0.001), and mitotic myocytes increased 4-fold. Porcine endomyocardial biopsies were harvested and plated as organotypic cultures in the presence or absence of MSC feeder layers. In vitro, MSCs stimulated c-kit+ CSCs proliferation into enriched populations of adult cardioblasts that expressed Nkx2-5 and troponin I. Conclusions MSCs stimulate host CSCs, a new mechanism of action underlying successful cell-based therapeutics. PMID:20671238

  7. Carbon nanotube biocompatibility with cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, Silvano; Brunelli, Claudio; Bavastrello, Valter; Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Nicolini, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Purified carbon nanotubes are new carbon allotropes, sharing similarities with graphite, that have recently been proposed for their potential use with biological systems as probes for in vitro research and for diagnostic and clinical purposes. However the biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes with cells represents an important problem that, so far, remains largely uninvestigated. The objective of this in vitro study is to explore the cytocompatibility properties of purified carbon nanofibres with cardiomyocytes. Cardiac muscle cells from a rat heart cell line H9c2 (2-1) have been used. Highly purified single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) were suspended at the concentration of 0.2 mg ml-1 by ultrasound in complete Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, and administered to cells to evaluate cell proliferation and shape changes by light microscopy, cell viability by trypan blue exclusion, and apoptosis, determined flow cytometrically by annexin/PI staining. Microscopic observation evidenced that carbon nanotubes bind to the cell membrane, causing a slight modification in cell shape and in cell count only after three days of treatment. Cell viability was not affected by carbon nanotubes in the first three days of culture, while after this time, cell death was slightly higher in nanotube-treated cells (p = ns). Accordingly, nanotube treatment induced little and non-significant change in the apoptotic cell number at day 1 and 3. The effect of nanotubes bound to cells was tested by reseeding treated cardiomyocytes. Cells from a trypsinized nanotube-treated sample showed a limited ability to proliferate, and a definite difference in shape, with a high degree of cell death: compared to reseeded untreated ones, in SWNT-treated samples the annexin-positive/PI-negative cells increased from 2.9% to 9.3% in SWNT (p<0.05, where p<0.05 defines a statistically significant difference with a probability above 95%), and the annexin-positive/PI-positive cells increased from 5.2% to 18.7% (p<0

  8. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  9. Human iPS cell-engineered cardiac tissue sheets with cardiomyocytes and vascular cells for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Ikuno, Takeshi; Takeda, Masafumi; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Marui, Akira; Katayama, Shiori; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Tadashi; Okano, Teruo; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K

    2014-01-01

    To realize cardiac regeneration using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), strategies for cell preparation, tissue engineering and transplantation must be explored. Here we report a new protocol for the simultaneous induction of cardiomyocytes (CMs) and vascular cells [endothelial cells (ECs)/vascular mural cells (MCs)], and generate entirely hiPSC-engineered cardiovascular cell sheets, which showed advantageous therapeutic effects in infarcted hearts. The protocol adds to a previous differentiation protocol of CMs by using stage-specific supplementation of vascular endothelial cell growth factor for the additional induction of vascular cells. Using this cell sheet technology, we successfully generated physically integrated cardiac tissue sheets (hiPSC-CTSs). HiPSC-CTS transplantation to rat infarcted hearts significantly improved cardiac function. In addition to neovascularization, we confirmed that engrafted human cells mainly consisted of CMs in >40% of transplanted rats four weeks after transplantation. Thus, our HiPSC-CTSs show promise for cardiac regenerative therapy.

  10. Alteration of cardiac progenitor cell potency in GRMD dogs.

    PubMed

    Cassano, M; Berardi, E; Crippa, S; Toelen, J; Barthelemy, I; Micheletti, R; Chuah, M; Vandendriessche, T; Debyser, Z; Blot, S; Sampaolesi, M

    2012-01-01

    Among the animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dog is considered the best model in terms of size and pathological onset of the disease. As in human patients presenting with DMD or Becker muscular dystrophies (BMD), the GRMD is related to a spontaneous X-linked mutation of dystrophin and is characterized by myocardial lesions. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac pathogenesis and for the development of therapeutic protocols. To investigate whether cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) isolated from healthy and GRMD dogs may differentiate into myocardial cell types and to test the feasibility of cell therapy for cardiomyopathies in a preclinical model of DMD, CPCs were isolated from cardiac biopsies of healthy and GRMD dogs. Gene profile analysis revealed an active cardiac transcription network in both healthy and GRMD CPCs. However, GRMD CPCs showed impaired self-renewal and cardiac differentiation. Population doubling and telomerase analyses highlighted earlier senescence and proliferation impairment in progenitors isolated from GRMD cardiac biopsies. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that only wt CPCs showed efficient although not terminal cardiac differentiation, consistent with the upregulation of cardiac-specific proteins and microRNAs. Thus, the pathological condition adversely influences the cardiomyogenic differentiation potential of cardiac progenitors. Using PiggyBac transposon technology we marked CPCs for nuclear dsRed expression, providing a stable nonviral gene marking method for in vivo tracing of CPCs. Xenotransplantation experiments in neonatal immunodeficient mice revealed a valuable contribution of CPCs to cardiomyogenesis with homing differences between wt and dystrophic progenitors. These results suggest that cardiac degeneration in dystrophinopathies may account for the progressive exhaustion of local cardiac progenitors and shed light on cardiac stemness in

  11. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  12. SWI/SNF in cardiac progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Sham, Mai Har; Wang, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    Cardiogenesis requires proper specification, proliferation, and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). The differentiation of CPCs to specific cardiac cell types is likely guided by a comprehensive network comprised of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic complexes. In this review, we describe how the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling SWI/SNF complexes work synergistically with transcription and epigenetic factors to direct specific cardiac gene expression during CPC differentiation. Furthermore, we discuss how SWI/SNF may prime chromatin for cardiac gene expression at a genome-wide level. A detailed understanding of SWI/SNF-mediated CPC differentiation will provide important insight into the etiology of cardica defects and help design novel therapies for heart disease.

  13. EphB4 Forward-Signaling Regulates Cardiac Progenitor Development in Mouse ES Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanfeng; Hoyle, Dixie L.; Shen, Wei-Feng; Wu, Li-Qun; Wang, Zack Z.

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor (Eph)-ephrin signaling plays an important role in organ development and tissue regeneration. Bidirectional signaling of EphB4– ephrinB2 regulates cardiovascular development. To assess the role of EphB4–ephrinB2 signaling in cardiac lineage development, we utilized two GFP reporter systems in embryonic stem (ES) cells, in which the GFP transgenes were expressed in Nkx2.5+ cardiac progenitor cells and in α-MHC+ cardiomyocytes, respectively. We found that both EphB4 and ephrinB2 were expressed in Nkx2.5-GFP+ cardiac progenitor cells, but not in α-MHC-GFP+ cardiomyocytes during cardiac lineage differentiation of ES cells. An antagonist of EphB4, TNYL-RAW peptides, that block the binding of EphB4 and ephrinB2, impaired cardiac lineage development in ES cells. Inhibition of EphB4–ephrinB2 signaling at different time points during ES cell differentiation demonstrated that the interaction of EphB4 and ephrinB2 was required for the early stage of cardiac lineage development. Forced expression of human full-length EphB4 or intracellular domain-truncated EphB4 in EphB4-null ES cells was established to investigate the role of EphB4-forward signaling in ES cells. Interestingly, while full-length EphB4 was able to restore the cardiac lineage development in EphB4-null ES cells, the truncated EphB4 that lacks the intracellular domain of tyrosine kinase and PDZ motif failed to rescue the defect of cardiomyocyte development, suggesting that EphB4 intracellular domain is essential for the development of cardiomyocytes. Our study provides evidence that receptor-kinase-dependent EphB4-forward signaling plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac progenitor cells. PMID:25359705

  14. Cardiac Electromechanical Models: From Cell to Organ

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A.; Rice, John Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The heart is a multiphysics and multiscale system that has driven the development of the most sophisticated mathematical models at the frontiers of computational physiology and medicine. This review focuses on electromechanical (EM) models of the heart from the molecular level of myofilaments to anatomical models of the organ. Because of the coupling in terms of function and emergent behaviors at each level of biological hierarchy, separation of behaviors at a given scale is difficult. Here, a separation is drawn at the cell level so that the first half addresses subcellular/single-cell models and the second half addresses organ models. At the subcellular level, myofilament models represent actin–myosin interaction and Ca-based activation. The discussion of specific models emphasizes the roles of cooperative mechanisms and sarcomere length dependence of contraction force, considered to be the cellular basis of the Frank–Starling law. A model of electrophysiology and Ca handling can be coupled to a myofilament model to produce an EM cell model, and representative examples are summarized to provide an overview of the progression of the field. The second half of the review covers organ-level models that require solution of the electrical component as a reaction–diffusion system and the mechanical component, in which active tension generated by the myocytes produces deformation of the organ as described by the equations of continuum mechanics. As outlined in the review, different organ-level models have chosen to use different ionic and myofilament models depending on the specific application; this choice has been largely dictated by compromises between model complexity and computational tractability. The review also addresses application areas of EM models such as cardiac resynchronization therapy and the role of mechano-electric coupling in arrhythmias and defibrillation. PMID:21886622

  15. From ontogenesis to regeneration: learning how to instruct adult cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Isotta; Forte, Elvira; Angelini, Francesco; Giacomello, Alessandro; Messina, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Since the first observations over two centuries ago by Lazzaro Spallanzani on the extraordinary regenerative capacity of urodeles, many attempts have been made to understand the reasons why such ability has been largely lost in metazoa and whether or how it can be restored, even partially. In this context, important clues can be derived from the systematic analysis of the relevant distinctions among species and of the pathways involved in embryonic development, which might be induced and/or recapitulated in adult tissues. This chapter provides an overview on regeneration and its mechanisms, starting with the lesson learned from lower vertebrates, and will then focus on recent advancements and novel insights concerning regeneration in the adult mammalian heart, including the discovery of resident cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). Subsequently, it explores all the important pathways involved in regulating differentiation during development and embryogenesis, and that might potentially provide important clues on how to activate and/or modulate regenerative processes in the adult myocardium, including the potential activation of endogenous CPCs. Furthermore the importance of the stem cell niche is discussed, and how it is possible to create in vitro a microenvironment and culture system to provide adult CPCs with the ideal conditions promoting their regenerative ability. Finally, the state of clinical translation of cardiac cell therapy is presented. Overall, this chapter provides a new perspective on how to approach cardiac regeneration, taking advantage of important lessons from development and optimizing biotechnological tools to obtain the ideal conditions for cell-based cardiac regenerative therapy.

  16. Electrical stimulation to optimize cardioprotective exosomes from cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C R; Berman, A E; Weintraub, N L; Tang, Y L

    2016-03-01

    Injured or ischemic cardiac tissue has limited intrinsic capacity for regeneration. While stem cell transplantation is a promising approach to stimulating cardiac repair, its success in humans has thus far been limited. Harnessing the therapeutic benefits of stem cells requires a better understanding of their mechanisms of action and methods to optimize their function. Cardiac stem cells (CSC) represent a particularly effective cellular source for cardiac repair, and pre-conditioning CSC with electrical stimulation (EleS) was demonstrated to further enhance their function, although the mechanisms are unknown. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells primarily exert their effects through communicating with endogenous tissues via the release of exosomes containing cardioprotective molecules such as miRNAs, which upon uptake by recipient cells may stimulate survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Exosomes are also effective therapeutic agents in isolation and may provide a feasible alternative to stem cell transplantation. We hypothesize that EleS enhances CSC-mediated cardiac repair through its beneficial effects on production of cardioprotective exosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the beneficial effects of biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure may in part result from EleS-induced preconditioning of endogenous CSC to promote cardiac repair. With future research, our hypothesis may provide applications to optimize stem cell therapy and augment current pacing protocols, which may significantly advance the treatment of patients with heart disease. PMID:26880625

  17. Effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.C.; Chen, K.C.; Cheng, Mei General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, MI )

    1988-09-01

    Embryonic rat cardiac muscle cells grown in the presence of various tensions of CO (5-95%) without the presence of O{sub 2} survived and exhibited reduced cell growth, which was concentration dependent. When cardiac muscle cells were grown in the presence of a mixture of CO (10-20%) and O{sub 2} (10-20%), the growth rate of these cells was comparable to that of the control cells. Cardiac myocytes continued to beat when exposed to varying tensions of CO, except in the case of 95% CO. The cells exposed to different concentrations of CO contained fewer myofibrils of different stages of differentiation compared with the control and the culture exposed to a mixture of 20% O{sub 2} and 20% CO, with cells that contained abundant, highly differentiated myofibrils. There was no significant difference in the structural organization of mitochondria between the control and the surviving experimental cells. It is evident from the present studies that O{sub 2} is required for the optimum in vitro cellular growth of cardiac muscle. Furthermore, CO in combination with O{sub 2} at a concentration of 10 or 20% can produce optimal growth of cardiac muscle cells in culture. To determine maximum labeling index during the labeling period, cells were continuously labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine for 24 h before the termination of cultures.

  18. Natural ECM as biomaterial for scaffold based cardiac regeneration using adult bone marrow derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sreejit, P; Verma, R S

    2013-04-01

    Cellular therapy using stem cells for cardiac diseases has recently gained much interest in the scientific community due to its potential in regenerating damaged and even dead tissue and thereby restoring the organ function. Stem cells from various sources and origin are being currently used for regeneration studies directly or along with differentiation inducing agents. Long term survival and minimal side effects can be attained by using autologous cells and reduced use of inducing agents. Cardiomyogenic differentiation of adult derived stem cells has been previously reported using various inducing agents but the use of a potentially harmful DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-azaC) has been found to be critical in almost all studies. Alternate inducing factors and conditions/stimulant like physical condition including electrical stimulation, chemical inducers and biological agents have been attempted by numerous groups to induce cardiac differentiation. Biomaterials were initially used as artificial scaffold in in vitro studies and later as a delivery vehicle. Natural ECM is the ideal biological scaffold since it contains all the components of the tissue from which it was derived except for the living cells. Constructive remodeling can be performed using such natural ECM scaffolds and stem cells since, the cells can be delivered to the site of infraction and once delivered the cells adhere and are not "lost". Due to the niche like conditions of ECM, stem cells tend to differentiate into tissue specific cells and attain several characteristics similar to that of functional cells even in absence of any directed differentiation using external inducers. The development of niche mimicking biomaterials and hybrid biomaterial can further advance directed differentiation without specific induction. The mechanical and electrical integration of these materials to the functional tissue is a problem to be addressed. The search for the perfect extracellular matrix for

  19. Novel Micropatterned Cardiac Cell Cultures with Realistic Ventricular Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Badie, Nima; Bursac, Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Systematic studies of cardiac structure-function relationships to date have been hindered by the intrinsic complexity and variability of in vivo and ex vivo model systems. Thus, we set out to develop a reproducible cell culture system that can accurately replicate the realistic microstructure of native cardiac tissues. Using cell micropatterning techniques, we aligned cultured cardiomyocytes at micro- and macroscopic spatial scales to follow local directions of cardiac fibers in murine ventricular cross sections, as measured by high-resolution diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. To elucidate the roles of ventricular tissue microstructure in macroscopic impulse conduction, we optically mapped membrane potentials in micropatterned cardiac cultures with realistic tissue boundaries and natural cell orientation, cardiac cultures with realistic tissue boundaries but random cell orientation, and standard isotropic monolayers. At 2 Hz pacing, both microscopic changes in cell orientation and ventricular tissue boundaries independently and synergistically increased the spatial dispersion of conduction velocity, but not the action potential duration. The realistic variations in intramural microstructure created unique spatial signatures in micro- and macroscopic impulse propagation within ventricular cross-section cultures. This novel in vitro model system is expected to help bridge the existing gap between experimental structure-function studies in standard cardiac monolayers and intact heart tissues. PMID:19413993

  20. Polymer microfiber meshes facilitate cardiac differentiation of c-kit(+) human cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kan, Lijuan; Thayer, Patrick; Fan, Huimin; Ledford, Benjamin; Chen, Miao; Goldstein, Aaron; Cao, Guohua; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-09-10

    Electrospun microfiber meshes have been shown to support the proliferation and differentiation of many types of stem cells, but the phenotypic fate of c-kit(+) human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) have not been explored. To this end, we utilized thin (~5µm) elastomeric meshes consisting of aligned 1.7µm diameter poly (ester-urethane urea) microfibers as substrates to examine their effect on hCSC viability, morphology, proliferation, and differentiation relative to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The results showed that cells on microfiber meshes displayed an elongated morphology aligned in the direction of fiber orientation, lower proliferation rates, but increased expressions of genes and proteins majorly associated with cardiomyocyte phenotype. The early (NK2 homeobox 5, Nkx2.5) and late (cardiac troponin I, cTnI) cardiomyocyte genes were significantly increased on meshes (Nkx=2.5 56.2±13.0, cTnl=2.9±0.56,) over TCPS (Nkx2.5=4.2±0.9, cTnl=1.6±0.5, n=9, p<0.05 for both groups) after differentiation. In contrast, expressions of smooth muscle markers, Gata6 and myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), were decreased on meshes. Immunocytochemical analysis with cardiac antibody exhibited the similar pattern of above cardiac differentiation. We conclude that aligned microfiber meshes are suitable for guiding cardiac differentiation of hCSCs and may facilitate stem cell-based therapies for treatment of cardiac diseases. PMID:27481582

  1. Multiple Antioxidants Improve Cardiac Complications and Inhibit Cardiac Cell Death in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Prasad, Sahdeo; Sitasawad, Sandhya L.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy, a disorder of the heart muscle in diabetic patients, is one of the major causes of heart failure. Since diabetic cardiomyopathy is now known to have a high prevalence in the asymptomatic diabetic patient, prevention at the earliest stage of development by existing molecules would be appropriate in order to prevent the progression of heart failure. In this study, we investigated the protective role of multiple antioxidants (MA), on cardiac dysfunction and cardiac cell apoptosis in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat. Diabetic cardiomyopathy in STZ-treated animals was characterized by declined systolic, diastolic myocardial performance, oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiac cells. Diabetic rats on supplementation with MA showed decreased oxidative stress evaluated by the content of reduced levels of lipid per-oxidation and decreased activity of catalase with down-regulation of heme-oxygenase-1 mRNA. Supplementation with MA also resulted in a normalized lipid profile and decreased levels of pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB as well as cytokines such as TNF-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β, and IL-10. MA was found to decrease the expression of ROS-generating enzymes like xanthine oxidase, monoamine oxidase-A along with 5-Lipoxygenase mRNA and/or protein expression. Further, left ventricular function, measured by a microtip pressure transducer, was re-established as evidenced by increase in ±dp/dtmax, heart rate, decreased blood pressure, systolic and diastolic pressure as well as decrease in the TUNEL positive cardiac cells with increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. In addition, MA supplementation decreased cell death and activation of NF-kappaB in cardiac H9c2 cells. Based on our results, we conclude that MA supplementation significantly attenuated cardiac dysfunction in diabetic rats; hence MA supplementation may have important clinical implications in terms of prevention and management of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:23843977

  2. Microwave radiation effects on cardiac muscle cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; Hall, C.A.; McRee, D.I.

    1981-05-01

    Isolated cardiac muscle cells were exposed to microwave radiation in a temperature-controlled waveguide apparatus. Microwave radiation for 90 min at specific absorption rates (SAR) as low as 10 mW/g increases the permeability of cardiac cells to trypan blue. At 100 mW/g the inability of the cells to exclude trypan blue is concurrent with the release of lactic dehydrogenase into the suspending medium. However, when the SAR is decreased to 50 mW/g, trypan blue uptake is still elevated without the concomitant release of lactic dehydrogenase. Transmission electron micrographs of the exposed cells showed cellular damage only at the 100 mW/g exposure level. The microwave-reduced change in membrane permeability was unrelated to a macroscopic heating effect of microwave radiation on the cells, but appeared to be due to some other specific action of microwave radiation on isolated cardiac cells.

  3. [Cardiac cellular therapy: from cells to the first clinical uses].

    PubMed

    Roncalli, J; Leobon, B; Massabuau, P; Galinier, M; Parini, A; Pathak, A; Bourin, P; Hagege, A A; Menasche, P; Fournial, G; Fauvel, J M

    2005-06-01

    Despite the improvement in revascularisation techniques, coronary artery disease remains the principal aetiology of cardiac failure in developed countries. The therapeutic management of cardiac failure has been improved over recent years, yet cardiac failure is still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As cardiac transplantation lacks donors, techniques that allow myocardial regeneration represent an attractive alternative. To date, several types of cells are under study and are suitable for implantation into infarcted myocardium (myoblasts, medullary stem cells...). Following good preclinical study results, the first human cell therapy trials, using the intramyocardial route, have begun, in the course of aorto-coronary bypass surgery in patients with chronic ischaemic cardiopathy and little altered left ventricular function, and then in those with ventricular dysfunction. Different modes of administration of these cell therapy products are under study and could be envisaged in clinical situations such as just after infarction in order to improve ventricular remodelling with an intracoronary injection technique. As for every new treatment, there are numerous problems to resolve, from understanding the relevant mechanisms of cellular transplantation, to the secondary effects that it could entail. Nevertheless, cardiac cellular transplantation is expanding rapidly and with the evolution of techniques it allows a glimpse of a new field of treatment for cardiac failure.

  4. Concise Review: Cardiac Disease Modeling Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunbo; Al-Aama, Jumana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Keavney, Bernard; Trafford, Andrew; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2015-09-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Although animal models have been created to provide some useful insights into the pathogenesis of genetic cardiac diseases, the significant species differences and the lack of genetic information for complex genetic diseases markedly attenuate the application values of such data. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient-specific specimens and subsequent derivation of cardiomyocytes offer novel avenues to study the mechanisms underlying cardiac diseases, to identify new causative genes, and to provide insights into the disease aetiology. In recent years, the list of human iPSC-based models for genetic cardiac diseases has been expanding rapidly, although there are still remaining concerns on the level of functionality of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ability to be used for modeling complex cardiac diseases in adults. This review focuses on the development of cardiomyocyte induction from pluripotent stem cells, the recent progress in heart disease modeling using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, and the challenges associated with understanding complex genetic diseases. To address these issues, we examine the similarity between iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ex vivo counterparts and how this relates to the method used to differentiate the pluripotent stem cells into a cardiomyocyte phenotype. We progress to examine categories of congenital cardiac abnormalities that are suitable for iPSC-based disease modeling.

  5. Ultrastructural features of degenerated cardiac muscle cells in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Maron, B. J.; Ferrans, V. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Degenerated cardiac muscle cells were present in hypertrophied ventricular muscle obtained at operation from 12 (38%) of 32 patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) or aortic valvular disease. Degenerated cells demonstrated a wide variety of ultrastructural alterations. Mildly altered cells were normal-sized or hypertrophied and showed focal changes, including preferential loss of thick (myosin) filaments, streaming and clumping of Z band material, and proliferation of the tubules of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were normal-sized or atrophic and showed additional changes, including extensive myofibrillar lysis and loss of T tubules. The appearance of the most severely degenerated cells usually reflected the cytoplasmic organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum, glycogen, or mitochondria) which underwent proliferation and filled the myofibril-free areas of these cells. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were present in areas of fibrosis, had thickened basement membranes, and had lost their intercellular connections. These observations suggest that degenerated cardiac muscle cells have poor contractile function and may be responsible for impaired cardiac performance in some patients with chronic ventricular hypertrophy. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Figs 4-6 Figs 7-8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Figs 12-15 Fig 16 Fig 17 Figs 18-21 Figs 22-23 Fig 24 Fig 25 Fig 26 Fig 27 Figs 28-29 Fig 30 Figs 31-32 Fig 33 PMID:124533

  6. A multistaged automatic restoration of noisy microscopy cell images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinwei; Hu, Jiankun; Jia, Xiuping

    2015-01-01

    Automated cell segmentation for microscopy cell images has recently become an initial step for further image analysis in cell biology. However, microscopy cell images are easily degraded by noise during the readout procedure via optical-electronic imaging systems. Such noise degradations result in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and poor image quality for cell identification. In order to improve SNR for subsequent segmentation and image-based quantitative analysis, the commonly used state-of-art restoration techniques are applied but few of them are suitable for corrupted microscopy cell images. In this paper, we propose a multistaged method based on a novel integration of trend surface analysis, quantile-quantile plot, bootstrapping, and the Gaussian spatial kernel for the restoration of noisy microscopy cell images. We show this multistaged approach achieves higher performance compared with other state-of-art restoration techniques in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio and structure similarity in synthetic noise experiments. This paper also reports an experiment on real noisy microscopy data which demonstrated the advantages of the proposed restoration method for improving segmentation performance. PMID:25291801

  7. A multistaged automatic restoration of noisy microscopy cell images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinwei; Hu, Jiankun; Jia, Xiuping

    2015-01-01

    Automated cell segmentation for microscopy cell images has recently become an initial step for further image analysis in cell biology. However, microscopy cell images are easily degraded by noise during the readout procedure via optical-electronic imaging systems. Such noise degradations result in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and poor image quality for cell identification. In order to improve SNR for subsequent segmentation and image-based quantitative analysis, the commonly used state-of-art restoration techniques are applied but few of them are suitable for corrupted microscopy cell images. In this paper, we propose a multistaged method based on a novel integration of trend surface analysis, quantile-quantile plot, bootstrapping, and the Gaussian spatial kernel for the restoration of noisy microscopy cell images. We show this multistaged approach achieves higher performance compared with other state-of-art restoration techniques in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio and structure similarity in synthetic noise experiments. This paper also reports an experiment on real noisy microscopy data which demonstrated the advantages of the proposed restoration method for improving segmentation performance.

  8. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  9. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  10. Local activation of cardiac stem cells for post-myocardial infarction cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhuzhi; Mai, Zun; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Yangxin; Geng, Dengfeng; Zhou, Shuxian; Wang, Jingfeng

    2012-11-01

    The prognosis of patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and resultant chronic heart failure remains extremely poor despite continuous advancements in optimal medical therapy and interventional procedures. Animal experiments and clinical trials using adult stem cell therapy following MI have shown a global improvement of myocardial function. The emergence of stem cell transplantation approaches has recently represented promising alternatives to stimulate myocardial regeneration. Regarding their tissue-specific properties, cardiac stem cells (CSCs) residing within the heart have advantages over other stem cell types to be the best cell source for cell transplantation. However, time-consuming and costly procedures to expanse cells prior to cell transplantation and the reliability of cell culture and expansion may both be major obstacles in the clinical application of CSC-based transplantation therapy after MI. The recognition that the adult heart possesses endogenous CSCs that can regenerate cardiomyocytes and vascular cells has raised the unique therapeutic strategy to reconstitute dead myocardium via activating these cells post-MI. Several strategies, such as growth factors, mircoRNAs and drugs, may be implemented to potentiate endogenous CSCs to repair infarcted heart without cell transplantation. Most molecular and cellular mechanism involved in the process of CSC-based endogenous regeneration after MI is far from understanding. This article reviews current knowledge opening up the possibilities of cardiac repair through CSCs activation in situ in the setting of MI.

  11. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alrefai, Mohammad T; Murali, Divya; Paul, Arghya; Ridwan, Khalid M; Connell, John M; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. PMID:25999743

  12. Electrically Induced Calcium Handling in Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    For nearly a century, the heart was viewed as a terminally differentiated organ until the discovery of a resident population of cardiac stem cells known as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). It has been shown that the regenerative capacity of CPCs can be enhanced by ex vivo modification. Preconditioning CPCs could provide drastic improvements in cardiac structure and function; however, a systematic approach to determining a mechanistic basis for these modifications founded on the physiology of CPCs is lacking. We have identified a novel property of CPCs to respond to electrical stimulation by initiating intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We used confocal microscopy and intracellular calcium imaging to determine the spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+ signal and the key proteins involved in this process using pharmacological inhibition and confocal Ca2+ imaging. Our results provide valuable insights into mechanisms to enhance the therapeutic potential in stem cells and further our understanding of human CPC physiology.

  13. Electrical and mechanical stimulation of cardiac cells and tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2016-01-15

    The field of cardiac tissue engineering has made significant strides over the last few decades, highlighted by the development of human cell derived constructs that have shown increasing functional maturity over time, particularly using bioreactor systems to stimulate the constructs. However, the functionality of these tissues is still unable to match that of native cardiac tissue and many of the stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes display an immature, fetal like phenotype. In this review, we seek to elucidate the biological underpinnings of both mechanical and electrical signaling, as identified via studies related to cardiac development and those related to an evaluation of cardiac disease progression. Next, we review the different types of bioreactors developed to individually deliver electrical and mechanical stimulation to cardiomyocytes in vitro in both two and three-dimensional tissue platforms. Reactors and culture conditions that promote functional cardiomyogenesis in vitro are also highlighted. We then cover the more recent work in the development of bioreactors that combine electrical and mechanical stimulation in order to mimic the complex signaling environment present in vivo. We conclude by offering our impressions on the important next steps for physiologically relevant mechanical and electrical stimulation of cardiac cells and engineered tissue in vitro.

  14. Cardiac stem cells and their roles in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingying; Wang, Lingyun; Jiang, Jieyu; Zhou, Changqing; Guo, Tianzhu; Zheng, Shaoxin; Wang, Tong

    2013-06-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodeling and eventually deterioration of heart function. Over the past decade, stem cell therapy has emerged as a novel strategy for patients with ischemic heart disease and its beneficial effects have been demonstrated by substantial preclinical and clinical studies. Efficacy of several types of stem cells in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases has already been evaluated. However, repair of injured myocardium through stem cell transplantation is restricted by critical safety issues and ethic concerns. Recently, the discovery of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) that reside in the heart itself brings new prospects for myocardial regeneration and reconstitution of cardiac tissues. CSCs are positive for various stem cell markers and have the potential of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. They play a pivotal role in the maintenance of heart homeostasis and cardiac repair. Elucidation of their biological characteristics and functions they exert in myocardial infarction are very crucial to further investigations on them. This review will focus on the field of cardiac stem cells and discuss technical and practical issues that may involve in their clinical applications in myocardial infarction.

  15. Cardiomyocyte differentiation induced in cardiac progenitor cells by cardiac fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Shen, Man-Ru; Xu, Zhen-Dong; Hu, Zhe; Chen, Chao; Chi, Ya-Li; Kong, Zhen-Dong; Li, Zi-Fu; Li, Xiao-Tong; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xiong, Shao-Hu; Zhang, Chuan-Sen

    2014-05-01

    Our previous study showed that after being treated with 5-azacytidine, Nkx2.5(+) human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from embryonic heart tubes could differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Although 5-azacytidine is a classical agent that induces myogenic differentiation in various types of cells, the drug is toxic and unspecific for myogenic differentiation. To investigate the possibility of inducing CPCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes by a specific and non-toxic method, CPCs of passage 15 and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were treated with cardiac ventricular fibroblast-conditioned medium (CVF-conditioned medium). Following this treatment, the Nkx2.5(+) CPCs underwent cardiomyogenic differentiation. Phase-contrast microscopy showed that the morphology of the treated CPCs gradually changed. Ultrastructural observation confirmed that the cells contained typical sarcomeres. The expression of cardiomyocyte-associated genes, such as alpha-cardiac actin, cardiac troponin T, and beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC), was increased in the CPCs that had undergone cardiomyogenic differentiation compared with untreated cells. In contrast, the MSCs did not exhibit changes in morphology or molecular expression after being treated with CVF-conditioned medium. The results indicated that Nkx2.5(+) CPCs treated with CVF-conditioned medium were capable of differentiating into a cardiac phenotype, whereas treated MSCs did not appear to undergo cardiomyogenic differentiation. Subsequently, following the addition of Dkk1 and the blocking of Wnt signaling pathway, CVF-conditioned medium-induced morphological changes and expression of cardiomyocyte-associated genes of Nkx2.5(+) CPCs were inhibited, which indicates that CVF-conditioned medium-induced cardiomyogenic differentiation of Nkx2.5(+) CPCs is associated with Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, we also found that the activation of Wnt signaling pathway was accompanied by higher expression of GATA-4 and the blocking of the

  16. Resident c-kit+ cells in the heart are not cardiac stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Nishat; Zhang, Lu; Yan, Jianyun; Chen, Jiqiu; Cai, Weibin; Razzaque, Shegufta; Jeong, Dongtak; Sheng, Wei; Bu, Lei; Xu, Mingjiang; Huang, Guo-Ying; Hajjar, Roger J.; Zhou, Bin; Moon, Anne; Cai, Chen-Leng

    2015-01-01

    Identifying a bona fide population of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) is a critical step for developing cell-based therapies for heart failure patients. Previously, cardiac c-kit+ cells were reported to be CSCs with a potential to become myocardial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro and after cardiac injury. Here we provide further insights into the nature of cardiac c-kit+ cells. By targeting the c-kit locus with multiple reporter genes in mice, we find that c-kit expression rarely co-localizes with the expression of the cardiac progenitor and myogenic marker Nkx2.5, or that of the myocardial marker, cardiac troponin T (cTnT). Instead, c-kit predominantly labels a cardiac endothelial cell population in developing and adult hearts. After acute cardiac injury, c-kit+ cells retain their endothelial identity and do not become myogenic progenitors or cardiomyocytes. Thus, our work strongly suggests that c-kit+ cells in the murine heart are endothelial cells and not CSCs. PMID:26515110

  17. Cell replacement and visual restoration by retinal sheet transplants

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affect millions of people. Replacing lost cells with new cells that connect with the still functional part of the host retina might repair a degenerating retina and restore eyesight to an unknown extent. A unique model, subretinal transplantation of freshly dissected sheets of fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells, combined with its retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), has demonstrated successful results in both animals and humans. Most other approaches are restricted to rescue endogenous retinal cells of the recipient in earlier disease stages by a ‘nursing’ role of the implanted cells and are not aimed at neural retinal cell replacement. Sheet transplants restore lost visual responses in several retinal degeneration models in the superior colliculus (SC) corresponding to the location of the transplant in the retina. They do not simply preserve visual performance – they increase visual responsiveness to light. Restoration of visual responses in the SC can be directly traced to neural cells in the transplant, demonstrating that synaptic connections between transplant and host contribute to the visual improvement. Transplant processes invade the inner plexiform layer of the host retina and form synapses with presumable host cells. In a Phase II trial of RP and ARMD patients, transplants of retina together with its RPE improved visual acuity. In summary, retinal progenitor sheet transplantation provides an excellent model to answer questions about how to repair and restore function of a degenerating retina. Supply of fetal donor tissue will always be limited but the model can set a standard and provide an informative base for optimal cell replacement therapies such as embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived therapy. PMID:22771454

  18. Contraction-induced cluster formation in cardiac cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Takahiro; Isomura, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2008-11-01

    The evolution of the spatial arrangement of cells in a primary culture of cardiac tissue derived from newborn rats was studied experimentally over an extended period. It was found that cells attract each other spontaneously to form a clustered structure over the timescale of several days. These clusters exhibit spontaneous rhythmic contraction and have been confirmed to consist of cardiac muscle cells. The addition of a contraction inhibitor (2,3-butanedione-2-monoxime) to the culture medium resulted in the inhibition of both the spontaneous contractions exhibited by the cells as well as the formation of clusters. Furthermore, the formation of clusters is suppressed when high concentrations of collagen are used for coating the substratum to which the cells adhere. From these experimental observations, it was deduced that the cells are mechanically stressed by the tension associated with repeated contractions and that this results in the cells becoming compact and attracting each other, finally resulting in the formation of clusters. This process can be interpreted as modulation of a cellular network by the activity associated with contraction, which could be employed to control cellular networks by modifying the dynamics associated with the contractions in cardiac tissue culture.

  19. Regeneration gaps: observations on stem cells and cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Murry, Charles E; Reinecke, Hans; Pabon, Lil M

    2006-05-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that cell transplantation can improve function of the infarcted heart. A surprisingly wide range of non-myogenic cell types improves ventricular function, suggesting that benefit may result in part from mechanisms that are distinct from true myocardial regeneration. While clinical trials explore cells derived from skeletal muscle and bone marrow, basic researchers are investigating sources of new cardiomyocytes, such as resident myocardial progenitors and embryonic stem cells. In this commentary, we briefly review the evolution of cell-based cardiac repair, discuss the current state of clinical research, and offer some thoughts on how newcomers can critically evaluate this emerging field.

  20. iPS cells: a source of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2011-02-01

    For the treatment of heart failure, a new strategy to improve cardiac function and inhibit cardiac remodeling needs to be established. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into cell types from all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic effect of ES/iPS cell-derived progeny was reported in animal model. Mouse and human somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the transduction of four transcription factors, Oct 3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. However, the low induction efficiency hinders the clinical application of iPS technology, and efforts have been made to improve the reprogramming efficiency. There are variations in the characteristics in ES/iPS cell lines, and the further understanding is necessary for the applications of ES/iPS cell technology. Some improvements were also made in the methods to induce cardiomyocytes from ES/iPS cells efficiently. This review article is focused on generation of iPS cells, cardiomyocyte differentiation from ES/iPS cells, and transplantation of derived cardiomyocytes.This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  1. Cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Lester, L A; Sodt, P C; Hutcheon, N; Arcilla, R A

    1990-11-01

    The cardiac status of 64 children (ages 0.2 to 18 yr) with sickle cell anemia documented by hemoglobin electrophoresis was evaluated by echocardiography. Left atrial, left ventricular and aortic root dimensions were significantly increased in over 60 percent of these children at all ages compared to values for 99 normal black (non-SCA) control subjects. Left ventricular wall thickness was increased in only 20 percent of older children with sickle cell anemia. Estimated LV mass/m2 and left ventricular cardiac index were increased compared to control subjects (p less than 0.001). Left heart abnormalities expressed as a single composite function, derived from multivariate regression analysis, correlated well with severity of anemia expressed as grams of hemoglobin (r = -0.52, p = less than 0.001) and with percentage of hemoglobin S (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001), but not to the same extent with age. Echocardiographically assessed left ventricular function at rest was comparable to that of control subjects. These data suggest that the major cardiac abnormalities in children are related to the volume overload effects of chronic anemia, and that in this age group, there is no evidence for a distinct "sickle cell cardiomyopathy" or cardiac dysfunction.

  2. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue.

  3. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  4. Optical Imaging of Voltage and Calcium in Cardiac Cells & Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Lee, Peter; Jalife, José

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac optical mapping has proven to be a powerful technology for studying cardiovascular function and disease. The development and scientific impact of this methodology are well documented. Because of its relevance in cardiac research, this imaging technology advances at a rapid pace. Here we review technological and scientific developments during the past several years and look also towards the future. First we explore key components of a modern optical mapping setup, focusing on 1) new camera technologies, 2) powerful light-emitting-diodes (from ultraviolet to red) for illumination, 3) improved optical filter technology, 4) new synthetic and optogenetic fluorescent probes, 5) optical mapping with motion and contraction, 6) new multi-parametric optical mapping techniques and 7) photon scattering effects in thick tissue preparations. We then look at recent optical mapping studies in single cells, cardiomyocyte monolayers, atria and whole hearts. Finally, we briefly look into the possible future roles of optical mapping in the development of regenerative cardiac research, cardiac cell therapies, and molecular genetic advances. PMID:22343556

  5. Modern perspectives on numerical modeling of cardiac pacemaker cell.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Victor A; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V; Stern, Michael D; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent "coupled-clock" theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  6. Human progenitor cells derived from cardiac adipose tissue ameliorate myocardial infarction in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Farré, Jordi; Sepúlveda, Pilar; Raya, Angel; Roura, Santiago; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Montero, José Anastasio; Büscher, Dirk; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Myocardial infarction caused by vascular occlusion results in the formation of nonfunctional fibrous tissue. Cumulative evidence indicates that cell therapy modestly improves cardiac function; thus, novel cell sources with the potential to repair injured tissue are actively sought. Here, we identify and characterize a cell population of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs) from biopsies of human adult cardiac adipose tissue. Cardiac ATDPCs express a mesenchymal stem cell-like marker profile (strongly positive for CD105, CD44, CD166, CD29 and CD90) and have immunosuppressive capacity. Moreover, cardiac ATDPCs have an inherent cardiac-like phenotype and were able to express de novo myocardial and endothelial markers in vitro but not to differentiate into adipocytes. In addition, when cardiac ATDPCs were transplanted into injured myocardium in mouse and rat models of myocardial infarction, the engrafted cells expressed cardiac (troponin I, sarcomeric α-actinin) and endothelial (CD31) markers, vascularization increased, and infarct size was reduced in mice and rats. Moreover, significant differences between control and cell-treated groups were found in fractional shortening and ejection fraction, and the anterior wall remained significantly thicker 30days after cardiac delivery of ATDPCs. Finally, cardiac ATDPCs secreted proangiogenic factors under in vitro hypoxic conditions, suggesting a paracrine effect to promote local vascularization. Our results indicate that the population of progenitor cells isolated from human cardiac adipose tissue (cardiac ATDPCs) may be valid candidates for future use in cell therapy to regenerate injured myocardium. PMID:20713059

  7. Pyridostigmine Restores Cardiac Autonomic Balance after Small Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Marina T.; Becari, Christiane; de Oliveira, Mauro; do Carmo, Jussara M.; Aguiar Silva, Carlos Alberto; Prado, Cibele M.; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of pyridostigmine (PYR) - an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor - on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control, was never studied in conscious myocardial infarcted mice. Telemetry transmitters were implanted into the carotid artery under isoflurane anesthesia. Seven to ten days after recovery from the surgery, basal arterial pressure and heart rate were recorded, while parasympathetic and sympathetic tone (ΔHR) was evaluated by means of methyl atropine and propranolol. After the basal hemodynamic recording the mice were subjected to left coronary artery ligation for producing myocardial infarction (MI), or sham operation, and implantation of minipumps filled with PYR or saline. Separate groups of anesthetized (isoflurane) mice previously (4 weeks) subjected to MI, or sham coronary artery ligation, were submitted to cardiac function examination. The mice exhibited an infarct length of approximately 12%, no change in arterial pressure and increased heart rate only in the 1st week after MI. Vagal tone decreased in the 1st week, while the sympathetic tone was increased in the 1st and 4th week after MI. PYR prevented the increase in heart rate but did not affect the arterial pressure. Moreover, PYR prevented the increase in sympathetic tone throughout the 4 weeks. Concerning the parasympathetic tone, PYR not only impaired its attenuation in the 1st week, but enhanced it in the 4th week. MI decreased ejection fraction and increased diastolic and systolic volume. Therefore, the pharmacological increase of peripheral acetylcholine availability by means of PYR prevented tachycardia, increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic tone after MI in mice. PMID:25133392

  8. Cardiac manifestations of sickle cell anaemia in Sudanese children

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ghada O. M.; Abdal Gader, Yahya S.; Abuzedi, Elfatih S.; Attalla, Bakhieta A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is one of the commonest chronic hemolytic anaemias in the Sudan; it is a disease with high mortality and morbidity. This study was conducted aiming to observe the clinical pattern of cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anaemia, and to assess the relationship between the cardiac abnormalities and the severity of the disease. The study was conducted in sickle cell disease clinic at Khartoum Children Emergency Hospital. The study group consisted of 289 patients with sickle cell anaemia, age range from 6 months to 18 years. Data were collected using a questionnaire which include full history, clinical examination findings, chest x-rays, and Electro-cardiography. Tachycardia, systolic murmurs, and cardiomegaly were detected in 28%, 61%, and 54% of patients with SCA respectively. Left ventricular dilatation was observed in 51% of the study group, while right ventricular dilatation was observed in 22% of the patients. Left and right atrial dilatations were observed in 16% and 6% of the patients respectively. Contractility, ejection fraction (EF) were found almost always normal in all study subjects. Chamber dilatations were not associated with any abnormality in Left ventricular functions. Hemglobin (Hb) levels correlated negatively with cardiomegaly. Left Ventricular End Diastolic Dimension (LVEDD) correlates negatively with Hb levels and positively with the severity index. Only four patients (1%) had abnormal valves. In conclusion, cardiac abnormalities in patients with SCA correlate with the age of the patients and the severity of the disease. PMID:27493331

  9. Cardiac manifestations of sickle cell anaemia in Sudanese children.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ghada O M; Abdal Gader, Yahya S; Abuzedi, Elfatih S; Attalla, Bakhieta A I

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is one of the commonest chronic hemolytic anaemias in the Sudan; it is a disease with high mortality and morbidity. This study was conducted aiming to observe the clinical pattern of cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anaemia, and to assess the relationship between the cardiac abnormalities and the severity of the disease. The study was conducted in sickle cell disease clinic at Khartoum Children Emergency Hospital. The study group consisted of 289 patients with sickle cell anaemia, age range from 6 months to 18 years. Data were collected using a questionnaire which include full history, clinical examination findings, chest x-rays, and Electro-cardiography. Tachycardia, systolic murmurs, and cardiomegaly were detected in 28%, 61%, and 54% of patients with SCA respectively. Left ventricular dilatation was observed in 51% of the study group, while right ventricular dilatation was observed in 22% of the patients. Left and right atrial dilatations were observed in 16% and 6% of the patients respectively. Contractility, ejection fraction (EF) were found almost always normal in all study subjects. Chamber dilatations were not associated with any abnormality in Left ventricular functions. Hemglobin (Hb) levels correlated negatively with cardiomegaly. Left Ventricular End Diastolic Dimension (LVEDD) correlates negatively with Hb levels and positively with the severity index. Only four patients (1%) had abnormal valves. In conclusion, cardiac abnormalities in patients with SCA correlate with the age of the patients and the severity of the disease. PMID:27493331

  10. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; Robb MacLellan, W.; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  11. Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration by Cell Therapy and Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  12. Harnessing the secretome of cardiac stem cells as therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khanabdali, Ramin; Rosdah, Ayeshah A; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-08-01

    Adult stem cells continue to promise opportunities to repair damaged cardiac tissue. However, precisely how adult stem cells accomplish cardiac repair, especially after ischemic damage, remains controversial. It has been postulated that the clinical benefit of adult stem cells for cardiovascular disease results from the release of cytokines and growth factors by the transplanted cells. Studies in animal models of myocardial infarction have reported that such paracrine factors released from transplanted adult stem cells contribute to improved cardiac function by several processes. These include promoting neovascularization of damaged tissue, reducing inflammation, reducing fibrosis and scar formation, as well as protecting cardiomyocytes from apoptosis. In addition, these factors might also stimulate endogenous repair by activating cardiac stem cells. Interestingly, stem cells discovered to be resident in the heart appear to be functionally superior to extra-cardiac adult stem cells when transplanted for cardiac repair and regeneration. In this review, we discuss the therapeutic potential of cardiac stem cells and how the proteins secreted from these cells might be harnessed to promote repair and regeneration of damaged cardiac tissue. We also highlight how recent controversies about the efficacy of adult stem cells in clinical trials of ischemic heart disease have not dampened enthusiasm for the application of cardiac stem cells and their paracrine factors for cardiac repair: the latter have proved superior to the mesenchymal stem cells used in most clinical trials in the past, some of which appear to have been conducted with sub-optimal rigor.

  13. Optimizing cardiac repair and regeneration through activation of the endogenous cardiac stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Georgina M; Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo; Torella, Daniele

    2012-10-01

    Given the aging of the Western World and declining death rates due to acute coronary syndromes, the increasing trends in the magnitude and morbidity of heart failure (HF) are predicted to continue for the foreseeable future. It is imperative to develop effective therapies for the amelioration and prevention of HF. The search for the best cell type to be used in clinical protocols of cardiac regeneration is still on. That the adult mammalian heart harbors endogenous, multipotent cardiac stem/progenitor cells (eCSCs) and that cardiomyocytes are replaced throughout adulthood represent a paradigm shift in cardiovascular biology. The presence of eCSCs supports the view that the heart can repair itself if the eCSCs can be properly stimulated. Pending a better understanding of eCSC biology, it should be possible to replace autologous cell transplantation-based myocardial regeneration protocols with an "off-the-shelf," readily available, and effective regenerative/reparative therapy based on activation of the eCSCs in situ. PMID:22688972

  14. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  15. More Than Tiny Sacks: Stem Cell Exosomes as Cell-Free Modality for Cardiac Repair.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Raj; Khan, Mohsin

    2016-01-22

    Stem cell therapy provides immense hope for regenerating the pathological heart, yet has been marred by issues surrounding the effectiveness, unclear mechanisms, and survival of the donated cell population in the ischemic myocardial milieu. Poor survival and engraftment coupled to inadequate cardiac commitment of the adoptively transferred stem cells compromises the improvement in cardiac function. Various alternative approaches to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapies and to overcome issues with cell therapy have been used with varied success. Cell-free components, such as exosomes enriched in proteins, messenger RNAs, and miRs characteristic of parental stem cells, represent a potential approach for treating cardiovascular diseases. Recently, exosomes from different kinds of stem cells have been effectively used to promote cardiac function in the pathological heart. The aim of this review is to summarize current research efforts on stem cell exosomes, including their potential benefits and limitations to develop a potentially viable therapy for cardiovascular problems.

  16. More Than Tiny Sacks: Stem Cell Exosomes as Cell-Free Modality for Cardiac Repair.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Raj; Khan, Mohsin

    2016-01-22

    Stem cell therapy provides immense hope for regenerating the pathological heart, yet has been marred by issues surrounding the effectiveness, unclear mechanisms, and survival of the donated cell population in the ischemic myocardial milieu. Poor survival and engraftment coupled to inadequate cardiac commitment of the adoptively transferred stem cells compromises the improvement in cardiac function. Various alternative approaches to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapies and to overcome issues with cell therapy have been used with varied success. Cell-free components, such as exosomes enriched in proteins, messenger RNAs, and miRs characteristic of parental stem cells, represent a potential approach for treating cardiovascular diseases. Recently, exosomes from different kinds of stem cells have been effectively used to promote cardiac function in the pathological heart. The aim of this review is to summarize current research efforts on stem cell exosomes, including their potential benefits and limitations to develop a potentially viable therapy for cardiovascular problems. PMID:26838317

  17. TRPV-1-mediated elimination of residual iPS cells in bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Seta, Hiroyoshi; Haraguchi, Yuji; Alsayegh, Khaled; Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Yamazaki, Kenji; Okano, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    The development of a suitable strategy for eliminating remaining undifferentiated cells is indispensable for the use of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells in regenerative medicine. Here, we show for the first time that TRPV-1 activation through transient culture at 42 °C in combination with agonists is a simple and useful strategy to eliminate iPS cells from bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues. When human iPS cells were cultured at 42 °C, almost all cells disappeared by 48 hours through apoptosis. However, iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts maintained transcriptional and protein expression levels, and cardiac cell sheets were fabricated after reducing the temperature. TRPV-1 expression in iPS cells was upregulated at 42 °C, and iPS cell death at 42 °C was TRPV-1-dependent. Furthermore, TRPV-1 activation through thermal or agonist treatment eliminated iPS cells in cardiac tissues for a final concentration of 0.4% iPS cell contamination. These findings suggest that the difference in tolerance to TRPV-1 activation between iPS cells and iPS cell-derived cardiac cells could be exploited to eliminate remaining iPS cells in bioengineered cell sheet tissues, which will further reduce the risk of tumour formation. PMID:26888607

  18. Three-dimensional cardiac tissue fabrication based on cell sheet technology.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shinako; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2016-01-15

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic strategy for severe heart failure. However, conventional tissue engineering methods by seeding cells into biodegradable scaffolds have intrinsic limitations such as inflammatory responses and fibrosis arising from the degradation of scaffolds. On the other hand, we have developed cell sheet engineering as a scaffold-free approach for cardiac tissue engineering. Confluent cultured cells are harvested as an intact cell sheet using a temperature-responsive culture surface. By layering cardiac cell sheets, it is possible to form electrically communicative three-dimensional cardiac constructs. Cell sheet transplantation onto damaged hearts in several animal models has revealed improvements in heart functions. Because of the lack of vasculature, the thickness of viable cardiac cell sheet-layered tissues is limited to three layers. Pre-vascularized structure formation within cardiac tissue and multi-step transplantation methods has enabled the formation of thick vascularized tissues in vivo. Furthermore, development of original bioreactor systems with vascular beds has allowed reconstruction of three-dimensional cardiac tissues with a functional vascular structure in vitro. Large-scale culture systems to generate pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells can create large numbers of cardiac cell sheets. Three-dimensional cardiac tissues fabricated by cell sheet engineering may be applied to treat heart disease and tissue model construction.

  19. Patterning human stem cells and endothelial cells with laser printing for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gaebel, Ralf; Ma, Nan; Liu, Jun; Guan, Jianjun; Koch, Lothar; Klopsch, Christian; Gruene, Martin; Toelk, Anita; Wang, Weiwei; Mark, Peter; Wang, Feng; Chichkov, Boris; Li, Wenzhong; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2011-12-01

    Recent study showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) could inhibit apoptosis of endothelial cells in hypoxic condition, increase their survival, and stimulate the angiogenesis process. In this project we applied Laser-Induced-Forward-Transfer (LIFT) cell printing technique and prepared a cardiac patch seeded with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human MSC (hMSC) in a defined pattern for cardiac regeneration. We seeded HUVEC and hMSC in a defined pattern on a Polyester urethane urea (PEUU) cardiac patch. On control patches an equal amount of cells was randomly seeded without LIFT. Patches were cultivated in vitro or transplanted in vivo to the infarcted zone of rat hearts after LAD-ligation. Cardiac performance was measured by left ventricular catheterization 8 weeks post infarction. Thereafter hearts were perfused with fluorescein tomato lectin for the assessment of functional blood vessels and stored for histology analyses. We demonstrated that LIFT-derived cell seeding pattern definitely modified growth characteristics of co-cultured HUVEC and hMSC leading to increased vessel formation and found significant functional improvement of infarcted hearts following transplantation of a LIFT-tissue engineered cardiac patch. Further, we could show enhanced capillary density and integration of human cells into the functionally connected vessels of murine vascular system. LIFT-based Tissue Engineering of cardiac patches for the treatment of myocardial infarction might improve wound healing and functional preservation. PMID:21911255

  20. Restoring stem cell mobilization to promote vascular repair in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Albiero, Mattia; Avogaro, Angelo; Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes triggers endothelial dysfunction, which is linked to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Stem and progenitor cells from the bone marrow are involved in the maintenance of vascular integrity. Diabetic patients show a dysfunction of these cells, which might represent a novel pathophysiological mechanism of vascular disease. Specifically, stem and progenitor cells fail to egress from the bone marrow (BM) due to BM pathological alterations and unresponsiveness to mobilizing stimuli. In this review, we describe impaired stem cell mobilization in diabetes as a mechanism of failed vascular repair and we provide evidence that pharmacological strategies can restore mobilization. We discuss recent advances in the knowledge of aberrant organization of the diabetic BM and its implications for impaired mobilization. Finally, we describe in detail the pharmacological exploitation of the G-CSF/DPP-4(CD26)/SDF-1α axis as a novel strategy to improve mobilization and attain vascular repair in diabetes.

  1. Restoration of contractility in hyperhomocysteinemia by cardiac-specific deletion of NMDA-R1.

    PubMed

    Moshal, Karni S; Kumar, Munish; Tyagi, Neetu; Mishra, Paras K; Metreveli, Naira; Rodriguez, Walter E; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2009-03-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) activated mitochondrial matrix metalloproteinase-9 and led to cardiomyocyte dysfunction, in part, by inducing mitochondrial permeability (MPT). Treatment with MK-801 [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist] ameliorated the HCY-induced decrease in myocyte contractility. However, the role of cardiomyocyte NMDA-receptor 1 (R1) activation in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY) leading to myocyte dysfunction was not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiac-specific deletion of NMDA-R1 mitigated the HCY-induced decrease in myocyte contraction, in part, by decreasing nitric oxide (NO). Cardiomyocyte-specific knockout of NMDA-R1 was generated using cre/lox technology. NMDA-R1 expression was detected by Western blot and confocal microscopy. MPT was determined using a spectrophotometer. Myocyte contractility and calcium transients were studied using the IonOptix video-edge detection system and fura 2-AM loading. We observed that HHCY induced NO production by agonizing NMDA-R1. HHCY induced the MPT by agonizing NMDA-R1. HHCY caused a decrease in myocyte contractile performance, maximal rate of contraction and relaxation, and prolonged the time to 90% peak shortening and 90% relaxation by agonizing NMDA-R1. HHCY decreased contraction amplitude with the increase in calcium concentration. The recovery of calcium transient was prolonged in HHCY mouse myocyte by agonizing NMDA-R1. It was suggested that HHCY increased mitochondrial NO levels and induced MPT, leading to the decline in myocyte mechanical function by agonizing NMDA-R1.

  2. Enhancer modeling uncovers transcriptional signatures of individual cardiac cell states in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Busser, Brian W.; Haimovich, Julian; Huang, Di; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we used discriminative training methods to uncover the chromatin, transcription factor (TF) binding and sequence features of enhancers underlying gene expression in individual cardiac cells. We used machine learning with TF motifs and ChIP data for a core set of cardiogenic TFs and histone modifications to classify Drosophila cell-type-specific cardiac enhancer activity. We show that the classifier models can be used to predict cardiac cell subtype cis-regulatory activities. Associating the predicted enhancers with an expression atlas of cardiac genes further uncovered clusters of genes with transcription and function limited to individual cardiac cell subtypes. Further, the cell-specific enhancer models revealed chromatin, TF binding and sequence features that distinguish enhancer activities in distinct subsets of heart cells. Collectively, our results show that computational modeling combined with empirical testing provides a powerful platform to uncover the enhancers, TF motifs and gene expression profiles which characterize individual cardiac cell fates. PMID:25609699

  3. The developing role of Neuregulin1 in cardiac regenerative stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    P Blomberg, Christopher; Lee, Juyong; P Morgan, James

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, heart failure, and chronic ischemic heart disease account for the majority of the cardiovascular burden. The current treatment strategies focus on limiting the progression of disease and preserving cardiac myocardium. The goal of stem cell therapy, on the other hand, is to reverse or replace damaged cardiac tissue. Over the past two decades many studies have been conducted to understand stem cell performance, survival, and the potential for cardiac repair. Neuregulin1, an epidermal growth factor family member, promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation into the cardiac lineage and improves survival in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell and embryonic endothelial progenitor cells. Current clinical trials are actively pursuing Neuregulin1's therapeutic potential in the areas of heart failure and cardiac ischemia. It is the intent of this paper to review the current knowledge of Neuregulin1 in stem cell biology and discuss the potential of using Neuregulin1 to improve stem cell therapy for cardiac repair.

  4. Antiarrhythmic effect of growth factor-supplemented cardiac progenitor cells in chronic infarcted heart.

    PubMed

    Savi, Monia; Bocchi, Leonardo; Rossi, Stefano; Frati, Caterina; Graiani, Gallia; Lagrasta, Costanza; Miragoli, Michele; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Stirparo, Giuliano G; Mastrototaro, Giuseppina; Urbanek, Konrad; De Angelis, Antonella; Macchi, Emilio; Stilli, Donatella; Quaini, Federico; Musso, Ezio

    2016-06-01

    c-Kit(pos) cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a successful approach in healing the infarcted heart and rescuing its mechanical function, but electrophysiological consequences are uncertain. CPC mobilization promoted by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and IGF-1 improved electrogenesis in myocardial infarction (MI). We hypothesized that locally delivered CPCs supplemented with HGF + IGF-1 (GFs) can concur in ameliorating electrical stability of the regenerated heart. Adult male Wistar rats (139 rats) with 4-wk-old MI or sham conditions were randomized to receive intramyocardial injection of GFs, CPCs, CPCs + GFs, or vehicle (V). Enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged CPCs were used for cell tracking. Vulnerability to stress-induced arrhythmia was assessed by telemetry-ECG. Basic cardiac electrophysiological properties were examined by epicardial multiple-lead recording. Hemodynamic function was measured invasively. Hearts were subjected to anatomical, morphometric, immunohistochemical, and molecular biology analyses. Compared with V and at variance with individual CPCs, CPCs + GFs approximately halved arrhythmias in all animals, restoring cardiac anisotropy toward sham values. GFs alone reduced arrhythmias by less than CPCs + GFs, prolonging ventricular refractoriness without affecting conduction velocity. Concomitantly, CPCs + GFs reactivated the expression levels of Connexin-43 and Connexin-40 as well as channel proteins of key depolarizing and repolarizing ion currents differently than sole GFs. Mechanical function and anatomical remodeling were equally improved by all regenerative treatments, thus exhibiting a divergent behavior relative to electrical aspects. Conclusively, we provided evidence of distinctive antiarrhythmic action of locally injected GF-supplemented CPCs, likely attributable to retrieval of Connexin-43, Connexin-40, and Cav1.2 expression, favoring intercellular coupling and spread of excitation in mended heart.

  5. Antiarrhythmic effect of growth factor-supplemented cardiac progenitor cells in chronic infarcted heart.

    PubMed

    Savi, Monia; Bocchi, Leonardo; Rossi, Stefano; Frati, Caterina; Graiani, Gallia; Lagrasta, Costanza; Miragoli, Michele; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Stirparo, Giuliano G; Mastrototaro, Giuseppina; Urbanek, Konrad; De Angelis, Antonella; Macchi, Emilio; Stilli, Donatella; Quaini, Federico; Musso, Ezio

    2016-06-01

    c-Kit(pos) cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a successful approach in healing the infarcted heart and rescuing its mechanical function, but electrophysiological consequences are uncertain. CPC mobilization promoted by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and IGF-1 improved electrogenesis in myocardial infarction (MI). We hypothesized that locally delivered CPCs supplemented with HGF + IGF-1 (GFs) can concur in ameliorating electrical stability of the regenerated heart. Adult male Wistar rats (139 rats) with 4-wk-old MI or sham conditions were randomized to receive intramyocardial injection of GFs, CPCs, CPCs + GFs, or vehicle (V). Enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged CPCs were used for cell tracking. Vulnerability to stress-induced arrhythmia was assessed by telemetry-ECG. Basic cardiac electrophysiological properties were examined by epicardial multiple-lead recording. Hemodynamic function was measured invasively. Hearts were subjected to anatomical, morphometric, immunohistochemical, and molecular biology analyses. Compared with V and at variance with individual CPCs, CPCs + GFs approximately halved arrhythmias in all animals, restoring cardiac anisotropy toward sham values. GFs alone reduced arrhythmias by less than CPCs + GFs, prolonging ventricular refractoriness without affecting conduction velocity. Concomitantly, CPCs + GFs reactivated the expression levels of Connexin-43 and Connexin-40 as well as channel proteins of key depolarizing and repolarizing ion currents differently than sole GFs. Mechanical function and anatomical remodeling were equally improved by all regenerative treatments, thus exhibiting a divergent behavior relative to electrical aspects. Conclusively, we provided evidence of distinctive antiarrhythmic action of locally injected GF-supplemented CPCs, likely attributable to retrieval of Connexin-43, Connexin-40, and Cav1.2 expression, favoring intercellular coupling and spread of excitation in mended heart. PMID:26993221

  6. Endogenous cardiac stem cells for the treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Tania; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies hold promise for regenerating the myocardium after injury. Recent data obtained from phase I clinical trials using endogenous cardiovascular progenitors isolated directly from the heart suggest that cell-based treatment for heart patients using stem cells that reside in the heart provides significant functional benefit and an improvement in patient outcome. Methods to achieve improved engraftment and regeneration may extend this therapeutic benefit. Endogenous cardiovascular progenitors have been tested extensively in small animals to identify cells that improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. However, the relative lack of large animal models impedes translation into clinical practice. This review will exclusively focus on the latest research pertaining to humans and large animals, including both endogenous and induced sources of cardiovascular progenitors. PMID:24426784

  7. Cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Batra, Anjan S; Acherman, Ruben J; Wong, Wing-yen; Wood, John C; Chan, Linda S; Ramicone, Emily; Ebrahimi, Mahmood; Wong, Pierre C

    2002-08-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) results in chronic volume overload of the heart due to hemodilution. Previous echocardiographic studies of cardiac function in children with SCA have not accounted for these abnormal loading conditions. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how the degree of anemia and transfusion status relate to cardiac findings and (2) evaluate cardiac function using load-independent parameters of function. We evaluated 77 patients with SCA, ages 2 to 22 years (mean +/- SD = 11.7 +/- 4.7), using physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. We compared two groups of patients. Group 1 consisted of 57 non-transfused patients, and Group 2 consisted of 20 patients on a chronic transfusion protocol. Group 1 patients exhibited a significantly lower hemoglobin, higher cardiac output, and larger left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic dimension and LV mass than groups 2 (P < 0.05). However, the velocity of circumferential fiber shortening-wall stress index (a load-independent measure of systolic function) was normal and not statistically different between the two groups. Conversely, the LV myocardial performance index (a measure of combined systolic and diastolic function) was significantly higher in Group 2 (P < 0.001), possibly indicating impaired myocardial diastolic function. SCA in children results in a volume-overloaded heart with a significant increase in LV dimensions and mass, both proportional to the degree of anemia. Despite these abnormal loading conditions, systolic function is preserved. Patients on a chronic transfusion protocol may develop diastolic dysfunction despite iron chelation therapy. PMID:12210812

  8. Secretome from resident cardiac stromal cells stimulates proliferation, cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis of progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Reus, Thamile Luciane; Robert, Anny Waloski; Da Costa, Marise Brenner Affonso; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Stimamiglio, Marco Augusto

    2016-10-15

    In the heart, tissue-derived signals play a central role on recruiting/activating stem cell sources to induce cardiac lineage specification for maintenance of tissue homeostasis and repair. Cardiac resident stromal cells (CRSCs) may play a pivotal role in cardiac repair throughout their secretome. Here, we performed the characterization of CRSCs and their secretome by analyzing the composition of their culture-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) and conditioned medium (CM) and by investigating their potential effect on adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) and progenitor cell behavior. We confirmed that CRSCs are a heterogeneous cell population whose secretome is composed by proteins related to cellular growth, immune response and cardiovascular development and function. We also observed that CRSC secretome was unable to change the behavior of ADSCs, except for proliferation. Additionally, CM from CRSCs demonstrated the potential to drive proliferation and cardiac differentiation of H9c2 cells and also the ability to induce angiogenesis in vitro. Our data suggest that the CRSCs can be a source of important modulating signals for cardiac progenitor cell recruitment/activation. PMID:27404713

  9. A Novel Class of Human Cardiac Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Moccetti, Tiziano; Leri, Annarosa; Goichberg, Polina; Rota, Marcello; Anversa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Following the recognition that hematopoietic stem cells improve the outcome of myocardial infarction in animal models, bone marrow mononuclear cells, CD34-positive cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells have been introduced clinically. The intracoronary or intramyocardial injection of these cell classes has been shown to be safe and to produce a modest but significant enhancement in systolic function. However, the identification of resident cardiac stem cells in the human heart (hCSCs) has created great expectation concerning the potential implementation of this category of autologous cells for the management of the human disease. Although phase 1 clinical trials have been conducted with encouraging results, the search for the most powerful hCSC for myocardial regeneration is in its infancy. This manuscript discusses the efforts performed in our laboratory to characterize the critical biological variables that define the growth reserve of hCSCs. Based on the theory of the immortal DNA template, we propose that stem cells retaining the old DNA represent 1 of the most powerful cells for myocardial regeneration. Similarly, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors in hCSCs recognizes a cell phenotype with superior replicating reserve. However, the impressive recovery in ventricular hemodynamics and anatomy mediated by clonal hCSCs carrying the "mother" DNA underscores the clinical relevance of this hCSC class for the treatment of human heart failure.

  10. A Novel Class of Human Cardiac Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moccetti, Tiziano; Leri, Annarosa; Goichberg, Polina; Rota, Marcello; Anversa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Following the recognition that hematopoietic stem cells improve the outcome of myocardial infarction in animal models, bone marrow mononuclear cells, CD34-positive cells and mesenchymal stromal cells have been introduced clinically. The intracoronary or intramyocardial injection of these cell classes has been shown to be safe and to produce a modest but significant enhancement in systolic function. However, the identification of resident cardiac stem cells in the human heart (hCSCs) has created great expectation concerning the potential implementation of this category of autologous cells for the management of the human disease. Although phase 1 clinical trials have been conducted with encouraging results, the search for the most powerful hCSC for myocardial regeneration is in its infancy. This manuscript discusses the efforts performed in our laboratory to characterize the critical biological variables that define the growth reserve of hCSCs. Based on the theory of the immortal DNA template, we propose that stem cells retaining the old DNA represent one of the most powerful cells for myocardial regeneration. Similarly, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors in hCSCs recognizes a cell phenotype with superior replicating reserve. However, the impressive recovery in ventricular hemodynamics and anatomy mediated by clonal hCSCs carrying the “mother” DNA underscores the clinical relevance of this hCSC class for the treatment of human heart failure. PMID:25807105

  11. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. PMID:26953627

  12. Bariatric Surgery Restores Cardiac and Sudomotor Autonomic C-Fiber Dysfunction towards Normal in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, David C.; Wohlgemuth, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    baseline. Conclusion This study shows that bariatric surgery can restore both cardiac and sudomotor autonomic C-fiber dysfunction in subjects with diabetes, potentially impacting morbidity and mortality. PMID:27137224

  13. Cell therapy for ischaemic heart disease: focus on the role of resident cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, S A J; Vrijsen, K R; Rokosh, D G; Tang, X L; Piek, J J; Bolli, R

    2009-05-01

    Myocardial infarction results in loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodelling, and eventually heart failure. In recent years, cell therapy has emerged as a potential new strategy for patients with ischaemic heart disease. This includes embryonic and bone marrow derived stem cells. Recent clinical studies showed ostensibly conflicting results of intracoronary infusion of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells in patients with acute or chronic myocardial infarction. Anyway, these results have stimulated additional clinical and pre-clinical studies to further enhance the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy. Recently, the existence of cardiac stem cells that reside in the heart itself was demonstrated. Their discovery has sparked intense hope for myocardial regeneration with cells that are obtained from the heart itself and are thereby inherently programmed to reconstitute cardiac tissue. These cells can be detected by several surface markers (e.g. c-kit, Sca-1, MDR1, Isl-1). Both in vitro and in vivo differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated, and animal studies showed promising results on improvement of left ventricular function. This review will discuss current views regarding the feasibility of cardiac repair, and focus on the potential role of the resident cardiac stem and progenitor cells. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:199-207.).

  14. The Role of MicroRNAs in Cardiac Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Purvis, Nima; Bahn, Andrew; Katare, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are considered as the next generation drug treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease who are resistant to conventional treatment. Among several stem cells used in the clinical setting, cardiac stem cells (CSCs) which reside in the myocardium and epicardium of the heart have been shown to be an effective option for the source of stem cells. In normal circumstances, CSCs primarily function as a cell store to replace the physiologically depleted cardiovascular cells, while under the diseased condition they have been shown to experimentally regenerate the diseased myocardium. In spite of their major functional role, molecular mechanisms regulating the CSCs proliferation and differentiation are still unknown. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated the important role of miRs in regulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation, as well as other physiological and pathological processes related to stem cell function. This review summarises the current understanding of the role of miRs in CSCs. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms by which miRs regulate CSCs may lead to advances in the mode of stem cell therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25802528

  15. Cardiac stem cell therapy: Have we put too much hype in which cell type to use?

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianqin; Yeghiazarians, Yerem

    2015-09-01

    Injection of various stem cells has been tested with the hopes of improving cardiac function after a myocardial infarction (MI). However, there is continued controversy as to which cell type is best for repair. Due to technical differences in cell isolation, processing, delivery, and cardiac functional assessment by various investigators, it has been difficult to directly compare the results of different cells. Using same techniques to evaluate the efficacy of different cell types, we have separately delivered bone marrow cells (BMCs), cardiospheres (CSs), CS-derived Sca-1(+)/CD45(-) cells, human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, and BMC extract into infarcted murine myocardium and found that all of these treatments reduce infarct size and improve cardiac function post-MI similarly without one regimen being superior to another. The beneficial effects appear to be via paracrine influences. Different progenitors lead to improved cardiac function post-MI, but it is premature to hype any specific cell type at this time. PMID:26024953

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cardiac Regenerative Therapy: Optimization of Cell Differentiation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Han; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhiwei; Yang, Junjie; Hu, Shijun; Shen, Zhenya

    2015-01-01

    With the high mortality rate, coronary heart disease (CHD) has currently become a major life-threatening disease. The main pathological change of myocardial infarction (MI) is the induction of myocardial necrosis in infarction area which finally causes heart failure. Conventional treatments cannot regenerate the functional cell efficiently. Recent researches suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are able to differentiate into multiple lineages, including cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and they have been used for the treatment of MI to repair the injured myocardium and improve cardiac function. In this review, we will focus on the recent progress on MSCs derived cardiomyocytes for cardiac regeneration after MI. PMID:26339251

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cardiac Regenerative Therapy: Optimization of Cell Differentiation Strategy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhiwei; Yang, Junjie; Hu, Shijun; Shen, Zhenya

    2015-01-01

    With the high mortality rate, coronary heart disease (CHD) has currently become a major life-threatening disease. The main pathological change of myocardial infarction (MI) is the induction of myocardial necrosis in infarction area which finally causes heart failure. Conventional treatments cannot regenerate the functional cell efficiently. Recent researches suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are able to differentiate into multiple lineages, including cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and they have been used for the treatment of MI to repair the injured myocardium and improve cardiac function. In this review, we will focus on the recent progress on MSCs derived cardiomyocytes for cardiac regeneration after MI.

  18. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, drastically depresses Ca2+ channel activity and uncouples excitation from contraction in cardiac cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, J F; Schmid, A; Romey, G; Nano, J L; Lazdunski, M

    1986-01-01

    Mevinolin (MK803), a potent inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) (Ki, 30 X 10(-9) M), depressed de novo synthesis of cholesterol in 11-day chicken embryonic cardiac cells cultured in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS). Cardiac cells exposed to different concentrations of mevinolin for 1-3 days presented different electrophysiological and mechanical properties: The resting membrane potential, the rate of increase, and the shape of the action potential and contractile properties were changed at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM mevinolin. At a concentration of 1 microM mevinolin, the cardiac cells became quiescent and electrical stimulation induced action potentials of short duration without contraction. Isoproterenol and Bay K8644 were unable to restore excitability and contraction. Although the number of receptors for the tritiated Ca2+ channel blocker nitrendipine was the same in control and in mevinolin-treated cells, voltage-clamp data on isolated cardiac cells and 45Ca2+ flux experiments on monolayers showed that most of the slow Ca2+ channel activity was lost in mevinolin-treated cells. These results suggest that the disappearance of Ca2+ channel activity is most probably at the origin of the loss of cardiac contractility. PMID:2429325

  19. Peruvoside, a Cardiac Glycoside, Induces Primitive Myeloid Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qian; Leong, Wa Seng; Liu, Liang; Chan, Wai-In

    2016-01-01

    Despite the available chemotherapy and treatment, leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure due to frequent relapses after treatment. Among the heterogeneous leukemic cells, a rare population referred as the leukemic stem cell (LSC), is thought to be responsible for relapses and drug resistance. Cardiac glycosides (CGs) have been used in treating heart failure despite its toxicity. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated its new usage as a potential anti-cancer drug. Ouabain, one of the CGs, specifically targeted CD34⁺CD38(-) leukemic stem-like cells, but not the more mature CD34⁺CD38⁺ leukemic cells, making this type of compounds a potential treatment for leukemia. In search of other potential anti-leukemia CGs, we found that Peruvoside, a less studied CG, is more effective than Ouabain and Digitoxin at inducing cell death in primitive myeloid leukemia cells without obvious cytotoxicity on normal blood cells. Similar to Ouabain and Digitoxin, Peruvoside also caused cell cycle arrest at G₂/M stage. It up-regulates CDKN1A expression and activated the cleavage of Caspase 3, 8 and PARP, resulting in apoptosis. Thus, Peruvoside showed potent anti-leukemia effect, which may serve as a new anti-leukemia agent in the future. PMID:27110755

  20. Human amniotic mesenchymal stem cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells may generate a universal source of cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaohu; Wang, I-Ning E; Toma, Ildiko; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Liu, Jianwei; Butte, Manish J; Reijo Pera, Renee A; Yang, Phillip C

    2012-10-10

    Human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) demonstrated partially pluripotent characteristics with a strong expression of Oct4 and Nanog genes and immunomodulatory properties characterized by the absence of HLA-DR and the presence of HLA-G and CD59. The hAMSCs were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that generate a promising source of universal cardiac cells. The hAMSC-derived iPSCs (MiPSCs) successfully underwent robust cardiac differentiation to generate cardiomyocytes. This study investigated 3 key properties of the hAMSCs and MiPSCs: (1) the reprogramming efficiency of the partially pluripotent hAMSCs to generate MiPSCs; (2) immunomodulatory properties of the hAMSCs and MiPSCs; and (3) the cardiac differentiation potential of the MiPSCs. The characteristic iPSC colony formation was observed within 10 days after the transduction of the hAMSCs with a single integration polycistronic vector containing 4 Yamanaka factors. Immunohistology and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that the MiPSCs expressed stem cell surface markers and pluripotency-specific genes. Furthermore, the hAMSCs and MiPSCs demonstrated immunomodulatory properties enabling successful engraftment in the SVJ mice. Finally, the cardiac differentiation of MiPSCs exhibited robust spontaneous contractility, characteristic calcium transience across the membrane, a high expression of cardiac genes and mature cardiac phenotypes, and a contractile force comparable to cardiomyocytes. Our results demonstrated that the hAMSCs are reprogrammed with a high efficiency into MiPSCs, which possess pluripotent, immunomodulatory, and precardiac properties. The MiPSC-derived cardiac cells express a c-kit cell surface marker, which may be employed to purify the cardiac cell population and enable allogeneic cardiac stem cell therapy.

  1. Myocardial remodeling in diabetic cardiomyopathy associated with cardiac mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi Gang; Jin, Qun; Fan, Min; Cong, Xiao Liang; Han, Shu Fang; Gao, Hai; Shan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a specific disease process distinct from coronary artery disease and hypertension. The disease features cardiac remodeling stimulated by hyperglycemia of the left ventricle wall and disrupts contractile functions. Cardiac mast cells may be activated by metabolic byproducts resulted from hyperglycermia and then participate in the remodeling process by releasing a multitude of cytokines and bioactive enzymes. Nedocromil, a pharmacologic stabilizer of mast cells, has been shown to normalize cytokine levels and attenuate cardiac remodeling. In this study, we describe the activation of cardiac mast cells by inducing diabetes in normal mice using streptozotocin (STZ). Next, we treated the diabetic mice with nedocromil for 12 weeks and then examined their hearts for signs of cardiac remodeling and quantified contractile function. We observed significantly impaired heart function in diabetic mice, as well as increased cardiac mast cell density and elevated mast cell secretions that correlated with gene expression and aberrant cytokine levels associated with cardiac remodeling. Nedocromil treatment halted contractile dysfunction in diabetic mice and reduced cardiac mast cell density, which correlated with reduced bioactive enzyme secretions, reduced expression of extracellular matrix remodeling factors and collagen synthesis, and normalized cytokine levels. However, the results showed nedocromil treatments did not return diabetic mice to a normal state. We concluded that manipulation of cardiac mast cell function is sufficient to attenuate cardiomyopathy stimulated by diabetes, but other cellular pathways also contribute to the disease process.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells promote matrix metalloproteinase secretion by cardiac fibroblasts and reduce cardiac ventricular fibrosis after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mias, Céline; Lairez, Olivier; Trouche, Elodie; Roncalli, Jérome; Calise, Denis; Seguelas, Marie-Hélène; Ordener, Catherine; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Auge, Nathalie; Salvayre, Anne Negre; Bourin, Philippe; Parini, Angelo; Cussac, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation significantly decreased cardiac fibrosis; however, the mechanisms involved in these effects are still poorly understood. In this work, we investigated whether the antifibrotic properties of MSCs involve the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and matrix metalloproteinase endogenous inhibitor (TIMP) production by cardiac fibroblasts. In vitro experiments showed that conditioned medium from MSCs decreased viability, alpha-smooth muscle actin expression, and collagen secretion of cardiac fibroblasts. These effects were concomitant with the stimulation of MMP-2/MMP-9 activities and membrane type 1 MMP expression. Experiments performed with fibroblasts from MMP2-knockout mice demonstrated that MMP-2 plays a preponderant role in preventing collagen accumulation upon incubation with conditioned medium from MSCs. We found that MSC-conditioned medium also decreased the expression of TIMP2 in cardiac fibroblasts. In vivo studies showed that intracardiac injection of MSCs in a rat model of postischemic heart failure induced a significant decrease in ventricular fibrosis. This effect was associated with the improvement of morphological and functional cardiac parameters. In conclusion, we showed that MSCs modulate the phenotype of cardiac fibroblasts and their ability to degrade extracellular matrix. These properties of MSCs open new perspectives for understanding the mechanisms of action of MSCs and anticipate their potential therapeutic or side effects.

  3. Cell transplantation for cardiac regeneration: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, E.J.; van der Giessen, W.J.; Duncker, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade transplantation of cells into the heart has emerged as a novel therapy for the prevention and treatment of heart failure. Although various cell types have been used, most experience has been obtained with the progenitor cells of skeletal muscle, also called myoblasts, and a wide array of bone marrow-derived cell types. The first preclinical studies demonstrated an improvement in global and regional heart function that was attributed mainly to a direct contractile effect of the transplanted cells. Furthermore, it was suggested that multiple cell types are able to form true cardiomyocytes and truly ‘regenerate’ the myocardium. More recent studies have questioned these early findings. Other mechanisms such as paracrine effects on the infarct and remote myocardium, a reduction in adverse remodelling and improvement of mechanical properties of the infarct tissue likely play a more important role. On the basis of encouraging preclinical studies, multiple early-phase clinical trials and several randomised controlled trials have been conducted that have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and potential efficacy of this novel therapy in humans. This review summarises the available evidence on cardiac cell transplantation and provides an outlook on future preclinical and clinical research that has to fill in the remaining gaps. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:88-95.) PMID:18364985

  4. Tailoring Material Properties of Cardiac Matrix Hydrogels to Induce Endothelial Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffords, Megan E.; Wu, Jinglei; Shah, Mickey; Hong, Yi; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac matrix hydrogel has shown great promise as an injectable biomaterial due to the possession of cardiac-specific extracellular matrix composition. A cardiac matrix hydrogel facilitating neovascularization will further improve its therapeutic outcomes in cardiac repair. In this study, we explored the feasibility of tailoring material properties of cardiac matrix hydrogels using a natural compound, genipin, to promote endothelial differentiation of stem cells. Our results demonstrated that the genipin crosslinking could increase the mechanical properties of the cardiac matrix hydrogel to a stiffness range promoting endothelial differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). It also decreased the swelling ratio and prolonged degradation without altering gelation time. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels showed great viability. After 1-day culture, hMSCs demonstrated down-regulation of early endothelial marker expression and up-regulation of mature endothelial marker expression. Especially for 1 mM genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels, hMSCs showed particularly significant expression of mature endothelial cell marker vWF. These attractive results indicate the potential of using genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels to promote rapid vascularization for cardiac infarction treatment through minimally invasive therapy. PMID:25946697

  5. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F.; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure. PMID:27622691

  6. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure.

  7. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure. PMID:27622691

  8. Targeting dendritic cell function during systemic autoimmunity to restore tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  9. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P.; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  10. Targeting dendritic cell function during systemic autoimmunity to restore tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-09-16

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Telomerase Activity in CD117+CD34+ Cardiac Telocytes with Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Cardiac Fibroblasts and Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Lu, Shan-Shan; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study characterized the cardiac telocyte (TC) population both in vivo and in vitro, and investigated its telomerase activity related to mitosis. Methods: Using transmission electron microscopy and a phase contrast microscope, the typical morphological features of cardiac TCs were observed; by targeting the cell surface proteins CD117 and CD34, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were sorted via flow cytometry and validated by immunofluorescence based on the primary cell culture. Then the optimized basal nutrient medium for selected population was examined with the cell counting kit 8. Under this conditioned medium, the process of cell division was captured, and the telomerase activity of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was detected in comparison with bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), cardiac fibroblasts (CFBs), cardiomyocytes (CMs). Results: Cardiac TCs projected characteristic telopodes with thin segments (podomers) in alternation with dilation (podoms). In addition, 64% of the primary cultured cardiac TCs were composed of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs; which was verified by immunofluorescence. In a live cell imaging system, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were observed to enter into cell division in a short time, followed by an significant invagination forming across the middle of the cell body. Using a real-time quantitative telomeric-repeat amplification assay, the telomerase concentration in CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was obviously lower than in BMSCs and CFBs, and significantly higher than in CMs. Conclusions: Cardiac TCs represent a unique cell population and CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs have relative low telomerase activity that differs from BMSCs, CFBs and CMs and thus they might play an important role in maintaining cardiac homeostasis. PMID:26168836

  12. CALCIUM-DRIVEN TRANSCRIPTION OF CARDIAC SPECIFYING GENE PROGRAM IN LIVER STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that a cloned liver stem cell line (WB F344) acquires a cardiac phenotype when seeded in a cardiac microenvironment in vivo and ex vivo. Here we investigated the mechanisms of this transdifferentiation in early (<72 hr) WB F344 cell, rat neonatal ventricu...

  13. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis in cardiac myocytes. Involvement of the sphingolipid signaling cascade in cardiac cell death.

    PubMed

    Krown, K A; Page, M T; Nguyen, C; Zechner, D; Gutierrez, V; Comstock, K L; Glembotski, C C; Quintana, P J; Sabbadini, R A

    1996-12-15

    In the present study, it was shown that physiologically relevant levels of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha induced apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes in vitro, as quantified by single cell microgel electrophoresis of nuclei ("cardiac comets") as well as by morphological and biochemical criteria. It was also shown that TNFalpha stimulated production of the endogenous second messenger, sphingosine, suggesting sphingolipid involvement in TNFalpha-mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Consistent with this hypothesis, sphingosine strongly induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The ability of the appropriate stimulus to drive cardiomyocytes into apoptosis indicated that these cells were primed for apoptosis and were susceptible to clinically relevant apoptotic triggers, such as TNFalpha. These findings suggest that the elevated TNFalpha levels seen in a variety of clinical conditions, including sepsis and ischemic myocardial disorders, may contribute to TNFalpha-induced cardiac cell death. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is also discussed in terms of its potential beneficial role in limiting the area of cardiac cell involvement as a consequence of myocardial infarction, viral infection, and primary cardiac tumors.

  14. Cardiac progenitor cell-derived exosomes prevent cardiomyocytes apoptosis through exosomal miR-21 by targeting PDCD4.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Pan, Y; Li, X H; Yang, X Y; Feng, Y L; Tan, H H; Jiang, L; Feng, J; Yu, X Y

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells derived from adult heart have emerged as one of the most promising stem cell types for cardiac protection and repair. Exosomes are known to mediate cell-cell communication by transporting cell-derived proteins and nucleic acids, including various microRNAs (miRNAs). Here we investigated the cardiac progenitor cell (CPC)-derived exosomal miRNAs on protecting myocardium under oxidative stress. Sca1(+)CPCs-derived exosomes were purified from conditional medium, and identified by nanoparticle trafficking analysis (NTA), transmission electron microscopy and western blotting using CD63, CD9 and Alix as markers. Exosomes production was measured by NTA, the result showed that oxidative stress-induced CPCs secrete more exosomes compared with normal condition. Although six apoptosis-related miRNAs could be detected in two different treatment-derived exosomes, only miR-21 was significantly upregulated in oxidative stress-induced exosomes compared with normal exosomes. The same oxidative stress could cause low miR-21 and high cleaved caspase-3 expression in H9C2 cardiac cells. But the cleaved caspase-3 was significantly decreased when miR-21 was overexpressed by transfecting miR-21 mimic. Furthermore, miR-21 mimic or inhibitor transfection and luciferase activity assay confirmed that programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) was a target gene of miR-21, and miR-21/PDCD4 axis has an important role in anti-apoptotic effect of H9C2 cell. Western blotting and Annexin V/PI results demonstrated that exosomes pre-treated H9C2 exhibited increased miR-21 whereas decreased PDCD4, and had more resistant potential to the apoptosis induced by the oxidative stress, compared with non-treated cells. These findings revealed that CPC-derived exosomal miR-21 had an inhibiting role in the apoptosis pathway through downregulating PDCD4. Restored miR-21/PDCD4 pathway using CPC-derived exosomes could protect myocardial cells against oxidative stress-related apoptosis. Therefore

  15. Cellular cardiac electrophysiology modeling with Chaste and CellML

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jonathan; Spiteri, Raymond J.; Mirams, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Chaste is an open-source C++ library for computational biology that has well-developed cardiac electrophysiology tissue simulation support. In this paper, we introduce the features available for performing cardiac electrophysiology action potential simulations using a wide range of models from the Physiome repository. The mathematics of the models are described in CellML, with units for all quantities. The primary idea is that the model is defined in one place (the CellML file), and all model code is auto-generated at compile or run time; it never has to be manually edited. We use ontological annotation to identify model variables describing certain biological quantities (membrane voltage, capacitance, etc.) to allow us to import any relevant CellML models into the Chaste framework in consistent units and to interact with them via consistent interfaces. This approach provides a great deal of flexibility for analysing different models of the same system. Chaste provides a wide choice of numerical methods for solving the ordinary differential equations that describe the models. Fixed-timestep explicit and implicit solvers are provided, as discussed in previous work. Here we introduce the Rush–Larsen and Generalized Rush–Larsen integration techniques, made available via symbolic manipulation of the model equations, which are automatically rearranged into the forms required by these approaches. We have also integrated the CVODE solvers, a ‘gold standard’ for stiff systems, and we have developed support for symbolic computation of the Jacobian matrix, yielding further increases in the performance and accuracy of CVODE. We discuss some of the technical details of this work and compare the performance of the available numerical methods. Finally, we discuss how this is generalized in our functional curation framework, which uses a domain-specific language for defining complex experiments as a basis for comparison of model behavior. PMID:25610400

  16. Cellular cardiac electrophysiology modeling with Chaste and CellML.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan; Spiteri, Raymond J; Mirams, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Chaste is an open-source C++ library for computational biology that has well-developed cardiac electrophysiology tissue simulation support. In this paper, we introduce the features available for performing cardiac electrophysiology action potential simulations using a wide range of models from the Physiome repository. The mathematics of the models are described in CellML, with units for all quantities. The primary idea is that the model is defined in one place (the CellML file), and all model code is auto-generated at compile or run time; it never has to be manually edited. We use ontological annotation to identify model variables describing certain biological quantities (membrane voltage, capacitance, etc.) to allow us to import any relevant CellML models into the Chaste framework in consistent units and to interact with them via consistent interfaces. This approach provides a great deal of flexibility for analysing different models of the same system. Chaste provides a wide choice of numerical methods for solving the ordinary differential equations that describe the models. Fixed-timestep explicit and implicit solvers are provided, as discussed in previous work. Here we introduce the Rush-Larsen and Generalized Rush-Larsen integration techniques, made available via symbolic manipulation of the model equations, which are automatically rearranged into the forms required by these approaches. We have also integrated the CVODE solvers, a 'gold standard' for stiff systems, and we have developed support for symbolic computation of the Jacobian matrix, yielding further increases in the performance and accuracy of CVODE. We discuss some of the technical details of this work and compare the performance of the available numerical methods. Finally, we discuss how this is generalized in our functional curation framework, which uses a domain-specific language for defining complex experiments as a basis for comparison of model behavior.

  17. Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Therapy of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karantalis, Vasileios; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial clinical advances over the past 65 years, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in America. The past 15 years has witnessed major basic and translational interest in the use of stem and/or precursor cells as a therapeutic agent for chronically injured organs. Among the cell types under investigation, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely studied and in early stage clinical studies show promise for repair and regeneration of cardiac tissues. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into mesoderm and non-mesoderm derived tissues, their immunomodulatory effects, their availability and their key role in maintaining and replenishing endogenous stem cell niches have rendered them one of the most heavily investigated and clinically tested type of stem cell. Accumulating data from preclinical and early phase clinical trials document their safety when delivered as either autologous or allogeneic forms in a range of cardiovascular diseases, but also importantly define parameters of clinical efficacy that justify further investigation in larger clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of MSCs, their interaction with endogenous molecular and cellular pathways, and their modulation of immune responses. Additionally, we discuss factors that enhance their proliferative and regenerative ability and factors that may hinder their effectiveness in the clinical setting. PMID:25858066

  18. Type 2 Diabetes Dysregulates Glucose Metabolism in Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K; Mehra, Parul; Gibb, Andrew A; Haberzettl, Petra; Hong, Kyung U; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Qianhong; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Bolli, Roberto; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G

    2016-06-24

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased mortality and progression to heart failure. Recent studies suggest that diabetes also impairs reparative responses after cell therapy. In this study, we examined potential mechanisms by which diabetes affects cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). CPCs isolated from the diabetic heart showed diminished proliferation, a propensity for cell death, and a pro-adipogenic phenotype. The diabetic CPCs were insulin-resistant, and they showed higher energetic reliance on glycolysis, which was associated with up-regulation of the pro-glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3). In WT CPCs, expression of a mutant form of PFKFB, which mimics PFKFB3 activity and increases glycolytic rate, was sufficient to phenocopy the mitochondrial and proliferative deficiencies found in diabetic cells. Consistent with activation of phosphofructokinase in diabetic cells, stable isotope carbon tracing in diabetic CPCs showed dysregulation of the pentose phosphate and glycero(phospho)lipid synthesis pathways. We describe diabetes-induced dysregulation of carbon partitioning using stable isotope metabolomics-based coupling quotients, which relate relative flux values between metabolic pathways. These findings suggest that diabetes causes an imbalance in glucose carbon allocation by uncoupling biosynthetic pathway activity, which could diminish the efficacy of CPCs for myocardial repair. PMID:27151219

  19. Modelling Cl- homeostasis and volume regulation of the cardiac cell.

    PubMed

    Terashima, K; Takeuchi, A; Sarai, N; Matsuoka, S; Shim, E B; Leem, C H; Noma, A

    2006-05-15

    We aim at introducing a Cl- homeostasis to the cardiac ventricular cell model (Kyoto model), which includes the sarcomere shortening and the mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation. First, we examined mechanisms underlying the cell volume regulation in a simple model consisting of Na+/K+ pump, Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, volume-regulated Cl- channel and background Na+, K+ and Cl- currents. The high intracellular Cl- concentration of approximately 30 mM was achieved by the balance between the secondary active transport via NKCC1 and passive currents. Simulating responses to Na+/K+ pump inhibition revealed the essential role of Na+/K+ pump in maintaining the cellular osmolarity through creating the negative membrane potential, which extrudes Cl- from a cell, confirming the previous model study in the skeletal muscle. In addition, this model well reproduced the experimental data such as the responses to hypotonic shock in the presence or absence of beta-adrenergic stimulation. Finally, the volume regulation via Cl- homeostasis was successfully incorporated to the Kyoto model. The steady state was well established in the comprehensive cell model in respect to both the intracellular ion concentrations and the shape of the action potential, which are all in the physiological range. The source code of the model, which can reproduce every result, is available from http://www.sim-bio.org/. PMID:16608706

  20. Making it stick: chasing the optimal stem cells for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Quijada, Pearl; Sussman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of stem cells for regenerative-based cardiac therapy, the optimal stem cell population(s) remains in a cloud of uncertainty. In the past decade, the field has witnessed a surge of researchers discovering stem cell populations reported to directly and/or indirectly contribute to cardiac regeneration through processes of cardiomyogenic commitment and/or release of cardioprotective paracrine factors. This review centers upon defining basic biological characteristics of stem cells used for sustaining cardiac integrity during disease and maintenance of communication between the cardiac environment and stem cells. Given the limited successes achieved so far in regenerative therapy, the future requires development of unprecedented concepts involving combinatorial approaches to create and deliver the optimal stem cell(s) that will enhance myocardial healing. PMID:25340282

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate Atherosclerotic Lesions via Restoring Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yuan-Tong

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is beneficial in myocardial infarction and hind limb ischemia, but its ability to ameliorate atherosclerosis remains unknown. Here, the effects of MSCs on inhibiting endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis were investigated in human/mouse endothelial cells treated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with oxLDL inactivated the Akt/endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway, induced eNOS degradation, and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Coculture with human MSCs reversed the effects of oxLDL on endothelial cells and restored Akt/eNOS activity, eNOS level, and NO production. Reduction of endothelium-dependent relaxation and subsequent plaque formation were developed in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat diet. Systemic infusion with mouse MSCs ameliorated endothelial dysfunction and plaque formation in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. Interestingly, treatment with interleukin-8 (IL8)/macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) alone induced the similar effects of human/mouse MSCs on oxLDL-treated human/mouse endothelial cells. Neutralization antibodies (Abs) against IL8/MIP-2 also blocked the effects of human/mouse MSCs on oxLDL-treated human/mouse endothelial cells. Consistently, MIP-2 injection alone induced the similar effect of MSCs on the endothelial function in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. The improvement in endothelial dysfunction by mouse MSCs was also blocked when pretreating MSCs with anti-MIP-2 Abs. In conclusion, MSC transplantation improved endothelial function and plaque formation in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. Activation of the Akt/eNOS pathway in endothelium by IL8/MIP-2 is involved in the protective effect of MSCs. The study helps support the use and clarify the mechanism of MSCs for ameliorating atherosclerosis. PMID:25504897

  2. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation restores damaged ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shao-Fang; Hu, Hong-Bo; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Xia-Fei; Peng, Dong-Xian; Su, Wei-Yan; He, Yuan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian injury because of chemotherapy can decrease the levels of sexual hormones and potentia generandi of patients, thereby greatly reducing quality of life. The goal of this study was to investigate which transplantation method for human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) can recover ovarian function that has been damaged by chemotherapy. A rat model of ovarian injury was established using an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide. Membrane-labelled HUMSCs were subsequently injected directly into ovary tissue or tail vein. The distribution of fluorescently labelled HUMSCs, estrous cycle, sexual hormone levels, and potentia generandi of treated and control rats were then examined. HUMSCs injected into the ovary only distributed to the ovary and uterus, while HUMSCs injected via tail vein were detected in the ovary, uterus, kidney, liver and lung. The estrous cycle, levels of sex hormones and potentia generandi of the treated rats were also recovered to a certain degree. Moreover, in some transplanted rats, fertility was restored and their offspring developed normally. While ovary injection could recover ovarian function faster, both methods produced similar results in the later stages of observation. Therefore, our results suggest that transplantation of HUMSCs by tail vein injection represents a minimally invasive and effective treatment method for ovarian injury. PMID:25922900

  3. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker.

    PubMed

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes. PMID:27350339

  4. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes. PMID:27350339

  5. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes for cardiac regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ji-Dong; Srivastava, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts play critical roles in maintaining normal cardiac function and in cardiac remodeling during pathological conditions such as myocardial infarction (MI). Adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) have little to no regenerative capacity; damaged CMs in the heart after MI are replaced by cardiac fibroblasts that become activated and transform into myofibroblasts, which preserves the structural integrity. Unfortunately, this process typically causes fibrosis and reduces cardiac function. Directly reprogramming adult cardiac fibroblasts into induced CM-like cells (iCMs) holds great promise for restoring heart function. Direct cardiac reprogramming also provides a new research model to investigate which transcription factors and microRNAs control the molecular network that guides cardiac cell fate. We review the approaches and characterization of in vitro and in vivo reprogrammed iCMs from different laboratories, and outline the future directions needed to translate this new approach into a practical therapy for damaged hearts.

  6. Human cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells acquire functional cardiac properties through a cell fusion process.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Daniele; Crespi, Alessia; Brioschi, Chiara; Parente, Valeria; Toietta, Gabriele; Devanna, Paolo; Baruscotti, Mirko; Truffa, Silvia; Scavone, Angela; Rusconi, Francesca; Biondi, Andrea; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Vigna, Elisa; Difrancesco, Dario; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Barbuti, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    The efficacy of cardiac repair by stem cell administration relies on a successful functional integration of injected cells into the host myocardium. Safety concerns have been raised about the possibility that stem cells may induce foci of arrhythmia in the ischemic myocardium. In a previous work (36), we showed that human cord blood CD34(+) cells, when cocultured on neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, exhibit excitation-contraction coupling features similar to those of cardiomyocytes, even though no human genes were upregulated. The aims of the present work are to investigate whether human CD34(+) cells, isolated after 1 wk of coculture with neonatal ventricular myocytes, possess molecular and functional properties of cardiomyocytes and to discriminate, using a reporter gene system, whether cardiac differentiation derives from a (trans)differentiation or a cell fusion process. Umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were isolated by a magnetic cell sorting method, transduced with a lentiviral vector carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, and seeded onto primary cultures of spontaneously beating rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cocultured EGFP(+)/CD34(+)-derived cells were analyzed for their electrophysiological features at different time points. After 1 wk in coculture, EGFP(+) cells, in contact with cardiomyocytes, were spontaneously contracting and had a maximum diastolic potential (MDP) of -53.1 mV, while those that remained isolated from the surrounding myocytes did not contract and had a depolarized resting potential of -11.4 mV. Cells were then resuspended and cultured at low density to identify EGFP(+) progenitor cell derivatives. Under these conditions, we observed single EGFP(+) beating cells that had acquired an hyperpolarization-activated current typical of neonatal cardiomyocytes (EGFP(+) cells, -2.24 ± 0.89 pA/pF; myocytes, -1.99 ± 0.63 pA/pF, at -125 mV). To discriminate between cell autonomous differentiation and fusion, EGFP(+)/CD34

  7. Native Cardiac Extracellular Matrix Hydrogels for Cultivation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Freytes, Donald O; O’Neill, John D; Duan-Arnold, Yi; Wrona, Emily; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Biomaterial scaffolds made of native and synthetic materials are designed to serve as a structural and informational template for cell attachment and tissue formation. The use of native extracellular matrix (ECM) is of special interest for the culture of cardiac stem and progenitor cells due to the presence of intrinsic regulatory factors regulating cardiac function. We describe here how to obtain native ECM hydrogels from porcine hearts for the culture of human embryonic, induced pluripotent, and somatic stem cells for cardiac tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:25070328

  8. Licorice treatment prevents oxidative stress, restores cardiac function, and salvages myocardium in rat model of myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Shreesh Kumar; Sharma, Charu; Golechha, Mahaveer Jain; Bhatia, Jagriti; Kumari, Santosh; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2015-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of licorice on antioxidant defense, functional impairment, histopathology, and ultrastructural alterations in isoproterenol (ISP)-induced myocardial injury in rats. Myocardial necrosis was induced by two subcutaneous injection of ISP (85 mg/kg) at an interval of 24 h. Licorice was administered orally for 30 days in the doses of 100, 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg. ISP-treated rats showed impaired hemodynamics, left ventricular dysfunction, and caused depletion of antioxidants and marker enzymes along with lipid peroxidation from myocardium. ISP also induced histopathological and ultrastructural alterations in myocardium. Pretreatment with licorice prevented the depletion of endogenous antioxidants and myocyte injury marker enzymes, inhibited lipid peroxidation, and showed recovery of hemodynamic and ventricular functions. Licorice treatment also reduced myonecrosis, edema, and infiltration of inflammatory cells and showed preservation of subcellular and ultrastructural components. Our results demonstrate that licorice exerts cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress, augmenting endogenous antioxidants, and restoring functional parameters as well as maintaining structural integrity.

  9. Chronic infusion of enalaprilat into hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy by restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Qing; Qi, Jie; Su, Qing; Suo, Yu-Ping; Yue, Li-Ying; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Qin, Da-Nian

    2014-02-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We hypothesized that inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension via restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines. Rats underwent subcutaneous infusions of ANG II or saline and bilateral PVN infusions of ACE inhibitor enalaprilat (ENL, 2.5 μg/h) or vehicle for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in higher mean arterial pressure and cardiac hypertrophy as indicated by increased whole heart weight/body weight ratio, whole heart weight/tibia length ratio, left ventricular weight/tibia length ratio, and mRNA expressions of cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide and beta-myosin heavy chain. These ANG II-infused rats had higher PVN levels of glutamate, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) and the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and lower PVN levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, interleukin (IL)-10 and the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), and higher plasma levels of PICs, norepinephrine and aldosterone, and lower plasma IL-10, and higher renal sympathetic nerve activity. However, PVN treatment with ENL attenuated these changes. PVN microinjection of ANG II induced increases in IL-1β and IL-6, and a decrease in IL-10 in the PVN, and pretreatment with angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) antagonist losartan attenuated these changes. These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the PVN, and PVN inhibition of the RAS restores neurotransmitters and cytokines in the PVN, thereby attenuating ANG II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Chronic ANG II infusion results in sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiac hypertrophy. • PVN inhibition of ACE

  10. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  11. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  12. Efficient Generation of Cardiac Purkinje Cells from ESCs by Activating cAMP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Maass, Karen; Lu, Jia; Fishman, Glenn I.; Chen, Shuibing; Evans, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dysfunction of the specialized cardiac conduction system (CCS) is associated with life-threatening arrhythmias. Strategies to derive CCS cells, including rare Purkinje cells (PCs), would facilitate models for mechanistic studies and drug discovery and also provide new cellular materials for regenerative therapies. A high-throughput chemical screen using CCS:lacz and Contactin2:egfp (Cntn2:egfp) reporter embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines was used to discover a small molecule, sodium nitroprusside (SN), that efficiently promotes the generation of cardiac cells that express gene profiles and generate action potentials of PC-like cells. Imaging and mechanistic studies suggest that SN promotes the generation of PCs from cardiac progenitors initially expressing cardiac myosin heavy chain and that it does so by activating cyclic AMP signaling. These findings provide a strategy to derive scalable PCs, along with insight into the ontogeny of CCS development. PMID:26028533

  13. Role of paracrine factors in stem and progenitor cell mediated cardiac repair and tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Burchfield, Jana S; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2008-01-01

    A new era has begun in the treatment of ischemic disease and heart failure. With the discovery that stem cells from diverse organs and tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord blood, and vessel wall, have the potential to improve cardiac function beyond that of conventional pharmacological therapy comes a new field of research aiming at understanding the precise mechanisms of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair. Not only will it be important to determine the most efficacious cell population for cardiac repair, but also whether overlapping, common mechanisms exist. Increasing evidence suggests that one mechanism of action by which cells provide tissue protection and repair may involve paracrine factors, including cytokines and growth factors, released from transplanted stem cells into the surrounding tissue. These paracrine factors have the potential to directly modify the healing process in the heart, including neovascularization, cardiac myocyte apoptosis, inflammation, fibrosis, contractility, bioenergetics, and endogenous repair. PMID:19014650

  14. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  15. Design and formulation of functional pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Thavandiran, Nimalan; Dubois, Nicole; Mikryukov, Alexander; Massé, Stéphane; Beca, Bogdan; Simmons, Craig A.; Deshpande, Vikram S.; McGarry, J. Patrick; Chen, Christopher S.; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Keller, Gordon M.; Radisic, Milica; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Access to robust and information-rich human cardiac tissue models would accelerate drug-based strategies for treating heart disease. Despite significant effort, the generation of high-fidelity adult-like human cardiac tissue analogs remains challenging. We used computational modeling of tissue contraction and assembly mechanics in conjunction with microfabricated constraints to guide the design of aligned and functional 3D human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cardiac microtissues that we term cardiac microwires (CMWs). Miniaturization of the platform circumvented the need for tissue vascularization and enabled higher-throughput image-based analysis of CMW drug responsiveness. CMW tissue properties could be tuned using electromechanical stimuli and cell composition. Specifically, controlling self-assembly of 3D tissues in aligned collagen, and pacing with point stimulation electrodes, were found to promote cardiac maturation-associated gene expression and in vivo-like electrical signal propagation. Furthermore, screening a range of hPSC-derived cardiac cell ratios identified that 75% NKX2 Homeobox 5 (NKX2-5)+ cardiomyocytes and 25% Cluster of Differentiation 90 OR (CD90)+ nonmyocytes optimized tissue remodeling dynamics and yielded enhanced structural and functional properties. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the optimized platform in a tachycardic model of arrhythmogenesis, an aspect of cardiac electrophysiology not previously recapitulated in 3D in vitro hPSC-derived cardiac microtissue models. The design criteria identified with our CMW platform should accelerate the development of predictive in vitro assays of human heart tissue function. PMID:24255110

  16. Restoration of WNT4 inhibits cell growth in leukemia-derived cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background WNT signaling pathways are significantly altered during cancer development. Vertebrates possess two classes of WNT signaling pathways: the “canonical” WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, and the “non-canonical” pathways including WNT/Ca2+ and WNT/Planar cell polarity [PCP] signaling. WNT4 influences hematopoietic progenitor cell expansion and survival; however, WNT4 function in cancer development and the resulting implications for oncogenesis are poorly understood. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to determine the expression of WNT4 in mature peripheral blood cells and diverse leukemia-derived cells including cell lines from hematopoietic neoplasms and cells from patients with leukemia; second, to identify the effect of this ligand on the proliferation and apoptosis of the blast-derived cell lines BJAB, Jurkat, CEM, K562, and HL60. Methods We determined WNT4 expression by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and T- and B-lymphocytes from healthy individuals, as well as from five leukemia-derived cell lines and blasts derived from patients with leukemia. To analyze the effect of WNT4 on cell proliferation, PBMCs and cell lines were exposed to a commercially available WNT4 recombinant human protein. Furthermore, WNT4 expression was restored in BJAB cells using an inducible lentiviral expression system. Cell viability and proliferation were measured by the addition of WST-1 to cell cultures and counting cells; in addition, the progression of the cell cycle and the amount of apoptosis were analyzed in the absence or presence of WNT4. Finally, the expression of WNT-pathway target genes was measured by qRT-PCR. Results WNT4 expression was severely reduced in leukemia-derived cell lines and blasts derived from patients with leukemia. The exposure of cell lines to WNT4 recombinant protein significantly inhibited cell proliferation; inducing WNT4 expression in BJAB

  17. Thymosin-β4 prevents cardiac rupture and improves cardiac function in mice with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongmei; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Dai, Xiangguo; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine

    2014-09-01

    Thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) promotes cell survival, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration and reduces inflammation. Cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction (MI) is mainly the consequence of excessive regional inflammation, whereas cardiac dysfunction after MI results from a massive cardiomyocyte loss and cardiac fibrosis. It is possible that Tβ4 reduces the incidence of cardiac rupture post-MI via anti-inflammatory actions and that it decreases adverse cardiac remodeling and improves cardiac function by promoting cardiac cell survival and cardiac repair. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to MI and treated with either vehicle or Tβ4 (1.6 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ip via osmotic minipump) for 7 days or 5 wk. Mice were assessed for 1) cardiac remodeling and function by echocardiography; 2) inflammatory cell infiltration, capillary density, myocyte apoptosis, and interstitial collagen fraction histopathologically; 3) gelatinolytic activity by in situ zymography; and 4) expression of ICAM-1 and p53 by immunoblot analysis. Tβ4 reduced cardiac rupture that was associated with a decrease in the numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells and apoptotic myocytes, a decrease in gelatinolytic activity and ICAM-1 and p53 expression, and an increase in the numbers of CD31-positive cells. Five-week treatment with Tβ4 ameliorated left ventricular dilation, improved cardiac function, markedly reduced interstitial collagen fraction, and increased capillary density. In a murine model of acute MI, Tβ4 not only decreased mortality rate as a result of cardiac rupture but also significantly improved cardiac function after MI. Thus, the use of Tβ4 could be explored as an alternative therapy in preventing cardiac rupture and restoring cardiac function in patients with MI.

  18. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells express a functional Ca+ -sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Berra Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela Federica; Moccia, Francesco; Avelino-Cruz, Josè Everardo; Oldani, Amanda; Coltrini, Daniela; Milesi, Veronica; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism whereby extracellular Ca(2+) exerts the endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone is still unclear. In this study, we assessed whether cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) express a functional extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) using a variety of techniques. CaSR mRNA was detected using RT-PCR, and CaSR protein was identified by immunocytochemical analysis. In order to assess the functionality of the receptor, CMEC were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome, Fura-2/AM. A number of CaSR agonists, such as spermine, Gd(3+), La(3+) and neomycin, elicited a heterogeneous intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which was abolished by disruption of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) signaling and by depletion of intracellular stores with cyclopiazonic acid. The inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger upon substitution of extracellular Na(+) unmasked the Ca(2+) signal triggered by an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) levels. Finally, aromatic amino acids, which function as allosteric activators of CaSR, potentiated the Ca(2+) response to the CaSR agonist La(3+). These data provide evidence that CMEC express CaSR, which is able to respond to physiological agonists by mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular InsP(3)-sensitive stores.

  19. Role of Cytosolic Calcium Diffusion in Murine Cardiac Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Limbu, Bijay; Shah, Kushal; Weinberg, Seth H.; Deo, Makarand

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) are morphologically and electrophysiologically different from ventricular myocytes and, importantly, exhibit distinct calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that PCs are more susceptible to action potential (AP) abnormalities than ventricular myocytes; however, the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we utilized a detailed biophysical mathematical model of a murine PC to systematically examine the role of cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion in shaping the AP in PCs. A biphasic spatiotemporal Ca2+ diffusion process, as recorded experimentally, was implemented in the model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics on AP and ionic current properties by varying the effective Ca2+ diffusion rate. It was observed that AP morphology, specifically the plateau, was affected due to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. Elevated Ca2+ concentration in the sarcolemmal region activated inward sodium–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current, resulting in a prolongation of the AP plateau at faster diffusion rates. Artificially clamping the NCX current to control values completely reversed the alterations in the AP plateau, thus confirming the role of NCX in modifying the AP morphology. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion waves play a significant role in shaping APs of PCs and could provide mechanistic insights in the increased arrhythmogeneity of PCs. PMID:27478391

  20. Characterization of epicardial-derived cardiac interstitial cells: differentiation and mobilization of heart fibroblast progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Villalba, Adrián; Ziogas, Algirdas; Ehrbar, Martin; Pérez-Pomares, José M

    2013-01-01

    The non-muscular cells that populate the space found between cardiomyocyte fibers are known as 'cardiac interstitial cells' (CICs). CICs are heterogeneous in nature and include different cardiac progenitor/stem cells, cardiac fibroblasts and other cell types. Upon heart damage CICs soon respond by initiating a reparative response that transforms with time into extensive fibrosis and heart failure. Despite the biomedical relevance of CICs, controversy remains on the ontogenetic relationship existing between the different cell kinds homing at the cardiac interstitium, as well as on the molecular signals that regulate their differentiation, maturation, mutual interaction and role in adult cardiac homeostasis and disease. Our work focuses on the analysis of epicardial-derived cells, the first cell type that colonizes the cardiac interstitium. We present here a characterization and an experimental analysis of the differentiation potential and mobilization properties of a new cell line derived from mouse embryonic epicardium (EPIC). Our results indicate that these cells express some markers associated with cardiovascular stemness and retain part of the multipotent properties of embryonic epicardial derivatives, spontaneously differentiating into smooth muscle, and fibroblast/myofibroblast-like cells. Epicardium-derived cells are also shown to initiate a characteristic response to different growth factors, to display a characteristic proteolytic expression profile and to degrade biological matrices in 3D in vitro assays. Taken together, these data indicate that EPICs are relevant to the analysis of epicardial-derived CICs, and are a god model for the research on cardiac fibroblasts and the role these cells play in ventricular remodeling in both ischemic or non/ischemic myocardial disease. PMID:23349729

  1. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Olivia; Qian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26176012

  2. Proteasome inhibitors attenuated cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong; Yoo, Young Sook; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-05-01

    The Ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in protein degradation, cell cycle control, and growth and inflammatory cell signaling. Dysfunction of UPS in cardiac diseases has been seen in many studies. Cholesterol acts as an inducer of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the cholesterol-induced hypertrophic growth in H9c2 cells is examined in order to observe whether UPS is involved in cardiac hypertrophy. The treatment of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib markedly reduced cellular surface area and mRNA expression of β-MHC in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, activated AKT and ERK were significantly attenuated by MG132 and Bortezomib in cholesterol- induced cardiac hypertrophy. We demonstrated that cholesterol- induced cardiac hypertrophy was suppressed by proteasome inhibitors. Thus, regulatory mechanism of cholesterol- induced cardiac hypertrophy by proteasome inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of heart failure. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 270-275]. PMID:26592933

  3. Proteasome inhibitors attenuated cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in H9c2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong; Yoo, Young Sook; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-01-01

    The Ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in protein degradation, cell cycle control, and growth and inflammatory cell signaling. Dysfunction of UPS in cardiac diseases has been seen in many studies. Cholesterol acts as an inducer of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the cholesterol-induced hypertrophic growth in H9c2 cells is examined in order to observe whether UPS is involved in cardiac hypertrophy. The treatment of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib markedly reduced cellular surface area and mRNA expression of β-MHC in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, activated AKT and ERK were significantly attenuated by MG132 and Bortezomib in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We demonstrated that cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy was suppressed by proteasome inhibitors. Thus, regulatory mechanism of cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy by proteasome inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of heart failure. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 270-275] PMID:26592933

  4. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells in Phenotypic Screening: A Transforming Growth Factor-β Type 1 Receptor Kinase Inhibitor Induces Efficient Cardiac Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Drowley, Lauren; Koonce, Chad; Peel, Samantha; Jonebring, Anna; Plowright, Alleyn T; Kattman, Steven J; Andersson, Henrik; Anson, Blake; Swanson, Bradley J; Wang, Qing-Dong; Brolen, Gabriella

    2016-02-01

    Several progenitor cell populations have been reported to exist in hearts that play a role in cardiac turnover and/or repair. Despite the presence of cardiac stem and progenitor cells within the myocardium, functional repair of the heart after injury is inadequate. Identification of the signaling pathways involved in the expansion and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) will broaden insight into the fundamental mechanisms playing a role in cardiac homeostasis and disease and might provide strategies for in vivo regenerative therapies. To understand and exploit cardiac ontogeny for drug discovery efforts, we developed an in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CPC model system using a highly enriched population of KDR(pos)/CKIT(neg)/NKX2.5(pos) CPCs. Using this model system, these CPCs were capable of generating highly enriched cultures of cardiomyocytes under directed differentiation conditions. In order to facilitate the identification of pathways and targets involved in proliferation and differentiation of resident CPCs, we developed phenotypic screening assays. Screening paradigms for therapeutic applications require a robust, scalable, and consistent methodology. In the present study, we have demonstrated the suitability of these cells for medium to high-throughput screens to assess both proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Using this CPC model system and a small directed compound set, we identified activin-like kinase 5 (transforming growth factor-β type 1 receptor kinase) inhibitors as novel and potent inducers of human CPC differentiation to cardiomyocytes. Significance: Cardiac disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, with no treatment available that can result in functional repair. This study demonstrates how differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells can be used to identify and isolate cell populations of interest that can translate to the adult human heart. Two separate examples of phenotypic

  5. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5

    PubMed Central

    Belian, Elisa; Noseda, Michela; Abreu Paiva, Marta S.; Leja, Thomas; Sampson, Robert; Schneider, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs) express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd)—a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5—is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT), and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains). MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized. In summary: (1) GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2) Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3) Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate. PMID

  6. Recent Insights in the Paracrine Modulation of Cardiomyocyte Contractility by Cardiac Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac endothelium is formed by a continuous monolayer of cells that line the cavity of the heart (endocardial endothelial cells (EECs)) and the luminal surface of the myocardial blood vessels (intramyocardial capillary endothelial cells (IMCEs)). EECs and IMCEs can exercise substantial control over the contractility of cardiomyocytes by releasing various factors such as nitric oxide (NO) via a constitutive endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1, prostaglandins, angiotensin II, peptide growth factors, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of the present paper is actually to shortly review recent new information concerning cardiomyocytes as effectors of endothelium paracrine signaling, focusing particularly on contractile function. The modes of action and the regulatory paracrine role of the main mediators delivered by cardiac endothelial cells upon cardiac contractility identified in cardiomyocytes are complex and not fully described. Thus, careful evaluation of new therapeutic approaches is required targeting important physiological signaling pathways, some of which have been until recently considered as deleterious, like reactive oxygen species. Future works in the field of cardiac endothelial cells and cardiac function will help to better understand the implication of these mediators in cardiac physiopathology. PMID:24745027

  7. Engineered heart tissue enables study of residual undifferentiated embryonic stem cell activity in a cardiac environment.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Jana; Song, Hannah; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Massé, Stéphane; Wood, Geoffrey A; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Zandstra, Peter W; Radisic, Milica

    2011-03-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) derivatives are a promising cell source for cardiac cell therapy. Mechanistic studies upon cell injection in conventional animal models are limited by inefficient delivery and poor cell survival. As an alternative, we have used an engineered heart tissue (EHT) based on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (CMs) cultivated with electrical field stimulation as an in vitro model to study cell injection. We injected (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 million) and tracked (by qPCR and histology) undifferentiated yellow-fluorescent protein transgenic mouse ESCs and Flk1 + /PDGFRα+ cardiac progenitor (CPs) cells, to investigate the effect of the cardiac environment on cell differentiation, as well as to test whether our in vitro model system could recapitulate the formation of teratoma-like structures commonly observed upon in vivo ESC injection. By 8 days post-injection, ESCs were spatially segregated from the cardiac cell population; however, ESC injection increased survival of CMs. The presence of ESCs blocked electrical conduction through the tissue, resulting in a 46% increase in the excitation threshold. Expression of mouse cardiac troponin I, was markedly increased in CP injected constructs compared to ESC injected constructs at all time points and cell doses tested. As early as 2 weeks, epithelial and ganglion-like structures were observed in ESC injected constructs. By 4 weeks of ESC injection, teratoma-like structures containing neural, epithelial, and connective tissue were observed in the constructs. Non-cardiac structures were observed in the CP injected constructs only after extended culture (4 weeks) and only at high cell doses, suggesting that these cells require further enrichment or differentiation prior to transplantation. Our data indicate that the cardiac environment of host tissue and electrical field stimulation did not preferentially guide the differentiation of ESCs towards the cardiac lineage. In the same environment, injection of CP

  8. Inscribing Optical Excitability to Non-Excitable Cardiac Cells: Viral Delivery of Optogenetic Tools in Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    We describe in detail a method to introduce optogenetic actuation tools, a mutant version of channelrhodopsin-2, ChR2(H134R), and archaerhodopsin (ArchT), into primary cardiac fibroblasts (cFB) in vitro by adenoviral infection to yield quick, robust, and consistent expression. Instructions on adjusting infection parameters such as the multiplicity of infection and virus incubation duration are provided to generalize the method for different lab settings or cell types. Specific conditions are discussed to create hybrid co-cultures of the optogenetically modified cFB and non-transformed cardiomyocytes to obtain light-sensitive excitable cardiac syncytium, including stencil-patterned cell growth. We also describe an all-optical framework for the functional testing of responsiveness of these opsins in cFB. The presented methodology provides cell-specific tools for the mechanistic investigation of the functional bioelectric contribution of different non-excitable cells in the heart and their electrical coupling to cardiomyocytes under different conditions. PMID:26965132

  9. Inscribing Optical Excitability to Non-Excitable Cardiac Cells: Viral Delivery of Optogenetic Tools in Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    We describe in detail a method to introduce optogenetic actuation tools, a mutant version of channelrhodopsin- 2, ChR2(H134R), and archaerhodopsin (ArchT), into primary cardiac fibroblasts (cFB) in vitro by adenoviral infection to yield quick, robust, and consistent expression. Instructions on adjusting infection parameters such as the multiplicity of infection and virus incubation duration are provided to generalize the method for different lab settings or cell types. Specific conditions are discussed to create hybrid co-cultures of the optogenetically modified cFB and non-transformed cardiomyocytes to obtain light- sensitive excitable cardiac syncytium, including stencil-patterned cell growth. We also describe an all-optical framework for the functional testing of responsiveness of these opsins in cFB. The presented methodology provides cell-specific tools for the mechanistic investigation of the functional bioelectric contribution of different non-excitable cells in the heart and their electrical coupling to cardiomyocytes under different conditions. PMID:26965132

  10. Elimination of remaining undifferentiated induced pluripotent stem cells in the process of human cardiac cell sheet fabrication using a methionine-free culture condition.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kodama, Fumiko; Sugiyama, Kasumi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Okano, Teruo

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising method for regenerative medicine. Although we have developed human cardiac cell sheets by integration of cell sheet-based tissue engineering and scalable bioreactor culture, the risk of contamination by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in cardiac cell sheets remains unresolved. In the present study, we established a novel culture method to fabricate human cardiac cell sheets with a decreased risk of iPS cell contamination while maintaining viabilities of iPS cell-derived cells, including cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts, using a methionine-free culture condition. When cultured in the methionine-free condition, human iPS cells did not survive without feeder cells and could not proliferate or form colonies on feeder cells or in coculture with cells for cardiac cell sheet fabrication. When iPS cell-derived cells after the cardiac differentiation were transiently cultured in the methionine-free condition, gene expression of OCT3/4 and NANOG was downregulated significantly compared with that in the standard culture condition. Furthermore, in fabricated cardiac cell sheets, spontaneous and synchronous beating was observed in the whole area while maintaining or upregulating the expression of various cardiac and extracellular matrix genes. These findings suggest that human iPS cells are methionine dependent and a methionine-free culture condition for cardiac cell sheet fabrication might reduce the risk of iPS cell contamination.

  11. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    PubMed

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field.

  12. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review

    PubMed Central

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  13. Cardiac Niche Influences the Direct Reprogramming of Canine Fibroblasts into Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palazzolo, Giacomo; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Toelen, Jaan; Dominici, Roberto; Tettamenti, Guido; Barthelemy, Inès; Blot, Stephane; Gijsbers, Rik; Cassano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by mutation of dystrophin gene and primarily affect skeletal and cardiac muscles. Cardiac involvement in dystrophic GRMD dogs has been demonstrated by electrocardiographic studies with the onset of a progressive cardiomyopathy similar to the cardiac disease in DMD patients. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac and skeletal muscle pathogenesis and for developing new therapeutic protocols. Here we describe a protocol to convert GRMD canine fibroblasts isolated from heart and skin into induced cardiac-like myocytes (ciCLMs). We used a mix of transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, TBX5, and MEF2C), known to be able to differentiate mouse and human somatic cells into ciCLMs. Exogenous gene expression was obtained using four lentiviral vectors carrying transcription factor genes and different resistance genes. Our data demonstrate a direct switch from fibroblast into ciCLMs with no activation of early cardiac genes. ciCLMs were unable to contract spontaneously, suggesting, differently from mouse and human cells, an incomplete differentiation process. However, when transplanted in neonatal hearts of SCID/Beige mice, ciCLMs participate in cardiac myogenesis. PMID:26681949

  14. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T.; De Caterina, Raffaele; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  15. Innovation in basic science: stem cells and their role in the treatment of paediatric cardiac failure--opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Sunjay; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Gossett, Jeffrey G; Steele, Ann; Steele, Peter; Davis, Craig R; Pahl, Elfriede; Vijayan, Kalpana; Asante-Korang, Alfred; Boucek, Robert J; Backer, Carl L; Wold, Loren E

    2009-11-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death worldwide. Current therapies only delay progression of the cardiac disease or replace the diseased heart with cardiac transplantation. Stem cells represent a recently discovered novel approach to the treatment of cardiac failure that may facilitate the replacement of diseased cardiac tissue and subsequently lead to improved cardiac function and cardiac regeneration. A stem cell is defined as a cell with the properties of being clonogenic, self-renewing, and multipotent. In response to intercellular signalling or environmental stimuli, stem cells differentiate into cells derived from any of the three primary germ layers: ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm, a powerful advantage for regenerative therapies. Meanwhile, a cardiac progenitor cell is a multipotent cell that can differentiate into cells of any of the cardiac lineages, including endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Stem cells can be classified into three categories: (1) adult stem cells, (2) embryonic stem cells, and (3) induced pluripotential cells. Adult stem cells have been identified in numerous organs and tissues in adults, including bone-marrow, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and, as was recently discovered, the heart. Embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst stage of the developing embryo. Finally through transcriptional reprogramming, somatic cells, such as fibroblasts, can be converted into induced pluripotential cells that resemble embryonic stem cells. Four classes of stem cells that may lead to cardiac regeneration are: (1) Embryonic stem cells, (2) Bone Marrow derived stem cells, (3) Skeletal myoblasts, and (4) Cardiac stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells. Embryonic stem cells are problematic because of several reasons: (1) the formation of teratomas, (2) potential immunologic cellular rejection, (3) low efficiency of their differentiation into cardiomyocytes, typically 1% in culture, and (4) ethical and political

  16. Cardiac tissue engineering: cell seeding, cultivation parameters, and tissue construct characterization.

    PubMed

    Carrier, R L; Papadaki, M; Rupnick, M; Schoen, F J; Bursac, N; Langer, R; Freed, L E; Vunjak-Novakovic, G

    1999-09-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering has been motivated by the need to create functional tissue equivalents for scientific studies and cardiac tissue repair. We previously demonstrated that contractile cardiac cell-polymer constructs can be cultivated using isolated cells, 3-dimensional scaffolds, and bioreactors. In the present work, we examined the effects of (1) cell source (neonatal rat or embryonic chick), (2) initial cell seeding density, (3) cell seeding vessel, and (4) tissue culture vessel on the structure and composition of engineered cardiac muscle. Constructs seeded under well-mixed conditions with rat heart cells at a high initial density ((6-8) x 10(6) cells/polymer scaffold) maintained structural integrity and contained macroscopic contractile areas (approximately 20 mm(2)). Seeding in rotating vessels (laminar flow) rather than mixed flasks (turbulent flow) resulted in 23% higher seeding efficiency and 20% less cell damage as assessed by medium lactate dehydrogenase levels (p < 0.05). Advantages of culturing constructs under mixed rather than static conditions included the maintenance of metabolic parameters in physiological ranges, 2-4 times higher construct cellularity (p &le 0.0001), more aerobic cell metabolism, and a more physiological, elongated cell shape. Cultivations in rotating bioreactors, in which flow patterns are laminar and dynamic, yielded constructs with a more active, aerobic metabolism as compared to constructs cultured in mixed or static flasks. After 1-2 weeks of cultivation, tissue constructs expressed cardiac specific proteins and ultrastructural features and had approximately 2-6 times lower cellularity (p < 0.05) but similar metabolic activity per unit cell when compared to native cardiac tissue.

  17. Doxorubicin Regulates Autophagy Signals via Accumulation of Cytosolic Ca2+ in Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Sung Hyun; Kim, Hyungtae; Ji, Seung Taek; Jang, Woong Bi; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang Mo

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOXO) is widely used to treat solid tumors. However, its clinical use is limited by side effects including serious cardiotoxicity due to cardiomyocyte damage. Resident cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) act as key regulators of homeostasis in myocardial cells. However, little is known about the function of hCPCs in DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity. In this study, we found that DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is closely related to calcium-related autophagy signaling and was significantly attenuated by blocking mTOR signaling in human hCPCs. DOXO induced hCPC apoptosis with reduction of SMP30 (regucalcin) and autophagosome marker LC3, as well as remarkable induction of the autophagy-related markers, Beclin-1, APG7, and P62/SQSTM1 and induction of calcium-related molecules, CaM (Calmodulin) and CaMKII (Calmodulin kinase II). The results of an LC3 puncta assay further indicated that DOXO reduced autophagosome formation via accumulation of cytosolic Ca2+. Additionally, DOXO significantly induced mTOR expression in hCPCs, and inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin, a specific inhibitor, rescued DOXO-mediated autophagosome depletion in hCPCs with significant reduction of DOXO-mediated cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in hCPCs, and restored SMP30 and mTOR expression. Thus, DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is linked to Ca2+-related autophagy signaling, and inhibition of mTOR signaling may provide a cardio-protective effect against DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity. PMID:27735842

  18. Multicellular automaticity of cardiac cell monolayers: effects of density and spatial distribution of pacemaker cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elber Duverger, James; Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Le, Minh Duc; Comtois, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization of pacemaker (PM) activity of interconnected elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for applications such as PM activity in cardiac tissue to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) are often used as experimental models in studies on cardiac electrophysiology. These monolayers exhibit automaticity (spontaneous activation) of their electrical activity. At low plated density, cells usually show a heterogeneous population consisting of PM and quiescent excitable cells (QECs). It is therefore highly probable that monolayers of NRVMs consist of a heterogeneous network of the two cell types. However, the effects of density and spatial distribution of the PM cells on spontaneous activity of monolayers remain unknown. Thus, a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm was implemented to distribute PM and QECs in a binary-like 2D network. A FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable medium was used to simulate electrical spontaneous and propagating activity. Simulations showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of PM cells. In most simulations, the first initiation sites were found to be located near the substrate boundaries. Comparison with experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte monolayers shows important similarities in the position of initiation site activity. However, limitations in the model that do not reflect the complex beat-to-beat variation found in experiments indicate the need for a more realistic cardiomyocyte representation.

  19. The secretome of myocardial telocytes modulates the activity of cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Albulescu, Radu; Tanase, Cristiana; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Daniela I; Cretoiu, Sanda M; Popescu, Laurentiu M

    2015-08-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are interstitial cells that are present in numerous organs, including the heart interstitial space and cardiac stem cell niche. TCs are completely different from fibroblasts. TCs release extracellular vesicles that may interact with cardiac stem cells (CSCs) via paracrine effects. Data on the secretory profile of TCs and the bidirectional shuttle vesicular signalling mechanism between TCs and CSCs are scarce. We aimed to characterize and understand the in vitro effect of the TC secretome on CSC fate. Therefore, we studied the protein secretory profile using supernatants from mouse cultured cardiac TCs. We also performed a comparative secretome analysis using supernatants from rat cultured cardiac TCs, a pure CSC line and TCs-CSCs in co-culture using (i) high-sensitivity on-chip electrophoresis, (ii) surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and (iii) multiplex analysis by Luminex-xMAP. We identified several highly expressed molecules in the mouse cardiac TC secretory profile: interleukin (IL)-6, VEGF, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-2 and MCP-1, which are also present in the proteome of rat cardiac TCs. In addition, rat cardiac TCs secrete a slightly greater number of cytokines, IL-2, IL-10, IL-13 and some chemokines like, GRO-KC. We found that VEGF, IL-6 and some chemokines (all stimulated by IL-6 signalling) are secreted by cardiac TCs and overexpressed in co-cultures with CSCs. The expression levels of MIP-2 and MIP-1α increased twofold and fourfold, respectively, when TCs were co-cultured with CSCs, while the expression of IL-2 did not significantly differ between TCs and CSCs in mono culture and significantly decreased (twofold) in the co-culture system. These data suggest that the TC secretome plays a modulatory role in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26176909

  20. The secretome of myocardial telocytes modulates the activity of cardiac stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Albulescu, Radu; Tanase, Cristiana; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Daniela I; Cretoiu, Sanda M; Popescu, Laurentiu M

    2015-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are interstitial cells that are present in numerous organs, including the heart interstitial space and cardiac stem cell niche. TCs are completely different from fibroblasts. TCs release extracellular vesicles that may interact with cardiac stem cells (CSCs) via paracrine effects. Data on the secretory profile of TCs and the bidirectional shuttle vesicular signalling mechanism between TCs and CSCs are scarce. We aimed to characterize and understand the in vitro effect of the TC secretome on CSC fate. Therefore, we studied the protein secretory profile using supernatants from mouse cultured cardiac TCs. We also performed a comparative secretome analysis using supernatants from rat cultured cardiac TCs, a pure CSC line and TCs-CSCs in co-culture using (i) high-sensitivity on-chip electrophoresis, (ii) surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and (iii) multiplex analysis by Luminex-xMAP. We identified several highly expressed molecules in the mouse cardiac TC secretory profile: interleukin (IL)-6, VEGF, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-2 and MCP-1, which are also present in the proteome of rat cardiac TCs. In addition, rat cardiac TCs secrete a slightly greater number of cytokines, IL-2, IL-10, IL-13 and some chemokines like, GRO-KC. We found that VEGF, IL-6 and some chemokines (all stimulated by IL-6 signalling) are secreted by cardiac TCs and overexpressed in co-cultures with CSCs. The expression levels of MIP-2 and MIP-1α increased twofold and fourfold, respectively, when TCs were co-cultured with CSCs, while the expression of IL-2 did not significantly differ between TCs and CSCs in mono culture and significantly decreased (twofold) in the co-culture system. These data suggest that the TC secretome plays a modulatory role in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26176909

  1. Gene Therapy Restores Hair Cell Stereocilia Morphology in Inner Ears of Deaf Whirler Mice.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wade W; Isgrig, Kevin; Roy, Soumen; Belyantseva, Inna A; Drummond, Meghan C; May, Lindsey A; Fitzgerald, Tracy S; Friedman, Thomas B; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary deafness is one of the most common disabilities affecting newborns. Many forms of hereditary deafness are caused by morphological defects of the stereocilia bundles on the apical surfaces of inner ear hair cells, which are responsible for sound detection. We explored the effectiveness of gene therapy in restoring the hair cell stereocilia architecture in the whirlin mouse model of human deafness, which is deaf due to dysmorphic, short stereocilia. Wild-type whirlin cDNA was delivered via adeno-associated virus (AAV8) by injection through the round window of the cochleas in neonatal whirler mice. Subsequently, whirlin expression was detected in infected hair cells (IHCs), and normal stereocilia length and bundle architecture were restored. Whirlin gene therapy also increased inner hair cell survival in the treated ears compared to the contralateral nontreated ears. These results indicate that a form of inherited deafness due to structural defects in cochlear hair cells is amenable to restoration through gene therapy.

  2. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  3. Alternative Splicing in the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Cardiac Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Salomonis, Nathan; Nelson, Brandon; Vranizan, Karen; Pico, Alexander R.; Hanspers, Kristina; Kuchinsky, Allan; Ta, Linda; Mercola, Mark; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    The role of alternative splicing in self-renewal, pluripotency and tissue lineage specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is largely unknown. To better define these regulatory cues, we modified the H9 hESC line to allow selection of pluripotent hESCs by neomycin resistance and cardiac progenitors by puromycin resistance. Exon-level microarray expression data from undifferentiated hESCs and cardiac and neural precursors were used to identify splice isoforms with cardiac-restricted or common cardiac/neural differentiation expression patterns. Splice events for these groups corresponded to the pathways of cytoskeletal remodeling, RNA splicing, muscle specification, and cell cycle checkpoint control as well as genes with serine/threonine kinase and helicase activity. Using a new program named AltAnalyze (http://www.AltAnalyze.org), we identified novel changes in protein domain and microRNA binding site architecture that were predicted to affect protein function and expression. These included an enrichment of splice isoforms that oppose cell-cycle arrest in hESCs and that promote calcium signaling and cardiac development in cardiac precursors. By combining genome-wide predictions of alternative splicing with new functional annotations, our data suggest potential mechanisms that may influence lineage commitment and hESC maintenance at the level of specific splice isoforms and microRNA regulation. PMID:19893621

  4. Simple measurement of the apparent viscosity of a cell from only one picture: Application to cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Plaza, G R; Marí, N; Gálvez, B G; Bernal, A; Guinea, G V; Daza, R; Pérez-Rigueiro, J; Solanas, C; Elices, M

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical deformability of cells is a key property that influences their ability to migrate and their contribution to tissue development and regeneration. We analyze here the possibility of characterizing the overall deformability of cells by their apparent viscosity, using a simplified method to estimate that parameter. The proposed method simplifies the quantitative analysis of micropipette-aspiration experiments. We have studied by this procedure the overall apparent viscosity of cardiac stem cells, which are considered a promising tool to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. Comparison with the apparent viscosity of low-viscosity cells such as immune-system cells suggests that treatments to reduce the viscosity of these cells could enhance their ability to repair damaged cardiac tissue.

  5. Isolation, characterization and cardiac differentiation of human thymus tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze Bang; Qian, Bo; Yang, Yu Zhong; Zhou, Kai; Sun, Jian; Mo, Xu Ming; Wu, Kai Hong

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidate donor cells for replacement of cardiomyocyte loss during ischemia and in vitro generation of myocardial tissue. We have successfully isolated MSCs from the discarded neonatal thymus gland during cardiac surgery. The thymus MSCs were characterized by cell-surface antigen expression. These cells have high ability for proliferation and are able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. For cardiac differentiation, the cells were divided into 3 groups: untreated control; 5-azacytidine group and sequential exposure to 5-azacytidine, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Thymus MSCs showed a fibrolast-like morphology and some differentiated cells increased in size, formed a ball-like appearance over time and spontaneously contracting cells were observed in sequential exposure group. Immunostaining studies, cardiac specific genes/protein expression confirmed the cardiomyocyte phenotype of the differentiated cells. These results demonstrate that thymus MSCs can be a promising cellular source for cardiac cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  6. The Emerging Prominence of the Cardiac Mast Cell as a Potent Mediator of Adverse Myocardial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Joseph S.; Brower, Gregory L.; Levick, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac mast cells store and release a variety of biologically active mediators, several of which have been implicated in the activation of matrix metalloproteinases in the volume-overloaded heart, while others are involved in the fibrotic process in pressure-overloaded hearts. Increased numbers of mast cells have been reported in explanted human hearts with dilated cardiomyopathy and in animal models of experimentally induced hypertension, myocardial infarction, and chronic cardiac volume overload. Also, there is evolving evidence implicating the cardiac mast cell as having a major role in the adverse remodeling underlying these cardiovascular disorders. Thus, the cardiac mast cell is the focus of this chapter that begins with a historical background, followed by sections on methods for their isolation and characterization, endogenous secretagogues, phenotype, and ability of estrogen to alter their phenotype so as to provide cardioprotection. Finally the role of mast cells in myocardial remodeling secondary to a sustained cardiac volume overload, hypertension, and ischemic injury and future research directions are discussed. PMID:25388248

  7. Human Cardiac Tissue Engineering: From Pluripotent Stem Cells to Heart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Christopher P.; Shadrin, Ilya Y.; Carlson, Aaron L.; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues hold great promise for use in drug and toxicology screening, in vitro studies of human physiology and disease, and as transplantable tissue grafts for myocardial repair. In this review, we discuss recent progress in cell-based therapy and functional tissue engineering using pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and we describe methods for delivery of cells into the injured heart. While significant hurdles remain, notable advances have been made in the methods to derive large numbers of pure human cardiomyocytes, mature their phenotype, and produce and implant functional cardiac tissues, bringing the field a step closer to widespread in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:25599018

  8. Nicotinate-Curcumin Impedes Foam Cell Formation from THP-1 Cells through Restoring Autophagy Flux.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hong-Feng; Li, Hai-Zhe; Tang, Ya-Ling; Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that a novel curcumin derivate nicotinate-curcumin (NC) has beneficial effects on the prevention of atherosclerosis, but the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Given that autophagy regulates lipid metabolism, the present study was designed to investigate whether NC decreases foam cell formation through restoring autophagy flux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 cells. Our results showed that ox-LDL (100 μg/ml) was accumulated in THP-1 cells and impaired autophagy flux. Ox-LDL-induced impairment of autophagy was enhanced by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) and rescued by the autophagy inducer rapamycin. The aggregation of ox-LDL was increased by CQ, but decreased by rapamycin. In addition, colocalization of lipid droplets with LC3-II was remarkably reduced in ox-LDL group. In contrast, NC (10 μM) rescued the impaired autophagy flux by significantly increasing level of LC3-II, the number of autophagolysosomes, and the degradation of p62 in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 cells. Inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling was required for NC-rescued autophagy flux. Notably, our results showed that NC remarkably promoted the colocalization of lipid droplets with autophagolysosomes, increased efflux of cholesterol, and reduced ox-LDL accumulation in THP-1 cells. However, treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or CQ reduced the protective effects of NC on lipid accumulation. Collectively, the findings suggest that NC decreases lipid accumulation in THP-1 cells through restoring autophagy flux, and further implicate that NC may be a potential therapeutic reagent to reverse atherosclerosis.

  9. Cell–cell junction remodeling in the heart: Possible role in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias?

    PubMed Central

    Mezzano, Valeria; Sheikh, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Anchoring Cell–cell junctions (desmosomes, fascia adherens) play crucial roles in maintaining mechanical integrity of cardiac muscle cells and tissue. Genetic mutations and/or loss of critical components in these macromolecular structures are increasingly being associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies; however, their specific roles have been primarily attributed to effects within the working (ventricular) cardiac muscle. Growing evidence also points to a key role for anchoring Cell–cell junction components in cardiac muscle cells of the cardiac conduction system. This is not only evidenced by the molecular and ultra-structural presence of anchoring cell junctions in specific compartments/structures of the cardiac conduction system (sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node, His-Purkinje system), but also because conduction system-related arrhythmias can be found in humans and mouse models of cardiomyopathies harboring defects and/or mutations in key anchoring Cell–cell junction proteins. These studies emphasize the clinical need to understand the molecular and cellular role(s) for anchoring Cell–cell junctions in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias. This review will focus on (i) experimental findings that underline an important role for anchoring Cell–cell junctions in the cardiac conduction system, (ii) insights regarding involvement of these structures in age-related cardiac remodeling of the conduction system, (iii) summarizing available genetic mouse models that can target cardiac conduction system structures and (iv) implications of these findings on future therapies for arrhythmogenic heart diseases. PMID:22227473

  10. Cardiac differentiation potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells in a 3D self-assembling peptide scaffold.

    PubMed

    Puig-Sanvicens, Veronica A C; Semino, Carlos E; Zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, various strategies for cardiac reparative medicine involving stem cells from multiple sources have been investigated. However, the intra-cardiac implantation of cells with contractile ability may seriously disrupt the cardiac syncytium and de-synchronize cardiac rhythm. For this reason, bioactive cardiac implants, consisting of stem cells embedded in biomaterials that act like band aids, have been exploited to repair the cardiac wall after myocardial infarction. For such bioactive implants to function properly after transplantation, the choice of biomaterial is equally important as the selection of the stem cell source. While adult stem cells have shown promising results, they have various disadvantages including low proliferative potential in vitro, which make their successful usage in human transplants difficult. As a first step towards the development of a bioactive cardiac patch, we investigate here the cardiac differentiation properties of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) when cultured with and without ascorbic acid (AA) and when embedded in RAD16-I, a biomaterial commonly used to develop cardiac implants. In adherent cultures and in the absence of RAD16-I, AA promotes the cardiac differentiation of hiPSCs by enhancing the expression of specific cardiac genes and proteins and by increasing the number of contracting clusters. In turn, embedding in peptide hydrogel based on RAD16-I interferes with the normal cardiac differentiation progression. Embedded hiPSCs up-regulate genes associated with early cardiogenesis by up to 105 times independently of the presence of AA. However, neither connexin 43 nor troponin I proteins, which are related with mature cardiomyocytes, were detected and no contraction was noted in the constructs. Future experiments will need to focus on characterizing the mature cardiac phenotype of these cells when implanted into infarcted myocardia and assess their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:26707885

  11. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  12. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass.

  13. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  14. Maturing human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in human engineered cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Feric, Nicole T; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-15

    Engineering functional human cardiac tissue that mimics the native adult morphological and functional phenotype has been a long held objective. In the last 5 years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has transitioned from cardiac tissues derived from various animal species to the production of the first generation of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs), due to recent advances in human stem cell biology. Despite this progress, the hECTs generated to date remain immature relative to the native adult myocardium. In this review, we focus on the maturation challenge in the context of hECTs, the present state of the art, and future perspectives in terms of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, preclinical safety testing and pathophysiological studies.

  15. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Facenda-Lorenzo, María; Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called "sanctuaries," are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  16. Hypertrophic phenotype in cardiac cell assemblies solely by structural cues and ensuing self-organization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chiung-yin; Bien, Harold; Sobie, Eric A.; Dasari, Vikram; McKinnon, David; Rosati, Barbara; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    In vitro models of cardiac hypertrophy focus exclusively on applying “external” dynamic signals (electrical, mechanical, and chemical) to achieve a hypertrophic state. In contrast, here we set out to demonstrate the role of “self-organized” cellular architecture and activity in reprogramming cardiac cell/tissue function toward a hypertrophic phenotype. We report that in neonatal rat cardiomyocyte culture, subtle out-of-plane microtopographic cues alter cell attachment, increase biomechanical stresses, and induce not only structural remodeling, but also yield essential molecular and electrophysiological signatures of hypertrophy. Increased cell size and cell binucleation, molecular up-regulation of released atrial natriuretic peptide, altered expression of classic hypertrophy markers, ion channel remodeling, and corresponding changes in electrophysiological function indicate a state of hypertrophy on par with other in vitro and in vivo models. Clinically used antihypertrophic pharmacological treatments partially reversed hypertrophic behavior in this in vitro model. Partial least-squares regression analysis, combining gene expression and functional data, yielded clear separation of phenotypes (control: cells grown on flat surfaces; hypertrophic: cells grown on quasi-3-dimensional surfaces and treated). In summary, structural surface features can guide cardiac cell attachment, and the subsequent syncytial behavior can facilitate trophic signals, unexpectedly on par with externally applied mechanical, electrical, and chemical stimulation.—Chung, C., Bien, H., Sobie, E. A., Dasari, V., McKinnon, D., Rosati, B., Entcheva, E. Hypertrophic phenotype in cardiac cell assemblies solely by structural cues and ensuing self-organization. PMID:21084696

  17. Electrical recordings from rat cardiac muscle cells using field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprössler, Christoph; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Steve; Knoll, Wolfgang; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    1999-08-01

    Extracellular electrophysiological recordings were made from cardiac cells cultured for up to seven days over microfabricated arrays of field-effect transistors. The recorded signals can be separated mainly into two types of cell transistor couplings: one that can be explained entirely by purely passive circuitry elements, and a second where voltage-gated ion channels contribute greatly to the measured extracellular signal.

  18. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bogabathina, Hari; Olson, Peter; Rathi, Vikas K.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient's cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos. PMID:24826266

  19. Cardiac Regenerative Medicine: The Potential of a New Generation of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cambria, Elena; Steiger, Julia; Günter, Julia; Bopp, Annina; Wolint, Petra; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Emmert, Maximilian Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy holds great potential to prompt myocardial regeneration in patients with ischemic heart disease. The selection of the most suitable cell type is pivotal for its successful application. Various cell types, including crude bone marrow mononuclear cells, skeletal myoblast, and hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors, have already advanced into the clinical arena based on promising results from different experimental and preclinical studies. However, most of these so-called first-generation cell types have failed to fully emulate the promising preclinical data in clinical trials, resulting in heterogeneous outcomes and a critical lack of translation. Therefore, different next-generation cell types are currently under investigation for the treatment of the diseased myocardium. This review article provides an overview of current stem cell therapy concepts, including the application of cardiac stem (CSCs) and progenitor cells (CPCs) and lineage commitment via guided cardiopoiesis from multipotent cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or pluripotent cells such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, it introduces new strategies combining complementary cell types, such as MSCs and CSCs/CPCs, which can yield synergistic effects to boost cardiac regeneration. PMID:27721703

  20. Cardiac primitive cells become committed to a cardiac fate in adult human heart with chronic ischemic disease but fail to acquire mature phenotype: genetic and phenotypic study.

    PubMed

    Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Romano, Veronica; Miraglia, Rita; Sacco, Anna Maria; Latino, Francesca; Bancone, Ciro; Della Corte, Alessandro; Maiello, Ciro; Amarelli, Cristiano; Montagnani, Stefania; Castaldo, Clotilde

    2013-01-01

    Adult human heart hosts a population of cardiac primitive CD117-positive cells (CPCs), which are responsible for physiological tissue homeostasis and regeneration. While the bona fide stem cells express telomerase, their progenies are no longer able to preserve telomeric DNA; hence the balance between their proliferation and differentiation has to be tightly controlled in order to prevent cellular senescence and apoptosis of CPCs before their maturation can be accomplished. We have examined at cellular and molecular level the proliferation, apoptosis and commitment of CPCs isolated from normal (CPC-N) and age-matched pathological adult human hearts (CPC-P) with ischemic heart disease. In the CPC-P, genes related to early stages of developmental processes, nervous system development and neurogenesis, skeletal development, bone and cartilage development were downregulated, while those involved in mesenchymal cell differentiation and heart development were upregulated, together with the transcriptional activation of TGFβ/BMP signaling pathway. In the pathological heart, asymmetric division was the prevalent type of cardiac stem cell division. The population of CPC-P consisted mainly of progenitors of cardiac cell lineages and less precursors; these cells proliferated more, but were also more susceptible to apoptosis with respect to CPC-N. These results indicate that CPCs fail to reach terminal differentiation and functional competence in pathological conditions. Adverse effects of underlying pathology, which disrupts cardiac tissue structure and composition, and cellular senescence, resulting from cardiac stem cell activation in telomere dysfunctional environment, can be responsible for such outcome.

  1. Clinical practice guide for the choice of perioperative volume-restoring fluid in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Basora, M; Colomina, M J; Moral, V; Asuero de Lis, M S; Boix, E; Jover, J L; Llau, J V; Rodrigo, M P; Ripollés, J; Calvo Vecino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The present Clinical practice guide responds to the clinical questions about security in the choice of fluid (crystalloid, colloid or hydroxyethyl starch 130) in patients who require volume replacement during perioperative period of non-cardiac surgeries. From the evidence summary, recommendations were made following the GRADE methodology. In this population fluid therapy based on crystalloids is suggested (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). In the events where volume replacement is not reached with crystalloids, the use of synthetic colloids (hydroxyethyl starch 130 or modified fluid gelatin) is suggested instead of 5% albumin (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). The choice and dosage of the colloid should be based in the product characteristics, patient comorbidity and anesthesiologist's experience.

  2. Clinical practice guide for the choice of perioperative volume-restoring fluid in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Basora, M; Colomina, M J; Moral, V; Asuero de Lis, M S; Boix, E; Jover, J L; Llau, J V; Rodrigo, M P; Ripollés, J; Calvo Vecino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The present Clinical practice guide responds to the clinical questions about security in the choice of fluid (crystalloid, colloid or hydroxyethyl starch 130) in patients who require volume replacement during perioperative period of non-cardiac surgeries. From the evidence summary, recommendations were made following the GRADE methodology. In this population fluid therapy based on crystalloids is suggested (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). In the events where volume replacement is not reached with crystalloids, the use of synthetic colloids (hydroxyethyl starch 130 or modified fluid gelatin) is suggested instead of 5% albumin (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). The choice and dosage of the colloid should be based in the product characteristics, patient comorbidity and anesthesiologist's experience. PMID:26343809

  3. Digital Imaging Fluorescence Microscopy Reveals Intracellular Calcium Ions In Living Cardiac And Smooth Muscle Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil Wier, W.; Goldman, William F.

    1988-06-01

    We have used digital video microscopy to study the relationship of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) to the function of living cardiac and vascular smooth muscle cells. The technical goal of our work is to obtain, with high spatial and temporal resolution, "maps" of [Ca2+]i inside single living cells. To relate [Ca2+]i to cell function, such "maps" can be used in conjunction with measurements of cell electrical activity, contractile activity or biochemical assays.

  4. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1–3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling. PMID:27667975

  5. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1–3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  6. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling. PMID:27667975

  7. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  8. Exploring the Role of Calcium in Cardiac Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Carolyn; Idriss, Salim; Rouze, Ned; Hall, David; Gauthier, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Bifurcations in the electrical response of cardiac tissue can destabilize spatio-temporal waves of electrochemical activity in the heart, leading to tachycardia or even fibrillation. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that cause instabilities in cardiac tissue.Traditionally, researchers have focused on understanding how the transmembrane voltage is altered in response to an increase in pacing rate, i.e. a shorter time interval between propagating electrochemical waves. However, the dynamics of the transmembrane voltage are coupled to the activity of several ions that traverse the membrane. Therefore, to fully understand the mechanisms that drive these bifurcations, we must include an investigation of the ionic behavior. We will present our recent investigation of the role of intracellular calcium in an experimental testbed of frog ventricle. Calcium and voltage are measured simultaneously, allowing for the previous research regarding voltage to guide our understanding of the calcium dynamics.

  9. Electrophysiological Modeling of Cardiac Ventricular Function: From Cell to Organ

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, R. L.; Scollan, D. F.; Holmes, A.; Yung, C. K.; Zhang, J.; Jafri, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Three topics of importance to modeling the integrative function of the heart are reviewed. The first is modeling of the ventricular myocyte. Emphasis is placed on excitation-contraction coupling and intracellular Ca2+ handling, and the interpretation of experimental data regarding interval-force relationships. Second, data on use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging for measuring the anatomical structure of the cardiac ventricles are presented. A method for the semi-automated reconstruction of the ventricles using a combination of gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS) and DTMR images is described. Third, we describe how these anatomically and biophysically based models of the cardiac ventricles can be implemented on parallel computers. PMID:11701509

  10. Exploring analytical proteomics platforms toward the definition of human cardiac stem cells receptome.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; R-Borlado, Luis; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Bernad, António; Alves, Paula M

    2015-04-01

    Human cardiac stem cells (hCSC) express a portfolio of plasma membrane receptors that are involved in the regulatory auto/paracrine feedback loop mechanism of activation of these cells, and consequently contribute to myocardial regeneration. In order to attain a comprehensive description of hCSC receptome and overcoming the inability demonstrated by other technologies applied in receptor identification, mainly due to the transmembrane nature, high hydrophobic character and relative low concentration of these proteins, we have exploited and improved a proteomics workflow. This approach was based on the enrichment of hCSC plasma membrane fraction and addition of prefractionation steps prior to MS analysis. More than 100 plasma membrane receptors were identified. The data reported herein constitute a valuable source of information to further understand cardiac stem cells activation mechanisms and the subsequent cardiac repair process. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001117 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001117).

  11. TRAIL restores DCA/metformin-mediated cell death in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Jin Kyung; Hong, Jungil; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Woo Chul; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, In-Chul

    2016-09-23

    Previous studies have shown that hypoxia can reverse DCA/metformin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells. Therefore, targeting hypoxia is necessary for therapies targeting cancer metabolism. In the present study, we found that TRAIL can overcome the effect of hypoxia on the cell death induced by treatment of DCA and metformin in breast cancer cells. Unexpectedly, DR5 is upregulated in the cells treated with DCA/metformin, and sustained under hypoxia. Blocking DR5 by siRNA inhibited DCA/metformin/TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that DR5 upregulation plays an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that activation of JNK and c-Jun is responsible for upregulation of DR5 induced by DCA/metformin. These findings support the potential application of combining TRAIL and metabolism-targeting drugs in the treatment of cancers under hypoxia. PMID:27569287

  12. Simple suspension culture system of human iPS cells maintaining their pluripotency for cardiac cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a simple three-dimensional (3D) suspension culture method for the expansion and cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is reported. The culture methods were easily adapted from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D culture without any additional manipulations. When hiPSCs were directly applied to 3D culture from 2D in a single-cell suspension, only a few aggregated cells were observed. However, after 3 days, culture of the small hiPSC aggregates in a spinner flask at the optimal agitation rate created aggregates which were capable of cell passages from the single-cell suspension. Cell numbers increased to approximately 10-fold after 12 days of culture. The undifferentiated state of expanded hiPSCs was confirmed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR, and the hiPSCs differentiated into three germ layers. When the hiPSCs were subsequently cultured in a flask using cardiac differentiation medium, expression of cardiac cell-specific genes and beating cardiomyocytes were observed. Furthermore, the culture of hiPSCs on Matrigel-coated dishes with serum-free medium containing activin A, BMP4 and FGF-2 enabled it to generate robust spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes and these cells expressed several cardiac cell-related genes, including HCN4, MLC-2a and MLC-2v. This suggests that the expanded hiPSCs might maintain the potential to differentiate into several types of cardiomyocytes, including pacemakers. Moreover, when cardiac cell sheets were fabricated using differentiated cardiomyocytes, they beat spontaneously and synchronously, indicating electrically communicative tissue. This simple culture system might enable the generation of sufficient amounts of beating cardiomyocytes for use in cardiac regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  13. Pharmacologic and genetic strategies to enhance cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M; Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez; Hare, Joshua M

    2011-10-01

    Cell-based therapy is emerging as an exciting potential therapeutic approach for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction (MI). As heart failure (HF) prevalence increases over time, development of new interventions designed to aid cardiac recovery from injury are crucial and should be considered more broadly. In this regard, substantial efforts to enhance the efficacy and safety of cell therapy are continuously growing along several fronts, including modifications to improve the reprogramming efficiency of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS), genetic engineering of adult stem cells, and administration of growth factors or small molecules to activate regenerative pathways in the injured heart. These interventions are emerging as potential therapeutic alternatives and/or adjuncts based on their potential to promote stem cell homing, proliferation, differentiation, and/or survival. Given the promise of therapeutic interventions to enhance the regenerative capacity of multipotent stem cells as well as specifically guide endogenous or exogenous stem cells into a cardiac lineage, their application in cardiac regenerative medicine should be the focus of future clinical research. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure."

  14. Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2000-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  15. Challenges in identifying the best source of stem cells for cardiac regeneration therapy.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Parul; Katare, Rajesh

    2015-03-13

    The overall clinical cardiac regeneration experience suggests that stem cell therapy can be safely performed, but it also underlines the need for reproducible results for their effective use in a real-world scenario. One of the significant challenges is the identification and selection of the best suited stem cell type for regeneration therapy. Bone marrow mononuclear cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, resident or endogenous cardiac stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are some of the stem cell types which have been extensively tested for their ability to regenerate the lost myocardium. While most of these cell types are being evaluated in clinical trials for their safety and efficacy, results show significant heterogeneity in terms of efficacy. The enthusiasm surrounding regenerative medicine in the heart has been dampened by the reports of poor survival, proliferation, engraftment, and differentiation of the transplanted cells. Therefore, the primary challenge is to create clearcut evidence on what actually drives the improvement of cardiac function after the administration of stem cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different types of stem cells currently being considered for cardiac regeneration and discuss why associated factors such as practicality and difficulty in cell collection should also be considered when selecting the stem cells for transplantation. Next, we discuss how the experimental variables (type of disease, marker-based selection and use of different isolation techniques) can influence the study outcome. Finally, we provide an outline of the molecular and genetic approaches to increase the functional ability of stem cells before and after transplantation.

  16. The impact of juvenile coxsackievirus infection on cardiac progenitor cells and postnatal heart development.

    PubMed

    Sin, Jon; Puccini, Jenna M; Huang, Chengqun; Konstandin, Mathias H; Gilbert, Paul E; Sussman, Mark A; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Feuer, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) is an enterovirus that most commonly causes a self-limited febrile illness in infants, but cases of severe infection can manifest in acute myocarditis. Chronic consequences of mild CVB infection are unknown, though there is an epidemiologic association between early subclinical infections and late heart failure, raising the possibility of subtle damage leading to late-onset dysfunction, or chronic ongoing injury due to inflammatory reactions during latent infection. Here we describe a mouse model of juvenile infection with a subclinical dose of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) which showed no evident symptoms, either immediately following infection or in adult mice. However following physiological or pharmacologically-induced cardiac stress, juvenile-infected adult mice underwent cardiac hypertrophy and dilation indicative of progression to heart failure. Evaluation of the vasculature in the hearts of adult mice subjected to cardiac stress showed a compensatory increase in CD31+ blood vessel formation, although this effect was suppressed in juvenile-infected mice. Moreover, CVB3 efficiently infected juvenile c-kit+ cells, and cardiac progenitor cell numbers were reduced in the hearts of juvenile-infected adult mice. These results suggest that the exhausted cardiac progenitor cell pool following juvenile CVB3 infection may impair the heart's ability to increase capillary density to adapt to increased load.

  17. Isolation and expansion of functionally-competent cardiac progenitor cells directly from heart biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Darryl R; Kizana, Eddy; Terrovitis, John; Barth, Andreas S.; Zhang, Yiqiang; Smith, Rachel Ruckdeschel; Miake, Junichiro; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The adult heart contains reservoirs of progenitor cells that express embryonic and stem cell-related antigens. While these antigenically-purified cells are promising candidates for autologous cell therapy, clinical application is hampered by their limited abundance and tedious isolation methods. Methods that involve an intermediate cardiosphere-forming step have proven successful and are being tested clinically, but it is unclear whether the cardiosphere step is necessary. Accordingly, we investigated the molecular profile and functional benefit of cells that spontaneously emigrate from cardiac tissue in primary culture. Adult Wistar-Kyoto rat hearts were minced, digested and cultured as separate anatomical regions. Loosely-adherent cells that surround the plated tissue were harvested weekly for a total of five harvests. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that a small proportion of the direct outgrowth from cardiac samples originates from myocardial cells. This outgrowth contains sub-populations of cells expressing embryonic (SSEA-1) and stem cell-related antigens (c-Kit, abcg2) that varied with time in culture but not with the cardiac chamber of origin. This direct outgrowth, and its expanded progeny, underwent marked in vitro angiogenic/cardiogenic differentiation and cytokine secretion (IGF-1, VGEF). In vivo effects included long-term functional benefits as gauged by MRI following cell injection in a rat model of myocardial infarction. Outgrowth cells afforded equivalent functional benefits to cardiosphere-derived cells, which require more processing steps to manufacture. These results provide the basis for a simplified and efficient process to generate autologous cardiac progenitor cells (and mesenchymal supporting cells) to augment clinically-relevant approaches for myocardial repair. PMID:20211627

  18. Segmenting the papillary muscles and the trabeculae from high resolution cardiac CT through restoration of topological handles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Shaoting; Qian, Zhen; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for segmenting the high resolution CT images of the left ventricle (LV), particularly the papillary muscles and the trabeculae. High quality segmentations of these structures are necessary in order to better understand the anatomical function and geometrical properties of LV. These fine structures, however, are extremely challenging to capture due to their delicate and complex nature in both geometry and topology. Our algorithm computes the potential missing topological structures of a given initial segmentation. Using techniques from computational topology, e.g. persistent homology, our algorithm find topological handles which are likely to be the true signal. To further increase accuracy, these proposals are measured by the saliency and confidence from a trained classifier. Handles with high scores are restored in the final segmentation, leading to high quality segmentation results of the complex structures. PMID:24683968

  19. Identification of drugs that restore primary cilium expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Niamat Ali; Willemarck, Nicolas; Talebi, Ali; Marchand, Arnaud; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Daniels, Veerle W; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak Balaji; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Munck, Sebastian; Chaltin, Patrick; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2016-03-01

    The development of cancer is often accompanied by a loss of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based cellular protrusion that functions as a cellular antenna and that puts a break on cell proliferation. Hence, restoration of the primary cilium in cancer cells may represent a novel promising approach to attenuate tumor growth. Using a high content analysis-based approach we screened a library of clinically evaluated compounds and marketed drugs for their ability to restore primary cilium expression in pancreatic ductal cancer cells. A diverse set of 118 compounds stimulating cilium expression was identified. These included glucocorticoids, fibrates and other nuclear receptor modulators, neurotransmitter regulators, ion channel modulators, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors, antibacterial compounds, protein inhibitors, microtubule modulators, and COX inhibitors. Certain compounds also dramatically affected the length of the cilium. For a selection of compounds (Clofibrate, Gefitinib, Sirolimus, Imexon and Dexamethasone) their ability to restore ciliogenesis was confirmed in a panel of human cancer cell line models representing different cancer types (pancreas, lung, kidney, breast). Most compounds attenuated cell proliferation, at least in part through induction of the primary cilium, as demonstrated by cilium removal using chloral hydrate. These findings reveal that several commonly used drugs restore ciliogenesis in cancer cells, and warrant further investigation of their antineoplastic properties. PMID:26862738

  20. Identification of drugs that restore primary cilium expression in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niamat Ali; Willemarck, Nicolas; Talebi, Ali; Marchand, Arnaud; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Daniels, Veerle W.; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Raj, Deepak Balaji Thimiri Govinda; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Munck, Sebastian; Chaltin, Patrick; Swinnen, Johannes V.

    2016-01-01

    The development of cancer is often accompanied by a loss of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based cellular protrusion that functions as a cellular antenna and that puts a break on cell proliferation. Hence, restoration of the primary cilium in cancer cells may represent a novel promising approach to attenuate tumor growth. Using a high content analysis-based approach we screened a library of clinically evaluated compounds and marketed drugs for their ability to restore primary cilium expression in pancreatic ductal cancer cells. A diverse set of 118 compounds stimulating cilium expression was identified. These included glucocorticoids, fibrates and other nuclear receptor modulators, neurotransmitter regulators, ion channel modulators, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors, antibacterial compounds, protein inhibitors, microtubule modulators, and COX inhibitors. Certain compounds also dramatically affected the length of the cilium. For a selection of compounds (Clofibrate, Gefitinib, Sirolimus, Imexon and Dexamethasone) their ability to restore ciliogenesis was confirmed in a panel of human cancer cell line models representing different cancer types (pancreas, lung, kidney, breast). Most compounds attenuated cell proliferation, at least in part through induction of the primary cilium, as demonstrated by cilium removal using chloral hydrate. These findings reveal that several commonly used drugs restore ciliogenesis in cancer cells, and warrant further investigation of their antineoplastic properties. PMID:26862738

  1. Rat Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Transplantation Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction Post Infarction and Biopolymers Enhance Cell Retention

    PubMed Central

    Danoviz, Maria E.; Nakamuta, Juliana S.; Marques, Fabio L. N.; dos Santos, Leonardo; Alvarenga, Erica C.; dos Santos, Alexandra A.; Antonio, Ednei L.; Schettert, Isolmar T.; Tucci, Paulo J.; Krieger, Jose E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac cell transplantation is compromised by low cell retention and poor graft viability. Here, the effects of co-injecting adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) with biopolymers on cell cardiac retention, ventricular morphometry and performance were evaluated in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI). Methodology/Principal Findings 99mTc-labeled ASCs (1×106 cells) isolated from isogenic Lewis rats were injected 24 hours post-MI using fibrin a, collagen (ASC/C), or culture medium (ASC/M) as vehicle, and cell body distribution was assessed 24 hours later by γ-emission counting of harvested organs. ASC/F and ASC/C groups retained significantly more cells in the myocardium than ASC/M (13.8±2.0 and 26.8±2.4% vs. 4.8±0.7%, respectively). Then, morphometric and direct cardiac functional parameters were evaluated 4 weeks post-MI cell injection. Left ventricle (LV) perimeter and percentage of interstitial collagen in the spare myocardium were significantly attenuated in all ASC-treated groups compared to the non-treated (NT) and control groups (culture medium, fibrin, or collagen alone). Direct hemodynamic assessment under pharmacological stress showed that stroke volume (SV) and left ventricle end-diastolic pressure were preserved in ASC-treated groups regardless of the vehicle used to deliver ASCs. Stroke work (SW), a global index of cardiac function, improved in ASC/M while it normalized when biopolymers were co-injected with ASCs. A positive correlation was observed between cardiac ASCs retention and preservation of SV and improvement in SW post-MI under hemodynamic stress. Conclusions We provided direct evidence that intramyocardial injection of ASCs mitigates the negative cardiac remodeling and preserves ventricular function post-MI in rats and these beneficial effects can be further enhanced by administrating co-injection of ASCs with biopolymers. PMID:20711471

  2. Rigid microenvironments promote cardiac differentiation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshi, Armin; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Haruko; Eaimkhong, Sarayoot; Evseenko, Denis; Reed, Jason; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    While adult heart muscle is the least regenerative of tissues, embryonic cardiomyocytes are proliferative, with embryonic stem (ES) cells providing an endless reservoir. In addition to secreted factors and cell-cell interactions, the extracellular microenvironment has been shown to play an important role in stem cell lineage specification, and understanding how scaffold elasticity influences cardiac differentiation is crucial to cardiac tissue engineering. Though previous studies have analyzed the role of matrix elasticity on the function of differentiated cardiomyocytes, whether it affects the induction of cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells is poorly understood. Here, we examine the role of matrix rigidity on cardiac differentiation using mouse and human ES cells. Culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates of varied monomer-to-crosslinker ratios revealed that rigid extracellular matrices promote a higher yield of de novo cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated ES cells. Using a genetically modified ES system that allows us to purify differentiated cardiomyocytes by drug selection, we demonstrate that rigid environments induce higher cardiac troponin T expression, beating rate of foci, and expression ratio of adult α- to fetal β- myosin heavy chain in a purified cardiac population. M-mode and mechanical interferometry image analyses demonstrate that these ES-derived cardiomyocytes display functional maturity and synchronization of beating when co-cultured with neonatal cardiomyocytes harvested from a developing embryo. Together, these data identify matrix stiffness as an independent factor that instructs not only the maturation of already differentiated cardiomyocytes but also the induction and proliferation of cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated progenitors. Manipulation of the stiffness will help direct the production of functional cardiomyocytes en masse from stem cells for regenerative medicine purposes.

  3. Rigid microenvironments promote cardiac differentiation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arshi, Armin; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Haruko; Eaimkhong, Sarayoot; Evseenko, Denis; Reed, Jason; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    While adult heart muscle is the least regenerative of tissues, embryonic cardiomyocytes are proliferative, with embryonic stem (ES) cells providing an endless reservoir. In addition to secreted factors and cell-cell interactions, the extracellular microenvironment has been shown to play an important role in stem cell lineage specification, and understanding how scaffold elasticity influences cardiac differentiation is crucial to cardiac tissue engineering. Though previous studies have analyzed the role of the matrix elasticity on the function of differentiated cardiomyocytes, whether it affects the induction of cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells is poorly understood. Here, we examined the role of matrix rigidity on the cardiac differentiation using mouse and human ES cells. Culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates of varied monomer-to-crosslinker ratios revealed that rigid extracellular matrices promote a higher yield of de novo cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated ES cells. Using an genetically modified ES system that allows us to purify differentiated cardiomyocytes by drug selection, we demonstrate that rigid environments induce higher cardiac troponin T expression, beating rate of foci, and expression ratio of adult α- to fetal β- myosin heavy chain in a purified cardiac population. M-mode and mechanical interferometry image analyses demonstrate that these ES-derived cardiomyocytes display functional maturity and synchronization of beating when co-cultured with neonatal cardiomyocytes harvested from a developing embryo. Together, these data identify matrix stiffness as an independent factor that instructs not only the maturation of the already differentiated cardiomyocytes but also the induction and proliferation of cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated progenitors. Manipulation of the stiffness will help direct the production of functional cardiomyocytes en masse from stem cells for regenerative medicine purposes. PMID:24311969

  4. 3, 4-dihydroxyl-phenyl lactic acid restores NADH dehydrogenase 1 α subunit 10 to ameliorate cardiac reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yuan; He, Ke; Pan, Chun-Shui; Li, Quan; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Mao, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Li-Jun; Hu, Shui-Wang; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Guo-Cheng; Fan, Jing-Yu; Fan, Tai-Ping; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the role of 3, 4-dihydroxyl-phenyl lactic acid (DLA) during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced myocardial injury with emphasis on the underlying mechanism of DLA antioxidant. Male Spragu-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to left descending artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Treatment with DLA ameliorated myocardial structure and function disorder, blunted the impairment of Complex I activity and mitochondrial function after I/R. The results of 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis revealed that DLA prevented the decrease in NDUFA10 expression, one of the subunits of Complex I. To find the target of DLA, the binding affinity of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) to DLA and DLA derivatives with replaced two phenolic hydroxyls was detected using surface plasmon resonance and bilayer interferometry. The results showed that DLA could activate SIRT1 after I/R probably by binding to this protein, depending on phenolic hydroxyl. Moreover, the importance of SIRT1 to DLA effectiveness was confirmed through siRNA transfection in vitro. These results demonstrated that DLA was able to prevent I/R induced decrease in NDUFA10 expression, improve Complex I activity and mitochondrial function, eventually attenuate cardiac structure and function injury after I/R, which was possibly related to its ability of binding to and activating SIRT1. PMID:26030156

  5. Restoring KLF5 in esophageal squamous cell cancer cells activates the JNK pathway leading to apoptosis and reduced cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tarapore, Rohinton S; Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P

    2013-05-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world and has an extremely dismal prognosis, with a 5-year survival of less than 20%. Current treatment options are limited, and thus identifying new molecular targets and pathways is critical to derive novel therapies. Worldwide, more than 90% of esophageal cancers are esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Previously, we identified that Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5), a key transcriptional regulator normally expressed in esophageal squamous epithelial cells, is lost in human ESCC. To examine the effects of restoring KLF5 in ESCC, we transduced the human ESCC cell lines TE7 and TE15, both of which lack KLF5 expression, with retrovirus to express KLF5 upon doxycycline induction. When KLF5 was induced, ESCC cells demonstrated increased apoptosis and decreased viability, with up-regulation of the proapoptotic factor BAX. Interestingly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, an important upstream mediator of proapoptotic pathways including BAX, was also activated following KLF5 induction. KLF5 activation of JNK signaling was mediated by KLF5 transactivation of two key upstream regulators of the JNK pathway, ASK1 and MKK4, and inhibition of JNK blocked apoptosis and normalized cell survival following KLF5 induction. Thus, restoring KLF5 in ESCC cells promotes apoptosis and decreases cell survival in a JNK-dependent manner, providing a potential therapeutic target for human ESCC.

  6. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration.

  7. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F.; Gomez, Marcus V.; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration. PMID:25724498

  8. Activation of cardiac progenitor cells through paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Chiaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Yamahara, Kenichi; Hagino, Ikuo; Mori, Hidezo; Sawa, Yoshiki; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2008-09-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) transplantation has been proved to be promising strategy to treat the failing heart. The effect of MSC transplantation is thought to be mediated mainly in a paracrine manner. Recent reports have suggested that cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) reside in the heart. In this study, we investigated whether MSC had paracrine effects on CPC in vitro. CPC were isolated from the neonatal rat heart using an explant method. MSC were isolated from the adult rat bone marrow. MSC-derived conditioned medium promoted proliferation of CPC and inhibited apoptosis of CPC induced by hypoxia and serum starvation. Chemotaxis chamber assay demonstrated that MSC-derived conditioned medium enhanced migration of CPC. Furthermore, MSC-derived conditioned medium upregulated expression of cardiomyocyte-related genes in CPC such as {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). In conclusion, MSC-derived conditioned medium had protective effects on CPC and enhanced their migration and differentiation.

  9. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Rodin, Sergey; Bulatovic, Ivana; Ibarra, Cristián; Löfling, Marie; Genead, Rami; Wärdell, Eva; Felldin, Ulrika; Granath, Carl; Alici, Evren; Le Blanc, Katarina; Smith, C.I. Edvard; Salašová, Alena; Westgren, Magnus; Sundström, Erik; Uhlén, Per; Arenas, Ernest; Sylvén, Christer; Tryggvason, Karl; Corbascio, Matthias; Simonson, Oscar E.; Österholm, Cecilia; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Summary The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN)-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27052314

  10. Drug insight: cancer therapy strategies based on restoration of endogenous cell death mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Reed, John C

    2006-07-01

    Cell death is a normal facet of human physiology, ensuring tissue homeostasis by offsetting cell production with cell demise. Neoplasms arise in part because of defects in physiological cell death mechanisms, contributing to pathological cell expansion. Defects in normal cell death pathways also contribute to cancer progression by permitting progressively aberrant cell behaviors, while also desensitizing tumor cells to immune-mediated attack, radiation, and chemotherapy. Through basic research, much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell turnover and how tumors escape cell death. By exploiting this knowledge base, several innovative strategies for eradicating malignancies have materialized that are based on restoration of natural pathways for cell autodestruction. Some of these strategies have advanced into human clinical trials. Several of the current strategies based on targeting core components of the cell death machinery for cancer therapy are reviewed here, and a summary of progress toward clinical applications is provided. PMID:16826219

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes as models for cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Maaike; Mummery, Christine L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Verkerk, Arie O.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In younger patients, the majority of sudden cardiac deaths have an underlying Mendelian genetic cause. Over the last 15 years, enormous progress has been made in identifying the distinct clinical phenotypes and in studying the basic cellular and genetic mechanisms associated with the primary Mendelian (monogenic) arrhythmia syndromes. Investigation of the electrophysiological consequences of an ion channel mutation is ideally done in the native cardiomyocyte (CM) environment. However, the majority of such studies so far have relied on heterologous expression systems in which single ion channel genes are expressed in non-cardiac cells. In some cases, transgenic mouse models have been generated, but these also have significant shortcomings, primarily related to species differences. The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) has generated much interest since it presents an opportunity to generate patient- and disease-specific cell lines from which normal and diseased human CMs can be obtained These genetically diverse human model systems can be studied in vitro and used to decipher mechanisms of disease and identify strategies and reagents for new therapies. Here, we review the present state of the art with respect to cardiac disease models already generated using IPSC technology and which have been (partially) characterized. Human iPSC (hiPSC) models have been described for the cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including LQT1, LQT2, LQT3-Brugada Syndrome, LQT8/Timothy syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In most cases, the hiPSC-derived cardiomyoctes recapitulate the disease phenotype and have already provided opportunities for novel insight into cardiac pathophysiology. It is expected that the lines will be useful in the development of pharmacological agents for the management of these disorders. PMID

  12. Isolation and characterization of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Maass, Karen; Shekhar, Akshay; Lu, Jia; Kang, Guoxin; See, Fiona; Kim, Eugene E; Delgado, Camila; Shen, Steven; Cohen, Lisa; Fishman, Glenn I

    2015-04-01

    The cardiac Purkinje fiber network is composed of highly specialized cardiomyocytes responsible for the synchronous excitation and contraction of the ventricles. Computational modeling, experimental animal studies, and intracardiac electrical recordings from patients with heritable and acquired forms of heart disease suggest that Purkinje cells (PCs) may also serve as critical triggers of life-threatening arrhythmias. Nonetheless, owing to the difficulty in isolating and studying this rare population of cells, the precise role of PC in arrhythmogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for their proarrhythmic behavior are not fully characterized. Conceptually, a stem cell-based model system might facilitate studies of PC-dependent arrhythmia mechanisms and serve as a platform to test novel therapeutics. Here, we describe the generation of murine embryonic stem cells (ESC) harboring pan-cardiomyocyte and PC-specific reporter genes. We demonstrate that the dual reporter gene strategy may be used to identify and isolate the rare ESC-derived PC (ESC-PC) from a mixed population of cardiogenic cells. ESC-PC display transcriptional signatures and functional properties, including action potentials, intracellular calcium cycling, and chronotropic behavior comparable to endogenous PC. Our results suggest that stem-cell derived PC are a feasible new platform for studies of developmental biology, disease pathogenesis, and screening for novel antiarrhythmic therapies.

  13. Cardiac glycoside-induced cell death and Rho/Rho kinase pathway: Implication of different regulation in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Aysun; Şimay, Yaprak Dilber; İbişoğlu, Burçin; Yaren, Biljana; Bülbül, Döne; Ark, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the Rho/ROCK pathway is involved in ouabain-induced apoptosis in HUVEC. In the current work, we investigated whether the Rho/ROCK pathway is functional during cardiac glycosides-induced cytotoxic effects in cancer cell lines, as well as in non-tumor cells. For that purpose, we evaluated the role of ROCK activation in bleb formation and cell migration over upstream and downstream effectors in addition to ROCK cleavage after cardiac glycosides treatment. All three cardiac glycosides (ouabain, digoxin and bufalin) induced cell death in HeLa and HepG2 cells and increased the formation of blebbing in HeLa cells. In contrast to our previous study, ROCK inhibitor Y27632 did not prevent bleb formation. Observation of ROCK II cleavage after ouabain, digoxin and oxaliplatin treatments in HeLa and/or HepG2 cells suggested that cleavage is independent of cell type and cell death induction. While inhibiting cleavage of ROCK II by the caspase inhibitors z-VAD-fmk, z-VDVAD-fmk and z-DEVD-fmk, evaluation of caspase 2 siRNA ineffectiveness on this truncation indicated that caspase-dependent ROCK II cleavage is differentially regulated in cancer cell lines. In HeLa cells, ouabain induced the activation of ROCK, although it did not induce phosphorylation of ERM, an upstream effector. While Y27632 inhibited the migration of HeLa cells, 10nM ouabain had no effect on cell migration. In conclusion, these findings indicate that the Rho/ROCK pathway is regulated differently in cancer cell lines compared to normal cells during cardiac glycosides-induced cell death. PMID:27017918

  14. O-GlcNAcylation Negatively Regulates Cardiomyogenic Fate in Adult Mouse Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zafir, Ayesha; Bradley, James A.; Long, Bethany W.; Muthusamy, Senthilkumar; Li, Qianhong; Hill, Bradford G.; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    In both preclinical and clinical studies, cell transplantation of several cell types is used to promote repair of damaged organs and tissues. Nevertheless, despite the widespread use of such strategies, there remains little understanding of how the efficacy of cell therapy is regulated. We showed previously that augmentation of a unique, metabolically derived stress signal (i.e., O-GlcNAc) improves survival of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells; however, it is not known whether enhancing O-GlcNAcylation affects lineage commitment or other aspects of cell competency. In this study, we assessed the role of O-GlcNAc in differentiation of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells. Exposure of these cells to routine differentiation protocols in culture increased markers of the cardiomyogenic lineage such as Nkx2.5 and connexin 40, and augmented the abundance of transcripts associated with endothelial and fibroblast cell fates. Differentiation significantly decreased the abundance of O-GlcNAcylated proteins. To determine if O-GlcNAc is involved in stromal cell differentiation, O-GlcNAcylation was increased pharmacologically during the differentiation protocol. Although elevated O-GlcNAc levels did not significantly affect fibroblast and endothelial marker expression, acquisition of cardiomyocyte markers was limited. In addition, increasing O-GlcNAcylation further elevated smooth muscle actin expression. In addition to lineage commitment, we also evaluated proliferation and migration, and found that increasing O-GlcNAcylation did not significantly affect either; however, we found that O-GlcNAc transferase—the protein responsible for adding O-GlcNAc to proteins—is at least partially required for maintaining cellular proliferative and migratory capacities. We conclude that O-GlcNAcylation contributes significantly to cardiac mesenchymal stromal cell lineage and function. O-GlcNAcylation and pathological conditions that may affect O-GlcNAc levels (such as diabetes) should be

  15. pH-Sensitive and Thermosensitive Hydrogels as Stem-Cell Carriers for Cardiac Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenqing; Fan, Zhaobo; Xu, Yanyi; Lo, Wilson; Wang, Xi; Niu, Hong; Li, Xiaofei; Xie, Xiaoyun; Khan, Mahmood; Guan, Jianjun

    2016-05-01

    Stem-cell therapy has the potential to regenerate damaged heart tissue after a heart attack. Injectable hydrogels may be used as stem-cell carriers to improve cell retention in the heart tissue. However, current hydrogels are not ideal to serve as cell carriers because most of them block blood vessels after solidification. In addition, these hydrogels have a relatively slow gelation rate (typically >60 s), which does not allow them to quickly solidify upon injection, so as to efficiently hold cells in the heart tissue. As a result, the hydrogels and cells are squeezed out of the tissue, leading to low cell retention. To address these issues, we have developed hydrogels that can quickly solidify at the pH of an infarcted heart (6-7) at 37 °C but cannot solidify at the pH of blood (7.4) at 37 °C. These hydrogels are also clinically attractive because they can be injected through catheters commonly used for minimally invasive surgeries. The hydrogels were synthesized by free-radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide, propylacrylic acid, hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-oligo(trimethylene carbonate), and methacrylate poly(ethylene oxide) methoxy ester. Hydrogel solutions were injectable through 0.2-mm-diameter catheters at pH 8.0 at 37 °C, and they can quickly form solid gels under pH 6.5 at 37 °C. All of the hydrogels showed pH-dependent degradation and mechanical properties with less mass loss and greater complex shear modulus at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. When cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) were encapsulated in the hydrogels, the cells were able to survive during a 7-day culture period. The surviving cells were differentiated into cardiac cells, as evidenced by the expression of cardiac markers at both the gene and protein levels, such as cardiac troponin T, myosin heavy chain α, calcium channel CACNA1c, cardiac troponin I, and connexin 43. The gel integrity was found to largely affect CDC cardiac differentiation. These results suggest that the developed dual

  16. Cardiac stem cell biology: glimpse of the past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Matsa, Elena; Sallam, Karim; Wu, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac regeneration strategies and de novo generation of cardiomyocytes have long been significant areas of research interest in cardiovascular medicine. In this review, we outline a variety of common cell sources and methods used to regenerate cardiomyocytes and highlight the important role that key Circulation Research articles have played in this flourishing field.

  17. TBX1 Represses Vegfr2 Gene Expression and Enhances the Cardiac Fate of VEGFR2+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lania, Gabriella; Ferrentino, Rosa; Baldini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor TBX1 has critical roles in maintaining proliferation and inhibiting differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells of the second heart field (SHF). Haploinsufficiency of the gene that encodes it is a cause of congenital heart disease. Here, we developed an embryonic stem (ES) cell-based model in which Tbx1 expression can be modulated by tetracycline. Using this model, we found that TBX1 down regulates the expression of VEGFR2, and we confirmed this finding in vivo during embryonic development. In addition, we found a Vegfr2 domain of expression, not previously described, in the posterior SHF and this expression is extended by loss of Tbx1. VEGFR2 has been previously described as a marker of a subpopulation of cardiac progenitors. Clonal analysis of ES-derived VEGFR2+ cells indicated that 12.5% of clones expressed three markers of cardiac lineage (cardiomyocyte, smooth muscle and endothelium). However, a pulse of Tbx1 expression was sufficient to increase the percentage to 20.8%. In addition, the percentage of clones expressing markers of multiple cardiac lineages increased from 41.6% to 79.1% after Tbx1 pulse. These results suggest that TBX1 plays a role in maintaining a progenitor state in VEGFR2+ cells. PMID:26382615

  18. The Therapeutic Promise of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Liver Restoration.

    PubMed

    Christ, Bruno; Brückner, Sandra; Winkler, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation aims to provide a functional substitution of liver tissue lost due to trauma or toxins. Chronic liver diseases are associated with inflammation, deterioration of tissue homeostasis, and deprivation of metabolic capacity. Recent advances in liver biology have focused on the pro-regenerative features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We argue that MSCs represent an attractive therapeutic option to treat liver disease. Indeed, their pleiotropic actions include the modulation of immune reactions, the stimulation of cell proliferation, and the attenuation of cell death responses. These characteristics are highly warranted add-ons to their capacity for hepatocyte differentiation. Undoubtedly, the elucidation of the regenerative mechanisms of MSCs in different liver diseases will promote their versatile and disease-specific therapeutic use.

  19. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy restores B cell tolerance in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Pala, Francesca; Morbach, Henner; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cassani, Barbara; Glauzy, Salome; Romberg, Neil; Candotti, Fabio; Aiuti, Alessandro; Bosticardo, Marita; Villa, Anna; Meffre, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, and high susceptibility to developing tumors and autoimmunity. Recent evidence suggests that B cells may be key players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity in WAS. Here, we assessed whether WAS protein deficiency (WASp deficiency) affects the establishment of B cell tolerance by testing the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells from 4 WAS patients before and after gene therapy (GT). We found that pre-GT WASp-deficient B cells were hyperreactive to B cell receptor stimulation (BCR stimulation). This hyperreactivity correlated with decreased frequency of autoreactive new emigrant/transitional B cells exiting the BM, indicating that the BCR signaling threshold plays a major role in the regulation of central B cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from WAS patients were enriched in self-reactive clones, revealing that peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint dysfunction is associated with impaired suppressive function of WAS regulatory T cells. The introduction of functional WASp by GT corrected the alterations of both central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We conclude that WASp plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of B cell tolerance in humans and that restoration of WASp by GT is able to restore B cell tolerance in WAS patients. PMID:26368308

  20. Adult Human Nasal Mesenchymal-Like Stem Cells Restore Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons After Experimental Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas R.; Lumbreras, Vicente; Rajguru, Suhrud; Goss, Garrett; Hare, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    A loss of sensory hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons from the inner ear causes deafness, affecting millions of people. Currently, there is no effective therapy to repair the inner ear sensory structures in humans. Cochlear implantation can restore input, but only if auditory neurons remain intact. Efforts to develop stem cell-based treatments for deafness have demonstrated progress, most notably utilizing embryonic-derived cells. In an effort to bypass limitations of embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells that may impede the translation to clinical applications, we sought to utilize an alternative cell source. Here, we show that adult human mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) obtained from nasal tissue can repair spiral ganglion loss in experimentally lesioned cochlear cultures from neonatal rats. Stem cells engraft into gentamicin-lesioned organotypic cultures and orchestrate the restoration of the spiral ganglion neuronal population, involving both direct neuronal differentiation and secondary effects on endogenous cells. As a physiologic assay, nasal MSC-derived cells engrafted into lesioned spiral ganglia demonstrate responses to infrared laser stimulus that are consistent with those typical of excitable cells. The addition of a pharmacologic activator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway concurrent with stem cell treatment promoted robust neuronal differentiation. The availability of an effective adult autologous cell source for inner ear tissue repair should contribute to efforts to translate cell-based strategies to the clinic. PMID:24172073

  1. Scaffold-Free Human Cardiac Tissue Patch Created from Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kelly R.; Pabon, Lil; Muskheli, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    Progress in cardiac tissue engineering has been limited by (1) unfavorable cell and host responses to biomaterial scaffolds, (2) lack of suitable human cardiomyocyte sources, and (3) lack of fabrication techniques for scalable production of engineered tissue constructs. Here we report a novel and scalable method to generate scaffold-free human cardiac tissue patches. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated to cardiomyocytes using activin A and BMP4 and placed into suspension on a rotating orbital shaker. Cells aggregated to form macroscopic disc-shaped patches of beating tissue after 2 days. Patch diameter was directly proportional to input cell number (approximately 11 mm with 12 million cells), and patches were 300–600 μm thick. Cardiomyocytes were concentrated around the patch edges and exhibited increased purity and maturation with time, comprising approximately 80% of total cells after 11 days. Noncardiac cell elements, primarily epithelium, were present at day 2 but were diminished markedly at later time points. Cardiomyocyte proliferation occurred throughout the patches at day 2 but declined by day 8. Patches exhibited automaticity and synchronous calcium transients, indicating electromechanical coupling. These novel scaffold-free human myocardial patches address critical challenges related to human cell sourcing and tissue fabrication that previously inhibited progress in cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:19063661

  2. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  3. Engineered 3D bioimplants using elastomeric scaffold, self-assembling peptide hydrogel, and adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Vallés-Lluch, Ana; Castells-Sala, Cristina; Martínez-Ramos, Cristina; Fernández-Muiños, Teresa; Chachques, Juan Carlos; Pradas, Manuel Monleón; Semino, Carlos E; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Contractile restoration of myocardial scars remains a challenge with important clinical implications. Here, a combination of porous elastomeric membrane, peptide hydrogel, and subcutaneous adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (subATDPCs) was designed and evaluated as a bioimplant for cardiac regeneration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. SubATDPCs were doubly transduced with lentiviral vectors to express bioluminescent-fluorescent reporters driven by constitutively active, cardiac tissue-specific promoters. Cells were seeded into an engineered bioimplant consisting of a scaffold (polycaprolactone methacryloyloxyethyl ester) filled with a peptide hydrogel (PuraMatrix™), and transplanted to cover injured myocardium. Bioluminescence and fluorescence quantifications showed de novo and progressive increases in promoter expression in bioactive implant-treated animals. The bioactive implant was well adapted to the heart, and fully functional vessels traversed the myocardium-bioactive implant interface. Treatment translated into a detectable positive effect on cardiac function, as revealed by echocardiography. Thus, this novel implant is a promising construct for supporting myocardial regeneration. PMID:24936221

  4. Calcitriol restores antiestrogen responsiveness in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells: A potential new therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 30% of breast tumors do not express the estrogen receptor (ER) α, which is necessary for endocrine therapy approaches. Studies are ongoing in order to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if calcitriol induces ERα expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells, thus restoring antiestrogen responses. Methods Cultured cells derived from ERα-negative breast tumors and an ERα-negative breast cancer cell line (SUM-229PE) were treated with calcitriol and ERα expression was assessed by real time PCR and western blots. The ERα functionality was evaluated by prolactin gene expression analysis. In addition, the effects of antiestrogens were assessed by growth assay using the XTT method. Gene expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Ether-à-go-go 1 (EAG1) was also evaluated in cells treated with calcitriol alone or in combination with estradiol or ICI-182,780. Statistical analyses were determined by one-way ANOVA. Results Calcitriol was able to induce the expression of a functional ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells. This effect was mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), since it was abrogated by a VDR antagonist. Interestingly, the calcitriol-induced ERα restored the response to antiestrogens by inhibiting cell proliferation. In addition, calcitriol-treated cells in the presence of ICI-182,780 resulted in a significant reduction of two important cell proliferation regulators CCND1 and EAG1. Conclusions Calcitriol induced the expression of ERα and restored the response to antiestrogens in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. The combined treatment with calcitriol and antiestrogens could represent a new therapeutic strategy in ERα-negative breast cancer patients. PMID:24678876

  5. Self-Healing Conductive Injectable Hydrogels with Antibacterial Activity as Cell Delivery Carrier for Cardiac Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruonan; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2016-07-13

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy to regenerate cardiac tissue for myocardial infarction. Injectable hydrogels with conductivity and self-healing ability are highly desirable as cell delivery vehicles for cardiac regeneration. Here, we developed self-healable conductive injectable hydrogels based on chitosan-graft-aniline tetramer (CS-AT) and dibenzaldehyde-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-DA) as cell delivery vehicles for myocardial infarction. Self-healed electroactive hydrogels were obtained after mixing CS-AT and PEG-DA solutions at physiological conditions. Rapid self-healing behavior was investigated by rheometer. Swelling behavior, morphology, mechanical strength, electrochemistry, conductivity, adhesiveness to host tissue and antibacterial property of the injectable hydrogels were fully studied. Conductivity of the hydrogels is ∼10(-3) S·cm(-1), which is quite close to native cardiac tissue. Proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in the hydrogel showed its good biocompatibility. After injection, viability of C2C12 cells in the hydrogels showed no significant difference with that before injection. Two different cell types were successfully encapsulated in the hydrogels by self-healing effect. Cell delivery profile of C2C12 myoblasts and H9c2 cardiac cells showed a tunable release rate, and in vivo cell retention in the conductive hydrogels was also studied. Subcutaneous injection and in vivo degradation of the hydrogels demonstrated their injectability and biodegradability. Together, these self-healing conductive biodegradable injectable hydrogels are excellent candidates as cell delivery vehicle for cardiac repair. PMID:27311127

  6. Cardiac Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Exhibit High Differentiation Potential to Cardiovascular Cells in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Hiroki; Ii, Masaaki; Kohbayashi, Eiko; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Asahi, Michio

    2016-02-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (AdSCs) have recently been shown to differentiate into cardiovascular lineage cells. However, little is known about the fat tissue origin-dependent differences in AdSC function and differentiation potential. AdSC-rich cells were isolated from subcutaneous, visceral, cardiac (CA), and subscapular adipose tissue from mice and their characteristics analyzed. After four different AdSC types were cultured with specific differentiation medium, immunocytochemical analysis was performed for the assessment of differentiation into cardiovascular cells. We then examined the in vitro differentiation capacity and therapeutic potential of AdSCs in ischemic myocardium using a mouse myocardial infarction model. The cell density and proliferation activity of CA-derived AdSCs were significantly increased compared with the other adipose tissue-derived AdSCs. Immunocytochemistry showed that CA-derived AdSCs had the highest appearance rates of markers for endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes among the AdSCs. Systemic transfusion of CA-derived AdSCs exhibited the highest cardiac functional recovery after myocardial infarction and the high frequency of the recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Moreover, long-term follow-up of the recruited CA-derived AdSCs frequently expressed cardiovascular cell markers compared with the other adipose tissue-derived AdSCs. Cardiac adipose tissue could be an ideal source for isolation of therapeutically effective AdSCs for cardiac regeneration in ischemic heart diseases. Significance: The present study found that cardiac adipose-derived stem cells have a high potential to differentiate into cardiovascular lineage cells (i.e., cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells) compared with stem cells derived from other adipose tissue such as subcutaneous, visceral, and subscapular adipose tissue. Notably, only a small number of supracardiac adipose-derived stem cells that were

  7. Concise Review: Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Cells, A Promising Cell Source for Therapy of Heart Failure: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Gouadon, Elodie; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Smit, Nicoline W; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Coronel, Ruben; Harding, Sian E; Jourdon, Philippe; Lambert, Virginie; Rucker-Martin, Catherine; Pucéat, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is still a major cause of hospitalization and mortality in developed countries. Many clinical trials have tested the use of multipotent stem cells as a cardiac regenerative medicine. The benefit for the patients of this therapeutic intervention has remained limited. Herein, we review the pluripotent stem cells as a cell source for cardiac regeneration. We more specifically address the various challenges of this cell therapy approach. We question the cell delivery systems, the immune tolerance of allogenic cells, the potential proarrhythmic effects, various drug mediated interventions to facilitate cell grafting and, finally, we describe the pathological conditions that may benefit from such an innovative approach. As members of a transatlantic consortium of excellence of basic science researchers and clinicians, we propose some guidelines to be applied to cell types and modes of delivery in order to translate pluripotent stem cell cardiac derivatives into safe and effective clinical trials.

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cells restore function in a human cell loss model of open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-03-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option.

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cells restore function in a human cell loss model of open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-03-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option. PMID:25377070

  10. Myocardial infarction: stem cell transplantation for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edmund; Verma, Paul; Hourigan, Kerry; Banerjee, Rinti

    2015-11-01

    It is estimated that by 2030, almost 23.6 million people will perish from cardiovascular disease, according to the WHO. The review discusses advances in stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction, including cell sources, methods of differentiation, expansion selection and their route of delivery. Skeletal muscle cells, hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs)-derived cardiomyocytes have advanced to the clinical stage, while induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs) are yet to be considered clinically. Delivery of cells to the sites of injury and their subsequent retention is a major issue. The development of supportive scaffold matrices to facilitate stem cell retention and differentiation are analyzed. The review outlines clinical translation of conjugate stem cell-based cellular therapeutics post-myocardial infarction.

  11. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell delivery strategies to promote cardiac regeneration following ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Russo, Valerio; Young, Stuart; Hamilton, Andrew; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide and is associated with irreversible cardiomyocyte death and pathological remodeling of cardiac tissue. In the past 15 years, several animal models have been developed for pre-clinical testing to assess the potential of stem cells for functional tissue regeneration and the attenuation of left ventricular remodeling. The promising results obtained in terms of improved cardiac function, neo-angiogenesis and reduction in infarct size have motivated the initiation of clinical trials in humans. Despite the potential, the results of these studies have highlighted that the effective delivery and retention of viable cells within the heart remain significant challenges that have limited the therapeutic efficacy of cell-based therapies for treating the ischemic myocardium. In this review, we discuss key elements for designing clinically translatable cell-delivery approaches to promote myocardial regeneration. Key topics addressed include cell selection, with a focus on mesenchymal stem cells derived from the bone marrow (bMSCs) and adipose tissue (ASCs), including a discussion of their potential mechanisms of action. Natural and synthetic biomaterials that have been investigated as injectable cell delivery vehicles for cardiac applications are critically reviewed, including an analysis of the role of the biomaterials themselves in the therapeutic scheme. PMID:24560461

  13. Restoration of Chloride Efflux by Azithromycin in Airway Epithelial Cells of Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Rebeyrol, Carine; Ruffin, Manon; Roque, Telma; Guillot, Loïc; Jacquot, Jacky; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) has shown promising anti-inflammatory properties in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and clinical studies have presented an improvement in the respiratory condition of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate, in human airway cells, the mechanism by which AZM has beneficial effects in CF. We demonstrated that AZM did not have any anti-inflammatory effect on CF airway cells but restored Cl− efflux. PMID:21220528

  14. Selective induction of cell adhesion molecules by proinflammatory mediators in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Nunn, Adrian D; Thomas, Regi

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory mediators can dramatically alter many responses of cultured endothelial cells in vitro, which are relevant to understanding the role played by the endothelium in inflammation in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of a comprehensive array of pro-inflammatory stimuli to modulate Cell Adhesion Molecule (CAM) expression in cultures of human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC.c). Cell ELISA, immunocy-tochemistry and flow cytometry were used to measure the CAM expressions in HMVEC.c in response to interleukins, TNF-α and LPS. Passage matched HMVEC.c from different donors showed different CAM expression profiles, confirming inherent variability in endothelial cells. Endothelial cells from different parts of the vasculature are exposed to different cytokines and thus different protein expression profiles. A thorough understanding of these innate differences in expression pattern of the microvasculatures of cardiac tissues might allow us the opportunity to target these tissues selectively. PMID:21072266

  15. β-Arrestin-biased AT1R stimulation promotes cell survival during acute cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Seok; Abraham, Dennis; Williams, Barbara; Violin, Jonathan D; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A

    2012-10-15

    Pharmacological blockade of the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a common therapy for treatment of congestive heart failure and hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that selective engagement of β-arrestin-mediated AT1R signaling, referred to as biased signaling, promotes cardioprotective signaling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a β-arrestin-biased AT1R ligand TRV120023 would confer cardioprotection in response to acute cardiac injury compared with the traditional AT1R blocker (ARB), losartan. TRV120023 promotes cardiac contractility, assessed by pressure-volume loop analyses, while blocking the effects of endogenous ANG II. Compared with losartan, TRV120023 significantly activates MAPK and Akt signaling pathways. These hemodynamic and biochemical effects were lost in β-arrestin-2 knockout (KO) mice. In response to cardiac injury induced by ischemia reperfusion injury or mechanical stretch, pretreatment with TRV120023 significantly diminishes cell death compared with losartan, which did not appear to be cardioprotective. This cytoprotective effect was lost in β-arrestin-2 KO mice. The β-arrestin-biased AT1R ligand, TRV120023, has cardioprotective and functional properties in vivo, which are distinct from losartan. Our data suggest that this novel class of drugs may provide an advantage over conventional ARBs by supporting cardiac function and reducing cellular injury during acute cardiac injury.

  16. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  17. Therapy of Chronic Cardiosclerosis in WAG Rats Using Cultures of Cardiovascular Cells Enriched with Cardiac Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Chepeleva, E V; Pavlova, S V; Malakhova, A A; Milevskaya, E A; Rusakova, Ya L; Podkhvatilina, N A; Sergeevichev, D S; Pokushalov, E A; Karaskov, A M; Sukhikh, G T; Zakiyan, S M

    2015-11-01

    We developed a protocol for preparing cardiac cell culture from rat heart enriched with regional stem cells based on clonogenic properties and proliferation in culture in a medium with low serum content. Experiments on WAG rats with experimental ischemic myocardial damage showed that implantation of autologous regional stem cells into the left ventricle reduced the volume of cicatricial tissue, promoted angiogenesis in the damaged zone, and prevented the risk of heart failure development.

  18. Cardiac muscle regeneration: lessons from development

    PubMed Central

    Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Schneider, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The adult human heart is an ideal target for regenerative intervention since it does not functionally restore itself after injury yet has a modest regenerative capacity that could be enhanced by innovative therapies. Adult cardiac cells with regenerative potential share gene expression signatures with early fetal progenitors that give rise to multiple cardiac cell types, suggesting that the evolutionarily conserved regulatory networks that drive embryonic heart development might also control aspects of regeneration. Here we discuss commonalities of development and regeneration, and the application of the rich developmental biology heritage to achieve therapeutic regeneration of the human heart. PMID:21325131

  19. Single-Cell Expression Profiling Reveals a Dynamic State of Cardiac Precursor Cells in the Early Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Ruchaya, Prashant; Cabrera, Claudia; Struebig, Monika; Barnes, Michael; Terry, Anna; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Coppen, Steven; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Ameen, Torath; Mein, Charles; Hamada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    In the early vertebrate embryo, cardiac progenitor/precursor cells (CPs) give rise to cardiac structures. Better understanding their biological character is critical to understand the heart development and to apply CPs for the clinical arena. However, our knowledge remains incomplete. With the use of single-cell expression profiling, we have now revealed rapid and dynamic changes in gene expression profiles of the embryonic CPs during the early phase after their segregation from the cardiac mesoderm. Progressively, the nascent mesodermal gene Mesp1 terminated, and Nkx2-5+/Tbx5+ population rapidly replaced the Tbx5low+ population as the expression of the cardiac genes Tbx5 and Nkx2-5 increased. At the Early Headfold stage, Tbx5-expressing CPs gradually showed a unique molecular signature with signs of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lineage-tracing revealed a developmentally distinct characteristic of this population. They underwent progressive differentiation only towards the cardiomyocyte lineage corresponding to the first heart field rather than being maintained as a progenitor pool. More importantly, Tbx5 likely plays an important role in a transcriptional network to regulate the distinct character of the FHF via a positive feedback loop to activate the robust expression of Tbx5 in CPs. These data expands our knowledge on the behavior of CPs during the early phase of cardiac development, subsequently providing a platform for further study. PMID:26469858

  20. Single-Cell Expression Profiling Reveals a Dynamic State of Cardiac Precursor Cells in the Early Mouse Embryo.

    PubMed

    Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Ruchaya, Prashant; Cabrera, Claudia; Struebig, Monika; Barnes, Michael; Terry, Anna; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Coppen, Steven; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Ameen, Torath; Mein, Charles; Hamada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    In the early vertebrate embryo, cardiac progenitor/precursor cells (CPs) give rise to cardiac structures. Better understanding their biological character is critical to understand the heart development and to apply CPs for the clinical arena. However, our knowledge remains incomplete. With the use of single-cell expression profiling, we have now revealed rapid and dynamic changes in gene expression profiles of the embryonic CPs during the early phase after their segregation from the cardiac mesoderm. Progressively, the nascent mesodermal gene Mesp1 terminated, and Nkx2-5+/Tbx5+ population rapidly replaced the Tbx5low+ population as the expression of the cardiac genes Tbx5 and Nkx2-5 increased. At the Early Headfold stage, Tbx5-expressing CPs gradually showed a unique molecular signature with signs of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lineage-tracing revealed a developmentally distinct characteristic of this population. They underwent progressive differentiation only towards the cardiomyocyte lineage corresponding to the first heart field rather than being maintained as a progenitor pool. More importantly, Tbx5 likely plays an important role in a transcriptional network to regulate the distinct character of the FHF via a positive feedback loop to activate the robust expression of Tbx5 in CPs. These data expands our knowledge on the behavior of CPs during the early phase of cardiac development, subsequently providing a platform for further study.

  1. PD98059 Protects Brain against Cells Death Resulting from ROS/ERK Activation in a Cardiac Arrest Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Thi, Phuong Anh; Chen, Meng-Hua; Li, Nuo; Zhuo, Xiao-Jun; Xie, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and experimental postcardiac arrest treatment has not reached therapeutic success. The present study investigated the effect of PD98059 (PD) in rats subjected to cardiac arrest (CA)/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Experimental rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: sham, CA, and PD. The rats except for sham group were subjected to CA for 5 min followed by CPR operation. Once spontaneous circulation was restored, saline and PD were injected in CA and PD groups, respectively. The survival rates and neurologic deficit scores (NDS) were observed, and the following indices of brain tissue were evaluated: ROS, MDA, SOD, p-ERK1/2/ERK1/2, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, TUNEL positive cells, and double fluorescent staining of p-ERK/TUNEL. Our results indicated that PD treatment significantly reduced apoptotic neurons and improved the survival rates and NDS. Moreover, PD markedly downregulated the ROS, MDA, p-ERK, and caspase-3, Bax and upregulated SOD and Bcl-2 levels. Double staining p-ERK/TUNEL in choroid plexus and cortex showed that cell death is dependent on ERK activation. The findings in present study demonstrated that PD provides neuroprotection via antioxidant activity and antiapoptosis in rats subjected to CA/CPR. PMID:27069530

  2. Epicardial application of cardiac progenitor cells in a 3D-printed gelatin/hyaluronic acid patch preserves cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Roberto; Feyen, Dries A M; Verhage, Vera; Slaats, Rolf; Messina, Elisa; Christman, Karen L; Giacomello, Alessandro; Doevendans, Pieter A F M; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac cell therapy suffers from limitations related to poor engraftment and significant cell death after transplantation. In this regard, ex vivo tissue engineering is a tool that has been demonstrated to increase cell retention and survival. The aim of our study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a 3D-printed patch composed of human cardiac-derived progenitor cells (hCMPCs) in a hyaluronic acid/gelatin (HA/gel) based matrix. hCMPCs were printed in the HA/gel matrix (30 × 10(6) cells/ml) to form a biocomplex made of six perpendicularly printed layers with a surface of 2 × 2 cm and thickness of 400 μm, in which they retained their viability, proliferation and differentiation capability. The printed biocomplex was transplanted in a mouse model of myocardial infarction (MI). The application of the patch led to a significant reduction in adverse remodeling and preservation of cardiac performance as was shown by both MRI and histology. Furthermore, the matrix supported the long-term in vivo survival and engraftment of hCMPCs, which exhibited a temporal increase in cardiac and vascular differentiation markers over the course of the 4 week follow-up period. Overall, we developed an effective and translational approach to enhance hCMPC delivery and action in the heart.

  3. Galectin-1 Prevents Infection and Damage Induced by Trypanosoma cruzi on Cardiac Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benatar, Alejandro F.; García, Gabriela A.; Bua, Jacqeline; Cerliani, Juan P.; Postan, Miriam; Tasso, Laura M.; Scaglione, Jorge; Stupirski, Juan C.; Toscano, Marta A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is the result of a pathologic process starting during the acute phase of parasite infection. Among different factors, the specific recognition of glycan structures by glycan-binding proteins from the parasite or from the mammalian host cells may play a critical role in the evolution of the infection. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we investigated the contribution of galectin–1 (Gal–1), an endogenous glycan-binding protein abundantly expressed in human and mouse heart, to the pathophysiology of T. cruzi infection, particularly in the context of cardiac pathology. We found that exposure of HL–1 cardiac cells to Gal–1 reduced the percentage of infection by two different T. cruzi strains, Tulahuén (TcVI) and Brazil (TcI). In addition, Gal–1 prevented exposure of phosphatidylserine and early events in the apoptotic program by parasite infection on HL–1 cells. These effects were not mediated by direct interaction with the parasite surface, suggesting that Gal–1 may act through binding to host cells. Moreover, we also observed that T. cruzi infection altered the glycophenotype of cardiac cells, reducing binding of exogenous Gal–1 to the cell surface. Consistent with these data, Gal–1 deficient (Lgals1-/-) mice showed increased parasitemia, reduced signs of inflammation in heart and skeletal muscle tissues, and lower survival rates as compared to wild-type (WT) mice in response to intraperitoneal infection with T. cruzi Tulahuén strain. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that Gal–1 modulates T. cruzi infection of cardiac cells, highlighting the relevance of galectins and their ligands as regulators of host-parasite interactions. PMID:26451839

  4. Force velocity relations of single cardiac muscle cells: calcium dependency

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Cellular cardiac preparations in which spontaneous activity was suppressed by EGTA buffering were isolated by microdissection. Uniform and reproducible contractions were induced by iontophoretically released calcium ions. No effects of a diffusional barrier to calcium ions between the micropipette and the contractile system were detected since the sensitivity of the mechanical performance for calcium was the same regardless of whether a constant amount of calcium ions was released from a single micropipette or from two micropipettes positioned at different sites along the longitudinal axis of the preparation. Force development, muscle length, and shortening velocity of eitherisometric or isotopic contractions were measured simultaneously. Initial length, and hence preload of the preparation were established by means of an electronic stop and any additional load was sensed as afterload. Mechanical performance was derived from force velocity relations and from the interrelationship between simultaneously measured force, length, and shortening velocity. From phase plane analysis of shortening velocity vs, instantaneous length during shortening and from load clamp experiments, the interrelationship between force, shortening, and velocity was shown to be independent of time during the major portion of shortening. Moreover, peak force, shortening, and velocity of shortening depended on the amount of calcium ions in the medium at low and high ionic strength. PMID:839198

  5. Thymosin β4-sulfoxide attenuates inflammatory cell infiltration and promotes cardiac wound healing.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark A; Smart, Nicola; Dubé, Karina N; Bollini, Sveva; Clark, James E; Evans, Hayley G; Taams, Leonie S; Richardson, Rebecca; Lévesque, Mathieu; Martin, Paul; Mills, Kevin; Riegler, Johannes; Price, Anthony N; Lythgoe, Mark F; Riley, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The downstream consequences of inflammation in the adult mammalian heart are formation of a non-functional scar, pathological remodelling and heart failure. In zebrafish, hydrogen peroxide released from a wound is the initial instructive chemotactic cue for the infiltration of inflammatory cells, however, the identity of a subsequent resolution signal(s), to attenuate chronic inflammation, remains unknown. Here we reveal that thymosin β4-sulfoxide lies downstream of hydrogen peroxide in the wounded fish and triggers depletion of inflammatory macrophages at the injury site. This function is conserved in the mouse and observed after cardiac injury, where it promotes wound healing and reduced scarring. In human T-cell/CD14+ monocyte co-cultures, thymosin β4-sulfoxide inhibits interferon-γ, and increases monocyte dispersal and cell death, likely by stimulating superoxide production. Thus, thymosin β4-sulfoxide is a putative target for therapeutic modulation of the immune response, resolution of fibrosis and cardiac repair. PMID:23820300

  6. [Interaction of Membrane and Calcium Oscillators in Cardiac Pacemaker Cells: Mathematical Modeling].

    PubMed

    Ryvkin, A M; Zorin, N M; Moskvin, A S; Solovyova, O E; Markhasin, V S

    2015-01-01

    An integrative model of the calcium dynamics in cardiac pacemaker cells is developed taking into account a synergetic effect of the interaction between an outer membrane oscillator and an intracellular calcium oscillator ("membrane and Ca(2+)-clock"). The main feature of the model is a description of the stochastic dynamics of Ca2+ release units within the electron-conformational mechanism of the functioning of ryanodine-sensitive calcium channels. It is shown that interaction of two cellular oscillators provides a stable action potential generation in the cardiac pacemaker cells even in the case of the stochastic Ca2+ dynamics. We studied in detail the effect of ryanodine channels sensitivity to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration in sarcoplasmic reticulum and in the dyadic space on the behavior of calcium-release system. A parametric analysis of the integrative model of pacemaker cells is performed. PMID:26841508

  7. Carbon fiber technique for the investigation of single-cell mechanics in intact cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Seiryo; Nishimura, Satoshi; Yasuda, Soichiro; Hosoya, Yumiko; Katoh, Kaoru

    2006-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for attaching single isolated cardiac myocytes to carbon fibers for mechanical manipulation and measurement. This method relies on cell-adhesive carbon fibers that attach easily to the cell membrane without causing damage, and is thus applicable to intact myocytes. To connect the carbon fiber to micromanipulators, a fiber holder with glass capillaries must first be fabricated. After connection of the fibers to the micromanipulators, firm attachment is easily established by gently pressing the fiber tip onto the cell membrane. Unlike other methods, this technique does not require vast technical expertise, and therefore greatly facilitates experiments. This method enables detection of the effect of drugs, genetic defects or the expression of exogenous proteins on both active and passive properties of cardiac myocytes. In combination with other experimental procedures, this technique can also be applied to the study of mechano-transduction. This protocol can be completed in 3.5 h.

  8. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field. PMID:27081108

  9. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field.

  10. Recent advances in animal and human pluripotent stem cell modeling of cardiac laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Ki; Jiang, Yu; Ran, Xin-Ru; Lau, Yee-Man; Ng, Kwong-Man; Lai, Wing-Hon Kevin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2016-01-01

    Laminopathy is a disease closely related to deficiency of the nuclear matrix protein lamin A/C or failure in prelamin A processing, and leads to accumulation of the misfold protein causing progeria. The resultant disrupted lamin function is highly associated with abnormal nuclear architecture, cell senescence, apoptosis, and unstable genome integrity. To date, the effects of loss in nuclear integrity on the susceptible organ, striated muscle, have been commonly associated with muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiac myopathy (DCM), and conduction defeats, but have not been studied intensively. In this review, we aim to summarize recent breakthroughs in an in vivo laminopathy model and in vitro study using patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that reproduce the pathophysiological phenotype for further drug screening. We describe several in-vivo transgenic mouse models to elucidate the effects of Lmna H222P, N195K mutations, and LMNA knockout on cardiac function, in terms of hemodynamic and electrical signal propagation; certain strategies targeted on stress-related MAPK are mentioned. We will also discuss human iPSC cardiomyocytes serving as a platform to reveal the underlying mechanisms, such as the altered mechanical sensation in electrical coupling of the heart conduction system and ion channel alternation in relation to altered nuclear architecture, and furthermore to enable screening of drugs that can attenuate this cardiac premature aging phenotype by inhibition of prelamin misfolding and oxidative stress, and also enhancement of autophagy protein clearance and cardiac-protective microRNA. PMID:27649756

  11. Recent advances in animal and human pluripotent stem cell modeling of cardiac laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Ki; Jiang, Yu; Ran, Xin-Ru; Lau, Yee-Man; Ng, Kwong-Man; Lai, Wing-Hon Kevin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2016-09-20

    Laminopathy is a disease closely related to deficiency of the nuclear matrix protein lamin A/C or failure in prelamin A processing, and leads to accumulation of the misfold protein causing progeria. The resultant disrupted lamin function is highly associated with abnormal nuclear architecture, cell senescence, apoptosis, and unstable genome integrity. To date, the effects of loss in nuclear integrity on the susceptible organ, striated muscle, have been commonly associated with muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiac myopathy (DCM), and conduction defeats, but have not been studied intensively. In this review, we aim to summarize recent breakthroughs in an in vivo laminopathy model and in vitro study using patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that reproduce the pathophysiological phenotype for further drug screening. We describe several in-vivo transgenic mouse models to elucidate the effects of Lmna H222P, N195K mutations, and LMNA knockout on cardiac function, in terms of hemodynamic and electrical signal propagation; certain strategies targeted on stress-related MAPK are mentioned. We will also discuss human iPSC cardiomyocytes serving as a platform to reveal the underlying mechanisms, such as the altered mechanical sensation in electrical coupling of the heart conduction system and ion channel alternation in relation to altered nuclear architecture, and furthermore to enable screening of drugs that can attenuate this cardiac premature aging phenotype by inhibition of prelamin misfolding and oxidative stress, and also enhancement of autophagy protein clearance and cardiac-protective microRNA.

  12. Twist1 Controls a Cell-Specification Switch Governing Cell Fate Decisions within the Cardiac Neural Crest

    PubMed Central

    Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Beth A.; Lin, Andrea; Spicer, Douglas B.; Howard, Marthe J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent progenitor cells that can generate both ectodermal cell types, such as neurons, and mesodermal cell types, such as smooth muscle. The mechanisms controlling this cell fate choice are not known. The basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor Twist1 is expressed throughout the migratory and post-migratory cardiac neural crest. Twist1 ablation or mutation of the Twist-box causes differentiation of ectopic neuronal cells, which molecularly resemble sympathetic ganglia, in the cardiac outflow tract. Twist1 interacts with the pro-neural factor Sox10 via its Twist-box domain and binds to the Phox2b promoter to repress transcriptional activity. Mesodermal cardiac neural crest trans-differentiation into ectodermal sympathetic ganglia-like neurons is dependent upon Phox2b function. Ectopic Twist1 expression in neural crest precursors disrupts sympathetic neurogenesis. These data demonstrate that Twist1 functions in post-migratory neural crest cells to repress pro-neural factors and thereby regulate cell fate determination between ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. PMID:23555309

  13. Resveratrol protects ROS-induced cell death by activating AMPK in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Park, Ock Jin

    2007-01-01

    Resveratrol, one of polyphenols derived from red wine, has been shown to protect against cell death, possibly through the association with several signaling pathways. Currently numerous studies indicate that cardiovascular diseases are linked to the release of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) often generated in states such as ischemia/reperfusion injury. In the present study, we investigated whether resveratrol has the capability to control intracellular survival signaling cascades involving AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in the inhibitory process of cardiac injury. We hypothesized that resveratrol may exert a protective effect on damage to heart muscle through modulating of the AMPK signaling pathway. We mimicked ischemic conditions by inducing cell death with H2O2 in H9c2 muscle cells. In this experiment, resveratrol induced strong activation of AMPK and inhibited the occurrence of cell death caused by treatment with H2O2. Under the same conditions, inhibition of AMPK using dominant negative AMPK constructs dramatically abolished the effect of resveratrol on cell survival in H2O2-treated cardiac muscle cells. These results indicate that resveratrol-induced cell survival is mediated by AMPK in H9c2 cells and may exert a novel therapeutic effect on oxidative stress induced in cardiac disorders. PMID:18850225

  14. Ionizing Radiation Impacts on Cardiac Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Alexander; Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Pignalosa, Diana; Schroeder, Insa S.; Durante, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of ionizing radiation on the earliest stages of embryonic development although it is well recognized that ionizing radiation is a natural part of our environment and further exposure may occur due to medical applications. The current study addresses this issue using D3 mouse embryonic stem cells as a model system. Cells were irradiated with either X-rays or carbon ions representing sparsely and densely ionizing radiation and their effect on the differentiation of D3 cells into spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes through embryoid body (EB) formation was measured. This study is the first to demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs the formation of beating cardiomyocytes with carbon ions being more detrimental than X-rays. However, after prolonged culture time, the number of beating EBs derived from carbon ion irradiated cells almost reached control levels indicating that the surviving cells are still capable of developing along the cardiac lineage although with considerable delay. Reduced EB size, failure to downregulate pluripotency markers, and impaired expression of cardiac markers were identified as the cause of compromised cardiomyocyte formation. Dysregulation of cardiac differentiation was accompanied by alterations in the expression of endodermal and ectodermal markers that were more severe after carbon ion irradiation than after exposure to X-rays. In conclusion, our data show that carbon ion irradiation profoundly affects differentiation and thus may pose a higher risk to the early embryo than X-rays. PMID:26506910

  15. Caveolae protect endothelial cells from membrane rupture during increased cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jade P.X.; Mendoza-Topaz, Carolina; Howard, Gillian; Chadwick, Jessica; Shvets, Elena; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Crosby, Alexi; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are strikingly abundant in endothelial cells, yet the physiological functions of caveolae in endothelium and other tissues remain incompletely understood. Previous studies suggest a mechanoprotective role, but whether this is relevant under the mechanical forces experienced by endothelial cells in vivo is unclear. In this study we have sought to determine whether endothelial caveolae disassemble under increased hemodynamic forces, and whether caveolae help prevent acute rupture of the plasma membrane under these conditions. Experiments in cultured cells established biochemical assays for disassembly of caveolar protein complexes, and assays for acute loss of plasma membrane integrity. In vivo, we demonstrate that caveolae in endothelial cells of the lung and cardiac muscle disassemble in response to acute increases in cardiac output. Electron microscopy and two-photon imaging reveal that the plasma membrane of microvascular endothelial cells in caveolin 1−/− mice is much more susceptible to acute rupture when cardiac output is increased. These data imply that mechanoprotection through disassembly of caveolae is important for endothelial function in vivo. PMID:26459598

  16. Cardiac valve cells and their microenvironment—insights from in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    During every heartbeat, cardiac valves open and close coordinately to control unidirectional flow of blood. In this dynamically challenging environment, resident valve cells actively maintain homeostasis, but the signalling between cells and their microenvironment is complex. When this homeostasis is disrupted and valve opening obstructed, haemodynamic profiles can be altered and lead to impaired cardiac function. Currently, late stages of cardiac valve diseases are treated surgically, as there are no known drug therapies to reverse or halt disease progression. Consequently investigators have sought to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of valvular diseases usi in vitro cell culture systems and biomaterials scaffolds that can mimic extracellular microenvironment. In this Review we describe how signals in the extra cellular matrix regulate valve cell function. We propose that the cellular context is a critical factor when studying the molecular basis of valvular diseases in vitro, and one should consider how the surrounding matrix might influence cell signalling and functional outcomes in the valve. Investigators need to build a systems level understanding of the complex signalling network involved in valve regulation, to facilitate drug target identification and promote in situ or ex vivo heart valve regeneration. PMID:25311230

  17. Human Salivary Gland Stem Cells Functionally Restore Radiation Damaged Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Sarah; Maimets, Martti; van der Zwaag, Marianne; Stokman, Monique A; van Gosliga, Djoke; Zwart, Erik; Witjes, Max J H; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald; Coppes, Rob P

    2016-03-01

    Adult stem cells are often touted as therapeutic agents in the regenerative medicine field, however data detailing both the engraftment and functional capabilities of solid tissue derived human adult epithelial stem cells is scarce. Here we show the isolation of adult human salivary gland (SG) stem/progenitor cells and demonstrate at the single cell level in vitro self-renewal and differentiation into multilineage organoids. We also show in vivo functionality, long-term engraftment, and functional restoration in a xenotransplantation model. Indeed, transplanted human salisphere-derived cells restored saliva production and greatly improved the regenerative potential of irradiated SGs. Further selection for c-Kit expression enriched for cells with enhanced regenerative potencies. Interestingly, interaction of transplanted cells with the recipient SG may also be involved in functional recovery. Thus, we show for the first time that salispheres cultured from human SGs contain stem/progenitor cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation and rescue of saliva production. Our study underpins the therapeutic promise of salisphere cell therapy for the treatment of xerostomia. PMID:26887347

  18. A New Method to Stabilize C-Kit Expression in Reparative Cardiac Mesenchymal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wysoczynski, Marcin; Dassanayaka, Sujith; Zafir, Ayesha; Ghafghazi, Shahab; Long, Bethany W.; Noble, Camille; DeMartino, Angelica M.; Brittian, Kenneth R.; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy improves cardiac function. Few cells have been investigated more extensively or consistently shown to be more effective than c-kit sorted cells; however, c-kit expression is easily lost during passage. Here, our primary goal was to develop an improved method to isolate c-kitpos cells and maintain c-kit expression after passaging. Cardiac mesenchymal cells (CMCs) from wild-type mice were selected by polystyrene adherence properties. CMCs adhering within the first hours are referred to as rapidly adherent (RA); CMCs adhering subsequently are dubbed slowly adherent (SA). Both RA and SA CMCs were c-kit sorted. SA CMCs maintained significantly higher c-kit expression than RA cells; SA CMCs also had higher expression endothelial markers. We subsequently tested the relative efficacy of SA vs. RA CMCs in the setting of post-infarct adoptive transfer. Two days after coronary occlusion, vehicle, RA CMCs, or SA CMCs were delivered percutaneously with echocardiographic guidance. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, significantly improved cardiac function compared to vehicle treatment. Although the mechanism remains to be elucidated, the more pronounced endothelial phenotype of the SA CMCs coupled with the finding of increased vascular density suggest a potential pro-vasculogenic action. This new method of isolating CMCs better preserves c-kit expression during passage. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, were effective in reducing cardiac dysfunction. Although c-kit expression was maintained, it is unclear whether maintenance of c-kit expression per se was responsible for improved function, or whether the differential adherence property itself confers a reparative phenotype independently of c-kit. PMID:27536657

  19. A New Method to Stabilize C-Kit Expression in Reparative Cardiac Mesenchymal Cells.

    PubMed

    Wysoczynski, Marcin; Dassanayaka, Sujith; Zafir, Ayesha; Ghafghazi, Shahab; Long, Bethany W; Noble, Camille; DeMartino, Angelica M; Brittian, Kenneth R; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy improves cardiac function. Few cells have been investigated more extensively or consistently shown to be more effective than c-kit sorted cells; however, c-kit expression is easily lost during passage. Here, our primary goal was to develop an improved method to isolate c-kit(pos) cells and maintain c-kit expression after passaging. Cardiac mesenchymal cells (CMCs) from wild-type mice were selected by polystyrene adherence properties. CMCs adhering within the first hours are referred to as rapidly adherent (RA); CMCs adhering subsequently are dubbed slowly adherent (SA). Both RA and SA CMCs were c-kit sorted. SA CMCs maintained significantly higher c-kit expression than RA cells; SA CMCs also had higher expression endothelial markers. We subsequently tested the relative efficacy of SA vs. RA CMCs in the setting of post-infarct adoptive transfer. Two days after coronary occlusion, vehicle, RA CMCs, or SA CMCs were delivered percutaneously with echocardiographic guidance. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, significantly improved cardiac function compared to vehicle treatment. Although the mechanism remains to be elucidated, the more pronounced endothelial phenotype of the SA CMCs coupled with the finding of increased vascular density suggest a potential pro-vasculogenic action. This new method of isolating CMCs better preserves c-kit expression during passage. SA CMCs, but not RA CMCs, were effective in reducing cardiac dysfunction. Although c-kit expression was maintained, it is unclear whether maintenance of c-kit expression per se was responsible for improved function, or whether the differential adherence property itself confers a reparative phenotype independently of c-kit. PMID:27536657

  20. Restoration of Brain Acid Soluble Protein 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Run-Sheng; Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Chen, Yue-Yu; Shen, Na; Qiu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) is identified as a novel potential tumor suppressor in several cancers. However, its role in thyroid cancer has not been investigated yet. In the present study, the antitumor activities of BASP1 against the growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells were evaluated. Methods: BASP1 expression in thyroid cancer tissues and normal tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and the association between its expression and prognosis was analyzed. pcDNA-BASP1 carrying full length of BASP1 cDNA was constructed to restore the expression of BASP1 in thyroid cancer cell lines (BHT-101 and KMH-2). The cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo was evaluated by WST-1 assay and xenograft tumor models, respectively. Cell cycle distribution after transfection was analyzed using flow cytometry. Cell apoptosis after transfection was examined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay. The migration was examined using transwell assay. Results: BASP1 expression was abundant in normal tissues while it is significantly decreased in cancer tissues (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 restored the expression of BASP1 and significantly inhibited the growth of BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells as well as xenograft tumors in nude mice (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells. In addition, pcDNA-BASP1 significantly inhibited the cell migration. Conclusions: Downregulation of BASP1 expression may play a role in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer. Restoration of BASP1 expression exerted extensive antitumor activities against growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells, which suggested that BASP1 gene might act as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:27270539

  1. Intracellular Energetic Units regulate metabolism in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Saks, Valdur; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Gonzalez-Granillo, Marcela; Tepp, Kersti; Timohhina, Natalja; Karu-Varikmaa, Minna; Kaambre, Tuuli; Dos Santos, Pierre; Boucher, François; Guzun, Rita

    2012-02-01

    This review describes developments in historical perspective as well as recent results of investigations of cellular mechanisms of regulation of energy fluxes and mitochondrial respiration by cardiac work - the metabolic aspect of the Frank-Starling law of the heart. A Systems Biology solution to this problem needs the integration of physiological and biochemical mechanisms that take into account intracellular interactions of mitochondria with other cellular systems, in particular with cytoskeleton components. Recent data show that different tubulin isotypes are involved in the regular arrangement exhibited by mitochondria and ATP-consuming systems into Intracellular Energetic Units (ICEUs). Beta II tubulin association with the mitochondrial outer membrane, when co-expressed with mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) specifically limits the permeability of voltage-dependent anion channel for adenine nucleotides. In the MtCK reaction this interaction changes the regulatory kinetics of respiration through a decrease in the affinity for adenine nucleotides and an increase in the affinity for creatine. Metabolic Control Analysis of the coupled MtCK-ATP Synthasome in permeabilized cardiomyocytes showed a significant increase in flux control by steps involved in ADP recycling. Mathematical modeling of compartmentalized energy transfer represented by ICEUs shows that cyclic changes in local ADP, Pi, phosphocreatine and creatine concentrations during contraction cycle represent effective metabolic feedback signals when amplified in the coupled non-equilibrium MtCK-ATP Synthasome reactions in mitochondria. This mechanism explains the regulation of respiration on beat to beat basis during workload changes under conditions of metabolic stability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes." PMID:21816155

  2. Hiding inside? Intracellular expression of non-glycosylated c-kit protein in cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huilin; Drummond, Christopher A; Fan, Xiaoming; Haller, Steven T; Liu, Jiang; Malhotra, Deepak; Tian, Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells including c-kit(+) cells and cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) play important roles in cardiac repair and regeneration. CDCs were reported to contain only small subpopulations of c-kit(+) cells and recent publications suggested that depletion of the c-kit(+) subpopulation of cells has no effect on regenerative properties of CDCs. However, our current study showed that the vast majority of CDCs from murine heart actually express c-kit, albeit, in an intracellular and non-glycosylated form. Immunostaining and flow cytometry showed that the fluorescent signal indicative of c-kit immunostaining significantly increased when cell membranes were permeabilized. Western blots further demonstrated that glycosylation of c-kit was increased during endothelial differentiation in a time dependent manner. Glycosylation inhibition by 1-deoxymannojirimycin hydrochloride (1-DMM) blocked c-kit glycosylation and reduced expression of endothelial cell markers such as Flk-1 and CD31 during differentiation. Pretreatment of these cells with a c-kit kinase inhibitor (imatinib mesylate) also attenuated Flk-1 and CD31 expression. These results suggest that c-kit glycosylation and its kinase activity are likely needed for these cells to differentiate into an endothelial lineage. In vivo, we found that intracellular c-kit expressing cells are located in the wall of cardiac blood vessels in mice subjected to myocardial infarction. In summary, our work demonstrated for the first time that c-kit is not only expressed in CDCs but may also directly participate in CDC differentiation into an endothelial lineage.

  3. Biphasic role of chondroitin sulfate in cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Robert D; Willis, Catherine M; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate is a critical component of proteoglycans on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. As such, chondroitin sulfate side chains and the sulfation balance of chondroitin play important roles in the control of signaling pathways, and have a functional importance in human disease. In contrast, very little is known about the roles of chondroitin sulfate molecules and sulfation patterns during mammalian development and cell lineage specification. Here, we report a novel biphasic role of chondroitin sulfate in the specification of the cardiac cell lineage during embryonic stem cell differentiation through modulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Lineage marker analysis demonstrates that enzymatic elimination of endogenous chondroitin sulfates leads to defects specifically in cardiac differentiation. This is accompanied by a reduction in the number of beating cardiac foci. Mechanistically, we show that endogenous chondroitin sulfate controls cardiac differentiation in a temporal biphasic manner through inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, a known regulatory pathway for the cardiac lineage. Treatment with a specific exogenous chondroitin sulfate, CS-E, could mimic these biphasic effects on cardiac differentiation and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. These results establish chondroitin sulfate and its sulfation balance as important regulators of cardiac cell lineage decisions through control of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Our work suggests that targeting the chondroitin biosynthesis and sulfation machinery is a novel promising avenue in regenerative strategies after heart injury.

  4. Foetal bovine serum-derived exosomes affect yield and phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Francesco; Ionta, Vittoria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Miraldi, Fabio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a powerful tool in cardiac regenerative medicine. Pre-clinical studies suggest that most of the beneficial effects promoted by the injected cells are due to their paracrine activity exerted on endogenous cells and tissue. Exosomes are candidate mediators of this paracrine effects. According to their potential, many researchers have focused on characterizing exosomes derived from specific cell types, but, up until now, only few studies have analyzed the possible in vitro effects of bovine serum-derived exosomes on cell proliferation or differentiation. Methods: The aim of this study was to analyse, from a qualitative and quantitative point of view, the in vitro effects of bovine serum exosomes on human CPCs cultured either as cardiospheres or as monolayers of cardiosphere-forming cells. Results: Effects on proliferation, yield and molecular patterning were detected. We show, for the first time, that exogenous bovine exosomes support the proliferation and migration of human cardiosphere-forming cells, and that their depletion affects cardiospheres formation, in terms of size, yield and extra-cellular matrix production. Conclusion: These results stress the importance of considering differential biological effects of exogenous cell culture supplements on the final phenotype of primary human cell cultures. PMID:27340620

  5. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  6. Mechanistic molecular imaging of cardiac cell therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiujun; Fan, Weiwei; Cao, Feng

    2013-10-01

    Cell-based myocardial regeneration has emerged as a promising therapeutic option for ischemic heart disease, though not yet at the level of routine clinical utility. Despite the encouraging results from initial preclinical studies that have demonstrated improved function and reduced infarct size of the ischemic myocardium following several candidate cell transplantation, the beneficial effects and molecular mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy are still unclear in clinical applications to date, and much remains to be optimized. To improve engraftment, accurate methods are required for tracking cell fate and quantifying functional outcome. In the present review, we summarized the current status and challenges of cardiac cell therapy for ischemic heart disease and discussed the strengths and limitations of currently available in vivo imaging techniques with special focus on the newly developed multimodality approaches for assessing the efficacy of engrafted donor cells. We also addressed the hurdles these imaging modalities are facing, including issues regarding immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of transplanted stem cells, and provided some the future perspectives on stem cell imaging.

  7. Cardiac Myocyte Alternans in Intact Heart: Influence of Cell-Cell Coupling and β-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Karin P.; Ljubojevic, Senka; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Pieske, Burkert M.; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac alternans are proarrhythmic and mechanistically link cardiac mechanical dysfunction and sudden cardiac death. Beat-to-beat alternans occur when beats with large Ca2+ transients and long action potential duration (APD) alternate with the converse. APD alternans are typically driven by Ca2+ alternans and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release alternans. But the effect of intercellular communication via gap junctions (GJ) on alternans in intact heart remains unknown. Objective We assessed the effects of cell-to-cell coupling on local alternans in intact Langen-dorff-perfused mouse hearts, measuring single myocyte [Ca2+] alternans synchronization among neighboring cells, and effects of β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) activation and reduced GJ coupling. Methods and Results Mouse hearts (C57BL/6) were retrogradely perfused and loaded with Fluo-8 AM to record cardiac myocyte [Ca2+] in situ with confocal microscopy. Single cell resolution allowed analysis of alternans within the intact organ during alternans induction. Carbenoxolone (25 μM), a GJ inhibitor, significantly increased the occurrence and amplitude of alternans in single cells within the intact heart. Alternans were concordant between neighboring cells throughout the field of view, except transiently during onset. β-AR stimulation only reduced Ca2+ alternans in tissue that had reduced GJ coupling, matching effects seen in isolated myocytes. Conclusions Ca2+ alternans among neighboring myocytes is predominantly concordant, likely because of electrical coupling between cells. Consistent with this, partial GJ uncoupling increased propensity and amplitude of Ca2+ alternans, and made them more sensitive to reversal by β-AR activation, as in isolated myocytes. Electrical coupling between myocytes may thus limit the alternans initiation, but also allow alternans to be more stable once established. PMID:25828762

  8. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived beating cardiac tissues on paper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Cong; Zhu, Yujuan; Yu, Yue; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Feng, Ke; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-11-21

    There is a growing interest in using paper as a biomaterial scaffold for cell-based applications. In this study, we made the first attempt to fabricate a paper-based array for the culture, proliferation, and direct differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into functional beating cardiac tissues and create "a beating heart on paper." This array was simply constructed by binding a cured multi-well polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold with common, commercially available paper substrates. Three types of paper material (print paper, chromatography paper and nitrocellulose membrane) were tested for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human-derived iPSCs. We found that hiPSCs grew well on these paper substrates, presenting a three-dimensional (3D)-like morphology with a pluripotent property. The direct differentiation of human iPSCs into functional cardiac tissues on paper was also achieved using our modified differentiation approach. The cardiac tissue retained its functional activities on the coated print paper and chromatography paper with a beating frequency of 40-70 beats per min for up to three months. Interestingly, human iPSCs could be differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium on nitrocellulose membrane under the conditions of cardiac-specific induction, indicating the potential roles of material properties and mechanical cues that are involved in regulating stem cell differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that different grades of paper could offer great opportunities as bioactive, low-cost, and 3D in vitro platforms for stem cell-based high-throughput drug testing at the tissue/organ level and for tissue engineering applications.

  9. Exploring analytical proteomics platforms toward the definition of human cardiac stem cells receptome.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; R-Borlado, Luis; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Bernad, António; Alves, Paula M

    2015-04-01

    Human cardiac stem cells (hCSC) express a portfolio of plasma membrane receptors that are involved in the regulatory auto/paracrine feedback loop mechanism of activation of these cells, and consequently contribute to myocardial regeneration. In order to attain a comprehensive description of hCSC receptome and overcoming the inability demonstrated by other technologies applied in receptor identification, mainly due to the transmembrane nature, high hydrophobic character and relative low concentration of these proteins, we have exploited and improved a proteomics workflow. This approach was based on the enrichment of hCSC plasma membrane fraction and addition of prefractionation steps prior to MS analysis. More than 100 plasma membrane receptors were identified. The data reported herein constitute a valuable source of information to further understand cardiac stem cells activation mechanisms and the subsequent cardiac repair process. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001117 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001117). PMID:25504917

  10. Lack of Rybp in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Impairs Cardiac Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ujhelly, Olga; Szabo, Viktoria; Kovacs, Gergo; Vajda, Flora; Mallok, Sylvia; Prorok, Janos; Acsai, Karoly; Hegedus, Zoltan; Krebs, Stefan; Dinnyes, Andras; Pirity, Melinda Katalin

    2015-09-15

    Ring1 and Yy1 binding protein (Rybp) has been implicated in transcriptional regulation, apoptotic signaling and as a member of the polycomb repressive complex 1, it has an important function in regulating pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Earlier, we had proved that Rybp plays an essential role in mouse embryonic and central nervous system development. This work identifies Rybp, as a critical regulator of heart development. Rybp is readily detectable in the developing mouse heart from day 8.5 of embryonic development. Prominent Rybp expression persists during all embryonic stages, and Rybp marks differentiated cell types of the heart. By utilizing rybp null ESCs in an in vitro cardiac differentiation assay, we found that rybp null ESCs do not form rhythmically beating cardiomyocytes (CMCs). Gene expression profiles revealed a downregulation of cardiac terminal and upregulation of germline-specific markers in the rybp null CMCs. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis uncovered a number of novel candidate target genes regulated by Rybp. Among these are several that are important in cardiac development and contractility such as Plagl1, Isl1, and Tnnt2. Importantly, forced expression of rybp in rybp-deficient ESCs by a lentiviral vector was able to rescue the mutant phenotype. Our data provide evidence for a previously unrecognized function of Rybp in heart development and point out the importance of germ cell lineage gene silencing during somatic differentiation.

  11. Regulation of troponin C synthesis in primary culture of chicken cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, S B; Bag, J

    1987-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte cell culture from fourteen day old embryonic chicken heart was prepared. This cultured cell system was used to examine the regulation of troponin C (TnC) synthesis in cardiac muscle. To examine the regulation of TnC polypeptide synthesis, cardiac myocyte cells were pulse labelled with 35S-methionine at different days after plating. The synthesis of TnC was measured by determining the amount of radioactivity incorporated into the TnC polypeptide following separation by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. These measurements showed that TnC synthesis was maximum in 36 to 48 h old cultures and reached its lowest level in 4 day old cultures. This was in contrast to the synthesis of actin and tropomyosin. Synthesis of these polypeptides were lowest in 36 to 48 h old cultures and was maximum in 7 day old cultures. To examine whether the synthesis of TnC polypeptide paralleled the levels of TnC mRNA the sequences homologous to quail slow TnC cDNA clone were measured by hybridisation. The results showed that the decrease in the synthesis of troponin C polypeptide cannot be fully explained by the decrease in the steady state level of troponin C mRNA. The possibility of a role of translational control of troponin C mRNA in this process is discussed. PMID:2890096

  12. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation.

  13. Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation Restores Inflammatory Balance of Cytokines after ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Alestalo, Kirsi; Miettinen, Johanna A.; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Huikuri, Heikki; Lehenkari, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) launches an inflammatory response and a repair process to compensate cardiac function. During this process, the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is important for optimal cardiac repair. Stem cell transplantation after AMI improves tissue repair and increases the ventricular ejection fraction. Here, we studied in detail the acute effect of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) transplantation on proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods Patients with STEMI treated with thrombolysis followed by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned to receive either BMMNC or saline as an intracoronary injection. Cardiac function was evaluated by left ventricle angiogram during the PCI and again after 6 months. The concentrations of 27 cytokines were measured from plasma samples up to 4 days after the PCI and the intracoronary injection. Results Twenty-six patients (control group, n = 12; BMMNC group, n = 14) from the previously reported FINCELL study (n = 80) were included to this study. At day 2, the change in the proinflammatory cytokines correlated with the change in the anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups (Kendall’s tau, control 0.6; BMMNC 0.7). At day 4, the correlation had completely disappeared in the control group but was preserved in the BMMNC group (Kendall’s tau, control 0.3; BMMNC 0.7). Conclusions BMMNC transplantation is associated with preserved balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after STEMI in PCI-treated patients. This may partly explain the favorable effect of stem cell transplantation after AMI. PMID:26690350

  14. Transforming growth factor-{beta}2 enhances differentiation of cardiac myocytes from embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinender . E-mail: Dinender.Kumar@uvm.edu; Sun, Baiming

    2005-06-24

    Stem cell therapy holds great promise for the treatment of injured myocardium, but is challenged by a limited supply of appropriate cells. Three different isoforms of transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) -{beta}1, -{beta}2, and -{beta}3 exhibit distinct regulatory effects on cell growth, differentiation, and migration during embryonic development. We compared the effects of these three different isoforms on cardiomyocyte differentiation from embryonic stem (ES) cells. In contrast to TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3, treatment of mouse ES cells with TGF-{beta}2 isoform significantly increased embryoid body (EB) proliferation as well as the extent of the EB outgrowth that beat rhythmically. At 17 days, 49% of the EBs treated with TGF-{beta}2 exhibited spontaneous beating compared with 15% in controls. Cardiac myocyte specific protein markers sarcomeric myosin and {alpha}-actin were demonstrated in beating EBs and cells isolated from EBs. In conclusion, TGF-{beta}2 but not TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3 promotes cardiac myocyte differentiation from ES cells.

  15. Pluripotent stem cell derivation and differentiation toward cardiac muscle: novel techniques and advances in patent literature.

    PubMed

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Thorrez, Lieven; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2013-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold unprecedented potential for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), standard model for pluripotency studies, have been recently flanked by induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs are obtained from somatic cells via epigenetic and transcriptional reprogramming, overcoming ESC-related ethical issues and enabling the possibility of donor-matching pluripotent cell lines. Since the European Court of Justice banned patents involving embryo disaggregation to generate human ESCs, iPSCs can now fuel the willingness of European companies to invest in treatments based on stem cells. Moreover, iPSCs share many unique features of ESCs, such as unlimited self-renewal potential and broad differentiation capability, even though iPSCs seem more susceptible to genomic instability and display epigenetic biases as compared to ESCs. Both ESCs and iPSCs have been intensely investigated for cardiomyocyte production and cardiac muscle regeneration, both in human and animal models. In vitro and in vivo studies are continuously expanding and refining this field via genetic manipulation and cell conditioning, trying to achieve standard and reproducible products, eligible for clinical and biopharmaceutical scopes. This review focuses on the recently growing body of patents, concerning technical advances in production, expansion and cardiac differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs.

  16. Force-controlled patch clamp of beating cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Dario; Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Abriel, Hugues; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-03-11

    From its invention in the 1970s, the patch clamp technique is the gold standard in electrophysiology research and drug screening because it is the only tool enabling accurate investigation of voltage-gated ion channels, which are responsible for action potentials. Because of its key role in drug screening, innovation efforts are being made to reduce its complexity toward more automated systems. While some of these new approaches are being adopted in pharmaceutical companies, conventional patch-clamp remains unmatched in fundamental research due to its versatility. Here, we merged the patch clamp and atomic force microscope (AFM) techniques, thus equipping the patch-clamp with the sensitive AFM force control. This was possible using the FluidFM, a force-controlled nanopipette based on microchanneled AFM cantilevers. First, the compatibility of the system with patch-clamp electronics and its ability to record the activity of voltage-gated ion channels in whole-cell configuration was demonstrated with sodium (NaV1.5) channels. Second, we showed the feasibility of simultaneous recording of membrane current and force development during contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes. Force feedback allowed for a gentle and stable contact between AFM tip and cell membrane enabling serial patch clamping and injection without apparent cell damage. PMID:25639960

  17. Osseous metastases from renal cell carcinoma: embolization and surgery for restoration of function. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D.M.; Becker, G.J.; Rabe, F.E.; Holden, R.W.; Richmond, B.D.; Wass, J.L.; Sequeira, F.W.

    1984-03-01

    Five patients underwent preoperative embolization of osseous metastases from renal cell carcinoma. The group consisted of four men and one woman who ranged in age from 46 to 79 years. The lesions were located in the pubic ramus and acetabulum, proximal femur, femoral midshaft, proximal humerus, and proximal tibia. All embolizations were performed within 24 hours of surgery. The internal fixation and tumor curettage was accomplished with estimated perioperative blood loss ranging from 10 ml to 1,250 ml. All patients had significant restoration of function following surgery. The authors suggest that preoperative embolization is an important and efficacious adjunct in the management of hypervascular renal cell osseous metastases.

  18. Advances in cryopreservation of spermatogonial stem cells and restoration of male fertility.

    PubMed

    Aliakbari, Fereshte; Yazdekhasti, Hosein; Abbasi, Mehdi; Hajian Monfared, Mahdieh; Baazm, Maryam

    2016-02-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly complicated process which initiated by spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). SSCs are the only cell type that can restore fertility in infertile recipient after SSCs transplantation. SSCs damage during cancer diagnosis and therapy and their depletion may be cause of male infertility in cancer survivors. In this review, used experimental methods regarding SSCs and testis tissue cryopreservation have been reviewed with a special focus on animal models and human which have generated the majority of data about SSCs and the cryopreservation process.

  19. Cardiac disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Era, Patrizia; Benzoni, Patrizia; Crescini, Elisabetta; Valle, Matteo; Xia, Er; Consiglio, Antonella; Memo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Causative mutations and variants associated with cardiac diseases have been found in genes encoding cardiac ion channels, accessory proteins, cytoskeletal components, junctional proteins, and signaling molecules. In most cases the functional evaluation of the genetic alteration has been carried out by expressing the mutated proteins in in-vitro heterologous systems. While these studies have provided a wealth of functional details that have greatly enhanced the understanding of the pathological mechanisms, it has always been clear that heterologous expression of the mutant protein bears the intrinsic limitation of the lack of a proper intracellular environment and the lack of pathological remodeling. The results obtained from the application of the next generation sequencing technique to patients suffering from cardiac diseases have identified several loci, mostly in non-coding DNA regions, which still await functional analysis. The isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cells has initially provided a constant source of cells from which cardiomyocytes (CMs) can be obtained by differentiation. Furthermore, the possibility to reprogram cellular fate to a pluripotent state, has opened this process to the study of genetic diseases. Thus induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a completely new cellular model that overcomes the limitations of heterologous studies. Importantly, due to the possibility to keep spontaneously beating CMs in culture for several months, during which they show a certain degree of maturation/aging, this approach will also provide a system in which to address the effect of long-term expression of the mutated proteins or any other DNA mutation, in terms of electrophysiological remodeling. Moreover, since iPSC preserve the entire patients’ genetic context, the system will help the physicians in identifying the most appropriate pharmacological intervention to correct the functional alteration. This article summarizes the current

  20. A cardiac mitochondrial cAMP signaling pathway regulates calcium accumulation, permeability transition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Liu, D; Varin, A; Nicolas, V; Courilleau, D; Mateo, P; Caubere, C; Rouet, P; Gomez, A-M; Vandecasteele, G; Fischmeister, R; Brenner, C

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac cytosolic cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates multiple processes, such as beating, contractility, metabolism and apoptosis, little is known yet on the role of this second messenger within cardiac mitochondria. Using cellular and subcellular approaches, we demonstrate here the local expression of several actors of cAMP signaling within cardiac mitochondria, namely a truncated form of soluble AC (sACt) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), and show a protective role for sACt against cell death, apoptosis as well as necrosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Upon stimulation with bicarbonate (HCO3−) and Ca2+, sACt produces cAMP, which in turn stimulates oxygen consumption, increases the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production. cAMP is rate limiting for matrix Ca2+ entry via Epac1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and, as a consequence, prevents mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The mitochondrial cAMP effects involve neither protein kinase A, Epac2 nor the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, in mitochondria isolated from failing rat hearts, stimulation of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway by HCO3− rescued the sensitization of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT. Thus, our study identifies a link between mitochondrial cAMP, mitochondrial metabolism and cell death in the heart, which is independent of cytosolic cAMP signaling. Our results might have implications for therapeutic prevention of cell death in cardiac pathologies. PMID:27100892

  1. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine.

  2. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  3. Myocardin restores erectile function in diabetic rats: phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhang, T; Liu, Y; Liu, L; Zhang, H; Chen, F; Wei, A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether gene transfer of myocardin to the penis of diabetic rats can modulate corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM) cells phenotype and restore erectile function. Five normal control rats, and 22 diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups: rats transfected with adCMV-myocardin (N = 6), treated with empty vector (N = 6), injected with medium (N = 5), and sham-operated rats (N = 5). The erectile response was measured 7 days after transfection. The percent of smooth muscle and the expressions of SMα-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), calponin were evaluated. The increases in intracorporal pressure(ICP)/mean arterial pressure and total ICP in response to nerve stimulation in the adCMV-myocardin treated rats were significantly greater than those in the empty vector (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), medium only (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), and sham-operated rats (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). The suppressed expressions of SMα-actin, SMMHC and calponin were completely restored, and the amount of smooth muscle in diabetic rats were not restored after treatment. It is concluded that myocardin ameliorated erectile responses in diabetic rats mainly via promoting phenotypic modulation of CCSM cells from a proliferative to a contractile state.

  4. Restoring ciliary function to differentiated Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia cells with a lentiviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Lawrence E; Yin, Weining; Patel, Manij; Sechelski, John; Rogers, Troy; Burns, Kimberlie; Grubb, Barbara R; Olsen, John C

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disease in which mutations disrupt ciliary function, leading to impaired mucociliary clearance and life-long lung disease. Mouse tracheal cells with a targeted deletion in the axonemal dynein intermediated chain gene Dnaic1 differentiate normally in culture but lack ciliary activity. Gene transfer to undifferentiated cultures of mouse Dnaic1−/− cells with a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with avian influenza hemagglutinin restored Dnaic1 expression and ciliary activity. Importantly, apical treatment of well-differentiated cultures of mouse Dnaic1−/− with lentiviral vector also restored ciliary activity, demonstrating successful gene transfer from the apical surface. Treatment of Dnaic1flox/flox mice expressing an estrogen responsive Cre recombinase with different doses of tamoxifen indicated that restoration of ~20% of ciliary activity may be sufficient to prevent the development of rhinosinusitis. However, while administration of a β-galactosidase expressing vector to control mice demonstrated efficient gene transfer to the nasal epithelium, treatment of Dnaic1−/− mice resulted in a low level of gene transfer, demonstrating that the severe rhinitis present in these animals impedes gene transfer. The results demonstrate that gene replacement therapy may be a viable treatment option for primary ciliary dyskinesia, but further improvements in the efficiency of gene transfer are necessary. PMID:24451115

  5. Restoration of the normal Clara cell phenotype after chronic allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Felix D; Quintar, Amado A; Leimgruber, Carolina; García, Luciana; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Torres, Alicia I; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiolar Clara cells play a critical role in lung homoeostasis. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic allergy on these cells and the efficacy of budesonide (BUD) and montelukast (MK) in restoring their typical phenotypes after ovalbumin-induced chronic allergy in mice. Chronic allergy induced extensive bronchiolar Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff (AB/PAS)-positive metaplasia. In addition, cells accumulated numerous big electron-lucent granules negative for Clara cell main secretory protein (CC16), and consequently, CC16 was significantly reduced in bronchoalveolar lavage. A concomitant reduction in SP-D and CYP2E1 content was observed. The phenotypic changes induced by allergy were pharmacologically reversed by both treatments; MK was more efficient than BUD in doing so. MK decreased AB/PAS reactivity to control levels whereas they remained persistently elevated after BUD. Moreover, most non-ciliated cells recovered their normal morphology after MK, whereas for BUD normal cells coexisted with ‘transitional’ cells that contained remnant mucous granules and stained strongly for CC16 and SP-D. Glucocorticoids were also less able to reduce inflammatory infiltration and maintained higher percentage of neutrophils, which may have contributed to prolonged mucin expression. These results show that chronic allergy-induced mucous metaplasia of Clara cells affects their defensive mechanisms. However, anti-inflammatory treatments were able to re-establish the normal phenotype of Clara cell, with MK being more efficient at restoring a normal profile than BUD. This study highlights the role of epithelial cells in lung injuries and their contribution to anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:23998365

  6. Substrate stiffness-regulated matrix metalloproteinase output in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts: implications for myocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Zhang, Quanyou; Zhu, Ting; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Bailin; Xu, Jianwen; Zhao, Hucheng

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac fibrosis, an important pathological feature of structural remodeling, contributes to ventricular stiffness, diastolic dysfunction, arrhythmia and may even lead to sudden death. Matrix stiffness, one of the many mechanical factors acting on cells, is increasingly appreciated as an important mediator of myocardial cell behavior. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates were fabricated with different stiffnesses to mimic physiological and pathological heart tissues, and the way in which the elastic modulus of the substrate regulated matrix-degrading gelatinases in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts was explored. Initially, an increase in cell spreading area was observed, concomitant with the increase in PDMS stiffness in both cells. Later, it was demonstrated that the MMP-2 gene expression and protein activity in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts can be enhanced with an increase in PDMS substrate stiffness and, moreover, such gene- and protein-related increases had a significant linear correlation with the elastic modulus. In comparison, the MMP-9 gene and protein expressions were up-regulated in cardiac fibroblasts only, not in myocardial cells. These results implied that myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts in the myocardium could sense the stiffness in pathological fibrosis and showed a differential but positive response in the expression of matrix-degrading gelatinases when exposed to an increased stiffening of the matrix in the microenvironment. The phenomenon of cells sensing pathological matrix stiffness can help to increase understanding of the mechanism underlying myocardial fibrosis and may ultimately lead to planning cure strategies.

  7. Enoxacin inhibits growth of prostate cancer cells and effectively restores microRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Elsa; Graça, Inês; Baptista, Tiago; Vieira, Filipa Q; Palmeira, Carlos; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2013-05-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most incident malignancies worldwide. Although efficient therapy is available for early-stage PCa, treatment of advanced disease is mainly ineffective and remains a clinical challenge. microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is associated with PCa development and progression. In fact, several studies have reported a widespread downregulation of miRNAs in PCa, which highlights the importance of studying compounds capable of restoring the global miRNA expression. The main aim of this study was to define the usefulness of enoxacin as an anti-tumoral agent in PCa, due to its ability to induce miRNA biogenesis in a TRBP-mediated manner. Using a panel of five PCa cell lines, we observed that all of them were wild type for the TARBP2 gene and expressed TRBP protein. Furthermore, primary prostate carcinomas displayed normal levels of TRBP protein. Remarkably, enoxacin was able to decrease cell viability, induce apoptosis, cause cell cycle arrest, and inhibit the invasiveness of cell lines. Enoxacin was also effective in restoring the global expression of miRNAs. This study is the first to show that PCa cells are highly responsive to the anti-tumoral effects of enoxacin. Therefore, enoxacin constitutes a promising therapeutic agent for PCa.

  8. Estrogen Inhibits Mast Cell Chymase Release to Prevent Pressure Overload-Induced Adverse Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianping; Jubair, Shaiban; Janicki, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen regulation of myocardial chymase and chymase effects on cardiac remodeling are unknown. To test the hypothesis that estrogen prevents pressure overload-induced adverse cardiac remodeling by inhibiting mast cell chymase release, transverse aortic constriction or sham surgery was performed in 7-week-old intact and ovariectomized rats. Three days prior to creating the constriction, additional groups of ovariectomized rats began receiving 17β-Estradiol, a chymase inhibitor, or a mast cell stabilizer. Left ventricular function, cardiomyocyte size, collagen volume fraction, mast cell density and degranulation, and myocardial and plasma chymase levels were assessed 18 days post-surgery. Aortic constriction resulted in ventricular hypertrophy in intact and ovariectomized groups while collagen volume fraction was increased only in ovariectomized rats. Chymase protein content was increased by aortic constriction in the intact and ovariectomized groups with the magnitude of the increase being greater in ovariectomized rats. Mast cell density and degranulation, plasma chymase levels and myocardial active transforming growth factor- 1 levels were increased by aortic constriction only in ovariectomized rats. Estrogen replacement markedly attenuated the constriction-increased myocardial chymase, mast cell density and degranulation, plasma chymase and myocardial active transforming growth factor- 1 as well as prevented ventricular hypertrophy and increased collagen volume fraction. Chymostatin attenuated the aortic constriction induced ventricular hypertrophy and collagen volume fraction in the ovariectomized rats similar to that achieved by estrogen replacement. Nedocromil yielded similar effects except for the reduction of chymase content. We conclude that the estrogen-inhibited release of mast cell chymase is responsible for the cardioprotection against transverse aortic constriction-induced adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:25403608

  9. Influence of aging on the quantity and quality of human cardiac stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tamami; Hosoyama, Tohru; Kawamura, Daichi; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Tanaka, Yuya; Samura, Makoto; Ueno, Koji; Nishimoto, Arata; Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryo; Ito, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kensuke; Mikamo, Akihito; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age affects various tissue-specific stem cells and decreases their regenerative ability. We therefore examined whether aging affected the quantity and quality of cardiac stem cells using cells obtained from 26 patients of various ages (from 2 to 83 years old). We collected fresh right atria and cultured cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), which are a type of cardiac stem cell. Then we investigated growth rate, senescence, DNA damage, and the growth factor production of CDCs. All samples yielded a sufficient number of CDCs for experiments and the cellular growth rate was not obviously associated with age. The expression of senescence-associated b-galactosidase and the DNA damage marker, gH2AX, showed a slightly higher trend in CDCs from older patients (≥65 years). The expression of VEGF, HGF, IGF-1, SDF-1, and TGF-b varied among samples, and the expression of these beneficial factors did not decrease with age. An in vitro angiogenesis assay also showed that the angiogenic potency of CDCs was not impaired, even in those from older patients. Our data suggest that the impact of age on the quantity and quality of CDCs is quite limited. These findings have important clinical implications for autologous stem cell transplantation in elderly patients. PMID:26947751

  10. Influence of aging on the quantity and quality of human cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tamami; Hosoyama, Tohru; Kawamura, Daichi; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Tanaka, Yuya; Samura, Makoto; Ueno, Koji; Nishimoto, Arata; Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryo; Ito, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kensuke; Mikamo, Akihito; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age affects various tissue-specific stem cells and decreases their regenerative ability. We therefore examined whether aging affected the quantity and quality of cardiac stem cells using cells obtained from 26 patients of various ages (from 2 to 83 years old). We collected fresh right atria and cultured cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), which are a type of cardiac stem cell. Then we investigated growth rate, senescence, DNA damage, and the growth factor production of CDCs. All samples yielded a sufficient number of CDCs for experiments and the cellular growth rate was not obviously associated with age. The expression of senescence-associated b-galactosidase and the DNA damage marker, gH2AX, showed a slightly higher trend in CDCs from older patients (≥ 65 years). The expression of VEGF, HGF, IGF-1, SDF-1, and TGF-b varied among samples, and the expression of these beneficial factors did not decrease with age. An in vitro angiogenesis assay also showed that the angiogenic potency of CDCs was not impaired, even in those from older patients. Our data suggest that the impact of age on the quantity and quality of CDCs is quite limited. These findings have important clinical implications for autologous stem cell transplantation in elderly patients. PMID:26947751

  11. Beta Cell Mass Restoration in Alloxan-Diabetic Mice Treated with EGF and Gastrin.

    PubMed

    Song, Imane; Patel, Oelfah; Himpe, Eddy; Muller, Christo J F; Bouwens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    One week of treatment with EGF and gastrin (EGF/G) was shown to restore normoglycemia and to induce islet regeneration in mice treated with the diabetogenic agent alloxan. The mechanisms underlying this regeneration are not fully understood. We performed genetic lineage tracing experiments to evaluate the contribution of beta cell neogenesis in this model. One day after alloxan administration, mice received EGF/G treatment for one week. The treatment could not prevent the initial alloxan-induced beta cell mass destruction, however it did reverse glycemia to control levels within one day, suggesting improved peripheral glucose uptake. In vitro experiments with C2C12 cell line showed that EGF could stimulate glucose uptake with an efficacy comparable to that of insulin. Subsequently, EGF/G treatment stimulated a 3-fold increase in beta cell mass, which was partially driven by neogenesis and beta cell proliferation as assessed by beta cell lineage tracing and BrdU-labeling experiments, respectively. Acinar cell lineage tracing failed to show an important contribution of acinar cells to the newly formed beta cells. No appearance of transitional cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon, a hallmark for alpha-to-beta cell conversion, was found, suggesting that alpha cells did not significantly contribute to the regeneration. An important fraction of the beta cells significantly lost insulin positivity after alloxan administration, which was restored to normal after one week of EGF/G treatment. Alloxan-only mice showed more pronounced beta cell neogenesis and proliferation, even though beta cell mass remained significantly depleted, suggesting ongoing beta cell death in that group. After one week, macrophage infiltration was significantly reduced in EGF/G-treated group compared to the alloxan-only group. Our results suggest that EGF/G-induced beta cell regeneration in alloxan-diabetic mice is driven by beta cell neogenesis, proliferation and recovery of insulin. The

  12. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node (SAN) dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart. Subsequently, these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system. Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias. For example, SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker. On the other hand, conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies, including defibrillation and tissue ablation. However, drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects. Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias, even with well developed technology, still face inadequacies, limitations, hardware complications, and other challenges. Therefore, scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy. In particular, cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart, cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac arrhythmias. This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field. PMID:22783301

  13. Kupffer cell blockade prevents induction of portal venous tolerance in rat cardiac allograft transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, T.; Callery, M.P.; Flye, M.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Pretransplant portal venous (pv) administration of donor antigen induces allospecific partial tolerance. Although the involved mechanism has not been defined, antigen presentation by Kupffer cells (KC) in the liver is considered to be critical. We evaluated the effect of KC blockade on this pv tolerance induction in Buffalo (RT1b) rats receiving Lewis (RT1(1)) cardiac heterotopic allografts. Control rats received no treatment, while experimental animals received 25 X 10(6) ultraviolet B-irradiated (12,000 J/m2) donor spleen cells via either the iv (systemic intravenous) or the pv routes 7 days before transplantation. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a rare earth metal known to inhibit KC phagocytosis, was given (7 mg/kg) 1 and 2 days before pv preimmunization. Cardiac graft prolongation was obtained by pv (MST = 13.3 +/- 1.9 days, n = 6, vs control = 7.3 +/- 0.5 days, n = 6; P less than 0.001) but not by iv preimmunization (7.7 +/- 0.7 days, n = 6, NS vs control). KC blockade abolished the pv tolerance, as indicated by abrogation of graft prolongation (PV + GdCl3 = 8.0 +/- 0.8 days, n = 6, NS vs control). These findings suggest that effective alloantigen uptake by KC in the liver is essential for the induction of pv tolerance in rat cardiac transplantation.

  14. Role of connectivity and fluctuations in the nucleation of calcium waves in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Hernandez, Gonzalo; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enric; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous calcium release (SCR) occurs when ion channel fluctuations lead to the nucleation of calcium waves in cardiac cells. This phenomenon is important since it has been implicated as a cause of various cardiac arrhythmias. However, to date, it is not understood what determines the timing and location of spontaneous calcium waves within cells. Here, we analyze a simplified model of SCR in which calcium release is modeled as a stochastic processes on a two-dimensional network of randomly distributed sites. Using this model we identify the essential parameters describing the system and compute the phase diagram. In particular, we identify a critical line which separates pinned and propagating fronts, and show that above this line wave nucleation is governed by fluctuations and the spatial connectivity of calcium release units. Using a mean-field analysis we show that the sites of wave nucleation are predicted by localized eigenvectors of a matrix representing the network connectivity of release sites. This result provides insight on the interplay between connectivity and fluctuations in the genesis of SCR in cardiac myocytes. PMID:26651731

  15. Role of connectivity and fluctuations in the nucleation of calcium waves in cardiac cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, Gonzalo; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enric; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous calcium release (SCR) occurs when ion channel fluctuations lead to the nucleation of calcium waves in cardiac cells. This phenomenon is important since it has been implicated as a cause of various cardiac arrhythmias. However, to date, it is not understood what determines the timing and location of spontaneous calcium waves within cells. Here, we analyze a simplified model of SCR in which calcium release is modeled as a stochastic processes on a two-dimensional network of randomly distributed sites. Using this model we identify the essential parameters describing the system and compute the phase diagram. In particular, we identify a critical line which separates pinned and propagating fronts, and show that above this line wave nucleation is governed by fluctuations and the spatial connectivity of calcium release units. Using a mean-field analysis we show that the sites of wave nucleation are predicted by localized eigenvectors of a matrix representing the network connectivity of release sites. This result provides insight on the interplay between connectivity and fluctuations in the genesis of SCR in cardiac myocytes.

  16. SIRT Is Required for EDP-Mediated Protective Responses toward Hypoxia–Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Cells

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L.; Fedotov, Ilia; Endo, Tomoko; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia–reoxygenation (H/R) injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex, and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s) protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways. PMID:27242531

  17. Cell death and serum markers of collagen metabolism during cardiac remodeling in Cavia porcellus experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E; Gilman, Robert H; Paico, Henry; Yauri, Verónica; Angulo, Noelia; Ccopa, Fredy; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    We studied cell death by apoptosis and necrosis in cardiac remodeling produced by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In addition, we evaluated collagen I, III, IV (CI, CIII and CIV) deposition in cardiac tissue, and their relationship with serum levels of procollagen type I carboxy-terminal propeptide (PICP) and procollagen type III amino-terminal propeptide (PIIINP). Eight infected and two uninfected guinea pigs were necropsied at seven time points up to one year post-infection. Cell death by necrosis and apoptosis was determined by histopathological observation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, respectively. Deposition of cardiac collagen types was determined by immunohistochemistry and serum levels of PICP, PIIINP, and anti-T. cruzi IgG1 and IgG2 by ELISA. IgG2 (Th1 response) predominated throughout the course of infection; IgG1 (Th2 response) was detected during the chronic phase. Cardiac cell death by necrosis predominated over apoptosis during the acute phase; during the chronic phase, both apoptosis and necrosis were observed in cardiac cells. Apoptosis was also observed in lymphocytes, endothelial cells and epicardial adipose tissue, especially in the chronic phase. Cardiac levels of CI, CIII, CIV increased progressively, but the highest levels were seen in the chronic phase and were primarily due to increase in CIII and CIV. High serum levels of PICP and PIIINP were observed throughout the infection, and increased levels of both biomarkers were associated with cardiac fibrosis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.038, respectively). These results confirm the role of apoptosis in cell loss mainly during the chronic phase and the utility of PICP and PIIINP as biomarkers of fibrosis in cardiac remodeling during T. cruzi infection. PMID:23409197

  18. Cell Death and Serum Markers of Collagen Metabolism during Cardiac Remodeling in Cavia porcellus Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Paico, Henry; Yauri, Verónica; Angulo, Noelia; Ccopa, Fredy; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    We studied cell death by apoptosis and necrosis in cardiac remodeling produced by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In addition, we evaluated collagen I, III, IV (CI, CIII and CIV) deposition in cardiac tissue, and their relationship with serum levels of procollagen type I carboxy-terminal propeptide (PICP) and procollagen type III amino-terminal propeptide (PIIINP). Eight infected and two uninfected guinea pigs were necropsied at seven time points up to one year post-infection. Cell death by necrosis and apoptosis was determined by histopathological observation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, respectively. Deposition of cardiac collagen types was determined by immunohistochemistry and serum levels of PICP, PIIINP, and anti-T. cruzi IgG1 and IgG2 by ELISA. IgG2 (Th1 response) predominated throughout the course of infection; IgG1 (Th2 response) was detected during the chronic phase. Cardiac cell death by necrosis predominated over apoptosis during the acute phase; during the chronic phase, both apoptosis and necrosis were observed in cardiac cells. Apoptosis was also observed in lymphocytes, endothelial cells and epicardial adipose tissue, especially in the chronic phase. Cardiac levels of CI, CIII, CIV increased progressively, but the highest levels were seen in the chronic phase and were primarily due to increase in CIII and CIV. High serum levels of PICP and PIIINP were observed throughout the infection, and increased levels of both biomarkers were associated with cardiac fibrosis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.038, respectively). These results confirm the role of apoptosis in cell loss mainly during the chronic phase and the utility of PICP and PIIINP as biomarkers of fibrosis in cardiac remodeling during T. cruzi infection. PMID:23409197

  19. Biological therapies for cardiac arrhythmias: can genes and cells replace drugs and devices?

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac rhythm disorders reflect failures of impulse generation and/or conduction. With the exception of ablation methods that yield selective endocardial destruction, present therapies are nonspecific and/or palliative. Progress in understanding the underlying biology opens up prospects for new alternatives. This article reviews the present state of the art in gene- and cell-based therapies to correct cardiac rhythm disturbances. We begin with the rationale for such approaches, briefly discuss efforts to address aspects of tachyarrhythmia, and review advances in creating a biological pacemaker to cure bradyarrhythmia. Insights gained bring the field closer to a paradigm shift away from devices and drugs, and toward biologics, in the treatment of rhythm disorders. PMID:20203316

  20. Intravital imaging of cardiac function at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Aaron D.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matt; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of cardiomyocyte biology is limited by the lack of methods to interrogate single-cell physiology in vivo. Here we show that contracting myocytes can indeed be imaged with optical microscopy at high temporal and spatial resolution in the beating murine heart, allowing visualization of individual sarcomeres and measurement of the single cardiomyocyte contractile cycle. Collectively, this has been enabled by efficient tissue stabilization, a prospective real-time cardiac gating approach, an image processing algorithm for motion-artifact-free imaging throughout the cardiac cycle, and a fluorescent membrane staining protocol. Quantification of cardiomyocyte contractile function in vivo opens many possibilities for investigating myocardial disease and therapeutic intervention at the cellular level. PMID:25053815

  1. A locus on chromosome 7 determines myocardial cell necrosis and calcification (dystrophic cardiac calcinosis) in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ivandic, B T; Qiao, J H; Machleder, D; Liao, F; Drake, T A; Lusis, A J

    1996-01-01

    Dystrophic cardiac calcinosis, an age-related cardiomyopathy that occurs among certain inbred strains of mice, involves myocardial injury, necrosis, and calcification. Using a complete linkage map approach and quantitative trait locus analysis, we sought to identify genetic loci determining dystrophic cardiac calcinosis in an F2 intercross of resistant C57BL/6J and susceptible C3H/HeJ inbred strains. We identified a single major locus, designated Dyscalc, located on proximal chromosome 7 in a region syntenic with human chromosomes 19q13 and 11p15. The statistical significance of Dyscalc (logarithm of odds score 14.6) was tested by analysis of permuted trait data. Analysis of BxH recombinant inbred strains confirmed the mapping position. The inheritance pattern indicated that this locus influences susceptibility of cells both to enter necrosis and to subsequently undergo calcification. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8643601

  2. Prospects for In Vitro Myofilament Maturation in Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, Jonas; Campbell, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human stem cells are quickly becoming mainstays of cardiac regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening. Their suitability for such roles may seem obvious, but assessments of their contractile behavior suggest that they have not achieved a completely mature cardiac muscle phenotype. This could be explained in part by an incomplete transition from fetal to adult myofilament protein isoform expression. In this commentary, we review evidence that supports this hypothesis and discuss prospects for ultimately generating engineered heart tissue specimens that behave similarly to adult human myocardium. We suggest approaches to better characterize myofilament maturation level in these in vitro systems, and illustrate how new computational models could be used to better understand complex relationships between muscle contraction, myofilament protein isoform expression, and maturation. PMID:26085788

  3. Prospects for In Vitro Myofilament Maturation in Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwan, Jonas; Campbell, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human stem cells are quickly becoming mainstays of cardiac regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening. Their suitability for such roles may seem obvious, but assessments of their contractile behavior suggest that they have not achieved a completely mature cardiac muscle phenotype. This could be explained in part by an incomplete transition from fetal to adult myofilament protein isoform expression. In this commentary, we review evidence that supports this hypothesis and discuss prospects for ultimately generating engineered heart tissue specimens that behave similarly to adult human myocardium. We suggest approaches to better characterize myofilament maturation level in these in vitro systems, and illustrate how new computational models could be used to better understand complex relationships between muscle contraction, myofilament protein isoform expression, and maturation.

  4. B-Cell Dysregulation in Crohn's Disease Is Partially Restored with Infliximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Wilhelmina M. C.; van Laar, Jan A. M.; van der Houwen, Tim B.; Kamphuis, Lieke S. J.; Bartol, Sophinus J. W.; Lam, King H.; Ouwendijk, Rob J.; Sparrow, Miles P.; Gibson, Peter R.; van Hagen, P. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background B-cell depletion can improve a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, but does not appear beneficial for patients with Crohn’s disease. Objective To elucidate the involvement of B cells in Crohn’s disease, we here performed an ‘in depth’ analysis of intestinal and blood B-cells in this chronic inflammatory disease. Methods Patients with Crohn’s disease were recruited to study B-cell infiltrates in intestinal biopsies (n = 5), serum immunoglobulin levels and the phenotype and molecular characteristics of blood B-cell subsets (n = 21). The effects of infliximab treatment were studied in 9 patients. Results Granulomatous tissue showed infiltrates of B lymphocytes rather than Ig-secreting plasma cells. Circulating transitional B cells and CD21low B cells were elevated. IgM memory B cells were reduced and natural effector cells showed decreased replication histories and somatic hypermutation (SHM) levels. In contrast, IgG and IgA memory B cells were normally present and their Ig gene transcripts carried increased SHM levels. The numbers of transitional and natural effector cells were normal in patients who responded clinically well to infliximab. Conclusions B cells in patients with Crohn’s disease showed signs of chronic stimulation with localization to granulomatous tissue and increased molecular maturation of IgA and IgG. Therapy with TNFα-blockers restored the defect in IgM memory B-cell generation and normalized transitional B-cell levels, making these subsets candidate markers for treatment monitoring. Together, these results suggest a chronic, aberrant B-cell response in patients with Crohn’s disease, which could be targeted with new therapeutics that specifically regulate B-cell function. PMID:27468085

  5. p53 Restoration in Induction and Maintenance of Senescence: Differential Effects in Premalignant and Malignant Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Harajly, Mohamad; Zalzali, Hasan; Nawaz, Zafar; Ghayad, Sandra E; Ghamloush, Farah; Basma, Hussein; Zainedin, Samiha; Rabeh, Wissam; Jabbour, Mark; Tawil, Ayman; Badro, Danielle A; Evan, Gerard I; Saab, Raya

    2016-02-01

    The restoration of p53 has been suggested as a therapeutic approach in tumors. However, the timing of p53 restoration in relation to its efficacy during tumor progression still is unclear. We now show that the restoration of p53 in murine premalignant proliferating pineal lesions resulted in cellular senescence, while p53 restoration in invasive pineal tumors did not. The effectiveness of p53 restoration was not dependent on p19(Arf) expression but showed an inverse correlation with Mdm2 expression. In tumor cells, p53 restoration became effective when paired with either DNA-damaging therapy or with nutlin, an inhibitor of p53-Mdm2 interaction. Interestingly, the inactivation of p53 after senescence resulted in reentry into the cell cycle and rapid tumor progression. The evaluation of a panel of human supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) showed low activity of the p53 pathway. Together, these data suggest that the restoration of the p53 pathway has different effects in premalignant versus invasive pineal tumors, and that p53 activation needs to be continually sustained, as reversion from senescence occurs rapidly with aggressive tumor growth when p53 is lost again. Finally, p53 restoration approaches may be worth exploring in sPNET, where the p53 gene is intact but the pathway is inactive in the majority of examined tumors. PMID:26598601

  6. p53 Restoration in Induction and Maintenance of Senescence: Differential Effects in Premalignant and Malignant Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harajly, Mohamad; Zalzali, Hasan; Nawaz, Zafar; Ghayad, Sandra E.; Ghamloush, Farah; Basma, Hussein; Zainedin, Samiha; Rabeh, Wissam; Jabbour, Mark; Tawil, Ayman; Badro, Danielle A.; Evan, Gerard I.

    2015-01-01

    The restoration of p53 has been suggested as a therapeutic approach in tumors. However, the timing of p53 restoration in relation to its efficacy during tumor progression still is unclear. We now show that the restoration of p53 in murine premalignant proliferating pineal lesions resulted in cellular senescence, while p53 restoration in invasive pineal tumors did not. The effectiveness of p53 restoration was not dependent on p19Arf expression but showed an inverse correlation with Mdm2 expression. In tumor cells, p53 restoration became effective when paired with either DNA-damaging therapy or with nutlin, an inhibitor of p53-Mdm2 interaction. Interestingly, the inactivation of p53 after senescence resulted in reentry into the cell cycle and rapid tumor progression. The evaluation of a panel of human supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) showed low activity of the p53 pathway. Together, these data suggest that the restoration of the p53 pathway has different effects in premalignant versus invasive pineal tumors, and that p53 activation needs to be continually sustained, as reversion from senescence occurs rapidly with aggressive tumor growth when p53 is lost again. Finally, p53 restoration approaches may be worth exploring in sPNET, where the p53 gene is intact but the pathway is inactive in the majority of examined tumors. PMID:26598601

  7. Cardiac progenitor/stem cells on myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease: what we have known from current research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hong; Li, Na; Duan, Chang-En; Yang, Yue-Jin

    2014-03-01

    Stem cell therapy has become a promising method for many diseases, including ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Several kinds of stem cells have been studied for heart diseases. Of them, bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), which have been used in many clinical trials, are the most understood one. But the effect of BMSCs is mediated by paracrine factors instead of direct turning into cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, a lot of evidences have shown that resident cardiac stem cells could turn into cardiomyocytes directly in vivo. Currently, seven kinds of resident cardiac stem cells have been discovered. However, their mechanisms, development origins, and relationships have yet to be fully understood. Moreover, two Phase I clinical trials have been performed recently. They show promising results. In this review, we will summarize the current research on these cardiac stem cells and the methods to enhance their effects in clinical applications.

  8. Restoration of telomeres in human papillomavirus-immortalized human anogenital epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Klingelhutz, A J; Barber, S A; Smith, P P; Dyer, K; McDougall, J K

    1994-01-01

    Loss of telomeres has been hypothesized to be important in cellular senescence and may play a role in carcinogenesis. In this study, we have measured telomere length in association with the immortalization and transformation of human cervical and foreskin epithelial cells by the human papillomavirus type 16 or 18 E6 and E7 open reading frames. By using a telomeric TTAGGG repeat probe, it was shown that the telomeres of precrisis normal and E6-, E7-, and E6/E7-expressing cells gradually shortened with passaging (30 to 100 bp per population doubling). Cells that expressed both E6 and E7 went through a crisis period and gave rise to immortalized lines. In contrast to precrisis cells, E6/E7-immortalized cells generally showed an increase in telomere length as they were passaged in culture, with some later passage lines having telomeres that were similar to or longer than the earliest-passage precrisis cells examined. No consistent association could be made between telomere length and tumorigenicity of cells in nude mice. However, of the three cell lines that grew in vivo, two had long telomeres, thus arguing against the hypothesis that cancer cells favor shortened telomeres. Our results indicate that arrest of telomere shortening may be important in human papillomavirus-associated immortalization and that restoration of telomere length may be advantageous to cells with regard to their ability to proliferate. Images PMID:8289836

  9. Restoration of telomeres in human papillomavirus-immortalized human anogenital epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klingelhutz, A.J.; Barber, S.A.; Smith, P.P.

    1994-02-01

    Loss of telomeres has been hypothesized to be important in cellular senescence and may play a role in carcinogenesis. In this study, we have measured telomere length in association with the immortalization and transformation of human cervical and foreskin epithelial cells by the human papillomavirus type 16 or 18 E6 and E7 open reading frames. By using a telomeric TTAGGG repeat probe, it was shown that the telomeres of precrisis normal and E6-, E7-, and E6/E7-expressing cells gradually shortened with passaging (30 to 100 bp per population doubling). Cells that expressed both E6 and E7 went through a crisis period and gave rise to immortalized lines. In contrast to precrisis cells, E6/E7-immortalized cells generally showed an increase in telomere length as they were passaged in culture, with some later passage lines having telomeres that were similar to or longer than the earliest-passage precrisis cells examined. No consistent association could be made between telomere length and tumorigenicity of cells in nude mice. However, of the three cell lines that grew in vivo, two had long telomeres, thus arguing against the hypothesis that cancer cells favor shortened telomeres. Our results indicate that arrest of telomere shortening may be important in human papillomavirus-associated immortalization and that restoration of telomere length may be advantageous to cells with regard to their ability to proliferate. 55 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Bone marrow cells for cardiac regeneration and repair: current status and issues.

    PubMed

    Haider, Husnain Kh

    2006-07-01

    Extensive studies in experimental animal heart models and patients have shown the promise of bone marrow cell (BMC) transplantation as an alternative strategy to the conventional treatment modalities for cardiac repair. 'Stemness' of BMC to adopt cardiac phenotype, their potential as carriers of exogenous therapeutic genes and an inherent ability to express growth factors and cytokines to exert paracrine effects have been especially focused until recently. These findings suggest that locally delivered BMCs are capable of regenerating de novo myocardium. Others have shown that extensive neovascularization due to paracrine effects of the engrafted cells resulted in improved regional blood flow and reduced infarct size. Despite initial success, there are multiple fundamental issues that remain contentious. Indeed, resolving these issues will optimize future heart cell therapy protocols to achieve better prognosis in the clinical settings. This review is a concise, in-depth and critical appreciation of the role of BMCs in heart cell therapy and builds a conceptual framework to elaborate their significance as a possible source of donor cells. Moreover, it discusses the current status of BMC transplantation as a clinical modality and the relevant issues confronting this approach in light of the published data with clinical relevance.

  11. Design of an automated algorithm for labeling cardiac blood pool in gated SPECT images of radiolabeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, T.J. |; Moore, W.H.; Dhekne, R.D.; Ford, P.V.; Wendt, J.A.; Murphy, P.H.; Ting, Y.

    1996-08-01

    The design of an automated computer algorithm for labeling the cardiac blood pool within gated 3-D reconstructions of the radiolabeled red blood cells is investigated. Due to patient functional abnormalities, limited resolution, and noise, certain spatial and temporal features of the cardiac blood pool that one would anticipate finding in every study are not present in certain frames or with certain patients. The labeling of the cardiac blood pool requires an algorithm that only relies upon features present in all patients. The authors investigate the design of a fully-automated region growing algorithm for this purpose.

  12. CD13 and ROR2 Permit Isolation of Highly Enriched Cardiac Mesoderm from Differentiating Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Rhys J P; Brady, Bevin; Khoja, Suhail; Sahoo, Debashis; Engel, James; Arasaratnam, Deevina; Saleh, Kholoud K; Abilez, Oscar J; Zhao, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Kwon, Murray; Elliott, David A; Ardehali, Reza

    2016-01-12

    The generation of tissue-specific cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is critical for the development of future stem cell-based regenerative therapies. Here, we identify CD13 and ROR2 as cell-surface markers capable of selecting early cardiac mesoderm emerging during hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that the CD13+/ROR2+ population encompasses pre-cardiac mesoderm, which efficiently differentiates to all major cardiovascular lineages. We determined the engraftment potential of CD13+/ROR2+ in small (murine) and large (porcine) animal models, and demonstrated that CD13+/ROR2+ progenitors have the capacity to differentiate toward cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells in vivo. Collectively, our data show that CD13 and ROR2 identify a cardiac lineage precursor pool that is capable of successful engraftment into the porcine heart. These markers represent valuable tools for further dissection of early human cardiac differentiation, and will enable a detailed assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac lineage cells for potential clinical applications.

  13. CD13 and ROR2 Permit Isolation of Highly Enriched Cardiac Mesoderm from Differentiating Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Rhys J P; Brady, Bevin; Khoja, Suhail; Sahoo, Debashis; Engel, James; Arasaratnam, Deevina; Saleh, Kholoud K; Abilez, Oscar J; Zhao, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Kwon, Murray; Elliott, David A; Ardehali, Reza

    2016-01-12

    The generation of tissue-specific cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is critical for the development of future stem cell-based regenerative therapies. Here, we identify CD13 and ROR2 as cell-surface markers capable of selecting early cardiac mesoderm emerging during hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that the CD13+/ROR2+ population encompasses pre-cardiac mesoderm, which efficiently differentiates to all major cardiovascular lineages. We determined the engraftment potential of CD13+/ROR2+ in small (murine) and large (porcine) animal models, and demonstrated that CD13+/ROR2+ progenitors have the capacity to differentiate toward cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells in vivo. Collectively, our data show that CD13 and ROR2 identify a cardiac lineage precursor pool that is capable of successful engraftment into the porcine heart. These markers represent valuable tools for further dissection of early human cardiac differentiation, and will enable a detailed assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac lineage cells for potential clinical applications. PMID:26771355

  14. CD13 and ROR2 Permit Isolation of Highly Enriched Cardiac Mesoderm from Differentiating Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rhys J.P.; Brady, Bevin; Khoja, Suhail; Sahoo, Debashis; Engel, James; Arasaratnam, Deevina; Saleh, Kholoud K.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Zhao, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Kwon, Murray; Elliott, David A.; Ardehali, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Summary The generation of tissue-specific cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is critical for the development of future stem cell-based regenerative therapies. Here, we identify CD13 and ROR2 as cell-surface markers capable of selecting early cardiac mesoderm emerging during hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that the CD13+/ROR2+ population encompasses pre-cardiac mesoderm, which efficiently differentiates to all major cardiovascular lineages. We determined the engraftment potential of CD13+/ROR2+ in small (murine) and large (porcine) animal models, and demonstrated that CD13+/ROR2+ progenitors have the capacity to differentiate toward cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells in vivo. Collectively, our data show that CD13 and ROR2 identify a cardiac lineage precursor pool that is capable of successful engraftment into the porcine heart. These markers represent valuable tools for further dissection of early human cardiac differentiation, and will enable a detailed assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac lineage cells for potential clinical applications. PMID:26771355

  15. Role of A2B Adenosine Receptors in Regulation of Paracrine Functions of Stem Cell Antigen 1-Positive Cardiac Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhov, Sergey; Goldstein, Anna E.; Novitskiy, Sergey V.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2012-01-01

    The existence of multipotent cardiac stromal cells expressing stem cell antigen (Sca)-1 has been reported, and their proangiogenic properties have been demonstrated in myocardial infarction models. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that stimulation of adenosine receptors on cardiac Sca-1+ cells up-regulates their secretion of proangiogenic factors. We found that Sca-1 is expressed in subsets of mouse cardiac stromal CD31− and endothelial CD31+ cells. The population of Sca-1+CD31+ endothelial cells was significantly reduced, whereas the population of Sca-1+CD31− stromal cells was increased 1 week after myocardial infarction, indicating their relative functional importance in this pathophysiological process. An increase in adenosine levels in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice in vivo significantly augmented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in cardiac Sca-1+CD31− stromal cells but not in Sca-1+CD31+ endothelial cells. We found that mouse cardiac Sca-1+CD31− stromal cells predominantly express mRNA encoding A2B adenosine receptors. Stimulation of adenosine receptors significantly increased interleukin (IL)-6, CXCL1 (a mouse ortholog of human IL-8), and VEGF release from these cells. Using conditionally immortalized Sca-1+CD31− stromal cells obtained from wild-type and A2B receptor knockout mouse hearts, we demonstrated that A2B receptors are essential for adenosine-dependent up-regulation of their paracrine functions. We found that the human heart also harbors a population of stromal cells similar to the mouse cardiac Sca-1+CD31− stromal cells that increase release of IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF in response to A2B receptor stimulation. Thus, our study identified A2B adenosine receptors on cardiac stromal cells as potential targets for up-regulation of proangiogenic factors in the ischemic heart. PMID:22431204

  16. Loss of the HVEM Tumor Suppressor in Lymphoma and Restoration by Modified CAR-T Cells.

    PubMed

    Boice, Michael; Salloum, Darin; Mourcin, Frederic; Sanghvi, Viraj; Amin, Rada; Oricchio, Elisa; Jiang, Man; Mottok, Anja; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Ciriello, Giovanni; Tam, Wayne; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; de Stanchina, Elisa; Chan, Wing C; Malek, Sami N; Ennishi, Daisuke; Brentjens, Renier J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Cogné, Michel; Tarte, Karin; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2016-10-01

    The HVEM (TNFRSF14) receptor gene is among the most frequently mutated genes in germinal center lymphomas. We report that loss of HVEM leads to cell-autonomous activation of B cell proliferation and drives the development of GC lymphomas in vivo. HVEM-deficient lymphoma B cells also induce a tumor-supportive microenvironment marked by exacerbated lymphoid stroma activation and increased recruitment of T follicular helper (TFH) cells. These changes result from the disruption of inhibitory cell-cell interactions between the HVEM and BTLA (B and T lymphocyte attenuator) receptors. Accordingly, administration of the HVEM ectodomain protein (solHVEM((P37-V202))) binds BTLA and restores tumor suppression. To deliver solHVEM to lymphomas in vivo, we engineered CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that produce solHVEM locally and continuously. These modified CAR-T cells show enhanced therapeutic activity against xenografted lymphomas. Hence, the HVEM-BTLA axis opposes lymphoma development, and our study illustrates the use of CAR-T cells as "micro-pharmacies" able to deliver an anti-cancer protein.

  17. The TGF-β pathway mediates doxorubicin effects on cardiac endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zuyue; Schriewer, Jill; Tang, Mingxin; Marlin, Jerry; Taylor, Frederick; Shohet, Ralph V; Konorev, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    Elevated ALK4/5 ligands including TGF-β and activins have been linked to cardiovascular remodeling and heart failure. Doxorubicin (Dox) is commonly used as a model of cardiomyopathy, a condition that often precedes cardiovascular remodeling and heart failure. In 7-8-week-old C57Bl/6 male mice treated with Dox we found decreased capillary density, increased levels of ALK4/5 ligand and Smad2/3 transcripts, and increased expression of Smad2/3 transcriptional targets. Human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMVEC) treated with Dox also showed increased levels of ALK4/5 ligands, Smad2/3 transcriptional targets, a decrease in proliferation and suppression of vascular network formation in a HCMVEC and human cardiac fibroblasts co-culture assay. Our hypothesis is that the deleterious effects of Dox on endothelial cells are mediated in part by the activation of the TGF-β pathway. We used the inhibitor of ALK4/5 kinases SB431542 (SB) in concert with Dox to ascertain the role of TGF-β pathway activation in doxorubicin induced endothelial cell defects. SB prevented the suppression of HCMVEC proliferation in the presence of TGF-β2 and activin A, and alleviated the inhibition of HCMVEC proliferation by Dox. SB also prevented the suppression of vascular network formation in co-cultures of HCMVEC and human cardiac fibroblasts treated with Dox. Our results show that the inhibition of the TGF-β pathway alleviates the detrimental effects of Dox on endothelial cells in vitro.

  18. Mechanisms that uncouple growth and differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells: restoration of requirement for normal growth-inducing protein without restoring induction of differentiation-inducing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L

    1982-01-01

    There are different macrophage- and granulocyte-inducing (MGI) proteins. Normal myeloid precursors are induced to multiply by one form (MGI-1) and to differentiate by another form (MGI-2). There are clones of myeloid leukemia cells that no longer require MGI-1 for growth but can still be induced to differentiate by MGI-2. After induction of differentiation in these leukemia cells by adding MCI-2 or inducing endogenous production of MGI-2 by lipopolysaccharide, the differentiating leukemia cells, like normal cells, again required MGI-1 for growth. This growth requirement for MGI-1 could not be substituted for by adding other protein growth factors such as epidermal, fibroblast, or nerve growth factor or insulin. Induction of differentiation in these leukemia cells by dexamethasone, arabinonucleoside (cytosine arabinoside), or methotrexate instead of by MGI-2, did not restore the requirement of MGI-1 for growth. Mutant myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate by MGI-2 also did not show this restoration of the requirement of MGI-1 for growth. MGI-1 in normal cells induced cell growth and also induced MGI-2, so that the cells could then differentiate by the endogenously produced MGI-2. However, MGI-1 did not induce production of MGI-2 in the leukemia cells, even though they again required MGI-1 for growth, so that there was no induction of differentiation after adding MGI-1. This lack of induction of differentiation-inducing protein by growth-inducing protein has thus identified an effective mechanism for uncoupling of growth and differentiation in malignant cells. PMID:6981812

  19. Fibronectin and Cyclic Strain Improve Cardiac Progenitor Cell Regenerative Potential In Vitro.

    PubMed

    French, Kristin M; Maxwell, Joshua T; Bhutani, Srishti; Ghosh-Choudhary, Shohini; Fierro, Marcos J; Johnson, Todd D; Christman, Karen L; Taylor, W Robert; Davis, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) have rapidly advanced to clinical trials, yet little is known regarding their interaction with the microenvironment. Signaling cues present in the microenvironment change with development and disease. This work aims to assess the influence of two distinct signaling moieties on CPCs: cyclic biaxial strain and extracellular matrix. We evaluate four endpoints for improving CPC therapy: paracrine signaling, proliferation, connexin43 expression, and alignment. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (about 900 pg/mL) was secreted by CPCs cultured on fibronectin and collagen I. The application of mechanical strain increased vascular endothelial growth factor A secretion 2-4-fold for CPCs cultured on poly-L-lysine, laminin, or a naturally derived cardiac extracellular matrix. CPC proliferation was at least 25% higher on fibronectin than that on other matrices, especially for lower strain magnitudes. At 5% strain, connexin43 expression was highest on fibronectin. With increasing strain magnitude, connexin43 expression decreased by as much as 60% in CPCs cultured on collagen I and a naturally derived cardiac extracellular matrix. Cyclic mechanical strain induced the strongest CPC alignment when cultured on fibronectin or collagen I. This study demonstrates that culturing CPCs on fibronectin with 5% strain magnitude is optimal for their vascular endothelial growth factor A secretion, proliferation, connexin43 expression, and alignment. PMID:27610140

  20. Fibronectin and Cyclic Strain Improve Cardiac Progenitor Cell Regenerative Potential In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh-Choudhary, Shohini; Fierro, Marcos J.; Christman, Karen L.; Taylor, W. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) have rapidly advanced to clinical trials, yet little is known regarding their interaction with the microenvironment. Signaling cues present in the microenvironment change with development and disease. This work aims to assess the influence of two distinct signaling moieties on CPCs: cyclic biaxial strain and extracellular matrix. We evaluate four endpoints for improving CPC therapy: paracrine signaling, proliferation, connexin43 expression, and alignment. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (about 900 pg/mL) was secreted by CPCs cultured on fibronectin and collagen I. The application of mechanical strain increased vascular endothelial growth factor A secretion 2–4-fold for CPCs cultured on poly-L-lysine, laminin, or a naturally derived cardiac extracellular matrix. CPC proliferation was at least 25% higher on fibronectin than that on other matrices, especially for lower strain magnitudes. At 5% strain, connexin43 expression was highest on fibronectin. With increasing strain magnitude, connexin43 expression decreased by as much as 60% in CPCs cultured on collagen I and a naturally derived cardiac extracellular matrix. Cyclic mechanical strain induced the strongest CPC alignment when cultured on fibronectin or collagen I. This study demonstrates that culturing CPCs on fibronectin with 5% strain magnitude is optimal for their vascular endothelial growth factor A secretion, proliferation, connexin43 expression, and alignment. PMID:27610140

  1. Fibronectin and Cyclic Strain Improve Cardiac Progenitor Cell Regenerative Potential In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh-Choudhary, Shohini; Fierro, Marcos J.; Christman, Karen L.; Taylor, W. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) have rapidly advanced to clinical trials, yet little is known regarding their interaction with the microenvironment. Signaling cues present in the microenvironment change with development and disease. This work aims to assess the influence of two distinct signaling moieties on CPCs: cyclic biaxial strain and extracellular matrix. We evaluate four endpoints for improving CPC therapy: paracrine signaling, proliferation, connexin43 expression, and alignment. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (about 900 pg/mL) was secreted by CPCs cultured on fibronectin and collagen I. The application of mechanical strain increased vascular endothelial growth factor A secretion 2–4-fold for CPCs cultured on poly-L-lysine, laminin, or a naturally derived cardiac extracellular matrix. CPC proliferation was at least 25% higher on fibronectin than that on other matrices, especially for lower strain magnitudes. At 5% strain, connexin43 expression was highest on fibronectin. With increasing strain magnitude, connexin43 expression decreased by as much as 60% in CPCs cultured on collagen I and a naturally derived cardiac extracellular matrix. Cyclic mechanical strain induced the strongest CPC alignment when cultured on fibronectin or collagen I. This study demonstrates that culturing CPCs on fibronectin with 5% strain magnitude is optimal for their vascular endothelial growth factor A secretion, proliferation, connexin43 expression, and alignment.

  2. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  3. [Cardiac invasion of ATLL cells and therapeutic effects of local along with systemic treatments].

    PubMed

    Imoto, S; Nakagawa, T; Ito, M

    1989-07-01

    We report a rare case of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in which cardiac invasion was clinically demonstrated and treated effectively. A 45-year-old female was admitted because of exertional dyspnea and cervical tumors. The leukocyte count was 19,100/microliters with 20% of flower cells. HTLV-I antibody was positive. She was diagnosed as ATLL and treated with VEPA. She got remission for a short duration which was followed by relapse. OPEC was started as salvage therapy. In the course, extensive pericardial effusion was found in chest X-P. Pericardial puncture demonstrated ATLL cells and high titer of free IL-2 receptor (57,400U/ml) in the effusion. It was diagnosed as pericardial invasion of ATLL cells. Chemotherapy was started with new combination of drugs (cisplatin, mitoxantrone, ifosfamide, and prednisolone). Concomitantly pericardial drainage was performed and the drugs were administered directly into the pericardial cavity. The clinical improvement was obtained and pericardial effusion did not appear thereafter. She died 4 months after the diagnosis of cardiac invasion. On autopsy myocardial invasion was identified. The pericardium widely adhered and effusion measured 42 ml. PMID:2810792

  4. Direct Mechanical Stimulation of Stem Cells: A Beating Electromechanically Active Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gelmi, Amy; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; de Muinck, Ebo; Los, Marek; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W H

    2016-06-01

    The combination of stem cell therapy with a supportive scaffold is a promising approach to improving cardiac tissue engineering. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair nonfunctioning heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration, and scaffold materials can be utilized in order to successfully deliver and support stem cells in vivo. Current research describes passive scaffold materials; here an electroactive scaffold that provides electrical, mechanical, and topographical cues to induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPS) is presented. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber scaffold coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) is capable of delivering direct electrical and mechanical stimulation to the iPS. The electroactive scaffolds demonstrate no cytotoxic effects on the iPS as well as an increased expression of cardiac markers for both stimulated and unstimulated protocols. This study demonstrates the first application of PPy as a supportive electroactive material for iPS and the first development of a fiber scaffold capable of dynamic mechanical actuation.

  5. Translating Stem Cell Research to Cardiac Disease Therapies: Pitfalls and Prospects for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael R.; Myerburg, Robert J.; Francis, Darrel P.; Cole, Graham D.; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, there have been numerous stem cell studies focused on cardiac diseases, ranging from proof-of-concept to phase 2 trials. This series of articles focuses on the legacy of these studies and the outlook for future treatment of cardiac diseases with stem cell therapies. The first section by Rosen and Myerburg is an independent review that analyzes the basic science and translational strategies supporting the rapid advance of stem cell technology to the clinic, the philosophies behind them, trial designs, and means for going forward that may impact favorably on progress. The second and third sections were collected in response to the initial section of this review. The commentary by Francis and Cole discusses the Rosen and Myerburg review and details how trial outcomes can be affected by noise, poor trial design (particularly the absence of blinding), and normal human tendencies toward optimism and denial. The final, independent article by Marbán takes a different perspective concerning the potential for positive impact of stem cell research applied to heart disease and future prospects for its clinical application. PMID:25169179

  6. Construction of three-dimensional vascularized cardiac tissue with cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-05-10

    Construction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues with pre-isolated cells is a promising achievement for novel medicine and drug-discovery research. Our laboratory constructs 3D tissues with an innovative and unique method for layering multiple cell sheets. Cell sheets maintain a high-efficiently regenerating function, because of the higher cell density and higher transplantation efficiency, compared to other cell-delivery methods. Cell sheets have already been applied in clinical applications for regenerative medicine in treating patients with various diseases. Therefore, in our search to develop a more efficient treatment with cell sheets, we are constructing 3D tissues by layering cell sheets. Native animal tissues and organs have an abundance of capillaries to supply oxygen and nutrients, and to remove waste molecules. In our investigation of vascularized cardiac cell sheets, we have found that endothelial cells within cell sheets spontaneously form blood vessel networks as in vivo capillaries. To construct even thicker 3D tissues by layering multiple cell sheets, it is critical to have a medium or blood flow within the vascular networks of the cell sheets. Therefore, to perfuse medium or blood in the cell sheet vascular network to maintain the viability of all cells, we developed two types of vascular beds; (1) a femoral muscle-based vascular bed, and (2) a synthetic collagen gel-based vascular bed. Both vascular beds successfully provide the critical flow of culture medium, which allows 12-layer cell sheets to survive. Such bioreactor systems, when combined with cell sheet engineering techniques, have produced functional vascularized 3D tissues. Here we explain and discuss the various processes to obtain vascular networks by properly connecting cell sheets and the engineering of 3D tissues.

  7. Speckle based configuration for simultaneous in vitro inspection of mechanical contractions of cardiac myocyte cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Mark; Fixler, Dror; Shainberg, Asher; Zlochiver, Sharon; Micó, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-04-01

    In this manuscript we propose optical lensless configuration for a remote non-contact measuring of mechanical contractions of vast number of cardiac myocytes. All the myocytes were taken from rats, and the measurements were done in an in vitro mode. The optical method is based on temporal analysis of secondary reflected speckle patterns generated in lensless microscope configuration. The processing involves analyzing the movement and the change in the statistics of the generated secondary speckle patterns that are created on top of the cell culture when it is illuminated by a spot of laser beam. The main advantage of the proposed system is the ability to measure many cells simultaneously (approximately one thousand cells) and to extract the statistical data of their movement at once. The presented experimental results also include investigation the effect of isoproteranol on cells contraction process.

  8. Bringing cardiac stem cell therapy from bench to bedside: lessons from the past and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Micheu, Miruna Mihaela; Scafa-Udrişte, Alexandru; DorobanŢu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Findings in the cardiology field from the last three decades of the 20th century were ruled by the theory that the heart is a post-mitotic organ, incapable to regenerate. Recent studies have brought evidences regarding the existence of some cells residing in the adult heart, having stem properties. These cardiac stem cells (CSCs) govern myocardial homeostasis and repair by differentiating into new cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells and vascular endothelial cells and also by releasing proangiogenic and procardiogenic cytokines. Hence, CSC-based therapy seems to be a promising tool for repairing failing hearts. This review presents the current data regarding various subpopulations of CSCs and their regenerative potential revealed by phase I clinical trials; finally, future perspectives for the development of more advanced therapeutic protocols are proposed. PMID:27516007

  9. A Synthetic Chloride Channel Restores Chloride Conductance in Human Cystic Fibrosis Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the gene-encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause defective transepithelial transport of chloride (Cl−) ions and fluid, thereby becoming responsible for the onset of cystic fibrosis (CF). One strategy to reduce the pathophysiology associated with CF is to increase Cl− transport through alternative pathways. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small synthetic molecule which forms Cl− channels to mediate Cl− transport across lipid bilayer membranes is capable of restoring Cl− permeability in human CF epithelial cells; as a result, it has the potential to become a lead compound for the treatment of human diseases associated with Cl− channel dysfunction. PMID:22514656

  10. Restoring wtp53 activity in HIPK2 depleted MCF7 cells by modulating metallothionein and zinc.

    PubMed

    Puca, Rosa; Nardinocchi, Lavinia; Bossi, Gianluca; Sacchi, Ada; Rechavi, Gideon; Givol, David; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of p53 transactivation activity is important for p53 apoptotic function. We have shown that stable knockdown of HIPK2 induces p53 misfolding with inhibition of p53 target gene transcription. In this study we established a lentiviral-based system for doxycyclin (Dox)-induced conditional interference of HIPK2 expression to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in p53 deregulation. We found that HIPK2 knockdown induced metallothionein 2A (MT2A) upregulation as assessed by RT-PCR analysis, increased promoter acetylation, and increased promoter luciferase activity. The MT2A upregulation correlated with resistance to Adriamycin (ADR)-driven apoptosis and with p53 inhibition. Thus, acute knockdown of HIPK2 (HIPK2i) induced misfolded p53 protein in MCF7 breast cancer cells and inhibited p53 DNA-binding and transcription activities in response to ADR treatment. Previous works show that MT may modulate p53 activity through zinc exchange. Here, we found that inhibition of MT2A expression by siRNA in the HIPK2i cells restored p53 transcription activity. Similarly zinc supplementation to HIPK2i cells restored p53 transcription activity and drug-induced apoptosis. These data support the notion that MT2A is involved in p53 deregulation and strengthen the possibility that combination of chemotherapy and zinc might be useful to treat tumors with inactive wtp53. PMID:18996371

  11. The Role of Astrocytes in Mediating Exogenous Cell-Based Restorative Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Liu, Zhongwu; Xin, Hongqi; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes have not been a major therapeutic target for the treatment of stroke, with most research emphasis on the neuron. Given the essential role that astrocytes play in maintaining physiological function of the central nervous system and the very rapid and sensitive reaction astrocytes have in response to cerebral injury or ischemic insult, we propose to replace the neurocentric view for treatment with a more nuanced astrocytic centered approach. In addition, after decades of effort in attempting to develop neuroprotective therapies, which target reduction of the ischemic lesion, there are no effective clinical treatments for stroke, aside from thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator, which is used in a small minority of patients. A more promising therapeutic approach, which may affect nearly all stroke patients, may be in promoting endogenous restorative mechanisms, which enhance neurological recovery. A focus of efforts in stimulating recovery post stroke is the use of exogenously administered cells. The present review focuses on the role of the astrocyte in mediating the brain network, brain plasticity, and neurological recovery post stroke. As a model to describe the interaction of a restorative cell-based therapy with astrocytes, which drives recovery from stroke, we specifically highlight the subacute treatment of stroke with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell therapy. PMID:24272702

  12. Generation and characterization of human cardiac resident and non-resident mesenchymal stem cell.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Baskar; Subbannagounder, Sellamuthu; Palanivel, Sekar; Ramanathanpullai, Chithra; Sivalingam, Sivakumar; Yakub, Azhari; SadanandaRao, Manjunath; Seenichamy, Arivudainambi; Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Tan, Jun Jie; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Despite the surgical and other insertional interventions, the complete recuperation of myocardial disorders is still elusive due to the insufficiency of functioning myocardiocytes. Thus, the use of stem cells to regenerate the affected region of heart becomes a prime important. In line with this human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) have gained considerable interest due to their potential use for mesodermal cell based replacement therapy and tissue engineering. Since MSCs are harvested from various organs and anatomical locations of same organism, thus the cardiac regenerative potential of human cardiac-derived MSCs (hC-MSCs) and human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly derived MSC (hUC-MSCs) were tested concurrently. At in vitro culture, both hUC-MSCs and hC-MSCs assumed spindle shape morphology with expression of typical MSC markers namely CD105, CD73, CD90 and CD44. Although, hUC-MSCs and hC-MSCs are identical in term of morphology and immunophenotype, yet hUC-MSCs harbored a higher cell growth as compared to the hC-MSCs. The inherent cardiac regenerative potential of both cells were further investigated with mRNA expression of ion channels. The RT-PCR results demonstrated that both MSCs were expressing a notable level of delayed rectifier-like K(+) current (I KDR ) ion channel, yet the relative expression level was considerably varied between hUC-MSCs and hC-MSCs that Kv1.1(39 ± 0.6 vs 31 ± 0.8), Kv2.1 (6 ± 0.2 vs 21 ± 0.12), Kv1.5 (7.4 ± 0.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.06) and Kv7.3 (27 ± 0.8 vs 13.8 ± 0.6). Similarly, the Ca2(+)-activated K(+) current (I KCa ) channel encoding gene, transient outward K(+) current (I to ) and TTX-sensitive transient inward sodium current (I Na.TTX ) encoding gene (Kv4.2, Kv4.3 and hNE-Na) expressions were detected in both groups as well. Despite the morphological and phenotypical similarity, the present study also confirms the existence of multiple functional ion channel currents IKDR, IKCa, Ito

  13. Restoration of proper trafficking to the cell surface for membrane proteins harboring cysteine mutations.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Angelica; Holmgren, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    A common phenotype for many genetic diseases is that the cell is unable to deliver full-length membrane proteins to the cell surface. For some forms of autism, hereditary spherocytosis and color blindness, the culprits are single point mutations to cysteine. We have studied two inheritable cysteine mutants of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels that produce achromatopsia, a common form of severe color blindness. By taking advantage of the reactivity of cysteine's sulfhydryl group, we modified these mutants with chemical reagents that attach moieties with similar chemistries to the wild-type amino acids' side chains. We show that these modifications restored proper delivery to the cell membrane. Once there, the channels exhibited normal functional properties. This strategy might provide a unique opportunity to assess the chemical nature of membrane protein traffic problems. PMID:23082193

  14. Lovastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Oi, S; Haneda, T; Osaki, J; Kashiwagi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kawabe, J; Kikuchi, K

    1999-07-01

    Angiotensin II activates p21ras, and mediates cardiac hypertrophic growth through the type 1 angiotensin II receptor in cardiac myocytes. An inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase has been shown to block the post-translational farnesylation of p21ras and inhibit protein synthesis in several cell types. Primary cultures of neonatal cardiac myocytes were used to determine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin inhibit the angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic growth. Angiotensin II (10(-6) M) significantly increased protein-DNA ratio, RNA-DNA ratio, ratios of protein synthesis and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin (10(-6) M) and simvastatin (10(-6) M) partially and significantly inhibited the angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, but a water-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, pravastatin (10(-6) M) did not. Mevalonate (10(-4) M) overcame the inhibitory effects of lovastatin and simvastatin on angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters. A selective protein kinase C inhibitor, calphostin C (10(-6) M) partially and significantly prevented angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, and treatment with both lovastatin and calphostin C inhibited completely. Angiotensin II increased p21ras activity and membrane association, and lovastatin inhibited them. These studies demonstrate that a lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, may prevent angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, at least in part, through p21ras/MAP kinase pathway, which is linked to mevalonate metabolism.

  15. Three-dimensional scaffolds of fetal decellularized hearts exhibit enhanced potential to support cardiac cells in comparison to the adult.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Rodrigues, S C; Caldeira, J; Nunes, A M; Sampaio-Pinto, V; Resende, T P; Oliveira, M J; Barbosa, M A; Thorsteinsdóttir, S; Nascimento, D S; Pinto-do-Ó, P

    2016-10-01

    A main challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the limited data on microenvironmental cues that sustain survival, proliferation and functional proficiency of cardiac cells. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential of fetal (E18) and adult myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM) to support cardiac cells. Acellular three-dimensional (3D) bioscaffolds were obtained by parallel decellularization of fetal- and adult-heart explants thereby ensuring reliable comparison. Acellular scaffolds retained main constituents of the cardiac ECM including distinctive biochemical and structural meshwork features of the native equivalents. In vitro, fetal and adult ECM-matrices supported 3D culture of heart-derived Sca-1(+) progenitors and of neonatal cardiomyocytes, which migrated toward the center of the scaffold and displayed elongated morphology and excellent viability. At the culture end-point, more Sca-1(+) cells and cardiomyocytes were found adhered and inside fetal bioscaffolds, compared to the adult. Higher repopulation yields of Sca-1(+) cells on fetal ECM relied on β1-integrin independent mitogenic signals. Sca-1(+) cells on fetal bioscaffolds showed a gene expression profile that anticipates the synthesis of a permissive microenvironment for cardiomyogenesis. Our findings demonstrate the superior potential of the 3D fetal microenvironment to support and instruct cardiac cells. This knowledge should be integrated in the design of next-generation biomimetic materials for heart repair.

  16. The effect of bioartificial constructs that mimic myocardial structure and biomechanical properties on stem cell commitment towards cardiac lineage.

    PubMed

    Cristallini, Caterina; Cibrario Rocchietti, Elisa; Accomasso, Lisa; Folino, Anna; Gallina, Clara; Muratori, Luisa; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Rastaldo, Raffaella; Raimondo, Stefania; Saviozzi, Silvia; Sprio, Andrea E; Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Barbani, Niccoletta; Giachino, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Despite the enormous progress in the treatment of coronary artery diseases, they remain the most common cause of heart failure in the Western countries. New translational therapeutic approaches explore cardiomyogenic differentiation of various types of stem cells in combination with tissue-engineered scaffolds. In this study we fabricated PHBHV/gelatin constructs mimicking myocardial structural properties. Chemical structure and molecular interaction between material components induced specific properties to the substrate in terms of hydrophilicity degree, porosity and mechanical characteristics. Viability and proliferation assays demonstrated that these constructs allow adhesion and growth of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cardiac resident non myocytic cells (NMCs). Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that stem cells cultured on these constructs adopt a distribution mimicking the three-dimensional cell alignment of myocardium. qPCR and immunofluorescence analyses showed the ability of this construct to direct initial MSC and NMC lineage specification towards cardiomyogenesis: both MSCs and NMCs showed the expression of the cardiac transcription factor GATA-4, fundamental for early cardiac commitment. Moreover NMCs also acquired the expression of the cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and TBX5 and produced sarcomeric proteins. This work may represent a new approach to induce both resident and non-resident stem cells to cardiac commitment in a 3-D structure, without using additional stimuli.

  17. Inhibition of ref-1 stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and induces differentiation in adult cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Narasimman; Mukherjee, Subhendu; Lekli, Istvan; Bearzi, Claudia; Bardelli, Silvana; Das, Dipak K

    2009-03-01

    Redox effector protein-1 (Ref-1) plays an essential role in DNA repair and redox regulation of several transcription factors. In the present study, we examined the role of Ref-1 in maintaining the redox status and survivability of adult cardiac stem cells challenged with a subtoxic level of H2O2 under inhibition of Ref-1 by RNA interference. Treatment of cardiac stem cells with a low concentration of H2O2 induced Ref-1-mediated survival signaling through phosphorylation of Akt. However, Ref-1 inhibition followed by H2O2 treatment extensively induced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through activation of the components of NADPH oxidase, like p22( phox ), p47( phox ), and Nox4. Cardiac differentiation markers (Nkx2.5, MEF2C, and GATA4), and cell death by apoptosis were significantly elevated in Ref-1 siRNA followed by H2O2-treated stem cells. Further, inhibition of Ref-1 increased the level of p53 but decreased the phosphorylation of Akt, a molecule involved in survival signaling. Treatment with ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine attenuated Ref-1 siRNA-mediated activation of NADPH oxidase and cardiac differentiation. Taken together, these results indicate that Ref-1 plays an important role in maintaining the redox status of cardiac stem cells and protects them from oxidative injury-mediated cell death and differentiation.

  18. Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

  19. The stimulation of the cardiac differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue constructs that mimic myocardium structure and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jianjun; Wang, Feng; Li, Zhenqing; Chen, Joseph; Guo, Xiaolei; Liao, Jun; Moldovan, Nicanor I

    2011-08-01

    We investigated whether tissue constructs resembling structural and mechanical properties of the myocardium would induce mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into a cardiac lineage, and whether further mimicking the 3-D cell alignment of myocardium would enhance cardiac differentiation. The tissue constructs were generated by integrating MSCs with elastic polyurethane nanofibers in an electrical field. Control of processing parameters resulted in tissue constructs recapitulating the fibrous and anisotropic structure, and typical stress-strain response of native porcine myocardium. MSCs proliferated in the tissue constructs when cultured dynamically, but retained a round morphology. mRNA expression demonstrated that cardiac differentiation was significantly stimulated. Enhanced cardiac differentiation was achieved by 3-D alignment of MSCs within the tissue constructs. Cell alignment was attained by statically stretching tissue constructs during culture. Increasing stretching strain from 25% to 75% increased the degree of 3-D cell alignment. Real time RT-PCR results showed that when cells assuming a high degree of alignment (with application of 75% strain), their expression of cardiac markers (GATA4, Nkx2.5 and MEF2C) remarkably increased. The differentiated cells also developed calcium channels, which are required to have electrophysiological properties. This report to some extent explains the outcome of many in vivo studies, where only a limited amount of the injected MSCs differentiated into cardiomyocytes. It is possible that the strain of the heartbeat (∼20%) cannot allow the MSCs to have an alignment high enough for a remarkable cardiac differentiation. This work suggests that pre-differentiation of MSCs into cardiomyocytes prior to injection may result in a greater degree of cardiac regeneration than simply injecting un-differentiated MSCs into heart.

  20. Adipose-derived stromal cell therapy improves cardiac function after coronary occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Bagno, Luiza L S; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro S; Oliveira, Patrícia F; Cunha-Abreu, Márcia S; Rocha, Nazareth N; Kasai-Brunswick, Taís H; Lago, Vivian M; Goldenberg, Regina C S; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified adipose tissue as a new source of mesenchymal stem cells for therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapy with adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) in a rat model of healed myocardial infarction (MI). ASCs from inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue of male Wistar rats were isolated by enzymatic digestion and filtration. Cells were then cultured until passage 3. Four weeks after ligation of the left coronary artery of female rats, a suspension of either 100 µl with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) + Matrigel + 2 × 10(6) ASCs labeled with Hoechst (n = 11) or 100 µl of PBS + Matrigel (n = 10) was injected along the borders of the ventricular wall scar tissue. A sham-operated group (n = 5) was submitted to the same surgical procedure except permanent ligation of left coronary artery. Cardiac performance was assessed by electro- and echocardiogram. Echo was performed prior to injections (baseline, BL) and 6 weeks after injections (follow-up, FU), and values after treatment were normalized by values obtained before treatment. Hemodynamic measurements were performed 6 weeks after injections. All infarcted animals exhibited cardiac function impairment. Ejection fraction (EF), shortening fractional area (SFA), and left ventricular akinesia (LVA) were similar between infarcted groups before treatment. Six weeks after therapy, ASC group showed significant improvement in all three ECHO indices in comparison to vehicle group. In anesthetized animals dp/dt(+) was also significantly higher in ASCs when compared to vehicle. In agreement with functional improvement, scar area was diminished in the ASC group. We conclude that ASCs improve cardiac function in infarcted rats when administered directly to the myocardium. PMID:22472303

  1. MicroRNA-133a engineered mesenchymal stem cells augment cardiac function and cell survival in the infarct heart

    PubMed Central

    Dakhlallah, Duaa; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Marsh, Clay B.; Angelos, Mark G.; Khan, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The most common manifestation of cardiovascular disease is myocardial infarction (MI), which can ultimately lead to congestive heart failure (CHF). Cell therap (cardiomyoplasty) is a new potential therapeutic treatment alternative for the damaged heart. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell type for cardiomyoplasty applications. However, a major limitation is the poor survival rate of transplanted stem cells in the infarcted heart. miR-133a is an abundantly expressed microRNA in the cardiac muscle and is down-regulated in patients with MI. We hypothesized that reprogramming MSCs using microRNA-mimics (double-stranded oligonucleotides) will improve survival of stem cells in the damaged heart. MSCs were transfected with miR-133a mimic and antagomirs and the levels of miR-133a were measured by qRT-PCR. Rat hearts were subjected to MI and MSCs transfected with miR-133a mimic or antagomir were implanted in the ischemic heart. Four weeks after MI, cardiac function, cardiac fibrosis, miR-133a levels and apoptosis related genes (Apaf-1, Capase-9 and Caspase-3) were measured in the heart. We found that transfecting MSCs with miR-133a mimic improves survival of MSCs as determined by the MTT assay. Similarly, transplantation of miR-133a mimic transfected MSCs in rat hearts subjected to MI led to a significant increase in cell engraftment, cardiac function and decreased fibrosis when compared with MSCs only or MI groups. At the molecular level, qRT-PCR data demonstrated a significant decrease in expression of the pro-apoptotic genes; Apaf-1, caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the miR-133a mimic transplanted group. Further, luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR- 133a is a direct target for Apaf-1. Overall, bioengineering of stem cells through miRNAs manipulation could potentially improve the therapeutic outcome of

  2. Bifurcations, chaos, and sensitivity to parameter variations in the Sato cardiac cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Stefan; Berg, Sebastian; Luther, Stefan; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of a detailed ionic cardiac cell model proposed by Sato et al. (2009) is investigated in terms of periodic and chaotic action potentials, bifurcation scenarios, and coexistence of attractors. Starting from the model's standard parameter values bifurcation diagrams are computed to evaluate the model's robustness with respect to (small) parameter changes. While for some parameters the dynamics turns out to be practically independent from their values, even minor changes of other parameters have a very strong impact and cause qualitative changes due to bifurcations or transitions to coexisting attractors. Implications of this lack of robustness are discussed.

  3. Materializing Heart Regeneration: Biomimicry of Key Observations in Cell Transplantation Therapies and Natural Cardiac Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yen P.; Jongpaiboonkit, Leena

    2016-07-01

    New regenerative paradigms are needed to address the growing global problem of heart failure as existing interventions are unsatisfactory. Outcomes from the current paradigm of cell transplantation have not been stellar but the mechanistic knowledge learned from them is instructive in the development of future paradigms. An emerging biomaterial-based approach incorporating key mechanisms and additional ones scrutinized from the process of natural heart regeneration in zebrafish may become the next evolution in cardiac repair. We highlight, with examples, tested key concepts and pivotal ones that may be integrated into a successful therapy.

  4. Multipotent human stromal cells improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice without long-term engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Iso, Yoshitaka; Spees, Jeffrey L.; E-mail: Jeffrey.Spees@uvm.edu; Serrano, Claudia; Bakondi, Benjamin; Pochampally, Radhika; Song, Yao-Hua; Sobel, Burton E.; Delafontaine, Patrick; Prockop, Darwin J. . E-mail: dprocko@tulane.edu

    2007-03-16

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intravenously administered multipotent stromal cells from human bone marrow (hMSCs) can improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) without long-term engraftment and therefore whether transitory paracrine effects or secreted factors are responsible for the benefit conferred. hMSCs were injected systemically into immunodeficient mice with acute MI. Cardiac function and fibrosis after MI in the hMSC-treated group were significantly improved compared with controls. However, despite the cardiac improvement, there was no evident hMSC engraftment in the heart 3 weeks after MI. Microarray assays and ELISAs demonstrated that multiple protective factors were expressed and secreted from the hMSCs in culture. Factors secreted by hMSCs prevented cell death of cultured cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells under conditions that mimicked tissue ischemia. The favorable effects of hMSCs appear to reflect the impact of secreted factors rather than engraftment, differentiation, or cell fusion.

  5. Periprostatic implantation of neural differentiated mesenchymal stem cells restores cavernous nerve injury-mediated erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Feng; Jia, Chang-Chang; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Ye, Xiao-Long; Wei, Bo; Huang, Li-Jun; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been utilized to restore erectile function in animal models of cavernous nerve injury (CNI). However, transplantation of primary MSCs may lead to unpredictable therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of neural differentiated MSCs (d-MSCs) on the restoration of erectile function in CNI rats. Rat bone marrow MSCs (r-BM-MSCs) were treated with all-trans retinoic acid to induce neural differentiation. Rats were divided into five groups: a sham operation group; a bilateral CNI group that received an intracavernous injection of r-BM-MSCs (IC group); and three groups that received periprostatic implantation of either r-BM-MSCs (IP group), d-MSCs (IP-d group), or PBS (PBS group). The data revealed that IP injection of d-MSCs ameliorated erectile function in a similar manner to an IC injection of MSCs and enhanced erectile function compared to an IP injection of MSCs. An in vivo time course of d-MSCs survival revealed that PKH26-labled d-MSCs were detectable either within or surrounding the cavernous nerve tissue. In addition, the expression of caspase-3 significantly increased in the PBS group and decreased after treatment with MSCs, especially in the IC and IP-d groups. Furthermore, the expression levels of neurotrophic factors increased significantly in d-MSCs. This study demonstrated that periprostatic implantation of d-MSCs effectively restored erectile function in CNI rats. The mechanism might be ascribed to decreases in the frequency of apoptotic cells, as well as paracrine signaling by factors derived from d-MSCs. PMID:27398139

  6. Cardiac Repair With a Novel Population of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resident in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Sivakumaran, Priyadharshini; Newcomb, Andrew E; Hernandez, Damián; Harris, Nicole; Khanabdali, Ramin; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Kelly, Darren J; Pébay, Alice; Hewitt, Alex W; Boyle, Andrew; Harvey, Richard; Morrison, Wayne A; Elliott, David A; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac resident stem cells (CRSCs) hold much promise to treat heart disease but this remains a controversial field. Here, we describe a novel population of CRSCs, which are positive for W8B2 antigen and were obtained from adult human atrial appendages. W8B2(+) CRSCs exhibit a spindle-shaped morphology, are clonogenic and capable of self-renewal. W8B2(+) CRSCs show high expression of mesenchymal but not hematopoietic nor endothelial markers. W8B2(+) CRSCs expressed GATA4, HAND2, and TBX5, but not C-KIT, SCA-1, NKX2.5, PDGFRα, ISL1, or WT1. W8B2(+) CRSCs can differentiate into cardiovascular lineages and secrete a range of cytokines implicated in angiogenesis, chemotaxis, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, cell growth, and survival. In vitro, conditioned medium collected from W8B2(+) CRSCs displayed prosurvival, proangiogenic, and promigratory effects on endothelial cells, superior to that of other adult stem cells tested, and additionally promoted survival and proliferation of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Intramyocardial transplantation of human W8B2(+) CRSCs into immunocompromised rats 1 week after myocardial infarction markedly improved cardiac function (∼40% improvement in ejection fraction) and reduced fibrotic scar tissue 4 weeks after infarction. Hearts treated with W8B2(+) CRSCs showed less adverse remodeling of the left ventricle, a greater number of proliferating cardiomyocytes (Ki67(+) cTnT(+) cells) in the remote region, higher myocardial vascular density, and greater infiltration of CD163(+) cells (a marker for M2 macrophages) into the border zone and scar regions. In summary, W8B2(+) CRSCs are distinct from currently known CRSCs found in human hearts, and as such may be an ideal cell source to repair myocardial damage after infarction.

  7. Transgenic systems for unequivocal identification of cardiac myocyte nuclei and analysis of cardiomyocyte cell cycle status.

    PubMed

    Raulf, Alexandra; Horder, Hannes; Tarnawski, Laura; Geisen, Caroline; Ottersbach, Annika; Röll, Wilhelm; Jovinge, Stefan; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Hesse, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Even though the mammalian heart has been investigated for many years, there are still uncertainties in the fields of cardiac cell biology and regeneration with regard to exact fractions of cardiomyocytes (CMs) at different developmental stages, their plasticity after cardiac lesion and also their basal turnover rate. A main shortcoming is the accurate identification of CM and the demonstration of CM division. Therefore, an in vivo model taking advantage of a live reporter-based identification of CM nuclei and their cell cycle status is needed. In this technical report, we describe the generation and characterization of embryonic stem cells and transgenic mice expressing a fusion protein of human histone 2B and the red fluorescence protein mCherry under control of the CM specific αMHC promoter. This fluorescence label allows unequivocal identification and quantitation of CM nuclei and nuclearity in isolated cells and native tissue slices. In ventricles of adults, we determined a fraction of <20 % CMs and binucleation of 77-90 %, while in atria a CM fraction of 30 % and a binucleation index of 14 % were found. We combined this transgenic system with the CAG-eGFP-anillin transgene, which identifies cell division and established a novel screening assay for cell cycle-modifying substances in isolated, postnatal CMs. Our transgenic live reporter-based system enables reliable identification of CM nuclei and determination of CM fractions and nuclearity in heart tissue. In combination with CAG-eGFP-anillin-mice, the cell cycle status of CMs can be monitored in detail enabling screening for proliferation-inducing substances in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Restoration of contact inhibition in human glioblastoma cell lines after MIF knockdown

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies of the role of the cytokine macrophage-migration-inhibitory-factor (MIF) in malignant tumors have revealed its stimulating influence on cell-cycle progression, angiogenesis and anti-apoptosis. Results Here we show that in vitro targeting MIF in cultures of human malignant glioblastoma cells by either antisense plasmid introduction or anti-MIF antibody treatment reduced the growth rates of tumor cells. Of note is the marked decrease of proliferation under confluent and over-confluent conditions, implying a role of MIF in overcoming contact inhibition. Several proteins involved in contact inhibition including p27, p21, p53 and CEBPalpha are upregulated in the MIF antisense clones indicating a restoration of contact inhibition in the tumor cells. Correspondingly, we observed a marked increase in MIF mRNA and protein content under higher cell densities in LN18 cells. Furthermore, we showed the relevance of the enzymatic active site of MIF for the proliferation of glioblastoma cells by using the MIF-tautomerase inhibitor ISO-1. Conclusion Our study adds another puzzle stone to the role of MIF in tumor growth and progression by showing the importance of MIF for overcoming contact inhibition. PMID:20038293

  9. Biorealistic cardiac cell culture platforms with integrated monitoring of extracellular action potentials.

    PubMed

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Terracciano, Cesare M; Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Humphrey, Eleanor J; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2015-01-01

    Current platforms for in vitro drug development utilize confluent, unorganized monolayers of heart cells to study the effect on action potential propagation. However, standard cell cultures are of limited use in cardiac research, as they do not preserve important structural and functional properties of the myocardium. Here we present a method to integrate a scaffolding technology with multi-electrode arrays and deliver a compact, off-the-shelf monitoring platform for growing biomimetic cardiac tissue. Our approach produces anisotropic cultures with conduction velocity (CV) profiles that closer resemble native heart tissue; the fastest impulse propagation is along the long axis of the aligned cardiomyocytes (CVL) and the slowest propagation is perpendicular (CVT), in contrast to standard cultures where action potential propagates isotropically (CVL ≈ CVT). The corresponding anisotropy velocity ratios (CVL/CVT = 1.38 - 2.22) are comparable with values for healthy adult rat ventricles (1.98 - 3.63). The main advantages of this approach are that (i) it provides ultimate pattern control, (ii) it is compatible with automated manufacturing steps and (iii) it is utilized through standard cell culturing protocols. Our platform is compatible with existing read-out equipment and comprises a prompt method for more reliable CV studies.

  10. Biorealistic cardiac cell culture platforms with integrated monitoring of extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Terracciano, Cesare M.; Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Humphrey, Eleanor J.; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2015-01-01

    Current platforms for in vitro drug development utilize confluent, unorganized monolayers of heart cells to study the effect on action potential propagation. However, standard cell cultures are of limited use in cardiac research, as they do not preserve important structural and functional properties of the myocardium. Here we present a method to integrate a scaffolding technology with multi-electrode arrays and deliver a compact, off-the-shelf monitoring platform for growing biomimetic cardiac tissue. Our approach produces anisotropic cultures with conduction velocity (CV) profiles that closer resemble native heart tissue; the fastest impulse propagation is along the long axis of the aligned cardiomyocytes (CVL) and the slowest propagation is perpendicular (CVT), in contrast to standard cultures where action potential propagates isotropically (CVL ≈ CVT). The corresponding anisotropy velocity ratios (CVL/CVT = 1.38 – 2.22) are comparable with values for healthy adult rat ventricles (1.98 – 3.63). The main advantages of this approach are that (i) it provides ultimate pattern control, (ii) it is compatible with automated manufacturing steps and (iii) it is utilized through standard cell culturing protocols. Our platform is compatible with existing read-out equipment and comprises a prompt method for more reliable CV studies. PMID:26053434

  11. Influence of Lithium Ions on the Transmembrane Potential and Cation Content of Cardiac Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carmeliet, E. E.

    1964-01-01

    The effect of lithium ions on cardiac cells was investigated by recording the changes in transmembrane potential and by following the movement of Li, Na, and K across the cell membrane. Isolated preparations of calf Purkinje fibers and cat ventricular muscles were used. Potentials were measured by intracellular microelectrodes; ion transport was estimated by flame photometric analysis and by using the radioactive isotopes of Na and K. It was shown (a) that Li ions can replace Na ions in the mechanism generating the cardiac action potential but that they also cause a marked depolarization and pronounced changes in action potential configuration; (b) that the resting permeability to Li ions is high and that these ions accumulate in the cell interior as if they were not actively pumped outwards. In Li-Tyrode [K]i decreases markedly while the K permeability seems to be increased. In a kinetic study of net K and Na fluxes, the outward movement of each ion was found to be proportional to the second power of its intracellular concentration. The effect on the transmembrane potential is explained in terms of changes in ion movement and intracellular ion concentration. PMID:14100967

  12. Endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the STOX1 model of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Aurélien; Doridot, Ludivine; Calicchio, Rosamaria; Méhats, Celine; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Castille, Johann; Barbaux, Sandrine; Couderc, Betty; Jacques, Sébastien; Letourneur, Franck; Buffat, Christophe; Le Grand, Fabien; Laissue, Paul; Miralles, Francisco; Vaiman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease of pregnancy involving systemic endothelial dysfunction. However, cardiovascular consequences of preeclampsia are difficult to analyze in humans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by preeclampsia by examining the endothelium of mice suffering of severe preeclampsia induced by STOX1 overexpression. Using Next Generation Sequencing on endothelial cells of mice carrying either transgenic or control embryos, we discovered significant alterations of gene networks involved in inflammation, cell cycle, and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the heart of the preeclamptic mice revealed cardiac hypertrophy associated with histological anomalies. Bioinformatics comparison of the networks of modified genes in the endothelial cells of the preeclamptic mice and HUVECs exposed to plasma from preeclamptic women identified striking similarities. The cardiovascular alterations in the pregnant mice are comparable to those endured by the cardiovascular system of preeclamptic women. The STOX1 mice could help to better understand the endothelial dysfunction in the context of preeclampsia, and guide the search for efficient therapies able to protect the maternal endothelium during the disease and its aftermath. PMID:26758611

  13. Somatic mutations and affinity maturation are impaired by excessive numbers of T follicular helper cells and restored by Treg cells or memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Preite, Silvia; Baumjohann, Dirk; Foglierini, Mathilde; Basso, Camilla; Ronchi, Francesca; Rodriguez, Blanca M. Fernandez; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that Cd3e‐deficient mice adoptively transferred with CD4+ T cells generate high numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which go on to induce a strong B‐cell and germinal center (GC) reaction. Here, we show that in this system, GC B cells display an altered distribution between the dark and light zones, and express low levels of activation‐induced cytidine deaminase. Furthermore, GC B cells from Cd3e –/– mice accumulate fewer somatic mutations as compared with GC B cells from wild‐type mice, and exhibit impaired affinity maturation and reduced differentiation into long‐lived plasma cells. Reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with regulatory T (Treg) cells restored Tfh‐cell numbers, GC B‐cell numbers and B‐cell distribution within dark and light zones, and the rate of antibody somatic mutations. Tfh‐cell numbers and GC B‐cell numbers and dynamics were also restored by pre‐reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with Cxcr5 –/– Treg cells or non‐regulatory, memory CD4+ T cells. Taken together, these findings underline the importance of a quantitatively regulated Tfh‐cell response for an efficient and long‐lasting serological response. PMID:26332258

  14. Expression of Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Separates Hematopoietic and Cardiac Progenitor Cells in Fetal Liver Kinase 1-Expressing Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Hirata, Nobue; Okada, Atsumasa; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Takayama, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In developing embryos or in vitro differentiation cultures using pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, fetal liver kinase 1 (Flk1)-expressing mesodermal cells are thought to be a heterogeneous population that includes hematopoietic progenitors, endothelial progenitors, and cardiac progenitors. However, information on cell surface markers for separating these progenitors in Flk1+ cells is currently limited. In the present study, we show that distinct types of progenitor cells in Flk1+ cells could be separated according to the expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, also known as CXADR), a tight junction component molecule. We found that mouse and human PSC- and mouse embryo-derived Flk1+ cells could be subdivided into Flk1+CAR+ cells and Flk1+CAR− cells. The progenitor cells with cardiac potential were almost entirely restricted to Flk1+CAR+ cells, and Flk1+CAR− cells efficiently differentiated into hematopoietic cells. Endothelial differentiation potential was observed in both populations. Furthermore, from the expression of CAR, Flk1, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα), Flk1+ cells could be separated into three populations (Flk1+PDGFRα−CAR− cells, Flk1+PDGFRα−CAR+ cells, and Flk1+PDGFRα+CAR+ cells). Flk1+PDGFRα+ cells and Flk1+PDGFRα− cells have been reported as cardiac and hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. We identified a novel population (Flk1+PDGFRα−CAR+ cells) with the potential to differentiate into not only hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells but also cardiomyocytes. Our findings indicate that CAR would be a novel and prominent marker for separating PSC- and embryo-derived Flk1+ mesodermal cells with distinct differentiation potentials. PMID:25762001

  15. Activation of Dbl restores migration in polyamine-depleted intestinal epithelial cells via Rho-GTPases.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Bavaria, Mitulkumar N; Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Johnson, Leonard R

    2011-06-01

    Integrin binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) activated Rho GTPases, Src, and focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6. Polyamine depletion inhibited activities of Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42 and thereby migration. However, constitutively active (CA) Rac1 expression abolished the inhibitory effect of polyamine depletion, indicating that polyamines are involved in a process upstream of Rac1. In the present study, we examined the role of polyamines in the regulation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, diffuse B-cell lymphoma (Dbl), for Rho GTPases. Polyamine depletion decreased the level as well as the activation of Dbl protein. Dbl knockdown by siRNA altered cytoskeletal structure and decreased Rac1 activity and migration. Cells expressing CA-Dbl increased migration, Rac1 activity, and proliferation. CA-Dbl restored migration in polyamine-depleted cells by activating RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. CA-Dbl caused extensive reorganization of the F-actin cortex into stress fibers. Inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 significantly decreased migration of vector-transfected cells and CA-Dbl-transfected cells. However, the inhibition of migration was significantly higher in the vector-transfected cells compared with that seen in the CA-Dbl-transfected cells. Dbl localized in the perinuclear region in polyamine-depleted cells, whereas it localized with the stress fibers in control cells. CA-Dbl localized with stress fibers in both the control and polyamine-depleted cells. These results suggest that polyamines regulate the activation of Dbl, a membrane-proximal process upstream of Rac1.

  16. Rejection of cardiac allografts by T cells expressing a restricted repertoire of T-cell receptor V beta genes.

    PubMed Central

    Shirwan, H; Barwari, L; Cramer, D V

    1997-01-01

    We have recently shown that T cells infiltrating cardiac allografts early in graft rejection use a limited T-cell receptor (TCR) V beta repertoire. In this study we tested whether this limited repertoire of V beta genes is important for graft rejection. A cell line, AL2-L3, was established from LEW lymphocytes infiltrating ACI heart allografts 2 days after transplantation. This cell line is composed of CD4+ T cells that primarily recognize the class II RTI.B major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule expressed by the donor graft. This cell line precipitated acute rejection of donor hearts with a median survival time (MST) of 10.5 days following adoptive transfer to sublethally irradiated LEW recipients. This rate of graft rejection was significantly (P < 0.0007) accelerated when compared with a MST of 60 days for allografts in irradiated control recipients. The AL2-L3-mediated acceleration of graft rejection was donor specific as WF third-party heart allografts were rejected with a delayed tempo (MST = 28.5 days). The V beta repertoire of this cell line was primarily restricted to the expression of V beta 4, 15 and 19 genes. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the beta-chain cDNAs from this cell line demonstrated that the restricted use of the V gene repertoire was not shared with the N, D and J regions. A wide variety of CDR3 loops and J beta genes were used in association with selected V beta genes. These data provide evidence for the role a restricted repertoire of V beta genes plays in cardiac allograft rejection in this model. The restricted usage of the V beta repertoire in an early T-cell response to allografts may provide the opportunity to therapeutically disrupt the rejection reaction by targeting selected T-cell populations for elimination at the time of organ transplantation. Images Figure 2 PMID:9176111

  17. Inhibition of G9a Histone Methyltransferase Converts Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Cardiac Competent Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinpu; Kaur, Keerat; Ong, Li Lin; Eisenberg, Carol A.; Eisenberg, Leonard M.

    2015-01-01

    The G9a histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX01294 was examined for its ability to expand the cardiac capacity of bone marrow cells. Inhibition of G9a histone methyltransferase by gene specific knockdown or BIX01294 treatment was sufficient to induce expression of precardiac markers Mesp1 and brachyury in bone marrow cells. BIX01294 treatment also allowed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to express the cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5, GATA4, and myocardin when subsequently exposed to the cardiogenic stimulating factor Wnt11. Incubation of BIX01294-treated MSCs with cardiac conditioned media provoked formation of phase bright cells that exhibited a morphology and molecular profile resembling similar cells that normally form from cultured atrial tissue. Subsequent aggregation and differentiation of BIX01294-induced, MSC-derived phase bright cells provoked their cardiomyogenesis. This latter outcome was indicated by their widespread expression of the primary sarcomeric proteins muscle α-actinin and titin. MSC-derived cultures that were not initially treated with BIX01294 exhibited neither a commensurate burst of phase bright cells nor stimulation of sarcomeric protein expression. Collectively, these data indicate that BIX01294 has utility as a pharmacological agent that could enhance the ability of an abundant and accessible stem cell population to regenerate new myocytes for cardiac repair. PMID:26089912

  18. Inorganic polyphosphate in cardiac myocytes: from bioenergetics to the permeability transition pore and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Dedkova, Elena N

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear polymer of Pi residues linked together by high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds as in ATP. PolyP is present in all living organisms ranging from bacteria to human and possibly even predating life of this planet. The length of polyP chain can vary from just a few phosphates to several thousand phosphate units long, depending on the organism and the tissue in which it is synthesized. PolyP was extensively studied in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes by Kulaev's group in the Russian Academy of Sciences and by the Nobel Prize Laureate Arthur Kornberg at Stanford University. Recently, we reported that mitochondria of cardiac ventricular myocytes contain significant amounts (280±60 pmol/mg of protein) of polyP with an average length of 25 Pi and that polyP is involved in Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Enzymatic polyP depletion prevented Ca(2+)-induced mPTP opening during ischaemia; however, it did not affect reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mPTP opening during reperfusion and even enhanced cell death in cardiac myocytes. We found that ROS generation was actually enhanced in polyP-depleted cells demonstrating that polyP protects cardiac myocytes against enhanced ROS formation. Furthermore, polyP concentration was dynamically changed during activation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and stress conditions such as ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) and heart failure (HF) indicating that polyP is required for the normal heart metabolism. This review discusses the current literature on the roles of polyP in cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:26862184

  19. Holographic analysis on deformation and restoration of malaria-infected red blood cells by antimalarial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    Malaria parasites induce morphological, biochemical, and mechanical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). Mechanical variations are closely related to the deformability of individual RBCs. The deformation of various RBCs, including healthy and malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs), can be directly observed through quantitative phase imaging (QPI). The effects of chloroquine treatment on the mechanical property variation of iRBCs were investigated using time-resolved holographic QPI of single live cells on a millisecond time scale. The deformabilities of healthy RBCs, iRBCs, and drug-treated iRBCs were compared, and the effect of chloroquine on iRBC restoration was experimentally examined. The present results are beneficial to elucidate the dynamic characteristics of iRBCs and the effect of the antimalarial drug on iRBCs.

  20. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  1. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4.

  2. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Use in Cardiac and Neural Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Skalova, Stepanka; Svadlakova, Tereza; Qureshi, Wasay Mohiuddin Shaikh; Dev, Kapil; Mokry, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are unique pools of cells that are crucial for embryonic development and maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. The landmark Nobel Prize winning research by Yamanaka and colleagues to induce pluripotency in somatic cells has reshaped the field of stem cell research. The complications related to the usage of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in human medicine, particularly ESC isolation and histoincompatibility were bypassed with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology. The human iPSCs can be used for studying embryogenesis, disease modeling, drug testing and regenerative medicine. iPSCs can be diverted to different cell lineages using small molecules and growth factors. In this review we have focused on iPSC differentiation towards cardiac and neuronal lineages. Moreover, we deal with the use of iPSCs in regenerative medicine and modeling diseases like myocardial infarction, Timothy syndrome, dilated cardiomyopathy, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease. Despite the promising potential of iPSCs, genome contamination and low efficacy of cell reprogramming remain significant challenges. PMID:25689424

  4. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Javaid, Alia; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Schurich, Anna; Dunn, Claire; Pallant, Celeste; Ellis, Gidon; Khanna, Pooja; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Gilson, Richard J; Maini, Mala K

    2010-01-01

    NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB), allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright) NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade. PMID:21187913

  5. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Impaired Mucosal Immune Responses in Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Aso, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruhara, Akitoshi; Takagaki, Kentaro; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ota, Megumi; Nose, Yasuhiro; Tanemura, Hideki; Urushihata, Naoki; Sasanuma, Jinichi; Sano, Masayuki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Aso, Rio; McGhee, Jerry R; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) can differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Several clinical trials have shown the ability of AMSCs to regenerate these differentiated cell types. Age-associated dysregulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) immune system has been well documented. Our previous studies showed that impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract occurs earlier during agingthan is seen in the systemic compartment. In this study, we examined the potential of AMSCs to restore the GI mucosal immune system in aged mice. Aged (>18 mo old) mice were adoptively transferred with AMSCs. Two weeks later, mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) three times at weekly intervals. Seven days after the final immunization, when fecal extract samples and plasma were subjected to OVA- and CT-B-specific ELISA, elevated levels of mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) and plasma IgG antibody (Ab) responses were noted in aged mouse recipients. Similar results were also seen aged mice which received AMSCs at one year of age. When cytokine production was examined, OVA-stimulated Peyer's patch CD4+ T cells produced increased levels of IL-4. Further, CD4+ T cells from the lamina propria revealed elevated levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ production. In contrast, aged mice without AMSC transfer showed essentially no OVA- or CT-B-specific mucosal SIgA or plasma IgG Ab or cytokine responses. Of importance, fecal extracts from AMSC transferred aged mice showed neutralization activity to CT intoxication. These results suggest that AMSCs can restore impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract of aged mice. PMID:26840058

  6. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Impaired Mucosal Immune Responses in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruhara, Akitoshi; Takagaki, Kentaro; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ota, Megumi; Nose, Yasuhiro; Tanemura, Hideki; Urushihata, Naoki; Sasanuma, Jinichi; Sano, Masayuki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Aso, Rio; McGhee, Jerry R.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) can differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Several clinical trials have shown the ability of AMSCs to regenerate these differentiated cell types. Age-associated dysregulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) immune system has been well documented. Our previous studies showed that impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract occurs earlier during agingthan is seen in the systemic compartment. In this study, we examined the potential of AMSCs to restore the GI mucosal immune system in aged mice. Aged (>18 mo old) mice were adoptively transferred with AMSCs. Two weeks later, mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) three times at weekly intervals. Seven days after the final immunization, when fecal extract samples and plasma were subjected to OVA- and CT-B-specific ELISA, elevated levels of mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) and plasma IgG antibody (Ab) responses were noted in aged mouse recipients. Similar results were also seen aged mice which received AMSCs at one year of age. When cytokine production was examined, OVA-stimulated Peyer’s patch CD4+ T cells produced increased levels of IL-4. Further, CD4+ T cells from the lamina propria revealed elevated levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ production. In contrast, aged mice without AMSC transfer showed essentially no OVA- or CT-B-specific mucosal SIgA or plasma IgG Ab or cytokine responses. Of importance, fecal extracts from AMSC transferred aged mice showed neutralization activity to CT intoxication. These results suggest that AMSCs can restore impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract of aged mice. PMID:26840058

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) enhances cardiac commitment of differentiating embryonic stem cells by activating PI3 kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Roggia, Cristiana; Ukena, Christian; Boehm, Michael; Kilter, Heiko . E-mail: kilter@med-in.uni-saarland.de

    2007-03-10

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine promoting proliferation, migration and survival in several cell types. HGF and its cognate receptor c-Met are expressed in cardiac cells during early cardiogenesis, but data concerning its role in cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and the underlying molecular mechanisms involved are limited. In the present study we show that HGF significantly increases the number of beating embryoid bodies of differentiating ESCs without affecting beating frequency. Furthermore, HGF up-regulates the expression of the cardiac-specific transcription factors Nkx 2.5 and GATA-4 and of markers of differentiated cardiomyocytes, i.e. {alpha}-MHC, {beta}-MHC, ANF, MLC2v and Troponin T. The HGF-induced increase in Nkx 2.5 expression was inhibited by co-treatment with the PI3 kinase inhibitors Wortmannin and LY294002, but not by its inactive homolog LY303511, suggesting an involvement of the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway in this effect. We conclude that HGF is an important growth factor involved in cardiac differentiation and/or proliferation of ESCs and may therefore be critical for the in vitro generation of pre- or fully differentiated cardiomyocytes as required for clinical use of embryonic stem cells in cardiac diseases.

  8. Analyses of cardiac blood cells and serum proteins with regard to cause of death in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Li, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Dong; Yoshida, Chiemi; Chen, Jian-Hua; Komatsu, Ayumi; Azuma, Yoko; Sakoda, Shigeki; Zhu, Bao-Li; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2009-04-01

    To investigate hematological and serum protein profiles of cadaveric heart blood with regard to the cause of death, serial forensic autopsy cases (n=308, >18 years of age, within 48 h postmortem) were examined. Red blood cells (Rbc), hemoglobin (Hb), platelets (Plt), white blood cells (Wbc), total protein (TP) and albumin (Alb) were examined in bilateral cardiac blood. Blood cell counts, collected after turning the bodies at autopsy, approximated to the clinical values. Postmortem changes were not significant for these markers. In non-head blunt injury cases, Rbc counts, Hb, TP and Alb levels in bilateral cardiac blood were lower in subacute deaths (survival time, 1-12 h) than in acute deaths (survival time <1 h). Wbc counts of left cardiac blood were significantly higher for non-head injury than for head injury in subacute deaths. In fire fatality cases, Plt count was markedly higher with an automated hematology analyzer than by using a blood smear test, suggesting Rbc fragmentation caused by deep burns, while increases in Wbc count and decreases in Alb levels were seen for subacute deaths. For asphyxiation, Rbc count, Hb, TP and Alb levels in bilateral cardiac blood were higher than other groups, and TP and Alb levels in the right cardiac blood were higher for hanging than for strangulation. These findings suggest that analyses of blood cells and proteins are useful for investigating the cause of death.

  9. Liénard-type models for the simulation of the action potential of cardiac nodal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podziemski, P.; Żebrowski, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Existing models of cardiac cells which include multi-variable cardiac transmembrane current are too complex to simulate the long time dynamical properties of the heart rhythm. The large number of parameters that need to be defined and set for such models make them not only cumbersome to use but also require a large computing power. Consequently, the application of such models for the bedside analysis of heart rate of a specific patient may be difficult. Other ways of modelling need to be investigated. We consider the general problem of developing a model of cardiac pacemaker tissue that allows to combine the investigation of phenomena at a time scale of thousands of heart beats with the ability to reproduce realistic tissue-level characteristics of cell dynamics. We propose a modified van der Pol-Duffing equation-a Liénard-type oscillator-as a phenomenological model for cardiac nodal tissue, with certain important physiological similarities to ion-channel models of cardiac pacemaker cells. The model presented here is specifically designed to qualitatively reproduce mesoscopic characteristics of cell dynamics, including action potential duration (APD) restitution properties, phase response characteristics, and phase space structure. We show that these characteristics agree qualitatively with the extensive ionic models and experimental results in the literature [Anumonwo et al., 1991, [33], Cao et al., 1999, [49], Coster and Celler, 2003, [31], Qu, 2004, [45], Tsalikakis et al., 2007, [32], Inada et al., 2009, [14], Qu et al., 2010, [50

  10. CYP epoxygenase metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity through SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, V; Jamieson, K L; Vriend, J; Quan, S; Seubert, J M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial LPS is an environmental toxin capable of promoting various cardiac complications. Current evidence suggests that LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction emerges as a consequence of compromised quality of cardiac mitochondria. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), which produces a broad spectrum of intrinsic physiological effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. Although, numerous studies revealed fundamentally beneficial effects of DHA on cardiovascular system, it remains unknown whether these effects were produced by DHA or one of its possibly more potent metabolites. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), produce more potent biological activity compared to its precursor DHA. In this study, we investigated whether DHA and its metabolite 19,20-EDP could protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. We provide evidence that exogenously added or DHA-derived EDPs promote mitochondrial biogenesis and function in HL-1 cardiac cells. Our results illustrate the CYP epoxygenase metabolite of DHA, 19,20-EDP, confers extensive protection to HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity via activation of SIRT1. PMID:27182450

  11. STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

  12. Coupling primary and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in an in vitro model of cardiac cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Yuan, Hongyan; McCain, Megan L; Ye, George J C; Sheehy, Sean P; Campbell, Patrick H; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-02-15

    The efficacy of cardiac cell therapy depends on the integration of existing and newly formed cardiomyocytes. Here, we developed a minimal in vitro model of this interface by engineering two cell microtissues (μtissues) containing mouse cardiomyocytes, representing spared myocardium after injury, and cardiomyocytes generated from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, to model newly formed cells. We demonstrated that weaker stem cell-derived myocytes coupled with stronger myocytes to support synchronous contraction, but this arrangement required focal adhesion-like structures near the cell-cell junction that degrade force transmission between cells. Moreover, we developed a computational model of μtissue mechanics to demonstrate that a reduction in isometric tension is sufficient to impair force transmission across the cell-cell boundary. Together, our in vitro and in silico results suggest that mechanotransductive mechanisms may contribute to the modest functional benefits observed in cell-therapy studies by regulating the amount of contractile force effectively transmitted at the junction between newly formed and spared myocytes. PMID:26858266

  13. From hair to heart: nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells differentiate to beating cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the neural stem-cell marker nestin is expressed in hair follicle stem cells located in the bulge area which are termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. HAP stem cells from mouse and human could form spheres in culture, termed hair spheres, which are keratin 15-negative and CD34-positive and could differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that nestin-expressing stem cells could effect nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. In the present study, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. We separated the mouse vibrissa hair follicle into 3 parts (upper, middle, and lower), and suspended each part separately in DMEM containing 10% FBS. All three parts of hair follicle differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells as well as neurons, glial cells, keratinocytes and smooth muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle is greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol and inhibited by propanolol. HAP stem cells have potential for regenerative medicine for heart disease as well as nerve and spinal cord repair.

  14. Adaptation of cardiac structure by mechanical feedback in the environment of the cell: a model study.

    PubMed Central

    Arts, T; Prinzen, F W; Snoeckx, L H; Rijcken, J M; Reneman, R S

    1994-01-01

    In the cardiac left ventricle during systole mechanical load of the myocardial fibers is distributed uniformly. A mechanism is proposed by which control of mechanical load is distributed over many individual control units acting in the environment of the cell. The mechanics of the equatorial region of the left ventricle was modeled by a thick-walled cylinder composed of 6-1500 shells of myocardial fiber material. In each shell a separate control unit was simulated. The direction of the cells was varied so that systolic fiber shortening approached a given optimum of 15%. End-diastolic sarcomere length was maintained at 2.1 microns. Regional early-systolic stretch and global contractility stimulated growth of cellular mass. If systolic shortening was more than normal the passive extracellular matrix stretched. The design of the load-controlling mechanism was derived from biological experiments showing that cellular processes are sensitive to mechanical deformation. After simulating a few hundred adaptation cycles, the macroscopic anatomical arrangement of helical pathways of the myocardial fibers formed automatically. If pump load of the ventricle was changed, wall thickness and cavity volume adapted physiologically. We propose that the cardiac anatomy may be defined and maintained by a multitude of control units for mechanical load, each acting in the cellular environment. Interestingly, feedback through fiber stress is not a compelling condition for such control. PMID:8038399

  15. Epicardial delivery of VEGF and cardiac stem cells guided by 3-dimensional PLLA mat enhancing cardiac regeneration and angiogenesis in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jung; Kyung, Hei-Won; Katila, Pramila; Lee, Jeong-Han; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Yang, Young-Il; Lee, Seung-Jin

    2015-05-10

    Congestive heart failure is mostly resulted in a consequence of the limited myocardial regeneration capacity after acute myocardial infarction. Targeted delivery of proangiogenic factors and/or stem cells to the ischemic myocardium is a promising strategy for enhancing their local and sustained therapeutic effects. Herein, we designed an epicardial delivery system of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cardiac stem cells (CSCs) using poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) mat applied to the acutely infarcted myocardium. The fibrous VEGF-loaded PLLA mat was fabricated by an electrospinning method using PLLA solution emulsified VEGF. This mat not only allowed for sustained release of VEGF for 4weeks but boosted migration and proliferation of both endothelial cells and CSCs in vitro. Furthermore, sustained release of VEGF showed a positive effect on in vitro capillary-like network formation of endothelial cells compared with bolus treatment of VEGF. PLLA mat provided a permissive 3-dimensional (3D) substratum that led to spontaneous cardiomyogenic differentiation of CSCs in vitro. Notably, sustained stimulation by VEGF-loaded PLLA mat resulted in a substantial increase in the expression of proangiogenic mRNAs of CSCs in vitro. The epicardially implanted VEGF-loaded PLLA mat showed modest effects on angiogenesis and cardiomyogenesis in the acutely infarcted hearts. However, co-implantation of VEGF and CSCs using the PLLA mat showed meaningful therapeutic effects on angiogenesis and cardiomyogenesis compared with controls, leading to reduced cardiac remodeling and enhanced global cardiac function. Collectively, the PLLA mat allowed a smart cargo that enabled the sustained release of VEGF and the delivery of CSCs, thereby synergistically inducing angiogenesis and cardiomyogenesis in acute myocardial infarction.

  16. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development.

  17. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development. PMID:25761723

  18. Generation of human secondary cardiospheres as a potent cell processing strategy for cell-based cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, Ho-Jae; Chung, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Ju-Young; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Yang, Han-Mo; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Hae-Young; Oh, Byung-Hee; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach for repairing damaged heart. However, there are large rooms to be improved in therapeutic efficacy. We cultured a small quantity (5-10 mg) of heart biopsy tissues from 16 patients who received heart transplantation. We produced primary and secondary cardiospheres (CSs) using repeated three-dimensional culture strategy and characterized the cells. Approximately 5000 secondary CSs were acquired after 45 days. Genetic analysis confirmed that the progenitor cells in the secondary CSs originated from the innate heart, but not from extra-cardiac organs. The expressions of Oct4 and Nanog were significantly induced in secondary CSs compared with adherent cells derived from primary CSs. Those expressions in secondary CSs were higher in a cytokine-deprived medium than in a cytokine-supplemented one, suggesting that formation of the three-dimensional structure was important to enhance stemness whereas supplementation with various cytokines was not essential. Signal blocking experiments showed that the ERK and VEGF pathways are indispensable for sphere formation. To optimize cell processing, we compared four different methods of generating spheres. Method based on the hanging-drop or AggreWell™ was superior to that based on the poly-d-lysine-coated dish or Petri dish with respect to homogeneity of the product, cellular potency and overall simplicity of the process. When transplanted into the ischemic myocardium of immunocompromised mice, human secondary CSs differentiated into cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. These results demonstrate that generation of secondary CSs from a small quantity of adult human cardiac tissue is a feasible and effective cell processing strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy.

  19. Generation of human secondary cardiospheres as a potent cell processing strategy for cell-based cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, Ho-Jae; Chung, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Ju-Young; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Yang, Han-Mo; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Hae-Young; Oh, Byung-Hee; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach for repairing damaged heart. However, there are large rooms to be improved in therapeutic efficacy. We cultured a small quantity (5-10 mg) of heart biopsy tissues from 16 patients who received heart transplantation. We produced primary and secondary cardiospheres (CSs) using repeated three-dimensional culture strategy and characterized the cells. Approximately 5000 secondary CSs were acquired after 45 days. Genetic analysis confirmed that the progenitor cells in the secondary CSs originated from the innate heart, but not from extra-cardiac organs. The expressions of Oct4 and Nanog were significantly induced in secondary CSs compared with adherent cells derived from primary CSs. Those expressions in secondary CSs were higher in a cytokine-deprived medium than in a cytokine-supplemented one, suggesting that formation of the three-dimensional structure was important to enhance stemness whereas supplementation with various cytokines was not essential. Signal blocking experiments showed that the ERK and VEGF pathways are indispensable for sphere formation. To optimize cell processing, we compared four different methods of generating spheres. Method based on the hanging-drop or AggreWell™ was superior to that based on the poly-d-lysine-coated dish or Petri dish with respect to homogeneity of the product, cellular potency and overall simplicity of the process. When transplanted into the ischemic myocardium of immunocompromised mice, human secondary CSs differentiated into cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. These results demonstrate that generation of secondary CSs from a small quantity of adult human cardiac tissue is a feasible and effective cell processing strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy. PMID:23103158

  20. TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-induced cardiac myofibroblasts are nonproliferating functional cells carrying DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Victor V. Pelt, Jos F. van; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Van Duppen, Viktor J.; Vekemans, Katrien; Fagard, Robert H.; Lijnen, Paul J.

    2008-04-15

    TGF-{beta}{sub 1} induces differentiation and total inhibition of cardiac MyoFb cell division and DNA synthesis. These effects of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} are irreversible. Inhibition of MyoFb proliferation is accompanied with the expression of Smad1, Mad1, p15Ink4B and total inhibition of telomerase activity. Surprisingly, TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are growth-arrested not only at G1-phase but also at S-phase of the cell cycle. Staining with TUNEL indicates that these cells carry DNA damages. However, the absolute majority of MyoFbs are non-apoptotic cells as established with two apoptosis-specific methods, flow cytometry and caspase-dependent cleavage of cytokeratin 18. Expression in MyoFbs of proliferative cell nuclear antigen even in the absence of serum confirms that these MyoFbs perform repair of DNA damages. These results suggest that TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs can be growth-arrested by two checkpoints, the G1/S checkpoint, which prevents cells from entering S-phase and the intra-S checkpoint, which is activated by encountering DNA damage during the S phase or by unrepaired damage that escapes the G1/S checkpoint. Despite carrying of the DNA damages TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are highly functional cells producing lysyl oxidase and contracting the collagen matrix.

  1. Parthenogenetic dopamine neurons from primate embryonic stem cells restore function in experimental Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojin; Patterson, Michaela; Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Yoshizaki, Takahito; Sonntag, Kai C.; Studer, Lorenz; Isacson, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The identity and functional potential of dopamine neurons derived in vitro from embryonic stem cells are critical for the development of a stem cell-based replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease. Using a parthenogenetic primate embryonic stem cell line, we have generated dopamine neurons that display persistent expression of midbrain regional and cell-specific transcription factors, which establish their proper identity and allow for their survival. We show here that transplantation of parthenogenetic dopamine neurons restores motor function in hemi-parkinsonian, 6-hydroxy-dopamine-lesioned rats. Exposure to Wnt5a and fibroblast growth factors (FGF) 20 and 2 at the final stage of in vitro differentiation enhanced the survival of dopamine neurons and, correspondingly, the extent of motor recovery of transplanted animals. Importantly for future development of clinical applications, dopamine neurons were post-mitotic at the time of transplantation and there was no tumour formation. These data provide proof for the concept that parthenogenetic stem cells are a suitable source of functional neurons for therapeutic applications. PMID:18669499

  2. Restoration of sensitivity in chemo-resistant glioma cells by cold atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Köritzer, Julia; Boxhammer, Veronika; Schäfer, Andrea; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klämpfl, Tobias G; Li, Yang-Fang; Welz, Christian; Schwenk-Zieger, Sabina; Morfill, Gregor E; Zimmermann, Julia L; Schlegel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults. Despite multimodal treatments including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy the prognosis remains poor and relapse occurs regularly. The alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) has been shown to improve the overall survival in patients with malignant gliomas, especially in tumors with methylated promoter of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance towards TMZ makes it crucial to find new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving the prognosis of patients suffering from malignant gliomas. Cold atmospheric plasma is a new auspicious candidate in cancer treatment. In the present study we demonstrate the anti-cancer properties of different dosages of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) both in TMZ-sensitive and TMZ-resistant cells by proliferation assay, immunoblotting, cell cycle analysis, and clonogenicity assay. Importantly, CAP treatment restored the responsiveness of resistant glioma cells towards TMZ therapy. Concomitant treatment with CAP and TMZ led to inhibition of cell growth and cell cycle arrest, thus CAP might be a promising candidate for combination therapy especially for patients suffering from GBMs showing an unfavorable MGMT status and TMZ resistance.

  3. Paracrine Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Matrix Stiffness-Induced Cardiac Myofibroblast Differentiation via Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Smad7

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kar Wey; Li, Yuhui; Liu, Fusheng; Bin Gao; Lu, Tian Jian; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Ma, Yufei; Xu, Feng; Huang, Guoyou

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) hold great promise in cardiac fibrosis therapy, due to their potential ability of inhibiting cardiac myofibroblast differentiation (a hallmark of cardiac fibrosis). However, the mechanism involved in their effects remains elusive. To explore this, it is necessary to develop an in vitro cardiac fibrosis model that incorporates pore size and native tissue-mimicking matrix stiffness, which may regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. In the present study, collagen coated polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates were fabricated, in which the pore size was adjusted without altering the matrix stiffness. Stiffness is shown to regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation independently of pore size. Substrate at a stiffness of 30 kPa, which mimics the stiffness of native fibrotic cardiac tissue, was found to induce cardiac myofibroblast differentiation to create in vitro cardiac fibrosis model. Conditioned medium of hMSCs was applied to the model to determine its role and inhibitory mechanism on cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. It was found that hMSCs secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) to inhibit cardiac myofibroblast differentiation via downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and upregulation of Smad7. These findings would aid in establishment of the therapeutic use of hMSCs in cardiac fibrosis therapy in future. PMID:27703175

  4. Calcium Alternans is Due to an Order-Disorder Phase Transition in Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Echebarria, Blas; Spalding, Jon; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Electromechanical alternans is a beat-to-beat alternation in the strength of contraction of a cardiac cell, which can be caused by an instability of calcium cycling. Using a distributed model of subcellular calcium we show that alternans occurs via an order-disorder phase transition which exhibits critical slowing down and a diverging correlation length. We apply finite size scaling along with a mapping to a stochastic coupled map model, to show that this transition in two dimensions is characterized by critical exponents consistent with the Ising universality class. These findings highlight the important role of cooperativity in biological cells, and suggest novel approaches to investigate the onset of the alternans instability in the heart.

  5. The tight junction protein CAR regulates cardiac conduction and cell-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Lisewski, Ulrike; Shi, Yu; Wrackmeyer, Uta; Fischer, Robert; Chen, Chen; Schirdewan, Alexander; Jüttner, Rene; Rathjen, Fritz; Poller, Wolfgang; Radke, Michael H; Gotthardt, Michael

    2008-09-29

    The Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) is known for its role in virus uptake and as a protein of the tight junction. It is predominantly expressed in the developing brain and heart and reinduced upon cardiac remodeling in heart disease. So far, the physiological functions of CAR in the adult heart are largely unknown. We have generated a heart-specific inducible CAR knockout (KO) and found impaired electrical conduction between atrium and ventricle that increased with progressive loss of CAR. The underlying mechanism relates to the cross talk of tight and gap junctions with altered expression and localization of connexins that affect communication between CAR KO cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that CAR is not only relevant for virus uptake and cardiac remodeling but also has a previously unknown function in the propagation of excitation from the atrium to the ventricle that could explain the association of arrhythmia and Coxsackievirus infection of the heart.

  6. Stem cell transplantation strategies for the restoration of cognitive dysfunction caused by cranial radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Roa, Dante E; Bosch, Omar; Lan, Mary L; Limoli, Charles L

    2011-10-18

    Radiotherapy often provides the only clinical recourse for those afflicted with primary or metastatic brain tumors. While beneficial, cranial irradiation can induce a progressive and debilitating decline in cognition that may, in part, be caused by the depletion of neural stem cells. Given the increased survival of patients diagnosed with brain cancer, quality of life in terms of cognitive health has become an increasing concern, especially in the absence of any satisfactory long-term treatments. To address this serious health concern we have used stem cell replacement as a strategy to combat radiation-induced cognitive decline. Our model utilizes athymic nude rats subjected to cranial irradiation. The ionizing radiation is delivered as either whole brain or as a highly focused beam to the hippocampus via linear accelerator (LINAC) based stereotaxic radiosurgery. Two days following irradiation, human neural stem cells (hNSCs) were stereotaxically transplanted into the hippocampus. Rats were then assessed for changes in cognition, grafted cell survival and for the expression of differentiation-specific markers 1 and 4-months after irradiation. Our cognitive testing paradigms have demonstrated that animals engrafted with hNSCs exhibit significant improvements in cognitive function. Unbiased stereology reveals significant survival (10-40%) of the engrafted cells at 1 and 4-months after transplantation, dependent on the amount and type of cells grafted. Engrafted cells migrate extensively, differentiate along glial and neuronal lineages, and express a range of immature and mature phenotypic markers. Our data demonstrate direct cognitive benefits derived from engrafted human stem cells, suggesting that this procedure may one day afford a promising strategy for the long-term functional restoration of cognition in individuals subjected to cranial radiotherapy. To promote the dissemination of the critical procedures necessary to replicate and extend our studies, we have

  7. Estrogen inhibits mast cell chymase release to prevent pressure overload-induced adverse cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Jubair, Shaiban; Janicki, Joseph S

    2015-02-01

    Estrogen regulation of myocardial chymase and chymase effects on cardiac remodeling are unknown. To test the hypothesis that estrogen prevents pressure overload-induced adverse cardiac remodeling by inhibiting mast cell (MC) chymase release, transverse aortic constriction or sham surgery was performed in 7-week-old intact and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three days before creating the constriction, additional groups of OVX rats began receiving 17β-estradiol, a chymase inhibitor, or a MC stabilizer. Left ventricular function, cardiomyocyte size, collagen volume fraction, MC density and degranulation, and myocardial and plasma chymase levels were assessed 18 days postsurgery. Aortic constriction resulted in ventricular hypertrophy in intact and OVX groups, whereas collagen volume fraction was increased only in OVX rats. Chymase protein content was increased by aortic constriction in the intact and OVX groups, with the magnitude of the increase being greater in OVX rats. MC density and degranulation, plasma chymase levels, and myocardial active transforming growth factor-β1 levels were increased by aortic constriction only in OVX rats. Estrogen replacement markedly attenuated the constriction-increased myocardial chymase, MC density and degranulation, plasma chymase, and myocardial active transforming growth factor-β1, as well as prevented ventricular hypertrophy and increased collagen volume fraction. Chymostatin attenuated the aortic constriction-induced ventricular hypertrophy and collagen volume fraction in the OVX rats similar to that achieved by estrogen replacement. Nedocromil yielded similar effects, except for the reduction of chymase content. We conclude that the estrogen-inhibited release of MC chymase is responsible for the cardioprotection against transverse aortic constriction-induced adverse cardiac remodeling.

  8. Preemptive donor apoptotic cell infusions induce IFN-γ-producing myeloid derived suppressor cells for cardiac allograft protection1

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jane; Lerret, Nadine M.; Wang, Jiao-jing; Kang, Hee-Kap; Tasch, James; Zhang, Zheng; Luo, Xunrong

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that preemptive infusion of apoptotic donor splenocytes treated with the chemical cross-linker ethylcarbodiimide (ECDI-SPs) induces long-term allograft survival in full MHC-mismatched models of allogeneic islet and cardiac transplantation. The role of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the graft protection provided by ECDI-SPs is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that infusions of ECDI-SPs increase two populations of CD11b+ cells in the spleen that phenotypically resemble monocytic-like (CD11b+Ly6CHI) and granulocytic-like (CD11b+Gr1HI) MDSCs. Both populations suppress T cell proliferation in vitro, and traffic to the cardiac allografts in vivo to mediate their protection via inhibition of local CD8 T cell accumulation and potentially also via induction and homing of regulatory T cells. Importantly, repeated treatments with ECDI-SPs induce the CD11b+Gr1HI cells to produce a high level of IFN-γ and to exhibit an enhanced responsiveness to IFN-γ by expressing higher levels of downstream effector molecules ido and nos2. Consequently, neutralization of IFN-γ completely abolishes the suppressive capacity of this population. We conclude that donor ECDI-SPs induce the expansion of two populations of MDSCs important for allograft protection mediated in part by intrinsic IFN-γ dependent mechanisms. This form of preemptive donor apoptotic cell infusions has significant potential for the therapeutic manipulation of MDSCs for transplant tolerance induction. PMID:24808363

  9. In vitro expansion of human cardiac progenitor cells: exploring 'omics tools for characterization of cell-based allogeneic products.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Alves, P; Serra, M; Brito, C; Ricardo, C P; Cunha, R; Sousa, M F; Sanchez, B; Bernad, A; Carrondo, M J T; Rodriguez-Borlado, L; Alves, P M

    2016-05-01

    Human cardiac stem/progenitor cells (hCPCs) have been shown to be capable to regenerate contractile myocardium. However, because of their relative low abundance in the heart, in vitro expansion of hCPC is mandatory to achieve necessary quantities for allogeneic or autologous cardiac regeneration therapy applications (10(6)-10(9) cells/patient). Up to now, cell number requirements of ongoing phase I/IIa trials have been fulfilled with production in static monolayer cultures. However, this manufacturing process poses critical limitations when moving to the following clinical phases where hundreds of patients will be enrolled. For this, increased process yield is required, while guaranteeing the quality of the cell-based products. In this work, we developed and validated a robust, scalable, and good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible bioprocess for the expansion of high-quality hCPC. We applied platforms extensively used by the biopharmaceutical industry, such as microcarrier technology and stirred systems, and assessed culture conditions' impact on hCPC's quality and potency, as required by regulatory agencies. Complementary analytical assays including gene expression microarrays and mass spectrometry-based approaches were explored to compare transcriptome, proteome, surface markers, and secretion profiles of hCPC cultured in static monolayers and in stirred microcarrier-based systems. Our results show that stirred microcarrier-based culture systems enabled achieving more than 3-fold increase in hCPC expansion, when compared with traditional static monolayers, while retaining cell's phenotype and similar "omics" profiles. These findings demonstrate that this change in the production process does not affect cell's identity and quality, with potential to be translated into a transversal production platform for clinical development of stem-cell therapies. PMID:26924043

  10. Comparison of SERCA1 and SERCA2a expressed in COS-1 cells and cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Sumbilla, C; Cavagna, M; Zhong, L; Ma, H; Lewis, D; Farrance, I; Inesi, G

    1999-12-01

    Cultured COS-1 cells, as well as chicken embryonic and neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, were infected with recombinant adenovirus vectors to define limiting factors in the expression and Ca2+ transport function of recombinant sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) (SERCA) isoforms. Titration experiments showed that all COS-1 cells and myocytes in culture could be infected by an adenovirus titer of 10 plaque-forming units (pfu) per seeded cell. Raising the adenovirus titer further yielded higher protein expression up to an asymptotic limit for functional, membrane-bound SERCA protein. The asymptotic behavior of SERCA expression was not transcription related but was due to posttranscriptional events. The minimal (-268) cardiac troponin T (cTnT) promoter was a convenient size for adenovirus vector construction and manifested tight muscle specificity. However, its efficiency was lower than that of the nonspecific cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. At any rate, identical maximal levels of SERCA expression were obtained with the CMV and the cTnT promoter, as long as the viral titer was adjusted to compensate for transcription efficiency. A maximal threefold increase of total SERCA protein expression over the level of the endogenous SERCA of control myocytes was reached (a sevenfold increase compared with the endogenous SERCA of the same infected myocytes due to reduction of endogenous SERCA after infection). In contrast with previous reports [Ji et al. Am. J. Physiol. 276 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 45): H89-H97, 1999], a higher kinetic turnover was demonstrated for the SERCA1 compared with the SERCA2a isoform as shown by a 5.0- versus 2.6-fold increase in calcium uptake rate accompanying maximal expression of recombinant SERCA1 or SERCA2a, respectively. This information is deemed necessary for studies attempting to modify myocardial cell function by manipulation of SERCA expression.

  11. Myocardial regeneration by activation of multipotent cardiac stem cells in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Konrad; Torella, Daniele; Sheikh, Farooq; de Angelis, Antonella; Nurzynska, Daria; Silvestri, Furio; Beltrami, C. Alberto; Bussani, Rossana; Beltrami, Antonio P.; Quaini, Federico; Bolli, Roberto; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero

    2005-06-01

    In this study, we tested whether the human heart possesses a cardiac stem cell (CSC) pool that promotes regeneration after infarction. For this purpose, CSC growth and senescence were measured in 20 hearts with acute infarcts, 20 hearts with end-stage postinfarction cardiomyopathy, and 12 control hearts. CSC number increased markedly in acute and, to a lesser extent, in chronic infarcts. CSC growth correlated with the increase in telomerase-competent dividing CSCs from 1.5% in controls to 28% in acute infarcts and 14% in chronic infarcts. The CSC mitotic index increased 29-fold in acute and 14-fold in chronic infarcts. CSCs committed to the myocyte, smooth muscle, and endothelial cell lineages increased 85-fold in acute infarcts and 25-fold in chronic infarcts. However, p16INK4a-p53-positive senescent CSCs also increased and were 10%, 18%, and 40% in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. Old CSCs had short telomeres and apoptosis involved 0.3%, 3.8%, and 9.6% of CSCs in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. These variables reduced the number of functionally competent CSCs from 26,000/cm3 of viable myocardium in acute to 7,000/cm3 in chronic infarcts, respectively. In seven acute infarcts, foci of spontaneous myocardial regeneration that did not involve cell fusion were identified. In conclusion, the human heart possesses a CSC compartment, and CSC activation occurs in response to ischemic injury. The loss of functionally competent CSCs in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy may underlie the progressive functional deterioration and the onset of terminal failure. cardiac progenitor cells | human heart | myocardial infarction

  12. Differentiation induction of mouse cardiac stem cells into sinus node-like cells by co-culturing with sinus node.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Xuan; Wen, Jing; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Feng-Xu; Deng, Ming-Bin; Wu, Chang-Xue; Liao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Sinus nodal cells can generate a diastolic or "pacemaker" depolarization at the end of an action potential driving the membrane potential slowly up to the threshold for firing the next action potential. It has been proved that adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs) can differentiate into sinus nodal cells by demethylating agent. However, there is no report about adult CSCs-derived sinus nodal cells with pacemaker current (the funny current, I f). In this study, we isolated the mouse adult CSCs from mouse hearts by the method of tissue explants adherence. The expression of c-kit protein indicated the isolation of CSCs. Then we co-cultured mouse CSCs with mouse sinus node tissue to induce the differentiation of these CSCs into sinus node-like cells, which was proved by identifying the enhanced expression of marker proteins cTnI, cTnT and α-Actinin with Immunofluorescence staining. At the same time, with whole-cell patch-clamp we detected the I f current, which can be blocked by CsCl, in these differentiated cells. In conclusion, by confirming specific I f current in the induced node-like cells, our work shows a method inducing differentiation of CSCs into sinus node-like cells, which can provide helpful information for the further research on sick sinus syndrome.

  13. Development of the endocrine pancreas and novel strategies for β-cell mass restoration and diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Aguirre, A L; Canales-Aguirre, A A; Padilla-Camberos, E; Esquivel-Solis, H; Díaz-Martínez, N E

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a serious public health problem owing to its global prevalence in the last decade. The causes of this metabolic disease include dysfunction and/or insufficient number of β cells. Existing diabetes mellitus treatments do not reverse or control the disease. Therefore, β-cell mass restoration might be a promising treatment. Several restoration approaches have been developed: inducing the proliferation of remaining insulin-producing cells, de novo islet formation from pancreatic progenitor cells (neogenesis), and converting non-β cells within the pancreas to β cells (transdifferentiation) are the most direct, simple, and least invasive ways to increase β-cell mass. However, their clinical significance is yet to be determined. Hypothetically, β cells or islet transplantation methods might be curative strategies for diabetes mellitus; however, the scarcity of donors limits the clinical application of these approaches. Thus, alternative cell sources for β-cell replacement could include embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. However, most differentiated cells obtained using these techniques are functionally immature and show poor glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared with native β cells. Currently, their clinical use is still hampered by ethical issues and the risk of tumor development post transplantation. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge of mouse pancreas organogenesis, morphogenesis, and maturation, including the molecular mechanisms involved. We then discuss two possible approaches of β-cell mass restoration for diabetes mellitus therapy: β-cell regeneration and β-cell replacement. We critically analyze each strategy with respect to the accessibility of the cells, potential risk to patients, and possible clinical outcomes.

  14. Synergistic plasticity of intrinsic conductance and electrical coupling restores synchrony in an intact motor network.

    PubMed

    Lane, Brian J; Samarth, Pranit; Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2016-01-01

    Motor neurons of the crustacean cardiac ganglion generate virtually identical, synchronized output despite the fact that each neuron uses distinct conductance magnitudes. As a result of this variability, manipulations that target ionic conductances have distinct effects on neurons within the same ganglion, disrupting synchronized motor neuron output that is necessary for proper cardiac function. We hypothesized that robustness in network output is accomplished via plasticity that counters such destabilizing influences. By blocking high-threshold K(+) conductances in motor neurons within the ongoing cardiac network, we discovered that compensation both resynchronized the network and helped restore excitability. Using model findings to guide experimentation, we determined that compensatory increases of both GA and electrical coupling restored function in the network. This is one of the first direct demonstrations of the physiological regulation of coupling conductance in a compensatory context, and of synergistic plasticity across cell- and network-level mechanisms in the restoration of output. PMID:27552052

  15. Zinc Restored the Decreased Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Viability under Atherosclerotic Calcification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mee-Young; Kwun, In-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is considered to be involved in maintaining healthy vascular condition. Atherosclerotic calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) occurs via the mechanism of cell death; therefore, cell viability is a critical factor for preventing VSMC calcification. In this study, we tested whether zinc affected VSMC viability under both normal physiological non-calcifying (0 mM P) and atherosclerotic calcifying conditions (3 and 5 mM P), since VSMC physiological characters change during the VSMC calcification process. The study results showed that an optimal zinc level (15 μM) restored the decreased VSMC viability which was induced under low zinc levels (0 and 1 μM) and calcifying conditions (3 and 5 mM P) at 9 and 15 days culture. This zinc-protecting effect for VSMC viability is more prominent under atherosclerotic calcifying condition (3 and 5 mM P) than normal condition (0 mM P). Also, the increased VSMC viability was consistent with the decreased Ca and P accumulation in VSMC cell layers. The results suggested that zinc could be an effective biomineral for preventing VSMC calcification under atherosclerotic calcifying conditions. PMID:25580404

  16. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Restore Brain Damage Induced Changes in Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Geißler, Maren; Dinse, Hubert R.; Neuhoff, Sandra; Kreikemeier, Klaus; Meier, Carola

    2011-01-01

    Intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells has been shown to reduce sensorimotor deficits after hypoxic ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats. However, the neuronal correlate of the functional recovery and how such a treatment enforces plastic remodelling at the level of neural processing remains elusive. Here we show by in-vivo recordings that hUCB cells have the capability of ameliorating the injury-related impairment of neural processing in primary somatosensory cortex. Intact cortical processing depends on a delicate balance of inhibitory and excitatory transmission, which is disturbed after injury. We found that the dimensions of cortical maps and receptive fields, which are significantly altered after injury, were largely restored. Additionally, the lesion induced hyperexcitability was no longer observed in hUCB treated animals as indicated by a paired-pulse behaviour resembling that observed in control animals. The beneficial effects on cortical processing were reflected in an almost complete recovery of sensorimotor behaviour. Our results demonstrate that hUCB cells reinstall the way central neurons process information by normalizing inhibitory and excitatory processes. We propose that the intermediate level of cortical processing will become relevant as a new stage to investigate efficacy and mechanisms of cell therapy in the treatment of brain injury. PMID:21673795

  17. Inhibition of B-cell death does not restore T-cell-dependent immune responses in CD40-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Jesús; Díez, Miguel A; Muñiz, María; Buelta, Luis; Núñez, Gabriel; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Merino, Ramón

    2003-01-01

    Signalling through CD40 is essential for the development of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses, germinal centres and B-cell memory against T-dependent antigens. In addition, engagement of CD40 in B cells promotes cell survival by inducing the expression of anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family of cell-death regulators. In the present study we analysed whether T-dependent immune responses can be developed in mice deficient in CD40 if the anti-apoptotic activity mediated by the engagement of CD40 in B cells is compensated by the constitutive over-expression of anti-apoptotic genes of the bcl-2 family. We showed that the over-expression of either hbcl-2 or hbcl-xL transgenes in B cells is not sufficient to restore IgG antibody responses and germinal centre formation in CD40-deficient mice. These results indicate that CD40 functions, other than those mediated through survival, are required for the establishment of T-dependent B-cell responses. PMID:12871216

  18. Extracellular ubiquitin increases expression of angiogenic molecules and stimulates angiogenesis in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Steagall, Rebecca J; Daniels, Christopher R; Dalal, Suman; Joyner, William L; Singh, Mahipal; Singh, Krishna

    2014-05-01

    Extracellular Ub is an immune modulator that plays a role in suppression of inflammation, organ injury, myocyte apoptosis, and fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of extracellular Ub on the process of cardiac angiogenesis. CMECs and aortic tissue were isolated from rats to measure changes in angiogenic protein levels and to assess angiogenic responses to extracellular Ub. In CMECs, extracellular Ub increased protein levels of VEGF-A and MMP-2, known angiogenesis regulators. CMECs demonstrated enhanced rearrangement of fibrillar actin and migration in response to Ub treatment. Ub-treated CMECs demonstrated an increase in tube network formation which was inhibited by the CXCR4 receptor antagonist, AMD3100. Methylated Ub, unable to form polyubiquitin chains, enhanced tube network formation. Aortic ring sprouting assays demonstrated that Ub increases microvessel sprouting in the Matrigel. The results of our study suggest a novel role for extracellular Ub in cardiac angiogenesis, providing evidence that extracellular Ub, at least in part acting via the CXCR4 receptor, has the potential to facilitate the process of angiogenesis in myocardial endothelial cells. PMID:24308702

  19. Abnormal autonomic cardiac response to transient hypoxia in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sangkatumvong, S; Coates, T D; Khoo, M C K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to non-invasively assess cardiac autonomic control in subjects with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by tracking the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) that occur following brief exposure to a hypoxic stimulus. Five African–American SCA patients and seven healthy control subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Each subject was exposed to a controlled hypoxic stimulus consisting of five breaths of nitrogen. Time-varying spectral analysis of HRV was applied to estimate the cardiac autonomic response to the transient episode of hypoxia. The confounding effects of changes in respiration on the HRV spectral indices were reduced by using a computational model. A significant decrease in the parameters related to parasympathetic control was detected in the post-hypoxic responses of the SCA subjects relative to normal controls. The spectral index related to sympathetic activity, on the other hand, showed a tendency to increase the following hypoxic stimulation, but the change was not significant. This study suggests that there is some degree of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in SCA that is revealed by the response to transient hypoxia. PMID:18460753

  20. Cardiac Development in Zebrafish and Human Embryonic Stem Cells Is Inhibited by Exposure to Tobacco Cigarettes and E-Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Palpant, Nathan J.; Hofsteen, Peter; Pabon, Lil; Reinecke, Hans; Murry, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking is a risk factor for low birth weight and other adverse developmental outcomes. Objective We sought to determine the impact of standard tobacco cigarettes and e-cigarettes on heart development in vitro and in vivo. Methods Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to assess developmental effects in vivo and cardiac differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) was used as a model for in vitro cardiac development. Results In zebrafish, exposure to both types of cigarettes results in broad, dose-dependent developmental defects coupled with severe heart malformation, pericardial edema and reduced heart function. Tobacco cigarettes are more toxic than e-cigarettes at comparable nicotine concentrations. During cardiac differentiation of hESCs, tobacco smoke exposure results in a delayed transition through mesoderm. Both types of cigarettes decrease expression of cardiac transcription factors in cardiac progenitor cells, suggesting a persistent delay in differentiation. In definitive human cardiomyocytes, both e-cigarette- and tobacco cigarette-treated samples showed reduced expression of sarcomeric genes such as MLC2v and MYL6. Furthermore, tobacco cigarette-treated samples had delayed onset of beating and showed low levels and aberrant localization of N-cadherin, reduced myofilament content with significantly reduced sarcomere length, and increased expression of the immature cardiac marker smooth muscle alpha-actin. Conclusion These data indicate a negative effect of both tobacco cigarettes and e-cigarettes on heart development in vitro and in vivo. Tobacco cigarettes are more toxic than E-cigarettes and exhibit a broader spectrum of cardiac developmental defects. PMID:25978043

  1. Combination of CD34-positive cell subsets with infarcted myocardium-like matrix stiffness: a potential solution to cell-based cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuning; Ma, Xin; Yao, Kang; Zhu, Hong; Huang, Zheyong; Shen, Li; Qian, Juying; Zou, Yunzeng; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the optimal cell transplantation strategy for myocardial infarction (MI) has attracted a great deal of attention. Commitment of engrafted cells to angiogenesis within damaged myocardium is regarded as one of the major targets in cell-based cardiac repair. Bone marrow–derived CD34-positive cells, a well-characterized population of stem cells, might represent highly functional endothelial progenitor cells and result in the formation of new blood vessels. Recently, physical microenvironment (extracellular matrix stiffness) around the engrafted cells was found to exert an essential impact on their fate. Stem cells are able to feel and respond to the tissue-like matrix stiffness to commit to a relevant lineage. Notably, the infarct area after MI experiences a time-dependent stiffness change from flexible to rigid. Our previous observations demonstrated myocardial stiffness-dependent differentiation of the unselected bone marrow–derived mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) along endothelial lineage cells. Myocardial stiffness (∽42 kPa) within the optimal time domain of cell engraftment (at week 1 to 2) after MI provided a more favourable physical microenvironment for cell specification and cell-based cardiac repair. However, the difference in tissue stiffness-dependent cell differentiation between the specific cell subsets expressing and no expressing CD34 phenotype remains uncertain. We presumed that CD34-positive cell subsets facilitated angiogenesis and subsequently resulted in cardiac repair under induction of infarcted myocardium-like matrix stiffness compared with CD34-negative cells. If the hypothesis were true, it would contribute greatly to detect the optimal cell subsets for cell therapy and to establish an optimized therapy strategy for cell-based cardiac repair. PMID:24945435

  2. Combination of CD34-positive cell subsets with infarcted myocardium-like matrix stiffness: a potential solution to cell-based cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuning; Ma, Xin; Yao, Kang; Zhu, Hong; Huang, Zheyong; Shen, Li; Qian, Juying; Zou, Yunzeng; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo

    2014-06-01

    Detection of the optimal cell transplantation strategy for myocardial infarction (MI) has attracted a great deal of attention. Commitment of engrafted cells to angiogenesis within damaged myocardium is regarded as one of the major targets in cell-based cardiac repair. Bone marrow-derived CD34-positive cells, a well-characterized population of stem cells, might represent highly functional endothelial progenitor cells and result in the formation of new blood vessels. Recently, physical microenvironment (extracellular matrix stiffness) around the engrafted cells was found to exert an essential impact on their fate. Stem cells are able to feel and respond to the tissue-like matrix stiffness to commit to a relevant lineage. Notably, the infarct area after MI experiences a time-dependent stiffness change from flexible to rigid. Our previous observations demonstrated myocardial stiffness-dependent differentiation of the unselected bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) along endothelial lineage cells. Myocardial stiffness (~42 kPa) within the optimal time domain of cell engraftment (at week 1 to 2) after MI provided a more favourable physical microenvironment for cell specification and cell-based cardiac repair. However, the difference in tissue stiffness-dependent cell differentiation between the specific cell subsets expressing and no expressing CD34 phenotype remains uncertain. We presumed that CD34-positive cell subsets facilitated angiogenesis and subsequently resulted in cardiac repair under induction of infarcted myocardium-like matrix stiffness compared with CD34-negative cells. If the hypothesis were true, it would contribute greatly to detect the optimal cell subsets for cell therapy and to establish an optimized therapy strategy for cell-based cardiac repair.

  3. Evaluation of polyelectrolyte complex-based scaffolds for mesenchymal stem cell therapy in cardiac ischemia treatment.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Caroline; Bushkalova, Raya; Alfarano, Chiara; Lairez, Olivier; Calise, Denis; Bourin, Philippe; Frugier, Celine; Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Cussac, Daniel; Parini, Angelo; Sallerin, Brigitte; Fullana, Sophie Girod

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds hold great potential for stem cell-based therapies. Indeed, recent results have shown that biomimetic scaffolds may enhance cell survival and promote an increase in the concentration of therapeutic cells at the injury site. The aim of this work was to engineer an original polymeric scaffold based on the respective beneficial effects of alginate and chitosan. Formulations were made from various alginate/chitosan ratios to form opposite-charge polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs). After freeze-drying, the resultant matrices presented a highly interconnected porous microstructure and mechanical properties suitable for cell culture. In vitro evaluation demonstrated their compatibility with mesenchymal stell cell (MSC) proliferation and their ability to maintain paracrine activity. Finally, the in vivo performance of seeded 3D PEC scaffolds with a polymeric ratio of 40/60 was evaluated after an acute myocardial infarction provoked in a rat model. Evaluation of cardiac function showed a significant increase in the ejection fraction, improved neovascularization, attenuated fibrosis as well as less left ventricular dilatation as compared to an animal control group. These results provide evidence that 3D PEC scaffolds prepared from alginate and chitosan offer an efficient environment for 3D culturing of MSCs and represent an innovative solution for tissue engineering.

  4. Treatment with TNF-α or bacterial lipopolysaccharide attenuates endocardial endothelial cell-mediated stimulation of cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kuruvilla, Leena; Kartha, Cheranellore Chandrasekharan

    2009-01-01

    Background The endocardial endothelium that lines the inner cavity of the heart is distinct from the microvascular endothelial cells and modulates cardiac muscle performance in a manner similar to the vascular endothelial modulation of vascular structure and vasomotor tone. Although the modulatory effects of endocardial endothelium (EE) on cardiomyocytes are firmly established, the regulatory effects of endocardial endothelium on the cardiac interstitium and its cellular components remain ill defined. Methods and Results We investigated whether the stimulatory effect of EE on cardiac fibroblasts would be altered when EECs are activated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or the endotoxin bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Both TNF-α and LPS were found to independently attenuate the stimulatory effect of EE on cardiac fibroblasts. These agents lowered the synthesis or release of ET-1 and increased the secretion of TGF-β and NO. Conclusion The findings of this study using endocardial endothelial cells (EECs) and neonatal cardiac fibroblasts demonstrate that pro-inflammatory cytokines cause altered secretion of paracrine factors by EECs and inhibit proliferation and lower collagen synthesis in fibroblasts. These changes may influence fibroblast response and extra cellular matrix remodeling in pathological conditions of the heart. PMID:19272191

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  6. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells and Its Application in Alveolar Defect Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Jiawen, Si; Jianjun, Zhang; Jiewen, Dai; Dedong, Yu; Hongbo, Yu; Jun, Shi; Xudong, Wang; Shen, Steve G.F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the detailed in vitro osteogenic differentiation process and in vivo bone regenerative property of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs). The in vitro osteogenic differentiation process of hAECs was evaluated by biochemical staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Next, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds alone or loaded with hAECs were implanted into the alveolar defects of rats. Micro-computed tomography evaluation and histologic studies were conducted. Our results validated the in vitro osteogenic capacity of hAECs by upregulation of Runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, and osteopontin, with positive biochemical staining for osteoblasts. An epithelial-mesenchymal transformation process might be involved in the osteogenic differentiation of hAECs by increased expression of transforming growth factor-β1. Our data also demonstrated that in vivo implantation of hAECs loaded on β-TCP scaffolds, not only improved bone regeneration by direct participation, but also reduced the early host immune response to the scaffolds. The presented data indicate that hAECs possess proper osteogenic differentiation potential and a modulatory influence on the early tissue remodeling process, making these cells a potential source of progenitor cells for clinical restoration of the alveolar defect. PMID:25368378

  7. Cell volume control in phospholemman (PLM) knockout mice: do cardiac myocytes demonstrate a regulatory volume decrease and is this influenced by deletion of PLM?

    PubMed

    Bell, James R; Lloyd, David; Curl, Claire L; Delbridge, Lea M D; Shattock, Michael J

    2009-03-01

    In addition to modulatory actions on Na+-K+-ATPase, phospholemman (PLM) has been proposed to play a role in cell volume regulation. Overexpression of PLM induces ionic conductances, with 'PLM channels' exhibiting selectivity for taurine. Osmotic challenge of host cells overexpressing PLM increases taurine efflux and augments the cellular regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response, though a link between PLM and cell volume regulation has not been studied in the heart. We recently reported a depressed cardiac contractile function in PLM knockout mice in vivo, which was exacerbated in crystalloid-perfused isolated hearts, indicating that these hearts were osmotically challenged. To address this, the present study investigated the role of PLM in osmoregulation in the heart. Isolated PLM wild-type and knockout hearts were perfused with a crystalloid buffer supplemented with mannitol in a bid to prevent perfusate-induced cell swelling and maintain function. Accordingly, and in contrast to wild-type control hearts, contractile function was improved in PLM knockout hearts with 30 mM mannitol. To investigate further, isolated PLM wild-type and knockout cardiomyocytes were subjected to increasing hyposmotic challenges. Initial validation studies showed the IonOptix video edge-detection system to be a simple and accurate 'real-time' method for tracking cell width as a marker of cell size. Myocytes swelled equally in both genotypes, indicating that PLM, when expressed at physiological levels in cardiomyocytes, is not essential to limit water accumulation in response to a hyposmotic challenge. Interestingly, freshly isolated adult cardiomyocytes consistently failed to mount RVDs in response to cell swelling, adding to conflicting reports in the literature. A proposed perturbation of the RVD response as a result of the cell isolation process was not restored, however, with short-term culture in either adult or neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  8. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell suspension for pigment cell restoration in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Mohanty, Sujata; Sahni, Kanika; Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Somesh

    2013-04-01

    Vitiligo surgery has come up a long way from punch skin grafts to epidermal cell suspension and latest to the extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell suspension (EHF-ORS-CS) transplantation. The progressive development from one technique to the other is always in a quest for the best. In the latest development- EHF-ORS-CS, which is an enriched source of follicular inactive melanocyte (melanocyte stem cells), seems to be a good addition to the prevailing cell-based therapies for vitiligo; however, need to be explored further in larger, and preferably randomized blinded studies. This review discusses the principle, technical details, and stem cell composition of hair follicular outer root sheath cell suspension. PMID:24023440

  9. Cyclophilin D is required for mitochondrial removal by autophagy in cardiac cells

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Raquel S.; Lee, Youngil; Ghochani, Mariam; Gustafsson, Åsa B.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated intracellular degradation process by which cells remove cytosolic long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. The mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) results in mitochondrial depolarization and increased reactive oxygen species production, which can trigger autophagy. Therefore, we hypothesized that the MPT may have a role in signaling autophagy in cardiac cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential was lower in HL-1 cells subjected to starvation compared to cells maintained in full medium. Mitochondrial membrane potential was preserved in starved cells treated with cyclosporin A (CsA), suggesting the MPT pore is associated with starvation-induced depolarization. Starvation-induced autophagy in HL-1 cells, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and adult mouse cardiomyocytes was inhibited by CsA. Starvation failed to induce autophagy in CypD-deficient murine cardiomyocytes, whereas in myocytes from mice overexpressing CypD the levels of autophagy were enhanced even under fed conditions. Collectively, these results demonstrate a role for CypD and the MPT in the initiation of autophagy. We also analyzed the role of the MPT in the degradation of mitochondria by biochemical analysis and electron microscopy. HL-1 cells subjected to starvation in the presence of CsA had higher levels of mitochondrial proteins (by Western blot), more mitochondria and less autophagosomes (by electron microscopy) then cells starved in the absence of CsA. Our results suggest a physiologic function for CypD and the MPT in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. Starvation-induced autophagy regulated by CypD and the MPT may represent a homeostatic mechanism for cellular and mitochondrial quality control. PMID:20364102

  10. Optimizing cell seeding and retention in a three-dimensional bioengineered cardiac ventricle: The two-stage cellularization model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nikita M; Yazdi, Iman K; Tasciotti, Ennio; Birla, Ravi K

    2016-10-01

    Current cell seeding techniques focus on passively directing cells to a scaffold surface with the addition of dynamic culture to encourage cell permeation. In 3D tissue engineered constructs, cell retention efficiency is dependent on the cell delivery method, and biomaterial properties. Passive cell delivery relies on cell migration to the scaffold surface; biomaterial surface properties and porosity determine cell infiltration capacity. As a result, cell retention efficiencies remain low. The development of an effective two-stage cell seeding technique, coupled with perfusion culture, provides the potential to improve cellularization efficiency, and retention. This study, uses a chitosan bioengineered open ventricle (BEOV) scaffold to produce a two-stage perfusion cultured ventricle (TPCV). TPCV were fabricated by direct injection of 10 million primary rat neonatal cardiac cells, followed by wrapping of the outer scaffold surface with a 3D fibrin gel artificial heart muscle patch; TPCV were perfusion cultured for 3 days. The average biopotential output was 1.731 mV. TPCV cell retention following culture was approximately 5%. Cardiac cells were deposited on the scaffold surface and formed intercellular connections. Histological assessment displayed localized cell clusters, with some dissemination, and validated the observed presence of intercellular and gap-junction interactions. The study demonstrates initial effectiveness of our two-stage cell delivery concept, based on function and biological metrics. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2275-2285. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27071026

  11. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26522928

  12. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Coupled iterated map models of action potential dynamics in a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihong; Xie, Yuanfang; Qu, Zhilin

    2008-05-01

    Low-dimensional iterated map models have been widely used to study action potential dynamics in isolated cardiac cells. Coupled iterated map models have also been widely used to investigate action potential propagation dynamics in one-dimensional (1D) coupled cardiac cells, however, these models are usually empirical and not carefully validated. In this study, we first developed two coupled iterated map models which are the standard forms of diffusively coupled maps and overcome the limitations of the previous models. We then determined the coupling strength and space constant by quantitatively comparing the 1D action potential duration profile from the coupled cardiac cell model described by differential equations with that of the coupled iterated map models. To further validate the coupled iterated map models, we compared the stability conditions of the spatially uniform state of the coupled iterated maps and those of the 1D ionic model and showed that the coupled iterated map model could well recapitulate the stability conditions, i.e. the spatially uniform state is stable unless the state is chaotic. Finally, we combined conduction into the developed coupled iterated map model to study the effects of coupling strength on wave stabilities and showed that the diffusive coupling between cardiac cells tends to suppress instabilities during reentry in a 1D ring and the onset of discordant alternans in a periodically paced 1D cable.

  14. Fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for cardiac precursor cell selection from stromal vascular fraction and optimization for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vinod Kumar; Kamaraju, Suguna Ratnakar; Kancherla, Ravindranath; Kona, Lakshmi K; Beevi, Syed Sultan; Debnath, Tanya; Usha, Shalini P; Vadapalli, Rammohan; Arbab, Ali Syed; Chelluri, Lakshmi Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been used to label cells for imaging as well as for therapeutic purposes. The purpose of this study was to modify the approach to develop a nanoprobe for cell selection and imaging with a direct therapeutic translational focus. The approach involves physical coincubation and adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-polyethylene glycol (SPION-PEG) complexes with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or a set of antibodies. Flow cytometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, iron staining, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess cell viability, function, and labeling efficiency. This process has been validated by selecting adipose tissue-derived cardiac progenitor cells from the stromal vascular fraction using signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA)/kinase domain receptor (KDR) mAbs. These markers were chosen because of their sustained expression during cardiomyocyte differentiation. Sorting of cells positive for SIRPA and KDR allowed the enrichment of cardiac progenitors with 90% troponin-I positivity in differentiation cultures. SPION labeled cardiac progenitor cells (1×105 cells) was mixed with gel and used for 3T magnetic resonance imaging at a concentration, as low as 12.5 μg of iron. The toxicity assays, at cellular and molecular levels, did not show any detrimental effects of SPION. Our study has the potential to achieve moderate to high specific cell selection for the dual purpose of imaging and therapy. PMID:25653519

  15. Amniotic fluid stem cells morph into a cardiovascular lineage: analysis of a chemically induced cardiac and vascular commitment.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Margherita; Contini, Giovanni; Santaniello, Sara; Bandiera, Pasquale; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Sanna, Raimonda; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Delitala, Alessandro P; Montella, Andrea; Bagella, Luigi; Ventura, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells were previously observed along with mesenchymal stem cells from different sources, after being treated with a mixed ester of hyaluronan with butyric and retinoic acids, to show a significant increase in the yield of cardiogenic and vascular differentiated elements. The aim of the present study was to determine if stem cells derived from primitive fetal cells present in human amniotic fluid (hAFSCs) and cultured in the presence of a mixture of hyaluronic (HA), butyric (BU), and retinoic (RA) acids show a higher yield of differentiation toward the cardiovascular phenotype as compared with untreated cells. During the differentiation process elicited by exposure to HA + BU + RA, genes controlling pluripotency and plasticity of stem cells, such as Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4, were significantly downregulated at the transcriptional level. At this point, a significant increase in expression of genes controlling the appearance of cardiogenic and vascular lineages in HA + BU + RA-treated cells was observed. The protein expression levels typical of cardiac and vascular phenotypes, evaluated by Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry, were higher in hAFSCs cultured in the presence of HA + BU + RA, as compared with untreated control cells. Appearance of the cardiac phenotype was further inferred by ultrastructural analysis using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These results demonstrate that a mixture of HA + BU + RA significantly increased the yield of elements committed toward cardiac and vascular phenotypes, confirming what we have previously observed in other cellular types.

  16. Fucoidan Promotes Early Step of Cardiac Differentiation from Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Long-Term Maintenance of Beating Areas

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Sofiane; Letourneur, Didier; Aid-Launais, Rachida; Di Stefano, Antonio; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Somatic stem cells require specific niches and three-dimensional scaffolds provide ways to mimic this microenvironment. Here, we studied a scaffold based on Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide known to influence morphogen gradients during embryonic development, to support human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiation toward the cardiac lineage. A macroporous (pore 200 μm) Fucoidan scaffold was selected to support hESCs attachment and proliferation. Using a protocol based on the cardiogenic morphogen bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) and transforming growth factor (TGFβ) followed by tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), an effector of cardiopoietic priming, we examined the cardiac differentiation in the scaffold compared to culture dishes and embryoid bodies (EBs). At day 8, Fucoidan scaffolds supported a significantly higher expression of the 3 genes encoding for transcription factors marking the early step of embryonic cardiac differentiation NKX2.5 (p<0.05), MEF2C (p<0.01), and GATA4 (p<0.01), confirmed by flow cytometry analysis for MEF2C and NKX2.5. The ability of Fucoidan scaffolds to locally concentrate and slowly release TGFβ and TNFα was confirmed by Luminex technology. We also found that Fucoidan scaffolds supported the late stage of embryonic cardiac differentiation marked by a significantly higher atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) expression (p<0.001), although only rare beating areas were observed. We postulated that absence of mechanical stress in the soft hydrogel impaired sarcomere formation, as confirmed by molecular analysis of the cardiac muscle myosin MYH6 and immunohistological staining of sarcomeric α-actinin. Nevertheless, Fucoidan scaffolds contributed to the development of thin filaments connecting beating areas through promotion of smooth muscle cells, thus enabling maintenance of beating areas for up to 6 months. In conclusion, Fucoidan scaffolds appear as a very promising biomaterial to control cardiac differentiation from hESCs that

  17. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  18. "String theory" of c-kit(pos) cardiac cells: a new paradigm regarding the nature of these cells that may reconcile apparently discrepant results.

    PubMed

    Keith, Matthew C L; Bolli, Roberto

    2015-03-27

    Although numerous preclinical investigations have consistently demonstrated salubrious effects of c-kit(pos) cardiac cells administered after myocardial infarction, the mechanism of action remains highly controversial. We and others have found little or no evidence that these cells differentiate into mature functional cardiomyocytes, suggesting paracrine effects. In this review, we propose a new paradigm predicated on a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including studies of cardiac development; we have (facetiously) dubbed this conceptual construct "string theory" of c-kit(pos) cardiac cells because it reconciles multifarious and sometimes apparently discrepant results. There is strong evidence that, during development, the c-kit receptor is expressed in different pools of cardiac progenitors (some capable of robust cardiomyogenesis and others with little or no contribution to myocytes). Accordingly, c-kit positivity, in itself, does not define the embryonic origins, lineage capabilities, or differentiation capacities of specific cardiac progenitors. C-kit(pos) cells derived from the first heart field exhibit cardiomyogenic potential during development, but these cells are likely depleted shortly before or after birth. The residual c-kit(pos) cells found in the adult heart are probably of proepicardial origin, possess a mesenchymal phenotype (resembling bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells), and are capable of contributing significantly only to nonmyocytic lineages (fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells). If these 2 populations (first heart field and proepicardium) express different levels of c-kit, the cardiomyogenic potential of first heart field progenitors might be reconciled with recent results of c-kit(pos) cell lineage tracing studies. The concept that c-kit expression in the adult heart identifies epicardium-derived, noncardiomyogenic precurs