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Sample records for cells retain antigen

  1. Selective degradation of T cell antigen receptor chains retained in a pre-Golgi compartment

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the fate of newly synthesized T cell antigen receptor (TCR) subunits in a T cell hybridoma deficient in expression of the clonotypic beta chain. Synthesis and assembly of the remaining chains proceed normally but surface expression of TCR chains is undetectable in these cells. A variety of biochemical and morphological techniques has been used to show that the TCR chains in these cells fail to be transported to any of the Golgi cisternae. Instead, they are retained in a pre-Golgi compartment which is either part of or closely related to the endoplasmic reticulum. The CD3-delta chain is degraded by a non- lysosomal process that is inhibited at temperatures at or below 27 degrees C. By contrast, the remaining chains (CD3-epsilon, CD3-gamma, and zeta) are very stable over 7 h. We propose possible mechanisms that may explain the differential fate of TCR chains retained in a pre-Golgi compartment. PMID:2974039

  2. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  3. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from cirrhotic patients retain similar capacity for maturation/activation and antigen presentation as those from healthy subjects☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Shiroh; Chang, Li-Yuan; Li, Yonghai; Kaplan, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of liver cirrhosis on dendritic cell function. The purpose of this study was to compare the activation and antigen-presentation capacity of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) from cirrhotic patients (CIR) relative to healthy donors (HD). MoDC from CIR and HD were matured, phenotyped, irradiated and pulsed with 15mer peptides for two hepatocellular carcinoma-related antigens, alphafetoprotein and glypican-3, then co-cultured with autologous T-cells. Expanded T-cells were evaluated by interferon-gamma ELISPOT and intracellular staining. 15 CIR and 7 HD were studied. While CD14+ monocytes from CIR displayed enhanced M2 polarization, under MoDC-polarizing conditions, we identified no significant difference between HD and CIR in maturation-induced upregulation of co-stimulation markers. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed between CIR and HD in subsequent expansion of tumor antigen-specific IFNγ+ T-cells. Conclusion MoDCs isolated from cirrhotic individuals retain similar capacity for in vitro activation, maturation and antigen-presentation as those from healthy donors. PMID:25734547

  4. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  5. Enrichment of antigen-specific B lymphocytes by the direct removal of B cells not bearing specificity for the antigen

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Antigen-specific B cells (ASC) were purified from other B cells by prior incubation with specific antigen followed by rosetting with erythrocytes conjugated with anti-mouse Ig and sedimenting on Ficoll- Isopaque. This procedure allowed the removal of most of the B cells, while those speicifc for the antigen used in incubation were retained. Relative to the B-cell content, ASC were enriched 64- to 132-fold. The method is highly specific in that B cells primed to two different antigens, turkey gamma globulin and sheep erythrocytes, could be separated from each other. The advantages of this indirect purification procedure over purification procedures which obtain ASC directly are the simplicity of obtaining the ASC and the ability of the ASC of respond to antigen without the addition of other cells. PMID:69002

  6. Acquired loss of red cell Kell antigens.

    PubMed

    Vengelen-Tyler, V; Gonzalez, B; Garratty, G; Kruppe, C; Johnson, C L; Mueller, K A; Marsh, W L

    1987-02-01

    A 19-year-old patient with a long history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura developed a potent antibody against a high-incidence antigen in the Kell blood group system. The direct antiglobulin test on his red cells was negative. His cells exhibited profound depression of Kell blood group antigens, but antigens of other blood groups were normal. Transfusion of incompatible blood was well tolerated and differential agglutination tests, using selected Rh antisera, showed in vivo survival of the transfused red cells for more than 8 weeks. However, the transfused red cells also showed acquired loss of Kell antigens. Five months after the initial findings, Kell-related antibody disappeared and Kell antigens reappeared on his red cells. The patient's serum stored from the initial investigation now reacted with his freshly collected red cells. These data suggest that an environmental agent in the patient's plasma was responsible for the temporary loss of Kell antigens from red cells in his circulation.

  7. Stem cell programs are retained in human leukemic lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, D; Zhou, X; Li, Z; Li, Z-Q; Duan, C; Liu, T; Zhang, F; Huang, Y; Zhang, Y; Gao, F; Guo, Y; Gupta, R; Chen, G; Enver, T; Tang, J; Hong, D

    2015-04-16

    Leukemic lymphoblasts within different immunophenotypic populations possess stem cell properties. However, whether or not the self-renewal program is retained from stem cells or conferred on progenitors by leukemogenic molecules remains unknown. We have addressed the issue in the context of TEL-AML1-associated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by profiling a refined program edited from genes essential for self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and B-cell development. Bioinformatic analysis shows that ALL populations are loosely clustered and close to the normal population that contains stem and primitive progenitor cells. This finding indicates that immunophenotypes do not reflect maturation stages in ALL and that the self-renewal program may be retained from stem cells. Results of assessing 'first hit' function of TEL-AML1 in different populations of normal cells demonstrate the molecular model. Therefore, the current study shows a leukemogenic scenario of human ALL in which programs of stem cells are sustained in distinct fractions by leukemogenic mutations.

  8. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  9. Modulation of cell-surface antigens of a murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Akeson, R; Herschman, H R

    1974-01-01

    Antisera were produced in rabbits to morphologically differentiated cells from the C1300 murine neuroblastoma (i.e., cells in which process formation was induced by maintenance on serum-free medium for 5 days). These antisera reacted more strongly in the complement fixation reaction with such "differentiated" cells than with "undifferentiated" (nonprocess-bearing) neuroblastoma cells. Adsorption of the antisera with undifferentiated cells removed the reactivity to cells without processes, while the reactivity with serum-free cells which possess processes was retained. Indirect immunofluorescence studies confirmed the results obtained by complement fixation and demonstrated that antibodies to the surface antigens of process-bearing cells could be adsorbed by particulate preparations from brain but not liver, spleen, or kidney. This is the first description of neural-associated cell-surface changes that correlate with the morphological differentiation in culture of neuroblastoma cells.

  10. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  11. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  12. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  13. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell. [lithium aluminate

    DOEpatents

    Singh, R.N.; Dusek, J.T.

    1979-12-27

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H/sub 2/ and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55 to 65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  14. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Raj N.; Dusek, Joseph T.

    1983-06-21

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H.sub.2 and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55-65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  15. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  16. Identification and manipulation of antigen specific T-cells with artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Koffeman, Eva; Keogh, Elissa; Klein, Mark; Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    T-cells specific for a particular antigen represent a small percentage of the overall T-cell population. Detecting the presence of antigen specific T-cells in patients, animal models or populations of cultured cells has presented a challenge to researchers. The T-cell capture method described here utilizes a truly artificial method of antigen presentation and requires only 50,000 cells for the detection of the major histomcompatibility complex (MHC) class II and antigen restricted T-cells. With this method, liposomes, prepared with readily available materials, are loaded with neutravidin "rafts" comprised of MHC/peptide complexes, anti-CD28, a costimulatory molecule, and anti-LFA-1, an adhesion molecule. These artificial APCs are easily manipulated to include any MHC, antibodies to cell surface markers and/or costimulatory signals of interest thereby enabling not only T-cell identification but also the manipulation of mechanisms of T-cell activation. PMID:17983141

  17. Activation of bone marrow-resident memory T cells by circulating, antigen-bearing dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Lois L.; Bonasio, Roberto; Mazo, Irina B.; Halin, Cornelia; Cheng, Guiying; van der Velden, Adrianus W. M.; Cariappa, Annaiah; Chase, Catherine; Russell, Paul; Starnbach, Michael N.; Koni, Pandelakis A.; Pillai, Shiv; Weninger, Wolfgang; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) carry antigen from peripheral tissues via lymphatics to lymph nodes (LN). We report that differentiated DC can also travel from the periphery into the blood. Circulating DC migrated to the spleen, liver and lung, but not LN. They also homed to the bone marrow (BM) where they were better retained than in most other tissues. DC homing to the BM depended on constitutively expressed VCAM-1 and endothelial selectins in BM microvessels. Two-photon intravital microscopy in BM cavities revealed that DC formed stable antigen-dependent contacts with BM-resident central memory T cells. Moreover, using this novel migratory pathway, antigen-pulsed DC could trigger central memory T cell-mediated recall responses in the BM. PMID:16155571

  18. Antigen Processing and Presentation Mechanisms in Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul A; Cresswell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Unlike B cells, CD8-positive and CD4-positive T cells of the adaptive immune system do not recognize intact foreign proteins but instead recognize polypeptide fragments of potential antigens. These antigenic peptides are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells bound to MHC class I and MHC class II proteins. Here, we review the basics of antigen acquisition by antigen presenting cells, antigen proteolysis into polypeptide fragments, antigenic peptide binding to MHC proteins, and surface display of both MHC class I-peptide and MHC class II-peptide complexes.

  19. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  20. Antigen presenting cells - diversity, differentiation, and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schook, L.B. ); Tew, J.G. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 35 papers. Some of the titles are: DNA-mediated gene transfer as a tool for analyzing Ia structure-function relationships and antigen presentation; Regulation of immune-associated genes during macrophage differentiation; Presentation of arsonate-tyrosine to cloned T-cells by L-Cells transfected with class II genes; and The duration of class II MHC glycoprotein expression by mononuclear phagocytes is regulated by the Bcg gene.

  1. Biodegradable nanoellipsoidal artificial antigen presenting cells for antigen specific T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Aje, Kent; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2015-04-01

    Non-spherical nanodimensional artificial antigen presenting cells (naAPCs) offer the potential to systemically induce an effective antigen-specific immune response. In this report it is shown biodegradable ellipsoidal naAPCs mimic the T-Cell/APC interaction better than equivalent spherical naAPCs. In addition, it is demonstrated ellipsoidal naAPCs offer reduced non-specific cellular uptake and a superior pharmacokinetic profile compared to spherical naAPCs. PMID:25641795

  2. Development of an Antigen-driven Colitis Model to Study Presentation of Antigens by Antigen Presenting Cells to T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Valerio; Radulovic, Katarina; Riedel, Christian U; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation which affects the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). One of the best ways to study the immunological mechanisms involved during the disease is the T cell transfer model of colitis. In this model, immunodeficient mice (RAG(-/-) recipients) are reconstituted with naive CD4(+) T cells from healthy wild type hosts. This model allows examination of the earliest immunological events leading to disease and chronic inflammation, when the gut inflammation perpetuates but does not depend on a defined antigen. To study the potential role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the disease process, it is helpful to have an antigen-driven disease model, in which a defined commensal-derived antigen leads to colitis. An antigen driven-colitis model has hence been developed. In this model OT-II CD4(+) T cells, that can recognize only specific epitopes in the OVA protein, are transferred into RAG(-/-) hosts challenged with CFP-OVA-expressing E. coli. This model allows the examination of interactions between APCs and T cells in the lamina propria. PMID:27684040

  3. [Mucose associated lymphoid tissue. Antigen presenting cells].

    PubMed

    Luzardo-Baptista, Mario J; Luzardo, José Rafael

    2013-12-01

    We studied samples of normal and abnormal human mucosae, including oral tissue and uterine cervix, using electron microscopy. Special attention was given to the functions and mechanisms of defense carried out by the epithelial (EC) and dendritic cells (DC). Activated epithelial cells posses the capacity to uptake and process antigens, in order to present them, subsequently, to the dendritic cells. The structures and elements of the cells intervening on this function are: micropinocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes, phagosomes, clathrin-covered vesicles, dense granules covered by a unit membrane, granules with onion likes leaves, microbodies, and dense granules with acid phosphatase activity. When they first arrive within the epithelial layers, the DC are clear with long cytoplasmic projections, which later become short, and the density of their cytoplasm increases. They possess mycropinocytic vesicles, some clathrine-covered vesicles, lysososmes and Birbeck granules. At this moment, they are known as Langerhans cells. EC and DC present many surface folds rich in micropynocytic vesicles. Between EC and DC there are many contacts (close junctions or tight junctions), through which antigens, phagocitized and processed by the EC, are given to the DC. These cells join them to major histocompatibility complex molecules or to other molecules with similar functions (CD1). Then the Langerhans cells travel to the lymphatic node to activate T cells and continue the immunologic task. So, in this way, both the EC and the DC are a link between the natural and the acquired immunological mechanisms. PMID:24502183

  4. Cell Wall-Associated Protein Antigens of Streptococcus salivarius: Purification, Properties, and Function in Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; Jacobs, Ton

    1982-01-01

    Three cell wall-associated protein antigens (antigens b, c, and d) were isolated from mutanolysin-solubilized cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB and purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and immunoadsorption chromatography. Antigens b and c were also isolated from culture supernatants. Antigen b consisted of more than 80% protein and had an apparent molecular weight as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 320,000. Antigen c consisted of 57% protein, about 30% neutral sugar, and about 13% amino sugar, and its glycoprotein nature was confirmed by specific staining techniques. During sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis antigen c resolved into two or more bands, depending on the source or the isolation procedure, in the molecular weight range from 220,000 to 280,000. Antigen d consisted of 95% protein and was observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as two bands with molecular weights of 129,000 and 121,000. Under nondenaturing conditions all three antigens had molecular weights in the range from 1 × 106 to 3 × 106 as determined by gel filtration. The amino acid compositions of antigens b, c, and d were characterized by low amounts of basic amino acids and relatively high levels of nonpolar amino acids. Among oral streptococcal species antigens b and c were virtually restricted to strains of S. salivarius and most often to serotype I strains. Antigen b was recognized as the factor that mediates coaggregation of S. salivarius with Veillonella strains. The purified protein retained its biological activity. Antigen c could be linked to functions relating to adhesion of the streptococci to host tissues on the basis of its absence in mutant strains and blocking by specific antisera. The purified molecule had no detectable biological activity. Antigen d could not be linked to an established adhesion function. Images

  5. Optofluidic realization and retaining of cell–cell contact using an abrupt tapered optical fibre

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongbao; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Yayi; Zhang, Huixian; Li, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Studies reveal that there exists much interaction and communication between bacterial cells, with parts of these social behaviors depending on cell–cell contacts. The cell–cell contact has proved to be crucial for determining various biochemical processes. However, for cell culture with relatively low cell concentration, it is difficult to precisely control and retain the contact of a small group of cells. Particularly, the retaining of cell–cell contact is difficult when flows occur in the medium. Here, we report an optofluidic method for realization and retaining of Escherichia coli cell–cell contact in a microfluidic channel using an abrupt tapered optical fibre. The contact process is based on launching a 980-nm wavelength laser into the fibre, E. coli cells were trapped onto the fibre tip one after another, retaining cell–cell contact and forming a highly organized cell chain. The formed chains further show the ability as bio-optical waveguides. PMID:23771190

  6. Multivalent Antigens for Promoting B and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Nitasha R.; Zwick, Daniel B.; Courtney, Adam H.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Efficacious vaccines require antigens that elicit productive immune system activation. Antigens that afford robust antibody production activate both B and T cells. Elucidating the antigen properties that enhance B–T cell communication is difficult with traditional antigens. We therefore used ring-opening metathesis polymerization to access chemically defined, multivalent antigens containing both B and T cell epitopes to explore how antigen structure impacts B cell and T cell activation and communication. The bifunctional antigens were designed so that the backbone substitution level of each antigenic epitope could be quantified using 19F NMR. The T cell peptide epitope was appended so that it could be liberated in B cells via the action of the endosomal protease cathepsin D, and this design feature was critical for T cell activation. Antigens with high BCR epitope valency induce greater BCR-mediated internalization and T cell activation than did low valency antigens, and these high-valency polymeric antigens were superior to protein antigens. We anticipate that these findings can guide the design of more effective vaccines. PMID:25970017

  7. Artificial antigen presenting cell (aAPC) mediated activation and expansion of natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Webb, Tonya J

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of T cells that display markers characteristic of both natural killer (NK) cells and T cells(1). Unlike classical T cells, NKT cells recognize lipid antigen in the context of CD1 molecules(2). NKT cells express an invariant TCRα chain rearrangement: Vα14Jα18 in mice and Vα24Jα18 in humans, which is associated with Vβ chains of limited diversity(3-6), and are referred to as canonical or invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Similar to conventional T cells, NKT cells develop from CD4-CD8- thymic precursor T cells following the appropriate signaling by CD1d (7). The potential to utilize NKT cells for therapeutic purposes has significantly increased with the ability to stimulate and expand human NKT cells with α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and a variety of cytokines(8). Importantly, these cells retained their original phenotype, secreted cytokines, and displayed cytotoxic function against tumor cell lines. Thus, ex vivo expanded NKT cells remain functional and can be used for adoptive immunotherapy. However, NKT cell based-immunotherapy has been limited by the use of autologous antigen presenting cells and the quantity and quality of these stimulator cells can vary substantially. Monocyte-derived DC from cancer patients have been reported to express reduced levels of costimulatory molecules and produce less inflammatory cytokines(9,10). In fact, murine DC rather than autologous APC have been used to test the function of NKT cells from CML patients(11). However, this system can only be used for in vitro testing since NKT cells cannot be expanded by murine DC and then used for adoptive immunotherapy. Thus, a standardized system that relies on artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) could produce the stimulating effects of DC without the pitfalls of allo- or xenogeneic cells(12, 13). Herein, we describe a method for generating CD1d-based aAPC. Since the engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) by CD1d-antigen complexes is

  8. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  9. Shashkov`s method retaining cell-edge unknowns

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.M.

    1996-01-05

    Shashkov`s method for scalar cell-edge and cell-center variables is derived. Dot products for cell-edge vectors are computed for a corner of the cell. Next, the divergence and gradient are discretized. The diffusion equation is solved with cell-edge continuity and boundary conditions. A symmetric positive definite solution matrix is proven.

  10. CELL SURFACE ANTIGENS OF A MOUSE TESTICULAR TERATOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Linda R.; Edidin, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to a mouse testicular teratoma, absorbed with normal mouse tissues, react by immunofluorescence with plasma membrane antigens of a variety of transplantable mouse tumor cells and transformed fibroblast cell lines including Clone 1D, SV-40-3T3, and 3T12. Trypsin treatment of cells of "normal" lines, 3T3 and FR-SV-3T3, uncovers reactivity on these as well. Early passage mouse embryo fibroblast cell cultures do not react even after trypsinization. By cross-absorbtion studies, the anti-teratoma serum appears to react with an antigen common to most tumor cells investigated thus far. When this antigen on Clone 1D cells is "capped," H-2 antigens collect with the teratoma antigens in the cap indicating a physical association between the molecules. Molecules specified by both the H-2D and H-2K regions are bound to the teratoma antigens in the Clone 1D plasma membrane. This antigen is also found in soluble tumor cell fractions where it is believed to be free of H-2. A second cell surface antigen defined by anti-teratoma serum is expressed only by hepatoma and teratoma itself. This second antigen is apparently a secretory product of teratoma cells. A third surface antigen defined by anti-teratoma serum appears to be specific for the teratoma. PMID:4365513

  11. Artificial antigen presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen presenting cells can affect T cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen presenting cell systems and their use in T cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  12. Artificial antigen-presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Cameron J; Riddell, Stanley R

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen-presenting cells can affect T-cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen-presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen-presenting cell systems and their use in T-cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  13. Immortalization of human myogenic progenitor cell clone retaining multipotentiality

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Naohiro . E-mail: nao@nils.go.jp; Kiyono, Tohru; Wada, Michiko R.; Shimizu, Shirabe; Yasumoto, Shigeru; Inagawa, Masayo

    2006-10-06

    Human myogenic cells have limited ability to proliferate in culture. Although forced expression of telomerase can immortalize some cell types, telomerase alone delays senescence of human primary cultured myogenic cells, but fails to immortalize them. In contrast, constitutive expression of both telomerase and the E7 gene from human papillomavirus type 16 immortalizes primary human myogenic cells. We have established an immortalized primary human myogenic cell line preserving multipotentiality by ectopic expression of telomerase and E7. The immortalized human myogenic cells exhibit the phenotypic characteristics of their primary parent, including an ability to undergo myogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic terminal differentiation under appropriate culture conditions. The immortalized cells will be useful for both basic and applied studies aimed at human muscle disorders. Furthermore, immortalization by transduction of telomerase and E7 represents a useful method by which to expand human myogenic cells in vitro without compromising their ability to differentiate.

  14. Two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell clones display heterogeneity in antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, M T; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1989-01-01

    Evidence from various antigen systems suggests that antigen processing can be one factor that determines the repertoire of immunogenic peptides. Thus, processing events may account for some of the disparity between the available and expressed helper T-cell repertoires. In this report, we demonstrate that the immunodominant T-cell determinant in ovalbumin [p323-339; ovalbumin-(323-339) heptadecapeptide] is processed differently by two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell lines, M12 and A20. The ovalbumin-specific T-cell-T-cell hybridomas, DO-11.10 and 3DO-54.8, were used to detect processed antigen. These T-T hybridomas have different fine specificities for the p323-339 determinant. A20 cells presented native ovalbumin well to both T-T hybridomas, whereas M12 cells presented native ovalbumin well to 3DO-54.8 but very inefficiently to DO-11.10. M12 and A20 cells effectively stimulated both T-T hybridomas with the same concentrations of the immunogenic synthetic peptide p323-339. Therefore, M12 cells and DO-11.10 can interact with each other, and both T-T hybridomas have similar sensitivities for the same immunogenic peptide. We conclude that genetically identical antigen-presenting cells can display heterogeneity in the fine processing of an immunodominant T-cell determinant, and synthetic model peptides that represent the minimal stimulatory sequence of a T-cell determinant are not necessarily identical to the structure of in vivo processed antigen. Heterogeneity in antigen processing by individual antigen-presenting cells would serve to increase the repertoire of immunogenic peptides that are presented to T cells. PMID:2470101

  15. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function.

  16. Secretion, interaction and assembly of two O-glycosylated cell wall antigens from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pavia, J; Aguado, C; Mormeneo, S; Sentandreu, R

    2001-07-01

    The mechanisms of incorporation of two antigens have been determined using a monoclonal antibody (3A10) raised against the material released from the mycelial cell wall by zymolyase digestion and retained on a concanavalin A column. One of the hybridomas secreted an IgG that reacted with two bands in Western blots. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that the antigens were located on the surfaces of mycelial cells, but within the cell walls of yeasts. These antigens were detected in a membrane preparation, in the SDS-soluble material and in the material released by a 1,3-beta-glucanase and chitinase from the cell walls of yeast and mycelial cells. In the latter three samples, an additional high-molecular-mass, highly polydispersed band was also detected. Beta-elimination of each fraction resulted in the disappearance of all antigen bands, suggesting that they are highly O-glycosylated. In addition, the electrophoretic mobility of the high-molecular-mass, highly polydispersed bands increased after digestion with endoglycosidase H, indicating that they are also N-glycosylated. New antigen bands were released when remnants of the cell walls extracted with 1,3-beta-glucanase or chitinase were digested with chitinase or 1,3-beta-glucanase. These results are consistent with the notion that, after secretion, parts of the O-glycosylated antigen molecules are transferred to an N-glycosylated protein(s). This molecular complex, as well as the remaining original 70 and 80 kDa antigen molecules, next bind to 1,3-beta-glucan or chitin, probably via 1,6-beta-glucan, and, in an additional step, to chitin or 1,3-beta-glucan. This process results in the final molecular product of each antigen, and their distribution in the cell walls. PMID:11429475

  17. Distribution and functional characteristics of antigen-specific helper T cells arising after Peyer's patch immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Dunkley, M L; Husband, A J

    1987-01-01

    Antigen-specific T-helper cells for IgA responses arise in Peyer's patches (PP) following their immunization by subserosal injection of keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). These are of the W3/25 phenotype and the W3/25 receptor is shown here to be involved in their helper function. These cells originate in PP and migrate via mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) to thoracic duct lymph, although the MLN appear to be unnecessary for the induction or maturation of antigen-specific helper cells collected in thoracic duct lymph after intra-Peyer's patch (i.p.p.) immunization. KLH-specific helper cells can be detected subsequently in the intraepithelial lymphocyte population and also among lamina propria lymphocytes. The helper cells also relocate to PP distant to their site of origin where they are retained only when antigen is present. While i.p.p. immunization is an efficient route for the induction of IgA helper cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissue, it differs from oral immunization in that concomitant induction of antigen-specific splenic suppressor cells does not occur, indicating a role for epithelial antigen processing in this phenomenon. PMID:2450831

  18. Nonclassical T Cells and Their Antigens in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Lepore, Marco; Mori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    T cells that recognize nonpeptidic antigens, and thereby are identified as nonclassical, represent important yet poorly characterized effectors of the immune response. They are present in large numbers in circulating blood and tissues and are as abundant as T cells recognizing peptide antigens. Nonclassical T cells exert multiple functions including immunoregulation, tumor control, and protection against infections. They recognize complexes of nonpeptidic antigens such as lipid and glycolipid molecules, vitamin B2 precursors, and phosphorylated metabolites of the mevalonate pathway. Each of these antigens is presented by antigen-presenting molecules other than major histocompatibility complex (MHC), including CD1, MHC class I–related molecule 1 (MR1), and butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) molecules. Here, we discuss how nonclassical T cells participate in the recognition of mycobacterial antigens and in the mycobacterial-specific immune response. PMID:25059739

  19. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  20. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  1. Targeting Antigens to Dendritic Cell Receptors for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Thalhammer, Theresia; Tzakos, Andreas G.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen presenting cells of the immune system which play a key role in regulating immune responses. Depending on the method of antigen delivery, DCs stimulate immune responses or induce tolerance. As a consequence of the dual function of DCs, DCs are studied in the context of immunotherapy for both cancer and autoimmune diseases. In vaccine development, a major aim is to induce strong, specific T-cell responses. This is achieved by targeting antigen to cell surface molecules on DCs that efficiently channel the antigen into endocytic compartments for loading onto MHC molecules and stimulation of T-cell responses. The most attractive cell surface receptors, expressed on DCs used as targets for antigen delivery for cancer and other diseases, are discussed. PMID:24228179

  2. CD1-Restricted T Cell Recognition of Microbial Lipoglycan Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieling, P. A.; Chatterjee, D.; Porcelli, S. A.; Prigozy, T. I.; Mazzaccaro, R. J.; Soriano, T.; Bloom, B. R.; Brenner, M. B.; Kronenberg, M.; Brennan, P. J.; Modlin, R. L.

    1995-07-01

    It has long been the paradigm that T cells recognize peptide antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. However, nonpeptide antigens can be presented to T cells by human CD1b molecules, which are not encoded by the MHC. A major class of microbial antigens associated with pathogenicity are lipoglycans. It is shown here that human CD1b presents the defined mycobacterial lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) to αβ T cell receptor-bearing lymphocytes. Presentation of these lipoglycan antigens required internalization and endosomal acidification. The T cell recognition required mannosides with α(1-->2) linkages and a phosphatidylinositol unit. T cells activated by LAM produced interferon γ and were cytolytic. Thus, an important class of microbial molecules, the lipoglycans, is a part of the universe of foreign antigens recognized by human T cells.

  3. Heat shock protein derivatives for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Takemoto, Seiji; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2008-04-16

    Delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a key issue for developing effective cancer vaccines. Controlling the tissue distribution of antigens can increase antigen-specific immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) forms complexes with a variety of tumor-related antigens via its polypeptide-binding domain. Because Hsp70 is taken up by APCs through recognition by Hsp receptors, such as CD91 and LOX-1, its application to antigen delivery systems has been examined both in experimental and clinical settings. A tissue distribution study revealed that Hsp70 is mainly taken up by the liver, especially by hepatocytes, after intravenous injection in mice. A significant amount of Hsp70 was also delivered to regional lymph nodes when it was injected subcutaneously, supporting the hypothesis that Hsp70 is a natural targeting system for APCs. Model antigens were complexed with or conjugated to Hsp70, resulting in greater antigen-specific immune responses. Cytoplasmic delivery of Hsp70-antigen further increased the efficacy of the Hsp70-based vaccines. These findings indicate that effective cancer therapy can be achieved by developing Hsp70-based anticancer vaccines when their tissue and intracellular distribution is properly controlled. PMID:17980980

  4. B cells do not present antigen covalently linked to microspheres.

    PubMed Central

    Galelli, A; Charlot, B; Dériaud, E; Leclerc, C

    1993-01-01

    B cells have been shown to present antigen to T cells very efficiently through their capacity to capture antigens by their membrane immunoglobulin. This direct cognate interaction of T and B cells results in the proliferation and differentiation of B cells. This concept has been established using soluble proteins. However, most of the antigens to which the immune system is exposed are included in complex particulate structures such as bacteria or parasites. The capacity of B cells to present these large and complex antigens is still unclear. To address this question we have studied the presentation by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-specific B cells of the same antigen TNP-KLH (keyhole limpet haemocyanin), either in a soluble form or covalently linked to poly(acrolein) microspheres, from 0.25 to 1.5 microns in diameter. In the presence of irradiated splenocytes or purified macrophages as a source of antigen-presenting cells (APC), KLH-specific T cells proliferated in response to soluble TNP-KLH or to TNP-KLH coupled to beads. In contrast, TNP-specific memory B cells were totally ineffective in presenting the TNP-KLH beads to KLH-specific T cells whereas they presented very efficiently soluble TNP-KLH. Similar results were obtained with the A20 B lymphoma or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated TNP-specific B cells. These results therefore indicate that B cells are unable to present large size particulate antigens such as bacteria or parasites. PMID:8509143

  5. Bronchoalveolar CD4+ T cell responses to respiratory antigens are impaired in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Sepako, Enoch; Fullerton, Duncan G; Mzinza, David; Glennie, Sarah; Wright, Adam K; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    Rationale HIV-infected adults are at an increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections. HIV infection impairs systemic acquired immunity, but there is limited information in humans on HIV-related cell-mediated immune defects in the lung. Objective To investigate antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses to influenza virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood between HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected Malawian adults. Methods We obtained BAL fluid and blood from HIV-infected individuals (n=21) and HIV-uninfected adults (n=24). We determined the proportion of T cell subsets including naive, memory and regulatory T cells using flow cytometry, and used intracellular cytokine staining to identify CD4+ T cells recognising influenza virus-, S pneumoniae- and M tuberculosis-antigens. Main results CD4+ T cells in BAL were predominantly of effector memory phenotype compared to blood, irrespective of HIV status (p<0.001). There was immune compartmentalisation with a higher frequency of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells against influenza virus, S pneumoniae and M tuberculosis retained in BAL compared to blood in HIV-uninfected adults (p<0.001 in each case). Influenza virus- and M tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cell responses in BAL were impaired in HIV-infected individuals: proportions of total antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and of polyfunctional IFN-γ and TNF-α-secreting cells were lower in HIV-infected individuals than in HIV-uninfected adults (p<0.05 in each case). Conclusions BAL antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses against important viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens are impaired in HIV-infected adults. This might contribute to the susceptibility of HIV-infected adults to lower respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. PMID:21357587

  6. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  7. Nanoscale Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for T Cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Perica, Karlo; De León Medero, Andrés; Durai, Malarvizhi; Chiu, Yen Ling; Bieler, Joan Glick; Sibener, Leah; Niemöller, Michaela; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne; Edidin, Michael; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC), which deliver stimulatory signals to cytotoxic lymphocytes, are a powerful tool for both adoptive and active immunotherapy. Thus far, aAPC have been synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins such as CD3 or MHC-peptide to micron-sized beads. Nanoscale platforms have different trafficking and biophysical interaction properties and may allow development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. We therefore manufactured aAPC based on two types of nanoscale particle platforms: biocompatible iron-dextran paramagnetic particles (50–100 nm in diameter) and avidin-coated quantum dot nanocrystals, (~30 nm). Nanoscale aAPC induced antigen-specific T cell proliferation from mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood T cells. When injected in vivo, both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhanced tumor rejection in a subcutaneous mouse melanoma model. This is the first description of nanoscale aAPC that induce antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. PMID:23891987

  8. Mouse Ovarian Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Resist Chemotherapy and Retain Ability to Initiate Oocyte-Specific Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sriraman, Kalpana; Anand, Sandhya; Bhutda, Smita

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate stem cells in adult mouse ovary, the effect of chemotherapy on them and their potential to differentiate into germ cells. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that were SCA-1+/Lin−/CD45−, positive for nuclear octamer-binding transforming factor 4 (OCT-4), Nanog, and cell surface stage-specific embryonic antigen 1, were identified in adult mouse ovary. Chemotherapy resulted in complete loss of follicular reserve and cytoplasmic OCT-4 positive progenitors (ovarian germ stem cells) but VSELs survived. In ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cell cultures from chemoablated ovary, proliferating germ cell clusters and mouse vasa homolog/growth differentiation factor 9-positive oocyte-like structure were observed by day 6, probably arising as a result of differentiation of the surviving VSELs. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) exerted a direct stimulatory action on the OSE and induced stem cells proliferation and differentiation into premeiotic germ cell clusters during intact chemoablated ovaries culture. The FSH analog pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment to chemoablated mice increased the percentage of surviving VSELs in ovary. The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of potential VSELs in mouse ovaries and show that they survive chemotherapy, are modulated by FSH, and retain the ability to undergo oocyte-specific differentiation. These results show relevance to women who undergo premature ovarian failure because of oncotherapy. PMID:25779995

  9. Mouse Ovarian Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Resist Chemotherapy and Retain Ability to Initiate Oocyte-Specific Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sriraman, Kalpana; Bhartiya, Deepa; Anand, Sandhya; Bhutda, Smita

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate stem cells in adult mouse ovary, the effect of chemotherapy on them and their potential to differentiate into germ cells. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that were SCA-1+/Lin-/CD45-, positive for nuclear octamer-binding transforming factor 4 (OCT-4), Nanog, and cell surface stage-specific embryonic antigen 1, were identified in adult mouse ovary. Chemotherapy resulted in complete loss of follicular reserve and cytoplasmic OCT-4 positive progenitors (ovarian germ stem cells) but VSELs survived. In ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cell cultures from chemoablated ovary, proliferating germ cell clusters and mouse vasa homolog/growth differentiation factor 9-positive oocyte-like structure were observed by day 6, probably arising as a result of differentiation of the surviving VSELs. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) exerted a direct stimulatory action on the OSE and induced stem cells proliferation and differentiation into premeiotic germ cell clusters during intact chemoablated ovaries culture. The FSH analog pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment to chemoablated mice increased the percentage of surviving VSELs in ovary. The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of potential VSELs in mouse ovaries and show that they survive chemotherapy, are modulated by FSH, and retain the ability to undergo oocyte-specific differentiation. These results show relevance to women who undergo premature ovarian failure because of oncotherapy.

  10. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhixin; Zou, Keke; Zhuang, Liping; Qin, Jianjie; Li, Hong; Li, Chao; Zhang, Zhengtao; Chen, Xiaotao; Cen, Jin; Meng, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Haibin; Li, Yixue; Hui, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines are useful in vitro models for the study of primary HCCs. Because cell lines acquire additional mutations in culture, it is important to understand to what extent HCC cell lines retain the genetic landscapes of primary HCCs. Most HCC cell lines were established during the last century, precluding comparison between cell lines and primary cancers. In this study, 9 Chinese HCC cell lines with matched patient-derived cells at low passages (PDCs) were established in the defined culture condition. Whole genome analyses of 4 HCC cell lines showed that genomic mutation landscapes, including mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs) and HBV integrations, were highly stable during cell line establishment. Importantly, genetic alterations in cancer drivers and druggable genes were reserved in cell lines. HCC cell lines also retained gene expression patterns of primary HCCs during in vitro culture. Finally, sequential analysis of HCC cell lines and PDCs at different passages revealed their comparable and stable genomic and transcriptomic levels if maintained within proper passages. These results show that HCC cell lines largely retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary HCCs, thus laying the rationale for testing HCC cell lines as preclinical models in precision medicine. PMID:27273737

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary human cancers.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhixin; Zou, Keke; Zhuang, Liping; Qin, Jianjie; Li, Hong; Li, Chao; Zhang, Zhengtao; Chen, Xiaotao; Cen, Jin; Meng, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Haibin; Li, Yixue; Hui, Lijian

    2016-06-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines are useful in vitro models for the study of primary HCCs. Because cell lines acquire additional mutations in culture, it is important to understand to what extent HCC cell lines retain the genetic landscapes of primary HCCs. Most HCC cell lines were established during the last century, precluding comparison between cell lines and primary cancers. In this study, 9 Chinese HCC cell lines with matched patient-derived cells at low passages (PDCs) were established in the defined culture condition. Whole genome analyses of 4 HCC cell lines showed that genomic mutation landscapes, including mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs) and HBV integrations, were highly stable during cell line establishment. Importantly, genetic alterations in cancer drivers and druggable genes were reserved in cell lines. HCC cell lines also retained gene expression patterns of primary HCCs during in vitro culture. Finally, sequential analysis of HCC cell lines and PDCs at different passages revealed their comparable and stable genomic and transcriptomic levels if maintained within proper passages. These results show that HCC cell lines largely retain the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of primary HCCs, thus laying the rationale for testing HCC cell lines as preclinical models in precision medicine.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  14. Rubber and alumina gaskets retain vacuum seal in high temperature EMF cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesson, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Silicone rubber gasket and an alumina gasket retain a vacuum inside a high temperature EMF cell in which higher and lower density liquid metal electrodes are separated by an intermediate density fused salt electrolyte. This innovation is in use on a sodium bismuth regenerable EMF cell in which the fused salts and metals are at about 500 deg to 600 deg C.

  15. Antigen suppression of the in vitro development of plaque-forming cells to autologous erythrocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Lord, E M; Dutton, R W

    1975-12-01

    Peritoneal cell cultures from NZB and C57BL/6 mice develop large numbers of PFC directed against antigens present on bromelain-treated isologous erythrocytes. The development of these autoimmune PFC can be suppressed by the addition of small numbers of BrMRBC at the start of the culture period. The possibility that the development of the plaque is prevented by the presence of antigen in vivo is discussed.

  16. Antigen Presenting Properties of a Myeloid Dendritic-Like Cell in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-ying; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper distinguishes a rare subset of myeloid dendritic-like cells found in mouse spleen from conventional (c) dendritic cells (DC) in terms of phenotype, function and gene expression. These cells are tentatively named “L-DC” since they resemble dendritic-like cells produced in longterm cultures of spleen. L-DC can be distinguished on the basis of their unique phenotype as CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII-CD43+Ly6C-Ly6G-Siglec-F- cells. They demonstrate similar ability as cDC to uptake and retain complex antigens like mannan via mannose receptors, but much lower ability to endocytose and retain soluble antigen. While L-DC differ from cDC by their inability to activate CD4+ T cells, they are capable of antigen cross-presentation for activation of CD8+ T cells, although less effectively so than the cDC subsets. In terms of gene expression, CD8- cDC and CD8+ cDC are quite distinct from L-DC. CD8+ cDC are distinguishable from the other two subsets by expression of CD24a, Clec9a, Xcr1 and Tlr11, while CD8- cDC are distinguished by expression of Ccnd1 and H-2Eb2. L-DC are distinct from the two cDC subsets through upregulated expression of Clec4a3, Emr4, Itgam, Csf1r and CD300ld. The L-DC gene profile is quite distinct from that of cDC, confirming a myeloid cell type with distinct antigen presenting properties. PMID:27654936

  17. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  18. Fibroblasts as Efficient Antigen-Presenting Cells in Lymphoid Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundig, Thomas M.; Bachmann, Martin F.; Dipaolo, Claudio; Simard, John J. L.; Battegay, Manuel; Lother, Heinz; Gessner, Andre; Kuhlcke, Klaus; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1995-06-01

    Only so-called "professional" antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of hematopoietic origin are believed capable of inducing T lymphocyte responses. However, fibroblasts transfected with viral proteins directly induced antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo, without involvement of host APCs. Fibroblasts induced T cells only in the milieu of lymphoid organs. Thus, antigen localization affects self-nonself discrimination and cell-based vaccine strategies.

  19. Specific Antibody Production by Blood B Cells is Retained in Late Stage Drug-naïve HIV-infected Africans

    PubMed Central

    Béniguel, Lydie; Bégaud, Evelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Gabrié, Philippe; Mbolidi, Christophe D.; Marovich, Mary A.; Cazorla, Céline; Lucht, Frédéric; Genin, Christian; Garraud, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    Unseparated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from drug-naïve African individuals living in a context of multi-infections and presenting with high viral load (VL), were cultured in vitro and tested for their ability to produce antibodies (Abs) reacting with HIV-1 antigens. Within these PBMCs, circulating B cells were differentiated in vitro and produced IgG Abs against not only ENV, but also GAG and POL proteins. Under similar experimental conditions, HAART treated patients produced Abs to ENV proteins only. The in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs depended on exogenous cytokines (IL-2 and IL-10) but neither on the re-stimulation of reactive cells in cultures by purified HIV-1-gp 160 antigen nor on the re-engagement of CD40 surface molecules. Further, it was not abrogated by the addition of various monoclonal Abs (mAbs) to co-stimulatory molecules. This suggests that the in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs resulted from the maturation of already envelope and core antigen-primed, differentiated B cells, presumably pre-plasma cells, which are not known to circulate at homeostasy. As in vitro produced Abs retained the capacity of binding antigen and forming complexes, this study provides pre-clinical support for functional humoral responses despite major HIV- and other tropical pathogen-induced B cell perturbations. PMID:15330447

  20. B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Internalization Are Mutually Exclusive Events

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ping; Araujo, Elizabeth; Zhao, Tong; Zhang, Miao; Massenburg, Don; Veselits, Margaret; Doyle, Colleen; Dinner, Aaron R; Clark, Marcus R

    2006-01-01

    Engagement of the B cell antigen receptor initiates two concurrent processes, signaling and receptor internalization. While both are required for normal humoral immune responses, the relationship between these two processes is unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that following receptor ligation, a small subpopulation of B cell antigen receptors are inductively phosphorylated and selectively retained at the cell surface where they can serve as scaffolds for the assembly of signaling molecules. In contrast, the larger population of non-phosphorylated receptors is rapidly endocytosed. Each receptor can undergo only one of two mutually exclusive fates because the tyrosine-based motifs that mediate signaling when phosphorylated mediate internalization when not phosphorylated. Mathematical modeling indicates that the observed competition between receptor phosphorylation and internalization enhances signaling responses to low avidity ligands. PMID:16719564

  1. Carbohydrate-Mediated Targeting of Antigen to Dendritic Cells Leads to Enhanced Presentation of Antigen to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eddie W.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Seeberger, Peter H.; Hacohen, Nir

    2009-01-01

    The unique therapeutic value of dendritic cells (DCs) for the treatment of allergy, autoimmunity and transplant rejection is predicated upon our ability to selectively deliver antigens, drugs or nucleic acids to DCs in vivo. Here we describe a method for delivering whole protein antigens to DCs based on carbohydrate-mediated targeting of DC-expressed lectins. A series of synthetic carbohydrates was chemically-coupled to a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), and each conjugate was evaluated for its ability to increase the efficiency of antigen presentation by murine DCs to OVA-specific T cells (CD4+ and CD8+). In vitro data are presented that demonstrate that carbohydrate modification of OVA leads to a 50-fold enhancement of presentation of antigenic peptide to CD4+ T cells. A tenfold enhancement is observed for CD8+ T cells; this indicates that the targeted lectin(s) can mediate cross-presentation of antigens on MHC class I. Our data indicate that the observed enhancements in antigen presentation are unique to OVA that is conjugated to complex oligosaccharides, such as a high-mannose nonasaccharide, but not to monosaccharides. Taken together, our data suggest that a DC targeting strategy that is based upon carbohydrate-lectin interactions is a promising approach for enhancing antigen presentation via class I and class II molecules. PMID:18186095

  2. Cultured human Langerhans' cells are superior to fresh cells at presenting native HIV-1 protein antigens to specific CD4+ T-cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Girolomoni, G; Valle, M T; Zacchi, V; Costa, M G; Giannetti, A; Manca, F

    1996-01-01

    Cultured Langerhans' cells (CLC) exhibit enhanced antigen-presenting function compared to freshly isolated LC (FLC), but they are commonly believed to be inefficient at processing intact proteins. In this study, FLC and CLC from normal, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative volunteers were compared for their ability to present the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 or reverse transcriptase (p66) antigens to autologous, specific CD4+ T cell lines. Epidermal cell suspensions enriched for LC were prepared from suction blister roofs. FLC stimulated T cells at lower antigen concentrations compared to unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). CLC were more potent on a per cell basis than FLC, PBMC or adherent monocytes at presenting native gp120, native p66 or immunogenic peptides. CLC were also more efficient than FLC or PBMC in terms of the amount of antigen required for T-cell activation. Chloroquine and leupeptin inhibited presentation of intact p66, but not of an immunodominant peptide, by FLC or CLC, thus indicating that both cells utilize antigen-processing mechanisms that are based on intracellular acidification and protease activity. Incubation of CLC with monoclonal antibodies against HLA-DR, CD11b, CD18, CD50, CD54, CD58 or CD80, but not anti-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), inhibited antigen-specific T-cell proliferation to varying degrees. We conclude that human CLC retain the ability to process and present protein antigens potently to CD4+ T cells. Thus, CLC have the capacity to participate actively in the generation and maintenance of T-helper cell immunity to viral antigens during HIV-1 infection. PMID:8698396

  3. Control of T cell antigen reactivity via programmed TCR downregulation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Alena M; Xiong, Huizhong; Leiner, Ingrid M; Sušac, Bože; Glickman, Michael S; Pamer, Eric G; van Heijst, Jeroen W J

    2016-04-01

    The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is unique in that its affinity for ligand is unknown before encounter and can vary by orders of magnitude. How the immune system regulates individual T cells that display very different reactivity to antigen remains unclear. Here we found that activated CD4(+) T cells, at the peak of clonal expansion, persistently downregulated their TCR expression in proportion to the strength of the initial antigen recognition. This programmed response increased the threshold for cytokine production and recall proliferation in a clone-specific manner and ultimately excluded clones with the highest antigen reactivity. Thus, programmed downregulation of TCR expression represents a negative feedback mechanism for constraining T cell effector function with a suitable time delay to thereby allow pathogen control while avoiding excess inflammatory damage. PMID:26901151

  4. Podocytes Are Nonhematopoietic Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burkard, Miriam; Ölke, Martha; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Hugo, Christian; Kurts, Christian; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Gessner, André

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes are essential to the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier; however, they also exhibit increased expression of MHC class II molecules under inflammatory conditions, and they remove Ig and immune complexes from the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). This finding suggests that podocytes may act as antigen-presenting cells, taking up and processing antigens to initiate specific T cell responses, similar to professional hematopoietic cells such as dendritic cells or macrophages. Here, MHC–antigen complexes expressed exclusively on podocytes of transgenic mice were sufficient to activate CD8+ T cells in vivo. In addition, deleting MHC class II exclusively on podocytes prevented the induction of experimental anti-GBM nephritis. Podocytes ingested soluble and particulate antigens, activated CD4+ T cells, and crosspresented exogenous antigen on MHC class I molecules to CD8+ T cells. In conclusion, podocytes participate in the antigen-specific activation of adaptive immune responses, providing a potential target for immunotherapies of inflammatory kidney diseases and transplant rejection. PMID:23539760

  5. Use of somatic cell genetics to study chromosomes contributing to antigen plus I recognition by T cell hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)/I region-specific T cell hybridomas have been prepared by fusing KLH/I-specific T cell blasts from mice with single pairs of metacentric chromosomes to the inducible, interleukin 2 (IL-2)-secreting T cell hybridoma FS6-14.13.AG2.1. T cell hybridomas with KLH/I receptors were identified by their ability to secrete IL-2 in response to KLH and the appropriate antigen-presenting cells. After cloning and subcloning, KLH/I reactivity was correlated with the presence or absence of metacentric chromosomes derived from the KLH/I-specific T cell blast parent. Hybridomas were identified that had lost all chromosomes 4 and 6 or 16 and 17 derived from their normal T cell parent, but retained the ability to respond to KLH/I. This suggested that products of genes on these chromosomes did not contribute to the specific portions of T cell Ag/I receptors. These gene products would include, of course, kappa and lambda chains and H- 2. We did not obtain any T cell hybridomas that had lost both metacentric (8.12) chromosomes derived from T cells of the Robertsonian mouse strain Rb(8.12)5, so we could not draw any conclusions about the contributions of products of genes on these chromosomes. T cell hybridomas with KLH/I reactivity were found that contained only one metacentric (8.12) chromosome derived from this strain. Moreover, a T cell hybridoma was found that retained both metacentric (8.12) chromosomes from its normal T cell parent, but had lost KLH/I reactivity. These results suggested that neither two chromosomes 8 nor two chromosomes 12 were required for antigen/I reactivity in normal T cells and that antigen/I reactivity was controlled, at least in part, by genes mapping on chromosomes other than 8 or 12. PMID:6401795

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Newick, Kheng; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias). This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment. PMID:27162934

  7. Beyond model antigens: high-dimensional methods for the analysis of antigen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Evan W.; Davis, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses often begin with the formation of a molecular complex between a T cell receptor (TCR) and a peptide antigen bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. These complexes are highly variable, however, due to the polymorphism of MHC genes, the random, inexact recombination of TCR gene segments and the vast array of possible self and pathogen peptide antigens. As a result, it has been very difficult to comprehensively study the TCR repertoire or identify and track more than a few antigen-specific T cells in mice or humans. For mouse studies, this had led to a reliance on model antigens and TCR transgenes. The study of limited human clinical samples, in contrast, requires techniques that can simultaneously survey phenotype, function and reactivity to many T cell epitopes. Thanks to recent advances in single-cell and cytometry methodologies, as well as high-throughput sequencing of the TCR repertoire, we now have or will soon have the tools needed to comprehensively analyze T-cell responses during health and disease. PMID:24441473

  8. Cannabinoid receptor 2 positions and retains marginal zone B cells within the splenic marginal zone

    PubMed Central

    Muppidi, Jagan R.; Arnon, Tal I.; Bronevetsky, Yelena; Veerapen, Natacha; Tanaka, Masato; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2011-01-01

    Specialized B cells residing in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) continuously survey the blood for antigens and are important for immunity to systemic infections. However, the cues that uniquely attract cells to the MZ have not been defined. Previous work demonstrated that mice deficient in cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) have decreased numbers of MZ B cells but it has been unclear whether CB2 regulates MZ B cell development or positioning. We show that MZ B cells are highly responsive to the CB2 ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and that CB2 antagonism rapidly displaces small numbers of MZ B cells to the blood. Antagonism for longer durations depletes MZ B cells from the spleen. In mice deficient in sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor function, CB2 antagonism causes MZ B cell displacement into follicles. Moreover, CB2 overexpression is sufficient to position B cells to the splenic MZ. These findings establish a role for CB2 in guiding B cells to the MZ and in preventing their loss to the blood. As a consequence of their MZ B cell deficiency, CB2-deficient mice have reduced numbers of CD1d-high B cells. We show that CB2 deficiency results in diminished humoral responses to a CD1d-restricted systemic antigen. PMID:21875957

  9. Five novel cell surface antigens of CNS neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M T; Jennings, V D; Asadourian, L L; Rosenblum, M; Albino, A P; Cairncross, J G; Old, L J

    1989-01-01

    Optimal monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy requires the identification of tumor-restricted cell surface antigens. We have identified and partially characterized 5 new monoclonal antibodies generated against malignant astrocytoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma and melanoma which were used to define 5 neuroectodermal tumor antigenic systems. CNT/1 identifies a 57-kDa, heat-stable, trypsin-sensitive neuroblastoma surface antigen, which is expressed intracellularly in many malignant gliomas, medulloblastomas, ependymomas, breast and ovarian carcinomas. CNT/2 reacts with a 130-kDa, heat-labile, trypsin- and neuraminidase-resistant antigen restricted to low-grade astrocytomas and malignant gliomas. CNT/11 reacts with a 70-kDa, heat-labile, trypsin-sensitive antigen coded for by a gene on chromosome 12, and is restricted to astrocytomas, neuroblastomas and sarcomas. CNT/8 identifies a heat-labile, trypsin-sensitive antigen whose gene has been localized to chromosome 15 and is expressed by neuroectodermal and mesodermally derived tumors and few epithelial cancers. The B2.6 antigen is identified only in terms of serologic reactivity with a subset of cultured astrocytomas and melanomas. Neuroectodermal tumor-associated antigens may be categorized as lineage-consistent, lineage-independent and putatively tumor-restricted in their expression. These restricted antibodies may be potentially useful reagents to consider for monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy of CNS neoplasms.

  10. Immortalized Mouse Floxed Fam20c Dental Papillar Mesenchymal and Osteoblast Cell Lines Retain Their Primary Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Hua; Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Peihong; Liu, Ying; Jani, Priyam H.; Lu, Yongbo; Chen, Shuo; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Fam20c is essential for the normal mineralization of dentin and bone. The generation of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines carrying floxed Fam20c allele can offer valuable tools for the study of the roles of Fam20c in the mineralization of dentin and bone. The limited capability of the primary odontoblasts and osteoblasts to proliferate necessitates the development of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines serving as substitutes for the study of differentiation and mineralization of the odontoblasts and osteoblasts. In this study, we established and characterized immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. The isolated primary mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts were immortalized by the infection of lentivirus containing Simian Virus 40 T-antigen (SV40 T-Ag). The immortalization of floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts was verified by the long-term passages and genomic integration of SV40 T-Ag. The immortalized floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines not only proliferated at a high rate and retained the morphology of their primary counterparts, but also preserved the dentin and bone specific gene expression as the primary dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts did. Consistently, the capability of the primary floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts to mineralize was also inherited by the immortalized dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. Thus, we have successfully generated the immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. PMID:25833681

  11. Virus-induced polyclonal B cell activation improves protective CTL memory via retained CD27 expression on memory CTL.

    PubMed

    Matter, Matthias; Mumprecht, Sabine; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Pavelic, Viktor; Yagita, Hideo; Krautwald, Stefan; Borst, Jannie; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2005-11-01

    Different viruses elicit distinct phenotypes of memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). This is reflected in differential expression of homing receptors and costimulatory molecules like CD27. Memory CTL retained CD27 following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, but not after immunization with recombinant vaccinia virus or tumor cells expressing LCMV glycoprotein. Stable CD27 expression on memory CTL required ligation by CD70 expressed on polyclonally activated B cells during the contraction phase. The functional consequence of CD27 expressed on virus-specific CTL was analyzed in CD27-deficient mice. LCMV infection of CD27(-/-) mice revealed that primary CTL activation and expansion as well as elimination of the virus were independent of CD27 expression. In contrast, ligation of CD27 on memory CTL upon secondary antigen encounter increased clonal expansion and improved protection against re-infection. This points to novel B cell-CTL interactions during viral infection and to a beneficial role of polyclonal B cell activation that represents a characteristic of murine LCMV, human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis B and C virus infection. PMID:16231287

  12. Recognition of antigen-specific B-cell receptors from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients by synthetic antigen surrogates.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Morimoto, Jumpei; Peng, Haiyong; Aquino, Claudio; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-12-18

    In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a single neoplastic antigen-specific B cell accumulates and overgrows other B cells, leading to immune deficiency. CLL is often treated with drugs that ablate all B cells, leading to further weakening of humoral immunity, and a more focused therapeutic strategy capable of targeting only the pathogenic B cells would represent a significant advance. One approach to this would be to develop synthetic surrogates of the CLL antigens allowing differentiation of the CLL cells and healthy B cells in a patient. Here, we describe nonpeptidic molecules capable of targeting antigen-specific B cell receptors with good affinity and selectivity using a combinatorial library screen. We demonstrate that our hit compounds act as synthetic antigen surrogates and recognize CLL cells and not healthy B cells. Additionally, we argue that the technology we developed can be used to identify other classes of antigen surrogates.

  13. Functional Development of the T Cell Receptor for Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Peter J.R.; Li, Qi-Jing; Huppa, Johannes B.; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    For over three decades now, the T cell receptor (TCR) for antigen has not ceased to challenge the imaginations of cellular and molecular immunologists alike. T cell antigen recognition transcends every aspect of adaptive immunity: it shapes the T cell repertoire in the thymus and directs T cell-mediated effector functions in the periphery, where it is also central to the induction of peripheral tolerance. Yet, despite its central position, there remain many questions unresolved: how can one TCR be specific for one particular peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand while also binding other pMHC ligands with an immunologically relevant affinity? And how can a T cell’s extreme specificity (alterations of single methyl groups in their ligand can abrogate a response) and sensitivity (single agonist ligands on a cell surface are sufficient to trigger a measurable response) emerge from TCR–ligand interactions that are so low in affinity? Solving these questions is intimately tied to a fundamental understanding of molecular recognition dynamics within the many different contexts of various T cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) contacts: from the thymic APCs that shape the TCR repertoire and guide functional differentiation of developing T cells to the peripheral APCs that support homeostasis and provoke antigen responses in naïve, effector, memory, and regulatory T cells. Here, we discuss our recent findings relating to T cell antigen recognition and how this leads to the thymic development of foreign-antigen-responsive αβT cells. PMID:20800817

  14. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  15. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Haber, S I; Herrmann, S; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens--ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu56LLys35LPhe9) [(GluLysPhe)n]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to controls in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or "processing independent" antigens. In parallel studies 125I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. At least some of the biotin-insulin surface sites are immunologically relevant, because the presentation of processed biotin-insulin by fixed APC is blocked by avidin. This effect is specific. Avidin binding to biotin-insulin-exposed APC does not inhibit allospecific stimulation nor the presentation of unconjugated insulin. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen. PMID:3467371

  16. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  17. IL-12 secreting tumor-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T cells eradicate ovarian tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Mythili; Purdon, Terence J.; Spriggs, David; Koneru, Susmith; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for the treatment of ovarian cancer includes immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells targeted to ovarian cancer cell antigens. Using retroviral transduction, T cells can be created that express an artificial T cell receptor (TCR) termed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We have generated a CAR, 4H11-28z, specific to MUC-16ecto antigen, which is the over-expressed on a majority of ovarian tumor cells and is the retained portion of MUC-16 after cleavage of CA-125. We previously demonstrated that T cells modified to express the 4H11-28z CAR eradicate orthotopic human ovarian cancer xenografts in SCID-Beige mice. However, despite the ability of CAR T cells to localize to tumors, their activation in the clinical setting can be inhibited by the tumor microenvironment, as is commonly seen for endogenous antitumor immune response. To potentially overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a construct that co-expresses both MUC16ecto CAR and IL-12 (4H11-28z/IL-12). In vitro, 4H11-28z/IL-12 CAR T cells show enhanced proliferation and robust IFNγ secretion compared to 4H11-28z CAR T cells. In SCID-Beige mice with human ovarian cancer xenografts, IL-12 secreting CAR T cells exhibit enhanced antitumor efficacy as determined by increased survival, prolonged persistence of T cells, and higher systemic IFNγ. Furthermore, in anticipation of translating these results into a phase I clinical trial which will be the first to study IL-12 secreting CAR T cells in ovarian cancer, an elimination gene has been included to allow for deletion of CAR T cells in the context of unforeseen or off-tumor on-target toxicity. PMID:25949921

  18. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  19. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  20. Establishment and characterization of a cell based artificial antigen-presenting cell for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weijuan; Ji, Mingchun; Cao, Zhengfeng; Wang, Liheng; Qian, Yayun; Hu, Maozhi; Qian, Li; Pan, Xingyuan

    2008-02-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells are expected to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before infusion. Here CD32 that binds to a crystallizable fragment of IgG monoclonal antibody was genetically expressed on human K562 leukemia cells to provide a ligand for T-cell receptor. CD86 and 4-1BBL, which are ligands of co-stimulating receptors of CD28 and 4-1BB, respectively, were also expressed on K562 cells. Then we accomplished the artificial antigen-presenting cells by coupling K32/CD86/4-1BBL cell with OKT3 monoclonal antibody against CD3, named K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells. These artificial modified cells had the abilities of inducing CD8+ T cell activation, promoting CD8+ T cell proliferation, division, and long-term growth, inhibiting CD8+ T cell apoptosis, and enhancing CD8+ T cell secretion of IFN-gamma and perforin. Furthermore, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be retained in the culture stimulated with K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells at least within 28 days. This approach was robust, simple, reproducible and economical for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells and may have important therapeutic implications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:18318994

  1. Label-retaining assay enriches tumor-initiating cells in glioblastoma spheres cultivated in serum-free medium

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lingcheng; Zhao, Yiqing; Ouyang, Taohui; Zhao, Tianyuan; Zhang, Suojun; Chen, Jian; Yu, Jiasheng; Lei, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Label-retaining cells, which are characterized by dormancy or slow cycling, may be identified in a number of human normal and cancer tissues, and these cells demonstrate stem cell potential. In glioblastoma, label-retaining assays to enrich glioma stem cells remain to be fully investigated. In the present study, glioblastoma sphere cells cultured in serum-free medium were initially stained with the cell membrane fluorescent marker DiI. The fluorescence intensity during cell proliferation and sphere reformation was observed. At 2 weeks, the DiI-retaining cells were screened by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and compared phenotypically with the DiI-negative cells in terms of in vitro proliferation, clonogenicity and multipotency and for in vivo tumorigenicity, as well as sensitivity to irradiation and temozolomide treatment. It was observed that DiI-retaining cells accounted for a small proportion, <10%, within the glioblastoma spheres and that DiI-retaining cells proliferated significantly more slowly compared with DiI-negative cells (P=0.011, P=0.035 and P=0.023 in the of NCH421k, NCH441 and NCH644 glioblastoma sphere cell lines). Significantly increased clonogenicity (P=0.002, P=0.034 and P=0.016 in the NCH441, NCH644 and NCH421k glioblastoma sphere cell lines) and three-lineage multipotency were observed in DiI-retaining cells in vitro compared with DiI-negative cells. As few as 100 DiI-retaining cells were able to effectively generate tumors in the immunocompromised mouse brain, whereas the same number of DiI-negative cells possessed no such ability, indicating the increased tumorigenicity of DiI-retaining cells compared with DiI-negative cells. Furthermore, DiI-retaining cells demonstrated significant resistance following irradiation (P=0.012, P=0.024 and P=0.036) and temozolomide (P=0.003, P=0.005 and P=0.029) compared with DiI-negative cells in the NCH421k, NCH441 and NCH644 glioblastoma sphere cell lines, respectively. It was concluded that label-retaining

  2. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  3. Label-retaining cells in the adult murine salivary glands possess characteristics of adult progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chibly, Alejandro M; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction.

  4. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells.

  5. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells. PMID:21447831

  6. Breaking the In Vitro Alveolar Type II Cell Proliferation Barrier while Retaining Ion Transport Properties

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hong; Cheluvaraju, Chaitra; Jones, Lisa C.; Liu, Xuefeng; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Randell, Scott H.; Schlegel, Richard; Boucher, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar type (AT)I and ATII cells are central to maintaining normal alveolar fluid homeostasis. When disrupted, they contribute to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Research on ATII cells has been limited by the inability to propagate primary cells in vitro to study their specific functional properties. Moreover, primary ATII cells in vitro quickly transdifferentiate into nonproliferative “ATI-like” cells under traditional culture conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that normal and tumor cells grown in culture with a combination of fibroblast (feeder cells) and a pharmacological Rho kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) exhibit indefinite cell proliferation that resembled a “conditionally reprogrammed cell” phenotype. Using this coculture system, we found that primary human ATII cells (1) proliferated at an exponential rate, (2) established epithelial colonies expressing ATII-specific and “ATI-like” mRNA and proteins after serial passage, (3) up-regulated genes important in cell proliferation and migration, and (4) on removal of feeder cells and Rho kinase inhibitor under air–liquid interface conditions, exhibited bioelectric and volume transport characteristics similar to freshly cultured ATII cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that this novel coculture technique breaks the in vitro ATII cell proliferation barrier while retaining cell-specific functional properties. This work will allow for a significant increase in studies designed to elucidate ATII cell function with the goal of accelerating the development of novel therapies for alveolar diseases. PMID:24191670

  7. Antigen conformation determines processing requirements for T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, H Z; Berkower, I J; Busch, M; Gurd, F R; Berzofsky, J A

    1984-01-01

    We studied the difference in requirements for processing and presentation to a single T-cell clone of four different forms of the same epitope of sperm whale myoglobin--namely, on the native protein, on two conformationally altered forms of the protein, or as a 22-residue antigenic peptide fragment. The T-cell clone was I-Ed-restricted and specific for an epitope on the CNBr fragment 132-153 involving Lys-140. As inhibitors of macrophage processing of antigen, we used several agents that inhibit lysosomal function: the weak bases chloroquine and NH4Cl, the cationic ionophore monensin, and the competitive protease inhibitor leupeptin. When these agents were used to inhibit processing of antigen by presenting cells and then washed out before T cells were added to culture, they inhibited the presentation of native antigen but not of fragment 132-153. To our surprise, the intact but denatured form, S-methylmyoglobin, behaved like the fragment not like the native protein. Apomyoglobin was intermediate in susceptibility to inhibition. Thus, native myoglobin requires a processing step that appears to involve lysosomal proteolysis, which is not required by fragment 132-153 or the denatured unfolded forms. For an antigen the size of myoglobin (Mr 17,800), it appears that unfolding of the native conformation, rather than further reduction in size, is the critical parameter determining the need for processing. Since a major difference between native myoglobin and the other forms is the greater accessibility in the latter of sites, such as hydrophobic residues, buried in the native protein, we propose that processing may be necessary to expose these sites, perhaps for interaction with the cell membrane or the Ia of the antigen-presenting cell. PMID:6333686

  8. Synthesis of Antihemophilic Factor Antigen by Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Eric A.; Hoyer, Leon W.; Nachman, Ralph L.

    1973-01-01

    Antihemophilic factor (AHF, Factor VIII) antigen has been demonstrated in cultured human endothelial cells by immunofluorescence studies using monospecific rabbit antibody to human AHF. Control studies with cultured human smooth muscle cells and human fibroblasts were negative. By radioimmunoassay it was demonstrated that cultured human endothelial cells contain AHF antigen which is released into the culture medium. Cultured smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts did not have this property. Cultured endothelial cells incorporated radioactive amino acids into high molecular weight, AHF antigen-rich protein fractions prepared from the culture media, 7% of the radioactive amino acid counts incorporated into this material were precipitated by globulin prepared from rabbit anti-AHF whereas normal rabbit globulin precipitated only 1.5% of the counts. Although cultured endothelial cells actively synthesize AHF antigen, AHF procoagulant activity was not detected in the culture medium. Studies seeking a basis for the lack of procoagulant activity have not clarified this deficiency, but they have established that exogenous AHF procoagulant activity is not inactivated by the tissue culture system. Images PMID:4583980

  9. An antigenic study of human plasma cells in normal tissue and in myeloma: identification of a novel plasma cell associated antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P D; Walker, L; Hardie, D; Richardson, P; Khan, M; Johnson, G D; Ling, N R

    1986-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody named BU11 which detects an antigen strongly expressed on human plasma cells is described. The antibody stains plasma cells in tonsil sections, fresh and cultured plasmacytoid cells from the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma and cells of the plasmacytoid cell line RPMI 8226 used as the immunogen. In vitro studies of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated peripheral blood B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) stimulated tonsil B cells show that the antigen is present mainly on cells coexpressing the OKT10 antigen and containing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg). The BU11 antigen is expressed weakly on some normal B cells and is not present on T cells, monocytes or granulocytes. The antigen is of molecular weight 58kD under reducing conditions and is biochemically distinct from previously described plasma cell antigens. Images Fig. 4 PMID:3024883

  10. Regulatory T Cells Are Dispensable for Tolerance to RBC Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Amanda L.; Kapp, Linda M.; Wang, Xiaohong; Howie, Heather L.; Hudson, Krystalyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) occurs when pathogenic autoantibodies against red blood cell (RBC) antigens are generated. While the basic disease pathology of AIHA is well studied, the underlying mechanism(s) behind the failure in tolerance to RBC autoantigens are poorly understood. Thus, to investigate the tolerance mechanisms required for the establishment and maintenance of tolerance to RBC antigens, we developed a novel murine model. With this model, we evaluated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tolerance to RBC-specific antigens. Herein, we show that neither sustained depletion of Tregs nor immunization with RBC-specific proteins in conjunction with Treg depletion led to RBC-specific autoantibody generation. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Tregs are not required to prevent autoantibodies to RBCs and suggest that other tolerance mechanisms are likely involved.

  11. Regulatory T Cells Are Dispensable for Tolerance to RBC Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Amanda L.; Kapp, Linda M.; Wang, Xiaohong; Howie, Heather L.; Hudson, Krystalyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) occurs when pathogenic autoantibodies against red blood cell (RBC) antigens are generated. While the basic disease pathology of AIHA is well studied, the underlying mechanism(s) behind the failure in tolerance to RBC autoantigens are poorly understood. Thus, to investigate the tolerance mechanisms required for the establishment and maintenance of tolerance to RBC antigens, we developed a novel murine model. With this model, we evaluated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tolerance to RBC-specific antigens. Herein, we show that neither sustained depletion of Tregs nor immunization with RBC-specific proteins in conjunction with Treg depletion led to RBC-specific autoantibody generation. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Tregs are not required to prevent autoantibodies to RBCs and suggest that other tolerance mechanisms are likely involved. PMID:27698653

  12. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Sam; Willems, Maxime; Witten, P Eckhard; Hansen, Tom; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus) are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1) determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2) describe cell dynamics and (3) investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks) and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks), we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone) and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement. PMID:27049953

  13. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, Sam; Willems, Maxime; Witten, P. Eckhard; Hansen, Tom; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus) are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1) determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2) describe cell dynamics and (3) investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks) and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks), we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone) and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement. PMID:27049953

  14. Idiotype and antigen-specific T cell responses in mice on immunization with antigen, antibody, and anti-idiotypic antibody.

    PubMed

    Mitra-Kaushik, S; Shaila, M S; Karande, A K; Nayak, R

    2001-05-01

    Idiotypic determinants of immunoglobulin molecules can evoke both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T responses and exist not only as the integral components of a bona fide antigen binding receptor but also as distinct molecular entities in the processed forms on the cell surface of B lymphocytes. The present work provides experimental evidence for the concept that regulation of memory B cell populations can be achieved through the presentation of idiotypic and anti-idiotypic determinants to helper and cytotoxic cell. The potential of B cells to present antigens to helper and cytotoxic T cells through class II and class I MHC suggests a mechanism by which both B and T cell homeostasis can be maintained. We provide evidence for the generation of idiotype- and antigen-specific Th and Tc cells upon immunization of syngenic mice with antigen or idiotypic antibody (Ab1) or anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2). The selective activation and proliferation of the antigen-specific Th and Tc cells mediated by idiotypic stimulation observed in these experiments suggests a B-cell-driven mechanism for the maintenance of antigen-specific T cell memory in the absence of antigenic stimulation, under certain conditions.

  15. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  16. Merocytic dendritic cells break T cell tolerance to beta cell antigens in NOD mouse diabetes1

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Jonathan D; Ondr, Jennifer K; Opoka, Robert J; Garcia, Zacharias; Janssen, Edith M

    2010-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the breach of central and peripheral tolerance results in autoreactive T cells destroying insulin-producing, pancreatic beta cells. Herein, we identify a critical sub-population of dendritic cells responsible for mediating both the cross-presentation of islet antigen to CD8+ T cells and the direct presentation of beta cell antigen to CD4+ T cells. These cells, termed merocytic dendritic cells (mcDC), are more numerous in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, and when antigen-loaded rescue CD8+ T cells from peripheral anergy and deletion, while stimulating islet-reactive CD4+ T cells. When purified from the pancreatic lymph nodes of overtly diabetic NOD mice, mcDC break peripheral T cell tolerance to beta cells in vivo and induce rapid onset T1D in young NOD mouse. Thus, the mcDC subset appears to represent the long-sought APC responsible for breaking peripheral tolerance to beta cell antigen in vivo. PMID:20644171

  17. Purification of the subcellular compartment in which exogenous antigens undergo endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation from dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Jun; Otani, Mayu; Sakai, Takahiro; Hatta, Shinichi

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are capable of processing and presenting exogenous antigens using MHC class I molecules. This pathway is called antigen cross-presentation and plays an important role in the stimulation of naïve CD8(+) T cells for infectious and tumor immunity. Our previous studies in DC2.4 cells and bone marrow-derived DCs revealed that exogenously added ovalbumin (OVA) is processed through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) for cross-presentation. In this study, we aimed to further confirm these results by purification of the subcellular compartment in which exogenous antigens undergo ERAD from homogenates of DC2.4 cells pretreated with biotinylated OVA (bOVA). bOVA-containing vesicles were purified using streptavidin (SA)-magnetic beads from cell homogenates and were found to contain ER chaperones and ERAD components together with proteins for antigen presentation. In purified microsomes, bOVA was retained in membranous fractions and degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system in presence reticulocyte lysates and ATP. These results strongly suggested that DCs processed and degraded exogenous antigens through ERAD for cross-presentation in this purified subcellular compartment. PMID:27656684

  18. Bone marrow long label-retaining cells reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio

    2008-02-08

    In response to changing signals, quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be induced to an activated cycling state and provide multi-lineage hematopoietic cells to the whole body via blood vessels. However, the precise localization of quiescent HSCs in bone marrow microenvironment is not fully characterized. Here, we performed whole-mount immunostaining of bone marrow and found that BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) definitively reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic zone distant from the 'vascular niche'. Although LRCs expressed very low level of a well-known HSC marker, c-kit in normal circumstances, myeloablation by 5-FU treatment caused LRCs to abundantly express c-kit and proliferate actively. These results demonstrate that bone marrow LRCs reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche, and function as a regenerative cell pool of HSCs.

  19. Killer Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (KaAPC) for Efficient In Vitro Depletion of Human Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  20. Killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC) for efficient in vitro depletion of human antigen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  1. Universal artificial antigen presenting cells to selectively propagate T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor independent of specificity.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-05-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to nonviral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through coculture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed 1 ligand that could activate CAR T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated that CARL aAPC propagate CAR T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Using CARL enables 1 aAPC to numerically expand all CAR T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  2. Universal Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells to Selectively Propagate T Cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Independent of Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to non-viral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR+ T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through co-culture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed one ligand that could activate CAR+ T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated CARL+ aAPC propagate CAR+ T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Employing CARL enables one aAPC to numerically expand all CAR+ T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR+ T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  3. Antigen presentation by chemically modified splenocytes induces antigen- specific T cell unresponsiveness in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the antigen specificity and presentation requirements for inactivation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies revealed that splenocytes treated with the crosslinker 1-ethyl- 3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (ECDI) and soluble antigen fragments failed to stimulate significant proliferation by normal pigeon cytochrome c-specific T cell clones, suggesting that the chemical treatment inactivated full antigen presentation function. However, T cell clones exposed to ECDI-treated splenocytes and antigen in vitro were rendered unresponsive for at least 8 d to subsequent antigen stimulation with normal presenting cells. As predicted by the in vitro results, specific T cell unresponsiveness was also induced in vivo in B10.A mice injected intravenously with B10.A, but not B10.A(4R), splenocytes coupled with pigeon cytochrome c via ECDI. The antigen and MHC specificity of the induction of this T cell unresponsiveness in vitro and in vivo was identical to that required for T cell activation. These results suggest that nonmitogenic T cell recognition of antigen/MHC on ECDI-modified APCs results in the functional inactivation of T cell clones. PMID:3029267

  4. Label-Retaining, Quiescent Globose Basal Cells Are Found in the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Woochan; Chen, Xueyan; Flis, Daniel; Harris, Margaret; Schwob, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate olfactory epithelium (OE) is known for its ability to renew itself throughout life as well as to reconstitute after injury. Although this remarkable capacity demonstrates the persistence of stem cells and multipotent progenitor cells, their nature in the OE remains undefined and controversial, as both horizontal basal cells (HBCs) and globose basal cells (GBCs) have features in common with each other and with stem cells in other tissues. Here, we investigate whether some among the population of GBCs satisfy a key feature of stem cells, i.e., mitotic quiescence with retention of thymidine analogue label and activation by injury. Accordingly, we demonstrate that some GBCs express p27Kip1, a member of the Kip/Cip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. In addition, some GBCs retain bromodeoxyuridine or ethynyldeoxyuridine for an extended period when the pulse is administered in neonates followed by a 1-month chase. Their identity as GBCs was confirmed by electron microscopy. All spared GBCs express Ki-67 in the methyl bromide (MeBr)-lesioned OE initially after lesion, indicating that the label-retaining (LR) GBCs are activated in response to injury. LR-GBCs reappear during the acute recovery period following MeBr exposure, as demonstrated with 2- or 4-week chase periods after labeling. Taken together, our data demonstrate the existence of LR-GBCs that are seemingly activated in response to epithelial injury and then re-established after the initial phase of recovery is completed. In this regard, some among the GBCs satisfy a common criterion for functioning like stem cells. PMID:24122672

  5. Cross-Presentation of Cell-Associated Antigens by MHC Class I in Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Planès, Remi; Anselmi, Giorgio; Reynolds, Matthew; Menezes, Shinelle; Adiko, Aimé Cézaire; Saveanu, Loredana; Guermonprez, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique ability to pick up dead cells carrying antigens in tissue and migrate to the lymph nodes where they can cross-present cell-associated antigens by MHC class I to CD8+ T cells. There is strong in vivo evidence that the mouse XCR1+ DCs subset acts as a key player in this process. The intracellular processes underlying cross-presentation remain controversial and several pathways have been proposed. Indeed, a wide number of studies have addressed the cellular process of cross-presentation in vitro using a variety of sources of antigen and antigen-presenting cells. Here, we review the in vivo and in vitro evidence supporting the current mechanistic models and disscuss their physiological relevance to the cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by DCs subsets. PMID:26236315

  6. Divergent members of a single autoreactive B cell clone retain specificity for apoptotic blebs.

    PubMed

    Neeli, Indira; Richardson, Mekel M; Khan, Salar N; Nicolo, Danielle; Monestier, Marc; Radic, Marko Z

    2007-03-01

    Specificity for double-stranded DNA can arise due to somatic mutations within one of the branches of an autoreactive B cell clone. However, it is not known whether a different autospecificity predates anti-dsDNA and whether separate offshoots of an expanding B cell clone retain or evolve alternative specificities. We compared 3H9, an anti-dsDNA IgG, to 4H8 and 1A11, antibodies produced by hybridomas representing an alternative branch of the 3H9 B cell clone. All three IgG bound chromatin in ELISA and apoptotic cells in confocal microscopy, yet only 3H9 bound dsDNA, as measured by plasmon resonance. Moreover, we demonstrate that despite the unique specificity of 3H9 for dsDNA, all three clone members exhibited indistinguishable binding to chromatin. The binding to chromatin and apoptotic cells was unaffected by N-linked glycosylation in L chain CDR1, a modification that results from a replacement of serine 26 with asparagine in 4H8 and 1A11. These data provide the first evidence that specificity for nucleosome epitopes on apoptotic cells provides the initial positive stimulus for somatic variants that comprise a B cell clone, including those that subsequently acquire specificity for dsDNA. Conversely, selection of autoreactive B cells for binding to apoptotic cells leads to clonal expansion, antibody diversification, and the development of linked sets of anti-nuclear autoantibodies.

  7. Impaired Tumor Antigen Processing by Immunoproteasome-expressing CD40-Activated B cells and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Zeng, Wanyong; Sasada, Tetsuro; Su, Mei; Choi, Jaewon; Drakoulakos, Donna; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2012-01-01

    Professional APCs, such as dendritic cells, are routinely used in vitro for the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for tumor antigens. In addition to dendritic cells, CD40-activated B cells and variant K562 leukemic cells can be readily transfected with nucleic acids for in vitro and in vivo antigen presentation. However, the expression of immunoproteasome components in dendritic cells may preclude display of tumor antigens such as Mart1/MelanA. Here, we use three target epitopes, two derived from tumor antigens [Mart126–34 (M26) and Cyp1B1239–247 (Cyp239)] and one derived from the Influenza A viral antigen [FluM158–66 (FluM58)], to demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells, like dendritic cells, have a limited capability to process certain tumor antigens. In contrast, the K562 HLA-A*0201 transfectant efficiently processes and presents M26 and Cyp239 as well as the influenza FluM58 epitopes to T cells. These results demonstrate that the choice of target APC for gene transfer of tumor antigens may be limited by the relative efficacy of proteasome components to process certain tumor epitopes. Importantly, K562 can be exploited as an artificial APC, efficient in processing both M26 and Cyp239 epitopes and presumably, by extension, other relevant tumor antigens. PMID:21400024

  8. Label-Retaining Stromal Cells in Mouse Endometrium Awaken for Expansion and Repair After Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingzhu; Yeung, William S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse endometrium undergo dramatic cellular reorganization during pregnancy and postpartum. Somatic stem cells maintain homeostasis of the tissue by providing a cell reservoir for regeneration. We hypothesized that endometrial cells with quiescent properties (stem/progenitor cells) were involved in the regeneration of the endometrial tissue. Given that stem cells divide infrequently, they can retain the DNA synthesis label [bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] after a prolonged chase period. In this study, prepubertal mice were pulsed with BrdU and after a 6-week chase a small population of label-retaining stromal cells (LRSC) was located primarily beneath the luminal epithelium, adjacent to blood vessels, and near the endometrial–myometrial junction. Marker analyses suggested that they were of mesenchymal origin expressing CD44+, CD90+, CD140b+, CD146+, and Sca-1+. During pregnancy, nonproliferating LRSC predominately resided at the interimplantation/placental loci of the gestational endometrium. Immediately after parturition, a significant portion of the LRSC underwent proliferation (BrdU+/Ki-67+) and expressed total and active β-catenin. The β-catenin expression in the LRSC was transiently elevated at postpartum day (PPD) 1. The proliferation of LRSC resulted in a significant decline in the proportion of LRSC in the postpartum uterus. The LRSC returned to dormancy at PPD7, and the percentage of LRSC remained stable thereafter until 11 weeks. This study demonstrated that LRSC can respond efficiently to physiological stimuli upon initiation of uterine involution and return to its quiescent state after postpartum repair. PMID:25386902

  9. Antigen-presenting cells in the female reproductive tract: influence of sex hormones on antigen presentation in the vagina.

    PubMed Central

    Wira, C R; Rossoll, R M

    1995-01-01

    We report here that the stage of the reproductive cycle and the administration of physiological amounts of oestradiol to ovariectomized rats influences antigen presentation by macrophage/dendritic cells in the vagina. Antigen presentation is elevated when oestradiol levels in blood are low, and reduced just prior to ovulation. Of those hormones tested, only oestradiol lowered vaginal antigen presentation. When progesterone was given along with oestradiol, the inhibitory effect of oestradiol on vaginal antigen presentation was reversed. These studies demonstrate that the vagina is an inductive site and that antigen presentation is under hormonal control. Our results suggest that immunization studies designed to enhance mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract should take into account the stage of the reproductive cycle when antigen is deposited. PMID:7790022

  10. Immunologic ignorance of vascular endothelial cells expressing minor histocompatibility antigen.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Krebs, Philippe; Tian, Yinghua; Engeler, Daniel; Scandella, Elke; Miller, Simone; Palmer, Douglas C; Restifo, Nicholas P; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2008-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) presenting minor histocompatibility antigen (mhAg) are major target cells for alloreactive effector CD8(+) T cells during chronic transplant rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The contribution of ECs to T-cell activation, however, is still a controversial issue. In this study, we have assessed the antigen-presenting capacity of ECs in vivo using a transgenic mouse model with beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression confined to the vascular endothelium (Tie2-LacZ mice). In a GVHD-like setting with adoptive transfer of beta-gal-specific T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, beta-gal expression by ECs was not sufficient to either activate or tolerize CD8(+) T cells. Likewise, transplantation of fully vascularized heart or liver grafts from Tie2-LacZ mice into nontransgenic recipients did not suffice to activate beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells, indicating that CD8(+) T-cell responses against mhAg cannot be initiated by ECs. Moreover, we could show that spontaneous activation of beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells in Tie2-LacZ mice was exclusively dependent on CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs), demonstrating that mhAgs presented by ECs remain immunologically ignored unless presentation by DCs is granted.

  11. Immunoglobulin as a vehicle for foreign antigenic peptides immunogenic to T cells.

    PubMed

    Lunde, E; Bogen, B; Sandlie, I

    1997-01-01

    Antibody (Ab) molecules may serve as targeting vehicles for delivery of foreign antigenic peptides to antigen presenting cells (APC). An attractive strategy is to substitute segments between beta-strands of immunoglobulin (Ig) constant (C)-region domains with antigenic peptides. For this to work, the mutant Ab must maintain its conformation so that it can be secreted from transfected cells. Furthermore, the antigenic peptides must be excised by the processing machinery of APC and loaded onto major histo-compatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. To test this, we have introduced a peptide of eleven amino acids (a.a.) as either of three different loops in the first C-region domain of the heavy (H) chain (CH1) of human IgG3. When the resulting mutant H chain genes were expressed in a fibroblast cell line equipped with proper class II molecules, the H chains were retained intracellularly, probably due to the light (L) chain deficiency of the fibroblasts. Nevertheless, by the endogenous class II processing pathway, presentation of the epitope to CD4+ cells was observed for all three mutants. The presentation efficiency, however, depended on the position of the peptide in the H chain. This could be due to influence of flanking sequences, which differ in the three loop replacement mutants. When L chain-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) lambda cells were transfected with the same constructs, two out of the three mutant Ig were secreted. The mutants had the expected antigen specificity and were recognized by anti-IgG Ab. When added exogenously to dendritic cell APC, the mutant IgG3 were processed, and the liberated foreign epitopes presented to T cells. The results suggest that the loops connecting beta-strands in the Ig fold may be replaced by foreign peptides, which upon processing become stimulatory to CD4+ T cells. Combined with the well-known targeting function of antibodies, this principle may be useful for construction of a new generation of vaccines.

  12. Telomerase-immortalized non-malignant human prostate epithelial cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongzhen; Zhou Jianjun; Miki, Jun; Furusato, Bungo; Gu Yongpeng; Srivastava, Shiv; McLeod, David G.; Vogel, Jonathan C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding prostate stem cells may provide insight into the origin of prostate cancer. Primary cells have been cultured from human prostate tissue but they usually survive only 15-20 population doublings before undergoing senescence. We report here that RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells, a clonal cell line from hTERT-immortalized primary non-malignant tissue-derived human prostate epithelial cell line (RC170N/h), retain multipotent stem cell properties. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells expressed a human embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, and potential prostate epithelial stem cell markers, CD133, integrin {alpha}2{beta}1{sup hi} and CD44. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells proliferated in KGM and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 5 {mu}g/ml insulin (DMEM + 10% FBS + Ins.) medium, and differentiated into epithelial stem cells that expressed epithelial cell markers, including CK5/14, CD44, p63 and cytokeratin 18 (CK18); as well as the mesenchymal cell markers, vimentin, desmin; the neuron and neuroendocrine cell marker, chromogranin A. Furthermore the RC170 N/h/clone 7 cells differentiated into multi tissues when transplanted into the sub-renal capsule and subcutaneously of NOD-SCID mice. The results indicate that RC170N/h/clone 7 cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells and will be useful as a novel cell model for studying the mechanisms of human prostate stem cell differentiation and transformation.

  13. Stem cells expanded from the human embryonic hindbrain stably retain regional specification and high neurogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando; Falk, Anna; Smith, Austin

    2013-07-24

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5-7, Carnegie stage 15-17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization.

  14. Modeling T cell responses to antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    T cell responses are a crucial part of the adaptive immune system in the fight against infections. This article discusses the use of mathematical models for understanding the dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral infections. Complementing experimental research, mathematical models have been very useful for exploring new hypotheses, interpreting experimental data, and for defining what needs to be measured to improve understanding. This review will start with minimally parameterized models of CTL responses, which have generated some valuable insights into basic dynamics and correlates of control. Subsequently, more biological complexity is incorporated into this modeling framework, examining different mechanisms of CTL expansion, different effector activities, and the influence of T cell help. Models and results are discussed in the context of data from specific infections. PMID:25269610

  15. Twist1-positive epithelial cells retain adhesive and proliferative capacity throughout dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Coutinho, Kester; Georgess, Dan; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dissemination is the process by which cells detach and migrate away from a multicellular tissue. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) conceptualizes dissemination in a stepwise fashion, with downregulation of E-cadherin leading to loss of intercellular junctions, induction of motility, and then escape from the epithelium. This gain of migratory activity is proposed to be mutually exclusive with proliferation. We previously developed a dissemination assay based on inducible expression of the transcription factor Twist1 and here utilize it to characterize the timing and dynamics of intercellular adhesion, proliferation and migration during dissemination. Surprisingly, Twist1+ epithelium displayed extensive intercellular junctions, and Twist1– luminal epithelial cells could still adhere to disseminating Twist1+ cells. Although proteolysis and proliferation were both observed throughout dissemination, neither was absolutely required. Finally, Twist1+ cells exhibited a hybrid migration mode; their morphology and nuclear deformation were characteristic of amoeboid cells, whereas their dynamic protrusive activity, pericellular proteolysis and migration speeds were more typical of mesenchymal cells. Our data reveal that epithelial cells can disseminate while retaining competence to adhere and proliferate. PMID:27402962

  16. Impairments of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, Ludmila V; Shevela, Ekaterina Ya; Tikhonova, Marina A; Nikonov, Sergey D; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Chernykh, Elena R

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype and functional properties of antigen-presenting cells (APC), that is, circulating monocytes and generated in vitro macrophages and dendritic cells, were investigated in the patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) differing in lymphocyte reactivity to M. tuberculosis antigens (PPD-reactive versus PPD-anergic patients). We revealed the distinct impairments in patient APC functions. For example, the monocyte dysfunctions were displayed by low CD86 and HLA-DR expression, 2-fold increase in CD14(+)CD16(+) expression, the high numbers of IL-10-producing cells, and enhanced IL-10 and IL-6 production upon LPS-stimulation. The macrophages which were in vitro generated from peripheral blood monocytes under GM-CSF were characterized by Th1/Th2-balance shifting (downproduction of IFN-γ coupled with upproduction of IL-10) and by reducing of allostimulatory activity in mixed lymphocyte culture. The dendritic cells (generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes upon GM-CSF + IFN-α) were characterized by impaired maturation/activation, a lower level of IFN-γ production in conjunction with an enhanced capacity to produce IL-10 and IL-6, and a profound reduction of allostimulatory activity. The APC dysfunctions were found to be most prominent in PPD-anergic patients. The possible role of APC impairments in reducing the antigen-specific T-cell response to M. tuberculosis was discussed. PMID:26339660

  17. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  18. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  19. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-01-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy. PMID:26377367

  20. Dry-coated live viral vector vaccines delivered by nanopatch microprojections retain long-term thermostability and induce transgene-specific T cell responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Frances E; McNeilly, Celia L; Crichton, Michael L; Primiero, Clare A; Yukiko, Sally R; Fernando, Germain J P; Chen, Xianfeng; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S; Kendall, Mark A F

    2013-01-01

    The disadvantages of needle-based immunisation motivate the development of simple, low cost, needle-free alternatives. Vaccine delivery to cutaneous environments rich in specialised antigen-presenting cells using microprojection patches has practical and immunological advantages over conventional needle delivery. Additionally, stable coating of vaccine onto microprojections removes logistical obstacles presented by the strict requirement for cold-chain storage and distribution of liquid vaccine, or lyophilised vaccine plus diluent. These attributes make these technologies particularly suitable for delivery of vaccines against diseases such as malaria, which exerts its worst effects in countries with poorly-resourced healthcare systems. Live viral vectors including adenoviruses and poxviruses encoding exogenous antigens have shown significant clinical promise as vaccines, due to their ability to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells. Here, the simian adenovirus serotype 63 and the poxvirus modified vaccinia Ankara--two vectors under evaluation for the delivery of malaria antigens to humans--were formulated for coating onto Nanopatch microprojections and applied to murine skin. Co-formulation with the stabilising disaccharides trehalose and sucrose protected virions during the dry-coating process. Transgene-specific CD8(+) T cell responses following Nanopatch delivery of both vectors were similar to intradermal injection controls after a single immunisation (despite a much lower delivered dose), though MVA boosting of pre-primed responses with Nanopatch was found to be less effective than the ID route. Importantly, disaccharide-stabilised ChAd63 could be stored for 10 weeks at 37°C with less than 1 log10 loss of viability, and retained single-dose immunogenicity after storage. These data support the further development of microprojection patches for the deployment of live vaccines in hot climates.

  1. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  2. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-05-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation.

  3. Internalization and presentation of myelin antigens by the brain endothelium guides antigen-specific T cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kamermans, Alwin; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van het Hof, Bert; Wierts, Laura; O'Toole, Tom; Boeve, Daniël; Verstege, Marleen; van der Pol, Susanne MA; van Kooyk, Yvette; de Vries, Helga E; Unger, Wendy WJ

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells across the brain endothelium, an essential step in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), is suggested to be an antigen-specific process, yet which cells provide this signal is unknown. Here we provide direct evidence that under inflammatory conditions, brain endothelial cells (BECs) stimulate the migration of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells by acting as non-professional antigen presenting cells through the processing and presentation of myelin-derived antigens in MHC-II. Inflamed BECs internalized myelin, which was routed to endo-lysosomal compartment for processing in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, myelin/MHC-II complexes on inflamed BECs stimulated the trans-endothelial migration of myelin-reactive Th1 and Th17 2D2 cells, while control antigen loaded BECs did not stimulate T-cell migration. Furthermore, blocking the interaction between myelin/MHC-II complexes and myelin-reactive T-cells prevented T-cell transmigration. These results demonstrate that endothelial cells derived from the brain are capable of enhancing antigen-specific T cell recruitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13149.001 PMID:27336724

  4. Specific adhesion of carcinoembryonic antigen-bearing colorectal cancer cells to immobilized carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Levin, L V; Griffin, T W

    1991-11-01

    Recent characterization of the genomic structure of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is consistent with that of a cellular adhesion molecule. To examine this function in colorectal cancer, the adherence of cell lines to microtiter wells coated with CEA and well-described adhesive molecules was determined. The CEA-positive cell line LoVo and the CEA-devoid cell line H-Meso-1 did not differ in adherence to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen and fibronectin, whereas LoVo cells adhered to CEA (10 micrograms/well) in a specific manner (43% bound cells vs. 1.5% bound cells with BSA or alpha-acidglycoprotein controls, P less than 0.01) while H-MESO-1 showed no adhesion to CEA (less than 0.6% bound cells). This adhesion of LoVo cells to CEA was not affected by co-incubation of cells with EDTA, sodium azide, or at 23 degrees C. However, the CEA to CEA adhesive interaction was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the N-terminal domain of the CEA molecule, and decreased by enzymatic removal of CEA from the LoVo cell membrane. The extent of adhesion to immobilized CEA by four CEA-producing cell lines (LoVo, HT29, LS174T and LS174-S), correlated with membrane CEA expression as determined by FACS analysis. The results of these experiments add support to the concept that CEA may function as a specific homotypic cellular adhesion molecule for colorectal cancer cells.

  5. The role of a human antigen specific T8+ cell subset in antigen presentation, helper function and contrasuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Avery, J; Jones, T

    1985-01-01

    Regulation of the human immune response was studied by sequential separation of subsets of T cells, followed by assessment of their helper and suppressor functions in a series of reconstitution experiments. T8+ lymphocytes were separated by panning on streptococcal antigen (SA) coated plates into T8+ SA-adherent cells (T8+SA+) and T8+ SA-non-adherent cells (T8+SA-). The helper and suppressor functions of the T8+SA+ and T8+SA- cells, reconstituted with T4+ helper cells were then studied by a direct antibody forming cell assay. T4+ cells will not induce helper activity by 1000 ng SA alone but require the accessory function of monocytes (Mo). However, replacing Mo by T8+SA+ cells will elicit a similar helper activity by T4+ cells and SA as that induced by Mo. In addition to the antigen-specific presentation and induction of helper activity, the T8+SA+ subset displays the properties of antigen-specific contrasuppressor cells. Thus, reconstitution of T4+ cells and T8+SA- (suppressor cells) with T8+SA+ and 1000 ng SA induces helper and no suppressor activity. Substitution of Mo for the T8+SA+ cells converts the helper to a predominantly suppressor-cell function. T8+SA- cells elicit suppression with 1 ng SA in the absence of accessory cells and reconstitution with Mo, T8+SA+ or T4+ cells failed to affect the suppressor activity. Total reconstitution of the four principle subsets of T4+, T8+SA+, T8+SA- cells and Mo elicited similar antigen dose-dependent responses as those of the unseparated mononuclear cells. It seems that all four cell subsets are required for optimal immunoregulation. We suggest that the T8+SA+ can present antigen to T4+ helper cells and induce helper activity, but in addition these cells can prevent the suppressor subset of T8+ cells from inhibiting T4+ helper cells and function as contrasuppressor cells. The mechanism of these functions is not known but HLA class II antigens might play an essential role in antigen binding, presentation and

  6. Skeletal muscle stem cells adopt a dormant cell state post mortem and retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Rocheteau, Pierre; Châtre, Laurent; Sanulli, Serena; Mémet, Sylvie; Ricchetti, Miria; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    The accessibility to stem cells from healthy or diseased individuals, and the maintenance of their potency are challenging issues for stem cell biology. Here we report the isolation of viable and functional skeletal myogenic cells from humans up to 17 days, and mice up to 14 days post mortem, much longer beyond previous reports. Muscle stem cells are enriched in post mortem tissue, suggesting a selective survival advantage compared with other cell types. Transplantation of mouse muscle and haematopoietic stem cells regenerates tissues robustly. Cellular quiescence contributes to this cell viability where cells adopt a reversible dormant state characterized by reduced metabolic activity, a prolonged lag phase before the first cell division, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and a transcriptional status less primed for commitment. Finally, severe hypoxia, or anoxia is critical for maintaining stem cell viability and regenerative capacity. Thus, these cells provide a useful resource for studying stem cell biology.

  7. Sockeye Salmon Retain Immunoglobulin-Secreting Plasma Cells Throughout Their Spawning Journey And Post-spawning

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Jonathan; Clister, Terri; Bruce, Amber; Epp, Lidia; Zwollo, Patty

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-producing plasma cells are a major source of protective immunity in vertebrates, including salmon. During the spawning phase, salmon undergo drastic, hormonally driven changes in their physiology, including elevated levels of cortisol, which are known to suppress the immune system. As adult fish need to survive their long journey to the spawning grounds, we hypothesized that humoral immunity, in the form of IgM-secreting plasma cells, remains functional until post-spawning. This was investigated by measuring changes in membrane and secreted immunoglobulin heavy chain mu and Pax5 transcripts in spleen and kidney from migrating sockeye salmon, using real-time qPCR. As an additional measurement, the abundance of developing B, mature B, and plasma cells was determined in spawning fish, using flow cytometry. Immune tissue samples were collected from fish from the Kenai River drainage and Main Bay, Prince William Sound. Our results reveal that spawning fish express high levels of secreted heavy chain mu transcripts in their spleen and anterior kidney throughout the spawning journey. Furthermore, we show that IgM-secreting PCs (HCmu++/Pax5−) remain abundant in anterior kidney and spleen of post-spawning sockeye salmon, with a concomitant loss in developing B cells (HCmu−/Pax5+). This suggests that successful spawners retain their PCs throughout the spawning journey and post-spawning. PMID:23434463

  8. Sockeye salmon retain immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells throughout their spawning journey and post-spawning.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Jonathan; Clister, Terri; Bruce, Amber; Epp, Lidia; Zwollo, Patty

    2013-06-01

    Antibody-producing plasma cells are a major source of protective immunity in vertebrates, including salmon. During the spawning phase, salmon undergo drastic, hormonally driven changes in their physiology, including elevated levels of cortisol, which are known to suppress the immune system. As adult fish need to survive their long journey to the spawning grounds, we hypothesized that humoral immunity, in the form of IgM-secreting plasma cells, remains functional until post-spawning. This was investigated by measuring changes in membrane and secreted immunoglobulin heavy chain mu and Pax5 transcripts in spleen and kidney from migrating sockeye salmon, using real-time qPCR. As an additional measurement, the abundance of developing B, mature B, and plasma cells was determined in spawning fish, using flow cytometry. Immune tissue samples were collected from fish from the Kenai River drainage and Main Bay, Prince William Sound. Our results reveal that spawning fish express high levels of secreted heavy chain mu transcripts in their spleen and anterior kidney throughout the spawning journey. Furthermore, we show that IgM-secreting PCs (HCmu++/Pax5-) remain abundant in anterior kidney and spleen of post-spawning sockeye salmon, with a concomitant loss in developing B cells (HCmu-/Pax5+). This suggests that successful spawners retain their PCs throughout the spawning journey and post-spawning. PMID:23434463

  9. BrdU-label-retaining cells in rat eccrine sweat glands over time.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Li, Xuexue; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bingna; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Cell proliferation and turnover are fueled by stem cells. In a previous study, we demonstrated that rat eccrine sweat glands contained abundant bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-label-retaining cells (LRCs). However, morphological observations showed that eccrine sweat glands usually show little or no signs of homeostatic change. In this study, we account for why the homeostatic change is rare in eccrine sweat glands based on cytokinetic changes in BrdU-LRC turnover, and also determine the BrdU-labeled cell type. Thirty-six newborn SD rats, were injected intraperitoneally with 50mg/kg BrdU twice daily at a 2h interval for 4 consecutive days. After a chase period of 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 32 weeks, rats were euthanized, and the hind footpads were removed and processed for BrdU immunostaining, and BrdU/α-SMA and BrdU/K14 double-immunostaining. BrdU-LRCs were observed in the ducts, secretory coils and mesenchymal cells at all survival time points. The percentage of BrdU(+) cells in rat eccrine sweat glands averaged 4.2±1.2% after 4 weeks of chase, increased slightly by the 6th week, averaging 4.4±0.9%, and peaked at 8 weeks, averaging 5.3±1.0%. Subsequently, the average percentage of BrdU(+) cells declined to 3.2±0.8% by the 32nd week. There was no difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs among the different survival time points except that a significant difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs detected at 24 weeks versus 8 weeks, and 32 weeks versus 8 weeks, was observed. We concluded that the BrdU-LRCs turnover is slow in eccrine sweat glands. PMID:26657518

  10. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein - CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  11. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A.; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  12. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. PMID:25600436

  13. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials.

  14. Immune complexes that contain HIV antigens activate peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, L B; Shmagel, K V; Saidakova, E V; Shmagel, N G; Chereshnev, V A

    2016-07-01

    Uninfected donor T cells were treated in vitro by model immune complexes that contained either HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens. Unlike HCV antigen-containing complexes, the immune complexes that contained HIV antigens have been shown to activate peripheral blood T cells of uninfected donors under in vitro conditions. Both the antiviral antibodies and HIV antigen were involved in the activation process. The unique properties of the immune complexes formed by HIV antigens and antiviral antibodies are believed to result from the virus-specific antibody properties and molecular conformation of the antigen-antibody complex. PMID:27595830

  15. The use of marsupial x eutherian somatic cell hybrids to study marsupial cell surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Sykes, P J; Hope, R M

    1978-12-01

    Buck and Bodmer (1976) have developed a technique for identifying an antigen on the surface of human x mouse somatic cell hybrids, specified by a gene on a particular human chromosome. We have successfully adapted this technique to a study of marsupial cell surface antigens. Somatic cell hybrids between Macropus rufus (Marsupialia) lymphocytes and the mouse cell lines PG19 and 1R were injected intraperitoneally into mice of the same inbred strain from which the above cell lines were derived (C57B16J and C3H, respectively). The only identified M. rufus chromosome present in the hybrid cells was the X chromosome. The antisera, after adsorption with PG19 or 1R, were tested using indirect immunofluorescence, against the hybrid cells, and also against sub-clones (derived from hybrids) which had apparently lost the M. rufus X chromosome, or at least its long arm. The results of these tests showed that the absorbed antisera contained reactivity against an M. rufus cell surface antigen (or antigens). The reactions of one of the antisera were most simply interpreted by supposing that it was detecting an M. rufus X-lined antigen(s).

  16. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  17. CD4+ T Cell Tolerance to Tissue-Restricted Self Antigens Is Mediated by Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells Rather Than Deletion.

    PubMed

    Legoux, Francois P; Lim, Jong-Baeck; Cauley, Andrew W; Dikiy, Stanislav; Ertelt, James; Mariani, Thomas J; Sparwasser, Tim; Way, Sing Sing; Moon, James J

    2015-11-17

    Deletion of self-antigen-specific T cells during thymic development provides protection from autoimmunity. However, it is unclear how efficiently this occurs for tissue-restricted self antigens, or how immune tolerance is maintained for self-antigen-specific T cells that routinely escape deletion. Here we show that endogenous CD4+ T cells with specificity for a set of tissue-restricted self antigens were not deleted at all. For pancreatic self antigen, this resulted in an absence of steady-state tolerance, while for the lung and intestine, tolerance was maintained by the enhanced presence of thymically-derived antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. Unlike deletional tolerance, Treg cell-mediated tolerance was broken by successive antigen challenges. These findings reveal that for some tissue-restricted self antigens, tolerance relies entirely on nondeletional mechanisms that are less durable than T cell deletion. This might explain why autoimmunity is often tissue-specific, and it offers a rationale for cancer vaccine strategies targeting tissue-restricted tumor antigens.

  18. HIV-1--Infected T Cells Show a Selective Signaling Defect after Perturbation of CD3/Antigen Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linette, Gerald P.; Hartzman, Robert J.; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; June, Carl H.

    1988-07-01

    The binding of antigen or monoclonal antibody to the T cell receptor for antigen or the closely associated CD3 complex causes increases in the concentration of intracellular ionized calcium and subsequent cell proliferation. By measuring second messenger production in primary cultures of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)--infected T cells stimulated with monoclonal antibodies specific for either CD3 or CD2, a specific impairment of membrane signaling was revealed. The HIV-1--infected T cells were unable to mobilize Ca2+ after stimulation with anti-CD3, whereas CD2-induced calcium mobilization remained intact. Furthermore, the HIV-1--infected cells proliferated poorly after CD3 stimulation, although the cells retained normal DNA synthesis in response to interleukin-2 stimulation. These results show that the signals initiated by CD2 and CD3 can be regulated independently within the same T cell; uncoupling of signal transduction after antigen-specific stimulation provides a biochemical mechanism to explain, in part, the profound immunodeficiency of patients with HIV-1 infection.

  19. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  20. Mechanism of effector-cell blockade. I. Antigen-induced suppression of Ig synthesis in a hybridoma cell line, and correlation with cell- associated antigen

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    A mouse hybridoma cell line, FluIgM-1, which secretes IgM specific for the hapten fluorescein (FLU) was developed to allow detailed analysis of the effector-cell blockade (ECB) phenomenon, in which contact of antibody-forming cells (AFC) with specific antigen results in marked reduction of antibody secretion. Treatment of hybridoma cells with highly substituted FLU conjugates (e.g., Flu20gelatin) resulted in inhibition of plaque formation. The data indicated close parallels with the ECB of normal spleen AFC, both in speed of onset and the dose of antigen required. The inhibition of antibody secretion was confirmed with a biosynthetic-labeling procedure which demonstrated that this was a result of reduced Ig synthesis. The inhibitory effect appeared to be confined to antibody synthesis, in the total protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, and cell-doubling times were unaffected. The association of FLU conjugates with the cells during and following ECB was studied directly using fluorescence microscopy and the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. These experiments showed that FLU conjugates capable of causing blockade aggregated on the cell surface, that the clearance of cell-associated antigen correlated with recovery from ECB, and that at all times when cell associated antigen was detectable, a portion remained bound to the cell surface and was susceptible to enzymatic removal. The latter observations supported previous findings suggesting that ECB was mediated by extracellular antigen. The direct observation of aggregates of antigen on the surface of blockaded cells is consistent with a mechanism involving cross-linking of Ig receptors. Finally, Fc receptors were not present on hybridoma cells, excluding their involvement in induction of ECB. PMID:7381364

  1. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  2. Caveolae, fenestrae and transendothelial channels retain PV1 on the surface of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Eugene; Tse, Dan; Sideleva, Olga; Deharvengt, Sophie J; Luciano, Marcus R; Xu, Yan; McGarry, Caitlin L; Chidlow, John; Pilch, Paul F; Sessa, William C; Toomre, Derek K; Stan, Radu V

    2012-01-01

    PV1 protein is an essential component of stomatal and fenestral diaphragms, which are formed at the plasma membrane of endothelial cells (ECs), on structures such as caveolae, fenestrae and transendothelial channels. Knockout of PV1 in mice results in in utero and perinatal mortality. To be able to interpret the complex PV1 knockout phenotype, it is critical to determine whether the formation of diaphragms is the only cellular role of PV1. We addressed this question by measuring the effect of complete and partial removal of structures capable of forming diaphragms on PV1 protein level. Removal of caveolae in mice by knocking out caveolin-1 or cavin-1 resulted in a dramatic reduction of PV1 protein level in lungs but not kidneys. The magnitude of PV1 reduction correlated with the abundance of structures capable of forming diaphragms in the microvasculature of these organs. The absence of caveolae in the lung ECs did not affect the transcription or translation of PV1, but it caused a sharp increase in PV1 protein internalization rate via a clathrin- and dynamin-independent pathway followed by degradation in lysosomes. Thus, PV1 is retained on the cell surface of ECs by structures capable of forming diaphragms, but undergoes rapid internalization and degradation in the absence of these structures, suggesting that formation of diaphragms is the only role of PV1.

  3. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richard B M; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2014-02-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and specific ligands deposited on sensor chips using an IBIS MX96 SPR imager (SPRi). As a model system, cells from the breast cancer cell line HS578T, SKBR3 and MCF7 were used. SPRi responses to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antibody and other ligands coated on the sensor chips were measured. SPR curves show a response attributable to the sedimentation of the cells and a specific binding response on top of the initial response, the magnitude of which is dependent on the ligand density and the cell type used. Comparison of SPRi with flow cytometry showed similar EpCAM expression on MCF7, SKBR3 and HS578T cells.

  4. Antigen specific killing assay using CFSE labeled target cells.

    PubMed

    Durward, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2010-11-09

    Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) can be used to easily and quickly label a cell population of interest for in vivo investigation. This labeling has classically been used to study proliferation and migration. In the method presented here, we have shortened the timeline after adoptive transfer to look at survival and killing of epitope specific CFSE labeled target cells. The level of specific killing of a CD8 + T cell clone can indicate the quality of the response, as their quantity may be misleading. Specific CD8+ T cells can become functionally exhausted over time with a decline in cytokine production and killing. Also, certain CD8 + T cell clones may not kill as well as others with differing TCR specificities. For effective Cell Mediated Immunity (CMI), antigens must be identified that produce not only adequate numbers of responding T cells, but also functionally robust responding T cells. Here we assess the percent cell specific killing of two peptide specific T cell clones in BALB/c mice.

  5. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  6. Autologous tumor cells engineered to express bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Ramiya, Vijayakumar K; Jerald, Maya M; Lawman, Patricia D; Lawman, Michael J P

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapies are emerging as promising treatment modalities in the management of the disease. As a result, cancer vaccines are considered to be immensely crucial in preventing recurrence, a well-known nemesis in cancer patients because they have the potential to activate memory antitumor immunity. Due to poor antigenicity and self-tolerance, most tumor antigens require interventional vaccine therapies to provide an adequate "danger" signal to the immune system in order to activate a robust, clinically meaningful antitumor immunity. It has been postulated that this requirement may be achieved by providing bacterial and/or viral immunogens to prime this type of immune response. Briefly, we provide here a method of transfecting whole tumor cells with plasmid DNA encoding an immunogenic bacterial protein such as Emm55, which was derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes). Subsequent inactivation of the transfected cells by irradiation (100 Gray) prevents replication. This type of whole-cell vaccine, e.g., ImmuneFx™, has demonstrated activity in a murine neuroblastoma model, in canine lymphoma patients with naturally occurring disease, and in many cancer types in companion animals. The protocols described in this chapter provide the necessary materials and methodologies to manufacture such a vaccine.

  7. Glycan modification of antigen alters its intracellular routing in dendritic cells, promoting priming of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Ho, Nataschja I; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Boks, Martine Annemarie; Cornelissen, Lenneke AM; Kaur Singh, Satwinder; Saeland, Eirikur; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Ossendorp, Ferry A; Unger, Wendy WJ; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake by dendritic cells and intracellular routing of antigens to specific compartments is regulated by C-type lectin receptors that recognize glycan structures. We show that the modification of Ovalbumin (OVA) with the glycan-structure LewisX (LeX) re-directs OVA to the C-type lectin receptor MGL1. LeX-modification of OVA favored Th1 skewing of CD4+ T cells and enhanced cross-priming of CD8+ T cells. While cross-presentation of native OVA requires high antigen dose and TLR stimuli, LeX modification reduces the required amount 100-fold and obviates its dependence on TLR signaling. The OVA-LeX-induced enhancement of T cell cross-priming is MGL1-dependent as shown by reduced CD8+ effector T cell frequencies in MGL1-deficient mice. Moreover, MGL1-mediated cross-presentation of OVA-LeX neither required TAP-transporters nor Cathepsin-S and was still observed after prolonged intracellular storage of antigen in Rab11+LAMP1+ compartments. We conclude that controlled neo-glycosylation of antigens can crucially influence intracellular routing of antigens, the nature and strength of immune responses and should be considered for optimizing current vaccination strategies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11765.001 PMID:26999763

  8. Ia-antigen-T-cell interactions for a thymus-independent antigen composed of D amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, E; Dayan, M; Sela, M; Mozes, E

    1993-01-01

    Synthetic polypeptide antigens of L amino acids, although bearing repeating sequences, are thymus-dependent (L-TD), whereas the same polymers composed of D amino acids are thymus-independent (D-TI), probably due to a slower rate of metabolism. Yet we found that lymph-node cells of BALB/c mice immunized with D-TI proliferate in response to it in vitro. To follow T-cell activation by D-TI, we established T-cell hybridomas to D-TI and to its analog composed of L isomers, L-TD, for comparison. The T-cell hybridomas express membrane alpha/beta T-cell receptors and secrete interleukin 2 upon stimulation with the respective antigen. In addition, D-TI-specific hybridomas are stimulated, to a lesser extent, by the L-TD antigen, whereas only some L-TD-specific hybridomas recognize D-TI. Moreover, biotinylated analogs of D-TI and L-TD bind to splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from BALB/c mice. Binding is inhibited by an excess of nonbiotinylated L-TD, and by an excess of a peptide comprising residues 259-271 of the human acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit, which binds to I-Ad and I-Ed molecules without prior processing. Analysis of APC lysates following incubation of the APCs with biotinylated D-TI and L-TD reveals that the biotinylated antigen moiety is associated with Ia molecules. D-TI and L-TD bind to Ia molecules on intact APCs with similar KD values, 5 x 10(-8) M and 3 x 10(-8) M, respectively. However, D-TI has faster kinetics of binding than L-TD, probably due to different processing requirements. Hence, we have demonstrated a major histocompatibility complex class II-mediated T-cell response to a thymus-independent antigen. Images PMID:8381541

  9. Cell surface origin of antigens shed by Leishmania donovani during growth in axenic culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, E S; Gottlieb, M; Dwyer, D M

    1982-01-01

    Antisera against isolated cell surface preparations (PCSP-As) of Leishmania donovani promastigotes were used to detect extracellular antigens produced during the growth of these organisms in four different growth media. The PCSP-As precipitated two major antigenically identical but electrophoretically distinct components, in addition to several minor antigens. Immunoelectrophoretic studies employing PCSP-As, PCSP-As absorbed with intact, live promastigotes, and PCSP-As absorbed with a major extracellular antigen demonstrated the antigenic identity between the major extracellular antigens and two major components externally disposed at the surface of promastigotes. Growth curve kinetic investigations suggested that the major extracellular antigens did not appear in the growth media primarily as a result of cell lysis or damage. The carbohydrate nature of the major extracellular antigens was indicated by physicochemical characterization. Images PMID:7118250

  10. Nuclear EGFR characterize still controlled proliferation retained in better differentiated clear cell RCC.

    PubMed

    Ahel, J; Dordevic, G; Markic, D; Mozetic, V; Spanjol, J; Grahovac, B; Stifter, S

    2015-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common solid kidney tumor representing 2-3% of all cancers, with the highest frequency occurring in Western countries. There was a worldwide and European annual increase in incidence of approximately 2% although incidence has been stabilized in last few years. One third of the patients already have metastases in the time of the diagnosis with poor prognosis because RCC are radio and chemoresistant. The prognostic value of EGFR over-expression in RCC is a controversial issue that could be explained by different histological types of study tumors and non-standardized criteria for evaluation of expression. Recent evidences points to a new mode of EGFR signaling pathway in which activated EGFR undergoes nuclear translocalization and then, as transcription factor, mediates gene expression and other cellular events required for highly proliferating activities. According to our observations, the membranous expression of EGFR associates with high nuclear grade and poor differentiated tumors. On the other hand, nuclear EGFR expression was high in low nuclear graded and well differentiated tumors with good prognosis. We hypothesize that this mode of EGFR signaling characterizes still controlled proliferation retained in well differentiated RCC with Furhman nuclear grade I or II.

  11. Identification of epithelial label-retaining cells at the transition between the anal canal and the rectum in mice

    PubMed Central

    Runck, Laura A; Kramer, Megan; Ciraolo, Georgianne; Lewis, Alfor G

    2010-01-01

    In certain regions of the body, transition zones exist where stratified squamous epithelia directly abut against other types of epithelia. Certain transition zones are especially prone to tumorigenesis an example being the anorectal junction, although the reason for this is not known. One possibility is that the abrupt transition of the simple columnar epithelium of the colon to the stratified squamous epithelium of the proximal portion of the anal canal may contain a unique stem cell niche. We investigated whether the anorectal region contained cells with stem cell properties relative to the adjacent epithelium. We utilized a tetracycline-regulatable histone H2B-GFP transgenic mice model, previously used to identify hair follicle stem cells, to fluorescently label slow-cycling anal epithelial cells (e.g., prospective stem cells) in combination with a panel of putative stem cell markers. We identified a population of long-term GFP label-retaining cells concentrated at the junction between the anal canal and the rectum. These cells are BrdU-retaining cells and expressed the stem cell marker CD34. Moreover, tracking the fate of the anal label-retaining cells in vivo revealed that the slow-cycling cells only gave rise to progeny of the anal epithelium. In conclusion, we identified a unique population of cells at the anorectal junction which can be separated from the other basal anal epithelial cells based upon the expression of the stem cell marker CD34 and integrin α6, and thus represent a putative anal stem cell population. PMID:20647777

  12. An Overview of B-1 Cells as Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popi, Ana F.; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Mariano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been extensively studied, mainly in relation to the activation of memory T cells. Considering the B cell subtypes, the role of B-1 cells as APCs is beginning to be explored. Initially, it was described that B-1 cells are activated preferentially by T-independent antigens. However, some reports demonstrated that these cells are also involved in a T-dependent response. The aim of this review is to summarize information about the ability of B-1 cells to play a role as APCs and to briefly discuss the role of the BCR and toll-like receptor signals in this process. Furthermore, some characteristics of B-1 cells, such as natural IgM production and phagocytic ability, could interfere in the participation of these cells in the onset of an adaptive response. PMID:27148259

  13. Dietary antigens limit mucosal immunity by inducing regulatory T cells in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Han, Daehee; Yi, Jaeu; Jung, Jisun; Yang, Bo-Gie; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Minji; Surh, Charles D

    2016-02-19

    Dietary antigens are normally rendered nonimmunogenic through a poorly understood "oral tolerance" mechanism that involves immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells, especially Treg cells induced from conventional T cells in the periphery (pTreg cells). Although orally introducing nominal protein antigens is known to induce such pTreg cells, whether a typical diet induces a population of pTreg cells under normal conditions thus far has been unknown. By using germ-free mice raised and bred on an elemental diet devoid of dietary antigens, we demonstrated that under normal conditions, the vast majority of the small intestinal pTreg cells are induced by dietary antigens from solid foods. Moreover, these pTreg cells have a limited life span, are distinguishable from microbiota-induced pTreg cells, and repress underlying strong immunity to ingested protein antigens.

  14. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888

  15. Identification of a potent microbial lipid antigen for diverse Natural Killer T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Almeida, Catarina F.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Bhowruth, Veemal; Johnson, Darryl; Uldrich, Adam P.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Brigl, Manfred; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Godfrey, Dale I.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a well-characterized CD1d-restricted T cell subset. The availability of potent antigens and tetramers for iNKT cells has allowed this population to be extensively studied and has revealed their central roles in infection, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. In contrast, diverse Natural Killer T (dNKT) cells are poorly understood because the lipid antigens they recognize are largely unknown. We sought to identify dNKT cell lipid antigen(s) by interrogating a panel of dNKT mouse cell hybridomas with lipid extracts from the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We identified Listeria phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as a microbial antigen that was significantly more potent than a previously characterized dNKT cell antigen, mammalian PG. Further, while mammalian PG loaded CD1d tetramers did not stain dNKT cells, the Listeria-derived PG loaded tetramers did. The structure of Listeria PG was distinct from mammalian PG since it contained shorter, fully-saturated anteiso fatty acid lipid tails. CD1d binding lipid displacement studies revealed that the microbial PG antigen binds significantly better to CD1d than counterparts with the same headgroup. These data reveal a highly-potent microbial lipid antigen for a subset of dNKT cells and provide an explanation for its increased antigen potency compared to the mammalian counterpart. PMID:26254340

  16. Modes of Antigen Presentation by Lymph Node Stromal Cells and Their Immunological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Dubrot, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is no longer the exclusive domain of cells of hematopoietic origin. Recent works have demonstrated that lymph node stromal cell (LNSC) populations, such as fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic and blood endothelial cells, not only provide a scaffold for lymphocyte interactions but also exhibit active immunomodulatory roles that are critical to mounting and resolving effective immune responses. Importantly, LNSCs possess the ability to present antigens and establish antigen-specific interactions with T cells. One example is the expression of peripheral tissue antigens, which are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules with tolerogenic consequences on T cells. Additionally, exogenous antigens, including self and tumor antigens, can be processed and presented on MHC-I complexes, which result in dysfunctional activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. While MHC-I is widely expressed on cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins, antigen presentation via MHC-II is more precisely regulated. Nevertheless, LNSCs are capable of endogenously expressing, or alternatively, acquiring MHC-II molecules. Transfer of antigen between LNSC and dendritic cells in both directions has been recently suggested to promote tolerogenic roles of LNSCs on the CD4+ T cell compartment. Thus, antigen presentation by LNSCs is thought to be a mechanism that promotes the maintenance of peripheral tolerance as well as generates a pool of diverse antigen-experienced T cells for protective immunity. This review aims to integrate the current and emerging literature to highlight the importance of LNSCs in immune responses, and emphasize their role in antigen trafficking, retention, and presentation. PMID:26441957

  17. Cell-type specific regulation of gene expression by simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Saenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Patterson, William H.; Whitehead, Robert H.; Pipas, James M.

    2009-03-30

    SV40 transforms cells through the action of two oncoproteins, large T antigen and small t antigen. Small t antigen targets phosphatase PP2A, while large T antigen stimulates cell proliferation and survival by action on multiple proteins, including the tumor suppressors Rb and p53. Large T antigen also binds components of the transcription initiation complex and several transcription factors. We examined global gene expression in SV40-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, and in enterocytes obtained from transgenic mice. SV40 transformation alters the expression of approximately 800 cellular genes in both systems. Much of this regulation is observed in both MEFs and enterocytes and is consistent with T antigen action on the Rb-E2F pathway. However, the regulation of many genes is cell-type specific, suggesting that unique signaling pathways are activated in different cell types upon transformation, and that the consequences of SV40 transformation depends on the type of cell targeted.

  18. Dendritic cell preactivation impairs MHC class II presentation of vaccines and endogenous viral antigens

    PubMed Central

    Young, Louise J.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Schnorrer, Petra; Mount, Adele; Lundie, Rachel J.; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    When dendritic cells (DCs) encounter signals associated with infection or inflammation, they become activated and undergo maturation. Mature DCs are very efficient at presenting antigens captured in association with their activating signal but fail to present subsequently encountered antigens, at least in vitro. Such impairment of MHC class II (MHC II) antigen presentation has generally been thought to be a consequence of down-regulation of endocytosis, so it might be expected that antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves (for instance, viral antigens) would still be presented by mature DCs. Here, we show that DCs matured in vivo could still capture and process soluble antigens, but were unable to present peptides derived from these antigens. Furthermore, presentation of viral antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves was also severely impaired. Indeed, i.v. injection of pathogen mimics, which caused systemic DC activation in vivo, impaired the induction of CD4 T cell responses against subsequently encountered protein antigens. This immunosuppressed state could be reversed by adoptive transfer of DCs loaded exogenously with antigens, demonstrating that impairment of CD4 T cell responses was due to lack of antigen presentation rather than to overt suppression of T cell activation. The biochemical mechanism underlying this phenomenon was the down-regulation of MHC II–peptide complex formation that accompanied DC maturation. These observations have important implications for the design of prophylactic and therapeutic DC vaccines and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms causing immunosuppression during systemic blood infections. PMID:17978177

  19. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

  20. Precision Tumor Recognition by T Cells With Combinatorial Antigen-Sensing Circuits.

    PubMed

    Roybal, Kole T; Rupp, Levi J; Morsut, Leonardo; Walker, Whitney J; McNally, Krista A; Park, Jason S; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-02-11

    T cells can be re-directed to kill cancer cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T cell receptors (TCRs). This approach, however, is constrained by the rarity of tumor-specific single antigens. Targeting antigens also found on bystander tissues can cause life-threatening adverse effects. A powerful way to enhance ON-target activity of therapeutic T cells is to engineer them to require combinatorial antigens. Here, we engineer a combinatorially activated T cell circuit in which a synthetic Notch receptor for one antigen induces the expression of a CAR for a second antigen. These dual-receptor AND-gate T cells are only armed and activated in the presence of dual antigen tumor cells. These T cells show precise therapeutic discrimination in vivo-sparing single antigen "bystander" tumors while efficiently clearing combinatorial antigen "disease" tumors. This type of precision dual-receptor circuit opens the door to immune recognition of a wider range of tumors. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  1. Precision Tumor Recognition by T Cells With Combinatorial Antigen-Sensing Circuits.

    PubMed

    Roybal, Kole T; Rupp, Levi J; Morsut, Leonardo; Walker, Whitney J; McNally, Krista A; Park, Jason S; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-02-11

    T cells can be re-directed to kill cancer cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T cell receptors (TCRs). This approach, however, is constrained by the rarity of tumor-specific single antigens. Targeting antigens also found on bystander tissues can cause life-threatening adverse effects. A powerful way to enhance ON-target activity of therapeutic T cells is to engineer them to require combinatorial antigens. Here, we engineer a combinatorially activated T cell circuit in which a synthetic Notch receptor for one antigen induces the expression of a CAR for a second antigen. These dual-receptor AND-gate T cells are only armed and activated in the presence of dual antigen tumor cells. These T cells show precise therapeutic discrimination in vivo-sparing single antigen "bystander" tumors while efficiently clearing combinatorial antigen "disease" tumors. This type of precision dual-receptor circuit opens the door to immune recognition of a wider range of tumors. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26830879

  2. The cell proliferation antigen Ki-67 organises heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Sobecki, Michal; Mrouj, Karim; Camasses, Alain; Parisis, Nikolaos; Nicolas, Emilien; Llères, David; Gerbe, François; Prieto, Susana; Krasinska, Liliana; David, Alexandre; Eguren, Manuel; Birling, Marie-Christine; Urbach, Serge; Hem, Sonia; Déjardin, Jérôme; Malumbres, Marcos; Jay, Philippe; Dulic, Vjekoslav; Lafontaine, Denis LJ; Feil, Robert; Fisher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Antigen Ki-67 is a nuclear protein expressed in proliferating mammalian cells. It is widely used in cancer histopathology but its functions remain unclear. Here, we show that Ki-67 controls heterochromatin organisation. Altering Ki-67 expression levels did not significantly affect cell proliferation in vivo. Ki-67 mutant mice developed normally and cells lacking Ki-67 proliferated efficiently. Conversely, upregulation of Ki-67 expression in differentiated tissues did not prevent cell cycle arrest. Ki-67 interactors included proteins involved in nucleolar processes and chromatin regulators. Ki-67 depletion disrupted nucleologenesis but did not inhibit pre-rRNA processing. In contrast, it altered gene expression. Ki-67 silencing also had wide-ranging effects on chromatin organisation, disrupting heterochromatin compaction and long-range genomic interactions. Trimethylation of histone H3K9 and H4K20 was relocalised within the nucleus. Finally, overexpression of human or Xenopus Ki-67 induced ectopic heterochromatin formation. Altogether, our results suggest that Ki-67 expression in proliferating cells spatially organises heterochromatin, thereby controlling gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13722.001 PMID:26949251

  3. Clinical significance of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakagawa, Satoru; Ohashi, Manabu; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen levels were assessed to determine if their levels are useful for staging esophageal cancer preoperatively and for predicting patient survival after esophagectomy. Hence their seropositivity was investigated for a correlation with resectability, clinicopathologic parameters of tumor progression, and treatment outcomes in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer ( n = 63) and those undergoing esophagectomy for resectable disease ( n = 267). Abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen levels showed a significant correlation with resectability ( p< 0.0001), depth of tumor invasion ( p < 0.0001), lymph node status ( p = 0.0015), TNM stage ( p < 0.0001), lymphatic invasion ( p = 0.0019), blood vessel invasion ( p = 0.0079), and poor survival after esophagectomy ( p = 0.0061). A significant relation ( p = 0.0145) was found between elevated serum CEA levels and distant metastasis, whereas the seropositivity of CA 19-9 showed no association with resectability, tumor progression, or patient survival. These results indicate that abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen is a useful predictor of advanced esophageal cancer associated with poor survival after esophagectomy.

  4. Cholera Toxin B Subunit as a Carrier Molecule Promotes Antigen Presentation and Increases CD40 and CD86 Expression on Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    George-Chandy, Annie; Eriksson, Kristina; Lebens, Michael; Nordström, Inger; Schön, Emma; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is an efficient mucosal carrier molecule for the generation of mucosal antibody responses and/or induction of systemic T-cell tolerance to linked antigens. CTB binds with high affinity to GM1 ganglioside cell surface receptors. In this study, we evaluated how conjugation of a peptide or protein antigen to CTB by chemical coupling or genetic fusion influences the T-cell-activating capacity of different antigen-presenting cell (APC) subsets. Using an in vitro system in which antigen-pulsed APCs were incubated with antigen-specific, T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, we found that the dose of antigen required for T-cell activation could be decreased >10,000-fold using CTB-conjugated compared to free antigen. In contrast, no beneficial effects were observed when CTB was simply admixed with antigen. CTB conjugation enhanced the antigen-presenting capacity not only of dendritic cells and B cells but also of macrophages, which expressed low levels of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and were normally poor activators of naive T cells. Enhanced antigen-presenting activity by CTB-linked antigen resulted in both increased T-cell proliferation and increased interleukin-12 and gamma interferon secretion and was associated with up-regulation of CD40 and CD86 on the APC surface. These results imply that conjugation to CTB dramatically lowers the threshold concentration of antigen required for immune cell activation and also permits low-MHC II-expressing APCs to prime for a specific immune response. PMID:11500448

  5. Mast cells and dendritic cells form synapses that facilitate antigen transfer for T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Cannon, Judy L.; te Riet, Joost; Holmes, Anna; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) produce soluble mediators such as histamine and prostaglandins that are known to influence dendritic cell (DC) function by stimulating maturation and antigen processing. Whether direct cell–cell interactions are important in modulating MC/DC function is unclear. In this paper, we show that direct contact between MCs and DCs occurs and plays an important role in modulating the immune response. Activation of MCs through FcεRI cross-linking triggers the formation of stable cell–cell interactions with immature DCs that are reminiscent of the immunological synapse. Direct cellular contact differentially regulates the secreted cytokine profile, indicating that MC modulation of DC populations is influenced by the nature of their interaction. Synapse formation requires integrin engagement and facilitates the transfer of internalized MC-specific antigen from MCs to DCs. The transferred material is ultimately processed and presented by DCs and can activate T cells. The physiological outcomes of the MC–DC synapse suggest a new role for intercellular crosstalk in defining the immune response. PMID:26304724

  6. Phospholipase treatment of accessory cells that have been exposed to antigen selectively inhibits antigen-specific Ia-restricted, but not allospecific, stimulation of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    The corecognition of antigen and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (Ia molecules) by the T-cell receptor is a cell surface event. Before antigen is recognized, it must be taken up, processed, and displayed on the surface of an Ia-bearing accessory cell (antigen-presenting cell, APC). The exact nature of antigen processing and the subsequent associations of antigen with the APC plasma membrane, Ia molecules, and/or the T-cell receptor are not well defined. To further analyze these events, we have characterized the processing and presentation of the soluble polypeptide antigen bovine insulin. We found that this antigen requires APC-dependent processing, as evidenced by the inability of metabolically inactivated APCs to present native antigen to antigen plus Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. The ability of the same APCs to present antigen after uptake and processing showed that this antigen subsequently becomes stably associated with the APC plasma membrane. To characterize the basis for this association, we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. APCs exposed to antigen, treated with phospholipase A2, and then immediately fixed lost the ability to stimulate bovine insulin plus I-Ad-specific hybridomas. In contrast, the ability of these same APCs to stimulate I-Ad allospecific hybridomas was unaffected. This effect of phospholipase is not mimicked by the broadly active protease Pronase, nor is there evidence for contaminating proteases in the phospholipase preparation. These results suggest that one consequence of antigen processing may be an antigen-lipid association that contributes to the anchoring of antigen to the APC membrane. The implications of this model are discussed. PMID:3529095

  7. Ex vivo characterization and isolation of rare memory B cells with antigen tetramers.

    PubMed

    Franz, Bettina; May, Kenneth F; Dranoff, Glenn; Wucherpfennig, Kai

    2011-07-14

    Studying human antigen-specific memory B cells has been challenging because of low frequencies in peripheral blood, slow proliferation, and lack of antibody secretion. Therefore, most studies have relied on conversion of memory B cells into antibody-secreting cells by in vitro culture. To facilitate direct ex vivo isolation, we generated fluorescent antigen tetramers for characterization of memory B cells by using tetanus toxoid as a model antigen. Brightly labeled memory B cells were identified even 4 years after last immunization, despite low frequencies ranging from 0.01% to 0.11% of class-switched memory B cells. A direct comparison of monomeric to tetrameric antigen labeling demonstrated that a substantial fraction of the B-cell repertoire can be missed when monomeric antigens are used. The specificity of the method was confirmed by antibody reconstruction from single-cell sorted tetramer(+) B cells with single-cell RT-PCR of the B-cell receptor. All antibodies bound to tetanus antigen with high affinity, ranging from 0.23 to 2.2 nM. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified related memory B cell and plasmablast clones isolated more than a year apart. Therefore, antigen tetramers enable specific and sensitive ex vivo characterization of rare memory B cells as well as the production of fully human antibodies.

  8. Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized normal human liver epithelial cells express hepatocyte characteristics and metabolize chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, A M; Cole, K E; Smoot, D T; Weston, A; Groopman, J D; Shields, P G; Vignaud, J M; Juillerat, M; Lipsky, M M; Trump, B F

    1993-01-01

    Normal human liver tissue and cultured human hepatocytes are valuable models to study xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity, but they only have a limited in vitro life-span and are not readily available. This report describes the establishment of replicative cultures of human adult liver epithelial cells in serum-free medium. The longevity of three of these cultures, derived from different donors, was extended by introduction of the simian virus 40 large T antigen gene. Two cell lines, THLE-2 and -3, established with a recombinant simian virus 40 large T antigen virus have undergone > 100 population doublings, are nontumorigenic when injected into athymic nude mice, have near-diploid karyotypes, and do not express alpha-fetoprotein. The cells express cytokeratin 18 and albumin in early passage, whereas higher-passage cells in logarithmic-phase growth also express cytokeratin 19. THLE-2 and -3 cells metabolize benzo[a]pyrene, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and aflatoxin B1 to their ultimate carcinogenic metabolites that adduct DNA, which indicates functional cytochrome P450 pathways. Other enzymes involved in metabolism of chemical carcinogens, such as epoxide hydrolase, NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferases, and glutathione peroxidase are also retained by THLE cells. Thus, these immortalized human liver cells constitute an in vitro model for pharmacotoxicological studies and for the investigation of etiology and pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685115

  9. Ultrasensitive quantification of TAP-dependent antigen compartmentalization in scarce primary immune cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Hanna; Döring, Marius; Nikles, Daphne; Lehnert, Elisa; Baldauf, Christoph; Kalinke, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) is essential for the establishment and maintenance of self-tolerance, priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and the exertion of several T-cell effector functions. Cytosolic proteasomes continuously degrade proteins into peptides, which are actively transported across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In the ER lumen antigenic peptides are loaded onto MHC I, which is displayed on the cell surface. Here we describe an innovative flow cytometric approach to monitor time-resolved ER compartmentalization of antigenic peptides. This assay allows the analysis of distinct primary human immune cell subsets at reporter peptide concentrations of 1 nM. Thus, this ultrasensitive method for the first time permits quantification of TAP activity under close to physiological conditions in scarce primary cell subsets such as antigen cross-presenting dendritic cells. PMID:25656091

  10. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules.

  11. Ultrasensitive quantification of TAP-dependent antigen compartmentalization in scarce primary immune cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Hanna; Döring, Marius; Nikles, Daphne; Lehnert, Elisa; Baldauf, Christoph; Kalinke, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) is essential for the establishment and maintenance of self-tolerance, priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and the exertion of several T-cell effector functions. Cytosolic proteasomes continuously degrade proteins into peptides, which are actively transported across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In the ER lumen antigenic peptides are loaded onto MHC I, which is displayed on the cell surface. Here we describe an innovative flow cytometric approach to monitor time-resolved ER compartmentalization of antigenic peptides. This assay allows the analysis of distinct primary human immune cell subsets at reporter peptide concentrations of 1 nM. Thus, this ultrasensitive method for the first time permits quantification of TAP activity under close to physiological conditions in scarce primary cell subsets such as antigen cross-presenting dendritic cells. PMID:25656091

  12. Bicruciate retaining

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is a procedure used to treat knee arthropathy. Patients’ dissatisfaction is still relevant (literature reports dissatisfaction rates as high as 40%). The anterior cruciate ligament is usually removed while performing a total knee arthroplasty, thus changing knee biomechanics. As patients’ mean age to surgery is decreasing, bicruciate retaining models, which preserve normal biomechanics, may be useful in increasing patients’ outcomes. Limited data concerning bicruciate retaining arthroplasty is available; although clinical results are encouraging, there are concerns regarding surgical exposure, anterior cruciate integrity evaluation, and implant fixation. PMID:27162778

  13. Systemic administration of antigen-pulsed dendritic cells induces experimental allergic asthma in mice upon aerosol antigen rechallenge.

    PubMed

    Graffi, Sebastian J; Dekan, Gerhard; Stingl, Georg; Epstein, Michelle M

    2002-05-01

    Antigen-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) have been used extensively as cellular vaccines to induce a myriad of protective immune responses. Adoptive transfer of antigen-pulsed DCs is especially effective at generating Th1 and CD8 immune responses. However, recently this strategy has been shown to induce Th2 cells when DCs are administered locally into the respiratory tract. We sought to address whether systemic rather than local antigen-pulsed DC administration could induce Th2 experimental allergic asthma. We found that OVA-pulsed splenic DCs injected intraperitoneally induced polarized Th2 allergic lung disease upon secondary OVA aerosol challenge. Disease was characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation, excess mucus production, airway hyperresponsiveness, and OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE. In addition, unusual pathology characterized by macrophage alveolitis and multinucleated giant cells was observed. These data show that systemic administration of antigen-pulsed DCs and subsequent aeroantigen challenge induces Th2 immunity. These findings have important implications for the development of DC-based vaccines.

  14. Neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Terasawa, Masao; Nagata, Kisaburo; Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2008-12-12

    Antigen-transporting cells take up pathogens, and then migrate from sites of inflammation to secondary lymphoid tissues to induce an immune response. Among antigen-transporting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are believed to be the most potent and professional antigen-presenting cells that can stimulate naive T cells. However, the cells that transport antigens, tumor cell antigens in particular, have not been clearly identified. In this study we have analyzed what types of cells transport tumor cell antigens to secondary lymphoid tissues. We show that neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages but not DCs engulf X-irradiated P388 leukemic cells after their injection into the peritoneal cavity, and that neutrophils and monocytes but not macrophages migrate to the parathymic lymph nodes (pLN), the blood, and then the spleen. The monocytes in the pLN comprise Gr-1{sup -} and Gr-1{sup +} ones, and some of these cells express CD11c. Overall, this study demonstrates that neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues.

  15. Analysis of antigen presentation by metabolically inactive accessory cells and their isolated membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Sullivan, K; Benacerraf, B; Mescher, M F; Rock, K L

    1985-01-01

    Several amino acid copolymers are potent immunogens under the control of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded Ir genes. We have further characterized their accessory-cell-dependent, MHC-restricted presentation to T lymphocytes. We initially characterized their processing requirements by investigating the ability of paraformaldehyde-fixed antigen-presenting cells (APC) to present these copolymers. Fixed APC can present poly(Glu56Lys35Phe9) and poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10) provided that they have been incubated with antigen prior to fixation. The inability of these same fixed preparations to present soluble antigen indicates a fixation-sensitive antigen-processing step. In contrast, the antigens poly(Glu55Lys35Leu10) and poly(Glu55Lys35Tyr10) can be presented by APC fixed before antigen exposure. This differential requirement for antigen processing was exploited to analyze the events of antigen presentation in two related systems. First, the ability of isolated APC membranes to process and present antigen was assessed. APC membranes can present the antigens poly(GluLysLeu) and poly(GluLysTyr) in a specific and MHC-restricted manner. However, the isolated membranes fail to present either poly(GluLysPhe) or poly(GluAlaTyr), suggesting that such preparations can present but not process antigen. Second, the distinct properties of the various copolymers were used with fixed APC to test the effects of antigen processing on the phenomenon of antigen competition. APC that had processed poly(GluLysPhe) or poly(GluAlaTyr) were subsequently fixed and used to present antigen in the presence or absence of various antagonists. Under these conditions, poly(GluLysLeu) and poly(Glu50Tyr50) could effect specific inhibition, clearly indicating that antigen competition occurs distal to and does not require antigen processing. In contrast, native antigen with an absolute processing requirement is not capable of competing with preprocessed antigen on fixed APC. Taken together, these

  16. Detection of 2 immunoreactive antigens in the cell wall of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Hernández-Mendoza, Gustavo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Toriello, Conchita; López-Romero, Everardo; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    The cell wall of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex contains highly antigenic molecules which are potentially useful for the diagnosis and treatment of sporotrichosis. In this study, 2 immunoreactive antigens of 60 (Gp60) and 70 kDa (Gp70) were detected in the cell wall of the yeast morphotypes of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

  17. Biased T-Cell Antigen Receptor Repertoire in Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roessner, Karen; Trivedi, Harsh; Gaur, Lakshmi; Howard, Diantha; Aversa, John; Cooper, Sheldon M.; Sigal, Leonard H.; Budd, Ralph C.

    1998-01-01

    A common concern with many autoimmune diseases of unknown etiology is the extent to which tissue T-lymphocyte infiltrates, versus a nonspecific infiltrate, reflect a response to the causative agent. Lyme arthritis can histologically resemble rheumatoid synovitis, particularly the prominent infiltration by T lymphocytes. This has raised speculation about whether Lyme synovitis represents an ongoing response to the causative spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, or rather a self-perpetuating autoimmune reaction. In an effort to answer this question, the present study examined the repertoire of infiltrating T cells in synovial fluid from nine Lyme arthritis patients, before and after stimulation with B. burgdorferi. Using a highly sensitive and consistent quantitative PCR technique, a comparison of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) β-chain variable (Vβ) repertoires of the peripheral blood and synovial fluid showed a statistically significant increase in expression of Vβ2 and Vβ6 in the latter. This is remarkably similar to our previous findings in studies of rheumatoid arthritis and to other reports on psoriatic skin lesions. However, stimulation of synovial fluid T cells with B. burgdorferi provoked active proliferation but not a statistically significant increase in expression of any TCR Vβ, including Vβ2 and Vβ6. Collectively, the findings suggest that the skewing of the TCR repertoire of fresh synovial fluid in Lyme arthritis may represent more a synovium-tropic or nonspecific inflammatory response, similar to that occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, rather than a specific Borrelia reaction. PMID:9488400

  18. Activation requirements of circulating antigen-specific human CD8(+) memory T cells probed with insect cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Guelly, Christian; Küpcü, Zaruhi; Zalusky, Doris; Karner, Margarete; Zehetner, Margit; Schweighoffer, Tamás

    2002-01-01

    We sought to define the molecular setup of an antigen-presenting cell that elicits antigen-specific T cell responses in vitro using insect cells that were infected with recombinant baculoviruses. Expression of single-chain HLA was complemented step-by-step with costimulatory molecules, including CD54 and CD80, by co-infection with the relevant viruses. Role of CD8 was assessed by introducing hybrid class I molecules where the alpha-3 domain of the HLA heavy chain molecule was replaced by its murine K(b) counterpart. Circulating T cells that respond to the EBV-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptide GLGCTLVAML were previously shown to bear hallmarks of memory cells. We found that the HLA+peptide complex alone displayed on the surface of insect cells was sufficient to elicit IFN-gamma secretion from these freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells in ELISpot assays. Binding of CD8 was absolutely required, but coexpression of costimulatory molecules resulted only in minimal increase in the number of spots. Tumor antigen-specific CTL clones also reacted in a strictly antigen-specific manner, but required CD54 for quantitative responses. The amount of IFN-gamma produced by the individual reactive T cells was evaluated as spot size, and was also influenced by the costimulatory molecules: CD54 increased also the response magnitude of cultured CTL lines, while CD80 enhanced cytokine release from freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells. Understanding the stimulatory requirements of functionally competent effector/memory T cells and their exact enumeration will be helpful for increasing the efficacy of vaccines.

  19. Activation requirements of circulating antigen-specific human CD8(+) memory T cells probed with insect cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Guelly, Christian; Küpcü, Zaruhi; Zalusky, Doris; Karner, Margarete; Zehetner, Margit; Schweighoffer, Tamás

    2002-01-01

    We sought to define the molecular setup of an antigen-presenting cell that elicits antigen-specific T cell responses in vitro using insect cells that were infected with recombinant baculoviruses. Expression of single-chain HLA was complemented step-by-step with costimulatory molecules, including CD54 and CD80, by co-infection with the relevant viruses. Role of CD8 was assessed by introducing hybrid class I molecules where the alpha-3 domain of the HLA heavy chain molecule was replaced by its murine K(b) counterpart. Circulating T cells that respond to the EBV-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptide GLGCTLVAML were previously shown to bear hallmarks of memory cells. We found that the HLA+peptide complex alone displayed on the surface of insect cells was sufficient to elicit IFN-gamma secretion from these freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells in ELISpot assays. Binding of CD8 was absolutely required, but coexpression of costimulatory molecules resulted only in minimal increase in the number of spots. Tumor antigen-specific CTL clones also reacted in a strictly antigen-specific manner, but required CD54 for quantitative responses. The amount of IFN-gamma produced by the individual reactive T cells was evaluated as spot size, and was also influenced by the costimulatory molecules: CD54 increased also the response magnitude of cultured CTL lines, while CD80 enhanced cytokine release from freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells. Understanding the stimulatory requirements of functionally competent effector/memory T cells and their exact enumeration will be helpful for increasing the efficacy of vaccines. PMID:11754359

  20. Antigenic and functional characterization of a rat central nervous system-derived cell line immortalized by a retroviral vector

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have immortalized rat central nervous system (CNS) cells of primary cultures of rat optic nerve with murine leukemia virus psi-2,SV-40-6, which is defective in assembly and contains the SV-40 large T antigen and neomycin resistance genes, to produce a cell line that we named A7. After drug selection, greater than 90% of the growing cells expressed nuclear SV-40 large T cells and a fraction of these contained the astrocyte-specific marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein. The majority of these cells also expressed surface marker A4 (specific for neural tube derivatives), Ran 2, p185 (the 185-kD phosphoprotein product of the neu oncogene), and fibronectin, but did not express the astrocyte enzymes glutamine synthetase and monoamine oxidase B. Surface markers characteristic of glial progenitors (A2B5) and oligodendrocytes (galactocerebroside) were not detected. After two rounds of cell cloning, subclone A7.6-3 expressed Ran 2, fibronectin, and the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) but not glial fibrillary acidic protein and A4. The A7 cell line and subclones also displayed certain functions of type 1 astrocytes: the conditioned medium of these cells had a potent mitogenic activity for glial progenitor cells which could be neutralized by anti-platelet-derived growth factor antibodies and monolayers of these cells supported the growth of embryonic hypothalamic neurons. We conclude that a retrovirus containing SV-40 large T antigen can immortalize rat CNS cells and that such immortalized glial cells retain at least two important functions of type 1 astrocytes: the ability to secrete platelet-derived growth factor and to support the growth of embryonic CNS neurons. Moreover, such stable immortalized clonal cell lines can be used to study gene regulation in glial cells. PMID:3053737

  1. Janus particles as artificial antigen-presenting cells for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Jia, Yilong; Gao, Yuan; Sanchez, Lucero; Anthony, Stephen M; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the multifunctionality of Janus particles can be exploited for in vitro T cell activation. We engineer bifunctional Janus particles on which the spatial distribution of two ligands, anti-CD3 and fibronectin, mimics the "bull's eye" protein pattern formed in the membrane junction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. Different levels of T cell activation can be achieved by simply switching the spatial distribution of the two ligands on the surfaces of the "bull's eye" particles. We find that the ligand pattern also affects clustering of intracellular proteins. This study demonstrates that anisotropic particles, such as Janus particles, can be developed as artificial antigen-presenting cells for modulating T cell activation. PMID:25343426

  2. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: a novel strategy to delete specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Mackensen, Andreas; Zoso, Alessia; Halbritter, Dagmar; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2008-04-01

    Several cell-based immunotherapy strategies have been developed to specifically modulate T cell-mediated immune responses. These methods frequently rely on the utilization of tolerogenic cell-based antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, APCs are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T-cell responses, thus limiting their therapeutic capacity. Here, we describe a novel bead-based approach to modulate T-cell responses in an antigen-specific fashion. We have generated killer artificial APCs (kappaaAPCs) by coupling an apoptosis-inducing alpha-Fas (CD95) IgM mAb together with HLA-A2 Ig molecules onto beads. These kappaaAPCs deplete targeted antigen-specific T cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent fashion. T-cell depletion in cocultures is rapidly initiated (30 minutes), dependent on the amount of kappaaAPCs and independent of activation-induced cell death (AICD). kappaaAPCs represent a novel technology that can control T cell-mediated immune responses, and therefore has potential for use in treatment of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection. PMID:18096763

  3. The MDCK epithelial cell line expresses a cell surface antigen of the kidney distal tubule

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to identify epithelial cell surface macromolecules involved in renal function. Lymphocyte hybrids were generated by fusing P3U-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a C3H mouse immunized with MDCK cells. Hybridomas secreting anti-MDCK antibodies were obtained and clonal lines isolated in soft agarose. We are reporting on one hybridoma line that secretes a monoclonal antibody that binds to MDCK cells at levels 20-fold greater than background binding. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was utilized to study the distribution of antibody binding on MDCK cells and on frozen sections of dog kidney and several nonrenal tissues. In the kidney the fluorescence staining pattern demonstrates that the antibody recognizes an antigenic determinant that is expressed only on the epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loops and the distal convoluted tubule and appears to be localized on the basolateral plasma membrane. This antigen also has a unique distribution in non-renal tissues and can only be detected on cells known to be active in transepithelial ion movements. These results indicate the probable distal tubule origin of MDCK and suggest that the monoclonal antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen involved in physiological functions unique to the kidney distal tubule and transporting epithelia of nonrenal tissues. PMID:6178742

  4. Lipid and glycolipid antigens of CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    In spite of their relatively limited antigen receptor repertoire, CD1d-restricted NKT cells recognize a surprisingly diverse range of lipid and glycolipid antigens. Recent studies of natural and synthetic CD1d presented antigens provide an increasingly detailed picture of how the specific structural features of these lipids and glycolipids influence their ability to be presented to NKT cells and stimulate their diverse immunologic functions. Particularly for synthetic analogues of α-galactosylceramides which have been the focus of intense recent investigation, it is becoming clear that the design of glycolipid antigens with the ability to precisely control the specific immunologic activities of NKT cells is likely to be feasible. The emerging details of the mechanisms underlying the structure-activity relationship of NKT cell antigens will assist greatly in the design and production of immunomodulatory agents for the precise manipulation of NKT cells and the many other components of the immune system that they influence. PMID:19945296

  5. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy of cancer using chimeric antigen receptor-grafted T cells.

    PubMed

    Davies, David Marc; Maher, John

    2010-06-01

    Harnessing the power of the immune system to target cancer has long been a goal of tumor immunologists. One avenue under investigation is the modification of T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Expression of such a receptor enables T-cell specificity to be redirected against a chosen tumor antigen. Substantial research in this field has been carried out, incorporating a wide variety of malignancies and tumor-associated antigens. Ongoing investigations will ensure this area continues to expand at a rapid pace. This review will explain the evolution of CAR technology over the last two decades in addition to detailing the associated benefits and disadvantages. The outcome of recent phase I clinical trials and the impact that these have had upon the direction of future research in this field will also be addressed.

  6. A novel beta 4, alpha 6 integrin-associated epithelial cell antigen involved in natural killer cell and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Efficient immune responses require interactions between cell adhesion molecules on lymphocytes and counter-receptors on antigen presenting cells or target cells. While target-specific receptors or ligands have not been identified for natural killer (NK) cells, cell adhesion molecules have been implicated in the interaction between NK cell effectors and tumor cell targets. Herein, we describe monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a carcinoma cell line that efficiently block the cytolytic activity of interleukin 2-activated NK cell lines and clones. L280 mAb reacts with secretory epithelial cells in normal human tissues, but does not react with hematopoietic cells or other tissue types. Biochemical analysis revealed that L280 mAb immunoprecipitates the beta 4, alpha 6 integrin, as well as a novel 98-kD glycoprotein, and probably reacts with a carbohydrate epitope on these molecules. Involvement of the L280 antigen in cellular immunity is not restricted to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. L280 mAb also efficiently inhibits alloantigen-specific cytotoxicity against Colo-205 cells mediated by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 alloantigen specific alpha beta-TCR+ and gamma delta-TCR+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones. Additionally, we demonstrate that L280 mAb blocks cytotoxicity mediated by influenza peptide-specific HLA-restricted CTL clones. These data indicate that the antigen recognized by L280 mAb is important in both NK and CTL function, and that an as yet unidentified receptor for this epithelial antigen is present on both NK and T lymphocytes. The restricted expression of L280 antigen indicates that this molecule may be important in immune reactions in epithelial tissues. PMID:1744585

  7. A new approach for evaluating antigen-specific T cell responses to myelin antigens during the course of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Nathalie; Holz, Andreas; Sipe, Jack C.; Naniche, Denise; Romine, John S.; Zyroff, Jack; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2016-01-01

    We used a flow cytometry assay to measure proliferation and cytokine production of self-antigen-specific T cells in individual patients during the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin-associated oligodendrocytic basic protein (MOBP) was selected for proof of principles in the assay, along with myelin basic protein (MBP) to assess specific activated T cells in 10 MS patients over an 18-month period, in parallel with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and clinical rating scale. A positive correlation occurred between antigen-specific T cell proliferation and interferon-γ production with clinical relapses and MRI lesion activity that was absent when the same patients were in remission. PMID:12667664

  8. Identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis CD4 T-cell antigens via high throughput proteome screening

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kaustuv; Jing, Lichen; Russell, Ronnie M.; Davies, D. Huw; Hermanson, Gary; Molina, Douglas M.; Liang, Xiaowu; Sherman, David R.; Kwok, William W.; Yang, Junbao; Kenneth, John; Ahamed, Syed F.; Chandele, Anmol; Kaja, Murali-Krishna; Koelle, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Elicitation of CD4 IFN-gamma T cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a rational vaccine strategy to prevent clinical tuberculosis. Diagnosis of MTB infection is based on T-cell immune memory to MTB antigens. The MTB proteome contains over four thousand open reading frames (ORFs). We conducted a pilot antigen identification study using 164 MTB proteins and MTB-specific T-cells expanded in vitro from 12 persons with latent MTB infection. Enrichment of MTB-reactive T-cells from PBMC used cell sorting or an alternate system compatible with limited resources. MTB proteins were used as single antigens or combinatorial matrices in proliferation and cytokine secretion readouts. Overall, our study found that 44 MTB proteins were antigenic, including 27 not previously characterized as CD4 T-cell antigens. Antigen truncation, peptide, NTM homology, and HLA class II tetramer studies confirmed malate synthase G (encoded by gene Rv1837) as a CD4 T-cell antigen. This simple, scalable system has potential utility for the identification of candidate MTB vaccine and biomarker antigens. PMID:25857935

  9. The uptake of soluble and particulate antigens by epithelial cells in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Howe, Savannah E; Lickteig, Duane J; Plunkett, Kyle N; Ryerse, Jan S; Konjufca, Vjollca

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) overlying the villi play a prominent role in absorption of digested nutrients and establish a barrier that separates the internal milieu from potentially harmful microbial antigens. Several mechanisms by which antigens of dietary and microbial origin enter the body have been identified; however whether IECs play a role in antigen uptake is not known. Using in vivo imaging of the mouse small intestine, we investigated whether epithelial cells (enterocytes) play an active role in the uptake (sampling) of lumen antigens. We found that small molecular weight antigens such as chicken ovalbumin, dextran, and bacterial LPS enter the lamina propria, the loose connective tissue which lies beneath the epithelium via goblet cell associated passageways. However, epithelial cells overlying the villi can internalize particulate antigens such as bacterial cell debris and inert nanoparticles (NPs), which are then found co-localizing with the CD11c+ dendritic cells in the lamina propria. The extent of NP uptake by IECs depends on their size: 20-40 nm NPs are taken up readily, while NPs larger than 100 nm are taken up mainly by the epithelial cells overlying Peyer's patches. Blocking NPs with small proteins or conjugating them with ovalbumin does not inhibit their uptake. However, the uptake of 40 nm NPs can be inhibited when they are administered with an endocytosis inhibitor (chlorpromazine). Delineating the mechanisms of antigen uptake in the gut is essential for understanding how tolerance and immunity to lumen antigens are generated, and for the development of mucosal vaccines and therapies.

  10. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  11. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8(+) cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8(+) T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8(+) T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  12. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  13. Receptor editing can lead to allelic inclusion and development of B cells that retain antibodies reacting with high avidity autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sucai; Velez, Maria-Gabriela; Humann, Jessica; Rowland, Sarah; Conrad, Frank J; Halverson, Regina; Torres, Raul M; Pelanda, Roberta

    2005-10-15

    Receptor editing is a major B cell tolerance mechanism that operates by secondary Ig gene rearrangements to change the specificity of autoreactive developing B cells. In the 3-83Igi mouse model, receptor editing operates in every autoreactive anti-H-2K(b) B cell, providing a novel receptor without additional cell loss. Despite the efficiency of receptor editing in generating nonautoreactive Ag receptors, we show in this study that this process does not inactivate the autoantibody-encoding gene(s) in every autoreactive B cell. In fact, receptor editing can generate allelically and isotypically included B cells that simultaneously express the original autoreactive and a novel nonautoreactive Ag receptors. Such dual Ab-expressing B cells differentiate into transitional and mature B cells retaining the expression of the autoantibody despite the high avidity interaction between the autoantibody and the self-Ag in this system. Moreover, we find that these high avidity autoreactive B cells retain the autoreactive Ag receptor within the cell as a consequence of autoantigen engagement and through a Src family kinase-dependent process. Finally, anti-H-2K(b) IgM autoantibodies are found in the sera of older 3-83Igi mice, indicating that dual Ab-expressing autoreactive B cells are potentially functional and capable of differentiating into IgM autoantibody-secreting plasma cells under certain circumstances. These results demonstrate that autoreactive B cells reacting with ubiquitous membrane bound autoantigens can bypass mechanisms of central tolerance by coexpressing nonautoreactive Abs. These dual Ab-expressing autoreactive B cells conceal their autoantibodies within the cell manifesting a superficially tolerant phenotype that can be partially overcome to secrete IgM autoantibodies.

  14. Group-specific human granulocyte antigens on a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line with a Philadelphia chromosome marker.

    PubMed

    Drew, S I; Terasaki, P I; Billing, R J; Bergh, O J; Minowada, J; Klein, E

    1977-05-01

    Group-specific human granulocyte antigens are serologically detectable with granulocytotoxic-positive human alloantisera on a cell line, K562, of chronic myelogenous leukemia origin which bears a Philadelphia chromosomal marker. The same cell line lacks serologically detectable HLA, B2 microglobulin, and B-lymphocyte antigens. Granulocyte antigens are important cell markers for cell lines of suspected myeloid lineage.

  15. Apoptotic, necrotic, or fused tumor cells: an equivalent source of antigen for dendritic cell loading.

    PubMed

    Larmonier, Nicolas; Mérino, Delphine; Nicolas, Alexandra; Cathelin, Dominique; Besson, Angélique; Bateman, Andrew; Solary, Eric; Martin, François; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2006-09-01

    The identification of the most efficient strategy for tumor antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) remains a challenge in cancer immunotherapy protocols. Autologous dead tumor cells have been demonstrated to constitute an acceptable source of multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to pulse DCs. However the optimal approach for inducing cell death that would lead to effective endocytosis and activation of DCs remains controversial. In this study we have induced and defined 3 distinct mechanisms of tumor cell death (apoptosis, necrosis and fusion-mediated cell death), and investigated their differential effects on DCs. Bone marrow-derived DCs demonstrated comparable uptake of primary apoptotic, necrotic, or fused dead tumor cells. Furthermore, the distinct modes of cancer cell death had analogous potential in activating the transcription factors NF-kappaB and STAT1 and in maturing DCs, resulting in an equally effective stimulation of immune T cells. The current study therefore provides further informations on the use of dead whole tumor cells as antigen sources for effective active anti-cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Norovirus Antagonism of B cell Antigen Presentation Results in Impaired Control of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Jones, Melissa K.; Hickman, Danielle; Han, Shuhong; Reeves, Westley; Karst, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis so vaccine development is desperately needed. Elucidating viral mechanisms of immune antagonism can provide key insight into designing effective immunization platforms. We recently revealed that B cells are targets of norovirus infection. Because noroviruses can regulate antigen presentation by infected macrophages and B cells can function as antigen presenting cells, we tested whether noroviruses regulate B cell-mediated antigen presentation and the biological consequence of such regulation. Indeed, murine noroviruses could prevent B cell expression of antigen presentation molecules and this directly correlated with impaired control of acute infection. In addition to B cells, acute control required MHC class I molecules, CD8+ T cells, and granzymes, supporting a model whereby B cells act as antigen presenting cells to activate cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. This immune pathway was active prior to the induction of antiviral antibody responses. As in macrophages, the minor structural protein VP2 regulated B cell antigen presentation in a virus-specific manner. Commensal bacteria were not required for activation of this pathway and ultimately only B cells were required for clearance of viral infection. These findings provide new insight into the role of B cells in stimulating antiviral CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:27007673

  17. 20-kDa protein associated with the murine T-cell antigen receptor is phosphorylated in response to activation by antigen or concanavalin A

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, L.E.; Harford, J.; Schwartz, R.H.; Klausner, R.D.

    1985-04-01

    Antigen or concanavalin A activation of a murine T-cell hybrid specific for pigeon cytochrome resulted in phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that was specifically coprecipitated by a monoclonal antibody binding the T-cell antigen receptor. There was no evidence for phosphorylation of the antigen receptor itself. The phosphorylation of the 20-kDa polypeptide was dependent on the concentration of antigen or lectin used to activate the T-cell hybrid and reached a maximum 40 min after the addition of antigen. The 20-kDa protein was also radioiodinated with a hydrophobic photoactivatable labeling reagent. The amount of iodinated 20-kDa protein immunoprecipitable with the anti-receptor antibody did not increase with T-cell activation, indicating that the phosphorylation occurred on a molecule that was constitutively associated with the antigen receptor. Concanavalin A also induced phosphorylation of a 20-kDa polypeptide in a second antigen-specific major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybrid. Again, the phosphorylated polypeptide was precipitated only by a monoclonal antibody specific for the antigen receptor on this hybrid. Thus, the antigen or concanavalin A-induced activation of T-cell hybrids results in the rapid phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that is associated with the T-cell receptor.

  18. Heterogeneity in histone 2B-green fluorescent protein-retaining putative small intestinal stem cells at cell position 4 and their absence in the colon.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kevin R; Gândara, Ricardo M C; Javkar, Tanvi; Sablitzky, Fred; Hock, Hanno; Potten, Christopher S; Mahida, Yashwant R

    2012-12-01

    Stem cells have been identified in two locations in small intestinal crypts; those intercalated between Paneth cells and another population (which retains DNA label) are located above the Paneth cell zone, at cell position 4. Because of disadvantages associated with the use of DNA label, doxycycline-induced transient transgenic expression of histone 2B (H2B)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) was investigated. H2B-GFP-retaining putative stem cells were consistently seen, with a peak at cell position 4, over chase periods of up to 112 days. After a 28-day chase, a subpopulation of the H2B-GFP-retaining cells was cycling, but the slow cycling status of the majority was illustrated by lack of expression of pHistone H3 and Ki67. Although some H2B-GFP-retaining cells were sensitive to low-dose radiation, the majority was resistant to low- and high-dose radiation-induced cell death, and a proportion of the surviving cells proliferated during subsequent epithelial regeneration. Long-term retention of H2B-GFP in a subpopulation of small intestinal Paneth cells was also seen, implying that they are long lived. In contrast to the small intestine, H2B-GFP-retaining epithelial cells were not seen in the colon from 28-day chase onward. This implies important differences in stem cell function between these two regions of the gastrointestinal tract, which may have implications for region-specific susceptibility to diseases (such as cancer and ulcerative colitis), in which epithelial stem cells and their progeny are involved.

  19. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  20. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  1. COMMON CELL SURFACE ANTIGEN ASSOCIATED WITH MAMMALIAN C-TYPE RNA VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiki, Takashi; Mellors, Robert C.; Hardy, William D.; Fleissner, Erwin

    1974-01-01

    The indirect membrane immunofluorescence test and the absorption analysis of rabbit anti-FeLV, rabbit anti-FeLVp 30, and rabbit anti-MuLVp 30 antisera yielded the following conclusions. An antigen shared by mammalian (murine and feline) C-type RNA leukemia and sarcoma viruses was detected on the surface of cells infected or transformed by C-type viruses. The antigen was characterized as membrane-bound gs antigen bearing two determinants, membrane-bound gs-1, intraspecies-specific antigenic determinant, and membrane-bound gs-3, interspecies-specific antigenic determinant. Membrane-bound gs antigen was located on the cell surface, frequently near the site of virus budding but not on the envelope of murine C-type RNA virus. PMID:4131513

  2. Neisseria gonorrhoeae suppresses dendritic cell-induced, antigen-dependent CD4 T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiyan; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Knilans, Kayla J; Anderson, James E; Oldach, Laurel M; McKinnon, Karen P; Hobbs, Marcia M; Sempowski, Gregory D; Duncan, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the second most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Diseases associated with N. gonorrhoeae cause localized inflammation of the urethra and cervix. Despite this inflammatory response, infected individuals do not develop protective adaptive immune responses to N. gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is a highly adapted pathogen that has acquired multiple mechanisms to evade its host's immune system, including the ability to manipulate multiple immune signaling pathways. N. gonorrhoeae has previously been shown to engage immunosuppressive signaling pathways in B and T lymphocytes. We have now found that N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses adaptive immune responses through effects on antigen presenting cells. Using primary, murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and lymphocytes, we show that N. gonorrhoeae-exposed dendritic cells fail to elicit antigen-induced CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation. N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a number of secreted and dendritic cell surface proteins with immunosuppressive properties, particularly Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1). We also show that N. gonorrhoeae is able to inhibit dendritic cell- induced proliferation of human T-cells and that human dendritic cells upregulate similar immunosuppressive molecules. Our data suggest that, in addition to being able to directly influence host lymphocytes, N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses development of adaptive immune responses through interactions with host antigen presenting cells. These findings suggest that gonococcal factors involved in host immune suppression may be useful targets in developing vaccines that induce protective adaptive immune responses to this pathogen.

  3. Effective Delivery of Antigen-Encapsulin Nanoparticle Fusions to Dendritic Cells Leads to Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Cell Activation and Tumor Rejection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bongseo; Moon, Hyojin; Hong, Sung Joon; Shin, Changsik; Do, Yoonkyung; Ryu, Seongho; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-08-23

    In cancer immunotherapy, robust and efficient activation of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell immune responses is a promising, but challenging task. Dendritic cells (DCs) are well-known professional antigen presenting cells that initiate and regulate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that kill their target cells directly as well as secrete IFN-γ, a cytokine critical in tumor rejection. Here, we employed recently established protein cage nanoparticles, encapsulin (Encap), as antigenic peptide nanocarriers by genetically incorporating the OT-1 peptide of ovalbumin (OVA) protein to the three different positions of the Encap subunit. With them, we evaluated their efficacy in activating DC-mediated antigen-specific T cell cytotoxicity and consequent melanoma tumor rejection in vivo. DCs efficiently engulfed Encap and its variants (OT-1-Encaps), which carry antigenic peptides at different positions, and properly processed them within phagosomes. Delivered OT-1 peptides were effectively presented by DCs to naïve CD8(+) T cells successfully, resulting in the proliferation of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. OT-1-Encap vaccinations in B16-OVA melanoma tumor bearing mice effectively activated OT-1 peptide specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells before or even after tumor generation, resulting in significant suppression of tumor growth in prophylactic as well as therapeutic treatments. A large number of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that actively produce both intracellular and secretory IFN-γ were observed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes collected from B16-OVA tumor masses originally vaccinated with OT-1-Encap-C upon tumor challenges. The approaches we describe herein may provide opportunities to develop epitope-dependent vaccination systems that stimulate and/or modulate efficient and epitope-specific cytotoxic T cell immune responses in nonpathogenic diseases.

  4. Artificial antigen presenting cells that express prevalent HLA alleles: A step towards the broad application of antigen-specific adoptive cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Aisha N; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel W; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    The artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) described in this review were generated to facilitate the production of virus-specific T-cells for the treatment of infections in patients after bone marrow transplant. These AAPCs consist of murine 3T3 cells genetically modified to express critical human molecules needed for T-cell stimulation, such as the co-stimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 and one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. When T-cells were sensitized against cytomegalovirus (CMV) using AAPCs that express a shared HLA allele or using autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) loaded with the CMVpp65 antigen, they were activated and expanded to become HLA-restricted CMVpp65-specific T-cells. These T-cells demonstrated functional activity in vitro against CMV by producing IFN-gamma and inducing CMVpp65-specific cytotoxicity. T-cells sensitized with AAPCs recognized antigenic epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in Man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFN-gamma+ cytotoxic T-cells against subdominant epitopes that were not effectively recognized by T-cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This panel of AAPCs provides a source of immediately accessible, standardizable, and replenishable "off the shelf" cellular reagents with the potential to make adoptive immunotherapy widely available for the treatment of lethal infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20040272

  5. Formalinized chicken red cell nuclei as a simple antigen for standardized antinuclear factor determination

    PubMed Central

    Veen, J. H. Ten; Feltkamp, T. E. W.

    1969-01-01

    Chicken red cell nuclei treated with formalin appear to be specific and easy to handle nuclear antigens for antinuclear factor determination. They can be kept without cooling or freezing for at least 6 months, and probably considerably longer. As these nuclei can easily be obtained in great amounts it appears feasible to develop an international nuclear standard antigen for standardization in immunofluorescence. They might also be applied as a nuclear antigen in automated antinuclear factor determination. PMID:4904069

  6. Enhanced antigen-presenting capacity of cultured Langerhans' cells is associated with markedly increased expression of Ia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Caughman, S.W.; Sharrow, S.O.; Stephany, D.; Katz, S.I.

    1987-10-15

    Recent studies indicate that when epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) are cultured for 2 to 3 days they, in comparison to freshly prepared LC, exhibit markedly enhanced ability to stimulate T cell proliferative responses in oxidative mitogenesis and in the mixed epidermal-leukocyte reaction. In this study, we determined whether cultured LC enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, and whether such enhanced stimulatory capacity correlates with the level of Ia antigen expressed on LC. We used C3H/He (Iak) epidermal cells as stimulators and, as responder cells, both the trinitrophenyl-specific clones D8 and SE4, which were assayed for (/sup 3/H)dThd incorporation, and the pigeon cytochrome c specific hybridoma 2C2, which was assayed for interleukin 2 production. Cultured LC induced 10 to 100 times greater proliferation or interleukin 2 production by responder cells than did freshly prepared LC. The intensity of I-Ak and I-Ek, expressed on cultured LC as assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, was found to be 10 to 36 times greater on a per cell basis than that on freshly prepared LC. Depletion of LC from fresh epidermal cell suspensions by anti-Iak and complement or treatment with 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ medium range ultraviolet light or cycloheximide before culture abrogated both the increase in Ia expression and antigen-specific clonal proliferation. The results suggest that when LC are removed from their usual epidermal milieu, they express increased amounts of Ia and become more potent stimulators of T cell responses.

  7. Blockade of LFA-1 augments in vitro differentiation of antigen-induced Foxp3+ Treg cells

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific, in vitro-induced Foxp3+ Treg (iTreg) cells protects against autoimmune disease. To generate antigen-specific iTreg cells at high purity, however, remains a challenge. Whereas polyclonal T cell stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody yields Foxp3+ iTreg cells at a purity of 90–95%, antigen-induced iTreg cells typically do not exceed a purity of 65–75%, even in a TCR-transgenic model. In a similar vein to thymic Treg cell selection, iTreg cell differentiation is influenced not only by antigen recognition and the availability of TGF-β but also by co-factors including costimulation and adhesion molecules. In this study, we demonstrate that blockade of the T cell integrin Leukocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) during antigen-mediated iTreg cell differentiation augments Foxp3 induction, leading to approximately 90% purity of Foxp3+ iTreg cells. This increased efficacy not only boosts the yield of Foxp3+ iTreg cells, it also reduces contamination with activated effector T cells, thus improving the safety of adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:25108241

  8. Leishmania-infected macrophages sequester endogenously synthesized parasite antigens from presentation to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Kima, P E; Soong, L; Chicharro, C; Ruddle, N H; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1996-12-01

    CD4+ T cell lines raised against the protective leishmanial antigens GP46 and P8 were used to study the presentation of endogenously synthesized Leishmania antigens by infected cells. Using two different sources of macrophages, the I4.07 macrophage cell line (H-2k) which constitutively expresses major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, and elicited peritoneal exudate cells, we found that cells infected with Leishmania amastigotes presented little, if any endogenously synthesized parasite antigens to CD4+ T cells. In contrast, promastigote-infected macrophages did present endogenous parasite molecules to CD4+ T cells, although only for a limited time, with maximal presentation occurring within 24 h of infection and decreasing to minimal antigen presentation at 72 h post-infection. These observations suggest that once within the macrophage, Leishmania amastigote antigens are sequestered from the MHC class II pathway of antigen presentation. This allows live parasites to persist in infected hosts by evading the activation of CD4+ T cells, a major and critical anti-leishmanial component of the host immune system. Studies with drugs that modify fusion patterns of phagosomes suggest that the mechanism of this antigen sequestration includes targeted fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with certain endocytic compartments.

  9. Presence of species-specific, monomorphic antigens on sheep and goat binucleate cells.

    PubMed

    Gall, J G; MacLaren, L A; Anderson, G B

    1995-07-15

    Immunocytochemical assays for sheep and goat species-specific, monomorphic antigens were developed utilizing polyclonal antisera from sheep and goats immunized by interspecific pregnancy. The assays were applied to cell isolates from sheep and goat fetal cotyledons collected from allogeneic pregnancies at Days 35, 40 and 120 of gestation. The isolates contained 7 to 48% binucleate cells (BNC). Using these assays, the sheep-specific antigen was detected on sheep cotyledonary cell isolates on all days of gestation tested (P < 0.001); the assay also detected the antigen on the BNC subset of the cotyledonary cell isolate population (P < 0.001). The caprine-specific antigen was shown to be present on cotyledonary cell isolates (P < 0.05), although the presence of the antigen could not be demonstrated with statistical confidence on goat BNC due to insufficient numbers of discernible cells. Binucleate cells contribute to the formation of the syncytial layer of the placenta by fusing with maternal epithelial cells and with the syncytium. The species-specific antigen (or antigens) is present on BNC at the appropriate time of gestation at which it (they) could play a role in the humoral immune response to interspecific and hybrid pregnancies observed in ewes and does. PMID:16727726

  10. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  11. High sensitivity of cancer exome-based CD8 T cell neo-antigen identification

    PubMed Central

    van Buuren, Marit M; Calis, Jorg JA; Schumacher, Ton NM

    2014-01-01

    Recent data suggest that T-cell reactivity against tumor-specific neo-antigens may be central to the clinical efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. The development of personalized vaccines designed to boost T-cell reactivity against patient specific neo-antigens has been proposed largely on the basis of these findings. Work from several groups has demonstrated that novel tumor-specific antigens can be discovered through the use of cancer exome sequencing data, thereby providing a potential pipeline for the development of patient-specific vaccines. Importantly though, it has not been established which fraction of cancer neo-antigens that can be recognized by CD8+ T cells is successfully uncovered with the current exome-based epitope prediction strategies. Here, we use a data set comprising human cancer neo-antigens that was previously identified through the use of unbiased, computational-independent strategies to describe the potential of cancer exome-based neo-antigen discovery. This analysis shows a high sensitivity of exome-guided neo-antigen prediction of approximately 70%. We propose that future research should focus on the analysis and optimization of the specificity of neo-antigen prediction, and should undoubtedly entail the clinical evaluation of patient-specific vaccines with the aim of inducing immunoreactivity against tumor-displayed neo-antigens in a physiologically relevant context. PMID:25083320

  12. How antigen specificity directs regulatory T-cell function: self, foreign and engineered specificity.

    PubMed

    Hoeppli, R E; MacDonald, K G; Levings, M K; Cook, L

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a suppressive subset of T cells that have important roles in maintaining self-tolerance and preventing immunopathology. The T-cell receptor (TCR) and its antigen specificity play a dominant role in the differentiation of cells to a Treg fate, either in the thymus or in the periphery. This review focuses on the effects of the TCR and its antigen specificity on Treg biology. The role of Tregs with specificity for self-antigen has primarily been studied in the context of autoimmune disease, although recent studies have focused on their role in steady-state conditions. The role of Tregs that are specific for pathogens, dietary antigens and allergens is much less studied, although recent data suggest a significant and previously underappreciated role for Tregs during memory responses to a wide range of foreign antigens. The development of TCR- or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells means we are now able to engineer Tregs with disease-relevant antigen specificities, paving the way for ensuring specificity with Treg-based therapies. Understanding the role that antigens play in driving the generation and function of Tregs is critical for defining the pathophysiology of many immune-mediated diseases, and developing new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27256587

  13. Antigen mRNA-transfected, allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with NKT-cell ligand confer antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Goto, Akira; Shimizu, Kanako

    2009-04-30

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) in situ by danger signals plays a central role in linking innate and adaptive immunity. We previously demonstrated that the activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells by administration of alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer)-loaded tumor cells can act as a cellular adjuvant through the DC maturation. In the current study, we used allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer and transfected with antigen-encoding mRNA, thus combining the adjuvant effects of iNKT-cell activation with delivery of antigen to DCs in vivo. We found that these cells produce antigen protein and activate NK and iNKT cells. When injected into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mice, they elicited antigen-specific T-cell responses and provided tumor protection, suggesting that these immune responses depend on host DCs. In addition, antigen-expressing fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer lead to a more potent T-cell response than those expressing NK cell ligands. Thus, glycolipid-loaded, mRNA-transfected allogeneic fibroblasts act as cellular vectors to provide iNKT-cell activation, leading to DC maturation and T-cell immunity. By harnessing the innate immune system and generating an adaptive immune response to a variety of antigens, this unique tool could prove clinically beneficial in the development of immunotherapies against malignant and infectious diseases. PMID:19164596

  14. Flow Cytometric Analysis of T, B, and NK Cells Antigens in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Serkan; Bülbül Başkan, Emel; Budak, Ferah; Oral, Barbaros; Adim, Şaduman Balaban; Ceylan Kalin, Zübeyde; Özkaya, Güven; Aydoğan, Kenan; Saricaoğlu, Hayriye; Tunali, Şükran

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological correlation and prognostic value of cell surface antigens expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF). 121 consecutive MF patients were included in this study. All patients had peripheral blood flow cytometry as part of their first visit. TNMB and histopathological staging of the cases were retrospectively performed in accordance with International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) criteria at the time of flow cytometry sampling. To determine prognostic value of cell surface antigens, cases were divided into two groups as stable and progressive disease. 17 flow cytometric analyses of 17 parapsoriasis (PP) and 11 analyses of 11 benign erythrodermic patients were included as control groups. Fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell surface antigens: T cells (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), TCRαβ(+), TCRγδ(+), CD7(+), CD4(+)CD7(+), CD4(+)CD7(-), and CD71(+)), B cells (HLA-DR(+), CD19(+), and HLA-DR(+)CD19(+)), NKT cells (CD3(+)CD16(+)CD56(+)), and NK cells (CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+)). The mean value of all cell surface antigens was not statistically significant between parapsoriasis and MF groups. Along with an increase in cases of MF stage statistically significant difference was found between the mean values of cell surface antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cell surface antigens in patients with mycosis fungoides may contribute to predicting disease stage and progression. PMID:26788525

  15. Ultrastructural localization of capsules, cell wall polysaccharide, cell wall proteins, and F antigen in pneumococci.

    PubMed Central

    Skov Sørensen, U B; Blom, J; Birch-Andersen, A; Henrichsen, J

    1988-01-01

    The localization of pneumococcal capsular and cell wall antigens was examined by immunoelectron microscopy. C polysaccharide (C-Ps), a common component of all pneumococci, was uniformly distributed on both the inside and outside of the cell walls. The thickness of the C-Ps varied with the strain. Encapsulated strains were covered by varied amounts of capsular polysaccharide concealing the C-Ps of the bacteria so as to render it inaccessible to anti-C-Ps antibodies. In addition to C-Ps, protein antigens were demonstrable on the surface of nonencapsulated pneumococci. The proteins were not masked by the C-Ps layer. An extra layer on the cell walls was conspicuous on electron micrographs of both rough and encapsulated pneumococci. The nature of this extra layer has not been disclosed. F antigen, another common antigen of pneumococci, was uniformly distributed on the surface of the plasma membranes. During the course of the experimental work a reproducible method of gold labeling immunoglobulins was developed. Images PMID:3397179

  16. Responses of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells to allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Noriko; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakagawa, Eizo; Tani-Ishii, Nobuyuki; Ohshima, Hayato

    2011-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that a pulse of BrdU given to prenatal animals reveals the existence of slow-cycling long-term label-retaining cells (LRCs), putative adult stem or progenitor cells, which reside in the dental pulp. This study aims to clarify responses of LRCs to allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla using prenatal BrdU-labeling, in situ hybridization for osteopontin and periostin, and immunohistochemistry for BrdU, nestin, and osteopontin. The upper-right first molars were allografted in the original socket between BrdU-labeled and non-labeled mice or between GFP transgenic and wild-type mice. Tooth transplantation caused degeneration of the odontoblast layer, resulting in the disappearance of nestin-positive reactions in the dental pulp. On postoperative days 5-7, tertiary dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged in the successful cases. In BrdU-labeled transplanted teeth, dense LRCs were maintained in the center of the dental pulp beneath the odontoblast-like cells including LRCs, whereas LRCs disappeared in the area surrounding the bone-like tissue. In contrast, LRCs were not recognized in the pulp chamber of non-labeled transplants through the experimental period. Tooth transplantation using GFP mice demonstrated that the donor cells constituted the dental pulp of the transplant except for endothelial cells and some migrated cells, and the periodontal tissue was replaced by host-derived cells except for epithelial cell rests of Malassez. These results suggest that the maintenance of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells play a role in the regeneration of odontoblast-like cells in the process of pulpal healing following tooth transplantation. PMID:21986880

  17. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Cecilia; Esteban, Rosa; Canals, Carme; Muñiz-Díaz, Eduardo; Nogués, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs), which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories. Methods We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua). High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment. Results TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies. Conclusions Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs. PMID:27603310

  18. Computational Reprogramming of T Cell Antigen Receptor Binding Properties.

    PubMed

    Riley, Timothy P; Singh, Nishant K; Pierce, Brian G; Baker, Brian M; Weng, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) binding to peptide/MHC is key to antigen-specific cellular immunity, and there has been considerable interest in modulating TCR affinity and specificity for the development of therapeutics and imaging reagents. While in vitro engineering efforts using molecular evolution have yielded remarkable improvements in TCR affinity, such approaches do not offer structural control and can adversely affect receptor specificity, particularly if the attraction towards the MHC is enhanced independently of the peptide. Here we describe an approach to computational design that begins with structural information and offers the potential for more controlled manipulation of binding properties. Our design process models point mutations in selected regions of the TCR and ranks the resulting change in binding energy. Consideration is given to designing optimized scoring functions tuned to particular TCR-peptide/MHC interfaces. Validation of highly ranked predictions can be used to refine the modeling methodology and scoring functions, improving the design process. Our approach results in a strong correlation between predicted and measured changes in binding energy, as well as good agreement between modeled and experimental structures. PMID:27094299

  19. Cognate antigen directs CD8+ T cell migration to vascularized transplants.

    PubMed

    Walch, Jeffrey M; Zeng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Williams, Amanda L; Rothstein, David M; Shlomchik, Warren D; Kim, Jiyun V; Camirand, Geoffrey; Lakkis, Fadi G

    2013-06-01

    The migration of effector or memory T cells to the graft is a critical event in the rejection of transplanted organs. The prevailing view is that the key steps involved in T cell migration - integrin-mediated firm adhesion followed by transendothelial migration - are dependent on the activation of Gαi-coupled chemokine receptors on T cells. In contrast to this view, we demonstrated in vivo that cognate antigen was necessary for the firm adhesion and transendothelial migration of CD8+ effector T cells specific to graft antigens and that both steps occurred independent of Gαi signaling. Presentation of cognate antigen by either graft endothelial cells or bone marrow-derived APCs that extend into the capillary lumen was sufficient for T cell migration. The adhesion and transmigration of antigen-nonspecific (bystander) effector T cells, on the other hand, remained dependent on Gαi, but required the presence of antigen-specific effector T cells. These findings underscore the primary role of cognate antigen presented by either endothelial cells or bone marrow-derived APCs in the migration of T cells across endothelial barriers and have important implications for the prevention and treatment of graft rejection.

  20. Common antigenic determinants on human melanoma, glioma, neuroblastoma, and sarcoma cells defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seeger, R C; Rosenblatt, H M; Imai, K; Ferrone, S

    1981-07-01

    Antigenic determinants that are common to melanomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas but that are minimally or not detectably expressed by adult tissues were defined with monoclonal antibodies. Quantitative absorption of monoclonal antibody (Ab 165) with adult tissues followed by testing on antigen-positive UCLA-SO-M14 melanoma cells did not demonstrate antigenic determinant (Ag 165) in brain, lung, liver, kidney, intestine, adrenal, and muscle, Absorption of Ab 376 demonstrated Ag 376 in adult lung but minimal or no antigen in other tissues. Both antigens were associated with a variety of fetal tissues. Assessment of 28 human tumor cell lines with the 131I-staphylococcal Protein A-binding test demonstrated that Ab 165 reacted strongly with melanomas and gliomas and weakly with sarcomas. Ab 376 reacted strongly with melanomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas. Neither of these antibodies reacted appreciably with carcinoma or teratoma cell lines. Absorption of Ab 165 and Ab 376 with noncultured tumors demonstrated that melanomas, sarcomas, and neuroblastomas can have greater quantities of these antigens in vivo than do normal adult tissues. Qualitative and quantitative antigenic heterogeneity within positive classes of tumors was demonstrated for both cultured and noncultured tumors. The differences in antigen expression in vivo between normal and neoplastic cells suggest potential value for these antibodies in immunodiagnosis and possibly immunotherapy.

  1. Whole-cell antigenicity data support sequence-based kinetoplastid taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Couvreur, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Early immunological data, obtained by immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis, on the whole-cell antigenicity of kinetoplastid protozoa were retrieved and used to construct a dendrogram of antigenic distances. Remarkably, they supported the same taxonomic conclusions as analyses based on DNA and protein sequence data.

  2. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  3. HIV-1 p24 antigen is a significant inverse correlate of CD4 T-cell change in patients with suppressed viremia under long-term antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Böni, Jürg; Bisset, Leslie R; Tomasik, Zuzana; Fischer, Marek; Günthard, Huldrych F; Ledergerber, Bruno; Opravil, Milos

    2003-07-01

    An HIV-1 p24 antigen test involving signal amplification-boosted ELISA of heat-denatured plasma was evaluated prospectively in 55 patients whose viral RNA in plasma had previously been suppressed for at least 6 months under antiretroviral combination therapy. During a median follow-up of 504 days, CD4 counts increased by a median of 62 cells per year. By univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, the level of p24 antigen as expressed by the absorbance/cutoff ratio was a significant inverse correlate of both the CD4 count in a sample (p =.013) and its annual change in a patient (p <.0001). The p24 antigen retained significance even among 48 individuals whose HIV-1 RNA, apart from occasional blips, remained below 400 copies/mL. Batch-wise retesting of 70 samples from 5 such patients with a further improved procedure showed measurable p24 antigen in all but 1 sample and an inverse correlation with both the CD4 count (p =.0331) and percentage (p <.0001), thus confirming the prospectively generated data. Comparison of p24 antigen and HIV-1 RNA concentrations indicate that the p24 antigen detected in these samples is not associated with viral RNA-containing particles and may originate from other compartments of virus expression.

  4. Inclusion of Strep-Tag II in design of antigen receptors for T cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingfeng; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Cabanov, Alexandra; Kosasih, Paula; Hill, Tyler; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-01-01

    The tactical introduction of Strep-tag II into synthetic antigen receptors provides engineered T cells with a marker for identification and rapid purification, and a functional element for selective antibody coated microbead-driven large-scale expansion. Such receptor designs can be applied to chimeric antigen receptors of different ligand specificities and costimulatory domains, and to T cell receptors to facilitate cGMP manufacturing of adoptive T cell therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. PMID:26900664

  5. Selective inhibition of tumor growth by clonal NK cells expressing an ErbB2/HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, Kurt; Sahm, Christiane; Zhang, Congcong; Naundorf, Sonja; Brendel, Christian; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Kloess, Stephan; Köhler, Sylvia; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Jauch, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; Schubert, Ralf; Kühlcke, Klaus; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans G; Rieger, Michael A; Tonn, Torsten; Grez, Manuel; Wels, Winfried S

    2015-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important effector cell type for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Similar to T cells, NK cells can be modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance antitumor activity, but experience with CAR-engineered NK cells and their clinical development is still limited. Here, we redirected continuously expanding and clinically usable established human NK-92 cells to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2) antigen. Following GMP-compliant procedures, we generated a stable clonal cell line expressing a humanized CAR based on ErbB2-specific antibody FRP5 harboring CD28 and CD3ζ signaling domains (CAR 5.28.z). These NK-92/5.28.z cells efficiently lysed ErbB2-expressing tumor cells in vitro and exhibited serial target cell killing. Specific recognition of tumor cells and antitumor activity were retained in vivo, resulting in selective enrichment of NK-92/5.28.z cells in orthotopic breast carcinoma xenografts, and reduction of pulmonary metastasis in a renal cell carcinoma model, respectively. γ-irradiation as a potential safety measure for clinical application prevented NK cell replication, while antitumor activity was preserved. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to engineer CAR-expressing NK cells as a clonal, molecularly and functionally well-defined and continuously expandable cell therapeutic agent, and suggest NK-92/5.28.z cells as a promising candidate for use in adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25373520

  6. Peptide-β2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-β2-microglobulin–MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide–MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9·2 × 108 antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:17472719

  7. Peptide-beta2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-beta2-microglobulin-MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide-MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9.2 x 10(8) antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy.

  8. Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell features producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Hada, Masao; Oyama, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    A 76-year-old man underwent surgery for lung cancer. Histopathologically, most of the resected tumor was composed of polygonal cells with foamy cytoplasm, and the cells were arranged predominantly in acinar patterns. In this case, although the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level was high before surgery, it normalized after resection. The tumor was considered a carbohydrate antigen 19-9-producing tumor, which was further supported by the results of immunohistochemical analysis. Adenocarcinoma with clear cell features, producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9, is an exceedingly rare entity.

  9. Targeting to porcine sialoadhesin receptor improves antigen presentation to T cells

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Concepción; Poderoso, Teresa; Martínez, Paloma; Álvarez, Belén; López-Fuertes, Laura; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Angel; Domínguez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-mediated targeting of antigen to specific antigen presenting cells (APC) receptors is an attractive strategy to enhance T cell immune responses to weak immunogenic antigens. Here, we describe the characterization of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different epitopes of porcine sialoadhesin (Sn) and evaluate in vitro the potential of targeting this receptor for delivery of antigens to APC for T cell stimulation. The specificity of these mAb was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of peptides derived from the affinity purified antigen. Porcine Sn is expressed by macrophages present in the border between white and red pulp of the spleen and in the subcapsular sinus of lymph nodes, an appropriate location for trapping blood and lymph-borne antigens. It is also expressed by alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC). Blood monocytes are negative for this molecule, but its expression can be induced by treatment with IFN-a. MAb bound to Sn is rapidly endocytosed. MAb to sialoadhesin induced in vitro T cell proliferation at concentrations 100-fold lower than the non-targeting control mAb when using T lymphocytes from pigs immunized with mouse immunoglobulins as responder cells and IFN-a treated monocytes or MoDC as APC, suggesting a role of sialoadhesin in antigen uptake and/or delivery into the presentation pathway in APC. PMID:19081005

  10. Targeting to porcine sialoadhesin receptor improves antigen presentation to T cells.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Concepción; Poderoso, Teresa; Martínez, Paloma; Alvarez, Belén; López-Fuertes, Laura; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Angel; Domínguez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-mediated targeting of antigen to specific antigen presenting cells (APC) receptors is an attractive strategy to enhance T cell immune responses to weak immunogenic antigens. Here, we describe the characterization of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different epitopes of porcine sialoadhesin (Sn) and evaluate in vitro the potential of targeting this receptor for delivery of antigens to APC for T cell stimulation. The specificity of these mAb was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of peptides derived from the affinity purified antigen. Porcine Sn is expressed by macrophages present in the border between white and red pulp of the spleen and in the subcapsular sinus of lymph nodes, an appropriate location for trapping blood and lymph-borne antigens. It is also expressed by alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC). Blood monocytes are negative for this molecule, but its expression can be induced by treatment with IFN-alpha. MAb bound to Sn is rapidly endocytosed. MAb to sialoadhesin induced in vitro T cell proliferation at concentrations 100-fold lower than the non-targeting control mAb when using T lymphocytes from pigs immunized with mouse immunoglobulins as responder cells and IFN-alpha treated monocytes or MoDC as APC, suggesting a role of sialoadhesin in antigen uptake and/or delivery into the presentation pathway in APC.

  11. Localization of Label-Retaining Cells in Murine Vocal Fold Epithelium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leydon, Ciara; Bartlett, Rebecca S.; Roenneburg, Drew A.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Epithelial homeostasis is critical for vocal fold health, yet little is known about the cells that support epithelial self-renewal. As a known characteristic of stem cells is that they are slow-cycling in vivo, the purpose of this prospective controlled study was to identify and quantify slow-cycling cells or putative stem cells in murine…

  12. Immunochemical studies of streptococcal cell membrane antigens immunologically related to glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Zelman, M E; Lange, C F

    1995-12-01

    Pursuing an autoimmune model for the etiology of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, protein antigens isolated from the cytoplasmic membrane of nephritogenic group A Type 12 Streptococcus pyogenes were immunochemically characterized using antistreptococcal cell membrane (SCM) monoclonal antibody (MAb) cross-reactive with glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Low molecular weight (9.2, 7.0, 4.7, 2.3 kDa) HPLC-purified SCM polypeptide antigens were characterized by competitive inhibition and equilibrium dialysis. Competitive inhibition of the MAb, by different sized SCM polypeptide antigens showed an inverse relationship between the size of these antigens and the molar amount required to obtain 50% inhibition of the MAb, confirming previous observations that suggested that these SCM antigens exhibit increasing epitope concentration with increasing size, that is constant epitope density. The observed changes in epitope concentration correlated with differences in the valence and affinity of the MAb as determined by equilibrium dialysis. The Kds of the MAb for 9.2-, 7.0-, 4.7-, and 2.3-kDa SCM antigens ranged from 7.42 x 10(-7) to 1.15 x 10(-5). The experimentally determined MAb valence for these antigens was 2 for the 9.2-kDa antigen and approached 10 for the smaller antigens. Finally, the similarity of these SCM antigens was reflected in similar amino acid compositions; of note, these data agreed with the compositions previously reported for sized GBM antigens. Concentrations of Asp, Thr, Ser, Glu, Gly, Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu paralleled increasing epitope concentration. Apparent N-terminal blocking prevented sequencing of these peptides, but these immunochemical data suggest that intact SCM antigen recognized by the anti-SCM MAb consists of repeating epitopes, an observation consistent with the cytoplasmic membrane source of the antigen.

  13. Red Blood Cell Antigen Genotyping for Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, and Other Transfusion Complications.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Chou, Stella T

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group in the early 20th century, more than 300 blood group antigens have been categorized among 35 blood group systems. The molecular basis for most blood group antigens has been determined and demonstrates tremendous genetic diversity, particularly in the ABO and Rh systems. Several blood group genotyping assays have been developed, and 1 platform has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a "test of record," such that no phenotype confirmation with antisera is required. DNA-based red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping can overcome certain limitations of hemagglutination assays and is beneficial in many transfusion settings. Genotyping can be used to determine RBC antigen phenotypes in patients recently transfused or with interfering allo- or autoantibodies, to resolve discrepant serologic typing, and/or when typing antisera are not readily available. Molecular RBC antigen typing can facilitate complex antibody evaluations and guide RBC selection for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. High-resolution RH genotyping can identify variant RHD and RHCE in patients with SCD, which have been associated with alloimmunization. In the future, broader access to cost-efficient, high-resolution RBC genotyping technology for both patient and donor populations may be transformative for the field of transfusion medicine. PMID:27345938

  14. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  15. Antigen availability determines CD8+ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P.; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mazo, Irina B.; Haining, William N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary T cells are activated by antigen (Ag) bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in 3 phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8+ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, while higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation, but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12h and 24h. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  16. Skin-Resident Antigen-Presenting Cells: Instruction Manual for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia M.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Unger, Wendy W. J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The induction of antigen-specific effector T cells is driven by proper antigen presentation and co-stimulation by dendritic cells (DCs). For this reason strategies have been developed to instruct DCs for the induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Since DCs are localized, amongst other locations, in peripheral tissues such as the skin, new vaccines are aiming at targeting antigens to DCs in situ. Optimal skin-DC targeting in combination with adequate adjuvant delivery facilitates DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes and enhances antigen cross-presentation and T cell priming. In this review we describe what DC subsets populate the human skin, as well as current vaccination strategies based on targeting strategies and alternative administration for the induction of robust long-lived anti-cancer effector T cells. PMID:23801994

  17. HIG-82: an established cell line from rabbit periarticular soft tissue, which retains the "activatable" phenotype.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, H I; Mendelow, D; Evans, C H

    1988-10-01

    We have isolated a continuous cell line from soft tissue lining the knee joints of rabbits. Designated HIG-82, this line was produced by spontaneous establishment of an aging, late-passage culture of primary cells. Like unpassaged, primary cells, HIG-82 cells can be activated by a number of stimuli, including phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and the endocytosis of latex beads. Activated cells secrete collagenase, gelatinase, caseinase (stromelysin), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into their culture medium. Pseudodiploid, HIG-82 cells combine a high plating efficiency with a doubling time of approximately 24 h. As primary tissue of this origin is difficult to obtain in large quantities and shows cellular heterogeneity, the HIG-82 cell line should facilitate research into the biology and biochemistry of the fibroblastic cells that line the diarthrodial joints of mammals. Such cells are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of various arthritides.

  18. The relative ability of four rubella antigens to elicit blast cell transformation of lymphocytes from immune individuals.

    PubMed

    Rossier, E; Phipps, P H; Webb, T; Polley, J

    1977-05-01

    The ability of crude, semi-purified, and purified rubella antigens to elicit a specific and significant blast cell transformation of lymphocytes from immune individuals was investigated in 25 seronegative and 25 seropositive young adults. The type of preparation and the purity of the antigens were critical. Titration of the antigens by complement fixation or hemagglutination was of little value for selecting the best antigen which was a whole virion-purified antigen.

  19. The skin test antigen stimulated killer (STAK) cell mediating NK like CMC is OKM1 positive and OKT3 negative.

    PubMed Central

    Tartof, D; Curran, J J; Levitt, D; Loken, M R

    1983-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated that candida antigen stimulated natural killer cell like cell-mediated cytolysis (NK like CMC) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) isolated from normal individuals (Tartof et al., 1980). Utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed against human mononuclear cell subpopulations in conjunction with a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) we determined that, similar to the previously described NK cell, the skin test antigen stimulated killer (STAK) cell is a larger OKM1 positive, OKT3 negative cell. We obtained similar results using two different skin test antigens. Thus, stimulation of NK like CMC in PBMNC by skin test antigens probably represents activation of NK or NK like cells. PMID:6360439

  20. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    PubMed

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  1. Murine T-cell response to native and recombinant protein antigens of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi.

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, C J; Stover, C K; Joseph, S W; Oaks, E V

    1993-01-01

    A polyclonal T-cell line with TH1 characteristics was used to assess the murine cellular immune response to native and recombinant Rickettsia tsutsugamushi antigens. Proliferation of this T-cell line was observed in response to numerous native antigen fractions, which indicates that the murine T-helper-cell response is directed at multiple scrub typhus antigens with no apparent antigenic immunodominance. Subsequent analysis of recombinant R. tsutsugamushi antigens made it possible to identify a 47-kDa scrub typhus antigen (Sta47) that was stimulatory for the polyclonal T-cell line. Recombinant clones encoding 56-, 58-, and 110-kDa antigens (Sta56, Sta58, and Sta110, respectively) were unable to induce proliferation of this T-cell line. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned rickettsial insert encoding the Sta47 protein revealed the presence of four open reading frames potentially encoding proteins of 47, 30, 18, and 13 kDa. Analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated and eluted fractions of lysates from the recombinant HB101(pRTS47B4.3) demonstrated that the fractions containing the 47-kDa protein as well as those containing proteins less than 18 kDa were stimulatory. Selected synthetic amphipathic peptides derived from the Sta47 antigen sequence identified a 20-amino-acid peptide that gave a 10-fold increase in T-cell proliferation over a control malarial peptide of similar length. Recognition of the 47-kDa antigen by a T-cell line with TH1 characteristics implicates this protein as one of potential importance in protection studies and future vaccine development. Images PMID:8478055

  2. Angiomotin promotes renal epithelial and carcinoma cell proliferation by retaining the nuclear YAP.

    PubMed

    Lv, Meng; Li, Shuting; Luo, Changqin; Zhang, Xiaoman; Shen, Yanwei; Sui, Yan Xia; Wang, Fan; Wang, Xin; Yang, Jiao; Liu, Peijun; Yang, Jin

    2016-03-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the common tumors in the urinary system without effective therapies. Angiomotin (Amot) can interact with Yes-associated protein (YAP) to either stimulate or inhibit YAP activity, playing a potential role in cell proliferation. However, the role of Amot in regulating the proliferation of renal epithelial and RCC cells is unknown. Here, we show that Amot is expressed predominantly in the nucleus of RCC cells and tissues, and in the cytoplasm and nucleus of renal epithelial cells and paracancerous tissues. Furthermore, Amot silencing inhibited proliferation of HK-2 and 786-O cells while Amot upregulation promoted proliferation of ACHN cells. Interestingly, the location of Amot and YAP in RCC clinical samples and cells was similar. Amot interacted with YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells, particularly in the nucleus. Moreover, Amot silencing mitigated the levels of nuclear YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells and reduced YAP-related CTGF and Cyr61 expression in 786-O cells. Amot upregulation slightly increased the nuclear YAP and YAP-related gene expression in ACHN cells. Finally, enhanced YAP expression restored proliferation of Amot-silencing 786-O cells. Together, these data indicate that Amot is crucial for the maintenance of nuclear YAP to promote renal epithelial and RCC proliferation.

  3. Expression of the human mucosal lymphocyte antigen, HML-1, by T cells activated with mitogen or specific antigen in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brew, R; West, D C; Burthem, J; Christmas, S E

    1995-06-01

    Expression of the human mucosal lymphocyte antigen, HML-1 (CD103), recently identified as a novel alpha E beta 7 integrin, was studied on peripheral blood lymphocytes activated with mitogen or specific antigen. HML-1 was up-regulated on PHA activated T-lymphoblasts cultured in 100IU/ml interleukin-2 (IL-2), reaching a peak of > 50% positive cells at day 7, and expression was maintained at this level throughout the 28-day culture period. Following a transient decrease in the percentage of L-selectin cells, expression of this molecule was maintained on most PHA T-lymphoblasts. Cells activated by purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis (PPD) or in mixed lymphocyte culture also up-regulated and maintained HML-1 expression for 14 days. In contrast, in all cases the percentage of CD25+ cells rose initially but subsequently declined over the same time periods. When freshly isolated cells from tonsil, spleen, mesenteric lymph node and lung were analysed, only lung contained significant numbers (39 +/- 6%) of HML-1+ cells. In both freshly isolated and activated cell populations the great majority of HML-1+ cells co-expressed CD8 although some HML-1+ CD8- cells were also present. Production of TGF-beta 1 peaked early during T-lymphoblast and MLR cultures and was not related to induction of HML-1 expression. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that the HML-1 molecule expressed on 10-day PHA T-lymphoblasts was indistinguishable from that found on intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and that no alpha 4 beta 7 integrin was expressed by these cells. Although HML-1 expression is essentially restricted to mucosal leucocytes in vivo, these experiments show that it is readily induced and maintained along with co-expression of L-selectin following CD8+ T-lymphocyte activation in vitro.

  4. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BB ligand efficiently expand functional T cells specific to tumor-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wanyong; Su, Mei; Anderson, Karen S; Sasada, Tetsuro

    2014-08-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), notably dendritic cells (DCs), are the most potent for expanding antigen-specific T cells ex vivo. However, the labor-intensive and expensive procedure for customized preparation of autologous APCs has hampered their broad clinical application. Artificial APC (aAPC) systems, which can be readily prepared from off-the-shelf components, have been proposed as a promising alternative to custom-made professional APCs. Here, in order to develop a novel aAPC system, we established K562 erythroleukemia cells expressing different combinations of co-stimulatory molecule ligands, CD80, CD70, and/or 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL). When nucleofected with in vitro-generated mRNA encoding a tumor-associated antigen, MART-1, the K562 cells expressing all of CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL were the most efficient for expansion of functional T cells specific to an HLA-A2-restricted immunodominant epitope, MART-126-35. In addition, only the K562 cells expressing all three of these co-stimulatory molecule ligands could clearly expand T cells specific to other less immunogenic antigen epitopes, gp100154-162 and Cyp1B1239-247, through transfection with in vitro generated gp100 and Cyp1B1 mRNA, respectively. These results indicated that non-redundant and synergistic effects of co-stimulation via CD28/CD80, CD27/CD70, and 4-1BB/4-1BBL might be critical for eliciting efficient expansion of T cells; co-stimulation via the 4-1BB/4-1BBL interaction might expand antigen-specific T cells by preventing apoptotic cell death triggered by specific antigens in the presence of the CD28/CD80 and CD27/CD70 signaling. Taken together, our findings suggested that this K562-based aAPC system expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL would be useful for efficiently stimulating functional antigen-specific T cells ex vivo, in particular when detailed information on the epitope specificities is unavailable. PMID:24713579

  5. Neutral Polymer Micelle Carriers with pH-Responsive, Endosome-Releasing Activity Modulate Antigen Trafficking to Enhance CD8 T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Salka; Wilson, John T; Patilea, Gabriela I; Kern, Hanna B; Convertine, Anthony J; Stayton, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic subunit vaccines need to induce CD8+ cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses for effective vaccination against intracellular pathogens. Most subunit vaccines primarily generate humoral immune responses, with a weaker than desired CD8+ cytotoxic T-cell response. Here, a neutral, pH-responsive polymer micelle carrier that alters intracellular antigen trafficking was shown to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses with a correlated increase in cytosolic delivery and a decrease in exocytosis. Polymer diblock carriers consisted of a N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide corona block with pendant pyridyl disulfide groups for reversible conjugation of thiolated ovalbumin, and a tercopolymer ampholytic core-forming block composed of propylacrylic acid (PAA), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and butyl methacrylate (BMA). The diblock copolymers self-assembled into 25–30 nm diameter micellar nanoparticles. Conjugation of ovalbumin to the micelles significantly enhanced antigen cross-presentation in vitro relative to free ovalbumin, an unconjugated physical mixture of ovalbumin and polymer, and a non pH-responsive micelle-ovalbumin control. Mechanistic studies in a murine dendritic cell line (DC2.4) demonstrated micelle-mediated enhancements in intracellular antigen retention and cytosolic antigen accumulation. Approximately 90% of initially internalized ovalbumin-conjugated micelles were retained in cells after 1.5 h, compared to only ~40% for controls. Furthermore, cells dosed with conjugates displayed 67-fold higher cytosolic antigen levels relative to soluble ovalbumin 4 h post uptake. Subcutaneous immunization of mice with ovalbumin-polymer conjugates significantly enhanced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses (0.4 % IFN-γ+ of CD8+) compared to immunization with soluble protein, ovalbumin and polymer mixture, and the control micelle without endosome-releasing activity. Additionally, pH-responsive carrier facilitated antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells in the

  6. Neutral polymer micelle carriers with pH-responsive, endosome-releasing activity modulate antigen trafficking to enhance CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Keller, Salka; Wilson, John T; Patilea, Gabriela I; Kern, Hanna B; Convertine, Anthony J; Stayton, Patrick S

    2014-10-10

    Synthetic subunit vaccines need to induce CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses for effective vaccination against intracellular pathogens. Most subunit vaccines primarily generate humoral immune responses, with a weaker than desired CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell response. Here, a neutral, pH-responsive polymer micelle carrier that alters intracellular antigen trafficking was shown to enhance CD8(+) T cell responses with a correlated increase in cytosolic delivery and a decrease in exocytosis. Polymer diblock carriers consisted of a N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide corona block with pendent pyridyl disulfide groups for reversible conjugation of thiolated ovalbumin, and a tercopolymer ampholytic core-forming block composed of propylacrylic acid (PAA), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and butyl methacrylate (BMA). The diblock copolymers self-assembled into 25-30nm diameter micellar nanoparticles. Conjugation of ovalbumin to the micelles significantly enhanced antigen cross-presentation in vitro relative to free ovalbumin, an unconjugated physical mixture of ovalbumin and polymer, and a non-pH-responsive micelle-ovalbumin control. Mechanistic studies in a murine dendritic cell line (DC 2.4) demonstrated micelle-mediated enhancements in intracellular antigen retention and cytosolic antigen accumulation. Approximately 90% of initially internalized ovalbumin-conjugated micelles were retained in cells after 1.5h, compared to only ~40% for controls. Furthermore, cells dosed with conjugates displayed 67-fold higher cytosolic antigen levels relative to soluble ovalbumin 4h post uptake. Subcutaneous immunization of mice with ovalbumin-polymer conjugates significantly enhanced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses (0.4% IFN-γ(+) of CD8(+)) compared to immunization with soluble protein, ovalbumin and polymer mixture, and the control micelle without endosome-releasing activity. Additionally, pH-responsive carrier facilitated antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells

  7. High ALDH Activity Identifies Chemotherapy-Resistant Ewing's Sarcoma Stem Cells That Retain Sensitivity to EWS-FLI1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Naheed; Katuri, Varalakshmi; O'Neill, Alison; Kong, Yali; Brown, Milton L.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Loeb, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells are a chemotherapy-resistant population capable of self-renewal and of regenerating the bulk tumor, thereby causing relapse and patient death. Ewing's sarcoma, the second most common form of bone tumor in adolescents and young adults, follows a clinical pattern consistent with the Cancer Stem Cell model – remission is easily achieved, even for patients with metastatic disease, but relapse remains frequent and is usually fatal. Methodology/Principal Findings We have isolated a subpopulation of Ewing's sarcoma cells, from both human cell lines and human xenografts grown in immune deficient mice, which express high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHhigh) activity and are enriched for clonogenicity, sphere-formation, and tumor initiation. The ALDHhigh cells are resistant to chemotherapy in vitro, but this can be overcome by the ATP binding cassette transport protein inhibitor, verapamil. Importantly, these cells are not resistant to YK-4-279, a small molecule inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 that is selectively toxic to Ewing's sarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions/Significance Ewing's sarcoma contains an ALDHhigh stem-like population of chemotherapy-resistant cells that retain sensitivity to EWS-FLI1 inhibition. Inhibiting the EWS-FLI1 oncoprotein may prove to be an effective means of improving patient outcomes by targeting Ewing's sarcoma stem cells that survive standard chemotherapy. PMID:21085683

  8. Uncoupling protein 2 regulates metabolic reprogramming and fate of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Leena; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Kos, Ferdynand; Shrikant, Protul A

    2016-07-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) employing ex vivo-generated tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells shows tumor efficacy when the transferred cells possess both effector and memory functions. New strategies based on understanding of mechanisms that balance CD8+ T cell differentiation toward effector and memory responses are highly desirable. Emerging information confirms a central role for antigen-induced metabolic reprogramming in CD8+ T cell differentiation and clonal expansion. The mitochondrial protein uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is induced by antigen stimulation of CD8+ T cells; however, its role in metabolic reprogramming underlying differentiation and clonal expansion has not been reported. Employing genetic (siRNA) and pharmacologic (Genipin) approaches, we note that antigen-induced UCP2 expression reduces glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and production of reactive oxygen species to balance differentiation with survival of effector CD8+ T cells. Inhibition of UCP2 promotes CD8+ T cell terminal differentiation into short-lived effector cells (CD62L(lo)KLRG1(Hi)IFNγ(Hi)) that undergo clonal contraction. These findings are the first to reveal a role for antigen-induced UCP2 expression in balancing CD8+ T cell differentiation and survival. Targeting UCP2 to regulate metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells is an attractive new approach to augment efficacy of tumor therapy by ACT. PMID:27271549

  9. The Lewis-Y carbohydrate antigen is expressed by many human tumors and can serve as a target for genetically redirected T cells despite the presence of soluble antigen in serum.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Jennifer A; Murray, William K; Trivett, Melanie; Haynes, Nicole M; Solomon, Benjamin; Mileshkin, Linda; Ball, David; Michael, Michael; Burman, Angela; Mayura-Guru, Preethi; Trapani, Joseph A; Peinert, Stefan; Hönemann, Dirk; Miles Prince, H; Scott, Andrew M; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2009-04-01

    In this study we aimed to determine the suitability of the Lewis-Y carbohydrate antigen as a target for immunotherapy using genetically redirected T cells. Using the 3S193 monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, Lewis-Y was found to be expressed on a range of tumors including 42% squamous cell lung carcinoma, 80% lung adenocarcinoma, 25% ovarian carcinoma, and 25% colorectal adenocarcinoma. Expression levels varied from low to intense on between 1% and 90% of tumor cells. Lewis- was also found in soluble form in sera from both normal donors and cancer patients using a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels in patients was often less than 1 ng/mL, similar to normal donors, but approximately 30% of patients had soluble Lewis-Y levels exceeding 1 ng/mL and up to 9 ng/mL. Lewis-Y-specific human T cells were generated by genetic modification with a chimeric receptor encoding a single-chain humanized antibody linked to the T-cell signaling molecules, T-cell receptor-zeta, and CD28. T cells responded against the Lewis-Y antigen by cytokine secretion and cytolysis in response to tumor cells. Importantly, the T-cell response was not inhibited by patient serum containing soluble Lewis-Y. This study demonstrates that Lewis-Y is expressed on a large number of tumors and Lewis-Y-specific T cells can retain antitumor function in the presence of patient serum, indicating that this antigen is a suitable target for this form of therapy.

  10. Antigen selection in B-cell lymphomas--tracing the evidence.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Belessi, Chrysoula; Darzentas, Nikos; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Rosenquist, Richard; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    While signaling through the B cell receptor (BcR) facilitates B cell development and maintenance, it also carries intertwined risks for the development of lymphomas since malignant B cells can exploit these pathways in order to trigger and fuel clonal expansion. This corruption of the normal B cell response to antigens, leading to sustained BcR signaling, has given great impulse to investigate in detail the role of antigen in lymphomas. Suffice it to conclude from such studies, largely immunogenetics based, that the evidence implicating antigens (exogenous or self) in lymphoma development is substantial and that lymphomagenesis is functionally driven and dynamic, rather than a simple stochastic process. As the paradigm of antigen-driven lymphoma evolves, further investigation will be paramount to the identification of the inciting agent(s) that may be responsible for immunoproliferative neoplasms and also for the development of therapeutic agents targeting effectors of the BcR signaling pathway.

  11. Antigens for CD4 and CD8 T Cells in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Lewinsohn, David; Sette, Alessandro; Lewinsohn, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide for which an improved vaccine and immunodiagnostics are urgently needed. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells play an important role in host defense to TB. Definition of the antigens recognized by these T cells is critical for improved understanding of the immunobiology of TB and for development of vaccines and diagnostics. Herein, the antigens and epitopes recognized by classically HLA class I– and II–restricted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in humans infected with MTB are reviewed. Immunodominant antigens and epitopes have been defined using approaches targeting particular TB proteins or classes of proteins and by genome-wide discovery approaches. Antigens and epitopes recognized by classically restricted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells show extensive breadth and diversity in MTB-infected humans. PMID:24852051

  12. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with /sup 111/In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity.

  13. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape.

  14. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape. PMID:27427982

  15. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Scott G; Bennett, Michael; Galić, Zoran; Kim, Joanne; Xu, Qing; Young, Alan; Lieberman, Alexis; Joseph, Aviva; Goldstein, Harris; Ng, Hwee; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2009-01-01

    There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR). Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  16. Long-lived antigen-induced IgM plasma cells demonstrate somatic mutations and contribute to long-term protection

    PubMed Central

    Bohannon, Caitlin; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Cui, Ang; Tipton, Christopher; Michaeli, Miri; Skountzou, Ioanna; Mittler, Robert S.; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Mehr, Ramit; Lee, Frances Eun-Yun; Sanz, Ignacio; Jacob, Joshy

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived plasma cells are critical to humoral immunity as a lifelong source of protective antibodies. Antigen-activated B cells—with T-cell help—undergo affinity maturation within germinal centres and persist as long-lived IgG plasma cells in the bone marrow. Here we show that antigen-specific, induced IgM plasma cells also persist for a lifetime. Unlike long-lived IgG plasma cells, which develop in germinal centres and then home to the bone marrow, IgM plasma cells are primarily retained within the spleen and can develop even in the absence of germinal centres. Interestingly, their expressed IgV loci exhibit somatic mutations introduced by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). However, these IgM plasma cells are probably not antigen-selected, as replacement mutations are spread through the variable segment and not enriched within the CDRs. Finally, antibodies from long-lived IgM plasma cells provide protective host immunity against a lethal virus challenge. PMID:27270306

  17. The B-cell tumor–associated antigen ROR1 can be targeted with T cells modified to express a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Nishida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Bleakley, Marie; Turtle, Cameron J.; Chang, Wen-Chung; Greisman, Harvey A.; Wood, Brent; Maloney, David G.; Jensen, Michael C.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for B-cell lineage surface molecules such as CD20 exert antitumor activity in B-cell malignancies, but deplete normal B cells. The receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) was identified as a highly expressed gene in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), but not normal B cells, suggesting it may serve as a tumor-specific target for therapy. We analyzed ROR1-expression in normal nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic cells including B-cell precursors, and in hematopoietic malignancies. ROR1 has characteristics of an oncofetal gene and is expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, but not in major adult tissues apart from low levels in adipose tissue and at an early stage of B-cell development. We constructed a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor that when expressed in T cells from healthy donors or CLL patients conferred specific recognition of primary B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, including rare drug effluxing chemotherapy resistant tumor cells that have been implicated in maintaining the malignancy, but not mature normal B cells. T-cell therapies targeting ROR1 may be effective in B-CLL and other ROR1-positive tumors. However, the expression of ROR1 on some normal tissues suggests the potential for toxi-city to subsets of normal cells. PMID:20702778

  18. Hepatitis B surface antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in human chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, K R; Tiku, M L; Ogra, P L

    1978-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody (anti-HBs), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and antibody (anti-HBe), the nature of T-cell function, and specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg were determined and evaluated serially in groups of subjects with chronic HBsAg carrier states and in seronegative controls. The techniques of in vitro lymphocyte transformation, spontaneous rosette formation, radioimmunoassay, reverse passive hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination, rheophoresis, and liver function tests were employed for these studies. For the lymphocyte transformation assay, multiple concentrations of phytohemagglutinin and purified HBsAg were used as stimulants. Cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg was detectable in 50% of the chronic HBsAg carriers (responders) at one or more concentrations of HBsAg. The remaining carriers (nonresponders) and controls failed to manifest HBsAg-specific lymphocyte transformation activity. The profile of the responders was characterized by elevated serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of anti-HBe, high HBsAg titers, and the conspicuous absence of HBeAg in the serum. The nonresponders were characterized by normal serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe, and lower HBsAg titers. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg in chronic HBsAg carriers who manifest biochemical evidence of liver disease. PMID:80380

  19. Antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells fail to respond to Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Stephanie P; Doling, Amy M; Giddings, Kara S; Phalipon, Armelle; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Goldberg, Marcia B; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes often play a primary role in adaptive immunity to cytosolic microbial pathogens. Surprisingly, CD8(+) T cells are not required for protective immunity to the enteric pathogen Shigella flexneri, despite the ability of Shigella to actively secrete proteins into the host cytoplasm, a location from which antigenic peptides are processed for presentation to CD8(+) T cells. To determine why CD8(+) T cells fail to play a role in adaptive immunity to S. flexneri, we investigated whether antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells are primed during infection but are unable to confer protection or, alternatively, whether T cells fail to be primed. To test whether Shigella is capable of stimulating an antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell response, we created an S. flexneri strain that constitutively secretes a viral CD8(+) T-cell epitope via the Shigella type III secretion system and characterized the CD8(+) T-cell response to this strain both in mice and in cultured cells. Surprisingly, no T cells specific for the viral epitope were stimulated in mice infected with this strain, and cells infected with the recombinant strain were not targeted by epitope-specific T cells. Additionally, we found that the usually robust T-cell response to antigens artificially introduced into the cytoplasm of cultured cells was significantly reduced when the antigen-presenting cell was infected with Shigella. Collectively, these results suggest that antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells are not primed during S. flexneri infection and, as a result, afford little protection to the host during primary or subsequent infection.

  20. Survival and antigenic profile of irradiated malarial sporozoites in infected liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suhrbier, A.; Winger, L.A.; Castellano, E.; Sinden, R.E. )

    1990-09-01

    Exoerythrocytic (EE) stages of Plasmodium berghei derived from irradiated sporozoites were cultured in vitro in HepG2 cells. They synthesized several antigens, predominantly but not exclusively those expressed by normal early erythrocytic schizonts. After invasion, over half the intracellular sporozoites, both normal and irradiated, appeared to die. After 24 h, in marked contrast to the normal parasites, EE parasites derived from irradiated sporozoites continued to break open, shedding their antigens into the cytoplasm of the infected host cells. Increasing radiation dosage, which has previously been shown to reduce the ability of irradiated sporozoites to protect animals, correlated with reduced de novo antigen synthesis by EE parasites derived from irradiated sporozoites.

  1. Transient induction of a nuclear antigen unrelated to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen in cells of two human B-lymphoma lines converted by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fresen, K O; zur Hausen, H

    1977-01-01

    Infection of cells of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human B-lymphoma lines BJAB and Ramos with EBV preparations from P3HR-1 or B 95-8 cells converted these cells to EBV genome carriers expressing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) in almost 100% of these cells. Induction of these cells as well as of clones from P3HR-1 EBV-converted BJAB cells with iododeoxyuridine, aminopterin, and hypoxanthine resulted in the appearance of a nuclear antigen in about 1-6% of the cells 1-4 days after induction. The antigen is different from known EBV-induced antigens like EBNA, viral capsid antigen (VCA) or the D- and R-subspecificities of the early antigen (EA) complex. It is demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence and inactivated after acetone fixation. The antigen was not detectable after induction of uninfected BJAB and Ramos cells nor has it been found in noninduced or induced P3HR-1 and Raji cells. Thus, it appears that EBV-infection mediates the expression of this antigen, for which the name TINA (transiently induced nuclear antigen) is suggested. Sera reacting against TINA generally contained high antibody titers against EBV-induced EA. Only a limited number of highly EA-reactive sera, however, were also positive for TINA. Among 200 sera tested thus far, TINA reactivity was most frequently observed in sera of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (7 out of 28), in sera of the only two patients with immunoblastoma tested and occasionally in sera from patients with Hodgkin's disease and chronic lymphatic leukemia. Among 70 sera from nontumor patients, TINA reactivity was observed three times: two patients suffered from "chronic" infectious mononucleosis, the other revealed persistent splenomegaly. PMID:189313

  2. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  3. A comprehensive platform for ex vivo T-cell expansion based on biodegradable polymeric artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steenblock, Erin R; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2008-04-01

    Efficient T-cell stimulation and proliferation in response to specific antigens is a goal of immunotherapy against infectious disease and cancer. Manipulation of this response can be accomplished by adoptive immunotherapy involving the infusion of antigen-specific T-cell populations expanded ex vivo with antigen presenting cells. We mimicked physiological antigen presentation on a biodegradable microparticle constructed from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), a polymer system whose safety has been established for use in humans. These particles present a high density of adaptor elements for attaching both recognition ligands and co-stimulatory ligands to a biodegradable core encapsulating the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). We demonstrate the utility of this system in efficient polyclonal and antigen-specific T-cell stimulation and expansion, showing that sustained release of IL-2 in the vicinity of T-cell contacts dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of these acellular systems, as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. This results in a 45-fold enhancement in T-cell expansion. In addition, this mode of antigen presentation skews the expansion toward the CD8(+) T-cell phenotype. This comprehensive acellular platform, capable of delivering recognition, co-stimulatory, and cytokine signals, represents a promising new technology for artificial antigen presentation. PMID:18334990

  4. Combinational targeting offsets antigen escape and enhances effector functions of adoptively transferred T cells in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Corder, Amanda; Chow, Kevin K H; Mukherjee, Malini; Ashoori, Aidin; Kew, Yvonne; Zhang, Yi Jonathan; Baskin, David S; Merchant, Fatima A; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Wu, Meng Fen; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen; Gottachalk, Stephen; Yvon, Eric; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and early clinical studies have demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells are highly promising in cancer therapy. We observed that targeting HER2 in a glioblastoma (GBM) cell line results in the emergence of HER2-null tumor cells that maintain the expression of nontargeted tumor-associated antigens. Combinational targeting of these tumor-associated antigens could therefore offset this escape mechanism. We studied the single-cell coexpression patterns of HER2, IL-13Rα2, and EphA2 in primary GBM samples using multicolor flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and applied a binomial routine to the permutations of antigen expression and the related odds of complete tumor elimination. This mathematical model demonstrated that cotargeting HER2 and IL-13Rα2 could maximally expand the therapeutic reach of the T cell product in all primary tumors studied. Targeting a third antigen did not predict an added advantage in the tumor cohort studied. We therefore generated bispecific T cell products from healthy donors and from GBM patients by pooling T cells individually expressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-specific CARs and by making individual T cells to coexpress both molecules. Both HER2/IL-13Rα2-bispecific T cell products offset antigen escape, producing enhanced effector activity in vitro immunoassays (against autologous glioma cells in the case of GBM patient products) and in an orthotopic xenogeneic murine model. Further, T cells coexpressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-CARs exhibited accentuated yet antigen-dependent downstream signaling and a particularly enhanced antitumor activity.

  5. Codelivery of antigen and an immune cell adhesion inhibitor is necessary for efficacy of soluble antigen arrays in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Joshua O; Sullivan, Bradley P; Thati, Sharadvi; Northrup, Laura; Hartwell, Brittany; Antunez, Lorena; Forrest, M Laird; Vines, Charlotte M; Siahaan, Teruna J; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are typified by the misrecognition of self-antigen and the clonal expansion of autoreactive T cells. Antigen-specific immunotherapies (antigen-SITs) have long been explored as a means to desensitize patients to offending self-antigen(s) with the potential to retolerize the immune response. Soluble antigen arrays (SAgAs) are composed of hyaluronic acid (HA) cografted with disease-specific autoantigen (proteolipid protein peptide) and an ICAM-1 inhibitor peptide (LABL). SAgAs were designed as an antigen-SIT that codeliver peptides to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of MS. Codelivery of antigen and cell adhesion inhibitor (LABL) conjugated to HA was essential for SAgA treatment of EAE. Individual SAgA components or mixtures thereof reduced proinflammatory cytokines in cultured splenocytes from EAE mice; however, these treatments showed minimal to no in vivo therapeutic effect in EAE mice. Thus, carriers that codeliver antigen and a secondary “context” signal (e.g., LABL) in vivo may be an important design criteria to consider when designing antigen-SIT for autoimmune therapy. PMID:26015953

  6. THE MECHANISM OF ANTIGENIC STIMULATION OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY CLONAL PRECURSOR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Klinman, Norman R.

    1972-01-01

    Cell transfers to carrier-immunized irradiated mice have permitted an analysis of the in vitro stimulation of clonal precursors of anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) antibody-producing cells derived from both immune and nonimmune mice. The results indicate that: (a) carrier-specific enhancement is obligatory for stimulation of primary precursor cells and increases both the size and number of detectable foci derived from secondary precursors. (b) This carrier-specific enhancement is most apparent in the stimulation of precursors of high-affinity antibody producer cells. (c) The antibody produced by primary foci, like that of secondary foci, appears homogeneous. (d) The frequency of clonal precursors in normal spleens is 38% that in spleens from mice 4–8 months after immunization, and the number of such precursors in normal spleens can be reduced fivefold by specific suppression of donor mice with soluble antigen. (e) The average of association constants of primary monofocal antibodies, like that of primary serum antibody produced in carrier-primed mice, is less than 10-fold lower than that of secondary clonal or serum antibody. (f) The affinity of primary monofocal antibodies shows a slight dependence on stimulating antigen concentration; however, a minimum threshold affinity consonant with stimulation is apparent. (g) Free hapten inhibits antigenic stimulation of primary precursor cells at a much lower concentration than is required for the inhibition of secondary precursors. These results are interpreted as indicating that (a) primary stimulation, like secondary stimulation, results from the selective stimulation by antigen of a population of cells differing from one another in their potential antibody product but each having only a single such product; (b) the antigen receptors of primary cells interact with antigen as if they are monovalent while receptors of secondary cells evidence multivalence; (c) antigenic stimulation appears to require both a relatively high

  7. Immunomodulatory Effects of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 on Dendritic Cells Promote Induction of T Cell Hyporesponsiveness to Myelin-Derived Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Willekens, Barbara; Cras, Patrick; Goossens, Herman; Martínez-Cáceres, Eva; Berneman, Zwi N.

    2016-01-01

    While emerging evidence indicates that dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), their modulation with immunoregulatory agents provides prospect as disease-modifying therapy. Our observations reveal that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) treatment of monocyte-derived DC results in a semimature phenotype and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile as compared to conventional DC, in both healthy controls and MS patients. Importantly, 1,25(OH)2D3-treated DC induce T cell hyporesponsiveness, as demonstrated in an allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction. Next, following a freeze-thaw cycle, 1,25(OH)2D3-treated immature DC could be recovered with a 78% yield and 75% viability. Cryopreservation did not affect the expression of membrane markers by 1,25(OH)2D3-treated DC nor their capacity to induce T cell hyporesponsiveness. In addition, the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by 1,25(OH)2D3-treated DC is antigen-specific and robust since T cells retain their capacity to respond to an unrelated antigen and do not reactivate upon rechallenge with fully mature conventional DC, respectively. These observations underline the clinical potential of tolerogenic DC (tolDC) to correct the immunological imbalance in MS. Furthermore, the feasibility to cryopreserve highly potent tolDC will, ultimately, contribute to the large-scale production and the widely applicable use of tolDC. PMID:27703987

  8. Targeted delivery of antigen to hamster nasal lymphoid tissue with M-cell-directed lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, P J; Boden, J A; Monath, T P

    1997-01-01

    The nasal cavity of a rodent is lined by an epithelium organized into distinct regional domains responsible for specific physiological functions. Aggregates of nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT) located at the base of the nasal cavity are believed to be sites of induction of mucosal immune responses to airborne antigens. The epithelium overlying NALT contains M cells which are specialized for the transcytosis of immunogens, as demonstrated in other mucosal tissues. We hypothesized that NALT M cells are characterized by distinct glycoconjugate receptors which influence antigen uptake and immune responses to transcytosed antigens. To identify glycoconjugates that may distinguish NALT M cells from other cells of the respiratory epithelium (RE), we performed lectin histochemistry on sections of the hamster nasal cavity with a panel of lectins. Many classes of glycoconjugates were found on epithelial cells in this region. While most lectins bound to sites on both the RE and M cells, probes capable of recognizing alpha-linked galactose were found to label the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) almost exclusively. By morphological criteria, the FAE contains >90% M cells. To determine if apical glycoconjugates on M cells were accessible from the nasal cavity, an M-cell-selective lectin and a control lectin in parallel were administered intranasally to hamsters. The M-cell-selective lectin was found to specifically target the FAE, while the control lectin did not. Lectin bound to M cells in vivo was efficiently endocytosed, consistent with the role of M cells in antigen transport. Intranasal immunization with lectin-test antigen conjugates without adjuvant stimulated induction of specific serum immunoglobulin G, whereas antigen alone or admixed with lectin did not. The selective recognition of NALT M cells by a lectin in vivo provides a model for microbial adhesin-host cell receptor interactions on M cells and the targeted delivery of immunogens to NALT following intranasal

  9. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Rob N; Beurskens, Frank J; Verploegen, Sandra; Strumane, Kristin; van Kampen, Muriel D; Voorhorst, Marleen; Horstman, Wendy; Engelberts, Patrick J; Oostindie, Simone C; Wang, Guanbo; Heck, Albert J R; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies can organize into ordered hexamers on cell surfaces after binding their antigen. These hexamers bind the first component of complement C1 inducing complement-dependent target cell killing. Here, we translated this natural concept into a novel technology platform (HexaBody technology) for therapeutic antibody potentiation. We identified mutations that enhanced hexamer formation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies against a range of targets on cells from hematological and solid tumor indications. IgG1 backbones with preferred mutations E345K or E430G conveyed a strong ability to induce conditional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient tumor cells, while retaining regular pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutical developability. Both mutations potently enhanced CDC- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of a type II CD20 antibody that was ineffective in complement activation, while retaining its ability to induce apoptosis. The identified IgG1 Fc backbones provide a novel platform for the generation of therapeutics with enhanced effector functions that only become activated upon binding to target cell-expressed antigen. PMID:26736041

  10. Atypical natural killer T-cell receptor recognition of CD1d–lipid antigens

    PubMed Central

    Le Nours, Jérôme; Praveena, T.; Pellicci, Daniel G.; Gherardin, Nicholas A.; Ross, Fiona J.; Lim, Ricky T.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Richardson, Stewart K.; Howell, Amy R.; Gras, Stephanie; Godfrey, Dale I.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Uldrich, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    Crucial to Natural Killer T (NKT) cell function is the interaction between their T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD1d-antigen complex. However, the diversity of the NKT cell repertoire and the ensuing interactions with CD1d-antigen remain unclear. We describe an atypical population of CD1d–α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-reactive human NKT cells that differ markedly from the prototypical TRAV10-TRAJ18-TRBV25-1+ type I NKT cell repertoire. These cells express a range of TCR α- and β-chains that show differential recognition of glycolipid antigens. Two atypical NKT TCRs (TRAV21-TRAJ8-TRBV7–8 and TRAV12-3-TRAJ27-TRBV6-5) bind orthogonally over the A′-pocket of CD1d, adopting distinct docking modes that contrast with the docking mode of all type I NKT TCR-CD1d-antigen complexes. Moreover, the interactions with α-GalCer differ between the type I and these atypical NKT TCRs. Accordingly, diverse NKT TCR repertoire usage manifests in varied docking strategies and specificities towards CD1d–α-GalCer and related antigens, thus providing far greater scope for diverse glycolipid antigen recognition. PMID:26875526

  11. Targeting Antigens to Dec-205 on Dendritic Cells Induces Immune Protection in Experimental Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wadwa, Munisch; Klopfleisch, Robert; Buer, Jan; Westendorf, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    The endocytotic c-type lectin receptor DEC-205 is highly expressed on immature dendritic cells. In previous studies, it was shown that antigen-targeting to DEC-205 is a useful tool for the induction of antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and thereby can prevent inflammatory processes. However, whether this approach is sufficient to mediate tolerance in mucosal tissues like the gut is unknown. In this study, we established a new mouse model in which the adoptive transfer of naive hemagglutinin (HA)-specific CD4+Foxp3– T cells into VILLIN-HA transgenic mice leads to severe colitis. To analyze if antigen-targeting to DEC-205 could protect against inflammation of the gut, VILLIN-HA transgenic mice were injected with an antibody–antigen complex consisting of the immunogenic HA110–120 peptide coupled to an α-DEC-205 antibody (DEC-HA) before adoptive T cell transfer. DEC-HA-treated mice showed significantly less signs of intestinal inflammation as was demonstrated by reduced loss of body weight and histopathology in the gut. Strikingly, abrogated intestinal inflammation was mediated via the conversion of naive HA-specific CD4+Foxp3– T cells into HA-specific CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In this study, we provide evidence that antigen-targeting to DEC-205 can be utilized for the induction of tolerance in mucosal organs that are confronted with large numbers of exogenous antigens. PMID:27141310

  12. NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive T cell receptors exhibit diverse therapeutic capability.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Conrad, Heinke; Krönig, Holger; Gelfort, Haike; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-15

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has been used as a target for different immunotherapies like vaccinations and adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, as it is expressed in various tumor types and has limited expression in normal cells. The in vitro generation of T cells with defined antigen specificity by T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an established method to create cells for immunotherapy. However, an extensive characterization of TCR which are candidates for treatment of patients is crucial for successful therapies. The TCR has to be efficiently expressed, their affinity to the desired antigen should be high enough to recognize low amounts of endogenously processed peptides on tumor cells, and the TCR should not be cross-reactive to other antigens. We characterized three NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones which were generated by different approaches of T cell priming (autologous, allogeneic), and transferred their TCR into donor T cells for more extensive evaluations. Although one TCR most efficiently bound MHC-multimers loaded with NY-ESO-1 peptide, T cells expressing this transgenic TCR were not able to recognize endogenously processed antigen. A second TCR recognized HLA-A2 independent of the bound peptide beside its much stronger recognition of NY-ESO-1 bound to HLA-A2. A third TCR displayed an intermediate but peptide-specific performance in all functional assays and, therefore, is the most promising candidate TCR for further clinical development. Our data indicate that multiple parameters of TCR gene-modified T cells have to be evaluated to identify an optimal TCR candidate for adoptive therapy.

  13. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: the synthetic embodiment of a 'guided missile'.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Mackensen, Andreas; Fleck, Martin

    2010-07-01

    At present, the treatment of T-cell-dependent autoimmune diseases relies exclusively on strategies leading to nonspecific suppression of the immune systems causing a substantial reduced ability to control concomitant infections or malignancies. Furthermore, long-term treatment with most drugs is accompanied by several serious adverse effects and does not consequently result in cure of the primary immunological malfunction. By contrast, antigen-specific immunotherapy offers the potential to achieve the highest therapeutic efficiency in accordance with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, several studies have been performed utilizing antigen-presenting cells specifically engineered to deplete allo- or antigen-specific T cells ('guided missiles'). Many of these strategies take advantage of the Fas/Fas ligand signaling pathway to efficiently induce antigen-presenting cell-mediated apoptosis in targeted T cells. In this article, we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of a novel non-cell-based 'killer artificial antigen-presenting cell' strategy, developed to overcome obstacles related to current cell-based approaches for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:20636007

  14. Increased competition for antigen during priming negatively impacts the generation of memory CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Blair, David A.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2007-01-01

    The factors involved in the differentiation of memory CD4 T cells from naïve precursors are poorly understood. We developed a system to examine the effect of increased competition for antigen by CD4 T cells on the generation of memory in response to infection with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus. Competition was initially regulated by increasing the precursor frequency of adoptively transferred naïve T cell antigen receptor transgenic CD4 T cells. Despite robust proliferation at high precursor frequencies, memory CD4 T cells did not develop, whereas decreasing the input number of naïve CD4 T cells promoted memory development after infection. The lack of memory development was linked to reduced blastogenesis and poor effector cell induction, but not to initial recruitment or proliferation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells. To prove that availability of antigen alone could regulate memory CD4 T cell development, we used treatment with an mAb specific for the epitope recognized by the transferred CD4 T cells. At high doses, this mAb effectively inhibited the antigen-specific CD4 T cell response. However, at a very low dose of mAb, primary CD4 T cell expansion was unaffected, although memory development was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the induction of effector function was concomitantly inhibited. Thus, competition for antigen during CD4 T cell priming is a major contributing factor to the development of the memory CD4 T cell pool. PMID:17827281

  15. Chitosan Feasibility to Retain Retinal Stem Cell Phenotype and Slow Proliferation for Retinal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Girish K.; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Singh, Amar K.; Casado-Coterillo, Clara; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T.; Coronas, Joaquin; Pastor, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Retinal stem cells (RSCs) are promising in cell replacement strategies for retinal diseases. RSCs can migrate, differentiate, and integrate into retina. However, RSCs transplantation needs an adequate support; chitosan membrane (ChM) could be one, which can carry RSCs with high feasibility to support their integration into retina. RSCs were isolated, evaluated for phenotype, and subsequently grown on sterilized ChM and polystyrene surface for 8 hours, 1, 4, and 11 days for analysing cell adhesion, proliferation, viability, and phenotype. Isolated RSCs expressed GFAP, PKC, isolectin, recoverin, RPE65, PAX-6, cytokeratin 8/18, and nestin proteins. They adhered (28 ± 16%, 8 hours) and proliferated (40 ± 20 cells/field, day 1 and 244 ± 100 cells/field, day 4) significantly low (P < 0.05) on ChM. However, they maintained similar viability (>95%) and phenotype (cytokeratin 8/18, PAX6, and nestin proteins expression, day 11) on both surfaces (ChM and polystyrene). RSCs did not express alpha-SMA protein on both surfaces. RSCs express proteins belonging to epithelial, glial, and neural cells, confirming that they need further stimulus to reach a final destination of differentiation that could be provided in in vivo condition. ChM does not alternate RSCs behaviour and therefore can be used as a cell carrier so that slow proliferating RSCs can migrate and integrate into retina. PMID:24719852

  16. Chitosan feasibility to retain retinal stem cell phenotype and slow proliferation for retinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Girish K; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Singh, Amar K; Casado-Coterillo, Clara; Fernandez-Bueno, Ivan; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T; Coronas, Joaquin; Pastor, J Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Retinal stem cells (RSCs) are promising in cell replacement strategies for retinal diseases. RSCs can migrate, differentiate, and integrate into retina. However, RSCs transplantation needs an adequate support; chitosan membrane (ChM) could be one, which can carry RSCs with high feasibility to support their integration into retina. RSCs were isolated, evaluated for phenotype, and subsequently grown on sterilized ChM and polystyrene surface for 8 hours, 1, 4, and 11 days for analysing cell adhesion, proliferation, viability, and phenotype. Isolated RSCs expressed GFAP, PKC, isolectin, recoverin, RPE65, PAX-6, cytokeratin 8/18, and nestin proteins. They adhered (28 ± 16%, 8 hours) and proliferated (40 ± 20 cells/field, day 1 and 244 ± 100 cells/field, day 4) significantly low (P < 0.05) on ChM. However, they maintained similar viability (>95%) and phenotype (cytokeratin 8/18, PAX6, and nestin proteins expression, day 11) on both surfaces (ChM and polystyrene). RSCs did not express alpha-SMA protein on both surfaces. RSCs express proteins belonging to epithelial, glial, and neural cells, confirming that they need further stimulus to reach a final destination of differentiation that could be provided in in vivo condition. ChM does not alternate RSCs behaviour and therefore can be used as a cell carrier so that slow proliferating RSCs can migrate and integrate into retina.

  17. Induction of primary, antiviral cytotoxic, and proliferative responses with antigens administered via dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, S; Babu, J S; Dunham, R G; Kanda, P; Burke, R L; Rouse, B T

    1993-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) play an essential role in recovery from viral infections, but induction of CTL responses with nonreplicating antigens is difficult to achieve. Exogenous antigens, such as viral proteins and peptides, normally induce CD4+ T-cell responses unless appropriately delivered to the major histocompatibility complex class I antigen presentation pathway. In vitro studies performed to address this issue revealed a similar scenario, and primary CTL induction with nonreplicating antigens has rarely been reported. This study demonstrated primary antiviral CTL induction in vitro with exogenous antigens delivered in vivo to dendritic cells. This study also evaluated the efficacy of glycoprotein B peptide (free or encapsulated in liposomes), peptide-tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl cysteinyl conjugate (acylpeptide), and glycoprotein B protein encapsulated in pH-sensitive liposomes as antigen delivery vehicles. Our results show that higher levels of cytotoxicity against herpes simplex virus type 1 resulted from exposure of dendritic cells to peptide-tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl cysteinyl in liposomes. Macrophages treated in a similar manner were not effective stimulators for primary CTL induction. Our data have relevance to the understanding of mechanisms of antigen processing and presentation and the design of antiviral vaccines. PMID:8510217

  18. SEROLOGICAL ANALYSES OF CELLULAR SLIME-MOLD DEVELOPMENT. I. CHANGES IN ANTIGENIC ACTIVITY DURING CELL AGGREATION.

    PubMed

    SONNEBORN, D R; SUSSMAN, M; LEVINE, L

    1964-06-01

    Sonneborn, D. R. (Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass.), M. Sussman, and L. Levine. Serological analysis of cellular slime-mold development. I. Changes in antigenic activity during cell aggregation. J. Bacteriol. 87:1321-1329. 1964.-During aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum, the concentration of a single antigenic determinant increased markedly, starting from very low or undetectable levels. Subsequently, the determinant appeared to segregate preferentially into the stalks of terminal fruiting bodies. Sera containing the antibody specific for this determinant inhibited the aggregation of D. discoideum without disturbing cell viability. The properties of the antigen during fractionation are consistent with the supposition that it may be a protein associated with the cell membrane. The ability or inability of three species to coaggregate with D. discoideum was correlated with the presence or absence of the antigenic determinant in aggregates of these species.

  19. A structural basis for antigen recognition by the T cell-like lymphocytes of sea lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lu; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Xu, Gang; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Tasumi, Satoshi; Kerzic, Melissa C.; Flajnik, Martin F.; Aravind, L.; Pancer, Zeev; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2010-10-28

    Adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates is mediated by leucine-rich repeat proteins called 'variable lymphocyte receptors' (VLRs). Two types of VLR (A and B) are expressed by mutually exclusive lymphocyte populations in lamprey. VLRB lymphocytes resemble the B cells of jawed vertebrates; VLRA lymphocytes are similar to T cells. We determined the structure of a high-affinity VLRA isolated from lamprey immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) in unbound and antigen-bound forms. The VLRA-HEL complex demonstrates that certain VLRAs, like {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptors (TCRs) but unlike {alpha}{beta} TCRs, can recognize antigens directly, without a requirement for processing or antigen-presenting molecules. Thus, these VLRAs feature the nanomolar affinities of antibodies, the direct recognition of unprocessed antigens of both antibodies and {gamma}{delta} TCRs, and the exclusive expression on the lymphocyte surface that is unique to {alpha}{beta} and {gamma}{delta} TCRs.

  20. Successive Administration of Streptococcus Type 5 Group A Antigens and S. typhimurium Antigenic Complex Corrects Elevation of Serum Cytokine Concentration and Number of Bone Marrow Stromal Pluripotent Cells in CBA Mice Induced by Each Antigen Separately.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Grabko, V I; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-12-01

    Administration of bacterial antigens to CBA mice induced an increase in serum concentration of virtually all cytokines with a peak in 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens and in 7 h after administration of streptococcus antigens. In 20 h, cytokine concentrations returned to the control level or were slightly below it. In 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, we observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-10, GM-CSF, IL-12, and TNF-α, in comparison with injection S. typhimurium antigens alone and IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF, and TNF-α in comparison with injection of streptococcus antigens alone; the concentrations of IL-2 and IFN-γ, in contrast, increased by 1.5 times in this case. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens, the number of multipotential stromal cells (MSC) in the bone marrow and their cloning efficiency (ECF-MSC) increased by 4.8 and 4.4 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, while after administration of streptococcus antigens by 2.6 and 2.4 times, respectively. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, these parameters increased by 3.2 and 2.9 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, i.e. the observed increase in the level of MSC count and ECF-MSC is more consistent with the response of the stromal tissue to streptococcus antigens. Thus, successive administration of two bacterial antigens corrected both serum cytokine profiles and MSC response to administration of each antigen separately, which indicates changeability of the stromal tissue in response to changes in the immune response.

  1. Biodegradable nanoparticle mediated antigen delivery to human cord blood derived dendritic cells for induction of primary T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Manish; Elamanchili, Praveen; Lane, Helena; Gainer, Anita; Samuel, John

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) in the peripheral tissues act as sentinels of the immune system. They detect and capture pathogens entering the body and present their antigens to T cells to trigger responses directed towards elimination of the pathogen. The induction of peripheral tolerance against self and certain foreign antigens is also believed to be mediated through DCs. The outcome of any immune response is largely controlled by the microenvironment of antigen capture, processing and presentation by DCs. The "context" of antigen delivery to DCs will directly influence the microenvironment of antigen presentation and hence the regulation of immune responses. We report here preliminary investigations describing the formulation of a pharmaceutically acceptable, biodegradable, and strategic nanoparticulate delivery system, and its application for efficient antigen loading of DCs to achieve antigen specific T cell activation. "Pathogen-mimicking" nanoparticles capable of interacting with DCs were fabricated by incorporating monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA; toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand) or CpG ODN (seq #2006; TLR9 ligand) in biodegradable copolymer, poly(D,L,-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The uptake of PLGA nanoparticles by human umbilical cord blood derived DCs (DCs propagated from CD34 progenitors) was conclusively demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Cell phenotype at day 12 of cultures was determined as immature DC using specific cell surface markers, i.e. CD11c (approximately 90%), MHC-II (approximately 70%), CD86 (approximately 20%), CD83 (approximately 5%), CD80 (approximately 40%), CD40 (approximately 40%), and CCR7 (approximately 5%). Tetanus toxoid (TT), a model antigen, was encapsulated in nanoparticles along with an immunomodulator, i.e. either MPLA or CpG ODN. DCs pulsed with various antigen formulations were co-cultured with autologous naïve T cells at

  2. Human cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Marcus O.; Hirano, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Adoptive T-cell therapy, where antitumor T cells are first prepared in vitro, is attractive since it facilitates the delivery of essential signals to selected subsets of antitumor T cells without unfavorable immunoregulatory issues that exist in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that antitumor adoptive T-cell therapy, i.e. infusion of tumor-specific T cells, can induce clinically relevant and sustained responses in patients with advanced cancer. The goal of adoptive cell therapy is to establish antitumor immunological memory, which can result in life-long rejection of tumor cells in patients. To achieve this goal, during the process of in vitro expansion, T-cell grafts used in adoptive T-cell therapy must to be appropriately educated and equipped with the capacity to accomplish multiple, essential tasks. Adoptively transferred T cells must be endowed, prior to infusion, with the ability to efficiently engraft, expand, persist, and traffic to tumor in vivo. As a strategy to consistently generate T-cell grafts with these capabilities, artificial antigen-presenting cells have been developed to deliver the proper signals necessary to T cells to enable optimal adoptive cell therapy. PMID:24329798

  3. Human cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Butler, Marcus O; Hirano, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy, where anti-tumor T cells are first prepared in vitro, is attractive since it facilitates the delivery of essential signals to selected subsets of anti-tumor T cells without unfavorable immunoregulatory issues that exist in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that anti-tumor adoptive T-cell therapy, i.e. infusion of tumor-specific T cells, can induce clinically relevant and sustained responses in patients with advanced cancer. The goal of adoptive cell therapy is to establish anti-tumor immunologic memory, which can result in life-long rejection of tumor cells in patients. To achieve this goal, during the process of in vitro expansion, T-cell grafts used in adoptive T-cell therapy must be appropriately educated and equipped with the capacity to accomplish multiple, essential tasks. Adoptively transferred T cells must be endowed, prior to infusion, with the ability to efficiently engraft, expand, persist, and traffic to tumor in vivo. As a strategy to consistently generate T-cell grafts with these capabilities, artificial antigen-presenting cells have been developed to deliver the proper signals necessary to T cells to enable optimal adoptive cell therapy. PMID:24329798

  4. Comprehensive red blood cell and platelet antigen prediction from whole genome sequencing: proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Connie M.; Uy, Jon Michael; Aguad, Maria; Smeland‐Wagman, Robin; Kaufman, Richard M.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Green, Robert C.; Silberstein, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are 346 serologically defined red blood cell (RBC) antigens and 33 serologically defined platelet (PLT) antigens, most of which have known genetic changes in 45 RBC or six PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression. Polymorphic sites associated with antigen expression in the primary literature and reference databases are annotated according to nucleotide positions in cDNA. This makes antigen prediction from next‐generation sequencing data challenging, since it uses genomic coordinates. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The conventional cDNA reference sequences for all known RBC and PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression were aligned to the human reference genome. The alignments allowed conversion of conventional cDNA nucleotide positions to the corresponding genomic coordinates. RBC and PLT antigen prediction was then performed using the human reference genome and whole genome sequencing (WGS) data with serologic confirmation. RESULTS Some major differences and alignment issues were found when attempting to convert the conventional cDNA to human reference genome sequences for the following genes: ABO, A4GALT, RHD, RHCE, FUT3, ACKR1 (previously DARC), ACHE, FUT2, CR1, GCNT2, and RHAG. However, it was possible to create usable alignments, which facilitated the prediction of all RBC and PLT antigens with a known molecular basis from WGS data. Traditional serologic typing for 18 RBC antigens were in agreement with the WGS‐based antigen predictions, providing proof of principle for this approach. CONCLUSION Detailed mapping of conventional cDNA annotated RBC and PLT alleles can enable accurate prediction of RBC and PLT antigens from whole genomic sequencing data. PMID:26634332

  5. Variant antigenic peptide promotes cytotoxic T lymphocyte adhesion to target cells without cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shotton, David M.; Attaran, Amir

    1998-01-01

    Timelapse video microscopy has been used to record the motility and dynamic interactions between an H-2Db-restricted murine cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone (F5) and Db-transfected L929 mouse fibroblasts (LDb) presenting normal or variant antigenic peptides from human influenza nucleoprotein. F5 cells will kill LDb target cells presenting specific antigen (peptide NP68: ASNENMDAM) after “browsing” their surfaces for between 8 min and many hours. Cell death is characterized by abrupt cellular rounding followed by zeiosis (vigorous “boiling” of the cytoplasm and blebbing of the plasma membrane) for 10–20 min, with subsequent cessation of all activity. Departure of cytotoxic T lymphocytes from unkilled target cells is rare, whereas serial killing is sometimes observed. In the absence of antigenic peptide, cytotoxic T lymphocytes browse target cells for much shorter periods, and readily leave to encounter other targets, while never causing target cell death. Two variant antigenic peptides, differing in nonamer position 7 or 8, also act as antigens, albeit with lower efficiency. A third variant peptide NP34 (ASNENMETM), which differs from NP68 in both positions and yet still binds Db, does not stimulate F5 cytotoxicity. Nevertheless, timelapse video analysis shows that NP34 leads to a significant modification of cell behavior, by up-regulating F5–LDb adhesive interactions. These data extend recent studies showing that partial agonists may elicit a subset of the T cell responses associated with full antigen stimulation, by demonstrating that TCR interaction with variant peptide antigens can trigger target cell adhesion and surface exploration without activating the signaling pathway that results in cytotoxicity. PMID:9861010

  6. Porcine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Stem Cell Characteristics and Cell Activities While Enhancing the Expression of Liver-Specific Genes after Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenxia; Zhou, Ning; Li, Jianzhou; Shi, Ding; Cao, Hongcui; Li, Jun; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-05

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a kind of complicated syndrome. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) can serve as a useful cell resource for autotransplantation due to their abundance and micro-invasive accessability. However, it is unknown how ALF will influence the characteristics of ADMSCs and whether ADMSCs from patients suffering from end-stage liver diseases are potential candidates for autotransplantation. This study was designed to compare various properties of ALF-derived ADMSCs with normal ADMSCs in pig models, with regard to their cellular morphology, cell proliferative ability, cell apoptosis, expression of surface antigens, mitochondrial and lysosomal activities, multilineage potency, and expression of liver-specific genes. Our results showed that ALF does not influence the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs. Intriguingly, the expression levels of several liver-specific genes in ALF-derived ADMSCs are higher than in normal ADMSCs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs were not altered by ALF and these cells can serve as a new source for regenerative medicine.

  7. Porcine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Stem Cell Characteristics and Cell Activities While Enhancing the Expression of Liver-Specific Genes after Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chenxia; Zhou, Ning; Li, Jianzhou; Shi, Ding; Cao, Hongcui; Li, Jun; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a kind of complicated syndrome. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) can serve as a useful cell resource for autotransplantation due to their abundance and micro-invasive accessability. However, it is unknown how ALF will influence the characteristics of ADMSCs and whether ADMSCs from patients suffering from end-stage liver diseases are potential candidates for autotransplantation. This study was designed to compare various properties of ALF-derived ADMSCs with normal ADMSCs in pig models, with regard to their cellular morphology, cell proliferative ability, cell apoptosis, expression of surface antigens, mitochondrial and lysosomal activities, multilineage potency, and expression of liver-specific genes. Our results showed that ALF does not influence the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs. Intriguingly, the expression levels of several liver-specific genes in ALF-derived ADMSCs are higher than in normal ADMSCs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs were not altered by ALF and these cells can serve as a new source for regenerative medicine. PMID:26742034

  8. CTLA4 mediates antigen-specific apoptosis of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, J G; Freeman, G J; Boussiotis, V A; Rennert, P; Jellis, C L; Greenfield, E; Barber, M; Restivo, V A; Ke, X; Gray, G S

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses requires a balance between amplification and generation of effector function and subsequent selective termination by clonal deletion. Although apoptosis of previously activated T cells can be induced by signaling of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, these molecules do not appear to regulate T-cell clonal deletion in an antigen-specific fashion. We demonstrate that cross-linking of the inducible T-cell surface molecule CTLA4 can mediate apoptosis of previously activated human T lymphocytes. This function appears to be antigen-restricted, since a concomitant signal T-cell receptor signal is required. Regulation of this pathway may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to delete antigen-specific activated T cells. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846057

  9. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jonathan Cy; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. PMID:27205882

  10. Differential presentation of tumor antigen-derived epitopes by MHC-class I and antigen-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Held, Gerhard; Neumann, Frank; Sturm, Christine; Kaestner, Lars; Dauth, Nina; de Bruijn, Diederik R; Renner, Christoph; Lipp, Peter; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-10-15

    SSX2 is a member of the family of cancer/testis antigens. The SSX2 derived peptide SSX2(103-111) has been shown to be presented to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by Major-Histocompatibility (MHC) Class-I complexes after endogenous processing, more precisely by the allele HLA-A*0201. The HLA-A*0201- and SSX2-positive melanoma cell line SK-Mel-37 but not Me275 had been shown to elicit reactivity in SSX2(103-111) specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. To analyze the correlation between SSX2(103-111) presentation and T-cell stimulation, we intended to visualize presentation of SSX2(103-111) in these melanoma cell lines. Fab-antibodies were established from a human phage library with specificity for SSX2(103-111)/HLA-A*0201 complexes (but non-reactive with HLA-A*0201 or SSX2(103-111) alone) and used to visualize the presentation of SSX2(103-111) in the context of HLA-A*0201 by fluorescence microscopy. Presentation of SSX2(103-111) the context of HLA-A*0201 was demonstrated for the majority of SK-Mel-37, but for only a small fraction (<1%) of Me275 as indicated by a clear membrane-staining pattern in fluorescence microscopy. The presentation of SSX2(103-111) on SK-Mel37 and Me275, but not the expression of the SSX2 protein correlated with the capability of these cells to stimulate cells of an SSX2(103-111)-specific T-cell clone. MHC-peptide specific antibodies are a valuable tool for the analysis of antigenic peptides in the context of MHC-I molecules and for the structural definition of immunodominant epitopes. PMID:18688854

  11. Expression of the T-cell surface molecule CD2 and an epitope-loss CD2 mutant to define the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, B E; Peterson, A; Barbosa, J; Seed, B; Burakoff, S J

    1988-01-01

    To define the role of the CD2-lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) interaction in T-cell activation, we have expressed a cDNA encoding the human CD2 molecule in a murine antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Expression of the CD2 molecule greatly enhances T-cell responsiveness to antigen; this enhancement is inhibited by anti-CD2 and anti-LFA-3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). CD2+ hybridomas produce interleukin 2 in response to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs 9.6 and 9-1 and, in the presence of mAb 9-1, to sheep erythrocytes or to the LFA-3 antigen. Furthermore, hybridomas expressing a mutant CD2 molecule that has lost mAb 9.6 binding do not exhibit the enhanced response to antigen or the ability to respond to LFA-3 plus mAb 9-1, but these hybridomas retain the ability to respond to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs. The role of the CD2-LFA-3 interaction in T-cell activation and the potential for other physiologic ligands for CD2 are discussed. PMID:2448792

  12. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated peripheral regulatory T cell and tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses towards innocuous foreign antigens via peripheral regulatory T cells (pTreg cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure to instruct naïve CD4+ T cells to differentiate into pTreg cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs are dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) are critical for pTreg cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b− cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pTreg cells, and conversely, loss of IRF8-dependent CD11b− cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in pTreg cell induction and their redundancy during oral tolerance development. PMID:27019226

  13. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Verploegen, Sandra; Strumane, Kristin; van Kampen, Muriel D.; Voorhorst, Marleen; Horstman, Wendy; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Oostindie, Simone C.; Wang, Guanbo; Heck, Albert J. R.; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies can organize into ordered hexamers on cell surfaces after binding their antigen. These hexamers bind the first component of complement C1 inducing complement-dependent target cell killing. Here, we translated this natural concept into a novel technology platform (HexaBody technology) for therapeutic antibody potentiation. We identified mutations that enhanced hexamer formation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies against a range of targets on cells from hematological and solid tumor indications. IgG1 backbones with preferred mutations E345K or E430G conveyed a strong ability to induce conditional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient tumor cells, while retaining regular pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutical developability. Both mutations potently enhanced CDC- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of a type II CD20 antibody that was ineffective in complement activation, while retaining its ability to induce apoptosis. The identified IgG1 Fc backbones provide a novel platform for the generation of therapeutics with enhanced effector functions that only become activated upon binding to target cell–expressed antigen. PMID:26736041

  14. Adipose-derived stem cells retain their regenerative potential after methotrexate treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Olivia S.; Fonseca, Vera C.; Darling, Eric M.

    2014-10-01

    In musculoskeletal tissues like bone, chemotherapy can impair progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation, resulting in decreased bone growth and mineralization throughout a patient's lifetime. In the current study, we investigated the effects of chemotherapeutics on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) function to determine whether this cell source could be a candidate for repairing, or even preventing, chemotherapy-induced tissue damage. Dose-dependent proliferation rates of ASCs and normal human fibroblasts (NHFs) were quantified after treatment with cytarabine (CY), etoposide (ETO), methotrexate (MTX), and vincristine (VIN) using a fluorescence-based assay. The influence of MTX on the multipotency of ASCs and freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells was also evaluated using lineage-specific stains and spectrophotometry. ASC and NHF proliferation were equally inhibited by exposure to CY and ETO; however, when treated with MTX and VIN, ASCs exhibited greater resistance. This was especially apparent for MTX-treated samples, with ASC proliferation showing no inhibition for clinically relevant MTX doses ranging from 0.1 to 50 μM. Additional experiments revealed that the differentiation potential of ASCs was not affected by MTX treatment and that upregulation of dihydrofolate reductase possibly contributed to this response. Moreover, SVF cells, which include ASCs, exhibited similar resistance to MTX impairment, with respect to cellular proliferation, clonogenicity, and differentiation capability. Therefore, we have shown that the regenerative properties of ASCs resist the cytotoxicity of MTX, identifying these cells as a potential key for repairing musculoskeletal damage in patients undergoing chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Long-term effects of chemotherapeutics can include musculoskeletal dysfunction. • A screen of common drugs showed disparate effects on ASCs and fibroblasts. • One drug, methotrexate, did not impair ASC growth characteristics

  15. Tubulin and actin interplay at the T cell and antigen-presenting cell interface.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off.

  16. Tubulin and Actin Interplay at the T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off. PMID:22566814

  17. Recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens on lymphocytic and myeloid leukemic cells by cytotoxic T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, D; Goulmy, E; Falkenburg, J H; Kooij-Winkelaar, Y M; van Luxemburg-Heijs, S A; Goselink, H M; Brand, A

    1994-02-15

    Clinical studies indicated an enhanced antileukemic effect of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), as compared with autologous BMT. After allogeneic HLA-identical BMT, donor-derived cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed at minor histocompatibility (mH) antigens on the recipients, tissues can be shown. To evaluate the antileukemic reactivity of mH antigen-specific CTLs, we analyzed the expression of mH antigens on circulating lymphocytic and myeloid leukemic cells. We show that the defined mH specificities HA-1 through HA-5 and H-Y are present on leukemic cells, indicating that mH antigen-specific CTLs are capable of HLA class I-restricted antigen-specific lysis of leukemic cells. Compared with interleukin-2-stimulated normal lymphocytes, leukemic cells of lymphocytic origin are less susceptible to T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity by the HA-2 mH antigen-specific CTL and the anti-HLA-A2 CTL clone. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is impaired expression of the LFA-1 adhesion molecule. Our study suggests that mH antigen-specific HLA class I-restricted CD8+ CTLs may be involved in the graft-versus-leukemia reactivity after allogeneic BMT.

  18. Studies on thyroid cell surface antigens using cultured human thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fenzi, G F; Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Marcocci, C; Rotella, C M; Zonefrati, R; Toccafondi, R; Pinchera, A

    1982-01-01

    Human thyroid cells in primary culture were used for studies of thyroid cell surface antibodies in patients with thyroid autoimmune disorders. Radioiodinated IgG preparations containing thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb), thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and/or thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) were tested for binding to thyroid cells. Binding was observed with radioiodinated IgG from patients with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and idiopathic myxoedema containing TMAb, irrespective of the presence of TSAb and TgAb, while negative results were obtained with normal IgG. A dose-dependent inhibition of binding to thyroid cells was produced by the addition of the corresponding unlabelled IgG preparations. Evidence for tissue specificity was provided by the absence of binding to human skin fibroblasts used as controls. Preabsorption with human thyroid microsomes completely abolished the binding to thyroid cells of a radioiodinated TMAb positive IgG preparation, while only incomplete removal of the reactivity to thyroid microsomes was produced by preabsorption with thyroid cells. These data suggest that some but not all microsomal antigenic determinants are expressed on the thyroid cell surface. Binding to thyroid cells was also observed with purified TgAb, indicating that thyroglobulin antigenic determinants are present on the surface of thyroid cells. No evidence of binding was obtained with a TSAb positive Graves' IgG preparation with undetectable TMAb and TgAb. Unlabelled IgG preparations containing TMAb from patients with either Hashimoto's thyroiditis or idiopathic myxoedema were shown to inhibit the binding to thyroid cells of radioiodinated TMAb positive Graves' IgG and vice versa. These data indicate that antibodies present in these thyroid autoimmune disorders share common thyroid cell surface antigens. However, the binding of radioiodinated IgG from a patient with idiopathic myxoedema was only partially inhibited by Graves' or Hashimoto's Ig

  19. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Mediates Microtubule Destabilization To Promote Cell Motility and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Laura M.; Stakaityte, Gabriele; Wood, Jennifer, J.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Griffiths, David A.; Howell, Gareth J.; Wheat, Rachel; Blair, G. Eric; Steven, Neil M.; Macdonald, Andrew; Blackbourn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive skin cancer of neuroendocrine origin with a high propensity for recurrence and metastasis. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes the majority of MCC cases due to the expression of the MCPyV small and large tumor antigens (ST and LT, respectively). Although a number of molecular mechanisms have been attributed to MCPyV tumor antigen-mediated cellular transformation or replication, to date, no studies have investigated any potential link between MCPyV T antigen expression and the highly metastatic nature of MCC. Here we use a quantitative proteomic approach to show that MCPyV ST promotes differential expression of cellular proteins implicated in microtubule-associated cytoskeletal organization and dynamics. Intriguingly, we demonstrate that MCPyV ST expression promotes microtubule destabilization, leading to a motile and migratory phenotype. We further highlight the essential role of the microtubule-associated protein stathmin in MCPyV ST-mediated microtubule destabilization and cell motility and implicate the cellular phosphatase catalytic subunit protein phosphatase 4C (PP4C) in the regulation of this process. These findings suggest a possible molecular mechanism for the highly metastatic phenotype associated with MCC. IMPORTANCE Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes the majority of cases of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), an aggressive skin cancer with a high metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to virally induced cancer development have yet to be fully elucidated. In particular, no studies have investigated any potential link between the virus and the highly metastatic nature of MCC. We demonstrate that the MCPyV small tumor antigen (ST) promotes the destabilization of the host cell microtubule network, which leads to a more motile and migratory cell phenotype. We further show that MCPyV ST induces this process by regulating the phosphorylation status of the cellular microtubule

  20. Antigen-presenting cells in parotid glands contain cystatin D originating from acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Nashida, Tomoko; Sato, Ritsuko; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Yoshimura, Ken; Imai, Akane; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2013-02-01

    Cystatin D encoded by Cst5 is a salivary classified type II cystatin. We investigated the dynamism of cystatin D by examining the distribution of cystatin D protein and mRNA in rats, to identify novel functions. The simultaneous expression of Cst5 and cystatin D was observed in parotid glands, however in situ hybridization showed that only acinar cells produced cystatin D. Synthesized cystatin D was localized in small vesicles and secreted from the apical side to the saliva, and from the basolateral side to the extracellular region, a second secretory pathway for cystatin D. We also identified antigen-presenting cells in the parotid glands that contained cystatin D without the expression of Cst5, indicating the uptake of cystatin D from the extracellular region. Cystatin D was detected in blood serum and renal tubular cells with megalin, indicating the circulation of cystatin D through the body and uptake by renal tubular cells. Thus, the novel dynamism of cystatin D was shown and a function for cystatin D in the regulation of antigen-presenting cell activity was proposed.

  1. Perivascular Stem Cells Diminish Muscle Atrophy and Retain Viability in a Rotator Cuff Tear Model

    PubMed Central

    Eliasberg, Claire; Jensen, Andrew; Dar, Ayelet; Kowalski, Tomasz J.; Murray, Iain; Khan, Adam Z.; Natsuhara, Kyle; Garagozlo, Cameron; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common cause of shoulder pain and often necessitate surgical repair. Muscle changes including atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration can develop after RCTs, which may compromise surgical repair and clinical outcomes. Lipoaspirate-derived human perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have demonstrated myogenic and angiogenic potential in other small animal models of muscle injury. We hypothesized that the administration of PSCs following massive RCTs may help to diminish these muscle changes in a small animal model. Methods: A total of 90 immunodeficient mice were used (15 groups, N=6). Each was assigned to one of three surgical groups: i) sham, ii) supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon transection (TT), or iii) TT and suprascapular nerve denervation (TT+DN). PSCs were harvested from human lipoaspirate and sorted using fluorescence-activated cell sorting into small blood vessel residing pericytes (CD146+ CD34- CD45- CD31-) and large blood perivascular adventitial cells (CD146- CD34+ CD45- CD31-). Mice received either a) no injection, b) saline injection, c) pericyte injection, or d) adventitial cell injection at the time of the index procedure or at two weeks following index surgery. The supraspinatus muscles were harvested six weeks after the index procedure. Muscle atrophy was assessed by measuring percent wet muscle weight change for each sample. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fibrosis, and fatty degeneration were analyzed using Image J™. Additionally, pericytes and adventitial cells were transduced with a luciferase-containing construct. Animals were given injections of luciferin and imaged using IVIS to track in vivo bioluminescence following injections to assess cell viability. Results: Treatment with PSC injection after TT resulted in less wet weight loss and greater muscle fiber CSA than control groups (P<0.05). The TT+DN groups treated with PSC injections two weeks post-op also had less muscle weight loss

  2. Development of immunoglobulin and antibody-synthesizing cells after immunization with different doses of antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, J C; Petit, C; Avrameas, S

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of development of antibody-synthesizing cells and of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without detectable antibody function were studied in rats immunized with different doses (0-1, 1, 10, 100 mg) of horse radish peroxidase, bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, hen ovalbumin, or human IgG, which had been deaggregated or heat-aggregated. Each antigen was injected once or twice as a solution in saline. Antibody and immunoglobulin-producing cells were detected in draining lymph nodes by immunohistochemical staining. In the primary response a few antibody-synthesizing cells were found whatever the dose injected. No increase or some increase was found with the amount of antigen injected, according to the protein used, but with all doses of antigen injected, the population of cells remained small, except with human IgG where a relatively high number of positive cells was detected even after injection of 1 mg of antigen. In the secondary response a few antibody-forming cells were also detected with the lower doses of antigen, but this population increased after boosting with 100 mg of antigen. With human IgG a greater number of positive cells was induced withall the doses tested. A correlation between the number of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without antibody function and the amount of antigen injected was observed in the primary and secondary responses. The relative size of these two populations varied with the stage of immunity of the animals. In the primary response, the population of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without antibody function was larger than the population of antibody-forming cells. The same was true in the secondary response, but if after a booster injection the level of antibody-synthesizing cells exceeded that reached in the primary response, the increase of cells synthesizing Ig without antibody function was smaller than the increase in antibody-forming cells. In general the more immunogenic an antigen was, the smaller

  3. Characterization of antigen-presenting properties of tumour cells using virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Spierings, D C; Agsteribbe, E; Wilschut, J; Huckriede, A

    2000-04-01

    Immunotherapy of tumours by induction of tumour-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) will only be effective for tumours with a functional antigen processing and presentation machinery. However, many tumours are known to down-regulate expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and/or to impair antigen processing. It is therefore desirable to evaluate the ability of a given tumour to present antigenic epitopes before developing an immunotherapy protocol. In this study we have used influenza virus as a tool to determine the antigen-presenting capacities of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 cell line NB41A3, a frequently used model for human neuroblastoma. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed low and moderate expression of MHC class I molecules Dd and Kk respectively. Nevertheless, infected NB41 A3 cells were lysed efficiently by influenza-specific CTLs. These results demonstrate that all steps of the antigen-processing pathway function properly in the NB tumour cells, and that the limited MHC class I expression suffices for efficient recognition by CTLs. In addition, lysis of the NB tumour cells shows that the cells are susceptible to CTL-induced apoptosis, a pathway that is often impaired in tumour cells. These characteristics make neuroblastoma a suitable target for immunotherapy. The presented assay allows evaluation of various immunological properties of tumour cells and, thus, represents a valuable tool to assess whether a given tumour will be susceptible to immunotherapy or not.

  4. Accumulation of chlamydial lipopolysaccharide antigen in the plasma membranes of infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, S. T.; Schloemer, R. H.; Wilde, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of a chlamydia-specified antigen associated with the plasma membrane of infected cell lines was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence staining with a monoclonal antibody, designated 47A2, specific for the chlamydial genus-specific lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen. Staining of HeLa, L-929, and McCoy cells infected with the L2 or F serovar of Chlamydia trachomatis was observed either without fixation or following aldehyde fixation and brief drying. The 47A2-reactive antigen appeared to be present on the plasma membrane, on bleb-like structures on the host cell surface, and on proximal processes of neighboring uninfected cells. Antibodies to chlamydial protein antigens such as the major outer membrane protein produced no surface staining under similar conditions. Membrane vesicles elaborated from infected cells were enriched for the 47A2-reactive antigen. Superinfection of chlamydia-infected cells with vesicular stomatitis virus, an enveloped virus which buds from the plasma membrane, allowed purification of progeny virions that were enriched with chlamydial LPS. These results are consistent with the presence of chlamydial LPS in the plasma membranes of infected host cells. Images PMID:2470679

  5. Human macrophages can express the Hodgkin's cell-associated antigen Ki-1 (CD30).

    PubMed Central

    Andreesen, R.; Brugger, W.; Löhr, G. W.; Bross, K. J.

    1989-01-01

    The normal precursor of the neoplastic cell in Hodgkin's lymphoma is still unknown. Previous reports on the expression of the Hodgkin's cell-associated antigen Ki-1, CD30, on normal cells have been limited to activated lymphocytes. This study demonstrates, however, that cells of the macrophage lineage also are able to express the Ki-1 antigen. The Ki-1 antigen is absent from normal blood monocytes but expressed on up to 85% of macrophage-type cells developed during subsequent in vitro differentiation on Teflon membranes. Unlike other maturation-associated antigens, Ki-1 is found only at late stages of the macrophage primary cultures. Its expression can be enhanced by human interferon-gamma in a fashion similar to that of HLA-DR molecules. In addition, freshly explanted tumor cells from three patients with histopathologic and clinical features consistent with the diagnosis of true histiocytic lymphoma or malignant histiocytosis as well as the permanent cell line SU-DHL-1 could be demonstrated to express the Ki-1 antigen. The phenotype of histiocytic malignancy was further evaluated to be HLA-DR+MAX.26+CD25+-EMA+OKT9+Ki-1+. The results could indicate either that Hodgkin's lymphoma may arise not only from the lymphocyte but also from the macrophage lineage or may emphasize a macrophage involvement in the pathogenesis of this disease. Images Figure 3 PMID:2536522

  6. Flow Cytometric Analysis of T, B, and NK Cells Antigens in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Yazıcı, Serkan; Bülbül Başkan, Emel; Budak, Ferah; Oral, Barbaros; Adim, Şaduman Balaban; Ceylan Kalin, Zübeyde; Özkaya, Güven; Aydoğan, Kenan; Saricaoğlu, Hayriye; Tunali, Şükran

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological correlation and prognostic value of cell surface antigens expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF). 121 consecutive MF patients were included in this study. All patients had peripheral blood flow cytometry as part of their first visit. TNMB and histopathological staging of the cases were retrospectively performed in accordance with International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) criteria at the time of flow cytometry sampling. To determine prognostic value of cell surface antigens, cases were divided into two groups as stable and progressive disease. 17 flow cytometric analyses of 17 parapsoriasis (PP) and 11 analyses of 11 benign erythrodermic patients were included as control groups. Fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell surface antigens: T cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, TCRαβ+, TCRγδ+, CD7+, CD4+CD7+, CD4+CD7−, and CD71+), B cells (HLA-DR+, CD19+, and HLA-DR+CD19+), NKT cells (CD3+CD16+CD56+), and NK cells (CD3−CD16+CD56+). The mean value of all cell surface antigens was not statistically significant between parapsoriasis and MF groups. Along with an increase in cases of MF stage statistically significant difference was found between the mean values of cell surface antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cell surface antigens in patients with mycosis fungoides may contribute to predicting disease stage and progression. PMID:26788525

  7. Heat Shock Protein-90 Inhibitors Enhance Antigen Expression on Melanomas and Increase T Cell Recognition of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Timothy J.; Dunn, Ian S.; Rose, Lenora B.; Newton, Estelle E.; Pandolfi, Franco; Kurnick, James T.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90) share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:25503774

  8. Preserved Activity of CD20-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T Cells in the Presence of Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Rufener, Gregory A; Press, Oliver W; Olsen, Philip; Lee, Sang Yun; Jensen, Michael C; Gopal, Ajay K; Pender, Barbara; Budde, Lihua E; Rossow, Jeffrey K; Green, Damian J; Maloney, David G; Riddell, Stanley R; Till, Brian G

    2016-06-01

    CD20 is an attractive immunotherapy target for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD20 is a promising strategy. A theoretical limitation is that residual serum rituximab might block CAR binding to CD20 and thereby impede T cell-mediated anti-lymphoma responses. The activity of CD20 CAR-modified T cells in the presence of various concentrations of rituximab was tested in vitro and in vivo CAR-binding sites on CD20(+) tumor cells were blocked by rituximab in a dose-dependent fashion, although at 37°C blockade was incomplete at concentrations up to 200 μg/mL. T cells with CD20 CARs also exhibited modest dose-dependent reductions in cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity, but not proliferation, against lymphoma cell lines. At rituximab concentrations of 100 μg/mL, CAR T cells retained ≥50% of baseline activity against targets with high CD20 expression, but were more strongly inhibited when target cells expressed low CD20. In a murine xenograft model using a rituximab-refractory lymphoma cell line, rituximab did not impair CAR T-cell activity, and tumors were eradicated in >85% of mice. Clinical residual rituximab serum concentrations were measured in 103 lymphoma patients after rituximab therapy, with the median level found to be only 38 μg/mL (interquartile range, 19-72 μg/mL). Thus, despite modest functional impairment in vitro, the in vivo activity of CD20-targeted CAR T cells remains intact at clinically relevant levels of rituximab, making use of these T cells clinically feasible. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 509-19. ©2016 AACRSee related Spotlight by Sadelain, p. 473.

  9. Identification of T-cell stimulatory antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis using synovial fluid-derived T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Reynolds, D J; Deacon, M; Gaston, J S; Pearce, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease, infertility and reactive arthritis in the Western world, and of trachoma in the developing world. There is evidence that the chronic inflammatory reaction seen in diseases associated with chlamydiae represents a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to chlamydial antigens. Little is known about which chlamydial antigens elicit T-cell responses yet such information could have important implications in terms of both immunopathological understanding of these diseases and immunoprophylaxis design. In this study, 61 chlamydia-specific T-cell clones have been produced from the synovial fluid of an individual with sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA). Ten clones have been characterized in detail and used to identify T-cell stimulatory antigens of chlamydiae by means of T-cell immunoblotting. Two distinct antigenic fractions have been identified, one recognized by three of the clones (molecular weight 18,000), the other recognized by six of the clones (molecular weight 30,000). The fractions are distinct from the major outer membrane protein, the 57,000 MW stress protein and the 60,000 MW cysteine-rich membrane protein of chlamydiae. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of the response to these antigens differed: clones recognizing the 18,000 MW antigen required antigen-presenting cells expressing DR1 subtype DRB1*0101 or DRB1*0102 which only differ at amino acids 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain; by contrast clones recognizing the 30,000 MW antigen were presented to only by antigen-presenting cells from DRB1*0101 individuals, reflecting extreme sensitivity of these clones to the polymorphism at positions 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain. Images Figure 4 PMID:7691730

  10. Effect of activated antigen-specific B cells on ES-62-mediated modulation of effector function of heterologous antigen-specific T cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Fraser A; Watson, Katherine A; Garside, Paul; Harnett, Margaret M; Harnett, William

    2008-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the idea of using helminth-derived molecules for therapeutic purposes and indeed we have shown that ES-62, a filarial nematode-derived phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein, significantly reduces the severity of arthritis in a murine model. Clearly, knowledge of mechanism of action is important when considering molecules for use in treating disease and although much is known regarding how ES-62 interacts with the immune system, gaps in our understanding remain. A feature of filarial nematode infection is a defective, T helper 2 (Th2)-polarized antigen-specific T-cell response and in relation to this we have recently shown that ES-62 inhibits clonal expansion and modulates effector function towards a Th2 phenotype, of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. ES-62 is also known to directly modulate B-cell behaviour and hence to determine whether it was mediating these effects on T cells by disrupting B–T-cell co-operation, we have investigated antigen-specific responses using an adoptive transfer system in which traceable numbers of tg ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells and hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-specific B cells respond to a chemically coupled form of OVA–HEL that contains linked epitopes that promote cognate T- and B-cell interactions. Surprisingly, these studies indicate that activated B cells restore T-cell expansion and prevent Th2-like polarization. However, ES-62-treated double cell transfer mice demonstrate a more generalized immunosuppression with reduced levels of Th1 and -2 type cytokines and antibody subclasses. Collectively, these results suggest that whilst ES-62 can target B–T-cell co-operation, this does not promote polarizing of T-cell responses towards a Th2-type phenotype. PMID:17961164

  11. Extraocular muscle satellite cells are high performance myo-engines retaining efficient regenerative capacity in dystrophin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stuelsatz, Pascal; Shearer, Andrew; Li, Yunfei; Muir, Lindsey A; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Shen, Qingwu W; Kirillova, Irina; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2015-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) are highly specialized skeletal muscles that originate from the head mesoderm and control eye movements. EOMs are uniquely spared in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and animal models of dystrophin deficiency. Specific traits of myogenic progenitors may be determinants of this preferential sparing, but very little is known about the myogenic cells in this muscle group. While satellite cells (SCs) have long been recognized as the main source of myogenic cells in adult muscle, most of the knowledge about these cells comes from the prototypic limb muscles. In this study, we show that EOMs, regardless of their distinctive Pax3-negative lineage origin, harbor SCs that share a common signature (Pax7(+), Ki67(-), Nestin-GFP(+), Myf5(nLacZ+), MyoD-positive lineage origin) with their limb and diaphragm somite-derived counterparts, but are remarkably endowed with a high proliferative potential as revealed in cell culture assays. Specifically, we demonstrate that in adult as well as in aging mice, EOM SCs possess a superior expansion capacity, contributing significantly more proliferating, differentiating and renewal progeny than their limb and diaphragm counterparts. These robust growth and renewal properties are maintained by EOM SCs isolated from dystrophin-null (mdx) mice, while SCs from muscles affected by dystrophin deficiency (i.e., limb and diaphragm) expand poorly in vitro. EOM SCs also retain higher performance in cell transplantation assays in which donor cells were engrafted into host mdx limb muscle. Collectively, our study provides a comprehensive picture of EOM myogenic progenitors, showing that while these cells share common hallmarks with the prototypic SCs in somite-derived muscles, they distinctively feature robust growth and renewal capacities that warrant the title of high performance myo-engines and promote consideration of their properties for developing new approaches in cell-based therapy to combat skeletal muscle wasting.

  12. Bacterial cell surface display for epitope mapping of hepatitis C virus core antigen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-09-26

    Cell surface expression of protein has been widely used to display enzymes and antigens. Here we show that Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein with a deletion of internal repeating domain (INC) can be used in Escherichia coli to display peptide in a conformationally active form on the outside of the folded protein by fusing to the C-terminus of INC. Diagnostic potential of this technology was demonstrated by effective mapping of antigenic epitopes derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Amino acids 1-38 and 26-53 of HCV core protein were found to react more sensitively in a native conformation with the HCV patient sera than commercial diagnostic antigen, c22p (amino acids 10-53) by display-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell surface display using INC is useful for peptide presentation and thus epitope mapping of antigen. PMID:14553932

  13. Female human iPS cells retain an inactive X-chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Tchieu, Jason; Kuoy, Edward; Chin, Mark H.; Trinh, Hung; Patterson, Michaela; Sherman, Sean P.; Aimiuwu, Otaren; Lindgren, Anne; Hakimian, Shahrad; Zack, Jerome A.; Clark, Amander T.; Pyle, April D.; Lowry, William E.; Plath, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    Generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) requires massive epigenome reorganization. It is unclear whether reprogramming of female human cells reactivates the inactive X chromosome (Xi), like in mouse. Here we establish that human (h)iPSCs derived from several female fibroblasts under standard culture conditions carry an Xi. Despite the lack of reactivation, the Xi undergoes defined chromatin changes, and expansion of hiPSCs can lead to partial loss of XIST RNA. These results indicate that hiPSCs are epigenetically dynamic and do not display a pristine state of X-inactivation with two active X’s as found in some female human embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, while fibroblasts are mosaic for the Xi, hiPSCs are clonal for the Xi. This non-random pattern of X chromosome inactivation in female hiPSCs, which is maintained upon differentiation, has critical implications for clinical applications and disease modeling, and could be exploited for a unique form of gene therapy for X-linked diseases. PMID:20727844

  14. Antigen/IgG immune complex-primed mucosal mast cells mediate antigen-specific activation of co-cultured T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are proposed to be one of the targets for mucosal vaccine adjuvants. We previously demonstrated that mucosal adjuvants containing IgG immune complexes could activate connective tissue mast cells enhancing immune responses. Here we suggest that mucosal mast cells (MMC) may also contribute to augmentation of antigen-specific immune responses following treatment with antigens complexed with IgG. We demonstrated that both bone marrow-derived cultured MMC and tissue resident MMC incorporated ovalbumin (OVA) at a greater level in the presence of anti-OVA IgG. Co-culture of OVA/IgG-pulsed bone marrow-derived MMC with splenocytes from OT-II mice promoted OVA-specific activation and proliferation of T cells, a process known as cross-presentation. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived cultured MMC underwent apoptosis following treatment with IgG immune complexes, a feature that has been described as favouring phagocytosis of mast cells by professional antigen-presenting cells. PMID:25196548

  15. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed.

  16. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed. PMID:2973431

  17. Alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated with a chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Katherine G.; Hoeppli, Romy E.; Huang, Qing; Gillies, Jana; Luciani, Dan S.; Orban, Paul C.; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a promising treatment for allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Emerging data indicate that, compared with polyclonal Tregs, disease-relevant antigen-specific Tregs may have numerous advantages, such as a need for fewer cells and reduced risk of nonspecific immune suppression. Current methods to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs rely on expansion with allogeneic antigen-presenting cells, which requires access to donor and recipient cells and multiple MHC mismatches. The successful use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the generation of antigen-specific effector T cells suggests that a similar approach could be used to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we have described the creation of an HLA-A2–specific CAR (A2-CAR) and its application in the generation of alloantigen-specific human Tregs. In vitro, A2-CAR–expressing Tregs maintained their expected phenotype and suppressive function before, during, and after A2-CAR–mediated stimulation. In mouse models, human A2-CAR–expressing Tregs were superior to Tregs expressing an irrelevant CAR at preventing xenogeneic GVHD caused by HLA-A2+ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that use of CAR technology to generate potent, functional, and stable alloantigen-specific human Tregs markedly enhances their therapeutic potential in transplantation and sets the stage for using this approach for making antigen-specific Tregs for therapy of multiple diseases. PMID:26999600

  18. Alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated with a chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Katherine G; Hoeppli, Romy E; Huang, Qing; Gillies, Jana; Luciani, Dan S; Orban, Paul C; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan K

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a promising treatment for allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Emerging data indicate that, compared with polyclonal Tregs, disease-relevant antigen-specific Tregs may have numerous advantages, such as a need for fewer cells and reduced risk of nonspecific immune suppression. Current methods to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs rely on expansion with allogeneic antigen-presenting cells, which requires access to donor and recipient cells and multiple MHC mismatches. The successful use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the generation of antigen-specific effector T cells suggests that a similar approach could be used to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we have described the creation of an HLA-A2-specific CAR (A2-CAR) and its application in the generation of alloantigen-specific human Tregs. In vitro, A2-CAR-expressing Tregs maintained their expected phenotype and suppressive function before, during, and after A2-CAR-mediated stimulation. In mouse models, human A2-CAR-expressing Tregs were superior to Tregs expressing an irrelevant CAR at preventing xenogeneic GVHD caused by HLA-A2+ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that use of CAR technology to generate potent, functional, and stable alloantigen-specific human Tregs markedly enhances their therapeutic potential in transplantation and sets the stage for using this approach for making antigen-specific Tregs for therapy of multiple diseases. PMID:26999600

  19. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis. PMID:27278624

  20. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis.

  1. Immunocytological and biochemical characterization of a new neuronal cell surface component (L1 antigen) which is involved in cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Rathjen, F G; Schachner, M

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal and polyclonal L1 antibodies react by indirect immunofluorescence with the cell surface of cultured tetanus toxin-positive neurons from post-natal cerebella of mice, but not with glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes, O4 antigen-positive oligodendrocytes or fibronectin-positive fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells. During cerebellar development L1 antigen is detectable on tetanus toxin-positive cells as early as embryonic day 13 after 3 days in culture. In sections of the early post-natal cerebellum, L1 antigen is found on pre-migratory neurons in the internal, but not in the external part of the external granular layer. In the adult cerebellum, L1 antigen is predominantly localized in the molecular layer and around Purkinje cells. Fibers in white matter and the granular layer are also L1 antigen-positive. Granule cell bodies and synaptic glomeruli are weakly antigen-positive. Several cell lines derived from neuroblastoma C1300 also express L1 antigen. The antigen is not detectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in tissue homogenates of liver, kidney, lung, heart, sperm or thymus. With polyclonal L1 antibodies, cross-reactive determinants are found in brains of rat, guinea pig, hamster, chicken, rabbit and man, but not in frog, while monoclonal antibody reacts detectably only with mouse brain. The molecular species recognized by both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies display two prominent bands by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions with apparent mol. wts. of 140 and 200 kd. L1 antigen isolated from cultured cerebellar cells consists mainly of a band in the 200-kd range and a faint one at 140 kd. L1 antigen from neuroblastoma N2A shows two bands with slightly higher apparent mol. wts. All molecular forms of L1 antigen can be labeled by [3H]fucose and [3H]glucosamine. Ca2+-independent re-aggregation of cerebellar cells from early post-natal C57BL/6J mice and of the continuous cell line N2A derived from the murine

  2. Antigen dynamics govern the induction of CD4(+) T cell tolerance during autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Challa, Dilip K; Mi, Wentao; Lo, Su-Tang; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Antigen-specific T cell tolerance holds great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, strategies to induce durable tolerance using high doses of soluble antigen have to date been unsuccessful, due to lack of efficacy and the risk of hypersensitivity. In the current study we have overcome these limitations by developing a platform for tolerance induction based on engineering the immunoglobulin Fc region to modulate the dynamic properties of low doses (1 μg/mouse; ∼50 μg/kg) of Fc-antigen fusions. Using this approach, we demonstrate that antigen persistence is a dominant factor governing the elicitation of tolerance in the model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), induced by immunizing B10.PL mice with the N-terminal epitope of myelin basic protein. Unexpectedly, our analyses reveal a stringent threshold of antigen persistence for both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments, although distinct mechanisms lead to tolerance in these two settings. Importantly, the delivery of tolerogenic Fc-antigen fusions during ongoing disease results in the downregulation of T-bet and CD40L combined with amplification of Foxp3(+) T cell numbers. The generation of effective, low dose tolerogens using Fc engineering has potential for the regulation of autoreactive T cells. PMID:27236506

  3. Mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres for targeting antigen presenting cells via nasal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Shan; Singh, Bijay; Park, Tae-Eun; Hong, Zhong-Shan; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal vaccination of protein as an antigen requires appropriate delivery or adjuvant systems to deliver antigen to mucosal immune cells efficiently and generate valid immune responses. For successful nasal immunization, the obstacles imposed by the normal process of mucociliary clearance which limits residence time of applied antigens and low antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells (APCs) in nasal associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) need to be overcome for the efficient vaccination. Here, we prepared mucoadhesive and mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres (Man-TEM) as a nasal vaccine carrier to overcome the limitations. Mucoadhesive thiolated Eudragit (TE) were decorated with mannan for targeting mannose receptors (MR) in antigen presenting cells (APCs) to obtain efficient immune responses. The potential adjuvant ability of Man-TEM for intranasal immunization was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In mechanistic study using APCs in vitro, we obtained that Man-TEM enhanced the receptor-mediated endocytosis by stimulating the MR receptors of APCs. The nasal vaccination of OVA-loaded Man-TEM in mice showed higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal sIgA than the soluble OVA group due to the specific recognition of MR of APCs by the mannan in the Man-TEM. These results suggest that mucoadhesive and Man-TEM may be a promising candidate for nasal vaccine delivery system to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity. PMID:26415829

  4. Development of an algorithm for production of inactivated arbovirus antigens in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, C.H.; Russell, B.J.; Velez, J.O.; Laven, J.J.; Nicholson, W.L; Bagarozzi, D.A.; Moon, J.L.; Bedi, K.; Johnson, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    Arboviruses are medically important pathogens that cause human disease ranging from a mild fever to encephalitis. Laboratory diagnosis is essential to differentiate arbovirus infections from other pathogens with similar clinical manifestations. The Arboviral Diseases Branch (ADB) reference laboratory at the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) produces reference antigens used in serological assays such as the virus-specific immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Antigen production in cell culture has largely replaced the use of suckling mice; however, the methods are not directly transferable. The development of a cell culture antigen production algorithm for nine arboviruses from the three main arbovirus families, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, is described here. Virus cell culture growth and harvest conditions were optimized, inactivation methods were evaluated, and concentration procedures were compared for each virus. Antigen performance was evaluated by the MAC-ELISA at each step of the procedure. The antigen production algorithm is a framework for standardization of methodology and quality control; however, a single antigen production protocol was not applicable to all arboviruses and needed to be optimized for each virus. PMID:25102428

  5. Leishmania chagasi T-cell antigens identified through a double library screen.

    PubMed

    Martins, Daniella R A; Jeronimo, Selma M B; Donelson, John E; Wilson, Mary E

    2006-12-01

    Control of human visceral leishmaniasis in regions where it is endemic is hampered in part by limited accessibility to medical care and emerging drug resistance. There is no available protective vaccine. Leishmania spp. protozoa express multiple antigens recognized by the vertebrate immune system. Since there is not one immunodominant epitope recognized by most hosts, strategies must be developed to optimize selection of antigens for prevention and immunodiagnosis. For this reason, we generated a cDNA library from the intracellular amastigote form of Leishmania chagasi, the cause of South American visceral leishmaniasis. We employed a two-step expression screen of the library to systematically identify T-cell antigens and T-dependent B-cell antigens. The first step was aimed at identifying the largest possible number of clones producing an epitope-containing polypeptide by screening with a pool of sera from Brazilians with documented visceral leishmaniasis. After removal of clones encoding heat shock proteins, positive clones underwent a second-step screen for their ability to cause proliferation and gamma interferon responses in T cells from immune mice. Six unique clones were selected from the second screen for further analysis. The corresponding antigens were derived from glutamine synthetase, a transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase, elongation factor 1gamma, kinesin K39, repetitive protein A2, and a hypothetical conserved protein. Humans naturally infected with L. chagasi mounted both cellular and antibody responses to these proteins. Preparations containing multiple antigens may be optimal for immunodiagnosis and protective vaccines. PMID:17000724

  6. Development of an algorithm for production of inactivated arbovirus antigens in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C H; Russell, B J; Velez, J O; Laven, J J; Nicholson, W L; Bagarozzi, D A; Moon, J L; Bedi, K; Johnson, B W

    2014-11-01

    Arboviruses are medically important pathogens that cause human disease ranging from a mild fever to encephalitis. Laboratory diagnosis is essential to differentiate arbovirus infections from other pathogens with similar clinical manifestations. The Arboviral Diseases Branch (ADB) reference laboratory at the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) produces reference antigens used in serological assays such as the virus-specific immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Antigen production in cell culture has largely replaced the use of suckling mice; however, the methods are not directly transferable. The development of a cell culture antigen production algorithm for nine arboviruses from the three main arbovirus families, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, is described here. Virus cell culture growth and harvest conditions were optimized, inactivation methods were evaluated, and concentration procedures were compared for each virus. Antigen performance was evaluated by the MAC-ELISA at each step of the procedure. The antigen production algorithm is a framework for standardization of methodology and quality control; however, a single antigen production protocol was not applicable to all arboviruses and needed to be optimized for each virus.

  7. Antigen dynamics govern the induction of CD4(+) T cell tolerance during autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Challa, Dilip K; Mi, Wentao; Lo, Su-Tang; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Antigen-specific T cell tolerance holds great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, strategies to induce durable tolerance using high doses of soluble antigen have to date been unsuccessful, due to lack of efficacy and the risk of hypersensitivity. In the current study we have overcome these limitations by developing a platform for tolerance induction based on engineering the immunoglobulin Fc region to modulate the dynamic properties of low doses (1 μg/mouse; ∼50 μg/kg) of Fc-antigen fusions. Using this approach, we demonstrate that antigen persistence is a dominant factor governing the elicitation of tolerance in the model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), induced by immunizing B10.PL mice with the N-terminal epitope of myelin basic protein. Unexpectedly, our analyses reveal a stringent threshold of antigen persistence for both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments, although distinct mechanisms lead to tolerance in these two settings. Importantly, the delivery of tolerogenic Fc-antigen fusions during ongoing disease results in the downregulation of T-bet and CD40L combined with amplification of Foxp3(+) T cell numbers. The generation of effective, low dose tolerogens using Fc engineering has potential for the regulation of autoreactive T cells.

  8. Mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres for targeting antigen presenting cells via nasal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Shan; Singh, Bijay; Park, Tae-Eun; Hong, Zhong-Shan; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal vaccination of protein as an antigen requires appropriate delivery or adjuvant systems to deliver antigen to mucosal immune cells efficiently and generate valid immune responses. For successful nasal immunization, the obstacles imposed by the normal process of mucociliary clearance which limits residence time of applied antigens and low antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells (APCs) in nasal associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) need to be overcome for the efficient vaccination. Here, we prepared mucoadhesive and mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres (Man-TEM) as a nasal vaccine carrier to overcome the limitations. Mucoadhesive thiolated Eudragit (TE) were decorated with mannan for targeting mannose receptors (MR) in antigen presenting cells (APCs) to obtain efficient immune responses. The potential adjuvant ability of Man-TEM for intranasal immunization was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In mechanistic study using APCs in vitro, we obtained that Man-TEM enhanced the receptor-mediated endocytosis by stimulating the MR receptors of APCs. The nasal vaccination of OVA-loaded Man-TEM in mice showed higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal sIgA than the soluble OVA group due to the specific recognition of MR of APCs by the mannan in the Man-TEM. These results suggest that mucoadhesive and Man-TEM may be a promising candidate for nasal vaccine delivery system to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity.

  9. Development of an algorithm for production of inactivated arbovirus antigens in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C H; Russell, B J; Velez, J O; Laven, J J; Nicholson, W L; Bagarozzi, D A; Moon, J L; Bedi, K; Johnson, B W

    2014-11-01

    Arboviruses are medically important pathogens that cause human disease ranging from a mild fever to encephalitis. Laboratory diagnosis is essential to differentiate arbovirus infections from other pathogens with similar clinical manifestations. The Arboviral Diseases Branch (ADB) reference laboratory at the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) produces reference antigens used in serological assays such as the virus-specific immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Antigen production in cell culture has largely replaced the use of suckling mice; however, the methods are not directly transferable. The development of a cell culture antigen production algorithm for nine arboviruses from the three main arbovirus families, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, is described here. Virus cell culture growth and harvest conditions were optimized, inactivation methods were evaluated, and concentration procedures were compared for each virus. Antigen performance was evaluated by the MAC-ELISA at each step of the procedure. The antigen production algorithm is a framework for standardization of methodology and quality control; however, a single antigen production protocol was not applicable to all arboviruses and needed to be optimized for each virus. PMID:25102428

  10. Comparison of transformation and T antigen induction in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Potter, C W; Potter, A M; Oxford, J S

    1970-03-01

    Skin fibroblast cultures were established from eight individuals. These cell cultures, together with WI-38 cells, were examined for susceptibility to transformation by SV40 virus. Four transformation-susceptible cell lines (TS), established from patients with Down's syndrome, were found to be three to four times more susceptible to transformation than transformation-resistant cell lines (TR) from normal individuals. TR and TS cell lines were compared for their susceptibility to induction of SV40 T antigen. For dividing cells T antigen was detected in a higher percentage of TS cells than TR cells. For nondividing cells, the reverse was found; T antigen was detected in 10-fold more cells of the TR lines than in cells of the TS lines. Similar results were obtained after infection of cells with CELO virus. Titration of vaccinia virus and influenza virus A2/Scotland/49/57 indicated that TR and TS cells were equally sensitive to the former virus, but TR cells were three to five times more sensitive to influenza virus A2/Scotland/49/57 than were TS cells.

  11. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major.

    PubMed Central

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC, identified morphologically and by their expression of specific cell markers, included Langerhans cells, macrophages, follicular dendritic cells, and interdigitating reticulum cells of the paracortex of lymph nodes. These cells expressed MHC class II antigens and contained Leishmania antigen. Since some keratinocytes and endothelial cells also showed these characteristics, they may also act as APC. By examining tissue samples from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes it was possible to follow the probable route of trafficking of various inflammatory cells between the skin lesion and lymph nodes. Leishmania antigen containing Langerhans cells were found in the epidermis, dermis and the regional lymph nodes. We believe these cells translocate from the epidermis to the dermis, where they take up antigen and migrate to the paracortex of the regional lymph nodes. There they are intimately associated with cells of the paracortex, and could be involved in the generation of Leishmania-specific T memory cells. LFA-1-positive T cells of the CD45RO phenotype were found in the skin lesion. Venular endothelium in the skin lesions expressed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the ligand for LFA-1. The migration of lymphocytes from the vascular lumen to the site of inflammation is possibly a result of the interaction of these two adhesion molecules. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7882568

  12. Correlated analysis of cellular DNA, membrane antigens and light scatter of human lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Braylan, R.C.; Benson, N.A.; Nourse, V.; Kruth, H.S.

    1982-03-01

    Flow cytometric correlated analysis of membrane antigens, DNA, and light scatter was performed on human lymphoid cells using fluorescein (FITC)-conjugated antibodies to label B- and T-cell antigens and propidium iodide (PI) to stain DNA after ethanol fixation and RNase treatment. A FACS II flow cytometer was modified to obtain digitized measurements of two color fluorescence and light scatter emissions, simultaneously. Software was written to allow single parameter analysis or correlated analysis of any two of the three parameters acquired. Ethanol fixation preserved FITC surface labeling for at least 15 weeks, but produced marked changes in light scatter. No changes in FITC distributions were observed after RNase treatment and PI staining, and the presence of FITC labeling did not affect DNA distributions. Within heterogeneous cell populations, the DNA distribution of cell subpopulations identified by a membrane antigen was clearly demonstrated.

  13. Immunolocalization indicates that both original and regenerated lizard tail tissues contain populations of long retaining cells, putative stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The regeneration of the tail in lizards is likely sustained by stem/progenitor cells located in the stump after amputation of the tail. This microscopic and ultrastructural study shows the localization of 5-bromo-deoxy-uridine (5BrdU)-long retaining labeled cells in different tissues of the tail stump. These putative stem/progenitor cells are sparsely detected in the epidermis of scales, adipose tissue, intermuscle connective septa, myosatellite cells, and perichondrion of the vertebrae. Most of 5BrdU-labeled cells are present in the bone marrow of vertebrae as hemocytoblasts and reticulate cells, whereas more numerous myelocytes and polychromatophilic erythroblasts show a variable level of nuclear labeling. 5BrdU and tritiated-thymidine labeled and unlabeled hemopoietic cells are seen in circulating vessels and in the blastema where their maturation is completed. This observation indicates that the entire differentiation span of both white and red blood cells, at least during tail regeneration, lasts longer than 4 weeks. Labeled polychromatophilic erythroblasts and heterophilic and basophilic myelocytes are present in the synusoidal vessels of the regenerating tail. This study indicates that extravasating blood cells involved in immunity make large part of the forming blastema cell population, but are replaced by mesenchymal cells of different origin. The presence of long retaining labeled cells in tissues of the tail stump is likely connected to the production of blastema mesenchymal cells. Although no direct cell-lineage study has been done, histological, immunocytochemical, and autoradiographic studies have indicated that it is from these tissues that proliferating cells appear mainly localized after tail amputation and blastema formation.

  14. Evaluation of the Antigen-Experienced B-Cell Receptor Repertoire in Healthy Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    IJspeert, Hanna; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A.; van Zessen, David; Pico-Knijnenburg, Ingrid; Driessen, Gertjan J.; Stubbs, Andrew P.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen recognition via their B cell receptor (BR), B cells migrate to the germinal center where they undergo somatic hypermutation (SHM) to increase their affinity for the antigen, and class switch recombination (CSR) to change the effector function of the secreted antibodies. These steps are essential to create an antigen-experienced BR repertoire that efficiently protects the body against pathogens. At the same time, the BR repertoire should be selected to protect against responses to self-antigen or harmless antigens. Insights into the processes of SHM, selection, and CSR can be obtained by studying the antigen-experienced BR repertoire. Currently, a large reference data set of healthy children and adults, which ranges from neonates to the elderly, is not available. In this study, we analyzed the antigen-experienced repertoire of 38 healthy donors (HD), ranging from cord blood to 74 years old, by sequencing IGA and IGG transcripts using next generation sequencing. This resulted in a large, freely available reference data set containing 412,890 IGA and IGG transcripts. We used this data set to study mutation levels, SHM patterns, antigenic selection, and CSR from birth to elderly HD. Only small differences were observed in SHM patterns, while the mutation levels increase in early childhood and stabilize at 6 years of age at around 7%. Furthermore, comparison of the antigen-experienced repertoire with sequences from the naive immune repertoire showed that features associated with autoimmunity such as long CDR3 length and IGHV4-34 usage are reduced in the antigen-experienced repertoire. Moreover, IGA2 and IGG2 usage was increased in HD in higher age categories, while IGG1 usage was decreased. In addition, we studied clonal relationship in the different samples. Clonally related sequences were found with different subclasses. Interestingly, we found transcripts with the same CDR1–CDR3 sequence, but different subclasses. Together, these data suggest that

  15. A single subset of dendritic cells controls the cytokine bias of natural killer T cell responses to diverse glycolipid antigens.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O A; Saini, Neeraj K; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Goldberg, Michael F; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R; Jervis, Peter J; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-16

    Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α(+) DEC-205(+) dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α(+) dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses.

  16. A Single Subset of Dendritic Cells Controls the Cytokine Bias of Natural Killer T Cell Responses to Diverse Glycolipid Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O.A.; Saini, Neeraj K.; Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J.; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R.; Jervis, Peter J.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α+ DEC-205+ dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α+ dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24412610

  17. In vivo targeting of antigens to maturing dendritic cells via the DEC-205 receptor improves T cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Bonnyay, David P; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M; Steinman, Ralph M

    2004-03-15

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic alpha-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the alphaDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models.

  18. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines. PMID:26583156

  19. Inhibition of immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis by antibody to a pulmonary macrophage cell surface antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Parod, R.J.; Godleski, J.J.; Brain J.D.

    1986-03-15

    Unlike other hamster phagoycytes, hamster pulmonary macrophages (PM) avidly ingest albumin-coated latex particles in the absence of serum. They also possess a highly specific cell surface antigen. To evaluate the relationship between these two characteristics, PM were incubated with mouse monoclonal antibody directed against the PM antigen. After unbound antibody was removed, the amount of bound antibody and the phagocytic capability of PM were measured by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Maximum antibody binding produced a 25% inhibition of ingestion. Particle attachment was not affected. This effect was antigen specific, since neither a nonspecific mouse myeloma protein of the same subclass nor a mouse antibody that bound to another hamster surface antigen had any effect on binding or ingestion. If antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments were introduced both before and during the period of phagocytosis, the inhibition of particle ingestion approached 100%. Particle binding increased at low F(ab')/sub 2/ concentrations but declined at higher concentrations. Because calcium may play a role in the ingestion process, the effect of antibody on /sup 45/Ca uptake was evaluated. It was observed that antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake, whereas control antibodies did not. These results suggest that the antigen reacting with the anti-hamster PM monoclonal antibody is involved in immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis and that calcium participates in this phagocytic process.

  20. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. PMID:26461179

  1. Mutant HLA-A2 antigens as restricting elements for virus-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Gaston, J S; Wallace, L E; Rickinson, A B; Epstein, M A; Pious, D

    1984-01-01

    Mutants of the EB virus-transformed cell line T5-1 (HLA-A1, 2; B8, 27), bearing well-characterized alterations in HLA-A2 antigen expression and unable to bind the HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibody BB7.2, have been tested for their susceptibility to EB virus-specific cytolysis using effector T-cell preparations functionally restricted through relevant HLA antigens. Initial experiments first confirmed that the parent line T5-1 was susceptible to cytolysis by both "common" A2-restricted and B27-restricted effector cells. While those T5-1 mutants with little or no surface A2 expression were not lysed by A2-restricted effectors, those targets with quantitatively normal expression of mutant A2 molecules were as susceptible to A2-restricted lysis as the parent line itself. In contrast, all the T5-1 mutant lines were susceptible to B27-restricted cytolysis. The results demonstrate that experimentally induced mutations of HLA-A2 antigen structure, affecting a serologically defined site on the molecule, can occur without altering that same molecule's expression of the T cell-restricting determinant(s). Such experimentally induced mutations are quite different from the naturally occurring "variant" A2 antigens which are present within the serologically defined A2 antigen group and which show changes at the T cell-restricting site. PMID:6329950

  2. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism.

  3. Particle shape dependence of CD8+ T cell activation by artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous work developing particle-based acellular, artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) has focused exclusively on spherical platforms. To explore the role of shape, we generated ellipsoidal PLGA microparticles with varying aspect ratios (ARs) and synthesized aAPCs from them. The ellipsoidal biomimetic aAPCs with high-AR showed significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo activity above spherical aAPCs with particle volume and antigen content held constant. Confocal imaging indicates that CD8+ T cells preferentially migrate to and are activated by interaction with the long axis of the aAPC. Importantly, enhanced activity of high-AR aAPCs was seen in a mouse melanoma model, with high-AR aAPCs improving melanoma survival compared to non-cognate aAPCs (p = 0.004) and cognate spherical aAPCs (p = 0.05). These findings indicate that particle geometry is a critical design criterion in the generation of aAPCs, and may offer insight into the essential role of geometry in the interaction between CD8+ T cells and biological APCs. PMID:24099710

  4. T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, Tumor Immunology Section, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize T Cells Attacking Cancer: T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen

  5. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M.; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Olshen, Richard A.; Boyd, Scott D.; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood is able to escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. While all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells, but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important read-out to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  6. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Olshen, Richard A; Boyd, Scott D; Weyand, Cornelia M; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-03-30

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood can escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. Although all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs, including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection that occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single-booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important readout to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection.

  7. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification. PMID:27668873

  8. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Olshen, Richard A; Boyd, Scott D; Weyand, Cornelia M; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-03-30

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood can escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. Although all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs, including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection that occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single-booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important readout to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  9. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  10. In Vivo Targeting of Antigens to Maturing Dendritic Cells via the DEC-205 Receptor Improves T Cell Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura C.; Bonnyay, David P.; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I.; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K.; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic α-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the αDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models. PMID:15024047

  11. Borate-Rhamnogalacturonan II Bonding Reinforced by Ca2+ Retains Pectic Polysaccharides in Higher-Plant Cell Walls1

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Hironobu; Asaka, Tomoyuki; Matoh, Toru

    1999-01-01

    The extent of in vitro formation of the borate-dimeric-rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) complex was stimulated by Ca2+. The complex formed in the presence of Ca2+ was more stable than that without Ca2+. A naturally occurring boron (B)-RG-II complex isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv Aokubi-daikon) root contained equimolar amounts of Ca2+ and B. Removal of the Ca2+ by trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid induced cleavage of the complex into monomeric RG-II. These data suggest that Ca2+ is a normal component of the B-RG-II complex. Washing the crude cell walls of radish roots with a 1.5% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, pH 6.5, released 98% of the tissue Ca2+ but only 13% of the B and 22% of the pectic polysaccharides. The remaining Ca2+ was associated with RG-II. Extraction of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-washed cell walls with 50 mm trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid, pH 6.5, removed the remaining Ca2+, 78% of B, and 49% of pectic polysaccharides. These results suggest that not only Ca2+ but also borate and Ca2+ cross-linking in the RG-II region retain so-called chelator-soluble pectic polysaccharides in cell walls. PMID:9880361

  12. N-alkylated isatins evade P-gp mediated efflux and retain potency in MDR cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vine, Kara L; Belfiore, Lisa; Jones, Luke; Locke, Julie M; Wade, Samantha; Minaei, Elahe; Ranson, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel anticancer therapeutics with the ability to overcome multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms is of high priority. A class of molecules that show potential in overcoming MDR are the N-alkylated isatins. In particular 5,7-dibromo-N-alkylisatins are potent microtubule destabilizing agents that act to depolymerize microtubules, induce apoptosis and inhibit primary tumor growth in vivo. In this study we evaluated the ability of four dibrominated N-alkylisatin derivatives and the parent compound, 5,7-dibromoisatin, to circumvent MDR. All of the isatin-based compounds examined retained potency against the MDR cell lines; U937VbR and MES-SA/Dx5 and displayed bioequivalent dose-dependent cytotoxicity to that of the parental control cell lines. We show that one mechanism by which the isatin-based compounds overcome MDR is by circumventing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated drug efflux. Thus, as the isatin-based compounds are not susceptible to extrusion from P-gp overexpressing tumor cells, they represent a promising alternative strategy as a stand-alone or combination therapy for treating MDR cancer. PMID:27441242

  13. Modulation of liver tolerance by conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells and regulatory immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Andrea Kristina; Neumann, Katrin; Diehl, Linda; Tiegs, Gisa

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a tolerogenic organ with exquisite mechanisms of immune regulation that ensure upkeep of local and systemic immune tolerance to self and foreign antigens, but that is also able to mount effective immune responses against pathogens. The immune privilege of liver allografts was recognized first in pigs in spite of major histo-compatibility complex mismatch, and termed the “liver tolerance effect”. Furthermore, liver transplants are spontaneously accepted with only low-dose immunosuppression, and induce tolerance for non-hepatic co-transplanted allografts of the same donor. Although this immunotolerogenic environment is favorable in the setting of organ transplantation, it is detrimental in chronic infectious liver diseases like hepatitis B or C, malaria, schistosomiasis or tumorigenesis, leading to pathogen persistence and weak anti-tumor effects. The liver is a primary site of T-cell activation, but it elicits poor or incomplete activation of T cells, leading to their abortive activation, exhaustion, suppression of their effector function and early death. This is exploited by pathogens and can impair pathogen control and clearance or allow tumor growth. Hepatic priming of T cells is mediated by a number of local conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which promote tolerance by immune deviation, induction of T-cell anergy or apoptosis, and generating and expanding regulatory T cells. This review will focus on the communication between classical and nonclassical APCs and lymphocytes in the liver in tolerance induction and will discuss recent insights into the role of innate lymphocytes in this process. PMID:27041638

  14. Pecking order among tumor-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Urban, J L; Van Waes, C; Schreiber, H

    1984-02-01

    The ultraviolet light-induced fibrosarcoma 1591 is regularly rejected upon transplantation into young syngeneic mice; in rare instances, however, this tumor grows progressively and the tumors that develop are then heritably stable variant progressor tumors (1591-PRO tumors). In this study, we have induced transplantation resistance to 1591-PRO tumors and determined which antigens were recognized by mice that rejected these progressor tumors. We found that cytolytic T cells of such mice recognized a 1591-specific antigen that was present not only on all the independently derived 1591-PRO tumors but also on the parental regressor tumor (1591-RE). However, the cytolytic immune response of mice that rejected 1591-RE lysed 1591-RE tumor cells but not 1591-PRO tumor cells. Thus, the 1591-RE tumor seemed to express two antigens that were specific for tumors of the 1591 lineage, one that was lost and a second that was retained by 1591-PRO tumor cells. Mice challenged with 1591-R# tumor cells mounted a response to only one of the tumor-specific antigens which was therefore "immunodominant" over the other "immunorecessive" antigen. This immunorecessive antigen became the target of the immune response once the immunodominant antigen was lost. This "pecking order" interfered with the simultaneous recognition of two tumor-specific antigens and this mechanism may favor immune escape.

  15. The human E48 antigen, highly homologous to the murine Ly-6 antigen ThB, is a GPI-anchored molecule apparently involved in keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The E48 antigen, a putative human homologue of the 20-kD protein present in desmosomal preparations of bovine muzzle, and formerly called desmoglein III (dg4), is a promising target antigen for antibody- based therapy of squamous cell carcinoma in man. To anticipate the effect of high antibody dose treatment, and to evaluate the possible biological involvement of the antigen in carcinogenesis, we set out to molecularly characterize the antigen. A cDNA clone encoding the E48 antigen was isolated by expression cloning in COS cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the clone contained an open reading frame of 128 amino acids, encoding a core protein of 13,286 kD. Database searching showed that the E48 antigen has a high level of sequence similarity with the mouse ThB antigen, a member of the Ly-6 antigen family. Phosphatidylinositol-specific (PI-specific) phospholipase-C treatment indicated that the E48 antigen is glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) to the plasma membrane. The gene encoding the E48 antigen is a single copy gene, located on human chromosome 8 in the 8q24-qter region. The expression of the gene is confined to keratinocytes and squamous tumor cells. The putative mouse homologue, the ThB antigen, originally identified as an antigen on cells of the lymphocyte lineage, was shown to be highly expressed in squamous mouse epithelia. Moreover, the ThB expression level is in keratinocytes, in contrast to that in lymphocytes, not mouse strain related. Transfection of mouse SV40-polyoma transformed mouse NIH/3T3 cells with the E48 cDNA confirmed that the antigen is likely to be involved in cell-cell adhesion. PMID:7790363

  16. Cytoplasmic proliferating cell nuclear antigen connects glycolysis and cell survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Delphine; De Chiara, Alessia; Chapuis, Nicolas; Candalh, Céline; Mocek, Julie; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Haddaoui, Lamya; Ifrah, Norbert; Hermine, Olivier; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Frachet, Philippe; Bouscary, Didier; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a scaffolding protein involved in DNA replication, has been described as a key element in survival of mature neutrophil granulocytes, which are non-proliferating cells. Herein, we demonstrated an active export of PCNA involved in cell survival and chemotherapy resistance. Notably, daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cells (HL-60R) have a prominent cytosolic PCNA localization due to increased nuclear export compared to daunorubicin-sensitive HL-60 cells (HL-60S). By interacting with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a protein involved in NAD biosynthesis, PCNA coordinates glycolysis and survival, especially in HL-60R cells. These cells showed a dramatic increase in intracellular NAD+ concentration as well as glycolysis including increased expression and activity of hexokinase 1 and increased lactate production. Furthermore, this functional activity of cytoplasmic PCNA was also demonstrated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our data uncover a novel pathway of nuclear export of PCNA that drives cell survival by increasing metabolism flux. PMID:27759041

  17. Targeting Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen and Its Protein Interactions Induces Apoptosis in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Rebekka; Bachke, Siri; Gilljam, Karin M.; Våtsveen, Thea K.; Rø, Torstein B.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sundan, Anders; Otterlei, Marit

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM). Thus inhibiting PCNA’s protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells’ sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment. PMID:23936203

  18. Cross-Presentation of Cell-Associated Antigens by Mouse Splenic Dendritic Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Robert I.; Janssen, Edith M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens (Ag) plays an important role in the induction of anti-tumor responses, autoimmune diseases, and transplant rejection. While several dendritic cell (DC) populations can induce pro-inflammatory CD8+ T cell responses to cell-associated Ag during infection, in the absence of infection, cross-priming of naïve CD8+ T cells is highly restricted. Comparison of the main splenic DC populations in mice – including the classic, cross-presenting CD8α DC and the recently described merocytic DC (mcDC) – reveals that cross-priming DCs display a distinct phenotype in cell-associated Ag uptake, endosomal/lysosomal trafficking, lysosomal acidification, and Ag persistence compared to non-cross-priming DC populations. Although the CD8α DC and mcDC subsets utilize similar processing pathways to cross-present cell-associated Ag, cross-priming by CD8α DCs is associated with IL-12 production, while the superior priming of the mcDC is critically dependent on type I IFN production. This discussion illustrates how subtle differences in internal processing pathways and their signaling sequelae significantly affect the duration of Ag cross-presentation and cytokine production by DCs, thereby shaping the ensuing CD8+ T cell response. PMID:22566924

  19. Long-term in vivo provision of antigen-specific T cell immunity by programming hematopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2005-03-01

    A method to genetically program mouse hematopoietic stem cells to develop into functional CD8 or CD4 T cells of defined specificity in vivo is described. For this purpose, a bicistronic retroviral vector was engineered that efficiently delivers genes for both and chains of T cell receptor (TCR) to hematopoietic stem cells. When modified cell populations were used to reconstruct the hematopoietic lineages of recipient mice, significant percentages of antigen-specific CD8 or CD4 T cells were observed. These cells expressed normal surface markers and responded to peptide antigen stimulation by proliferation and cytokine production. Moreover, they could mature into memory cells after peptide stimulation. Using TCRs specific for a model tumor antigen, we found that the recipient mice were able to partially resist a challenge with tumor cells carrying the antigen. By combining cells modified with CD8- and CD4-specific TCRs, and boosting with dendritic cells pulsed with cognate peptides, complete suppression of tumor could be achieved and even tumors that had become established would regress and be eliminated after dendritic cell/peptide immunization. This methodology of "instructive immunotherapy" could be developed for controlling the growth of human tumors and attacking established pathogens.

  20. Dendritic cell profile induced by Schistosoma mansoni antigen in cutaneous leishmaniasis patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Diego Mota; Fernandes, Jamille Souza; Cardoso, Thiago Marconi de Souza; Bafica, Aline Michele Barbosa; Oliveira, Sérgio Costa; Carvalho, Edgar M; Araujo, Maria Ilma; Cardoso, Luciana Santos

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response in cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), although responsible for controlling the infection, is associated with the pathogenesis of disease. Conversely, the immune response induced by S. mansoni antigens is able to prevent immune-mediated diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of the S. mansoni Sm29 antigen to change the profile of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) from subjects with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in vitro. Monocytes derived from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of twelve patients were cultured with GM-CSF and IL-4 for differentiation into dendritic cells and then stimulated with soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) in the presence or absence of Sm29 antigen. The expression of surface molecules associated with maturation and activation (HLA-DR, CD40, CD83, CD80, and CD86), inflammation (IL-12, TNF), and downregulation (IL-10, IL-10R) was evaluated using flow cytometry. We observed that the frequencies of HLA-DR, CD83, CD80, and CD86 as well as of IL-10 and IL-10R on MoDCs were higher in cultures stimulated with Sm29, compared to the unstimulated cell cultures. Our results indicate that the Sm29 antigen is able to activate regulatory MoDCs in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. It might be useful to control the inflammatory process associated with this disease.

  1. Dendritic Cell Profile Induced by Schistosoma mansoni Antigen in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Diego Mota; Fernandes, Jamille Souza; Cardoso, Thiago Marconi de Souza; Bafica, Aline Michele Barbosa; Oliveira, Sérgio Costa; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Araujo, Maria Ilma; Cardoso, Luciana Santos

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response in cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), although responsible for controlling the infection, is associated with the pathogenesis of disease. Conversely, the immune response induced by S. mansoni antigens is able to prevent immune-mediated diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of the S. mansoni Sm29 antigen to change the profile of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) from subjects with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in vitro. Monocytes derived from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of twelve patients were cultured with GM-CSF and IL-4 for differentiation into dendritic cells and then stimulated with soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) in the presence or absence of Sm29 antigen. The expression of surface molecules associated with maturation and activation (HLA-DR, CD40, CD83, CD80, and CD86), inflammation (IL-12, TNF), and downregulation (IL-10, IL-10R) was evaluated using flow cytometry. We observed that the frequencies of HLA-DR, CD83, CD80, and CD86 as well as of IL-10 and IL-10R on MoDCs were higher in cultures stimulated with Sm29, compared to the unstimulated cell cultures. Our results indicate that the Sm29 antigen is able to activate regulatory MoDCs in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. It might be useful to control the inflammatory process associated with this disease. PMID:25309922

  2. Expression of I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens on functional B cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, J A; Hibbler, F J; Hill, S W

    1978-12-01

    Ia antigens from specific subregions have been examined on functional B cell populations. Expression of both I-A and I-E,C region antigens was demonstrated on cells required for both lipopolysaccharide mitogenesis and polyclonal activation. Similar I-A and I-E,C subregion expression was found on cells required for response to the T-independent antigen, polyvinylpyrrolidone. TNP-specific IgM and hen egg lysozyme-specific IgG plaque-forming cells also express I-A and I-E,C region antigens. No evidence was found for an Ia- population responsive in the systems tested. Further, no evidence of preferential expression of I-A or I-E,C region antigens was observed in any system examined. Therefore, it appears that B cells express both I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the Helicobacter pylori CagA antigen after cag-driven host cell translocation.

    PubMed

    Stein, M; Rappuoli, R; Covacci, A

    2000-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains associated with severe tissue damage and inflammation possess a unique genetic locus, cag, containing 31 genes originating from a distant event of horizontal transfer and retained as a pathogenicity island. The cag system is an Helicobacter-specific type IV secretion engine involved in cellular responses like induction of pedestals, secretion of IL-8, and phosphorylation of proteic targets. It has previously been reported that cocultivation of epithelial cells with Helicobacter pylori triggers signal transduction and tyrosine phosphorylation of a 145-kDa putative host cell protein. Herein, we demonstrate that this protein is not derived from the host but rather is the bacterial immunodominant antigen CagA, a virulence factor commonly expressed in peptic ulcer disease and thought to be an orphan of a specific biological function. Thus, CagA is delivered into the epithelial cells by the cag type IV secretion system where it is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by an as yet unidentified host cell kinase and wired to eukaryotic signal transduction pathways and cytoskeletal plasticity. PMID:10655519

  4. Cooperation between the polyomavirus middle-T-antigen gene and the human c-myc oncogene in a rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell line: model of in vitro progression.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Portella, G; Grieco, M; Santoro, M; Fusco, A

    1988-01-01

    Two rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell lines, PC Cl 3 and PC myc, were infected with the polyoma murine leukemia virus (PyMLV) carrying the Middle-T-antigen gene of polyomavirus. After infection, both cell lines acquired the typical markers of neoplastic transformation; however, the PC myc cells showed a greater malignant phenotype. Furthermore, the thyroid differentiated functions were completely suppressed in PC myc cells transformed by PyMLV, whereas they were, at least partially, retained in PC Cl 3 cells transformed by PyMLV, and in particular, thyroglobulin synthesis and secretion were not affected at all. Since no differences in the expression of the middle-T-antigen gene were observed in the two PyMLV-transformed cell lines, the different properties shown by these two infected cell lines must be ascribed to the expression of the c-myc oncogene. Images PMID:2838744

  5. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade CD19-Specific T Cells Stably Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Using Sleeping Beauty System and Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼1010 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  6. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10) T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  7. Epidermal CD8+ T cells reactive with group A streptococcal antigens in chronic plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Ovigne, J-M; Baker, B S; Davison, S C; Powles, A V; Fry, L

    2002-08-01

    Chronic plaque psoriasis is a T cell mediated disease associated with group A streptococci (GAS). We have previously shown the presence of a psoriasis-specific dermal Th1 subset that recognizes GAS antigens. To assess whether GAS-reactive T cells are also present in lesional epidermis, fresh cell suspensions or T cell lines isolated from lesional epidermis of 33 psoriasis patients were stained for intracellular interferon-gamma after stimulation with GAS antigens. The patients were typed by PCR for HLA-DR7 and HLA-Cw6 expression. A subset of GAS-reactive CD8+ T cells (2.4% +/- 2.4) was found in 14/21 (67%) fresh cell suspensions. A smaller subset of GAS-reactive CD4+ T cells (0.9% +/- 0.9) was found in 13/21 (62%) fresh cell suspensions, which was expanded in the T cell lines. There was a significant inverse correlation between the proportions of GAS-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the fresh suspensions (r = -0.48, P = 0.0277). The presence of GAS-reactive CD4+ or CD8+ T cells did not correlate with HLA-DR7 or HLA-Cw6 expression, respectively. This study has demonstrated GAS-reactive CD8+, and to a lesser extent CD4+, T cell subsets in psoriatic epidermis and provides further evidence that GAS antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic plaque psoriasis.

  8. Modulation of MUC1 and blood group antigen expression in gastric adenocarcinoma cells by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Georg P M; Schirmacher, Peter; Manzke, Oliver; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Dienes, Hans P; Baldus, Stephan E

    2003-08-01

    Immunohistological studies demonstrated that MUC1 expression in gastric cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. As a mediator of cell-cell interactions, MUC1 may also be involved in metastasis. However, these aspects are of relevance since cytokine levels are locally increased as a consequence of peritumorous inflammatory response and coexisting chronic gastritis. Therefore we analyzed the potential influence of several cytokines on the expression of tumor-associated MUC1 and Lewis blood group antigens in gastric carcinoma cells. Gastric cancer cell lines AGS and KATOIII were incubated with the cytokines interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and hepatocyte growth factor over a period of 72 h. Expressions of mucin antigens and cytokine secretion were measured by immunocytochemistry and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) demonstrated that MUC1 and sialyl Lewis A reactivities of AGS cells were increased significantly following TNF-alpha stimulation but not by other cytokines. Expression of mucin-associated antigens by cell line KATOIII was not affected by any of the employed cytokines. These data provide evidence that TNF-alpha can raise the expression of important mucin peptide as well as mucin-associated carbohydrate antigens and thereby potentially influence the progression of gastric carcinomas. PMID:12906871

  9. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  10. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  11. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  12. Essential flexibility in the T-cell recognition of antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersh, Gilbert J.; Allen, Paul M.

    1996-04-01

    αβ T cells specifically recognize a ligand composed of a peptide bound to a self-major-histocompatibility-complex molecule, but the recognition of slightly altered ligands by T cells can lead to a partial activation. This flexibility is crucial for T-cell development and can have both beneficial and harmful effects on peripheral T cells.

  13. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled “Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor” by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view. PMID:26958613

  14. The Level of Viral Antigen Presented by Hepatocytes Influences CD8 T-Cell Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Adam J.; Sun, Dianxing; Kennedy, Patrick T. F.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Lim, Seng Gee; Wasser, Shanthi; Selden, Clare; Maini, Mala K.; Davis, Dan M.; Nassal, Michael; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    CD8 T cells exert their antiviral function through cytokines and lysis of infected cells. Because hepatocytes are susceptible to noncytolytic mechanisms of viral clearance, CD8 T-cell antiviral efficiency against hepatotropic viruses has been linked to their capacity to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). On the other hand, intrahepatic cytokine production triggers the recruitment of mononuclear cells, which sustain acute and chronic liver damage. Using virus-specific CD8 T cells and human hepatocytes, we analyzed the modulation of virus-specific CD8 T-cell function after recognition peptide-pulsed or virally infected hepatocytes. We observed that hepatocyte antigen presentation was generally inefficient, and the quantity of viral antigen strongly influenced CD8 T-cell antiviral function. High levels of hepatitis B virus production induced robust IFN-γ and TNF-α production in virus-specific CD8 T cells, while limiting amounts of viral antigen, both in hepatocyte-like cells and naturally infected human hepatocytes, preferentially stimulated CD8 T-cell degranulation. Our data document a mechanism where virus-specific CD8 T-cell function is influenced by the quantity of virus produced within hepatocytes. PMID:17202217

  15. Molecular Characterization of Antigen-Peptide Pulsed Dendritic Cells: Immature Dendritic Cells Develop a Distinct Molecular Profile when Pulsed with Antigen Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yufei; Catalano, Jennifer; Puri, Raj K.; Khleif, Samir N.

    2014-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC), immature DC (iDC), and mature DC (mDC) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20), a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC). When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA), pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN), anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA), DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1), and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61) in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE) induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host. PMID:24475103

  16. Cord Blood Derived CD4+CD25high T Cells Become Functional Regulatory T Cells upon Antigen Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Elisabeth; Bannert, Christina; Gruber, Saskia; Klunker, Sven; Spittler, Andreas; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Upon antigen exposure, cord blood derived T cells respond to ubiquitous environmental antigens by high proliferation. To date it remains unclear whether these “excessive” responses relate to different regulatory properties of the putative T regulatory cell (Treg) compartment or even expansion of the Treg compartment itself. Methods: Cord blood (>37 week of gestation) and peripheral blood (healthy controls) were obtained and different Treg cell subsets were isolated. The suppressive potential of Treg populations after antigen exposure was evaluated via functional inhibition assays ([3H]thymidine incorporation assay and CFSE staining) with or without allergen stimulation. The frequency and markers of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ T cells were characterized by mRNA analysis and flow cytometry. Results: Cord blood derived CD4+CD25high cells did not show substantial suppressor capacity upon TCR activation, in contrast to CD4+CD25high cells freshly purified from adult blood. This could not be explained by a lower frequency of FoxP3+CD4+CD25highcells or FOXP3 mRNA expression. However, after antigen-specific stimulation in vitro, these cells showed strong proliferation and expansion and gained potent suppressive properties. The efficiency of their suppressive capacity can be enhanced in the presence of endotoxins. If T-cells were sorted according to their CD127 expression, a tiny subset of Treg cells (CD4+CD25+CD127low) is highly suppressive even without prior antigen exposure. Conclusion: Cord blood harbors a very small subset of CD4+CD25high Treg cells that requires antigen-stimulation to show expansion and become functional suppressive Tregs. PMID:22272233

  17. Quantum dot fluorescence characterizes the nanoscale organization of T cell receptors for antigen.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Sarah; Kolin, David L; Bieler, Joan Glick; Schneck, Jonathan P; Wiseman, Paul W; Edidin, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Changes in the clustering of surface receptors modulate cell responses to ligands. Hence, global measures of receptor clustering can be useful for characterizing cell states. Using T cell receptor for antigen as an example, we show that k-space image correlation spectroscopy of quantum dots blinking detects T cell receptor clusters on a scale of tens of nanometers and reports changes in clustering after T cell activation. Our results offer a general approach to the global analysis of lateral organization and receptor clustering in single cells, and can thus be applied when the cell type of interest is rare.

  18. Recovery of a cell surface fetal antigen from circulating immune complexes of melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, J H; Aguero, B; Gupta, R K; Morton, D L

    1988-01-01

    A well-characterized 69.5 x 10(3) dalton glycoprotein fetal antigen (FA), isolated from the spent culture medium of a melanoma cell line, UCLA-SO-14 (M14), was utilized to characterize the antigen component of circulating immune complexes (CIC) from melanoma patients. Ten serum samples from five patients with stage II melanoma at 1 and 4 months prior to the clinical detection of recurrent disease were selected for study. The CIC were dissociated with low pH and ultrafiltered through a 100 x 10(3) dalton exclusion limit membrane. The low pH treatment resulted in an increase in antibody titer in eight of ten serum samples. The antibody activity in membrane immunofluorescence was quantitatively inhibited by the filtered antigen fraction and purified FA, suggesting the presence of anti-FA antibodies in the treated serum, which possibly were complexed with FA in the untreated sample. As determined by competitive inhibition in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the filtrate (antigen fraction) contained an antigen that was immunologically similar to FA. These results clearly demonstrate that FA, expressed on the cell surface of melanoma cells, is present in CIC of selected melanoma patients.

  19. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  20. Antigenic differences between Coxiella burnetii cells revealed by postembedding immunoelectron microscopy and immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    McCaul, T F; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, N; Williams, J C

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenic structures of the morphologically distinct cells of the Coxiella burnetii developmental cycle. Postembedding immunoelectron microscopy with polyclonal antibodies produced in rabbits to (i) phase I cells, (ii) a chloroform-methanol residue fraction of cells, (iii) the cell walls (CW) of large and small cells and small dense cells (SDC), and (iv) the peptidoglycan-protein complexes of small cells and SDC labelled the continuum of morphologically distinct cells. But these antibodies did not distinguish between the antigenic structures of the various cells. Monoclonal antibodies to the phase I lipopolysaccharide labelled the CW of a majority of the smaller cells, but there was diminished reactivity to the larger cells. Although monoclonal antibodies to a 29.5-kDa outer membrane protein labelled the CW of the large mother cells, the large cells, and the small cells, a minority of the SDC with compact CW were not labelled. The endogenous spore within the mother cell was not labelled by the polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies to cellular components. A selected population of SDC was prepared by osmotic lysis of large cells, differential centrifugation, Renografin step-gradient fractionation, and breakage of the small cells in a French press at 20,000 lb/in2. The pressure-resistant SDC collected as fraction CL did not contain the 29.5-kDa protein, as evidenced by the lack of (i) Coomassie brilliant blue staining of protein in the 29.5-kDa region of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (ii) reactivity of the 29.5-kDa protein antigenic epitopes in immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies to the protein. In contrast, CW of the pressure-sensitive small cells contained the 29.5-kDa protein. Therefore, the observed ultrastructural differences between large and small cells and SDC reflect differences in sensitivity to breakage by pressure treatment and in cell-associated antigens. Although the process of

  1. Antibodies to new beta cell antigen ICA12 in Latvian diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Hagopian, W; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    In Latvia diabetes mellitus is diagnosed using the WHO's clinical criteria, and assays for the detection of autoantibodies are not available. In consequence, slowly progressive autoimmune diabetes or LADA is likely to be missed. Antibodies to GAD65 and IA-2 are the major immunological markers in autoimmune diabetes. Recently, a new beta cell antigen, called ICA12, has been identified, which has a homology to the SOX family of transcription factors. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of ICA12 antibodies in diabetes mellitus patients and controls from Latvia and to see whether this antigen is important in revealing autoimmunity when antibodies against major antigens are not present. We studied 88 IDDM patients and 100 NIDDM patients as well as controls for the prevalence of GAD65, IA-2, and ICA12 antibodies by radioligand binding assay (RIA) using (35)S-labeled islet antigens. We found ICA12Abs in 26 of 88 IDDM patients (30%) vs. 4% in healthy controls (4/100) and in 9 of 100 NIDDM patients (9%) vs. 2% controls (2/100). ICA12Abs alone are present in only 3% (3/88) of the patients with IDDM and 1% (1/100) of the NIDDM patients. We conclude that ICA12 represents the minor antigens in autoimmune diabetes and that, as a minor antigen, ICA12 alone does not contribute significantly in revealing new cases of autoimmunity.

  2. Comparison of dengue virus antigens in sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dengue infected patients.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, L; Meethien, N; Sujirarat, D; Kittigul, C; Vasanavat, S

    1997-12-01

    The presence of dengue virus antigens in acute sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from dengue infected patients were determined by a biotin-streptavidin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BS-ELISA). The frequency of the antigens detected in PBMC was higher than that in sera (53.8% vs 18.9%). In comparison with sera, the detection rate in PBMC was greater than six times: 7 cases were positive only in sera whereas 44 cases were positive only in PBMC, p < 0.001. The presence of the antigens in the sera did not depend on the severity of the disease, i.e. dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (grades I and II) or dengue shock syndrome (grades III and IV). In contrast, the presence of the antigens in PBMC increased from 36.8% to 100% when the infection was more severe. The dengue virus antigens could be detected in the samples collected between day 2 and day 7 after onset of the disease with the highest rate of detection (68.8%) in PBMC collected on day 4. The data suggest the use of PBMC with access to the appropriate acute-phase specimen for detection of dengue virus antigens.

  3. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  4. T suppressor cells are required for the maintenance of the antigen-induced B-cell unresponsive state in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Benveniste, E.; Stevens, R.H.

    1983-04-01

    Tetanus toxoid immunization of humans generates circulating B cells which secrete IgG anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies (IgG-Tet) when stimulated in vitro with T cells and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). A unique property of these cells is the inhibition of maturation into antibody-secreting plasma cells following a 1-hr in vitro pulse with tetanus toxoid. Studies were undertaken to determine if different T-cell subsets could modulate the in vitro generated B-cell unresponsive state. The addition of OKT4+/OKT8- cells to antigen-treated B cells resulted in a partial reversal of the antigen-induced inhibition of IgG-Tet synthesis. The addition of OKT4-/OKT8+ cells to the treated B cells caused a suppression of IgG-Tet synthesis comparable to that seen in cultures containing unfractionated T cells. These results indicate that (1) the B-cell unresponsive state generated by antigen treatment is not absolute, (2) the degree of B-cell unresponsiveness results from a balance of suppressor and helper signals, and (3) T-suppressor cells need to be present to induce and maintain the B-cell unresponsive state.

  5. Mannosylation of Virus-Like Particles Enhances Internalization by Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barwani, Farah; Young, Sarah L.; Baird, Margaret A.; Larsen, David S.; Ward, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Internalization of peptides by antigen presenting cells is crucial for the initiation of the adaptive immune response. Mannosylation has been demonstrated to enhance antigen uptake through mannose receptors, leading to improved immune responses. In this study we test the effect of surface mannosylation of protein-based virus-like particles (VLP) derived from Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) on uptake by murine and human antigen presenting cells. A monomannoside and a novel dimannoside were synthesized and successfully conjugated to RHDV VLP capsid protein, providing approximately 270 mannose groups on the surface of each virus particle. VLP conjugated to the mannoside or dimannoside exhibited significantly enhanced binding and internalization by murine dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells as well as human dendritic cells and macrophages. This uptake was inhibited by the inclusion of mannan as a specific inhibitor of mannose specific uptake, demonstrating that mannosylation of VLP targets mannose receptor-based uptake. Consistent with mannose receptor-based uptake, partial retargeting of the intracellular processing of RHDV VLP was observed, confirming that mannosylation of VLP provides both enhanced uptake and modified processing of associated antigens. PMID:25122183

  6. Complex Minigene Library Vaccination for Discovery of Pre-Erythrocytic Plasmodium T Cell Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Brad C.; Kas, Arnold; Billman, Zachary P.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Fuller, James T.; Shendure, Jay; Murphy, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Development of a subunit vaccine targeting liver-stage Plasmodium parasites requires the identification of antigens capable of inducing protective T cell responses. However, traditional methods of antigen identification are incapable of evaluating T cell responses against large numbers of proteins expressed by these parasites. This bottleneck has limited development of subunit vaccines against Plasmodium and other complex intracellular pathogens. To address this bottleneck, we are developing a synthetic minigene technology for multi-antigen DNA vaccines. In an initial test of this approach, pools of long (150 bp) antigen-encoding oligonucleotides were synthesized and recombined into vectors by ligation-independent cloning to produce two DNA minigene library vaccines. Each vaccine encoded peptides derived from 36 (vaccine 1) and 53 (vaccine 2) secreted or transmembrane pre-erythrocytic P. yoelii proteins. BALB/cj mice were vaccinated three times with a single vaccine by biolistic particle delivery (gene gun) and screened for interferon-γ-producing T cell responses by ELISPOT. Library vaccination induced responses against four novel antigens. Naïve mice exposed to radiation-attenuated sporozoites mounted a response against only one of the four novel targets (PyMDH, malate dehydrogenase). The response to PyMDH could not be recalled by additional homologous sporozoite immunizations but could be partially recalled by heterologous cross-species sporozoite exposure. Vaccination against the dominant PyMDH epitope by DNA priming and recombinant Listeria boosting did not protect against sporozoite challenge. Improvements in library design and delivery, combined with methods promoting an increase in screening sensitivity, may enable complex minigene screening to serve as a high-throughput system for discovery of novel T cell antigens. PMID:27070430

  7. Enhanced induction of thyroid cell MHC class II antigen expression in rats highly responsive to thyroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Lahat, N; Hirose, W; Davies, T F

    1989-04-01

    Initial experiments demonstrated that the degree of autoantibody and proliferative T cell responses to syngeneic rat thyroglobulin differed markedly between Buffalo (high responder) and Fisher (low responder) rats after classical immunization schedules. While varying immune responsiveness may be due to qualitative and quantitative T and B cell differences, the role of thyroid cell MHC class II antigens may be pivotal to the onset of autoimmune thyroiditis in such animal models. We, therefore, examined the induction of MHC class II antigens in thyroid monolayers derived from Buffalo and Fisher rats treated with methimazole (0.1% in their water) for 4 weeks to induce mild thyroid hyperplasia. After thyroidectomy, thyroid cell monolayers were prepared and exposed to recombinant rat gamma-interferon (gamma IF; 10-1000 U/ml) for 1-7 days in the presence and absence of TSH (1 mU/ml). Both Buffalo and Fisher thyroid monolayers responded to gamma IF with MHC class II antigen expression when assessed by laser flow cytometry using MRC OX-6 monoclonal anti-RT1.B. In both types of culture, TSH enhanced MHC class II antigen expression in the presence of gamma IF to the same degree. However, there was a consistently earlier and greater degree of MHC class II antigen expression in Buffalo thyroid monolayers compared to Fisher monolayers, a phenomenon not explicable on the basis of fibroblast contamination as assessed by cytokeratin staining. These data demonstrate that end-organ sensitivity to MHC class II antigen expression may be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  8. Detection of antigens specific for B-lymphoid cultured cell lines with human alloantisera.

    PubMed

    Mann, D L; Abelson, L; Harris, S; Amos, D B

    1975-07-01

    Human sera were tested for cytotoxicity to pairs of long-term tissue-cultured cell lines. Each pair had been derived from the same individual and one of the pairs possessed the characteristics of either "T" or "B" cells. The alloantisera used were HL-A-typing reagents or sera obtained from Amish multiparas. Selected cytotoxicity was found against the B-cell lines by direct testing. Cytotoxicity was abolished by absorption with B-cell line but not by absorption with the T-cell lines. The results suggest that a group of allotypic antigens may be expressed exculsively on human B cells. PMID:1080182

  9. Adoptive Therapy with Chimeric Antigen Receptor Modified T Cells of Defined Subset Composition

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Berger, Carolina; Liu, Lingfeng (Steven); Balakrishnan, Ashwini; Salter, Alex; Hudecek, Michael; Maloney, David G.; Turtle, Cameron J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to engineer T cells to recognize tumor cells through genetic modification with a synthetic chimeric antigen receptor has ushered in a new era in cancer immunotherapy. The most advanced clinical applications are in in targeting CD19 on B cell malignancies. The clinical trials of CD19 CAR therapy have thus far not attempted to select defined subsets prior to transduction or imposed uniformity of the CD4 and CD8 cell composition of the cell products. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to utilizing adoptive therapy with genetically modified T cells of defined subset and phenotypic composition. PMID:24667960

  10. Effective expansion of forkhead box P3⁺ regulatory T cells via early secreted antigenic target 6 and antigen 85 complex B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-E; Du, Zhong-Ren; Cai, Ying-Mu; Peng, Wen-Guang; Zheng, Gao-Zhe; Zheng, Geng-Long; Wu, Li-Biao; Li, Ke

    2015-04-01

    The expansion of CD4+ CD25+ forkhead box (FOX)P3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells has been observed in patients with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis; however, the mechanism of expansion remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the early secreted antigenic target 6(ESAT‑6) and antigen 85 complex B (Ag85B) from M. tuberculosis on Treg cell expansion. To investigate the sensitivity of peripheral blood cultures to the M. tuberculosis ESAT‑6 and Ag85B antigens, the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells was determined using flow cytometry and the levels of FOXP3 mRNA were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA levels of FOXP3 and the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells were increased in multiplicitous drug‑resistant tuberculosis patients compared with those in healthy controls and patients with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) (P<0.001). The mycobacterial antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B increased the expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells and the mRNA levels of FOXP3 in healthy controls and LTBI patients compared with the effect of Bacillus Calmette‑Guerin (P<0.05). Additionally, the mRNA levels of FOXP3 were elevated in the LTBI patients following stimulations with the mycobacterial antigens (P=0.012). Therefore, the M. tuberculosis antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B induced CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg‑cell expansion, particularly in patients with LTBI. These findings indicated that CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells may have a primary role in the failure of the host immune system to eradicate M. tuberculosis.

  11. Antigenic variation of pilin regulates adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nassif, X; Lowy, J; Stenberg, P; O'Gaora, P; Ganji, A; So, M

    1993-05-01

    Pili have been shown to play an essential role in the adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to epithelial cells. However, among piliated strains, both inter- and intrastrain variability exist with respect to their degree of adhesion to epithelial cells in vitro (Virji et al., 1992). This suggests that factors other than the presence of pili per se are involved in this process. The N. meningitidis pilin subunit undergoes extensive antigenic variation. Piliated low- and high-adhesive derivatives of the same N. meningitidis strain were selected and the nucleotide sequence of the pilin gene expressed in each was determined. The highly adhesive derivatives had the same pilin sequence. The alleles encoding the pilin subunit of the low-adhesive derivatives were completely different from the one found in the high-adhesive isolates. Using polyclonal antibodies raised against one hyperadhesive variant, it was confirmed that the low-adhesive piliated derivatives expressed pilin variants antigenically different from the highly adhesive strains. The role of antigenic variation in the adhesive process of N. meningitidis was confirmed by performing allelic exchanges of the pilE locus between low- and high-adhesive isolates. Antigenic variation has been considered a means by which virulent bacteria evade the host immune system. This work provides genetic proof that a bacterial pathogen, N. meningitidis, can use antigenic variation to modulate their degree of virulence.

  12. The CD1 family: serving lipid antigens to T cells since the Mesozoic era.

    PubMed

    Zajonc, Dirk M

    2016-08-01

    Class I-like CD1 molecules are in a family of antigen-presenting molecules that bind lipids and lipopeptides, rather than peptides for immune surveillance by T cells. Since CD1 lacks the high degree of polymorphism found in their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, different species express different numbers of CD1 isotypes, likely to be able to present structurally diverse classes of lipid antigens. In this review, we will present a historical overview of the structures of the different human CD1 isotypes and also discuss species-specific adaptations of the lipid-binding groove. We will discuss how single amino acid changes alter the shape and volume of the CD1 binding groove, how these minor changes can give rise to different numbers of binding pockets, and how these pockets affect the lipid repertoire that can be presented by any given CD1 protein. We will compare the structures of various lipid antigens and finally, we will discuss recognition of CD1-presented lipid antigens by antigen receptors on T cells (TCRs).

  13. The CD1 family: serving lipid antigens to T cells since the Mesozoic era.

    PubMed

    Zajonc, Dirk M

    2016-08-01

    Class I-like CD1 molecules are in a family of antigen-presenting molecules that bind lipids and lipopeptides, rather than peptides for immune surveillance by T cells. Since CD1 lacks the high degree of polymorphism found in their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, different species express different numbers of CD1 isotypes, likely to be able to present structurally diverse classes of lipid antigens. In this review, we will present a historical overview of the structures of the different human CD1 isotypes and also discuss species-specific adaptations of the lipid-binding groove. We will discuss how single amino acid changes alter the shape and volume of the CD1 binding groove, how these minor changes can give rise to different numbers of binding pockets, and how these pockets affect the lipid repertoire that can be presented by any given CD1 protein. We will compare the structures of various lipid antigens and finally, we will discuss recognition of CD1-presented lipid antigens by antigen receptors on T cells (TCRs). PMID:27368414

  14. Somatic cell genetic analysis of human cell surface antigens 5.1H11 and F35/9 (gp45).

    PubMed

    Rettig, W J; Triche, T J; Bander, N H

    1990-01-01

    Serologic analysis of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids has permitted the assignment of loci coding for cell surface differentiation antigens 5.1H11 (gene symbol MSK39) and F35/9 (MSK40) to human chromosomes 11q13-qter and 22, respectively. Both antigens are expressed in hybrids constructed with antigen-positive human cells and certain hybrids constructed with antigen-negative human cells, indicating that the coding genes are not irreversibly silenced in human nonexpressor cells. Antigens 5.1H11 and F35/9, and at least six additional cell surface antigens encoded by chromosomes 11 and 22, are expressed on human Ewing sarcoma and peripheral neuroepithelioma cells, providing selectable markers for isolating and characterizing the specific t(11;22)(q24;q12) marker chromosomes of these tumors in interspecies hybrids.

  15. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages.

  16. Cell surface antigens detected on mature and leukemic granulocytic populations by cytotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Drew, S I; Carter, B M; Terasaki, P I; Naiem, F; Nathanson, D S; Abromowitz, B; Gale, R P

    1978-08-01

    Using a microcytotoxicity assay, the serological reactivity of human granulocytes, namely neutrophils and eosinophils, and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and cultured CML cell lines (K562, NALM-1) were examined. Mature granulocyte forms and cord granulocytes are readily lysed by specific granulocyte cytotoxins that do not react with random T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, red blood cells, or platelets. Furthermore, certain antisera were preferentially cytotoxic for eosinophil-enriched populations. Granulocytotoxin detected antigens on one of three CML blast cell populations tested and K562, but failed to react with NALM-1. By cytotoxicity, mature granulocytes were poor targets for B2-microglobulin and the appropriate HLA antisera although both sera types are absorbed with granulocytes. Furthermore, granulocytes did not possess B-lymphocytes (Ia-like) or blood group A, B, and Rh (D) antigens. Except for K562, both HLA and heterologous B-lymphocyte antisera were cytotoxic for the CML blast cell populations tested.

  17. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  18. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Shenoda, Botros B; Ajit, Seena K

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  19. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Florian R.; Becattini, Simone; Rülicke, Thomas; Sallusto, Federica; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2015-01-01

    Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity. PMID:26431538

  20. Artificial antigen-presenting cells engineered by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing antigen, MHC class II, and costimulatory molecules elicit proliferation of CD4+ lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oertli, D; Marti, W R; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-10-01

    The current study was designed to test the ability of recombinant Vaccinia virus (rVV) encoding essential components of an artificial antigen-presenting cell to activate antigen-specific T cells in vitro. We have constructed a set of rVV encoding separately or in combination a CD4+ T cell-specific epitope (the 133-145 peptide of chicken conalbumin), the MHC class II molecule I-Ak, and costimulatory molecules (mB7-1 and mB7-2). Cultured cells infected with rVV encoding both the antigen and the presenting MHC, but not either one alone, could activate cloned CD4+ T cells specific for the virus-encoded epitope. Additional co-expression of mB7-1 and mB7-2 resulted in further enhancement of T cell response. Thus, our rVV vector expressing four different foreign gene products elicited the highest proliferation rates of antigen-specific cloned T cells. PMID:9353162

  1. Differential expression of melanoma-associated antigens and molecules involved in antigen processing and presentation in three cell lines established from a single patient.

    PubMed

    Kovalcsik, Edit; John, Justin; Turner, Matthew; Birchall, Lindsay; Sage, Deborah; Whittle, Robert; Dalgleish, Angus; Pandha, Hardev

    2004-12-01

    Tumour cells are able to evade the immune system by using several 'escape mechanisms'. Downregulation of molecules involved in the processing and presentation of self-antigens has been reported. However, these adaptations have not been compared in metastases in different anatomical locations but derived from a single patient. We investigated three melanoma cell lines--MJT1 from the parietal lobe of the brain, MJT3 from the cerebellum and MJT5 from the left side of the neck--established from biopsies excised from a 45 year old female patient. Although human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I was detected in all three cell lines by flow cytometry using an anti-HLA monomorphic antibody, further serological analysis demonstrated HLA B38 loss in all three cell lines, HLA B7 downregulation in MJT5 (skin metastases) and B7 loss in MJT3 and MJT1 (brain metastases) compared with the HLA type of the patient's normal autologous lymphocytes. Interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) treatment increased the expression of HLA class I and transporters associated with antigen processing 1 (TAP1) in all three cell lines. De novo HLA class II molecule expression was observed after IFNgamma treatment in MJT3 and MJT5. Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results revealed heterogeneity of melanoma-associated antigen (MAA) expression in the cell lines: MJT3 cells expressed higher levels of MAAs than the other two cell lines. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that three metastatic lesions from a single patient can have differential expression of molecules involved in antigen processing (TAP1) and presentation (HLA I and II), but that expression of these molecules is modulated by IFNgamma to a similar degree in all cell lines. In contrast, the downregulation of expression of specific MAAs between the three cell lines was unaffected by the addition of IFNgamma.

  2. Manipulation of regulatory T cells and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G

    2015-01-01

    The most potent killing machinery in our immune system is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Since the possibility for self-destruction by these cells is high, many regulatory activities exist to prevent autoimmune destruction by these cells. A tumour (cancer) grows from the cells of the body and is tolerated by the body's immune system. Yet, it has been possible to generate tumour-associated antigen (TAA) -specific CTL that are also self-antigen specific in vivo, to achieve a degree of therapeutic efficacy. Tumour-associated antigen-specific T-cell tolerance through pathways of self-tolerance generation represents a significant challenge to successful immunotherapy. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells, referred to as T regulatory (Treg) cells, are selected in the thymus as controllers of the anti-self repertoire. These cells are referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. According to the new consensus (Nature Immunology 2013; 14:307–308) these cells are to be termed as (tTreg). There is another class of CD4+ Treg cells also involved in regulatory function in the periphery, also phenotypically CD4+ CD25±, classified as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. These cells are to be termed as peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. In vitro-induced Treg cells with suppressor function should be termed as iTreg. These different Treg cells differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. The current challenges are to determine the degree of specificity of these Treg cells in recognizing the same TAA as the CTL population and to circumvent their regulatory constraints so as to achieve robust CTL responses against cancer. PMID:25243729

  3. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  4. Antigen-specific activation and cytokine-facilitated expansion of naive, human CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wölfl, Matthias; Greenberg, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-specific priming of human, naïve T-cells has been difficult to assess. Due to the low initial frequency in the naïve cell pool of specific T-cell precursors, such an analysis has been obscured by the requirements for repeated stimulations and prolonged culture time. In this protocol, we describe how to rapidly evaluate antigen-specific priming of CD8+ -cells following a single stimulation. The assay provides reference conditions, which result in the expansion of a significant population of antigen-specific T-cells from the naïve repertoire. Various conditions and modifications during the priming process (e.g. testing new cytokines, costimulators, etc.) can now be directly compared to the reference conditions. Factors relevant to achieving effective priming include the dendritic cell preparation, the T-cell preparation, the cell ratio at the time of priming, the serum source used for the experiment, and the timing of addition and concentration of the cytokines used for expansion. This protocol is relevant for human immunology, vaccine biology and drug development. PMID:24675735

  5. Cancer/testis antigen NY-SAR-35 enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

    PubMed

    Song, Myung-Ha; Kim, Ye-Rin; Lee, Jun-Won; Lee, Chang-Hun; Lee, Sang-Yull

    2016-02-01

    The cancer/testis antigen NY-SAR-35 is aberrantly expressed in various cancer tissues and cancer cell lines but not in normal tissues except for the testis. A previous study demonstrated that the expression of NY-SAR-35 is activated by hypomethylation in cancer cells. However, the functions of this antigen remain unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the role of NY-SAR‑35 in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells using exogenous expression system of the gene. NY-SAR‑35 was predominantly expressed at the cytoplasm and was mainly observed in spermatogonia and spermatocytes. Expression of NY-SAR-35 in stable HEK293 transfectant clones was 2-fold higher than the control cells promoting cell growth and proliferation. NY-SAR-35 overexpression also enhanced cell migration and invasion ~2-fold and 4-fold more than the control, respectively. In contrast, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of NY-SAR-35 suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in HEK293 stable transfectants. We concluded that NY-SAR-35 as a cancer/testis antigen enhanced cell proliferation and invasion.

  6. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  7. Equipotent generation of protective antitumor immunity by various methods of dendritic cell loading with whole cell tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Lambert, L A; Gibson, G R; Maloney, M; Barth, R J

    2001-01-01

    Multiple clinically applicable methods have been used to induce dendritic cells (DCs) to express whole cell tumor antigens, including pulsing DCs with tumor lysate, and mixing DCs with apoptotic or live tumor cells. Herein we demonstrate, using two different tumor systems, that these methods are equipotent inducers of systemic antitumor immunity. Furthermore, tumor lysate pulsed DC vaccines generate more potent antitumor immunity than immunization with irradiated tumor cells plus the classic adjuvant, Corynebacterium parvum. PMID:11394500

  8. Expansion of CD133+ colon cancer cultures retaining stem cell properties to enable cancer stem cell target discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fang, D D; Kim, Y J; Lee, C N; Aggarwal, S; McKinnon, K; Mesmer, D; Norton, J; Birse, C E; He, T; Ruben, S M; Moore, P A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite earlier studies demonstrating in vitro propagation of solid tumour cancer stem cells (CSCs) as non-adherent tumour spheres, it remains controversial as to whether CSCs can be maintained in vitro. Additional validation of the CSC properties of tumour spheres would support their use as CSC models and provide an opportunity to discover additional CSC cell surface markers to aid in CSC detection and potential elimination. Methods: Primary tumour cells isolated from 13 surgically resected colon tumour specimens were propagated using serum-free CSC-selective conditions. The CSC properties of long-term cultured tumour spheres were established and mass spectrometry-based proteomics performed. Results: Freshly isolated CD133+ colorectal cancer cells gave rise to long-term tumour sphere (or spheroids) cultures maintaining CD133 expression. These spheroid cells were able to self-renew and differentiate into adherent epithelial lineages and recapitulate the phenotype of the original tumour. Relative to their differentiated progeny, tumour spheroid cells were more resistant to the chemotherapeutic irinotecan. Finally, CD44, CD166, CD29, CEACAM5, cadherin 17, and biglycan were identified by mass spectrometry to be enriched in CD133+ tumour spheroid cells. Conclusion: Our data suggest that ex vivo-expanded colon CSCs isolated from clinical specimens can be maintained in culture enabling the identification of CSC cell surface-associated proteins. PMID:20332776

  9. Identification of Theileria lestoquardi Antigens Recognized by CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngugi, Daniel; Lizundia, Regina; Hostettler, Isabel; Woods, Kerry; Ballingall, Keith; MacHugh, Niall D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Weir, Willie; Shiels, Brian; Werling, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    As part of an international effort to develop vaccines for Theileria lestoquardi, we undertook a limited screen to test T. lestoquardi orthologues of antigens recognised by CD8+ T lymphocyte responses against T. annulata and T. parva in cattle. Five MHC defined sheep were immunized by live T. lestoquardi infection and their CD8+ T lymphocyte responses determined. Thirteen T. lestoquardi orthologues of T. parva and T. annulata genes, previously shown to be targets of CD8+ T lymphocyte responses of immune cattle, were expressed in autologous fibroblasts and screened for T cell recognition using an IFNγ assay. Genes encoding T. lestoquardi antigens Tl8 (putative cysteine proteinase, 349 aa) or Tl9 (hypothetical secreted protein, 293 aa) were recognise by T cells from one animal that displayed a unique MHC class I genotype. Antigenic 9-mer peptide epitopes of Tl8 and Tl9 were identified through peptide scans using CD8+ T cells from the responding animal. These experiments identify the first T. lestoquardi antigens recognised by CD8+ T cell responses linked to specific MHC class I alleles. PMID:27611868

  10. Precise conditional immortalization of mouse cells using tetracycline-regulated SV40 large T-antigen.

    PubMed

    Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Rostovskaya, Maria; Lubitz, Sandra; Weidlich, Stefanie; Stewart, A Francis

    2010-04-01

    Cellular immortalization provides a way for expansion and subsequent molecular characterization of rare cell types. Ideally, immortalization can be achieved by the reversible expression of immortalizing proteins. Here, we describe the use of conditional immortalization based on a modified tetracycline-regulated system for the expression of SV40 large T-antigen in embryonic stem (ES) cells and mice. The modified system relies on a codon improved reverse tetracycline transactivator (irtTA) fused to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the androgen receptor (irtTA-ABD) or of a mutated glucocorticoid receptor (irtTA-GBD*). Induction of T-antigen is conferred only after addition of two ligands, one to activate the LBD (mibolerone for irtTA-ABD or dexamethasone for irtTA-GBD*) and one to activate the tetracycline transactivator (doxycycline). In ES cells, changes in gene expression upon large T induction were limited and reversible upon deinduction. Similarly, expression of T-antigen was very tightly regulated in mice. We have isolated and expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells that could be genetically manipulated and maintained their differentiation properties after several passages of expansion under conditions that induce the expression of large T-antigen. PMID:20146354

  11. Cell-surface antigens of melanoma recognized by human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, H; Furukawa, K; Fortunato, S R; Livingston, P O; Lloyd, K O; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1987-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were derived from lymph node lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with melanoma. Four methods for generating human mAbs were compared: fusion with human [LICR-LON-HMy-2 (LICR-2)] or mouse (NS-1) cells; transformation by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV); and EBV transformation followed by NS-1 fusion. NS-1 fusion with lymph node lymphocytes resulted in a higher number of growing hybrids than LICR-2 fusion. Virtually no hybrids were obtained from NS-1 or LICR-2 fusions with PBL. EBV transformed lymphocytes from lymph node and peripheral blood with equal efficiency, and the yield of proliferating cultures for antibody screening was more than 10- to 30-fold greater than that obtained by fusion techniques. However, once antibody-producing cultures had been identified, stability and clonability of EBV-transformed cells were poorer than that of NS-1 hybrid cells. To combine the strengths of both methods, cultures of EBV-transformed cells were fused with NS-1; and hybrid clones were isolated that showed vigorous growth, clonability, and stable antibody secretion. Detailed specificity analysis of the mAbs produced by six of these clones indicated detection of a class 1 (unique) melanoma antigen, a class 3 melanoma antigen, and four ganglioside antigens (GD3, GM3, and two other, as yet uncharacterized, heterophile antigens). Images PMID:3031684

  12. Expression of CD3-associated antigen-binding receptors on suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Steele, J K; Billings, P R; Selvaraj, P; Dorf, M E

    1988-01-01

    Three suppressor T (Ts)-cell hybridomas specific for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (NP) hapten were selected for surface expression of cluster determinant 3 (CD3) by using antibody (anti-CD3) or antigen (NP-bovine serum albumin) panning procedures followed by cloning at limiting dilution. The CD3-selected Ts hybridomas showed a 1-2 logarithmic enrichment in suppressor activity when compared to the parent lines; they also specifically bound NP-coupled sheep red blood cells in rosette assays. This antigen-binding ability could be down-modulated by anti-CD3 antibody. Similarly, surface expression of CD3 was specifically down-modulated by preincubation of these hybridomas with antigen. Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody under reducing conditions coprecipitated a broad band of 38-50 kDa associated with two CD3 (25 and 16 kDa) bands. T-cell receptor, anti-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody also immunoprecipitated a broad band in the 41 to 49-kDa region. The combined results suggest that, like helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Ts cells also bear antigen-specific receptors associated with CD3 molecules. Images PMID:2973609

  13. S-antigen. Identification of human T-cell lymphocyte proliferation sites.

    PubMed

    Vrabec, T R; Reber, R N; Magargal, L E; Donoso, L A

    1990-10-01

    Immune responses to normal retinal proteins, including S-antigen, have been demonstrated in patients with a variety of retinal disorders, as well as in those who have received panretinal laser photocoagulation. T-cell lymphocytes (T cells) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several ocular inflammatory diseases of possible autoimmune etiology. We used synthetic peptides that correspond to the amino acid sequence of S-antigen in lymphocyte proliferation assays to identify specific sites in the molecule recognized by human T cells. Ten patients with type II diabetes were studied before and after initial panretinal laser photocoagulation for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. T-cell responses, expressed as a stimulation index, to S-antigen and peptides were negative in all patients before treatment. Three weeks after panretinal laser photocoagulation, eight of 10 assays were positive (stimulation index greater than 2; P less than .01) when lymphocytes were stimulated with peptide BSA(273-292); six of nine were positive (P less than .01) with peptide BSA(303-332); and six of six were positive (P less than .001) with peptide BSA(343-362). Our study identifies several specific sites in S-antigen that elicit human immune responses. The implications of these findings with regard to the pathogenesis and treatment of autoimmune uveitis are discussed. PMID:2222280

  14. Identification of Theileria lestoquardi Antigens Recognized by CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shan; Ngugi, Daniel; Lizundia, Regina; Hostettler, Isabel; Woods, Kerry; Ballingall, Keith; MacHugh, Niall D; Morrison, W Ivan; Weir, Willie; Shiels, Brian; Werling, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    As part of an international effort to develop vaccines for Theileria lestoquardi, we undertook a limited screen to test T. lestoquardi orthologues of antigens recognised by CD8+ T lymphocyte responses against T. annulata and T. parva in cattle. Five MHC defined sheep were immunized by live T. lestoquardi infection and their CD8+ T lymphocyte responses determined. Thirteen T. lestoquardi orthologues of T. parva and T. annulata genes, previously shown to be targets of CD8+ T lymphocyte responses of immune cattle, were expressed in autologous fibroblasts and screened for T cell recognition using an IFNγ assay. Genes encoding T. lestoquardi antigens Tl8 (putative cysteine proteinase, 349 aa) or Tl9 (hypothetical secreted protein, 293 aa) were recognise by T cells from one animal that displayed a unique MHC class I genotype. Antigenic 9-mer peptide epitopes of Tl8 and Tl9 were identified through peptide scans using CD8+ T cells from the responding animal. These experiments identify the first T. lestoquardi antigens recognised by CD8+ T cell responses linked to specific MHC class I alleles. PMID:27611868

  15. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  16. Sialic acid-modified antigens impose tolerance via inhibition of T-cell proliferation and de novo induction of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Ilarregui, Juan M.; Verstege, Marleen I.; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Schetters, Sjoerd T. T.; Engels, Steef; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Veninga, Henrike; den Haan, Joke M. M.; van Berkel, Lisette A.; Samsom, Janneke N.; Crocker, Paul R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Berod, Luciana; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids are negatively charged nine-carbon carboxylated monosaccharides that often cap glycans on glycosylated proteins and lipids. Because of their strategic location at the cell surface, sialic acids contribute to interactions that are critical for immune homeostasis via interactions with sialic acid-binding Ig-type lectins (siglecs). In particular, these interactions may be of importance in cases where sialic acids may be overexpressed, such as on certain pathogens and tumors. We now demonstrate that modification of antigens with sialic acids (Sia-antigens) regulates the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells via dendritic cells (DCs). Additionally, DCs that take up Sia-antigen prevent formation of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Importantly, the regulatory properties endowed on DCs upon Sia-antigen uptake are antigen-specific: only T cells responsive to the sialylated antigen become tolerized. In vivo, injection of Sia-antigen–loaded DCs increased de novo Treg-cell numbers and dampened effector T-cell expansion and IFN-γ production. The dual tolerogenic features that Sia-antigen imposed on DCs are Siglec-E–mediated and maintained under inflammatory conditions. Moreover, loading DCs with Sia-antigens not only inhibited the function of in vitro–established Th1 and Th17 effector T cells but also significantly dampened ex vivo myelin-reactive T cells, present in the circulation of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data indicate that sialic acid-modified antigens instruct DCs in an antigen-specific tolerogenic programming, enhancing Treg cells and reducing the generation and propagation of inflammatory T cells. Our data suggest that sialylation of antigens provides an attractive way to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance. PMID:26941238

  17. Affinity for self antigen selects Treg cells with distinct functional properties.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Lena; Stadinski, Brian D; King, Carolyn G; Schallenberg, Sonja; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Lee, Jun Young; Kretschmer, Karsten; Terracciano, Luigi M; Anderson, Graham; Surh, Charles D; Huseby, Eric S; Palmer, Ed

    2016-09-01

    The manner in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control lymphocyte homeostasis is not fully understood. We identified two Treg cell populations with differing degrees of self-reactivity and distinct regulatory functions. We found that GITR(hi)PD-1(hi)CD25(hi) (Triple(hi)) Treg cells were highly self-reactive and controlled lympho-proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes. GITR(lo)PD-1(lo)CD25(lo) (Triple(lo)) Treg cells were less self-reactive and limited the development of colitis by promoting the conversion of CD4(+) Tconv cells into induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). Although Foxp3-deficient (Scurfy) mice lacked Treg cells, they contained Triple(hi)-like and Triple(lo)-like CD4(+) T cells zsuper> T cells infiltrated the skin, whereas Scurfy Triple(lo)CD4(+) T cells induced colitis and wasting disease. These findings indicate that the affinity of the T cell antigen receptor for self antigen drives the differentiation of Treg cells into distinct subsets with non-overlapping regulatory activities. PMID:27478940

  18. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  19. Improved poliovirus D-antigen yields by application of different Vero cell cultivation methods.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; Rubingh, Olaf; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2014-05-19

    Vero cells were grown adherent to microcarriers (Cytodex 1; 3 g L(-1)) using animal component free media in stirred-tank type bioreactors. Different strategies for media refreshment, daily media replacement (semi-batch), continuous media replacement (perfusion) and recirculation of media, were compared with batch cultivation. Cell densities increased using a feed strategy from 1×10(6) cells mL(-1) during batch cultivation to 1.8, 2.7 and 5.0×10(6) cells mL(-1) during semi-batch, perfusion and recirculation, respectively. The effects of these different cell culture strategies on subsequent poliovirus production were investigated. Increased cell densities allowed up to 3 times higher D-antigen levels when compared with that obtained from batch-wise Vero cell culture. However, the cell specific D-antigen production was lower when cells were infected at higher cell densities. This cell density effect is in good agreement with observations for different cell lines and virus types. From the evaluated alternative culture methods, application of a semi-batch mode of operations allowed the highest cell specific D-antigen production. The increased product yields that can easily be reached using these higher cell density cultivation methods, showed the possibility for better use of bioreactor capacity for the manufacturing of polio vaccines to ultimately reduce vaccine cost per dose. Further, the use of animal-component-free cell- and virus culture media shows opportunities for modernization of human viral vaccine manufacturing. PMID:24583004

  20. B-cell follicle development remodels the conduit system and allows soluble antigen delivery to follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Ronald N.

    2009-01-01

    Afferent lymph is transported throughout lymph nodes (LNs) by the conduit system. Whereas this conduit network is dense in the T-cell zone, it is sparse in B-cell follicles. In this study, we show that this differential organization emerges during lymph node development. Neonatal LNs lack B follicles, but have a developed T-cell zone and a dense conduit network. As new T and B cells enter the developing LN, the conduit network density is maintained in the T, but not the B zone, leading to a profound remodeling of the follicular network that nevertheless maintains its connectivity. In adults, the residual follicular conduits transport soluble antigen to deep regions, where follicular dendritic cells are abundant and appear to replace the fibroblastic reticular cells that enwrap conduits in the T zone. This strategic location correlates with the capacity of the follicular dendritic cells to capture antigen even in the absence of antigen-specific antibodies. Together, these results describe how the stromal organization of the T and B regions of LNs diverges during development, giving rise to distinct antigen transport and delivery modes in the 2 compartments. PMID:19713459

  1. Inflammatory environment and oxidized LDL convert circulating human proangiogenic cells into functional antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Luca; Chiesa, Mattia; Saporiti, Federica; Colombo, Gualtiero I; Pesce, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The function of human circulating PACs has been described extensively. However, little focus has been placed on understanding how these cells differ in their functions in the presence of microenvironments mimicking vascular inflammation. We hypothesized that exposure to proinflammatory cytokines or the oxLDL, an autoantigen abundant in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, converts PACs into immune-modulating/proinflammatory cells. Hence, we examined the effect of oxLDL and inflammatory stimuli on their phenotype by use of a functional genomics model based on secretome and whole genome transcriptome profiling. PACs obtained from culturing a PBMC fraction in angiogenic medium were primed with DC differentiation cytokines and then exposed to proinflammatory cytokines or oxLDL. Under these conditions, PACs converted into APCs, expressed maturation markers CD80 and CD83, and showed an increased up-regulation of CD86. APCcy and APCox induced a robust T cell BrdU incorporation. Despite a similar ability to induce lymphocyte proliferation, APCcy and APCox differed for the secretory pathway and mRNA expression. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes identified 4 gene "clusters," showing reciprocal modulation in APCcy vs. APCox, justifying, according to functional genomics analyses, a different putative function of the cells in antigen processing. Together, these data show that treatment with inflammatory cytokines or oxLDL converts human PAC phenotypes and functions into that of APCs with similar lymphocyte-activating ability but distinct maturation degree and paracrine functions.

  2. CD301b+ dendritic cells suppress T follicular helper cells and antibody responses to protein antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Yosuke; Hirai, Toshiro; Wong, Patrick W; Kaplan, Daniel H; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Strong antibody response is considered a hallmark of a successful vaccine. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important for T follicular helper (Tfh) cell priming, how this process is regulated in vivo is unclear. We show here that the depletion of CD301b+ DCs specifically enhanced the development of Tfh cells, germinal center B cells and antibody responses against protein antigens. Exaggerated antibody responses in mice depleted of CD301b+ DCs occurred in the absence of any adjuvants, and resulting antibodies had broader specificity and higher affinity to the immunogen. CD301b+ DCs express high levels of PD-1 ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. Blocking PD-1 or PD-L1 during priming in wild-type mice partially mimicked the phenotype of CD301b+ DC-depleted animals, suggesting their role in Tfh suppression. Transient depletion of CD301b+ DC results in the generation of autoreactive IgG responses. These results revealed a novel regulatory mechanism and a key role of CD301b+ DCs in blocking autoantibody generation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17979.001 PMID:27657168

  3. Reconstitution of the B cell antigen receptor signaling components in COS cells.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Rowley, R B; Bolen, J B; Mahajan, S

    1995-11-10

    To elucidate interactions occurring between B cell protein tyrosine kinases and the signaling components of the B cell antigen receptor, we have co-transfected into COS cells individual tyrosine kinases together with chimeric cell surface receptors containing the cytoplasmic domains of Ig alpha or Ig beta. Of the tyrosine kinases transfected (Lyn, Blk, Hck, Syk, Fyn), only Blk was able to phosphorylate and subsequently associate with cotransfected Ig alpha and Ig beta chimeras in vivo. Association between Blk and the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains was shown by mutational analyses to be the result of an SH2-phosphotyrosine interaction. We identified the tyrosine residues of the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains was shown by mutational analyses to be the result of an SH2-phosphotyrosine interaction. We identified the tyrosine residues of the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains phosphorylated by Blk. The enzymatic activity and membrane association of Blk were required for the observed phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta chimeras. Sequences within the amino-terminal unique domain of Blk are responsible for recognition and subsequent phosphorylation of the Ig alpha chimera since transfer of the unique region of Blk to Fyn results in the chimeric kinase's ability to phosphorylate the cytoplasmic domain of Ig alpha. These findings indicate that the unique domain of Src family kinases may direct recognition of certain substrates leading to their phosphorylation. PMID:7592958

  4. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  5. SAMHD1 Limits HIV-1 Antigen Presentation by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Porrot, Françoise; Prado, Julia G.; Moris, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) stimulate CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) by presenting endogenous and exogenous viral peptides via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. MDDC are poorly susceptible to HIV-1, in part due to the presence of SAMHD1, a cellular enzyme that depletes intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and degrades viral RNA. Vpx, an HIV-2/SIVsm protein absent from HIV-1, antagonizes SAMHD1 by inducing its degradation. The impact of SAMHD1 on the adaptive cellular immune response remains poorly characterized. Here, we asked whether SAMHD1 modulates MHC-I-restricted HIV-1 antigen presentation. Untreated MDDC or MDDC pretreated with Vpx were exposed to HIV-1, and antigen presentation was examined by monitoring the activation of an HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL clone. SAMHD1 depletion strongly enhanced productive infection of MDDC as well as endogenous HIV-1 antigen presentation. Time-lapse microscopy analysis demonstrated that in the absence of SAMHD1, the CTL rapidly killed infected MDDC. We also report that various transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 strains poorly infected MDDC and, as a consequence, did not stimulate CTL. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyping of T/F alleviated a block in viral entry and induced antigen presentation only in the absence of SAMHD1. Furthermore, by using another CTL clone that mostly recognizes incoming HIV-1 antigens, we demonstrate that SAMHD1 does not influence exogenous viral antigen presentation. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the antiviral activity of SAMHD1 impacts antigen presentation by DC, highlighting the link that exists between restriction factors and adaptive immune responses. IMPORTANCE Upon viral infection, DC may present antigens derived from incoming viral material in the absence of productive infection of DC or from newly synthesized viral proteins. In the case of HIV, productive infection of DC is blocked at an early

  6. Induction of cytotoxic T cells and their antitumor activity in mice transgenic for carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Mizobata, S; Tompkins, K; Simpson, J F; Shyr, Y; Primus, F J

    2000-08-01

    In order to develop immunotherapy strategies that are based on eliciting immune responsiveness to the self-antigen, human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), we examined whether cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against CEA could be elicited in CEA-transgenic and nontransgenic mice. CEA-transgenic [C57BL/ 6-TGN(CEAGe)18FJP] and nontransgenic mice were primed with CEA-transfected syngeneic fibroblasts in combination with Corynebacterium parvum. Spleen cells from immunized mice were cultured with irradiated syngeneic MC-38 colon carcinoma cells transfected with CEA (MC-38.CEA) as stimulators prior to the measurement of CTL activity. Primed nontransgenic spleen cells showed augmented CTL activity against MC-38.CEA cells as compared with control parental MC-38 cells, nontransfected or transfected with vector only. Moreover, primed CEA transgenic spleen cells showed augmented CTL activity against MC-38.CEA cells that was similar to that observed in nontransgenic mice. All CTL clones derived from either transgenic or nontransgenic mice showed cross-reactivity with MC-38 cells expressing the CEA-related antigen, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen, but not biliary glycoprotein. CEA-specific CTL clones were not identified. Adoptive transfer of cloned CTL resulted in inhibition of MC-38.CEA but not MC-38.BGP tumor growth. Tumor cures were elicited in mice treated with a combination of cloned CTL and cyclophosphamide. Histopathological examination of CEA-expressing colons from either immunized mice or recipients of cloned CTL did not reveal any autoimmune reactions. These studies demonstrate that CTL recognizing cross-reactive class I epitopes on the CEA molecule can be induced in transgenic mice. The expression of these epitopes on tumor cells creates effective targets for CTL in vivo without inducing adverse reactions in CEA-expressing normal tissues. Since anti-CEA CTL have been generated in humans, CEA-transgenic mice may be a useful model to study vaccines that are based

  7. Measuring antigen presentation in mouse brain endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain endothelial cells cross-present parasite antigen during mouse experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Here we describe a 2-d protocol to detect cross-presentation by isolating the brain microvessels and incubating them with a reporter cell line that expresses lacZ upon detection of the relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complex. After X-gal staining, a typical positive result consists of hundreds of blue spots, compared with fewer than 20 spots from a naive brain. The assay is generalizable to other disease contexts by using reporter cells that express appropriate specific T cell receptors. Also described is the protocol for culturing endothelial cells from brain microvessels isolated from naive mice. After 7-10 d, an in vitro cross-presentation assay can be performed by adding interferon-γ, antigen (e.g., Plasmodium berghei-infected red blood cells) and reporter cells in sequence over 3 d. This is useful for comparing different antigen forms or for probing the effects of various interventions.

  8. Going viral: chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar; June, Carl H

    2015-01-01

    On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to CTL019, the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania. This is the first personalized cellular therapy for cancer to be so designated and occurred 25 years after the first publication describing genetic redirection of T cells to a surface antigen of choice. The peer-reviewed literature currently contains the outcomes of more than 100 patients treated on clinical trials of anti-CD19 redirected T cells, and preliminary results on many more patients have been presented. At last count almost 30 clinical trials targeting CD19 were actively recruiting patients in North America, Europe, and Asia. Patients with high-risk B-cell malignancies therefore represent the first beneficiaries of an exciting and potent new treatment modality that harnesses the power of the immune system as never before. A handful of trials are targeting non-CD19 hematological and solid malignancies and represent the vanguard of enormous preclinical efforts to develop CAR T-cell therapy beyond B-cell malignancies. In this review, we explain the concept of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells, describe the extant results in hematologic malignancies, and share our outlook on where this modality is likely to head in the near future.

  9. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  10. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a major enzyme that cleaves proteins for antigen presentation. Cleaved peptides traffic to the cell surface, where they are presented in the context of MHC class I. Recognition of these complexes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is crucial for elimination of cells bearing “non-self” proteins. Our previous studies revealed that ethanol suppresses proteasome function in ethanol-metabolizing liver cells. We hypothesized that proteasome suppression reduces the hydrolysis of antigenic peptides, thereby decreasing the presentation of the peptide-MHC class I-complexes on the cell surface. To test this, we used the mouse hepatocyte cell line (CYP2E1/ADH-transfected HepB5 cells) or primary mouse hepatocytes, both derived from livers of C57Bl/6 mice, which present the ovalbumin peptide, SIINFEKL, complexed with H2Kb. To induce H2Kb expression, HepB5 cells were treated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) and then exposed to ethanol. In these cells, ethanol metabolism decreased not only proteasome activity, but also hydrolysis of the C-extended peptide, SIINFEKL-TE and the presentation of SIINFEKL-H2Kb complexes measured after the delivery of SIINFEKL-TE to cytoplasm. The suppressive effects of ethanol were, in part, attributed to ethanol-elicited impairment of IFNγ signaling. However, in primary hepatocytes, even in the absence of IFNγ, we observed a similar decline in proteasome activity and antigen presentation after ethanol exposure. We conclude that proteasome function is directly suppressed by ethanol metabolism and indirectly, by preventing the activating effects of IFNγ. Ethanol-elicited reduction in proteasome activity contributes to the suppression of SIINFEKL-H2Kb presentation on the surface of liver cells. Immune response to viral antigens plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C or B viral infections (HCV and HBV, respectively). Professional antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are responsible for priming the

  11. Studies of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of bromelain-pretreated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, K O; Baddams, H; Evans, A

    1977-02-01

    The effects of the proteolytic enzyme bromelain (Br) on the antigenicity and immunogenicity of sheep and mouse red blood cells (RBC) have been investigated. The results presented support the previous claim that there are antigens present on Br RBC that are not present in an exposed form on untreated RBC and that Br RBC have lost some of the antigens present on the surface of normal RBC. The susceptibility of Br RBC to osmotic lysis was very similar to that of normal RBC, implying that the modified RBC were not more fragile than normal RBC. Injection of mice with Br mouse-RBC did not increase the unusually high "background" number of cells producing IgM antibodies against Br mouse-RBC and mice did not mount delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions against Br mouse-RBC, either before or after sensitizing injections of Br mouse-RBC. However, mouse-RBC and Br mouse-RBC elicited similar antibody responses in rabbits and guinea pigs. Although mice appeared unresponsive to Br mouse-RBC injections, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and antibody production in primary and secondary responses were of similar levels irrespective of whether sheep-RBC or Br sheep-RBC were used as immunogens. From these studies it appears that mice have B-cells producing antibodies against the "new" antigens on Br mouse-RBC, but there are no T-cells that respond to these antigens by way of "helper" activity in antibody production or by way of cell-mediated immune reactions.

  12. Preparation of Cell Wall Antigens of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, J. J.; Tipper, Donald J.; Berman, David T.

    1970-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from Staphylococcus aureus strains Copenhagen and 263 by high-speed mixing in the presence of glass beads followed by differential centrifugation. Insoluble peptidoglycan complexes were derived from cell walls by extraction of teichoic acid with 10% trichloroacetic acid. Intact teichoic acid was prepared from each strain by digestion of cell walls with lysostaphin and isolated by column chromatography. Soluble glycopeptide (peptidoglycan in which only the glycan has been fragmented) and the stable complex of teichoic acid with glycopeptide were prepared by digestion of cell walls with Chalaropsis B endo-N-acetylmuramidase and were separated by column chromatography. Amino acid and amino sugar contents of walls and subunits of walls were comparable to those reported by others. Images PMID:16557799

  13. Oral delivery of human biopharmaceuticals, autoantigens and vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Herzog, Roland; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Among 12 billion injections administered annually, unsafe delivery leads to >20 million infections and >100 million reactions. In an emerging new concept, freeze-dried plant cells (lettuce) expressing vaccine antigens/biopharmaceuticals are protected in the stomach from acids/enzymes but are released to the immune or blood circulatory system when plant cell walls are digested by microbes that colonize the gut. Vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells upon oral delivery after priming, conferred both mucosal and systemic immunity and protection against bacterial, viral or protozoan pathogens or toxin challenge. Oral delivery of autoantigens was effective against complications of type 1diabetes and hemophilia, by developing tolerance. Oral delivery of proinsulin or exendin-4 expressed in plant cells regulated blood glucose levels similar to injections. Therefore, this new platform offers a low cost alternative to deliver different therapeutic proteins to combat infectious or inherited diseases by eliminating inactivated pathogens, expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and sterile injections. PMID:23099275

  14. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  15. Minor histocompatibility antigens on canine hemopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martin; Lange, Claudia; Günther, Wolfgang; Franz, Monika; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kolb, Hans-Jochem

    2003-06-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy with CTL against minor histocompatibility Ags (mHA) provides a promising way to treat