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Sample records for cells specific removal

  1. Enrichment of antigen-specific B lymphocytes by the direct removal of B cells not bearing specificity for the antigen

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Antigen-specific B cells (ASC) were purified from other B cells by prior incubation with specific antigen followed by rosetting with erythrocytes conjugated with anti-mouse Ig and sedimenting on Ficoll- Isopaque. This procedure allowed the removal of most of the B cells, while those speicifc for the antigen used in incubation were retained. Relative to the B-cell content, ASC were enriched 64- to 132-fold. The method is highly specific in that B cells primed to two different antigens, turkey gamma globulin and sheep erythrocytes, could be separated from each other. The advantages of this indirect purification procedure over purification procedures which obtain ASC directly are the simplicity of obtaining the ASC and the ability of the ASC of respond to antigen without the addition of other cells. PMID:69002

  2. Removal of damaged proteins during ES cell fate specification requires the proteasome activator PA28

    PubMed Central

    Hernebring, Malin; Fredriksson, Åsa; Liljevald, Maria; Cvijovic, Marija; Norrman, Karin; Wiseman, John; Semb, Henrik; Nyström, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, removal of oxidatively damaged proteins is triggered upon the first signs of cell fate specification but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, we report that this phase of differentiation encompasses an unexpected induction of genes encoding the proteasome activator PA28αβ (11S), subunits of the immunoproteasome (20Si), and the 20Si regulator TNFα. This induction is accompanied by assembly of mature PA28-20S(i) proteasomes and elevated proteasome activity. Inhibiting accumulation of PA28α using miRNA counteracted the removal of damaged proteins demonstrating that PA28αβ has a hitherto unidentified role required for resetting the levels of protein damage at the transition from self-renewal to cell differentiation. PMID:23459332

  3. TIM-4, a Receptor for Phosphatidylserine, Controls Adaptive Immunity by Regulating the Removal of Antigen-Specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albacker, Lee A.; Karisola, Piia; Chang, Ya-Jen; Umetsu, Sarah E.; Zhou, Meixia; Akbari, Omid; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Baumgarth, Nicole; Freeman, Gordon J.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is characterized by the expansion of an Ag-specific T cell population following Ag exposure. The precise mechanisms, however, that control the expansion and subsequent contraction in the number of Ag-specific T cells are not fully understood. We show that T cell/transmembrane, Ig, and mucin (TIM)-4, a receptor for phosphatidylserine, a marker of apoptotic cells, regulates adaptive immunity in part by mediating the removal of Ag-specific T cells during the contraction phase of the response. During Ag immunization or during infection with influenza A virus, blockade of TIM-4 on APCs increased the expansion of Ag-specific T cells, resulting in an increase in secondary immune responses. Conversely, overexpression of TIM-4 on APCs in transgenic mice reduced the number of Ag-specific T cells that remained after immunization, resulting in reduced secondary T cell responses. There was no change in the total number of cell divisions that T cells completed, no change in the per cell proliferative capacity of the remaining Ag-specific T cells, and no increase in the development of Ag-specific regulatory T cells in TIM-4 transgenic mice. Thus, TIM-4–expressing cells regulate adaptive immunity by mediating the removal of phosphatidylserine-expressing apoptotic, Ag-specific T cells, thereby controlling the number of Ag-specific T cells that remain after the clearance of Ag or infection. PMID:21037090

  4. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Haber, S I; Herrmann, S; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens--ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu56LLys35LPhe9) [(GluLysPhe)n]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to controls in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or "processing independent" antigens. In parallel studies 125I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. At least some of the biotin-insulin surface sites are immunologically relevant, because the presentation of processed biotin-insulin by fixed APC is blocked by avidin. This effect is specific. Avidin binding to biotin-insulin-exposed APC does not inhibit allospecific stimulation nor the presentation of unconjugated insulin. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen. PMID:3467371

  5. Metabolism of /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic factor by vascular smooth muscle cells. Evidence for a peptidase that specifically removes the COOH-terminal tripeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Arik, L.; Foster, C.J.

    1989-07-15

    The addition of 200 pM monoiodinated human atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) (125I-hANF) to cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells at 37/degree/C resulted in a rapid clearance from the medium (t1/2 approximately 7.5 min). Within 5 min, (125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-Y), Arg125-(125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-RY) and Phe124-Arg-(125)iodotyrosine126 (125I-FRY) appeared in the medium. The identities of these degradation products were confirmed by (1) retention time on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) relative to standards, (2) products generated by digestion with aminopeptidase M, and (3) the absence of the Met110. Preincubation of the cells with ammonium chloride or chloroquine resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular accumulation of radiolabel, indicative of endocytosis and rapid delivery of 125I-hANF to an acidic intracellular compartment (endosome and/or lysosome). Neither ammonium chloride, chloroquine, nor excess unlabeled hANF blocked the rapid appearance in the medium of 125I-RY or 125I-FRY. Bestatin inhibited the generation of 125I-RY, with a concomitant increase in 125I-FRY, suggesting that the 125I-RY is produced by aminopeptidase action on 125I-FRY. The endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) inhibitor, SCH 39370, did not inhibit the formation of 125I-FRY. These results provide evidence of a peptidase capable of specifically removing the COOH-terminal tripeptide from 125I-hANF. The COOH-terminal tripeptide, Phe124-Arg-Tyr126, was also isolated from cell digests of hANF by HPLC and its identity confirmed by amino acid analysis. Since it is generally believed that the COOH-terminal tripeptide is critical to many of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126)'s bioactivities, this enzyme may be involved in the inactivation of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) in target tissues.

  6. Removing the Barriers: Accessibility Guidelines and Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotler, Stephen R.

    This guide provides guidelines for meeting the accessibility requirements of the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act in college and university buildings. The publication is divided into 10 chapters, the first 7 of which present construction drawings, evaluation criteria, and specifications for: (1) site accessibility (external path of travel,…

  7. Dust removal from solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  8. Dust Removal from Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  9. Should dialysis modalities be designed to remove specific uremic toxins?

    PubMed

    Baurmeister, Ulrich; Vienken, Joerg; Ward, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The definition of optimal dialysis therapy remains elusive. Randomized clinical trials have neither supported using urea as a surrogate marker for uremic toxicity nor provided clear cut evidence in favor of larger solutes. Thus, where to focus resources in the development of new membranes, and therapies remains unclear. Three basic questions remain unanswered: (i) what solute(s) should be used as a marker for optimal dialysis; (ii) should dialytic therapies be designed to remove a specific solute; and (iii) how can current therapies be modified to provide better control of uremic toxicity? Identification of a single, well-defined uremic toxin appears to be unlikely as new analytical tools reveal an increasingly complex uremic milieu. As a result, it is probable that membranes and therapies should be designed for the nonspecific removal of a wide variety of solutes retained in uremia. Removal of the widest range of solutes can best be achieved using existing therapies that incorporate convection in conjunction with longer treatment times and more frequent treatments. Membranes capable of removing solutes over an expanded effective molecular size range can already be fabricated; however, their use will require novel approaches to conserve proteins, such as albumin.

  10. Mechanisms regulating phosphatase specificity and the removal of individual phosphorylation sites during mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; McCloy, Rachael; Watkins, D Neil; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Entry into mitosis is driven by the activity of kinases, which phosphorylate over 7000 proteins on multiple sites. For cells to exit mitosis and segregate their genome correctly, these phosphorylations must be removed in a specific temporal order. This raises a critical and important question: how are specific phosphorylation sites on an individual protein removed? Traditionally, the temporal order of dephosphorylation was attributed to decreasing kinase activity. However, recent evidence in human cells has identified unique patterns of dephosphorylation during mammalian mitotic exit that cannot be fully explained by the loss of kinase activity. This suggests that specificity is determined in part by phosphatases. In this review, we explore how the physicochemical properties of an individual phosphosite and its surrounding amino acids can affect interactions with a phosphatase. These positive and negative interactions in turn help determine the specific pattern of dephosphorylation required for correct mitotic exit. PMID:27417119

  11. EFFECT OF THE REMOVAL OF LIPIDS ON SPECIFIC PRECIPITATION

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Robert C.; Heidelberger, Michael

    1950-01-01

    Horse antisera to rabbit albumin and globulins and to Type III pneumococci were extracted at low temperatures with alcohol-ether. The precipitin reactions given by these sera deprived of lipids were studied by quantitative analytical methods. With longer periods of standing and slightly higher speeds of centrifugation than those usually required for lipid-containing sera, precipitation may be made complete in immune sera from which the lipids have been removed. The function of lipids in immune reactions is discussed, as well as the effects on antibody globulin of the procedures used in their removal. PMID:14778919

  12. Debris Removal Project K West Canister Cleaning System Performance Specification

    SciTech Connect

    FARWICK, C.C.

    1999-12-09

    Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. Design criteria for a Canister Cleaning System to be installed in the KW Basin. This documents the requirements for design and installation of the system.

  13. Duplex-specific nuclease efficiently removes rRNA for prokaryotic RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hana; Cho, Yong-Joon; Won, Sungho; Lee, Jong-Eun; Jin Yu, Hyung; Kim, Sujin; Schroth, Gary P; Luo, Shujun; Chun, Jongsik

    2011-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing has great potential for application in bacterial transcriptomics. However, unlike eukaryotes, bacteria have no clear mechanism to select mRNAs over rRNAs; therefore, rRNA removal is a critical step in sequencing-based transcriptomics. Duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) is an enzyme that, at high temperatures, degrades duplex DNA in preference to single-stranded DNA. DSN treatment has been successfully used to normalize the relative transcript abundance in mRNA-enriched cDNA libraries from eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of this method to remove rRNA from prokaryotic total RNA. We evaluated the efficacy of DSN to remove rRNA by comparing it with the conventional subtractive hybridization (Hyb) method. Illumina deep sequencing was performed to obtain transcriptomes from Escherichia coli grown under four growth conditions. The results clearly showed that our DSN treatment was more efficient at removing rRNA than the Hyb method was, while preserving the original relative abundance of mRNA species in bacterial cells. Therefore, we propose that, for bacterial mRNA-seq experiments, DSN treatment should be preferred to Hyb-based methods.

  14. Gas diffusion cell removes carbon dioxide from occupied airtight enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Small, lightweight permeable cell package separates and removes carbon dioxide from respiratory gas mixtures. The cell is regenerative while chemically inert in the presence of carbon dioxide so that only adsorption takes place.

  15. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  16. COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; He, Weihua; Ren, Lijiao; Stager, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick J; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    Exoelectrogenic microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compete with other microorganisms for substrate. In order to understand how this affects removal rates, current generation, and coulombic efficiencies (CEs), substrate removal rates were compared in MFCs fed a single, readily biodegradable compound (acetate) or domestic wastewater (WW). Removal rates based on initial test conditions fit first-order kinetics, but rate constants varied with circuit resistance. With filtered WW (100Ω), the rate constant was 0.18h(-)(1), which was higher than acetate or filtered WW with an open circuit (0.10h(-)(1)), but CEs were much lower (15-24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100Ω), COD removal proceeded in two stages: a fast removal stage with high current production, followed by a slower removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary processes will be needed to reduce COD to levels suitable for discharge.

  17. Benchmark specifications for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, T.; Briggs, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is hosting an IAEA-coordinated research project on benchmark analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor passive safety tests performed at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The benchmark project involves analysis of a protected and an unprotected loss of flow tests conducted during an extensive testing program within the framework of the U.S. Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate the inherently safety features of EBR-II as a pool-type, sodium-cooled fast reactor prototype. The project is intended to improve the participants' design and safety analysis capabilities for sodium-cooled fast reactors through validation and qualification of safety analysis codes and methods. This paper provides a description of the EBR-II tests included in the program, and outlines the benchmark specifications being prepared to support the IAEA-coordinated research project. (authors)

  18. Cell-Type-Specific Optogenetics in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-09-01

    The recent advent of technologies enabling cell-type-specific recording and manipulation of neuronal activity spurred tremendous progress in neuroscience. However, they have been largely limited to mice, which lack the richness in behavior of primates. Stauffer et al. now present a generalizable method for achieving cell-type specificity in monkeys. PMID:27610562

  19. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  20. Cell multiplication following partial enzymatic removal of surface coat.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1978-08-01

    Treatment of Paramecium aurelia with trypsin or pronase (1 mg per 10(5) cells, at 0 to 4 degrees C) partially removes the surface coat and modifies significantly multiplication of cells. The division rate after 24 hours of cultivation is diminished approximately twice in the case of pronase-treated cells and 1.5 for tyrpsin-digested ciliates as compared with the control. On the second day the division rate increases rapidly and number of cell divisions exceeds the values observed in the control. After 72 hours of cultivation the division rate in both untreated and enzyme-treated cells is almost the same. It is concluded that the observed inhibition of cell fission results from the enzymatic removal of the surface coat--the integrity of this surface coat seems to be necessary in the process of cell division. The influence of environmental factors on the rate of growth is presented.

  1. Species-specific visitation and removal of baits for delivery of pharmaceuticals to feral swine.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Tyler A; Long, David B

    2007-07-01

    Within the domestic swine industry there is growing trepidation about the role feral swine (Sus scrofa) play in the maintenance and transmission of important swine diseases. Innovative disease management tools for feral swine are needed. We used field trials conducted in southern Texas from February to March 2006 to compare species-specific visitation and removal rates of fish-flavored and vegetable-flavored baits with and without commercially available raccoon (Procyon lotor) repellent (trial 1) and removal rates of baits deployed in a systematic and cluster arrangement (trial 2). During trial 1, 1) cumulative bait removal rates after four nights ranged from 93% to 98%; 2) bait removal rates by feral swine, raccoons, and collared peccaries (Pecari tajacu) did not differ by treatment; and 3) coyotes (Canis latrans) removed more fish-flavored baits without raccoon repellent and white-tailed deer removed more vegetable-flavored baits without raccoon repellent than expected. During trial 2, feral swine removed fish-flavored baits distributed in a cluster arrangement (eight baits within 5 m2) at a rate greater than expected. Our observed bait removal rates illustrate bait attractiveness to feral swine. However, the diverse assemblage of omnivores in the United States compared with Australia where the baits were manufactured adds complexity to the development of a feral swine-specific baiting system for pharmaceutical delivery.

  2. Germ cell specification and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Newmark, P A; Wang, Y; Chong, T

    2008-01-01

    In metazoans, two apparently distinct mechanisms specify germ cell fate: Determinate specification (observed in animals including Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, zebra fish, and Xenopus) uses cytoplasmic factors localized to specific regions of the egg, whereas epigenetic specification (observed in many basal metazoans, urodeles, and mammals) involves inductive interactions between cells. Much of our understanding of germ cell specification has emerged from studies of model organisms displaying determinate specification. In contrast, our understanding of epigenetic/inductive specification is less advanced and would benefit from studies of additional organisms. Freshwater planarians--widely known for their remarkable powers of regeneration--are well suited for studying the mechanisms by which germ cells can be induced. Classic experiments showed that planarians can regenerate germ cells from body fragments entirely lacking reproductive structures, suggesting that planarian germ cells could be specified by inductive signals. Furthermore, the availability of the genome sequence of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, coupled with the animal's susceptibility to systemic RNA interference (RNAi), facilitates functional genomic analyses of germ cell development and regeneration. Here, we describe recent progress in studies of planarian germ cells and frame some of the critical unresolved questions for future work.

  3. High and stable substrate specificities of microorganisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants.

    PubMed

    Kindaichi, Tomonori; Nierychlo, Marta; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2013-06-01

    Microbial communities are typically characterized by conditions of nutrient limitation so the availability of the resources is likely a key factor in the niche differentiation across all species and in the regulation of the community structure. In this study we have investigated whether four species exhibit any in situ short-term changes in substrate uptake pattern when exposed to variations in substrate and growth conditions. Microautoradiography was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to investigate in situ cell-specific substrate uptake profiles of four probe-defined coexisting species in a wastewater treatment plant with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. These were the filamentous 'Candidatus Microthrix' and Caldilinea (type 0803), the polyphosphate-accumulating organism 'Candidatus Accumulibacter', and the denitrifying Azoarcus. The experimental conditions mimicked the conditions potentially encountered in the respective environment (starvation, high/low substrate concentration, induction with specific substrates, and single/multiple substrates). The results showed that each probe-defined species exhibited very distinct and constant substrate uptake profile in time and space, which hardly changed under any of the conditions tested. Such niche partitioning implies that a significant change in substrate composition will be reflected in a changed community structure rather than the substrate uptake response from the different species.

  4. Specific strains of probiotic bacteria are efficient in removal of several different cyanobacterial toxins from solution.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Sonja M K; Salminen, Seppo J; Meriluoto, Jussi A O

    2008-08-01

    The ability of specific strains of probiotic bacteria to remove the pure cyanobacterial peptide toxins microcystin-LR, -RR, -LF, and a combination of microcystins from the cyanobacterial extracts Microcystis PCC 7820 and NIES 107, as well as the cyanobacterial cytotoxin cylindrospermopsin, from aqueous solutions was assessed. The probiotic bacterial strains studied were Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705, Bifidobacterium lactis strains 420 and Bb12 and Bifidobacterium longum 46, all previously shown to be effective in toxin removal. The maximum removal of microcystin-LR, 60.3%, was observed with L. rhamnosus GG, of microcystin-RR, 62.8%, and microcystin-LF, 77.4%, with L. rhamnosus LC-705, and of cylindrospermopsin, 31.6%, with B. longum 46 (toxin concentration 100mugL(-1), 37 degrees C, 24h). Several microcystins could be removed simultaneously as observed by removal of microcystins present in the cyanobacterial extracts. A combination of three probiotic strains enhanced their removal ability as compared to the removal properties of the individual strains. We conclude that specific strains of probiotic bacteria are effective in elimination of different cyanotoxins from solution. PMID:18639912

  5. Specification of germ cell fate in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Saitou, Mitinori; Payer, Bernhard; Lange, Ulrike C; Erhardt, Sylvia; Barton, Sheila C; Surani, M Azim

    2003-01-01

    An early fundamental event during development is the segregation of germ cells from somatic cells. In many organisms, this is accomplished by the inheritance of preformed germ plasm, which apparently imposes transcriptional repression to prevent somatic cell fate. However, in mammals, pluripotent epiblast cells acquire germ cell fate in response to signalling molecules. We have used single cell analysis to study how epiblast cells acquire germ cell competence and undergo specification. Germ cell competent cells express Fragilis and initially progress towards a somatic mesodermal fate. However, a subset of these cells, the future primordial germ cells (PGCs), then shows rapid upregulation of Fragilis with concomitant transcriptional repression of a number of genes, including Hox and Smad genes. This repression may be a key event associated with germ cell specification. Furthermore, PGCs express Stella and other genes, such as Oct-4 that are associated with pluripotency. While these molecules are also detected in mature oocytes as maternally inherited factors, their early role is to regulate development and maintain pluripotency, and they do not serve the role of classical germline determinants. PMID:14511483

  6. Embryonic stem cell neurogenesis and neural specification.

    PubMed

    Germain, Noélle; Banda, Erin; Grabel, Laura

    2010-10-15

    The prospect of using embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived neural progenitors and neurons to treat neurological disorders has led to great interest in defining the conditions that guide the differentiation of ESCs, and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), into neural stem cells (NSCs) and a variety of neuronal and glial subtypes. Over the past decade, researchers have looked to the embryo to guide these studies, applying what we know about the signaling events that direct neural specification during development. This has led to the design of a number of protocols that successfully promote ESC neurogenesis, terminating with the production of neurons and glia with diverse regional addresses and functional properties. These protocols demonstrate that ESCs undergo neural specification in two, three, and four dimensions, mimicking the cell-cell interactions, patterning, and timing that characterizes the in vivo process. We therefore propose that these in vitro systems can be used to examine the molecular regulation of neural specification.

  7. Cell cycle-specific effects of lovastatin.

    PubMed Central

    Jakóbisiak, M; Bruno, S; Skierski, J S; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    1991-01-01

    Lovastatin (LOV), the drug recently introduced to treat hypercholesteremia, inhibits the synthesis of mevalonic acid. The effects of LOV on the cell cycle progression of the human bladder carcinoma T24 cell line expressing activated p21ras were investigated. At a concentration of 2-10 microM, LOV arrested cells in G1 and also prolonged--or arrested a minor fraction of cells in--the G2 phase of the cell cycle; at a concentration of 50 microM, LOV was cytotoxic. The cytostatic effects were reversed by addition of exogenous mevalonate. Cells arrested in the cycle by LOV were viable for up to 72 hr and did not show any changes in RNA or protein content or chromatin condensation, which would be typical of either unbalanced growth or deep quiescence. The expression of the proliferation-associated nuclear proteins Ki-67 and p105 in these cells was reduced by up to 72% and 74%, respectively, compared with exponentially growing control cells. After removal of LOV, the cells resumed progression through the cycle; they entered S phase asynchronously after a lag of approximately 6 hr. Because mevalonate is essential for the posttranslational modification (isoprenylation) of p21ras, which in turn allows this protein to become attached to the cell membrane, the data suggest that the LOV-induced G1 arrest may be a consequence of the loss of the signal transduction capacity of p21ras. Indeed, while exposure of cells to LOV had no effect on the cellular content of p21ras (detected immunocytochemically), it altered the intracellular location of this protein, causing its dissociation from the cell membrane and translocation toward the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, it is also possible that inhibition of isoprenylation of proteins other than p21ras (e.g., nuclear lamins) by LOV may be responsible for the observed suppression of growth of T24 cells. Images PMID:1673788

  8. Primordial Germ Cell Specification and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells are the progenitor cells that give rise to the gametes. In some animals, the germline is induced by zygotic transcription factors, whereas in others, primordial germ cell specification occurs via inheritance of maternally provided gene products known as germ plasm. Once specified, the primordial germ cells of some animals must acquire motility and migrate to the gonad in order to survive. In all animals examined, perinuclear structures called germ granules form within germ cells. This review focuses on some of the recent studies, conducted by several groups using diverse systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates, which have provided mechanistic insight into the molecular regulation of germ cell specification and migration. PMID:26918157

  9. NK cell depletion diminish tumour-specific B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Markus; Tawadros, Samir; Sedlacek, Hans-Harald; Schultze, Joachim L; Berthold, Frank

    2004-05-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells can exercise immediate cytotoxicity against malignant cells and thus far modulate the development of tumour directed T cell immunity. To investigate the impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell immunity mice were immunised with IMR5-75 human neuroblastoma cells with or without prior in vivo NK cell depletion. Flow cytometry analyses gave evidence for an impaired IgG response against the cells immunised with. Dissection of Th1 (IgG2a) and Th2 (IgG1) oriented B cell responses revealed Th1 responses as primarily affected, while Th2 oriented B cell responses as measured by flow cytometry and GD2 ganglioside-specific ELISA were enforced. The data reveal an unexpected impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell responses. Consequently, NK cell function has also to be taken into account when developing B cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having a density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  11. Photoreceptor cell fate specification in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Brzezinski, Joseph A.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors – the light-sensitive cells in the vertebrate retina – have been extremely well-characterized with regards to their biochemistry, cell biology and physiology. They therefore provide an excellent model for exploring the factors and mechanisms that drive neural progenitors into a differentiated cell fate in the nervous system. As a result, great progress in understanding the transcriptional network that controls photoreceptor specification and differentiation has been made over the last 20 years. This progress has also enabled the production of photoreceptors from pluripotent stem cells, thereby aiding the development of regenerative medical approaches to eye disease. In this Review, we outline the signaling and transcription factors that drive vertebrate photoreceptor development and discuss how these function together in gene regulatory networks to control photoreceptor cell fate specification. PMID:26443631

  12. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell power plants are being developed for transit bus and passenger car applications that use methanol as the on-board fuel. Commodity methanol by itself contains very little sulfur; however, it may occasionally be contaminated with up to about 1% diesel fuel or gasoline in current liquid-fuel distribution systems, leading to the presence of sulfur in the methanol fuel. This sulfur must be removed because of its deleterious effect on the reforming catalysts. International Fuel Cells has set the allowable sulfur limit in the methanol fuel at less than 1 ppm. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess the feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon adsorber for the removal of sulfur from transportation fuel cell systems.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  14. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  15. Extrinsic regulation of satellite cell specification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cellular commitment during vertebrate embryogenesis is controlled by an interplay of intrinsic regulators and morphogenetic signals. These mechanisms recruit a subset of cells in the developing organism to become the ancestors of skeletal muscle. Signals that control progression through the myogenic lineage converge on a battery of hierarchically organized transcription factors which modulate the cells to either remain in a primitive state or allow their commitment and differentiation into skeletal muscle fibers. A small population of cells will retain a largely unspecified state throughout development. Such stem cells, in conjunction with more committed myogenic progenitors, form a heterogeneous population that colonizes adult skeletal muscle as satellite cells. The satellite cell pool is responsible for the remarkable regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. Similar to their counterparts during embryonic development, satellite cells are capable of self-renewal and can give rise to myogenic progeny. Impaired satellite cell homeostasis has been associated with numerous muscular disorders. Due to intense research efforts in the past two decades, the complex biology of muscle stem cells has now revealed some of its secrets and new avenues for the development of therapeutic molecules have emerged. In the present review we focus on the extrinsic mechanisms that control self-renewal, specification and differentiation of satellite cells and their significance for the development of biologic drugs. PMID:20804582

  16. Cell therapy to remove excess copper in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    To achieve permanent correction of Wilson's disease by a cell therapy approach, replacement of diseased hepatocytes with healthy hepatocytes is desirable. There is a physiological requirement for hepatic ATP7B-dependent copper (Cu) transport in bile, which is deficient in Wilson's disease, producing progressive Cu accumulation in the liver or brain with organ damage. The ability to repopulate the liver with healthy hepatocytes raises the possibility of cell therapy in Wilson's disease. Therapeutic principles included reconstitution of bile canalicular network as well as proliferation in transplanted hepatocytes, despite toxic amounts of Cu in the liver. Nonetheless, cell therapy studies in animal models elicited major differences in the mechanisms driving liver repopulation with transplanted hepatocytes in Wilson's disease versus nondiseased settings. Recently, noninvasive imaging was developed to demonstrate Cu removal from the liver, including after cell therapy in Wilson's disease. Such developments will help advance cell/gene therapy approaches, particularly by offering roadmaps for clinical trials in people with Wilson's disease.

  17. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Congjun

    2011-01-01

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells. We explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells and we characterize the properties of butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. The site of growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest was analyzed using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry analyses. Exposure of MDBK cells to 10 mM butyrate caused growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest in a reversible manner. Butyrate affected the cell cycle at a specific point both immediately after mitosis and at a very early stage of the G1 phase. After release from butyrate arrest, MDBK cells underwent synchronous cycles of DNA synthesis and transited through the S phase. It takes at least 8 h for butyrate-induced G1-synchronized cells to begin the progression into the S phase. One cycle of cell division for MDBK cells is about 20 h. By combining BrdU incorporation and DNA content analysis, not only can the overlapping of different cell populations be eliminated, but the frequency and nature of individual cells that have synthesized DNA can also be determined.

  18. Embryonic stem cell neurogenesis and neural specification.

    PubMed

    Germain, Noélle; Banda, Erin; Grabel, Laura

    2010-10-15

    The prospect of using embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived neural progenitors and neurons to treat neurological disorders has led to great interest in defining the conditions that guide the differentiation of ESCs, and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), into neural stem cells (NSCs) and a variety of neuronal and glial subtypes. Over the past decade, researchers have looked to the embryo to guide these studies, applying what we know about the signaling events that direct neural specification during development. This has led to the design of a number of protocols that successfully promote ESC neurogenesis, terminating with the production of neurons and glia with diverse regional addresses and functional properties. These protocols demonstrate that ESCs undergo neural specification in two, three, and four dimensions, mimicking the cell-cell interactions, patterning, and timing that characterizes the in vivo process. We therefore propose that these in vitro systems can be used to examine the molecular regulation of neural specification. PMID:20589755

  19. Evaluation of Alternatives for Hanford 327 Building Hot Cell Removal and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Ray W.; Jasen, William G.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site 327 Building, built in 1953, played a key role in reactor material and fuel research programs. The facility includes nine shielded hot cells, a fuel storage basin, dry sample storage, and a large inerted hot (SERF) cell. In 1996, the 327 Building was transferred from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to Fluor Hanford, Inc., to begin the transition from the mission of irradiated fuel examination to stabilization and deactivation. In 2001, a multi-contractor team conducted a review of the concept of intact (one piece) removal, packaging, and disposal of the 327 hot cells. This paper focuses on challenges related to preparing the 327 Building hot cells for intact one-piece disposal as Low Level Waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site. These challenges, described in this paper, are threefold and include: Sampling and characterization of the cells for low level waste designation; Packaging of the cells for transportation and waste disposal; Transportation from the facility to the disposal site. The primary technical challenges in one-piece removal, packaging, and disposal of the hot cells involve the techniques required to characterize, remove, handle, package and transport a large (approximately up to 12-feet long and 8-feet high) contaminated object that weighs 35 to 160 tons. Specific characterization results associated with two hot cells, G and H cells will be reported. A review of the activities and plans to stabilize and deactivate the 327 Building provides insight into the technical challenges faced by this project and identifies a potential opportunity to modify the baseline strategy by removing the hot cells in one piece instead of decontaminating and dismantling the cells.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of glial cell specification.

    PubMed

    Ragone, Gianluca; Van De Bor, Véronique; Sorrentino, Sandro; Kammerer, Martial; Galy, Anne; Schenck, Annette; Bernardoni, Roberto; Miller, Alita A; Roy, Nivedita; Giangrande, Angela

    2003-03-01

    Neuronal differentiation relies on proneural factors that also integrate positional information and contribute to the specification of the neuronal type. The molecular pathway triggering glial specification is not understood yet. In Drosophila, all lateral glial precursors and glial-promoting activity have been identified, which provides us with a unique opportunity to dissect the regulatory pathways controlling glial differentiation and specification. Although glial lineages are very heterogeneous with respect to position, time of differentiation, and lineage tree, they all express and require two homologous genes, glial cell deficient/glial cell missing (glide/gcm) and glide2, that act in concert, with glide/gcm constituting the major glial-promoting factor. Here, we show that glial specification resides in glide/gcm transcriptional regulation. The glide/gcm promoter contains lineage-specific elements as well as quantitative and turmoil elements scattered throughout several kilobases. Interestingly, there is no correlation between a specific regulatory element and the type of glial lineage. Thus, the glial-promoting factor acts as a naive switch-on button that triggers gliogenesis in response to multiple pathways converging onto its promoter. Both negative and positive regulation are required to control glide/gcm expression, indicating that gliogenesis is actively repressed in some neural lineages. PMID:12618139

  1. 2,4-Dichlorophenol hydroxylase for chlorophenol removal: Substrate specificity and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hejun; Li, Qingchao; Zhan, Yang; Fang, Xuexun; Yu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) are common environmental pollutants. As such, different treatments have been assessed to facilitate their removal. In this study, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) hydroxylase was used to systematically investigate the activity and removal ability of 19CP congeners at 25 and 0 °C. Results demonstrated that 2,4-DCP hydroxylase exhibited a broad substrate specificity to CPs. The activities of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against specific CP congeners, including 3-CP, 2,3,6-trichlorophenol, 2-CP, and 2,3-DCP, were higher than those against 2,4-DCP, which is the preferred substrate of previously reported 2,4-DCP hydroxylase. To verify whether cofactors are necessary to promote hydroxylase activity against CP congeners, we added FAD and found that the added FAD induced a 1.33-fold to 5.13-fold significant increase in hydroxylase activity against different CP congeners. The metabolic pathways of the CP degradation in the enzymatic hydroxylation step were preliminarily proposed on the basis of the analyses of the enzymatic activities against 19CP congeners. We found that the high activity and removal rate of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against CPs at 0 °C enhance the low-temperature-adaptability of this enzyme to the CP congeners; as such, the proposed removal process may be applied to biochemical, bioremediation, and industrial processes, particularly in cold environments.

  2. Cell Specific eQTL Analysis without Sorting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Esko, Tõnu; Peters, Marjolein J.; Schurmann, Claudia; Schramm, Katharina; Kettunen, Johannes; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Li, Yang; Fu, Jingyuan; Karjalainen, Juha; Platteel, Mathieu; Visschedijk, Marijn; Weersma, Rinse K.; Kasela, Silva; Milani, Lili; Tserel, Liina; Peterson, Pärt; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Homuth, Georg; Petersmann, Astrid; Lorbeer, Roberto; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald; Ripatti, Samuli; Perola, Markus; Wood, Andrew R.; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Knight, Julian C.; Melchiotti, Rossella; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Wang, De Yun; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan H.; Rotzschke, Olaf; Makino, Seiko; Salomaa, Veikko; Strauch, Konstantin; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Metspalu, Andres; Wijmenga, Cisca; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-01

    The functional consequences of trait associated SNPs are often investigated using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. While trait-associated variants may operate in a cell-type specific manner, eQTL datasets for such cell-types may not always be available. We performed a genome-environment interaction (GxE) meta-analysis on data from 5,683 samples to infer the cell type specificity of whole blood cis-eQTLs. We demonstrate that this method is able to predict neutrophil and lymphocyte specific cis-eQTLs and replicate these predictions in independent cell-type specific datasets. Finally, we show that SNPs associated with Crohn’s disease preferentially affect gene expression within neutrophils, including the archetypal NOD2 locus. PMID:25955312

  3. Cell Specific eQTL Analysis without Sorting Cells.

    PubMed

    Westra, Harm-Jan; Arends, Danny; Esko, Tõnu; Peters, Marjolein J; Schurmann, Claudia; Schramm, Katharina; Kettunen, Johannes; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Li, Yang; Fu, Jingyuan; Karjalainen, Juha; Platteel, Mathieu; Visschedijk, Marijn; Weersma, Rinse K; Kasela, Silva; Milani, Lili; Tserel, Liina; Peterson, Pärt; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Homuth, Georg; Petersmann, Astrid; Lorbeer, Roberto; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald; Ripatti, Samuli; Perola, Markus; Wood, Andrew R; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B; Hernandez, Dena G; Knight, Julian C; Melchiotti, Rossella; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Wang, De Yun; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan H; Rotzschke, Olaf; Makino, Seiko; Salomaa, Veikko; Strauch, Konstantin; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Metspalu, Andres; Wijmenga, Cisca; Jansen, Ritsert C; Franke, Lude

    2015-05-01

    The functional consequences of trait associated SNPs are often investigated using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. While trait-associated variants may operate in a cell-type specific manner, eQTL datasets for such cell-types may not always be available. We performed a genome-environment interaction (GxE) meta-analysis on data from 5,683 samples to infer the cell type specificity of whole blood cis-eQTLs. We demonstrate that this method is able to predict neutrophil and lymphocyte specific cis-eQTLs and replicate these predictions in independent cell-type specific datasets. Finally, we show that SNPs associated with Crohn's disease preferentially affect gene expression within neutrophils, including the archetypal NOD2 locus. PMID:25955312

  4. Identifying and removing the cell-cycle effect from single-cell RNA-Sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is a revolutionary technique for discovering and describing cell types in heterogeneous tissues, yet its measurement of expression often suffers from large systematic bias. A major source of this bias is the cell cycle, which introduces large within-cell-type heterogeneity that can obscure the differences in expression between cell types. The current method for removing the cell-cycle effect is unable to effectively identify this effect and has a high risk of removing other biological components of interest, compromising downstream analysis. We present ccRemover, a new method that reliably identifies the cell-cycle effect and removes it. ccRemover preserves other biological signals of interest in the data and thus can serve as an important pre-processing step for many scRNA-Seq data analyses. The effectiveness of ccRemover is demonstrated using simulation data and three real scRNA-Seq datasets, where it boosts the performance of existing clustering algorithms in distinguishing between cell types. PMID:27670849

  5. Copper cation removal in an electrokinetic cell containing zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elsayed-Ali, Omar H; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E

    2011-01-30

    Zeolites are used in environmental remediation of soil or water to immobilize or remove toxic materials by cation exchange. An experiment was conducted to test the use a low electric field to direct the toxic cations towards the zeolite. An electrokinetic cell was constructed using carbon electrodes. Synthetic Linde Type A (LTA) zeolite was placed in the cell. Copper(II) chloride dissolved in water was used as a contaminant. The Cu(2+) concentration was measured for ten hours with and without an applied electric field. The removal of the Cu(2+) ions was accelerated by the applied field in the first two hours. For longer time, the electric field did not improve the removal rate of the Cu(2+) ions. The presence of zeolite and applied electric field complicates the chemistry near the cathode and causes precipitation of Cu(2+) ions as copper oxide on the surface of the zeolite. With increased electric field the zeolite farther away from the cathode had little cation exchange due to the higher drift velocity of the Cu(2+) ions. The results also show that, in the LTA Zeolite A pellets, the cation exchange of Cu is limited to a shell of several tens of micrometers. PMID:21109348

  6. Typical low cost biosorbents for adsorptive removal of specific organic pollutants from water.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van Son; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Shuang; Ton-That, Cuong; Zhang, Xinbo

    2015-04-01

    Specific organic pollutants (SOPs) such as phenolic compounds, PAHs, organic pesticides, and organic herbicides cause health and environmental problems due to their excessive toxic properties and poor biodegradability. Low-cost biosorbents are considered as a promising alternative for conventional adsorbents to remove SOPs from water. These materials have several advantages such as high sorption capacities, good modifiability and recoverability, insensitivity to toxic substances, simple operation in the treatment processes. However, previous reports on various types of biosorbents for removing SOPs are still moderately fragmented. Hence, this paper provides a comprehensive review on using typical low-cost biosorbents obtained from lignocellulose and chitin/chitosan for SOPs adsorption. Especially, their characteristics, biosorption mechanism together with utilization for eliminating SOPs are presented and discussed. The paper also gives a critical view regarding future applications of low-cost biosorbents in SOPs-contaminated water treatment.

  7. Ca2+-SPECIFIC REMOVAL OF Z LINES FROM RABBIT SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Wayne A.; Stromer, M. H.; Goll, Darrel E.; Suzuki, A.

    1972-01-01

    Removal of rabbit psoas strips immediately after death and incubation in a saline solution containing 1 mM Ca2+ and 5 nM Mg2+ for 9 hr at 37°C and pH 7.1 causes complete Z-line removal but has no ultrastructurally detectable effect on other parts of the myofibril. Z lines remain ultrastructurally intact if 1 mM 1,2-bis-(2-dicarboxymethylaminoethoxy)-ethane (EGTA) is substituted for 1 mM Ca2+ and the other conditions remain unchanged. Z lines are broadened and amorphous but are still present after incubation for 9 hr at 37°C if 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is substituted for 1 mM Ca2+ and 5 mM Mg2+ in the saline solution. A protein fraction that causes Z-line removal from myofibrils in the presence of Ca2+ at pH 7.0 can be isolated by extraction of ground muscle with 4 mM EDTA at pH 7.0–7.6 followed by isoelectric precipitation and fractionation between 0 and 40% ammonium sulfate saturation. Z-line removal by this protein fraction requires Ca2+ levels higher than 0.1 mM, but Z lines are removed without causing any other ultrastructurally detectable degradation of the myofibril. This is the first report of a protein endogenous to muscle that is able to catalyze degradation of the myofibril. The very low level of unbound Ca2+ in muscle cells in vivo may regulate activity of this protein fraction, or alternatively, this protein fraction may be localized in lysosomes. PMID:4621650

  8. Ultrasensitive Responses and Specificity in Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interconnected cell signaling pathways are able to efficiently and accurately transmit a multitude of different signals, despite an inherent potential for undesirable levels of cross-talk. To ensure that an appropriate response is produced, biological systems have evolved network-level mechanisms that insulate pathways from crosstalk and prevent 'leaking' or 'spillover' between pathways. Many signaling pathways have been shown to respond in an ultrasensitive (switch-like) fashion to graded input, and this behavior may influence specificity. The relationship of ultrasensitivity to signaling specificity has not been extensively explored. Results We studied the behavior of simple mathematical models of signaling networks composed of two interconnected pathways that share an intermediate component, asking if the two pathways in the network could exhibit both output specificity (preferentially activate their own output) and input fidelity (preferentially respond to their own input). Previous results with weakly-activated pathways indicated that neither mutual specificity nor mutual fidelity were obtainable in the absence of an insulating mechanism, such as cross-pathway inhibition, combinatorial signaling or scaffolding/compartmentalization. Here we found that mutual specificity is obtainable for hyperbolic or ultrasensitive pathways, even in the absence of an insulating mechanism. However, mutual fidelity is impossible at steady-state, even if pathways are hyperbolic or ultrasensitive. Nevertheless, ultrasensitivity does provide advantages in attaining specificity and fidelity to networks that contain an insulating mechanism. For networks featuring cross-pathway inhibition or combinatorial signaling, ultrasensitive activation can increase specificity in a limited way, and can only be utilized by one of the two pathways. In contrast, for networks featuring scaffolding/compartmentalization, ultrasensitive activation of both pathways can dramatically improve

  9. A preliminary report of designing removable partial denture frameworks using a specifically developed software package.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a method to digitally survey and build virtual patterns for removable partial denture (RPD) frameworks using a new three-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software package developed specifically for RPD design. The procedure included obtaining 3D data from partially dentate casts, deciding on the path of insertion, and modeling the shape of the components of the frameworks digitally. The completed model data were stored as stereolithography (STL) files, which are commonly used in transferring CAD/CAM models to rapid prototyping technologies. Finally, metal RPD frameworks were fabricated using a selective laser melting technique.

  10. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2006-11-01

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was ~ 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity used was ~ 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the depth of groove. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch of the tested TiAls, which facilitated both the detachments of developing chips and the pile-ups of materials on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction on the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the tested TiAls. The materiel removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall response of materials can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The obtained depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen the candidate materials for the specific purpose depending on whether the application is scratch-dominant or impact-dominant. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation in the material loss or material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size show a higher resistance against the indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and

  11. Cell-Specific Cardiac Electrophysiology Models

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, Willemijn; Ortega, Francis A.; Kherlopian, Armen R.; Zygmunt, Andrew C.; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional cardiac model-building paradigm involves constructing a composite model using data collected from many cells. Equations are derived for each relevant cellular component (e.g., ion channel, exchanger) independently. After the equations for all components are combined to form the composite model, a subset of parameters is tuned, often arbitrarily and by hand, until the model output matches a target objective, such as an action potential. Unfortunately, such models often fail to accurately simulate behavior that is dynamically dissimilar (e.g., arrhythmia) to the simple target objective to which the model was fit. In this study, we develop a new approach in which data are collected via a series of complex electrophysiology protocols from single cardiac myocytes and then used to tune model parameters via a parallel fitting method known as a genetic algorithm (GA). The dynamical complexity of the electrophysiological data, which can only be fit by an automated method such as a GA, leads to more accurately parameterized models that can simulate rich cardiac dynamics. The feasibility of the method is first validated computationally, after which it is used to develop models of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes that simulate the electrophysiological dynamics significantly better than does a standard guinea pig model. In addition to improving model fidelity generally, this approach can be used to generate a cell-specific model. By so doing, the approach may be useful in applications ranging from studying the implications of cell-to-cell variability to the prediction of intersubject differences in response to pharmacological treatment. PMID:25928268

  12. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Lin, H.-T.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    2006-11-30

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was {approx} 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity was {approx} 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the groove depth. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch test of the TiAls, which facilitated both the detachment of developing chips and pile-up of material on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction in the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the TiAls tested. The material removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall material response can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen candidate materials for the applications that are scratch-dominated versus impact-dominated. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation during material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size shows a higher resistance to indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and conclusions in this study can serve as a base line for the further

  13. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber for use as a sulfur removal subsystem in transportation fuel cell systems. Results suggest that an on-board GAC adsorber may not be attractive due to size and weight constraints. However, it may be feasible to install this GAC adsorber at methanol distribution stations, where space and weight are not a critical concern. Preliminary economic analysis indicated that the GAC adsorber concept will be attractive if the spent AC can be regenerated for reuse. These preliminary analyses were made on basis of very limited breakthrough data obtained from the bench-scale testing. Optimization on dynamic testing parameters and study on regeneration of spent AC are needed.

  14. Facial dermis grafts after removal of basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Kyu; Yoon, Won-Young; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2012-11-01

    Selecting a proper reconstruction method is the key to success in skin cancer management, especially for lesions involving the face. Using a skin graft is usually straightforward when covering a skin defect; however, major concerns in skin grafting include a poor color match in the recipient-site and donor-site morbidity. To overcome these limitations, the authors have developed a dermis graft, which utilizes a de-epithelialized split-thickness skin graft method. The purpose of this retrospective study was to report reliability of dermis grafts after removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) on the face by presenting our clinical experience with them. This study included 38 patients who were treated for facial defects created by resection of BCCs. The locations of the defects were as follows: nose (n = 17), orbital area (n = 14), cheek (n = 4), temple area (n = 2), and forehead (n = 1). The defects ranged in size from 3.3 to 6.5 cm. Functional and cosmetic outcomes, postoperative complications, and patient satisfaction were assessed. The patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months. The entire dermis graft re-epithelialized after grafting within 17 to 27 days. Most of the patients had satisfactory results in both functional and cosmetic matters with high-quality skin characteristics. There were no significant complications and no recurrences were observed during the follow-up period. Patient satisfaction with the dermis graft was also excellent. The dermis graft may be used reliably for covering defects after removal of BCCs on the face. PMID:23172436

  15. Development of standardized specifications for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A space silicon solar cell assembly (cell and coverglass) specification aimed at standardizing the diverse requirements of current cell or assembly specifications was developed. This specification was designed to minimize both the procurement and manufacturing costs for space qualified silicon solar cell assembilies. In addition, an impact analysis estimating the technological and economic effects of employing a standardized space silicon solar cell assembly was performed.

  16. Highly selective and rapid arsenic removal by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli cells expressing Fucus vesiculosus metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-05-01

    An arsenic-chelating metallothionein (fMT) from the arsenic-tolerant marine alga Fucus vesiculosus was expressed in Escherichia coli, resulting in 30- and 26-fold-higher As(III) and As(V) binding, respectively. Coexpression of the As(III)-specific transporter GlpF with fMT further improved arsenic accumulation and offered high selectivity toward As. Resting E. coli cells coexpressing fMT and GlpF completely removed trace amounts (35 ppb) of As(III) within 20 min, providing a promising technology for compliance with the As limit of 10 ppb newly recommended by the U.S. EPA.

  17. Removal of F-specific RNA bacteriophages in artificial recharge of groundwater--a field study.

    PubMed

    Niemi, R M; Kytövaara, A; Pääkkönen, J; Lahti, K

    2004-01-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater offers a semi-natural means to produce raw water for drinking-water plants. Surface water works are increasingly being replaced by artificial groundwater works in Finland. Two municipalities, one serving 30,000 and the other 170,000 inhabitants, have considered filtering river water through eskers for the production of potable water. In this study the removal of bacteriophages during infiltration of river water was estimated, for the evaluation of treatment adequacy in a field study. A 5-m-deep column of sand was constructed and used to mimic the percolating phase in infiltration. An artificial esker was constructed on the riverbank by isolating a 2-m-wide, 2-m-deep and 18-m-long bed of coarse sand with plastic. The sand bed represented the saturated zone. River water was pumped at a rate of 40 L/h to the sand column. The river water was spiked with F+ specific RNA phage MS2 by adding phage suspension during one week at an average concentration of 4.3 x 10(9) PFU/mL. Samples for phage assays were taken during one month, from four sampling sites, on the basis of detention time as estimated by a tracer experiment with sodium chloride. The median count of MS2 for percolated water was 2.4 x 10(5) PFU/mL, representing a 96.7% reduction. During the passage of 6 m in the saturated zone, a further reduction of 98.5% occurred. During the passage from 6 m to 12 m the additional reduction was 99.97%. The overall reduction was between 6 and 7 log10 units. The removal of MS2 phages was rather efficient, although the esker material was coarse, mainly sandy, gravel.

  18. Dermis mechanical behaviour after different cell removal treatments.

    PubMed

    Terzini, Mara; Bignardi, Cristina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Audenino, Alberto L

    2016-09-01

    Human acellular dermal matrices (HADMs) are used in reconstructive surgery as scaffolds promoting autologous tissue regeneration. Critical to the HADM ability to remodel and integrate into the host tissue is the removal of cells while maintaining an intact extracellular architecture. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to analyse the mechanical properties of HADMs after decellularization to identify its ideal form of treatment and its duration. Two different decellularization techniques were used as a benchmark: the first is a well-established technique (incubation in NaOH for 1-7 weeks), and the second is an innovative technique developed by this research group (incubation in DMEM (Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium) for 1-7 weeks). After decellularization, the specimens underwent uniaxial tensile tests, and experimental data were represented with stress strain curves, calculating both engineering and true values. Mechanical tests have led to the identification of the optimal method (NaOH or DMEM) and duration for the decellularization treatment; differences between engineering and true values can reach 84%, but the engineering values remain useful to make comparisons, providing reliable indications with a simpler experimental set up and data processing.

  19. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  20. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  1. Method of improving fuel cell performance by removing at least one metal oxide contaminant from a fuel cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Choi, Jong-Ho; Zelenay, Piotr

    2009-08-18

    A method of removing contaminants from a fuel cell catalyst electrode. The method includes providing a getter electrode and a fuel cell catalyst electrode having at least one contaminant to a bath and applying a voltage sufficient to drive the contaminant from the fuel cell catalyst electrode to the getter electrode. Methods of removing contaminants from a membrane electrode assembly of a fuel cell and of improving performance of a fuel cell are also provided.

  2. Innate Non-Specific Cell Substratum Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, William F.; Fuller, Danny; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of motile cells to solid surfaces is necessary to transmit forces required for propulsion. Unlike mammalian cells, Dictyostelium cells do not make integrin mediated focal adhesions. Nevertheless, they can move rapidly on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. We have found that adhesion to such surfaces can be inhibited by addition of sugars or amino acids to the buffer. Treating whole cells with αlpha-mannosidase to cleave surface oligosaccharides also reduces adhesion. The results indicate that adhesion of these cells is mediated by van der Waals attraction of their surface glycoproteins to the underlying substratum. Since glycoproteins are prevalent components of the surface of most cells, innate adhesion may be a common cellular property that has been overlooked. PMID:22952588

  3. Selective familiarity deficits after left anterior temporal-lobe removal with hippocampal sparing are material specific.

    PubMed

    Martin, Chris B; Bowles, Ben; Mirsattari, Seyed M; Köhler, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    Research has firmly established a link between recognition memory and the functional integrity of the medial temporal lobes (MTL). Dual-process models of MTL organization maintain that there is a division of labour within the MTL, with the hippocampus (HC) supporting recollective processes and perirhinal cortex (PRc) supporting familiarity assessment. An older neuropsychological literature suggested a different type of division of labour within the MTL, with left-sided structures playing a critical role in memory for verbal materials and right-sided structures being differentially involved in memory for material that cannot easily be verbalized. Research that has related predictions made by these two accounts to each other is limited. Evidence from research in patients with selective recollection impairments and fMRI data in healthy individuals suggests that lateralization of recollection for verbal materials is not clear-cut. Here we examined lateralization of familiarity processes in the MTL by asking whether selective familiarity impairments after unilateral anterior temporal-lobe removal with hippocampal sparing are material specific. We examined this issue in NB, an individual who was previously shown to exhibit selective familiarity impairments with such a lesion (Bowles et al., 2007). We administered three similar recognition memory tests in combination with the same Remember-Know procedure for three different types of novel stimuli without pre-existing semantic representations. Analyses focused on discrimination and on possible differences in response criterion, and included an ROC based approach as well. We found that NB exhibited a deficit in overall recognition of aurally presented pronounceable non-words that reflected a specific impairment of familiarity assessment with preservation of recollective processes. Examination of recognition memory for visually presented abstract pictures and faces did not reveal any impairment, neither at the level of

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Collie, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  6. Enteric glial cells have specific immunosuppressive properties.

    PubMed

    Kermarrec, Laetitia; Durand, Tony; Neunlist, Michel; Naveilhan, Philippe; Neveu, Isabelle

    2016-06-15

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) have trophic and neuroregulatory functions in the enteric nervous system, but whether they exert a direct effect on immune cells is unknown. Here, we used co-cultures to show that human EGC can inhibit the proliferation of activated T lymphocytes. Interestingly, EGC from Crohn's patients were effective at one EGC for two T cells whereas EGC from control patients required a ratio of 1:1. These data suggest that EGC contribute to local immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal wall. They also raise the possibility that EGC have particular immunosuppressive properties in inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. PMID:27235353

  7. Habitat-specific nutrient removal and release in Oregon salt marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  8. Cell-cycle-specific initiation of replication.

    PubMed

    Nordström, K; Austin, S J

    1993-11-01

    The following characteristics are relevant when replication of chromosomes and plasmids is discussed in relation to the cell cycle: the timing or replication, the selection of molecules for replication, and the coordination of multiple initiation events within a single cell cycle. Several fundamentally different methods have been used to study these processes: Meselson-Stahl density-shift experiments, experiments with the so-called 'baby machine', sorting of cells according to size, and flow cytometry. The evidence for precise timing and co-ordination of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is overwhelming. Similarly, the high-copy-number plasmid ColE1 and the low-copy-number plasmids R1/R100 without any doubt replicate randomly throughout the cell cycle. Data about the low-copy-number plasmids F and P1 are conflicting. This calls for new types of experiments and for a better understanding of how these plasmids control their replication and partitioning.

  9. Induction of tissue-specific stem cells by reprogramming factors, and tissue-specific selection.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Saitoh, I; Tsugata, T; Kataoka, H; Watanabe, M; Noguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Although induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have significant implications for overcoming most of the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells, there are still several unresolved issues related to the use of iPS cells for clinical applications, such as teratoma formation. In this study, we were able to generate tissue-specific stem (induced tissue-specific stem; iTS) cells from the pancreas (iTS-P) or liver (iTS-L) by transient overexpression of reprogramming factors, combined with tissue-specific selection. The generation of iTS cells was easier than that of iPS cells. The iTS-P/iTS-L cells express genetic markers of endoderm and pancreatic/hepatic progenitors and were able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells/hepatocytes more efficiently than ES cells. Subcutaneous transplantation of both types of iTS cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in no teratoma formation. The technology used for the transient overexpression of reprogramming factors and tissue-specific selection may be useful for the generation of other tissue-specific stem cells, and the generation of iTS cells could have important implications for the clinical application of stem cells.

  10. Induction of tissue-specific stem cells by reprogramming factors, and tissue-specific selection.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Saitoh, I; Tsugata, T; Kataoka, H; Watanabe, M; Noguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Although induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have significant implications for overcoming most of the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells, there are still several unresolved issues related to the use of iPS cells for clinical applications, such as teratoma formation. In this study, we were able to generate tissue-specific stem (induced tissue-specific stem; iTS) cells from the pancreas (iTS-P) or liver (iTS-L) by transient overexpression of reprogramming factors, combined with tissue-specific selection. The generation of iTS cells was easier than that of iPS cells. The iTS-P/iTS-L cells express genetic markers of endoderm and pancreatic/hepatic progenitors and were able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells/hepatocytes more efficiently than ES cells. Subcutaneous transplantation of both types of iTS cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in no teratoma formation. The technology used for the transient overexpression of reprogramming factors and tissue-specific selection may be useful for the generation of other tissue-specific stem cells, and the generation of iTS cells could have important implications for the clinical application of stem cells. PMID:25190146

  11. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. PMID:26929053

  12. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  13. Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1994-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  14. Biomimetic fat cell (BFC) modification and for lindane removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liyan, Song; Youcai, Zhao; Guojian, Wang; Bing, Li; Dongjie, Niu; Xiaoli, Chai

    2008-03-01

    To improve the regeneration ability of biomimetic fat cell (BFC), an innovative agent for hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) removal, BFC was modified through introducing 1, 3, 5-benzenetricarboxyl trichloride with trifunctional group and heterocyclic piperazine in this research. Modified biomimetic fat cell (MBFC) has a good lindane removal capacity close to that of BFC and powder activated carbon (PAC), and the lindane removal is 97.68, 96.65 and 98.36% with 7 mg/L lindane initial concentration, respectively. At the same time, 20 mg/L MBFC or PAC is sufficient for 10 microg/L lindane removal, and in 20-60 mg/L doses range the lindane removal by both MBFC and PAC can reach 99.0%; When the doses is below 10 mg/L, MBFC showed better lindane removal than PAC and MBFC even could reach 96.8% lindane removal in 5 mg/L dose. Lindane removal by MBFC could be held on 95% above in first 6-time reuse. Though the lindane removal by MBFC decreased with the reuse time increasing, MBFC still could remove 80 % lindane after 9 times regeneration. In contract with BFC, MBFC showed obvious advantage on the regeneration. The lindane removal mechanism by MBFC, similar with BFC, includes bioaccumulation by MBFC nucleolus-triolein and adsorption by MBFC membrane, and the bioaccumulation is the main way.

  15. How to search for specific markers of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai Guang; Zhang, Xiao Hua

    2009-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer stem cells with unlimited self-renewal and multi-differentiation properties such as adult stem cells are the root cause of cancer initiation and progression, and targeted therapy to cancer stem cells is to become the most efficient therapy of cancer. However, specific markers should be discovered to define cancer stem cells accurately before targeted therapy. Therefore, we propose a model of specific markers of cancer stem cells and how to search for such markers.

  16. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Visvader, Jane E; Clevers, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in quiescent or actively dividing states. 'Professional' stem cells may also co-exist with facultative stem cells, which are more specialized daughter cells that revert to a stem cell state under specific tissue damage conditions. Here, we discuss stem cell strategies as seen in three solid mammalian tissues: the intestine, mammary gland and skeletal muscle. PMID:26999737

  17. Water removal characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells using a dry gas purging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Uk; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyun; Oh, In-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ae; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Ko, Jaejun; Lim, Tae-Won; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lim, Tae-Hoon

    Water removal from proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is of great importance to improve start-up ability and mitigate cell degradation when the fuel cell operates at subfreezing temperatures. In this study, we report water removal characteristics under various shut down conditions including a dry gas-purging step. In order to estimate the dehydration level of the electrolyte membrane, the high frequency resistance of the fuel cell stack was observed. Also, a novel method for measuring the amount of residual water in the fuel cell was developed to determine the amount of water removal. The method used the phase change of liquid water and was successfully applied to examine the water removal characteristics. Based on these works, the effects of several parameters such as purging time, flow rate of purging gas, operation current, and stack temperature on the amount of residual water were investigated.

  18. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... focused on a very small area. The laser heats the cells in the area being treated until they "burst." There are several types of lasers. Each laser has specific uses. Laser excision can remove: Benign or pre- ...

  19. Marker-specific sorting of rare cells using dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyuan; Bessette, Paul H.; Qian, Jiangrong; Meinhart, Carl D.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Soh, Hyongsok T.

    2005-11-01

    Current techniques in high-speed cell sorting are limited by the inherent coupling among three competing parameters of performance: throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. Microfluidics provides an alternate strategy to decouple these parameters through the use of arrayed devices that operate in parallel. To efficiently isolate rare cells from complex mixtures, an electrokinetic sorting methodology was developed that exploits dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic channels. In this approach, the dielectrophoretic amplitude response of rare target cells is modulated by labeling cells with particles that differ in polarization response. Cell mixtures were interrogated in the DEP-activated cell sorter in a continuous-flow manner, wherein the electric fields were engineered to achieve efficient separation between the dielectrophoretically labeled and unlabeled cells. To demonstrate the efficiency of marker-specific cell separation, DEP-activated cell sorting (DACS) was applied for affinity-based enrichment of rare bacteria expressing a specific surface marker from an excess of nontarget bacteria that do not express this marker. Rare target cells were enriched by >200-fold in a single round of sorting at a single-channel throughput of 10,000 cells per second. DACS offers the potential for automated, surface marker-specific cell sorting in a disposable format that is capable of simultaneously achieving high throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. cell sorting | microfluidics

  20. Sex Specification and Heterogeneity of Primordial Germ Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakashita, Akihiko; Kawabata, Yukiko; Jincho, Yuko; Tajima, Shiun; Kumamoto, Soichiro; Kobayashi, Hisato; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Kono, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    In mice, primordial germ cells migrate into the genital ridges by embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), where they are then subjected to a sex-specific fate with female and male primordial germ cells undergoing mitotic arrest and meiosis, respectively. However, the sex-specific basis of primordial germ cell differentiation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the sex-specific features of mouse primordial germ cells. We performed RNA-sequencing (seq) of E13.5 female and male mouse primordial germ cells using next-generation sequencing. We identified 651 and 428 differentially expressed transcripts (>2-fold, P < 0.05) in female and male primordial germ cells, respectively. Of these, many transcription factors were identified. Gene ontology and network analysis revealed differing functions of the identified female- and male-specific genes that were associated with primordial germ cell acquisition of sex-specific properties required for differentiation into germ cells. Furthermore, DNA methylation and ChIP-seq analysis of histone modifications showed that hypomethylated gene promoter regions were bound with H3K4me3 and H3K27me3. Our global transcriptome data showed that in mice, primordial germ cells are decisively assigned to a sex-specific differentiation program by E13.5, which is necessary for the development of vital germ cells. PMID:26700643

  1. Antigen specific killing assay using CFSE labeled target cells.

    PubMed

    Durward, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2010-11-09

    Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) can be used to easily and quickly label a cell population of interest for in vivo investigation. This labeling has classically been used to study proliferation and migration. In the method presented here, we have shortened the timeline after adoptive transfer to look at survival and killing of epitope specific CFSE labeled target cells. The level of specific killing of a CD8 + T cell clone can indicate the quality of the response, as their quantity may be misleading. Specific CD8+ T cells can become functionally exhausted over time with a decline in cytokine production and killing. Also, certain CD8 + T cell clones may not kill as well as others with differing TCR specificities. For effective Cell Mediated Immunity (CMI), antigens must be identified that produce not only adequate numbers of responding T cells, but also functionally robust responding T cells. Here we assess the percent cell specific killing of two peptide specific T cell clones in BALB/c mice.

  2. Cell type-specific transcriptome profiling in mammalian brains

    PubMed Central

    LoVerso, Peter R.; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian brain contains numerous types of cells. Advances in neuroscience in the past decade allow us to identify and isolate neural cells of interest from mammalian brains. Recent developments in high-throughput technologies, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS), provide detailed information on gene expression in pooled cells on a genomic scale. As a result, many novel genes have been found critical in cell type-specific transcriptional regulation. These differentially expressed genes can be used as molecular signatures, unique to a particular class of neural cells. Use of this gene expression-based approach can further differentiate neural cell types into subtypes, potentially linking some of them with neurological diseases. In this article, experimental techniques used to purify neural cells are described, followed by a review on recent microarray- or NGS-based transcriptomic studies of common neural cell types. The future prospects of cell type-specific research are also discussed. PMID:27100485

  3. The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cooling, Michael T; Hunter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 is a modular framework that describes how semantic annotations should be made about mathematical models encoded in the CellML (www.cellml.org) format, and their elements. In addition to the Core specification, there are several satellite specifications, each designed to cater for model annotation in a different context. Basic Model Information, Citation, License and Biological Annotation specifications are presented. PMID:26528558

  4. Marker-specific sorting of rare cells using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyuan; Bessette, Paul H.; Qian, Jiangrong; Meinhart, Carl D.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Soh, Hyongsok T.

    2005-01-01

    Current techniques in high-speed cell sorting are limited by the inherent coupling among three competing parameters of performance: throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. Microfluidics provides an alternate strategy to decouple these parameters through the use of arrayed devices that operate in parallel. To efficiently isolate rare cells from complex mixtures, an electrokinetic sorting methodology was developed that exploits dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic channels. In this approach, the dielectrophoretic amplitude response of rare target cells is modulated by labeling cells with particles that differ in polarization response. Cell mixtures were interrogated in the DEP-activated cell sorter in a continuous-flow manner, wherein the electric fields were engineered to achieve efficient separation between the dielectrophoretically labeled and unlabeled cells. To demonstrate the efficiency of marker-specific cell separation, DEP-activated cell sorting (DACS) was applied for affinity-based enrichment of rare bacteria expressing a specific surface marker from an excess of nontarget bacteria that do not express this marker. Rare target cells were enriched by >200-fold in a single round of sorting at a single-channel throughput of 10,000 cells per second. DACS offers the potential for automated, surface marker-specific cell sorting in a disposable format that is capable of simultaneously achieving high throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. PMID:16236724

  5. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor.

  6. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Methods and Findings By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Conclusions Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM. PMID:26871570

  7. Integrated Droplet-Based Microextraction with ESI-MS for Removal of Matrix Interference in Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Chao; Wei, Zhen-Wei; Gong, Xiao-Yun; Si, Xing-Yu; Zhao, Yao-Yao; Yang, Cheng-Dui; Zhang, Si-Chun; Zhang, Xin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Integrating droplet-based microfluidics with mass spectrometry is essential to high-throughput and multiple analysis of single cells. Nevertheless, matrix effects such as the interference of culture medium and intracellular components influence the sensitivity and the accuracy of results in single-cell analysis. To resolve this problem, we developed a method that integrated droplet-based microextraction with single-cell mass spectrometry. Specific extraction solvent was used to selectively obtain intracellular components of interest and remove interference of other components. Using this method, UDP-Glc-NAc, GSH, GSSG, AMP, ADP and ATP were successfully detected in single MCF-7 cells. We also applied the method to study the change of unicellular metabolites in the biological process of dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation. The method could not only realize matrix-free, selective and sensitive detection of metabolites in single cells, but also have the capability for reliable and high-throughput single-cell analysis. PMID:27126222

  8. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling.

  9. Ni2+ removal and recovery from electroplating effluent by Pseudomonas putida 5-x cell biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chua, H; Wong, P K; Lo, W H; Yu, P H F

    2003-03-01

    Ni2+ and Cu2+ are the major heavy metal ions in electroplating wastewater of Hong Kong. In the present study, Pseudomonas putida 5-x cell biomass was used to remove Ni2+ from electroplating effluent. Ni2+ adsorption capacity of P. putida 5-x cell biomass cultured in sulphate-limiting medium was found to be minimum in early logarithmic growth phase, and maximum of 28.1 mg g(-1) in late stationary growth phase. Pretreated cells by 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl could greatly enhance the Ni2+ adsorption capacity of cell biomass from 28.1 to 36.7 mg g(-1) and had no significant effect on biomass loss. The adsorption process of P. putida 5-x fresh cells and pretreated cell all could be expressed with Freundlich isotherm. TEM analyses indicated that acidic pretreatment degraded the superficial layer-capsule outside of the fresh cell to improve the adsorption capacity of cell to Ni2+. The Ni2+ bound by P. putida 5-x cell biomass could be efficiently recovered using 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl, and the cell biomass could be reused at least five cycles for Ni2+ removal and recovery with 93% above removal efficiency and 98% above recovery rate. Owing to the Cu2+ presented in electroplating wastewater inhibiting Ni2+ adsorption process by P. putida 5-x cell biomass, two-stage biosorption processes should be designed to remove and recover Cu2+ and Ni2+ sequentially from electroplating effluent.

  10. Entorhinal Cortical Ocean Cells Encode Specific Contexts and Drive Context-Specific Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takashi; Sun, Chen; Martin, Jared; Kitch, Lacey J; Schnitzer, Mark J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-09-23

    Forming distinct representations and memories of multiple contexts and episodes is thought to be a crucial function of the hippocampal-entorhinal cortical network. The hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 are known to contribute to these functions, but the role of the entorhinal cortex (EC) is poorly understood. Here, we show that Ocean cells, excitatory stellate neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into DG and CA3, rapidly form a distinct representation of a novel context and drive context-specific activation of downstream CA3 cells as well as context-specific fear memory. In contrast, Island cells, excitatory pyramidal neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into CA1, are indifferent to context-specific encoding or memory. On the other hand, Ocean cells are dispensable for temporal association learning, for which Island cells are crucial. Together, the two excitatory medial EC layer II inputs to the hippocampus have complementary roles in episodic memory. PMID:26402611

  11. Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Preface Endothelial cells lining blood vessel capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establish specialized vascular niches that deploy specific sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors, which actively participate in inducing, specifying, patterning, and guiding organ regeneration and maintaining homeostasis and metabolism. Angiocrine factors upregulated in response to injury orchestrates self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific repopulating resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the precise mechanisms whereby physiological-levels of angiocrine factors are spatially and temporally produced, and distributed by organotypic endothelium to repopulating cells, will lay the foundation for driving organ repair without scarring. PMID:26791722

  12. Benzene and sulfide removal from groundwater treated in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Rakoczy, Jana; Feisthauer, Stefan; Wasmund, Kenneth; Bombach, Petra; Neu, Thomas R; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2013-12-01

    Sulfidic benzene-contaminated groundwater was used to fuel a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) over a period of 770 days. We aimed to understand benzene and sulfide removal processes in the anoxic anode chamber and describe the microbial community enriched over the operational time. Operated in batch feeding-like circular mode, supply of fresh groundwater resulted in a rapid increase in current production, accompanied by decreasing benzene and sulfide concentrations. The total electron recoveries for benzene and sulfide were between 18% and 49%, implying that benzene and sulfide were not completely oxidized at the anode. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from the anode-associated bacterial community revealed the dominance of δ-Proteobacteria (31%), followed by β-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, ϵ-Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes, most of which are known for anaerobic metabolism. Two-dimensional compound-specific isotope analysis demonstrated that benzene degradation was initiated by monohydroxylation, probably triggered by small amounts of oxygen which had leaked through the cation exchange membrane into the anode chamber. Experiments with [(13)C(6) ]-benzene revealed incorporation of (13)C into fatty acids of mainly Gram-negative bacteria, which are therefore candidates for benzene degradation. Our study demonstrated simultaneous benzene and sulfide removal by groundwater microorganisms which use an anode as artificial electron acceptor, thereby releasing an electrical current.

  13. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  14. Embryonic stem cell-specific signature in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Gariglio, Patricio

    2014-03-01

    The wide range of invasive and noninvasive lesion phenotypes associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in cervical cancer (CC) indicates that not only the virus but also specific cervical epithelial cells in the transformation zone (TZ), such as stem cells (SCs), play an important part in the development of cervical neoplasia. In this review, we focused in an expression signature that is specific to embryonic SCs and to poorly differentiated cervical malignant tumors and we hypothesize that this expression signature may play an important role to promote cell growth, survival, colony formation, lack of adhesion, as well as cell invasion and migration in CC.

  15. Selection of cell-type specific antibodies on tissue-sections using phage display.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-08-01

    With the advent of modern technologies enabling single cell analysis, it has become clear that small sub-populations of cells or even single cells can drive the phenotypic appearance of tissue, both diseased and normal. Nucleic acid based technologies allowing single cell analysis has been faster to mature, while technologies aimed at analysing the proteome at a single cell level is still lacking behind, especially technologies which allow single cell analysis in tissue. Introducing methods, that allows such analysis, will pave the way for discovering new biomarkers with more clinical relevance, as these may be unique for microenvironments only present in tissue and will avoid artifacts introduced by in vitro studies. Here, we introduce a technology enabling biomarker identification on small sub-populations of cells within a tissue section. Phage antibody libraries are applied to the tissue sections, followed by washing to remove non-bound phage particles. To eliminate phage antibodies binding to antigens ubiquitously expressed and retrieve phage antibodies binding specifically to antigens expressed by the sub-population of cells, the area of interest is protected by a 'shadow stick'. The phage antibodies on the remaining areas on the slide are exposed to UV light, which introduces cross-links in the phage genome, thus rendering them non-replicable. In this work we applied the technology, guided by CD31 expressing endothelial cells, to isolate recombinant antibodies specifically binding biomarkers expressed either by the cell or in the microenvironment surrounding the endothelial cell.

  16. Selection of cell-type specific antibodies on tissue-sections using phage display

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of modern technologies enabling single cell analysis, it has become clear that small sub-populations of cells or even single cells can drive the phenotypic appearance of tissue, both diseased and normal. Nucleic acid based technologies allowing single cell analysis has been faster to mature, while technologies aimed at analysing the proteome at a single cell level is still lacking behind, especially technologies which allow single cell analysis in tissue. Introducing methods, that allows such analysis, will pave the way for discovering new biomarkers with more clinical relevance, as these may be unique for microenvironments only present in tissue and will avoid artifacts introduced by in vitro studies. Here, we introduce a technology enabling biomarker identification on small sub-populations of cells within a tissue section. Phage antibody libraries are applied to the tissue sections, followed by washing to remove non-bound phage particles. To eliminate phage antibodies binding to antigens ubiquitously expressed and retrieve phage antibodies binding specifically to antigens expressed by the sub-population of cells, the area of interest is protected by a ‘shadow stick’. The phage antibodies on the remaining areas on the slide are exposed to UV light, which introduces cross-links in the phage genome, thus rendering them non-replicable. In this work we applied the technology, guided by CD31 expressing endothelial cells, to isolate recombinant antibodies specifically binding biomarkers expressed either by the cell or in the microenvironment surrounding the endothelial cell. PMID:25808085

  17. A Quality-Control Mechanism Removes Unfit Cells from a Population of Sporulating Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tan, Irene S; Weiss, Cordelia A; Popham, David L; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2015-09-28

    Recent discoveries of regulated cell death in bacteria have led to speculation about possible benefits that apoptosis-like pathways may confer to single-celled organisms. However, establishing how these pathways provide increased ecological fitness has remained difficult to determine. Here, we report a pathway in Bacillus subtilis in which regulated cell death maintains the fidelity of sporulation through selective removal of cells that misassemble the spore envelope. The spore envelope, which protects the dormant spore's genome from environmental insults, uses the protein SpoIVA as a scaffold for assembly. We found that disrupting envelope assembly activates a cell death pathway wherein the small protein CmpA acts as an adaptor to the AAA+ ClpXP protease to degrade SpoIVA, thereby halting sporulation and resulting in lysis of defective sporulating cells. We propose that removal of unfit cells from a population of terminally differentiating cells protects against evolutionary deterioration and ultimately loss of the sporulation program.

  18. How antigen specificity directs regulatory T-cell function: self, foreign and engineered specificity.

    PubMed

    Hoeppli, R E; MacDonald, K G; Levings, M K; Cook, L

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a suppressive subset of T cells that have important roles in maintaining self-tolerance and preventing immunopathology. The T-cell receptor (TCR) and its antigen specificity play a dominant role in the differentiation of cells to a Treg fate, either in the thymus or in the periphery. This review focuses on the effects of the TCR and its antigen specificity on Treg biology. The role of Tregs with specificity for self-antigen has primarily been studied in the context of autoimmune disease, although recent studies have focused on their role in steady-state conditions. The role of Tregs that are specific for pathogens, dietary antigens and allergens is much less studied, although recent data suggest a significant and previously underappreciated role for Tregs during memory responses to a wide range of foreign antigens. The development of TCR- or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells means we are now able to engineer Tregs with disease-relevant antigen specificities, paving the way for ensuring specificity with Treg-based therapies. Understanding the role that antigens play in driving the generation and function of Tregs is critical for defining the pathophysiology of many immune-mediated diseases, and developing new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27256587

  19. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties.

  20. Parametric Study to Characterize Low Activity Waste Tank Heat Removal Alternatives for Phase 1 Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    GRENARD, C.E.

    2000-09-11

    Alternative for removing heat from Phase 1, low-activity waste feed double-shell tanks using the ventilation systems have been analyzed for Phase 1 waste feed delivery. The analysis was a parametric study using a model that predicted the waste temperatures for a range of primary and annulus ventilation system flow rates. The analysis was performed to determine the ventilation flow required to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding the Limiting Conditions for Operation limits during normal operation and the Safety Limits during off-normal events.

  1. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  2. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  3. The cell biology of synaptic specificity during development

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ryan; Shao, Zhiyong; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Proper circuit connectivity is critical for nervous system function. Connectivity derives from the interaction of two interdependent modules: synaptic specificity and synaptic assembly. Specificity involves both targeting of neurons to specific laminar regions and the formation of synapses onto defined subcellular areas. In this review, we focus discussion on recently elucidated molecular mechanisms that control synaptic specificity and link them to synapse assembly. We use these molecular pathways to underscore fundamental cell biological concepts that underpin, and help explain, the rules governing synaptic specificity. PMID:23932598

  4. In situ removal of copper from sediments by a galvanic cell.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Songhu; Wu, Chan; Wan, Jinzhong; Lu, Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    This study dealt with in situ removal of copper from sediments through an electrokinetic (EK) process driven by a galvanic cell. Iron (Fe) and carbon (C) were placed separately and connected with a conductive wire. Polluted sediments were put between them and water was filled above the sediments. The galvanic cell was thus formed due to the different electrode potentials of Fe and C. The cell could remove the pollutants in the sediments by electromigration and/or electroosmosis. Results showed that a weak voltage less than 1V was formed by the galvanic cell. The voltage decreased with the increase of time. A slight increase of sediment pH from the anode (Fe) to the cathode (C) was observed. The presence of supernatant water inhibited the variation of sediment pH because H(+) and OH(-) could diffuse into the water. The removal of copper was affected by the sediment pH and the distribution of electrolyte in sediment and supernatant water. Lower pH led to higher removal efficiency. More electrolyte in the sediment and/or less electrolyte in the supernatant water favored the removal of copper. The major removal mechanism was proposed on the basis of the desorption of copper from sediment to pore solution and the subsequent electromigration of copper from the anode to the cathode. The diffusion of copper from sediment to supernatant water was negligible.

  5. Gas block mechanism for water removal in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Issacci, Farrokh; Rehg, Timothy J.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention is directed to apparatus and method for cathode-side disposal of water in an electrochemical fuel cell. There is a cathode plate. Within a surface of the plate is a flow field comprised of interdigitated channels. During operation of the fuel cell, cathode gas flows by convection through a gas diffusion layer above the flow field. Positioned at points adjacent to the flow field are one or more porous gas block mediums that have pores sized such that water is sipped off to the outside of the flow field by capillary flow and cathode gas is blocked from flowing through the medium. On the other surface of the plate is a channel in fluid communication with each porous gas block mediums. The method for water disposal in a fuel cell comprises installing the cathode plate assemblies at the cathode sides of the stack of fuel cells and manifolding the single water channel of each of the cathode plate assemblies to the coolant flow that feeds coolant plates in the stack.

  6. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, M A; Paulson, J C

    1980-01-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphological characteristics. By either criterion, treatment of the cells with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase to remove cell surface sialic acids rendered them resistant to infection by Sendai virus. Endogenous replacement of receptors by the cell occurred slowly but supported maximal levels of infection within 6 hr. In contrast, sialylation during a 20-min incubation with CMP-sialic acid and beta-galactoside alpha 2,3-sialytransferase restored full susceptibility to infection. This enzyme elaborates the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid) sequence on glycoproteins and glycolipids. No restoration of infectivity was observed when neuraminidase-treated cells were sialylated by using beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialytransferase, which elaborates the NeuAc-alpha 2,6Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc sequence. These results suggest that sialyloligosaccharide receptor determinants of defined sequence are required for Sendai virus infection of host cells. Images PMID:6255459

  7. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  8. Engineering human peripheral blood stem cell grafts that are depleted of naïve T cells and retain functional pathogen-specific memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Marie; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jones, Lori A; Turtle, Cameron; Krause, Diane; Riddell, Stanley R; Shlomchik, Warren

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Approaches that selectively deplete T cells that cause GVHD from allogeneic stem cell grafts and preserve T cells specific for pathogens may improve HCT outcomes. It has been hypothesized that the majority of T cells that can cause GVHD reside within the naïve T cell (TN) subset, and previous studies performed in mouse models and with human cells in vitro support this hypothesis. As a prelude to translating these findings to the clinic, we developed and evaluated a novel 2-step clinically compliant procedure for manipulating peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to remove TN, preserve CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, and provide for a fixed dose of memory T cells (TM) that includes T cells with specificity for common opportunistic pathogens encountered after HCT. Our studies demonstrate effective and reproducible performance of the immunomagnetic cell selection procedure for depleting TN. Moreover, after cell processing, the CD45RA-depleted PBSC products are enriched for CD4(+) and CD8(+) TM with a central memory phenotype and contain TM cells that are capable of proliferating and producing effector cytokines in response to opportunistic pathogens.

  9. Modeling BOD removal in constructed wetlands with mixing cell method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wang, G.T.; Xue, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    A new concept, transport detention time, is proposed in this paper to describe solute-transport processes. Using this concept, a new mathematical model was developed to describe biochemical oxygen demand removal in constructed wetlands. By treating a constructed wetland as a series of continuous stir tank reactors, an nth-order ordinary differential equation was derived based on the principle of mass balance and convective-dispersive equation and by introducing transfer function and Laplace transform. The number of continuous stir tank reactors of a particular wetland was determined by the parameters, such as dispersion coefficient and flow velocity, occurring in the wetland. Two examples were presented to illustrate the applications of the model. Moment method and a combination of moment and optimization methods were used to estimate the model parameters from tracer experiment data. A comparison between the model presented in this paper and the currently used plug-flow-constructed wetland model indicated that the former was more accurate. Additionally, this model can be applied to transient conditions, is theoretically sound, and represents a theoretical advance in constructed wetland research.

  10. pH-dependent ammonia removal pathways in microbial fuel cell system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Lee, Hyeryeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2016-09-01

    In this work, ammonia removal paths in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) under different initial pH conditions (pH 7.0, 8.0, and 8.6) were investigated. At a neutral pH condition (pH 7.0), MFC used an electrical energy of 27.4% and removed 23.3% of total ammonia by electrochemical pathway for 192h. At the identical pH condition, 36.1% of the total ammonia was also removed by the biological path suspected to be biological ammonia oxidation process (e.g., Anammox). With the initial pH increased, the electrochemical removal efficiency decreased to less than 5.0%, while the biological removal efficiency highly increased to 61.8%. In this study, a neutral pH should be maintained in the anode to utilize MFCs for ammonia recovery via electrochemical pathways from wastewater stream.

  11. pH-dependent ammonia removal pathways in microbial fuel cell system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Lee, Hyeryeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2016-09-01

    In this work, ammonia removal paths in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) under different initial pH conditions (pH 7.0, 8.0, and 8.6) were investigated. At a neutral pH condition (pH 7.0), MFC used an electrical energy of 27.4% and removed 23.3% of total ammonia by electrochemical pathway for 192h. At the identical pH condition, 36.1% of the total ammonia was also removed by the biological path suspected to be biological ammonia oxidation process (e.g., Anammox). With the initial pH increased, the electrochemical removal efficiency decreased to less than 5.0%, while the biological removal efficiency highly increased to 61.8%. In this study, a neutral pH should be maintained in the anode to utilize MFCs for ammonia recovery via electrochemical pathways from wastewater stream. PMID:27090407

  12. Dengue virus-specific suppressor T cells: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Umesh C; Shrivastava, Richa; Tripathi, Raj K; Nagar, Rachna

    2007-08-01

    Dengue virus was the first microorganism that was shown to induce generation of antigen-specific suppressor T (TS) cells in mice. The cascade of the three generations of TS cells (TS1, TS2, TS3) and their secretary products, the suppressor factors (SF1, SF2), was delineated. The TS pathway was proposed to be protective through inhibition of the production of enhancing antibody, which may enhance the severity of dengue disease. The currently second most favoured mechanism of severe dengue disease is the 'cytokine tsunami'. During the last decade, suppressor/regulatory T cells have been studied in greater detail using modern techniques in various diseases, including viral infections. This brief review discusses the role of dengue-specific suppressor T cells in protection and/or induction of severe dengue disease in view of our current understanding of suppressor/regulatory T cells. PMID:17573929

  13. Neurodegenerative disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhisa

    2010-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research contributes to the following 3 areas; "Disease modeling", "Disease material" and "Disease therapy". "Disease modeling", by recapitulating the disease phenotype in vitro, will reveal the pathomechanisms. Neurodegenerative disease-specific iPSC-derived non-neuronal cells harboring disease-causative protein(s), which play critical roles in neurodegeneration including motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, could be "Disease material", the target cell(s) for drug screening. These differentiated cells also could be used for "Disease therapy", an autologous cellular replacement/neuroprotection strategy, for patients with neurodegenerative disease. Further progress in these areas of research can be made for currently incurable neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Merbs, Shannath L; Khan, Miriam A; Hackler, Laszlo; Oliver, Verity F; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Zack, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS) of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO), retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP) cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW), cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW), and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW) was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods). These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA methylation that

  15. Coupling of anaerobic digester and microbial fuel cell for COD removal and ammonia recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated for use in removing total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and residual COD from effluent digested in an anaerobic digester (AD) fed with actual swine wastewater for 32 days in batch mode. Cumulative COD removal in the AD was as high as 59,647±2096 mg/L (80.5% removed), whereas TAN removal in the AD was negligible at 296±116 mg-N/L (5.8% removed), causing a decrease in the COD/TAN ratio from 14.5 to 3.0. In a subsequent MFC system, 77.5% of TAN was removed at 36 days, leading to an increase in COD/TAN ratio from 4.6 to 8.1. As a result, the COD in the anode was further reduced from 19,319±417 mg/L to 7519±554 mg/L (61.1% removed). From these results, removing the TAN in MFCs was found to increase the COD/TAN ratio, with the COD being further degraded.

  16. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor. PMID:26837600

  17. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  18. Role of the liver in determining alloimmune response in vitro following donor-specific spleen cell injection.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Masaki; Nagano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Shogo; He, Li; Ota, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Junzo; Takeda, Yutaka; Masrubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Tanemuea, Masahiro; Dono, Keizo; Sakon, Masato; Umeshita, Koji; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Monden, Morito

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the allogeneic influence inside and outside the liver in vitro following donor-specific cell injection (DSI). DA rats (RT1a) were used as donors and WS rats (RT1k) as recipients. WS were sensitized with DA spleen cells, followed 24h later by total hepatectomy. The liver was transplanted into another WS (sensitized liver-grafted; SL-Grafted). The hepatectomized WS underwent liver transplantation from a naive WS (sensitized liver-removed; SL-Removed). Alloantigens accumulated in the liver in SL-Grafted and in the extrahepatic tissue/organ(s) in SL-Removed. DA hearts were transplanted 10days after antigen administration. To analyze the immune responses, we measured Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles, and perforin mRNA in various organs, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), and donor-specific immunoglobulin. Th1 cytokine levels in the liver of SL-Grafted and in spleen of SL-Removed were highly and rapidly upregulated but decreased thereafter. IFN-gamma and perforin mRNAs were significantly higher in SL-Grafted and lower in SL-Removed. MLR was significantly higher in SL-Grafted than SL-Removed and controls. There was no significant difference in the donor-specific immunoglobulin level. Our findings suggest that liver and other organs may behave differently to alloantigen, suggesting the importance of an early Th1 reaction in the liver and spleen.

  19. Type-Specific Cell Line Models for Type-Specific Ovarian Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Anglesio, Michael S.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Melnyk, Nataliya; Chow, Christine; Salamanca, Clara; Prentice, Leah M.; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Spillman, Monique A.; Cochrane, Dawn R.; Shumansky, Karey; Shah, Sohrab P.; Kalloger, Steve E.; Huntsman, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian carcinomas consist of at least five distinct diseases: high-grade serous, low-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous. Biomarker and molecular characterization may represent a more biologically relevant basis for grouping and treating this family of tumors, rather than site of origin. Molecular characteristics have become the new standard for clinical pathology, however development of tailored type-specific therapies is hampered by a failure of basic research to recognize that model systems used to study these diseases must also be stratified. Unrelated model systems do offer value for study of biochemical processes but specific cellular context needs to be applied to assess relevant therapeutic strategies. Methods We have focused on the identification of clear cell carcinoma cell line models. A panel of 32 “ovarian cancer” cell lines has been classified into histotypes using a combination of mutation profiles, IHC mutation-surrogates, and a validated immunohistochemical model. All cell lines were identity verified using STR analysis. Results Many described ovarian clear cell lines have characteristic mutations (including ARID1A and PIK3CA) and an overall molecular/immuno-profile typical of primary tumors. Mutations in TP53 were present in the majority of high-grade serous cell lines. Advanced genomic analysis of bona-fide clear cell carcinoma cell lines also support copy number changes in typical biomarkers such at MET and HNF1B and a lack of any recurrent expressed re-arrangements. Conclusions: As with primary ovarian tumors, mutation status of cancer genes like ARID1A and TP53 and a general immuno-profile serve well for establishing histotype of ovarian cancer cell We describe specific biomarkers and molecular features to re-classify generic “ovarian carcinoma” cell lines into type specific categories. Our data supports the use of prototype clear cell lines, such as TOV21G and JHOC-5, and questions the use of SKOV3 and A

  20. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-02-15

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1(st) -5(th) order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  1. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1st –5th order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  2. Cell Specific Cytotoxicity and Uptake of Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lalwani, Gaurav; Zhang, Kevin; Yang, Jeong Yun; Neville, Kayla; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    types. Additional analysis indicates that this increased uptake is the dominant cause of the significantly higher toxicity exhibited by HeLa cells. The results suggest that water-solubilized O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs have a heterogeneous cell-specific cytotoxicity, and have significantly different cytotoxicity profile compared to graphene nanoparticles prepared by the modified Hummer’s method (graphene nanoparticles prepared by oxidation of graphite, and its mechanical exfoliation) or its variations. PMID:23072942

  3. Cell-Type Specific Four-Component Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, Timo; Franke, Katrin; Rist, Elke; Benz, Karin; Schlosshauer, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering. PMID:24475174

  4. Specification of epidermal cell fate in plant shoots.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinobu; Iida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved a single layer of epidermal cells, which are characterized by mostly anticlinal cell division patterns, formation of a waterproof coat called cuticle, and unique cell types such as stomatal guard cells and trichomes. The shoot epidermis plays important roles not only to protect plants from dehydration and pathogens but also to ensure their proper organogenesis and growth control. Extensive molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis and maize have identified a number of genes that are required for epidermal cell differentiation. However, the mechanism that specifies shoot epidermal cell fate during plant organogenesis remains largely unknown. Particularly, little is known regarding positional information that should restrict epidermal cell fate to the outermost cell layer of the developing organs. Recent studies suggested that certain members of the HD-ZIP class IV homeobox genes are possible master regulators of shoot epidermal cell fate. Here, we summarize the roles of the regulatory genes that are involved in epidermal cell fate specification and discuss the possible mechanisms that limit the expression and/or activity of the master transcriptional regulators to the outermost cell layer in plant shoots. PMID:24616724

  5. Probing Coagulation Behavior of Individual Aluminum Species for Removing Corresponding Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: The Role of Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Hu, Chengzhi; Zhang, Di; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation behavior of aluminum chloride and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) for removing corresponding disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors was discussed in this paper. CHCl3, bromine trihalomethanes (THM-Br), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) formation potential yields were correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values in different molecular weight (MW) fractions of humic substances (HS), respectively. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis were performed to examine the relationships between SUVA and different DBP precursors. To acquire more structural characters of DBP precursors and aluminum speciation, freeze-dried precipitates were analyzed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and C 1s, Al 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that TCAA precursors (no MW limits), DCAA and CHCl3 precursors in low MW fractions (MW<30 kDa) had a relatively good relations with SUVA values. These DBP precursors were coagulated more easily by in situ Al13 of AlCl3 at pH 5.0. Due to relatively low aromatic content and more aliphatic structures, THM-Br precursors (no MW limits) and CHCl3 precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) were preferentially removed by PACl coagulation with preformed Al13 species at pH 5.0. Additionally, for DCAA precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) with relatively low aromatic content and more carboxylic structures, the greatest removal occurred at pH 6.0 through PACl coagulation with aggregated Al13 species. PMID:26824243

  6. Probing Coagulation Behavior of Individual Aluminum Species for Removing Corresponding Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: The Role of Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Hu, Chengzhi; Zhang, Di; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation behavior of aluminum chloride and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) for removing corresponding disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors was discussed in this paper. CHCl3, bromine trihalomethanes (THM-Br), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) formation potential yields were correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values in different molecular weight (MW) fractions of humic substances (HS), respectively. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis were performed to examine the relationships between SUVA and different DBP precursors. To acquire more structural characters of DBP precursors and aluminum speciation, freeze-dried precipitates were analyzed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and C 1s, Al 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that TCAA precursors (no MW limits), DCAA and CHCl3 precursors in low MW fractions (MW<30 kDa) had a relatively good relations with SUVA values. These DBP precursors were coagulated more easily by in situ Al13 of AlCl3 at pH 5.0. Due to relatively low aromatic content and more aliphatic structures, THM-Br precursors (no MW limits) and CHCl3 precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) were preferentially removed by PACl coagulation with preformed Al13 species at pH 5.0. Additionally, for DCAA precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) with relatively low aromatic content and more carboxylic structures, the greatest removal occurred at pH 6.0 through PACl coagulation with aggregated Al13 species. PMID:26824243

  7. Probing Coagulation Behavior of Individual Aluminum Species for Removing Corresponding Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: The Role of Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Hu, Chengzhi; Zhang, Di; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation behavior of aluminum chloride and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) for removing corresponding disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors was discussed in this paper. CHCl3, bromine trihalomethanes (THM-Br), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) formation potential yields were correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values in different molecular weight (MW) fractions of humic substances (HS), respectively. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis were performed to examine the relationships between SUVA and different DBP precursors. To acquire more structural characters of DBP precursors and aluminum speciation, freeze-dried precipitates were analyzed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and C 1s, Al 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that TCAA precursors (no MW limits), DCAA and CHCl3 precursors in low MW fractions (MW<30 kDa) had a relatively good relations with SUVA values. These DBP precursors were coagulated more easily by in situ Al13 of AlCl3 at pH 5.0. Due to relatively low aromatic content and more aliphatic structures, THM-Br precursors (no MW limits) and CHCl3 precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) were preferentially removed by PACl coagulation with preformed Al13 species at pH 5.0. Additionally, for DCAA precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) with relatively low aromatic content and more carboxylic structures, the greatest removal occurred at pH 6.0 through PACl coagulation with aggregated Al13 species.

  8. Erythropoietin gene expression: developmental-stage specificity, cell-type specificity, and hypoxia inducibility.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes play an essential role in the delivery of oxygen from the lung to every organ; a decrease in erythrocytes (anemia) causes hypoxic stress and tissue damage. To maintain oxygen homeostasis in adult mammals, when the kidney senses hypoxia, it secretes an erythroid growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), which stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. Recently, studies using genetically modified mice have shown that the in vivo expression profile of the Epo gene changes dramatically during development. The first Epo-producing cells emerge in the neural crest and neuroepithelium of mid-stage embryos and support primitive erythropoiesis in the yolk sac. Subsequently, Epo from the hepatocytes stimulates erythropoiesis in the fetal liver of later stage embryos in a paracrine manner. In fact, erythroid lineage cells comprise the largest cell population in the fetal liver, and hepatocytes are distributed among the erythroid cell clusters. Adult erythropoiesis in the bone marrow requires Epo that is secreted by renal Epo-producing cells (REP cells). REP cells are widely distributed in the renal cortex and outer medulla. Hypoxia-inducible Epo production both in hepatocytes and REP cells is controlled at the gene transcription level that is mainly mediated by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) pathway. These mouse studies further provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cell-type specific, hypoxia-inducible expression of the Epo gene, which involves multiple sets of cis- and trans-regulatory elements. PMID:25786542

  9. Removal by centrifugation of leukocytes and red cells from apheresis platelets.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, T; Kakaiya, R M; Cable, R G

    1984-01-01

    Platelets prepared by discontinuous flow centrifugation contain significant numbers of leukocytes and red cells. Platelet products often are centrifuged further to remove this cellular "contamination." A method is described by which platelet products obtained by cytapheresis were prepared using an additional slow centrifugation step (121 X g for 7.5 minutes). In a production environment, we removed an average of 97 percent of leukocytes and most of the contaminating red cells with this method, while retaining 89 percent of the platelets in the final product. This method is an improvement over methods described previously and was consistently effective in routine use.

  10. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  11. Cell-Specific Expression of Mitochondrial Transcripts in Maize Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X. Q.; Zhang, M.; Brown, G. G.

    1996-01-01

    Although mitochondria are thought to assume crucial and possibly novel physiological functions during male gametogenesis, it is not known to what extent mitochondrial function is necessary for other aspects of plant development or to what degree the expression of plant mitochondrial genes is subject to cell-specific regulation, particularly during vegetative growth. We have used in situ hybridization to show that extensive differences exist in the levels of mitochondrial RNAs (mtRNAs) among different tissues and among different individual cell types within the same organ of maize seedlings. The expression of all examined mtRNAs is enhanced in vascular bundles, particularly in procambium- and xylem-forming cells. Mitochondrial transcript levels correlated highly with cell division activity. For example, in roots, the transcripts are abundant in the dividing cells of the meristem but drop to very low levels in the nondividing cells of the root cap and the meristem quiescent center. By comparison, levels of functional mitochondria, as assessed by rhodamine-123 fluorescence, did not vary greatly among the same group of cells. In shoots, in situ hybridization and blot hybridization revealed differences in the patterns of localization among different mtRNAs. The results indicate that during vegetative growth, mitochondrial gene expression at the transcript level is subject to an unexpected degree of cell-specific regulation and that different controls may operate on different trancripts. PMID:12239371

  12. Entorhinal Cortical Ocean Cells Encode Specific Contexts and Drive Context-Specific Fear Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takashi; Sun, Chen; Martin, Jared; Kitch, Lacey J; Schnitzer, Mark J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forming distinct representations and memories of multiple contexts and episodes is thought to be a crucial function of the hippocampal-entorhinal cortical network. The hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 are known to contribute to these functions but the role of the entorhinal cortex (EC) is poorly understood. Here, we show that Ocean cells, excitatory stellate neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into DG and CA3, rapidly form a distinct representation of a novel context and drive context-specific activation of downstream CA3 cells as well as context-specific fear memory. In contrast, Island cells, excitatory pyramidal neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into CA1, are indifferent to context-specific encoding or memory. On the other hand, Ocean cells are dispensable for temporal association learning, for which Island cells are crucial. Together, the two excitatory medial EC layer II inputs to the hippocampus have complementary roles in episodic memory. PMID:26402611

  13. Current tools for predicting cancer-specific T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, David; Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Schmidt, Julien; Luescher, Immanuel F

    2016-07-01

    Tumor exome and RNA sequencing data provide a systematic and unbiased view on cancer-specific expression, over-expression, and mutations of genes, which can be mined for personalized cancer vaccines and other immunotherapies. Of key interest are tumor-specific mutations, because T cells recognizing neoepitopes have the potential to be highly tumoricidal. Here, we review recent developments and technical advances in identifying MHC class I and class II-restricted tumor antigens, especially neoantigen derived MHC ligands, including in silico predictions, immune-peptidome analysis by mass spectrometry, and MHC ligand validation by biochemical methods on T cells. PMID:27622028

  14. Cell-Specific Aptamer-Mediated Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are in vitro-selected small, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can specifically recognize their target on the basis of their unique 3-dimensional structures. Recent advances in the development of escort aptamers to deliver and enhance the efficacy of other therapeutic agents have drawn enthusiasm in exploiting cell-type-specific aptamers as drug delivery vehicles. This review mainly focuses on the recent developments of aptamer-mediated targeted delivery systems. We also place particular emphasis on aptamers evolved against cell membrane receptors and possibilities for translation to clinical applications. PMID:21182455

  15. Tagging and Enriching Proteins Enables Cell-Specific Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Thomas S; Bianco, Ambra; Townsley, Fiona M; Fried, Stephen D; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-21

    Cell-specific proteomics in multicellular systems and whole animals is a promising approach to understand the differentiated functions of cells and tissues. Here, we extend our stochastic orthogonal recoding of translation (SORT) approach for the co-translational tagging of proteomes with a cyclopropene-containing amino acid in response to diverse codons in genetically targeted cells, and create a tetrazine-biotin probe containing a cleavable linker that offers a way to enrich and identify tagged proteins. We demonstrate that SORT with enrichment, SORT-E, efficiently recovers and enriches SORT tagged proteins and enables specific identification of enriched proteins via mass spectrometry, including low-abundance proteins. We show that tagging at distinct codons enriches overlapping, but distinct sets of proteins, suggesting that tagging at more than one codon enhances proteome coverage. Using SORT-E, we accomplish cell-specific proteomics in the fly. These results suggest that SORT-E will enable the definition of cell-specific proteomes in animals during development, disease progression, and learning and memory. PMID:27447048

  16. Engineered antigen-specific human regulatory T cells: immunosuppression of FVIII-specific T- and B-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Chan; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Su, Yan; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Rossi, Robert J.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Pratt, Kathleen P.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of human regulatory T cells (Tregs) for clinical applications offers great promise for the treatment of undesirable immune responses in autoimmunity, transplantation, allergy, and antidrug antibody responses, including inhibitor responses in hemophilia A patients. However, polyclonal Tregs are nonspecific and therefore could potentially cause global immunosuppression. To avoid this undesirable outcome, the generation of antigen-specific Tregs would be advantageous. Herein, we report the production and properties of engineered antigen-specific Tregs, created by transduction of a recombinant T-cell receptor obtained from a hemophilia A subject’s T-cell clone, into expanded human FoxP3+ Tregs. Such engineered factor VIII (FVIII)-specific Tregs efficiently suppressed the proliferation and cytokine production of FVIII-specific T-effector cells. Moreover, studies with an HLA-transgenic, FVIII-deficient mouse model demonstrated that antibody production from FVIII-primed spleen cells in vitro were profoundly inhibited in the presence of these FVIII-specific Tregs, suggesting potential utility to treat anti-FVIII inhibitory antibody formation in hemophilia A patients. PMID:25498909

  17. Specific Visualization of Glioma Cells in Living Low-Grade Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Caarls, Wouter; de Vries, Anthony H. B.; Hagen, Guy M.; Jovin, Thomas M.; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rohde, Veit; Giese, Alf; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The current therapy of malignant gliomas is based on surgical resection, radio-chemotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent retrospective case-series have highlighted the significance of the extent of resection as a prognostic factor predicting the course of the disease. Complete resection in low-grade gliomas that show no MRI-enhanced images are especially difficult. The aim in this study was to develop a robust, specific, new fluorescent probe for glioma cells that is easy to apply to live tumor biopsies and could identify tumor cells from normal brain cells at all levels of magnification. Methodology/Principal Findings In this investigation we employed brightly fluorescent, photostable quantum dots (QDs) to specifically target epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that is upregulated in many gliomas. Living glioma and normal cells or tissue biopsies were incubated with QDs coupled to EGF and/or monoclonal antibodies against EGFR for 30 minutes, washed and imaged. The data include results from cell-culture, animal model and ex vivo human tumor biopsies of both low-grade and high-grade gliomas and show high probe specificity. Tumor cells could be visualized from the macroscopic to single cell level with contrast ratios as high as 1000: 1 compared to normal brain tissue. Conclusions/Significance The ability of the targeted probes to clearly distinguish tumor cells in low-grade tumor biopsies, where no enhanced MRI image was obtained, demonstrates the great potential of the method. We propose that future application of specifically targeted fluorescent particles during surgery could allow intraoperative guidance for the removal of residual tumor cells from the resection cavity and thus increase patient survival. PMID:20614029

  18. Differences in pyrimidine dimer removal between rat skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mullaart, E.; Lohman, P.H.; Vijg, J.

    1988-03-01

    Pyrimidine dimers, the most abundant type of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light (UV), are rapidly repaired in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. In the same cell type from rats, however, there is hardly any removal of such dimers. To investigate whether this low capacity of rat skin cells to repair lesions in their DNA is an inherent characteristic of this species or an artifact due to cell culturing, we measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from rat epidermal keratinocytes both in vitro and in vivo. Epidermal keratinocytes in vitro were unable to remove any dimers over the first 3 h after UV-irradiation, while only about 20% was removed during a repair period of 24 h. In this respect, these cells were not different from cultured rat fibroblasts. In contrast to the results obtained with keratinocytes in vitro, we observed a rapid repair of pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated keratinocytes in vivo over the first 3 h; this rapid repair phase was followed by a much slower repair phase between 3 and 24 h. These results are discussed in terms of the possibility that mammalian cells are able to switch from one DNA repair pathway to another.

  19. Artesunate exerts specific cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cells via CD71.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Wang, Han; Kunda, Patricilia; Chen, Xuemei; Liu, Qiu-Ling; Liu, Tao

    2013-09-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is an intraocular cancer that affects young children. There is an ongoing effort to find new agents for RB management that are effective, specific and with few side-effects. In the present study, we tested artesunate (ART), a synthetic derivative from the herbal drug artemisinin, used in the clinic for the treatment of malaria. We analyzed ART cytotoxicity in an RB cell line (RB-Y79) and in a retinal epithelial cell line (hTERT-RPE1) by flow cytometric analysis (FCM). We related the effect of ART to the expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR-1, also known as CD71) by knocking down CD71 with RNAi and analyzing cell cycle variables by FCM. We found that the cytotoxic action of ART is specific for RB cells in a dose-dependent manner, with low toxicity in normal retina cells. ART is more effective in RB than carboplatin with a markedly strong cytotoxic effect on carboplatin-resistant RB cells. RB had higher CD71 levels at the membrane compared to normal retinal cells. We showed that ART internalization in RB cells is dependent upon the expression of the CD71. In addition, ART blocked the cell cycle progression at the G1 phase, even at low doses, and decreased the proportion of RB cells in the S phase. In conclusion, we showed that ART is a promising drug exhibiting high selective cytotoxicity even against multidrug-resistant RB cells. Thus, we suggest that ART could be used in the treatment of RB. PMID:23818062

  20. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  1. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs. PMID:26901739

  2. Removal of ammonia nitrogen from wastewater using an aerobic cathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Li; Zhao, Qin; Tao, Guanhong

    2013-10-01

    A new system for removing ammonia nitrogen was developed, which integrated a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an aerobic bioreactor. A three-chamber reactor consisted of an anode chamber, a middle chamber and a cathode chamber. The chambers were separated by an anion exchange membrane and a cation exchange membrane (CEM), respectively. Driven by the power generated by the MFC, NH4(+) in the middle chamber could migrate through CEM into the cathode chamber. The migrated NH4(+) further removed via biological denitrification in the cathode chamber. Up to 90.2% of total NH4(+)-N could be removed with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L in 98 h. Affecting factors were investigated on the removal efficiency including cathode surface area, electrode spacing, chemical oxygen demand concentration, dissolved oxygen concentration, and NH4(+)-N concentration. The system was characterized by simple configuration and high efficiency, and was successfully applied to the treatment of brewery wastewater.

  3. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (<6%) was observed in all treatments of the HER2- cell line (BALB/3T3) and in treatments the HER2+ cell line (3T3/HER2) with light or trastuzumab only. There was significant light-induced cell death in HER2 expressing cells using Tra-TAM (3% dead without light, 20% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2) and Tra-Rho6G (5% dead without light, 22% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2). No efficacy was observed in treatment with Tra-RhoB, which was also non-specifically taken up by BALB/3T3 cells and which had weaker PS-antibody interactions (as demonstrated by visualization of protein and fluorescence on SDS-PAGE).

  4. Specific uptake of serotonin by murine lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.C.; Walker, R.F.; Brooks, W.H.; Roszman, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the authors confirmed and extended earlier observations that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) can influence immune function. Both 5HT and its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan inhibit the primary, in vivo antibody response to sheep red blood cells, in mice. Here, the authors report specific in vitro association of this amine with mouse splenocytes. Spleen cells from 6-8 week old CBA/J mice incorporated /sup 3/H-5HT(10/sup -8/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/M) in a saturable manner, at 37/sup 0/C. Specificity of uptake was indicated by competition with excess (10/sup -5/M) unlabelled 5HT and with 10/sup -5/M fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of active 5HT reuptake in rat brain. The 5HT receptor antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, also blocked 5HT uptake. Cell lysis and displacement studies revealed largely intracellular accumulation of /sup 3/H-5HT with little membrane association, in splenocytes. Hofstee analysis of uptake kinetics yielded an apparent Km of 0.82 +/- 0.22 x 10/sup -7/M and Vmax of 501 +/- 108 pM/3 x 10/sup 6/ cells/10 min. Spleen cells fractionated on Sephadex G10 showed virtually no specific 5HT uptake while peritoneal exudate cells from thioglycollate treated mice displayed 5HT uptake kinetics similar to those of splenocytes. The site of specific /sup 3/H-5HT incorporation within a population of spleen cells and the functional significance of this phenomenon to immunomodulation by 5HT remain to be elucidated.

  5. Neuropeptides, via specific receptors, regulate T cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Levite, M; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Steinman, L; Lider, O

    1998-01-15

    The ability of T cells to adhere to and interact with components of the blood vessel walls and the extracellular matrix is essential for their extravasation and migration into inflamed sites. We have found that the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of resting human T cells to fibronectin, a major glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix, is induced by physiologic concentrations of three neuropeptides: calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin; each acts via its own specific receptor on the T cell membrane. In contrast, substance P (SP), which coexists with CGRP in the majority of peripheral endings of sensory nerves, including those innervating the lymphoid organs, blocks T cell adhesion to fibronectin when induced by CGRP, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, and PMA. Inhibition of T cell adhesion was obtained both by the intact SP peptide and by its 1-4 N-terminal and its 4-11, 5-11, and 6-11 C-terminal fragments, used at similar nanomolar concentrations. The inhibitory effects of the parent SP peptide and its fragments were abrogated by an SP NK-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting they all act through the same SP NK-1 receptor. These findings suggest that neuropeptides, by activating their specific T cell-expressed receptors, can provide the T cells with both positive (proadhesive) and negative (antiadhesive) signals and thereby regulate their function. Thus, neuropeptides may influence diverse physiologic processes involving integrins, including leukocyte-mediated migration and inflammation. PMID:9551939

  6. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  7. Specific adhesion of carcinoembryonic antigen-bearing colorectal cancer cells to immobilized carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Levin, L V; Griffin, T W

    1991-11-01

    Recent characterization of the genomic structure of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is consistent with that of a cellular adhesion molecule. To examine this function in colorectal cancer, the adherence of cell lines to microtiter wells coated with CEA and well-described adhesive molecules was determined. The CEA-positive cell line LoVo and the CEA-devoid cell line H-Meso-1 did not differ in adherence to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen and fibronectin, whereas LoVo cells adhered to CEA (10 micrograms/well) in a specific manner (43% bound cells vs. 1.5% bound cells with BSA or alpha-acidglycoprotein controls, P less than 0.01) while H-MESO-1 showed no adhesion to CEA (less than 0.6% bound cells). This adhesion of LoVo cells to CEA was not affected by co-incubation of cells with EDTA, sodium azide, or at 23 degrees C. However, the CEA to CEA adhesive interaction was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the N-terminal domain of the CEA molecule, and decreased by enzymatic removal of CEA from the LoVo cell membrane. The extent of adhesion to immobilized CEA by four CEA-producing cell lines (LoVo, HT29, LS174T and LS174-S), correlated with membrane CEA expression as determined by FACS analysis. The results of these experiments add support to the concept that CEA may function as a specific homotypic cellular adhesion molecule for colorectal cancer cells.

  8. Cell-specific cytotoxicity of dextran-stabilized magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jing; Tao, Ke; Li, Jiyu; Song, Sheng; Sun, Kang

    2010-08-01

    Cytotoxicity of dextran-hybridized magnetite nanoparticles which were prepared by a novel polyol method was evaluated by incubation with four different kinds of cells, including rat liver cells BRL 3A, renal cells NRK, astrocyte and periphery blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The study was designed not only to evaluate their cytotoxicity but also to reflect the interaction between nanoparticles and related cells in their circulation processes. By fluorescent-activated cell sorting technique, it was found that the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles is cell-specific. Under the concentrations in our study (0-128 mg/mL), the nanoparticles lead to the apoptosis of PBMC in a concentration-dependant manner, but have almost no influence on the other kinds of cells. TEM images demonstrate that the nanoparticles were endocytosed by BRL 3A, NRK and astrocyte, and result in the apoptosis of PBMC without the observation of the uptaking process. The results suggest that the related cells in nanoparticles cycling process should also be concerned for the cytotoxicity evaluation.

  9. Molecular Insights for Optimizing T Cell Receptor Specificity Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hebeisen, Michael; Oberle, Susanne G.; Presotto, Danilo; Speiser, Daniel E.; Zehn, Dietmar; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8 T cells mediate immunity to pathogens and they are able to eliminate malignant cells. Immunity to viruses and bacteria primarily involves CD8 T cells bearing high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs), which are specific to pathogen-derived (non-self) antigens. Given the thorough elimination of high affinity self/tumor-antigen reactive T cells by central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms, anti-cancer immunity mostly depends on TCRs with intermediate-to-low affinity for self-antigens. Because of this, a promising novel therapeutic approach to increase the efficacy of tumor-reactive T cells is to engineer their TCRs, with the aim to enhance their binding kinetics to pMHC complexes, or to directly manipulate the TCR-signaling cascades. Such manipulations require a detailed knowledge on how pMHC-TCR and co-receptors binding kinetics impact the T cell response. In this review, we present the current knowledge in this field. We discuss future challenges in identifying and targeting the molecular mechanisms to enhance the function of natural or TCR-affinity optimized T cells, and we provide perspectives for the development of protective anti-tumor T cell responses. PMID:23801991

  10. Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

    2006-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

  11. Endoscopic Removal of Granular Cell Tumors of Stomach: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Ramakrishnan, Ravi; Menon, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal granular cell tumors (GCTs), usually benign, soft-tissue tumors, are thought to arise from Schwann cells that may occur at many sites. Only 5-7% of these lesions are detected in the gastrointestinal tract. Histologically, it is composed of sheets or nests of plump round or polygonal cells having abundant slightly amphophilic granular cytoplasm with centrally located uniform pyknotic nuclei and immunohistochemical staining for S-100 protein supports the proposed derivation from Schwann cells. In this study, we reported a case of a solitary GCT of the stomach that was completely removed after endoscopic submuscosal resection.

  12. Substrate replenishment and byproduct removal improve yeast cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Schoborg, Jennifer A; Hodgman, C Eric; Anderson, Mark J; Jewett, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) platforms are now considered a powerful tool for synthesizing a variety of proteins at scales from pL to 100 L with accelerated process development pipelines. We previously reported the advancement of a novel yeast-based CFPS platform. Here, we studied factors that cause termination of yeast CFPS batch reactions. Specifically, we characterized the substrate and byproduct concentrations in batch, fed-batch, and semi-continuous reaction formats through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and chemical assays. We discovered that creatine phosphate, the secondary energy substrate, and nucleoside triphosphates were rapidly degraded during batch CFPS, causing a significant drop in the reaction's energy charge (E.C.) and eventual termination of protein synthesis. As a consequence of consuming creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate accumulated as a toxic byproduct. Additionally, we measured amino acid concentrations and found that aspartic acid was rapidly consumed. By adopting a semi-continuous reaction format, where passive diffusion enables substrate replenishment and byproduct removal, we achieved over a 70% increase in active superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) as compared with the batch system. This study identifies targets for the future improvement of the batch yeast CFPS reaction. Moreover, it outlines a detailed, generalized method to characterize and improve other CFPS platforms.

  13. Routine detection of Epstein-Barr virus specific T-cells in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to detect cytomegalovirus-specific T-cells (CD4(+)) in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry has been recently described by Picker et al. In this method, cells are incubated with viral antigen and responding (cytokine producing) T-cells are then identified by flow cytometry. To date, this technique has not been reliably used to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T-cells primarily due to the superantigen/mitogenic properties of the virus which non-specifically activate T-cells. By modifying culture conditions under which the antigens are presented, we have overcome this limitation and developed an assay to detect and quantitate EBV-specific T-cells. The detection of cytokine producing T-cells by flow cytometry requires an extremely strong signal (such as culture in the presence of PMA and ionomycin). Our data indicate that in modified culture conditions (early removal of viral antigen) the non-specific activation of T-cells by EBV is reduced, but antigen presentation will continue uninhibited. Using this method, EBV-specific T-cells may be legitimately detected using flow cytometry. No reduction in the numbers of antigen-specific T-cells was observed by the early removal of target antigen when verified using cytomegalovirus antigen (a virus with no non-specific T-cell activation properties). In EBV-seropositive individuals, the phenotype of the EBV-specific cytokine producing T-cells was evaluated using four-color flow cytometry and found to be CD45(+), CD3(+), CD4(+), CD45RA(-), CD69(+), CD25(-). This phenotype indicates the stimulation of circulating previously unactivated memory T-cells. No cytokine production was observed in CD4(+) T-cells from EBV-seronegative individuals, confirming the specificity of this assay. In addition, the use of four color cytometry (CD45, CD3, CD69, IFNgamma/IL-2) allows the total quantitative assessment of EBV-specific T-cells while monitoring the interference of EBV non-specific mitogenic activity. This method may

  14. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  15. Cell state-specific metabolic dependency in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Israelsen, William J.; Lee, Dongjun; Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Jeanson, Nathaniel T.; Clish, Clary B; Cantley, Lewis C.; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Scadden, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The balance between oxidative and non-oxidative glucose metabolism is essential for a number of pathophysiological processes. By deleting enzymes that affect aerobic glycolysis with different potencies, we examine how modulating glucose metabolism specifically affects hematopoietic and leukemic cell populations. We find that deficiency in the M2 pyruvate kinase isoform (PKM2) reduces levels of metabolic intermediates important for biosynthesis and impairs progenitor function without perturbing hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), whereas lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDHA) deletion significantly inhibits the function of both HSC and progenitors during hematopoiesis. In contrast, leukemia initiation by transforming alleles putatively affecting either HSC or progenitors is inhibited in the absence of either PKM2 or LDHA, indicating that the cell state-specific responses to metabolic manipulation in hematopoiesis do not apply to the setting of leukemia. This finding suggests that fine-tuning the level of glycolysis may be therapeutically explored for treating leukemia while preserving HSC function. PMID:25215489

  16. Specific RNA-cleaving activities from HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, S; Yehle, C O; Robertson, H D; Dickson, E

    1980-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation of HeLa cells was carried out under gentle conditions to isolate enzymes that cleave RNA precursors in a specific manner. Four separate activities--cleavage of HeLa cell heterogeneous nuclear RNA, the HeLa cell 45S rRNA precursor, RNA . DNA hybrids (RNase H), and the Escherichia coli tRNATyr precursor (RNase P)--were revealed by these studies. The specificity and limited nature of these cleavages suggest that they are due to eukaryotic RNA-processing enzymes. The virtual absence of random nucleases from these enzymes was demonstrated by their inability to cleave the 8000-base early mRNA precursor of bacteriophage T7, E. coli 30S rRNA precursor, or HeLa cytoplasmic poly(A)-containing RNA. Images PMID:6930639

  17. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  18. Human polymorphonuclear neutrophils specifically recognize and kill cancerous cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Kloecker, Goetz; Fleming, Chris; Bousamra, Michael; Hansen, Richard; Hu, Xiaoling; Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Xiang, Dong; Donninger, Howard; Eaton, John W; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the main effectors of the innate immune system, have rarely been considered as an anticancer therapeutic tool. However, recent investigations using animal models and preliminary clinical studies have highlighted the potential antitumor efficacy of PMNs. In the current study, we find that PMNs from some healthy donors naturally have potent cancer-killing activity against 4 different human cancer cell lines. The killing activity appears to be cancer cell-specific since PMNs did not kill primary normal epithelial cells or an immortalized breast epithelial cell line. Transfecting the immortalized mammary cells with plasmids expressing activated forms of the rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Ras) and teratocarcinoma oncogene 21 (TC21) oncogenes was sufficient to provoke aggressive attack by PMNs. However, transfection with activated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac1) was ineffective, suggesting specificity in PMN-targeting of neoplastic cells. Furthermore, PMNs from lung cancer patients were also found to exhibit relatively poor cancer-killing activity compared to the cytolytic activity of the average healthy donor. Taken together, our results suggest that PMN-based treatment regimens may represent a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy that may be easily introduced into the clinic to benefit a subset of patients with PMN-vulnerable tumors. PMID:25610737

  19. Branch-specific heterosynaptic facilitation in Aplysia siphon sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, G A; Kandel, E R

    1984-04-01

    Aplysia siphon sensory cells exhibit heterosynaptic facilitation of transmitter release during both sensitization and classical conditioning of the siphon withdrawal response. In the present study, we asked whether facilitation must invariably enhance transmission at all terminals of a neuron or whether facilitation can instead occur at one set of terminals without also occurring at other terminals of the same cell. To examine this question, we compared effects of local application of serotonin and of connective stimulation on transmission at central and peripheral branches of single sensory cells. We found that heterosynaptic facilitation can be branch-specific and can occur at either central or peripheral synapses independently. We also found that siphon sensory cells exhibit homosynaptic post-tetanic potentiation, allowing us to compare effects of hetero- and homosynaptic facilitation in the same cells. By contrast to heterosynaptic facilitation, homosynaptic facilitation occurs concomitantly at both central and peripheral synapses of siphon sensory cells. Thus, while both heterosynaptic and homosynaptic facilitation involve increases in transmitter release from sensory neuron terminals, heterosynaptic facilitation provides a greater specificity and flexibility in the modification of synaptic connections.

  20. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  1. Dendritic Cells Coordinate the Development and Homeostasis of Organ-Specific Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Daniel S; Gilmore, Dana C; Berger, Julian M; Nishi, Saki; Lee, Victoria; Malchow, Sven; Kline, Douglas E; Kline, Justin; Vander Griend, Donald J; Huang, Haochu; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-04-19

    Although antigen recognition mediated by the T cell receptor (TCR) influences many facets of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell biology, including development and function, the cell types that present antigen to Treg cells in vivo remain largely undefined. By tracking a clonal population of Aire-dependent, prostate-specific Treg cells in mice, we demonstrated an essential role for dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating organ-specific Treg cell biology. We have shown that the thymic development of prostate-specific Treg cells required antigen presentation by DCs. Moreover, Batf3-dependent CD8α(+) DCs were dispensable for the development of this clonotype and had negligible impact on the polyclonal Treg cell repertoire. In the periphery, CCR7-dependent migratory DCs coordinated the activation of organ-specific Treg cells in the prostate-draining lymph nodes. Our results demonstrate that the development and peripheral regulation of organ-specific Treg cells are dependent on antigen presentation by DCs, implicating DCs as key mediators of organ-specific immune tolerance.

  2. Identification and manipulation of antigen specific T-cells with artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Koffeman, Eva; Keogh, Elissa; Klein, Mark; Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    T-cells specific for a particular antigen represent a small percentage of the overall T-cell population. Detecting the presence of antigen specific T-cells in patients, animal models or populations of cultured cells has presented a challenge to researchers. The T-cell capture method described here utilizes a truly artificial method of antigen presentation and requires only 50,000 cells for the detection of the major histomcompatibility complex (MHC) class II and antigen restricted T-cells. With this method, liposomes, prepared with readily available materials, are loaded with neutravidin "rafts" comprised of MHC/peptide complexes, anti-CD28, a costimulatory molecule, and anti-LFA-1, an adhesion molecule. These artificial APCs are easily manipulated to include any MHC, antibodies to cell surface markers and/or costimulatory signals of interest thereby enabling not only T-cell identification but also the manipulation of mechanisms of T-cell activation. PMID:17983141

  3. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Verghese, Arun; Byers, Stephen W; Ochs, Michael; Tozeren, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Signaling

  4. Automated Analysis of Cell Cycle Phase-Specific DNA Damage Reveals Phase-Specific Differences in Cell Sensitivity to Etoposide.

    PubMed

    Luzhin, Artem V; Velichko, Artem K; Razin, Sergey V; Kantidze, Omar L

    2016-10-01

    The comet assay is one of the most widely used approaches for detecting DNA damage; generally, it provides information on the cell population-averaged level of DNA damage. Here, we present an automatic technique for easy measurement of standard comet characteristics and an annotation of the cell cycle phase of each comet. The approach includes the modified neutral comet assay and a pipeline for CellProfiler software designed to analyze DNA damage-related characteristics and annotate the cell cycle phase of each comet. Using this technique we have performed cell cycle phase-specific analysis of DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase II poison etoposide and have shown that the sensitivity of cells to this drug dramatically differed according to their cell cycle phase. It became evident from our results that the proposed protocol provides important additional information that often remains hidden in a standard comet analysis of an asynchronous cell population. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2209-2214, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mechanism of Oligonucleotide Uptake by Cells: Involvement of Specific receptors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubov, Leonid A.; Deeva, Elena A.; Zarytova, Valentina F.; Ivanova, Eugenia M.; Ryte, Antonina S.; Yurchenko, Lyudmila V.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    1989-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of oligonucleotides and their alkylating derivatives with mammalian cells. In experiments with L929 mouse fibroblast and Krebs 2 ascites carcinoma cells, it was found that cellular uptake of oligodeoxynucleotide derivatives is achieved by an endocytosis mechanism. Uptake is considerably more efficient at low oligomer concentration (< 1 μ M), because at this concentration a significant percentage of the total oligomer pool is absorbed on the cell surface and internalized by a more efficient absorptive endocytosis process. Two modified proteins were detected in mouse fibroblasts that were treated with the alkylating oligonucleotide derivatives. The binding of the oligomers to the proteins is inhibited by other oligodeoxynucleotides, single- and double-stranded DNA, and RNA. The polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfates A and B do not inhibit binding. These observations suggest the involvement of specific receptor proteins in binding of oligomers to mammalian cells.

  6. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Joana; Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Carvalho, Sofia B.; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M.; Altevogt, Peter; Costa, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs) and total cell membranes (MBs) from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. PMID:26248080

  7. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Joana; Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Carvalho, Sofia B; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M; Altevogt, Peter; Costa, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs) and total cell membranes (MBs) from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. PMID:26248080

  8. SWI/SNF-directed stem cell lineage specification: dynamic composition regulates specific stages of skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Toto, Paula Coutinho; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Albini, Sonia

    2016-10-01

    SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are key regulators of the epigenetic modifications that determine whether stem cells maintain pluripotency or commit toward specific lineages through development and during postnatal life. Dynamic combinatorial assembly of multiple variants of SWI/SNF subunits is emerging as the major determinant of the functional versatility of SWI/SNF. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of the alternative SWI/SNF complexes that direct stem cell fate toward skeletal muscle lineage and control distinct stages of skeletal myogenesis. In particular, we will refer to recent evidence pointing to the essential role of two SWI/SNF components not expressed in embryonic stem cells-the catalytic subunit BRM and the structural component BAF60C-whose induction in muscle progenitors coincides with the expansion of their transcriptional repertoire. PMID:27207468

  9. SWI/SNF-directed stem cell lineage specification: dynamic composition regulates specific stages of skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Toto, Paula Coutinho; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Albini, Sonia

    2016-10-01

    SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are key regulators of the epigenetic modifications that determine whether stem cells maintain pluripotency or commit toward specific lineages through development and during postnatal life. Dynamic combinatorial assembly of multiple variants of SWI/SNF subunits is emerging as the major determinant of the functional versatility of SWI/SNF. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of the alternative SWI/SNF complexes that direct stem cell fate toward skeletal muscle lineage and control distinct stages of skeletal myogenesis. In particular, we will refer to recent evidence pointing to the essential role of two SWI/SNF components not expressed in embryonic stem cells-the catalytic subunit BRM and the structural component BAF60C-whose induction in muscle progenitors coincides with the expansion of their transcriptional repertoire.

  10. Tcf21 regulates the specification and maturation of proepicardial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Panna; Miteva, Yana V.; Kuchenbrod, Lauren M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Conlon, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    The epicardium is a mesothelial cell layer essential for vertebrate heart development and pertinent for cardiac repair post-injury in the adult. The epicardium initially forms from a dynamic precursor structure, the proepicardial organ, from which cells migrate onto the heart surface. During the initial stage of epicardial development crucial epicardial-derived cell lineages are thought to be determined. Here, we define an essential requirement for transcription factor Tcf21 during early stages of epicardial development in Xenopus, and show that depletion of Tcf21 results in a disruption in proepicardial cell specification and failure to form a mature epithelial epicardium. Using a mass spectrometry-based approach we defined Tcf21 interactions and established its association with proteins that function as transcriptional co-repressors. Furthermore, using an in vivo systems-based approach, we identified a panel of previously unreported proepicardial precursor genes that are persistently expressed in the epicardial layer upon Tcf21 depletion, thereby confirming a primary role for Tcf21 in the correct determination of the proepicardial lineage. Collectively, these studies lead us to propose that Tcf21 functions as a transcriptional repressor to regulate proepicardial cell specification and the correct formation of a mature epithelial epicardium. PMID:23637334

  11. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg RP

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14912.001 PMID:27218453

  12. Specificity of regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells for self-T cell receptor determinants.

    PubMed

    Buenafe, Abigail C; Tsaknaridis, Laura; Spencer, Leslie; Hicks, Kevin S; McMahan, Rachel H; Watson, Lisa; Culbertson, Nicole E; Latocha, Dorian; Wegmann, Keith; Finn, Tom; Bartholomew, Richard; Burrows, Gregory G; Whitham, Ruth; Bourdette, Dennis N; Jones, Richard E; Offner, Halina; Chou, Yuan K; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2004-04-01

    Although the phenotypic and regulatory properties of the CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell lineage (Treg cells) have been well described, the specificities remain largely unknown. We demonstrate here that the CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg population includes the recognition of a broad spectrum of human TCR CDR2 determinants found in the germline V gene repertoire as well as that of a clonotypic nongermline-encoded CDR3beta sequence present in a recombinant soluble T cell receptor (TCR) protein. Regulatory activity was demonstrated in T cell lines responsive to TCR but not in T cell lines responsive to control antigens. Inhibitory activity of TCR-reactive T cells required cell-cell contact and involved CTLA-4, GITR, IL-10, and IL-17. Thus, the T-T regulatory network includes Treg cells with specificity directed toward self-TCR determinants.

  13. Generation of allo-restricted peptide-specific T cells using RNA-pulsed dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Susanne; Geiger, Christiane; Milosevic, Slavoljub; Mosetter, Barbara; Eichenlaub, Sabine; Schendel, Dolores J.

    2012-01-01

    Designer T cells expressing transgenic T cell receptors (TCR) with anti-tumor specificity offer new treatment options for cancer patients. We developed a three phase procedure to identify T cells of high avidity based on the fact that T cells recognizing peptides presented by allogeneic MHC efficiently kill tumor cells. Autologous dendritic cells (DC) are co-transfected with ivt-RNA encoding an allogeneic MHC molecule and a selected antigen to allow them to express allogeneic MHC-peptide complexes that activate allo-restricted peptide-specific T cells. This approach provides great flexibility for obtaining high-avidity T cells as potential sources of TCR for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:22720234

  14. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  15. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  16. Signalling pathways that control vertebrate haematopoietic stem cell specification

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Wilson K.; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are tissue-specific stem cells that replenish all mature blood lineages during the lifetime of an individual. Clinically, HSCs form the foundation of transplantation-based therapies for leukaemias and congenital blood disorders. Researchers have long been interested in understanding the normal signalling mechanisms that specify HSCs in the embryo, in part because recapitulating these requirements in vitro might provide a means to generate immune-compatible HSCs for transplantation. Recent embryological work has demonstrated the existence of previously unknown signalling requirements. Moreover, it is now clear that gene expression in the nearby somite is integrally involved in regulating the transition of the embryonic endothelium to a haemogenic fate. Here, we review current knowledge of the intraembryonic signals required for the specification of HSCs in vertebrates. PMID:23618830

  17. Specific lectin biomarkers for isolation of human pluripotent stem cells identified through array-based glycomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Nakagawa, Masato; Garitaonandia, Ibon; Slavin, Ileana; Altun, Gulsah; Lacharite, Robert M; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Lynch, Candace L; Leonardo, Trevor R; Liu, Ying; Peterson, Suzanne E; Laurent, Louise C; Yamanaka, Shinya; Loring, Jeanne F

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and dependable methods for isolating human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) populations are urgently needed for quality control in basic research and in cell-based therapy applications. Using lectin arrays, we analyzed glycoproteins extracted from 26 hPSC samples and 22 differentiated cell samples, and identified a small group of lectins with distinctive binding signatures that were sufficient to distinguish hPSCs from a variety of non-pluripotent cell types. These specific biomarkers were shared by all the 12 human embryonic stem cell and the 14 human induced pluripotent stem cell samples examined, regardless of the laboratory of origin, the culture conditions, the somatic cell type reprogrammed, or the reprogramming method used. We demonstrated a practical application of specific lectin binding by detecting hPSCs within a differentiated cell population with lectin-mediated staining followed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, and by enriching and purging viable hPSCs from mixed cell populations using lectin-mediated cell separation. Global gene expression analysis showed pluripotency-associated differential expression of specific fucosyltransferases and sialyltransferases, which may underlie these differences in protein glycosylation and lectin binding. Taken together, our results show that protein glycosylation differs considerably between pluripotent and non-pluripotent cells, and demonstrate that lectins may be used as biomarkers to monitor pluripotency in stem cell populations and for removal of viable hPSCs from mixed cell populations. PMID:21894191

  18. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen and phosphorus removal and electricity production in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Luo, Jingjing; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Shaoqi; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo

    2014-07-01

    Performance of a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was evaluated with the influence of cathodic dissolved oxygen (DO). The maximum voltage, coulombic efficiency and maximum power density outputs of MFC decreased from 521 to 303 mV, 52.48% to 23.09% and 530 to 178 mW/m(2) with cathodic DO declining. Furthermore, a great deal of total phosphorus (TP) was removed owing to chemical precipitation (about 80%) and microbial absorption (around 4-17%). COD was first removed in anode chamber (>70%) then in cathode chamber (<5%). Most of nitrogen was removed when the cathodic DO was at low levels. Chemical precipitates formed in cathode chamber were verified as phosphate, carbonate and hydroxyl compound with the aid of scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  19. Simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal coupled with electricity generation in Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Jiqiang; Xie, Zuofu; Li, Wei; Sun, Peide

    2013-02-01

    Two-chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (MFC) using graphite rods as electrodes were operated for simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal coupled with electricity generation. The MFC showed good ability to remove substrates. When the influent sulfide and nitrate concentrations were 780 mg/L and 135.49 mg/L, respectively, the removal percentages of sulfide and nitrate were higher than 90% and the main end products were nitrogen and sulfate. The MFC also showed good ability to generate electricity, and the voltage went up with the rise of influent substrate concentrations. When the external resistance was 1000 Ω, its highest steady voltage was 71 mV. Based on the linear relationship between the electrons released by substrates and accepted by electrode, it was concluded that the electricity generation was coupled with the substrate conversion in the MFC.

  20. Biomimetic fat cell (BFC) preparation and for lindane removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liyan, Song; Youcai, Zhao; Guojian, Wang; Bing, Li; Dongjie, Niu; Xiaoli, Chai

    2007-07-19

    Fat tissue of organism can accumulate hydrophobic chemicals efficiently and the accumulation level has a positive correlation with fat quantity. In this work, based on this characteristic, an innovative agent, that is, biomimetic fat cell (BFC) has been synthesized with interfacial polymerization. BFC has a hydrophobic nucleolus-triolein and hydrophilic membrane-polyamide, through which water, carrying hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), can pass. This process is followed by the accumulation of HOCs. BFC has 97.39% lindane removal ability. This is close to 98.12% lindane removal by powder active carbon (PAC) in aqueous solution and 7 mg/L initial concentration of lindane. BFC can be regenerated easily by organic solvent dialysis in comparison with high temperature or pressure used for PAC regeneration. Lindane removal by BFC may occur through two mechanisms: bioaccumulation by BFC nucleolus-triolein; and adsorption by BFC membrane. Bioaccumulation is the prevailing mechanism.

  1. Statistical Physics of T-Cell Development and Pathogen Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-04-01

    In addition to an innate immune system that battles pathogens in a nonspecific fashion, higher organisms, such as humans, possess an adaptive immune system to combat diverse (and evolving) microbial pathogens. Remarkably, the adaptive immune system mounts pathogen-specific responses, which can be recalled upon reinfection with the same pathogen. It is difficult to see how the adaptive immune system can be preprogrammed to respond specifically to a vast and unknown set of pathogens. Although major advances have been made in understanding pertinent molecular and cellular phenomena, the precise principles that govern many aspects of an immune response are largely unknown. We discuss complementary approaches from statistical mechanics and cell biology that can shed light on how key components of the adaptive immune system, T cells, develop to enable pathogen-specific responses against many diverse pathogens. The mechanistic understanding that emerges has implications for how host genetics may influence the development of T cells with differing responses to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  2. Cell Theory, Specificity, and Reproduction, 1837–1870

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental, but also the reproductive unit of life. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention by historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, i.e. that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question now was whether cells could be considered as independent agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus a stage in the development of the whole organism only. The question was an important one for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as independent agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of differential reproduction as a lawful process. PMID:20934643

  3. Cell theory, specificity, and reproduction, 1837-1870.

    PubMed

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2010-09-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental unit of life, but also the reproductive one. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention from historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, that is, that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question then became one of whether cells could be considered as autonomous agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus only a stage in the development of the whole organism. This question became an important issue for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as autonomous agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of inheritance as a lawful process. PMID:20934643

  4. Cell theory, specificity, and reproduction, 1837-1870.

    PubMed

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2010-09-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental unit of life, but also the reproductive one. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention from historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, that is, that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question then became one of whether cells could be considered as autonomous agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus only a stage in the development of the whole organism. This question became an important issue for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as autonomous agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of inheritance as a lawful process.

  5. Inducible site-specific recombination in myelinating cells.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, Nathalie H; Macklin, Wendy B; Popko, Brian

    2003-01-01

    To explore the function of genes expressed by myelinating cells we have developed a model system that allows for the inducible ablation of predetermined genes in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. The Cre/loxP recombination system provides the opportunity to generate tissue-specific somatic mutations in mice. We have used a fusion protein between the Cre recombinase and a mutated ligand-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor (CreER(T)) to obtain inducible, site-specific recombination. CreER(T) expression was placed under the transcriptional control of the regulatory sequences of the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is abundantly expressed in oligodendrocytes and to a lesser extent in Schwann cells. The CreER(T) fusion protein translocated to the nucleus and mediated the recombination of a LacZ reporter transgene in myelinating cells of PLP/CreER(T) mice injected with the synthetic steroid tamoxifen. In untreated animals CreER(T) remained cytoplasmic, and there was no evidence of recombination. The PLP/ CreER(T) animals should be very useful in elucidating and distinguishing a particular gene's function in the formation and maintenance of the myelin sheath and in analyzing mature oligodendrocyte function in pathological conditions. PMID:12481300

  6. Genetics and Cell Biology of Building Specific Synaptic Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kang; Scheiffele, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of specific synaptic connections during development of the nervous system represents a remarkable example of cellular recognition and differentiation. Neurons employ several different cellular signaling strategies to solve this puzzle, which successively limit unwanted interactions and reduce the number of direct recognition events that are required to result in a specific connectivity pattern. Specificity mechanisms include the action of contact-mediated and long-range signals that support or inhibit synapse formation, which can take place directly between synaptic partners or with transient partners and transient cell populations. The molecular signals that drive the synaptic differentiation process at individual synapses in the central nervous system are similarly diverse and act through multiple, parallel differentiation pathways. This molecular complexity balances the need for central circuits to be assembled with high accuracy during development while retaining plasticity for local and dynamic regulation. PMID:20367446

  7. Arsenite removal from aqueous solution by a microbial fuel cell-zerovalent iron hybrid process.

    PubMed

    Xue, An; Shen, Zhong-Zheng; Zhao, Bin; Zhao, Hua-Zhang

    2013-10-15

    Conventional zerovalent iron (ZVI) technology has low arsenic removal efficiency because of the slow ZVI corrosion rate. In this study, microbial fuel cell (MFC)-zerovalent iron (MFC-ZVI) hybrid process has been constructed and used to remove arsenite (As(III)) from aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that the ZVI corrosion directly utilizes the low-voltage electricity generated by MFC in the hybrid process and both the ZVI corrosion rate and arsenic removal efficiency are therefore substantially increased. The resultant water qualities are compliant with the recommended standards of EPA and WHO. Compared to the ZVI process alone, the H2O2 generation rate and output are dramatically improved in MFC-ZVI hybrid process. Strong oxidants derived from H2O2 can rapidly oxidize As(III) into arsenate (As(V)), which helps to improve the As(III) removal efficiency. The distribution analysis of As and Fe indicates that the As/Fe molar ratio of the flocs in solution is much higher in the MFC-ZVI hybrid process. This phenomenon results from the different arsenic species and hydrous ferric oxides species in these two processes. In addition, the electrosorption effect in the MFC-ZVI hybrid process also contributed to the arsenic removal by concentrating As(V) in the vicinity of the iron electrode.

  8. Multi-chamber microbial desalination cell for improved organic matter and dissolved solids removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Harapriya; Ghangrekar, M M

    2014-01-01

    A five-chamber microbial desalination cell (MDC) with anode, cathode, one central desalination chamber and two concentrate chambers separated by ion exchange membranes was operated in batch mode for more than 60 days. The performance of the MDC was evaluated for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, total dissolved solids (TDS) removal and energy production. An average COD removal of 81 ± 2.1% was obtained using acetate-fed wastewater as substrate in the anodic chamber inoculated with mixed anaerobic sludge. TDS removals of 58, 70 and 78% were observed with salt concentration of 8, 20 and 30 g/L, respectively, in the middle desalination chamber. The MDC produced a maximum power output of 16.87 mW/m(2) during polarization. The highest Coulombic efficiency of 12 ± 2.4% was observed in this system using mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculum. The system effectively demonstrated capability for simultaneous organic matter removal and desalination along with power generation.

  9. Removing heavy metals from synthetic effluents using "kamikaze" Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Lavinia; Paraschivescu, Codruta; Matache, Mihaela; Avramescu, Sorin; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    One key step of the bioremediation processes designed to clean up heavy metal contaminated environments is growing resistant cells that accumulate the heavy metals to ensure better removal through a combination of biosorption and continuous metabolic uptake after physical adsorption. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells can easily act as cation biosorbents, but isolation of mutants that are both hyperaccumulating and tolerant to heavy metals proved extremely difficult. Instead, mutants that are hypersensitive to heavy metals due to increased and continuous uptake from the environment were considered, aiming to use such mutants to reduce the heavy metal content of contaminated waters. In this study, the heavy metal hypersensitive yeast strain pmr1Delta was investigated for the ability to remove Mn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, or Cd2+ from synthetic effluents. Due to increased metal accumulation, the mutant strain was more efficient than the wild-type in removing Mn2+, Cu2+, or Co2+ from synthetic effluents containing 1-2 mM cations, with a selectivity and also in removing Mn2+ and Cd2+ from synthetic effluents containing 20-50 microM cations, with a selectivity Mn2+ > Cd2+. PMID:19795117

  10. Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air cathode.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kyle S; Drew, David M; He, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) hold great promise for drinking water production because of potential energy savings during the desalination process. In this study, we developed a continuously operated MDC--upflow microbial desalination cell (UMDC) for the purpose of salt removal. During the 4-month operation, the UMDC constantly removed salts and generated bio-electricity. At a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days (salt solution) and current production of ∼62 mA, the UMDC was able to remove more than 99% of NaCl from the salt solution that had an initial salt concentration of 30 g total dissolved solids (TDS)/L. In addition, the TDS removal rate was 7.50 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (salt solution volume) or 5.25 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (wastewater volume), and the desalinated water met the drinking water standard, in terms of TDS concentration. A high charge transfer efficiency of 98.6% or 81% was achieved at HRT 1 or 4d. The UMDC produced a maximum power density of 30.8 W/m(3). The phenomena of bipolar electrodialysis and proton transport in the UMDC were discussed. These results demonstrated the potential of the UMDC as either a sole desalination process or a pre-desalination reactor for downstream desalination processes.

  11. Pathogen-Specific T Cell Polyfunctionality Is a Correlate of T Cell Efficacy and Immune Protection

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Anders; Almeida, Jorge R.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Sauce, Delphine; Seder, Robert A.; Appay, Victor; Gorochov, Guy; Larsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Understanding the factors that delineate the efficacy of T cell responses towards pathogens is crucial for our ability to develop potent therapies against infectious diseases. Multidimensional evaluation of T cell functionality at the single-cell level enables exhaustive analysis of combinatorial functional properties, hence polyfunctionality. We have recently invented an algorithm that quantifies polyfunctionality, the Polyfunctionality Index (Larsen et al. PLoS One 2012). Here we demonstrate that quantitative assessment of T cell polyfunctionality correlates with T cell efficacy measured as the capacity to kill target cells in vitro and control infection in vivo. Methods We employed the polyfunctionality index on two datasets selected for their unique ability to evaluate the polyfunctional imprint on T cell efficacy. 1) HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and 2) Leishmania major-specific CD4+ T cells were analysed for their capacity to secrete multiple effector molecules, kill target cells and control infection. Briefly, employing the Polyfunctionality Index algorithm we determined the parameter estimates resulting in optimal correlation between T cell polyfunctionality and T cell efficacy. Results T cell polyfunctionality is correlated with T cell efficacy measured as 1) target killing (r=0.807, P<0.0001) and 2) lesion size upon challenge with Leishmania major (r=-0.50, P=0.004). Contrary to an approach relying on the Polyfunctionality Index algorithm, quantitative evaluation of T cell polyfunctionality traditionally ignores the gradual contribution of more or less polyfunctional T cells. Indeed, comparing both approaches we show that optimal description of T cell efficacy is obtained when gradually integrating all levels of polyfunctionality in accordance with the Polyfunctionality Index. Conclusions Our study presents a generalizable methodology to objectively evaluate the impact of polyfunctionality on T cell efficacy. We show that T cell polyfunctionality

  12. Identification and Specification of the Mouse Skeletal Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Charles K.F.; Seo, Eun Young; Chen, James Y.; Lo, David; McArdle, Adrian; Sinha, Rahul; Tevlin, Ruth; Seita, Jun; Vincent-Tompkins, Justin; Wearda, Taylor; Lu, Wan-Jin; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Chung, Michael T.; Marecic, Owen; Tran, Misha; Yan, Kelley S.; Upton, Rosalynd; Walmsley, Graham G.; Lee, Andrew S.; Sahoo, Debashis; Kuo, Calvin; Weissman, Irving L.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How are skeletal tissues derived from skeletal stem cells? Here, we map bone, cartilage and stromal development from a population of highly pure, post-natal skeletal stem cells (mouse Skeletal Stem Cell, mSSC) to its downstream progenitors of bone, cartilage and stromal tissue. We then investigated the transcriptome of the stem/progenitor cells for unique gene expression patterns that would indicate potential regulators of mSSC lineage commitment. We demonstrate that mSSC niche factors can be potent inducers of osteogenesis, and several specific combinations of recombinant mSSC niche factors can activate mSSC genetic programs in situ, even in non-skeletal tissues, resulting in de novo formation of cartilage or bone and bone marrow stroma. Inducing mSSC formation with soluble factors and subsequently regulating the mSSC niche to specify its differentiation towards bone, cartilage, or stromal cells could represent a paradigm shift in the therapeutic regeneration of skeletal tissues. PMID:25594184

  13. Degradation of organelles or specific organelle components via selective autophagy in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Simon; Galili, Gad

    2014-05-05

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a cellular mechanism dedicated to the degradation and recycling of unnecessary cytosolic components by their removal to the lytic compartment of the cell (the vacuole in plants). Autophagy is generally induced by stresses causing energy deprivation and its operation occurs by special vesicles, termed autophagosomes. Autophagy also operates in a selective manner, recycling specific components, such as organelles, protein aggregates or even specific proteins, and selective autophagy is implicated in both cellular housekeeping and response to stresses. In plants, selective autophagy has recently been shown to degrade mitochondria, plastids and peroxisomes, or organelle components such as the endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) membrane and chloroplast-derived proteins such as Rubisco. This ability places selective-autophagy as a major factor in cellular steady-state maintenance, both under stress and favorable environmental conditions. Here we review the recent advances documented in plants for this cellular process and further discuss its impact on plant physiology.

  14. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment. PMID:26855752

  15. Cell specific electrodes for neuronal network reconstruction and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bendali, Amel; Bouguelia, Sihem; Roupioz, Yoann; Forster, Valérie; Mailley, Pascal; Benosman, Ryad; Livache, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2014-07-01

    Direct interfacing of neurons with electronic devices has been investigated for both prosthetic and neuro-computing applications. In vitro neuronal networks provide great tools not only for improving neuroprostheses but also to take advantage of their computing abilities. However, it is often difficult to organize neuronal networks according to specific cell distributions. Our aim was to develop a cell-type specific immobilization of neurons on individual electrodes to produce organized in vitro neuronal networks on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). We demonstrate the selective capture of retinal neurons on antibody functionalized surfaces following the formation of self-assembled monolayers from protein-thiol conjugates by simple contact and protein-polypyrrole deposits by electrochemical functionalization. This neuronal selection was achieved on gold for either cone photoreceptors or retinal ganglion neurons using a PNA lectin or a Thy1 antibody, respectively. Anti-fouling of un-functionalized gold surfaces was optimized to increase the capture efficiencies. The technique was extended to electrode arrays by addressing electropolymerization of pyrrole monomers and pyrrole-protein conjugates to active electrodes. Retinal ganglion cell recording on the array further demonstrated the integrity of these neurons following their selection on polypyrrole-coated electrodes. Therefore, this protein-polypyrrole electrodeposition could provide a new approach to generate organized in vitro neuronal networks.

  16. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  17. Cell growth inhibition by sequence-specific RNA minihelices.

    PubMed Central

    Hipps, D; Schimmel, P

    1995-01-01

    RNA minihelices which reconstruct the 12 base pair acceptor-T psi C domains of transfer RNAs interact with their cognate tRNA synthetases. These substrates lack the anticodons of the genetic code and, therefore, cannot participate in steps of protein synthesis subsequent to aminoacylation. We report here that expression in Escherichia coli of either of two minihelices, each specific for a different amino acid, inhibited cell growth. Inhibition appears to be due to direct competition between the minihelix and its related tRNA for binding to their common synthetase. This competition, in turn, sharply lowers the pool of the specific charged tRNA for protein synthesis. Inhibition is relieved by single nucleotide changes which disrupt the minihelix-synthetase interaction. The results suggest that sequence-specific RNA minihelix substrates bind to cognate synthetases in vivo and can, in principle, act as cell growth regulators. Naturally occurring non-tRNA substrates for aminoacylation may serve a similar purpose. Images PMID:7664744

  18. DNA methylation status predicts cell type-specific enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Wiench, Malgorzata; John, Sam; Baek, Songjoon; Johnson, Thomas A; Sung, Myong-Hee; Escobar, Thelma; Simmons, Catherine A; Pearce, Kenneth H; Biddie, Simon C; Sabo, Pete J; Thurman, Robert E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Hager, Gordon L

    2011-01-01

    Cell-selective glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding to distal regulatory elements is associated with cell type-specific regions of locally accessible chromatin. These regions can either pre-exist in chromatin (pre-programmed) or be induced by the receptor (de novo). Mechanisms that create and maintain these sites are not well understood. We observe a global enrichment of CpG density for pre-programmed elements, and implicate their demethylated state in the maintenance of open chromatin in a tissue-specific manner. In contrast, sites that are actively opened by GR (de novo) are characterized by low CpG density, and form a unique class of enhancers devoid of suppressive effect of agglomerated methyl-cytosines. Furthermore, treatment with glucocorticoids induces rapid changes in methylation levels at selected CpGs within de novo sites. Finally, we identify GR-binding elements with CpGs at critical positions, and show that methylation can affect GR–DNA interactions in vitro. The findings present a unique link between tissue-specific chromatin accessibility, DNA methylation and transcription factor binding and show that DNA methylation can be an integral component of gene regulation by nuclear receptors. PMID:21701563

  19. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  20. 49 CFR 179.300 - General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... tank car tanks designed to be removed from car structure for filling and emptying (Classes DOT-106A and... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300... for filling and emptying (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW)....

  1. Highly efficient site-specific transgenesis in cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transgenes introduced into cancer cell lines serve as powerful tools for identification of genes involved in cancer. However, the random nature of genomic integration site of a transgene highly influences the fidelity, reliability and level of its expression. In order to alleviate this bottleneck, we characterized the potential utility of a novel PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific insertion system (PhiC31-IMSI) for introduction of transgenes into a pre-inserted docking site in the genome of cancer cells. Methods According to this system, a “docking-site” was first randomly inserted into human cancer cell lines and clones with a single copy were selected. Subsequently, an “incoming” vector containing the gene of interest was specifically inserted in the docking-site using PhiC31. Results Using the Pc-3 and SKOV-3 cancer cell lines, we showed that transgene insertion is reproducible and reliable. Furthermore, the selection system ensured that all surviving stable transgenic lines harbored the correct integration site. We demonstrated that the expression levels of reporter genes, such as green fluorescent protein and luciferase, from the same locus were comparable among sister, isogenic clones. Using in vivo xenograft studies, we showed that the genetically altered cancer cell lines retain the properties of the parental line. To achieve temporal control of transgene expression, we coupled our insertion strategy with the doxycycline inducible system and demonstrated tight regulation of the expression of the antiangiogenic molecule sFlt-1-Fc in Pc-3 cells. Furthermore, we introduced the luciferase gene into the insertion cassette allowing for possible live imaging of cancer cells in transplantation assays. We also generated a series of Gateway cloning-compatible intermediate cassettes ready for high-throughput cloning of transgenes and demonstrated that PhiC31-IMSI can be achieved in a high throughput 96-well plate format. Conclusions The novel

  2. Effect of Removal of Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) from In Vitro Culture on Gene Expression of Niche Factors in Bovine

    PubMed Central

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Niche cells, regulating Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) fate are believed to have a reciprocal communication with SSCs. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of SSC elimination on the gene expression of Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) and Kit Ligand (KITLG), which are the main growth factors regulating SSCs development and secreted by niche cells, primarily Sertoli cells. Methods: Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured for 12 days on extracellular matrix-coated plates. In the germ cell-removed group, the SSCs were removed from the in vitro culture using differential plating; however, in the control group, no intervention in the culture was performed. Colony formation of SSCs was evaluated using an inverted microscope. The gene expression of growth factors and spermatogonia markers were assessed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: SSCs colonies were developed in the control group but they were rarely observed in the germ cell-removed group; moreover, the expression of spermatogonia markers was detected in the control group while it was not observed in the germ cell-removed group, substantiating the success of SSCs removal. The expression of Gdnf and Fgf2 was greater in the germ cell-removed than control group (p<0.05), whereas the expression of Kitlg was lower in the germ cell-removed than control group (p< 0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, the results revealed that niche cells respond to SSCs removal by upregulation of GDNF and FGF2, and downregulation of KITLG in order to stimulate self-renewal and arrest differentiation. PMID:27563426

  3. Removal of hexavalent chromium ions by Yarrowia lipolytica cells modified with phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ashit; Bankar, Ashok; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Gosavi, Suresh; Zinjarde, Smita

    2013-03-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)], an important ground water pollutant by phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposite-modified cells of Yarrowia lipolytica (NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590), was investigated. Electron microscopy and magnetometer studies indicated an effective modification of yeast cell surfaces by the nanocomposites. The effect of pH, temperature, agitation speed, contact time and initial metal ion concentration on the removal of Cr (VI) was determined. The specific uptake values at pH 2.0 were 186.32 ± 3.17 and 137.31 ± 4.53 mg g- 1 for NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590, respectively, when 1000 mg L- 1 of metal ion concentrations were used. The equilibrium data fitted to Scatchard, Langmuir and linearized Freundlich models suggesting that adsorption played a role in the removal of Cr (VI) ions. The surface modified yeast cells displayed higher values of Langmuir and Scatchard coefficients than the unmodified cells indicating that the former were more efficient in Cr (VI) removal. The enhanced detoxification of Cr (VI) ions by this composite material could be attributed to the reductive power of the Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposites as well the yeast cell surface functional groups.

  4. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  5. Analyzing center specific outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Logan, Brent R; Nelson, Gene O; Klein, John P

    2008-12-01

    Reporting transplant center-specific survival rates after hematopoietic cell transplantation is required in the United States. We describe a method to report 1-year survival outcomes by center, as well as to quantify center performance relative to the transplant center network average, which can be reliably used with censored data and for small center sizes. Each center's observed 1-year survival outcome is compared to a predicted survival outcome adjusted for patient characteristics using a pseudovalue regression technique. A 95% prediction interval for 1-year survival assuming no center effect is computed for each center by bootstrapping the scaled residuals from the regression model, and the observed 1-year survival is compared to this prediction interval to determine center performance. We illustrate the technique using a recent center specific analysis performed by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, and study the performance of this method using simulation. PMID:18836830

  6. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  7. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  8. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  9. Biodegradable nanoellipsoidal artificial antigen presenting cells for antigen specific T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Aje, Kent; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2015-04-01

    Non-spherical nanodimensional artificial antigen presenting cells (naAPCs) offer the potential to systemically induce an effective antigen-specific immune response. In this report it is shown biodegradable ellipsoidal naAPCs mimic the T-Cell/APC interaction better than equivalent spherical naAPCs. In addition, it is demonstrated ellipsoidal naAPCs offer reduced non-specific cellular uptake and a superior pharmacokinetic profile compared to spherical naAPCs. PMID:25641795

  10. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  11. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M; Molenaar, Jan J; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses.

  12. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: a novel strategy to delete specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Mackensen, Andreas; Zoso, Alessia; Halbritter, Dagmar; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2008-04-01

    Several cell-based immunotherapy strategies have been developed to specifically modulate T cell-mediated immune responses. These methods frequently rely on the utilization of tolerogenic cell-based antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, APCs are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T-cell responses, thus limiting their therapeutic capacity. Here, we describe a novel bead-based approach to modulate T-cell responses in an antigen-specific fashion. We have generated killer artificial APCs (kappaaAPCs) by coupling an apoptosis-inducing alpha-Fas (CD95) IgM mAb together with HLA-A2 Ig molecules onto beads. These kappaaAPCs deplete targeted antigen-specific T cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent fashion. T-cell depletion in cocultures is rapidly initiated (30 minutes), dependent on the amount of kappaaAPCs and independent of activation-induced cell death (AICD). kappaaAPCs represent a novel technology that can control T cell-mediated immune responses, and therefore has potential for use in treatment of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection. PMID:18096763

  13. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kerry M; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (via trans interactions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (via cis interactions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition between cis and trans interactions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19058.001 PMID:27644106

  14. Electrosorption driven by microbial fuel cells to remove phenol without external power supply.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Minghua; Zhao, Yingying; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Youshuang

    2013-12-01

    This work studied the operating parameters (pH, electrolyte concentration, initial phenol concentration, MFCs connection numbers and mode), adsorption isotherms and kinetics of a novel electrosorption driven by microbial fuel cells (MFC-Sorption) to remove phenol without external electric grid energy supply. It proved that high electrolyte concentration and low solution pH promoted the performance of phenol removal. 3 MFCs connections in series achieved a adsorption capacity of 1.76 mmol/g, which was much higher than that in parallel connection (1.46 mmol/g). Well fitted with Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacity by MFC-Sorption and electrosorption was observed 48% and 65% higher than that by conventional adsorption. The phenol removal by MFC-Sorption was supposed to be more suitable for a pseudo-second-order kinetics, and with the increase of initial phenol concentration from 20 mg/L to 300 mg/L, the initial adsorption rate increased 26.99-fold. It concluded that the MFC-Sorption system could cost-effectively remove pollutant of phenol.

  15. Simultaneous carbon removal, denitrification and power generation in a membrane-less microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangcan; Onodera, Takashi; Tandukar, Madan; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2013-10-01

    A membrane-less microbial fuel cell (ML-MFC) was developed to investigate the simultaneous carbon removal and denitrification. The removal rates of 0.64 kg COD m(-3) of liquid cathode volume (LCV) d(-1) and 0.186 g NO3(-)-N m(-3) of LCV d(-1) were achieved, which resulted in the maximal COD and nitrate removal rates of 100% and 36.7%, respectively. The ML-MFC also achieved a maximal power output of 0.0712 W m(-3) of LCV and 0.844 A m(-3) of LCV in approximately 24h. The maximal coulombic efficiency of anode (CEAn) and cathode (CECa) was 5.1% and 475%, respectively. The anodic gas phase was consisted of 77.2±4.0% CH4, 3.9±0.5% CO2, and 3.9±1.5% N2, which indicated that the low anode coulombic efficiency was due to anodic methane production. The results of this study demonstrated the potential application of ML-MFC in simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal and energy (electricity) production. PMID:23911679

  16. Degradation of algal organic matter using microbial fuel cells and its association with trihalomethane precursor removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Dongmei; Lu, Lu; Zhao, Zhiwei; Xu, Yongpeng; Cui, Fuyi

    2012-07-01

    In order to provide an alternative for removal of algal organic matter (AOM) produced during algal blooms in aquatic environment, microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to study AOM degradation and its association with THM precursor removal. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals in MFCs were 81 ± 6% and 73 ± 3% for AOM from Microcystis aeruginosa (AOM(M)) and Chlorella vulgaris (AOM(C)), respectively. THM precursor was also effectively degraded (AOM(M) 85 ± 2%, AOM(C) 72 ± 4%). The major AOM components (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) were obviously removed in MFCs. The contribution of each component to the THM formation potential (THMFP) was obtained based on calculation. The THMFP produced from soluble microbial products was very low. If the energy input during operation process was not considered, MFCs treatment could recover electrical energy of 0.29 ± 0.02 kWh/kg COD (AOM(M)) and 0.35 ± 0.06 kWh/kg COD (AOM(C)).

  17. Polyfunctional T cells accumulate in large human cytomegalovirus-specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Raskit; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Smith, Helen; Cheek, Elizabeth; Akbar, Arne; Kern, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Large cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8 T-cell responses are observed in both young and, somewhat more often, old people. Frequent CMV reactivation is thought to exhaust these cells and render them dysfunctional so that larger numbers of them are needed to control CMV. Expansions of CMV-specific CD4 T cells are also seen but are less well studied. In this study, we examined the T-cell response to the dominant CMV pp65 and IE-1 antigens in healthy CMV-infected people across a wide age range (20 to 84 years) by using multicolor flow cytometry. CMV-specific T cells were characterized by the activation markers CD40 ligand (CD40L), interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the memory markers CD27 and CD45RA. The proportions of effector memory T cells increased in large responses, as did the proportions of polyfunctional CD8 (IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+/-) TNF-α(+)) and CD4 (CD40L(+/-) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) TNF-α(+)) T-cell subsets, while the proportion of naïve T cells decreased. The bigger the CD4 or CD8 T-cell response to pp65, the larger was the proportion of T cells with an advanced memory phenotype in the entire (including non-CMV-specific) T-cell compartment. In addition, the number of activation markers per cell correlated with the degree of T-cell receptor downregulation, suggesting increased antigen sensitivity in polyfunctional cells. In summary, our findings show that polyfunctional CMV-specific T cells were not superseded by dysfunctional cells, even in very large responses. At the same time, however, the memory subset composition of the entire T-cell compartment correlated with the size of the T-cell response to CMV pp65, confirming a strong effect of CMV infection on the immune systems of some, but not all, infected people. PMID:22072753

  18. Specific cytotoxic T-cell immune responses against autoantigens recognized by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zaleska, Joanna; Skorka, Katarzyna; Zajac, Malgorzata; Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Karp, Marta; Tomczak, Waldemar; Hus, Marek; Wlasiuk, Paulina; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that autoreactivity and inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Cytoskeletal proteins, including non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MYHIIA), vimentin (VIM) and cofilin-1 (CFL1), exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells have been identified as autoantigens that are recognized by the specific B-cell receptors of the CLL cells. In 212 CLL patients analysed with quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction we found CFL1 overexpression and low expression of MYH9 in comparison with healthy volunteers. We detected specific cytotoxic immune responses for peptides derived from MYHIIA in 66·7%, VIM in 87·5% and CFL1 in 62·5% CLL patients in an Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot assay. Low frequencies of autoreactive peptide-specific T cells were detected against MYHIIA, VIM and CFL1 in CLL patients ex vivo; most of the detected cells had an effector-memory phenotype. Our findings support the existence of cytotoxic immune responses against three autoantigens that have been identified as targets of CLL clonotypic B-cell receptors. The presence of autoreactive CD8(+) T cells against MYHIIA, VIM and CFL1 in CLL patients indicates the involvement of antigen-specific autoreactive T cells in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  19. Sickle cell hospital unit: a disease-specific model.

    PubMed

    Adams-Graves, Patricia; Ostric, Elizabeth J; Martin, Mary; Richardson, Pat; Lewis, James B

    2008-01-01

    American urban hospitals often serve large populations of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Those hospitals that choose to implement an adult SCD-specific inpatient unit have the opportunity to acquire multiple operational benefits. Such units may ultimately reduce patient morbidity and mortality; improve timely access to quality medical care in a cost-effective manner; reduce overcrowding in the emergency department; and increase patient, family, physician, and payer satisfaction. SCD is a serious, painful, genetic blood disorder that affects a growing population of adults in the United States. A single mistake in the gene that codes for hemoglobin causes crescent-shaped red blood cells that are sticky, are stiff, and have a short life span. These cells cause blockages, tremendous pain brought on by lack of oxygen in the muscles, organ damage, stroke, and problems with infections. The cells' short life span often results in anemia. The unpredictable pain event-sickle cell disease with crisis-is the most common reason for presentation to the emergency department and for hospital admission. For many SCD patients, the emergency department process and the general, overly conservative approach to pain relief lead to a delay in treatment and prolong needless suffering. Regional Medical Center at Memphis (Tennessee) established an SCD unit and developed an inpatient care delivery model that decreases the burden of caring for SCD patients on its busy emergency department, improves SCD patients' satisfaction and access to timely quality care, and reduces the needless pain and suffering of SCD patients. This SCD model may be replicated in large urban hospitals with a daily SCD patient census of five or more. PMID:18856136

  20. The WTX Tumor Suppressor Regulates Mesenchymal Progenitor Cell Fate Specification

    PubMed Central

    Lotinun, Sutada; Akhavanfard, Sara; Coffman, Erik J.; Cook, Edward B.; Stoykova, Svetlana; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Schoonmaker, Jesse A.; Burger, Alexa; Kim, Woo Jae; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland; Haber, Daniel A.; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY WTX is an X-linked tumor suppressor targeted by somatic mutations in Wilms tumor, a pediatric kidney cancer, and by germline inactivation in osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis, a bone overgrowth syndrome. Here, we show that Wtx deletion in mice causes neonatal lethality, somatic overgrowth, and malformation of multiple mesenchyme-derived tissues, including bone, fat, kidney, heart, and spleen. Inactivation of Wtx at different developmental stages and in primary mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) reveals that bone mass increase and adipose tissue deficiency are due to altered lineage fate decisions coupled with delayed terminal differentiation. Specification defects in MPCs result from aberrant β-catenin activation, whereas alternative pathways contribute to the subsequently delayed differentiation of lineage-restricted cells. Thus, Wtx is a regulator of MPC commitment and differentiation with stage-specific functions in inhibiting canonical Wnt signaling. Furthermore, the constellation of anomalies in Wtx null mice suggests that this tumor suppressor broadly regulates MPCs in multiple tissues. PMID:21571217

  1. A Recombinant Antibody with the Antigen-Specific, Major Histocompatibility Complex-Restricted Specificity of T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Peter S.; Stryhn, Anette; Hansen, Bjarke E.; Fugger, Lars; Engberg, Jan; Buus, Soren

    1996-03-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined peptide/MHC complexes.

  2. Cleavage patterns, cell-lineages and cell specification are clues to phyletic lineages in Spiralia.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, J A; Dictus, W J; van Loon, A E

    1997-08-01

    Embryos of molluscs, annelids, nemerteans and platyhelminthes show remarkable intra- and interphyletic resemblances and differences in mesentoblast, dorso-ventral axis and trochoblast specification. These variations have been used to investigate their evolutionary relationship. In molluscs and annelids a heterochronic shift parallels evolutionary relations based on adult characters. Nemerteans and platyhelminthes lack trochal cells and differ in the specification of the mesodermal precursor cell. Nemerteans also differ fundamentally with respect to axis specification related to the first cleavage. Therefore, close phylogenetic relations exist between molluscs and annelids, whereas nemerteans and platyhelminthes are only remotely related with each other and with molluscs and annelids. PMID:15001075

  3. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  4. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  5. The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Hetherington, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells have proven to be an attractive system for dissecting the mechanisms of stimulus-response coupling in plants. In this review we focus on the intracellular signal transduction pathways by which extracellular signals bring about closure and opening of the stomatal pore. It is proposed that guard cell signal transduction pathways may be organized into functional arrays or signalling cassettes that contain elements common to a number of converging signalling pathways. The purpose of these signalling cassettes may be to funnel extracellular signals down onto the ion transporters that control the fluxes of ions that underlie stomatal movements. Evidence is emerging that specificity in guard cell signalling may be, in part, encoded in complex spatio-temporal patterns of increases in the concentration of cytosolic-free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt). It is suggested that oscillations in [Ca2+]cyt may generate calcium signatures that encode information concerning the stimulus type and strength. New evidence is presented that suggests that these calcium signatures may integrate information when many stimuli are present.

  6. Specific parasitism of purified vaginal epithelial cells by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Demeś, P; Gombosova, A; Valent, M; Fabusová, M; Jánoska, A; Stefanovic, J; Arroyo, R

    1988-01-01

    Human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) from vaginal swabs obtained from normal women or from patients with trichomoniasis were purified, and VEC parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis was examined. Trichomonads bound equally well to live or dead VECs, and up to 20% of VECs were parasitized. Trichomonal cytadherence of human VECs was time, temperature, and pH dependent. Saturation binding levels of live trichomonads to VECs gave approximately 2 organisms adherent to parasitized VEC. No differences in cytadherence levels were detected by different isolates to VECs from the same patient compared with adherence to VECs from normal individuals. Trypsinized, live T. vaginalis organisms failed to recognize VECs. A ligand assay identified four adhesin candidates, and only organisms without a prominent immunogen on the surface (negative phenotype) cytadhered to VECs and synthesized the adhesins, confirming the results of a recently published report by us on adherence to HeLa cell monolayers (J. F. Alderete and G. E. Garza, Infect. Immun. 56:28-33, 1988). These data show the ability of T. vaginalis to parasitize human vaginal epithelial cells in a specific receptor-ligand manner. PMID:3262088

  7. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  8. Efficient Generation of Lens Progenitor Cells from Cataract Patient–Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaodi; Yang, Jin; Liu, Tianjin; Jiang, Yongxiang; Le, Qihua; Lu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The development of a technique to induce the transformation of somatic cells to a pluripotent state via the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors was a transformational event in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of this technique also impacted ophthalmology, as patient-specific induced pluripotent stemcells (iPSCs) may be useful resources for some ophthalmological diseases. The lens is a key refractive element in the eye that focuses images of the visual world onto the retina. To establish a new model for drug screening to treat lens diseases and investigating lens aging and development, we examined whether human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) could be induced into iPSCs and if lens-specific differentiation of these cells could be achieved under defined chemical conditions. We first efficiently reprogrammed HLECs from age-related cataract patients to iPSCs with OCT-4, SOX-2, and KLF-4. The resulting HLEC-derived iPS (HLE-iPS) colonies were indistinguishable from human ES cells with respect to morphology, gene expression, pluripotent marker expression and their ability to generate all embryonic germ-cell layers. Next, we performed a 3-step induction procedure: HLE-iPS cells were differentiated into large numbers of lens progenitor-like cells with defined factors (Noggin, BMP and FGF2), and we determined that these cells expressed lens-specific markers (PAX6, SOX2, SIX3, CRYAB, CRYAA, BFSP1, and MIP). In addition, HLE-iPS-derived lens cells exhibited reduced expression of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers compared with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Our study describes a highly efficient procedure for generating lens progenitor cells from cataract patient HLEC-derived iPSCs. These patient-derived pluripotent cells provide a valuable model for studying the developmental and molecular biological mechanisms that underlie cell determination in lens development and cataract pathophysiology

  9. Single-Cell mRNA Profiling Reveals Cell-Type-Specific Expression of Neurexin Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fuccillo, Marc V; Földy, Csaba; Gökce, Özgün; Rothwell, Patrick E; Sun, Gordon L; Malenka, Robert C; Südhof, Thomas C

    2015-07-15

    Neurexins are considered central organizers of synapse architecture that are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Expression of neurexins in hundreds of alternatively spliced isoforms suggested that individual neurons might exhibit a cell-type-specific neurexin expression pattern (a neurexin code). To test this hypothesis, we quantified the single-cell levels of neurexin isoforms and other trans-synaptic cell-adhesion molecules by microfluidics-based RT-PCR. We show that the neurexin repertoire displays pronounced cell-type specificity that is remarkably consistent within each type of neuron. Furthermore, we uncovered region-specific regulation of neurexin transcription and splice-site usage. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional profiles of neurexins can be altered in an experience-dependent fashion by exposure to a drug of abuse. Our data provide evidence of cell-type-specific expression patterns of multiple neurexins at the single-cell level and suggest that expression of synaptic cell-adhesion molecules overlaps with other key features of cellular identity and diversity.

  10. Single-Cell mRNA Profiling Reveals Cell-Type Specific Expression of Neurexin Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Fuccillo, Marc V.; Földy, Csaba; Gökce, Özgün; Rothwell, Patrick E.; Sun, Gordon L.; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurexins are considered central organizers of synapse architecture that are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Expression of neurexins in hundreds of alternatively spliced isoforms suggested that individual neurons might exhibit a cell type-specific neurexin expression pattern (a neurexin code). To test this hypothesis, we quantified the single-cell levels of neurexin isoforms and other trans-synaptic cell-adhesion molecules by microfluidics-based RT-PCR. We show that the neurexin repertoire displays pronounced cell-type specificity that is remarkably consistent within each type of neuron. Furthermore, we uncovered region-specific regulation of neurexin transcription and splice-site usage. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional profiles of neurexins can be altered in an experience-dependent fashion by exposure to a drug of abuse. Our data provide evidence of cell type-specific expression patterns of multiple neurexins at the single-cell level, and suggest that expression of synaptic cell-adhesion molecules overlaps with other key features of cellular identity and diversity. PMID:26182417

  11. Cell wall glycosphingolipids of Sphingomonas paucimobilis are CD1d-specific ligands for NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Venkataraman; Du, Wenjun; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2005-06-01

    The current consensus on characterization of NKT cells is based on their reactivity to the synthetic glycolipid, alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) in a CD1d-dependent manner. Because of the limited availability of alpha-GalCer, there is a constant search for CD1d-presented ligands that activate NKT cells. The alpha-anomericity of the carbohydrate is considered to be an important requisite for the CD1d-specific activation of NKT cells. The gram-negative, lipopolysaccharide-free bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis is known to contain glycosphingolipids (GSL) with alpha-anomeric sugars attached to the lipid chain. Here, we report that GSL extracted from this bacterium are able to stimulate NKT cells in a CD1d-specific manner. In addition, soluble CD1d-Ig dimers loaded with this lipid extract specifically bind to NKT cells (but not conventional T cells). Further studies on the S. paucimobilis GSL could potentially lead to other natural sources of CD1d-specific ligands useful for NKT cell analyses and aimed at identifying novel therapies for a variety of disease states.

  12. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  13. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  14. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  15. Disruption of pioneer growth cone guidance in vivo by removal of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, W S; Serikawa, K; Allen, K; Bentley, D

    1992-02-01

    Cell surface proteins anchored to membranes via covalently attached glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) have been implicated in neuronal adhesion, promotion of neurite outgrowth and directed cell migration. Treatment of grasshopper embryos with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), an enzyme that cleaves the GPI anchor, often induced disruptions in the highly stereotyped migrations of peripheral pioneer growth cones and afferent neuron cell bodies. In distal limb regions of embryos treated with PI-PLC at early stages of pioneer axon outgrowth, growth cones lost their proximal orientation toward the central nervous system (CNS) and turned distally. Pioneer growth cones in treated limbs also failed to make a characteristic ventral turn along the trochanter-coxa (Tr-Cx) segment boundary, and instead continued to grow proximally across the boundary. Treatment at an earlier stage of development caused pre-axonogenesis Cx1 neurons to abandon their normal circumferential migration and reorient toward the CNS. None of these abnormal phenotypes were observed in limbs of untreated embryos or embryos exposed to other phospholipases that do not release GPI-anchored proteins. Incubation of embryos with PI-PLC effectively removed immunoreactivity for fasciclin I, a GPI-anchored protein expressed on a subset of neuronal surfaces. These results suggest that cell surface GPI-anchored proteins are involved in pioneer growth cone guidance and in pre-axonogenesis migration of neurons in the grasshopper limb bud in vivo.

  16. Post-growth process for flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunwoo; Kang, Yoonmook; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrated a flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell with high specific power of approximately 254 W/kg. A flexible and ultra-light weight CdS/CdTe cell treated with pre-NP etch process exhibited high conversion efficiency of 13.56% in superstrate configuration. Morphological, structural and optical changes of CdS/CdTe thin films were characterized when pre-NP etch step was incorporated to the conventional post-deposition process. Improvement of photovoltaic parameters can be attributed to the removal of the oxide and the formation of Te-rich layer, which benefit the activation process. Pre-NP etched cell maintained their flexibility and performance under the repeated tensile strain of 0.13%. Our method can pave a way for manufacturing flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power for mobile and aerospace applications.

  17. Post-growth process for flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunwoo; Kang, Yoonmook; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrated a flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell with high specific power of approximately 254 W/kg. A flexible and ultra-light weight CdS/CdTe cell treated with pre-NP etch process exhibited high conversion efficiency of 13.56% in superstrate configuration. Morphological, structural and optical changes of CdS/CdTe thin films were characterized when pre-NP etch step was incorporated to the conventional post-deposition process. Improvement of photovoltaic parameters can be attributed to the removal of the oxide and the formation of Te-rich layer, which benefit the activation process. Pre-NP etched cell maintained their flexibility and performance under the repeated tensile strain of 0.13%. Our method can pave a way for manufacturing flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power for mobile and aerospace applications. PMID:27409952

  18. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Scott G; Bennett, Michael; Galić, Zoran; Kim, Joanne; Xu, Qing; Young, Alan; Lieberman, Alexis; Joseph, Aviva; Goldstein, Harris; Ng, Hwee; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2009-01-01

    There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR). Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  19. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  20. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns.

  1. Target-cell-specific fluorescence silica nanoprobes for imaging and theranostics of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Henan; Mu, Yawen; Lu, Jusheng; Wei, Wei; Wan, Yakun; Liu, Songqin

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) has been identified as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and predictors of drug response for many diseases, including a broad range of cancers, heart disease, and neurological diseases. The noninvasive theranostics system for miRNAs is very important for diagnosis and therapy of the cellular disease. Herein, a target-cell-specific theranostics nanoprobe for target-cell-specific delivery, cancer cells and intracellular miRNA-21 imaging, and cancer cell growth inhibition was proposed. The nanoprobe (FS-AS/MB) was prepared by simultaneously coupling of the AS1411 aptamer and miRNA-21 molecular beacon (miR-21-MB) onto the surface of Ru(bpy)₃²⁺-encapsulated silica (FS) nanoparticles. The FS nanoparticles synthesized by a facile reverse microemulsion method showed nearly monodisperse spherical shape with a smooth surface, good colloidal stability, a fluorescence quantum yield of ~21%, and low cytotoxicity. The antibiofouling polymer PEG grafted onto a silica shell reduced nonspecific uptake of cells. The ability of FS-AS/MB for target-specific cells delivery, simultaneous cancer cells, intracellular miRNA-21 imaging, and inhibition of miRNA-21 function and suppression of cell growth in vitro, were also demonstrated. The results of the present study suggested that the proposed nanoprobes would be a promising theranostics for different cancers by imaging and inhibiting other intracellular genes.

  2. The specific reactive surface area of granular zero-valent iron in metal contaminant removal: Column experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Statham, Tom M; Mason, Lachlan R; Mumford, Kathryn A; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2015-06-15

    A series of dynamic-flow kinetic experiments were conducted to assess the removal rates of aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions by zero-valent iron (ZVI), a promising material for inclusion in cold-climate remediation applications. The influence of experimental parameters on contaminant removal rates, including aqueous flow rate, operating temperature, and the concentrations of ZVI, salt and dissolved oxygen, was investigated. A mass transport model has been developed that accounts (i) aqueous-phase dispersion processes, (ii) film diffusion of contaminant ions to the reactive ZVI surface and (iii) the reactive removal mechanism itself. Regression to the experimental data indicated that when oxygen is present in the solution feed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal processes were limited by film diffusion. In de-aerated solutions film diffusion still controls Cu(2+) removal but a first-order surface reaction provides a better model for Zn(2+) kinetics. Using air as the equilibrium feed gas, the reactive proportion of the total surface area for contaminant removal was calculated to be 97% and 64% of the active spherically-assumed geometric area associated with ZVI media for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. Relative to a gas absorption area, determined in previous studies, the reactive proportion is less than 0.41% of the unreacted ZVI total surface area. These findings suggest that only part of the iron oxyhydroxide surface is reacting during ZVI based metal contaminant removal. PMID:25839833

  3. The specific reactive surface area of granular zero-valent iron in metal contaminant removal: Column experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Statham, Tom M; Mason, Lachlan R; Mumford, Kathryn A; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2015-06-15

    A series of dynamic-flow kinetic experiments were conducted to assess the removal rates of aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions by zero-valent iron (ZVI), a promising material for inclusion in cold-climate remediation applications. The influence of experimental parameters on contaminant removal rates, including aqueous flow rate, operating temperature, and the concentrations of ZVI, salt and dissolved oxygen, was investigated. A mass transport model has been developed that accounts (i) aqueous-phase dispersion processes, (ii) film diffusion of contaminant ions to the reactive ZVI surface and (iii) the reactive removal mechanism itself. Regression to the experimental data indicated that when oxygen is present in the solution feed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal processes were limited by film diffusion. In de-aerated solutions film diffusion still controls Cu(2+) removal but a first-order surface reaction provides a better model for Zn(2+) kinetics. Using air as the equilibrium feed gas, the reactive proportion of the total surface area for contaminant removal was calculated to be 97% and 64% of the active spherically-assumed geometric area associated with ZVI media for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. Relative to a gas absorption area, determined in previous studies, the reactive proportion is less than 0.41% of the unreacted ZVI total surface area. These findings suggest that only part of the iron oxyhydroxide surface is reacting during ZVI based metal contaminant removal.

  4. Cell type specific expression of p11 controls cocaine reward

    PubMed Central

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Schwarz, Justin T.; Vernov, Mary; Wilkinson, Matthew B.; Bradbury, Kathryn; Feliz, Akira; Marongiu, Roberta; Gelfand, Yaroslav; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer; Nestler, Eric J.; Greengard, Paul; Russo, Scott J.; Kaplitt, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The high rate of comorbidity between depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared molecular mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Limbic structures, such as the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders, yet how different cell types within these structures contribute to the pathogenesis remains elusive. Downregulation of p11 (S100A10) specifically in the NAc elicits depressive like behaviors in mice but its role in drug addiction is unknown. Methods We combine mouse genetics and viral strategies to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the entire NAc affects the rewarding actions of cocaine on behavior (6 to 8 mice per group) and molecular correlates (3 experiments, 5 to 8 mice per group). Finally, the manipulation of p11 expression in distinct NAc dopaminoceptive neuronal subsets distinguished cell type specific effects of p11 on cocaine reward (5 to 8 mice per group). Results We demonstrate that p11 knockout mice have enhanced cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP), which is reproduced by the focal downregulation of p11 in the NAc of wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, cocaine reduced p11 expression in the NAc, while p11 overexpression exclusively in the NAc reduced cocaine CPP. Finally, we identify dopamine receptor-1 (D1) expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) as key mediators of p11’s effects on cocaine reward. Conclusions Our data provide evidence that disruption of p11 homeostasis in the NAc particularly in D1 expressing MSNs may underlie pathophysiological mechanisms of cocaine rewarding action. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for cocaine addiction. PMID:24725970

  5. Specific immunotherapy modifies allergen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in an epitope-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wambre, Erik; DeLong, Jonathan H.; James, Eddie A.; Torres-Chinn, Nadia; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Möbs, Christian; Durham, Stephen R.; Till, Stephen J.; Robinson, David; Kwok, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system induces and controls allergic inflammation at the T cell epitope level is critical for the design of new allergy vaccine strategies. Objective To characterize allergen-specific T cell responses linked with allergy or peripheral tolerance and to determine how CD4+ T cell responses to individual allergen-derived epitopes change over allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Methods Timothy grass pollen (TGP) allergy was used as a model for studying grass pollen allergies. The breadth, magnitude, epitope hierarchy and phenotype of the DR04:01-restricted TGP-specific T cell responses in ten grass pollen allergic, five non-atopic and six allergy vaccine-treated individuals was determined using an ex vivo pMHCII-tetramer approach. Results CD4+ T cells in allergic individuals are directed to a broad range of TGP epitopes characterized by defined immunodominance hierarchy patterns and with distinct functional profiles that depend on the epitope recognized. Epitopes that are restricted specifically to either TH2 or TH1/TR1 responses were identified. ASIT was associated with preferential deletion of allergen-specific TH2 cells and without significant change in frequency of TH1/TR1 cells. Conclusions Preferential allergen-specific TH2-cells deletion after repeated high doses antigen stimulation can be another independent mechanism to restore tolerance to allergen during immunotherapy. PMID:24373351

  6. Design and synthesis of a potent peptide containing both specific and non-specific cell-adhesion motifs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yuxiao; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Zheng; Lu, Weiyue; Ding, Jiandong

    2010-06-01

    This article reports a potent chemical to promote cell adhesion on a substrate by combination of both moieties for specific and non-specific adhesion. The cyclic (-RGDfK-) (R: arginine, G: glycine, D: aspartic acid, f: D-phenylalanine, K: lysine) is employed to trigger specific cell adhesion, and a linear tripeptide KKK is introduced to enhance early non-specific cell adhesion. A series of cyclic and linear peptides with different charges were synthesized and then functionalized with thiol end-group. All the peptides were immobilized on gold layers, which were later passivated by bovine serum albumin. The coverage of NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells on the substrate modified by the linker containing both cyclic (-RGDfK-) and linear KKK is, surprisingly, significantly better than the summation using one of them, which reveals the strong cooperativity of specific and non-specific cell adhesions. The resultant cell adhesion on the substrates modified by appropriate linkers was much better than on tissue-culture plates. The cooperativity principle and the design strategy of the combined linker might be helpful for fundamental research of cell-material or cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and for modification of new biomaterials in regenerative medicine and targeted drug delivery.

  7. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  8. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus. PMID:26043681

  9. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  10. T cells in the control of organ-specific autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Cheng, Mickie; Anderson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Immune tolerance is critical to the avoidance of unwarranted immune responses against self antigens. Multiple, non-redundant checkpoints are in place to prevent such potentially deleterious autoimmune responses while preserving immunity integral to the fight against foreign pathogens. Nevertheless, a large and growing segment of the population is developing autoimmune diseases. Deciphering cellular and molecular pathways of immune tolerance is an important goal, with the expectation that understanding these pathways will lead to new clinical advances in the treatment of these devastating diseases. The vast majority of autoimmune diseases develop as a consequence of complex mechanisms that depend on genetic, epigenetic, molecular, cellular, and environmental elements and result in alterations in many different checkpoints of tolerance and ultimately in the breakdown of immune tolerance. The manifestations of this breakdown are harmful inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues driven by innate immunity and self antigen–specific pathogenic T and B cells. T cells play a central role in the regulation and initiation of these responses. In this Review we summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in these fundamental checkpoints, the pathways that are defective in autoimmune diseases, and the therapeutic strategies being developed with the goal of restoring immune tolerance. PMID:25985270

  11. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  12. Specific Visualization of Tumor Cells Using Upconversion Nanophosphors

    PubMed Central

    Grebenik, E. A.; Generalova, A. N.; Nechaev, A. V.; Khaydukov, E.V.; Mironova, K. E.; Stremovskiy, O. A.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Zvyagin, A. V.; Deyev, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of targeted constructs on the basis of photoluminescent nanoparticles with a high photo- and chemical stability and absorption/emission spectra in the “transparency window” of biological tissues is an important focus area of present-day medical diagnostics. In this work, a targeted two-component construct on the basis of upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) and anti-tumor 4D5 scFv was developed for selective labeling of tumor cells overexpressing the HER2 tumor marker characteristic of a number of human malignant tumors. A high affinity barnase : barstar (Bn : Bs) protein pair, which exhibits high stability in a wide range of pH and temperatures, was exploited as a molecular adapter providing self-assembly of the two-component construct. High selectivity for the binding of the two-component 4D5 scFv-Bn : UCNP-Bs construct to human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells overexpressing HER2 was demonstrated. This approach provides an opportunity to produce similar constructs for the visualization of different specific markers in pathogenic tissues, including malignant tumors. PMID:25558394

  13. Influenza virus and endothelial cells: a species specific relationship

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kirsty R.; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J. B.; Reperant, Leslie A.; Richard, Mathilde; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is an important cause of respiratory disease in humans. The original reservoirs of IAV are wild waterfowl and shorebirds, where virus infection causes limited, if any, disease. Both in humans and in wild waterbirds, epithelial cells are the main target of infection. However, influenza virus can spread from wild bird species to terrestrial poultry. Here, the virus can evolve into highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Part of this evolution involves increased viral tropism for endothelial cells. HPAI virus infections not only cause severe disease in chickens and other terrestrial poultry species but can also spread to humans and back to wild bird populations. Here, we review the role of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection in wild birds, terrestrial poultry and humans with a particular focus on HPAI viruses. We demonstrate that whilst the endothelium is an important target of virus infection in terrestrial poultry and some wild bird species, in humans the endothelium is more important in controlling the local inflammatory milieu. Thus, the endothelium plays an important, but species-specific, role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection. PMID:25520707

  14. Quantum dot-labeled aptamer nanoprobes specifically targeting glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue-Chai; Deng, Yu-Lin; Lin, Yi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Qing, Hong; Qu, Feng; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2008-06-01

    Two new techniques, aptamer-based specific recognition and quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence labeling, are becoming increasingly important in biosensing. In this study, these two techniques have been coupled together to construct a new kind of fluorescent QD-labeled aptamer (QD-Apt) nanoprobe by conjugating GBI-10 aptamer to the QD surface. GBI-10 is a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer for tenascin-C, which distributes on the surface of glioma cells as a dominant extracellular matrix protein. The QD-Apt nanoprobe can recognize the tenascin-C on the human glioma cell surface, which will be helpful for the development of new convenient and sensitive in vitro diagnostic assays for glioma. The QD-Apt nanoprobe has particular features such as strong fluorescence, stability, monodispersity and uniformity. In addition, this probe preparation method is universal, so it is expected to provide a new type of stable nanoprobe for high-throughput and fast biosensing detection and bioimaging. New methods for real-time and dynamic tracking and imaging can be accordingly developed.

  15. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed "lowest supercomplex" (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh's disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  16. Simultaneous phenol removal, nitrification and denitrification using microbial fuel cell technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunhua; Huang, Liqiao; Yu, Hui; Yi, Xiaoyun; Wei, Chaohai

    2015-06-01

    Here we show that concomitant removal of phenol and nitrogen can be accomplished in a single dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) reactor, in which the two chambers are separated with an anion-exchange membrane. A series of experiments were performed with ammonium (230 NH4(+)-N mg L(-1)) and phenol (with concentrations varying from 0 to 1400 mg L(-1)) fed to the aerobic cathode chamber of the MFC. Experimental results demonstrated that no apparent inhibitory effect of phenol on the nitrifying reaction was noted even at the phenol concentration up to 600 mg L(-1). For all the experiments, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was achieved in the MFC. In comparison to the traditional aerobic bioreactor (ABR) and the same MFC run under the open-circuit condition, the MFC reactor allowed less inhibition of nitrification to phenol exposure and higher rate of nitrogen removal. The data of bacterial analysis revealed that electrochemically active bacteria and denitrifiers in the anaerobic chamber play a significant role in electricity generation and anaerobic denitrification, respectively, while phenol-degrading bacteria, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the aerobic cathode chamber are responsible for phenol oxidation, aerobic nitrification and aerobic denitrification, respectively. These results imply that the MFC holds potential for simultaneous removal of phenolic compounds and nitrogen contained in some particular industrial wastewaters.

  17. Simultaneous Removal of Phenol and Dissolved Solids from Wastewater Using Multichambered Microbial Desalination Cell.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Harapriya; Jain, Sumat Chand; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2015-12-01

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) has great potential toward direct electricity generation from wastewater and concurrent desalination through potential difference developed due to microbial activity. Degradation of phenol by isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa in anodic chamber and simultaneous desalination of water in middle desalination chamber of multichamber MDC is demonstrated in this study. Performance of the MDCs with different anodic inoculum conditions, namely pure culture of P. aeruginosa (MDC-1), 50 % v/v mixture of P. aeruginosa and anaerobic mixed consortia (MDC-2) and anaerobic mixed consortia (MDC-3), was evaluated to compare the phenol degradation in anodic chamber, bioelectricity generation, and simultaneous total dissolved solids (TDS) removal from saline water in desalination chamber. Synergistic effect between P. aeruginosa and mixed anaerobic consortia as inoculum was evident in MDC-2 demonstrating phenol degradation of 90 %, TDS removal of 75 % in 72 h of reaction time along with higher power generation of 27.5 mW/m(2) as compared to MDC-1 (95 %, 64 %, 12.8 mW/m(2), respectively) and MDC-3 (58 %, 52 %, 4.8 mW/m(2), respectively). The results illustrate that the multichamber MDC-2 is effective for simultaneous removal of phenol and dissolved solids contained in industrial wastewaters.

  18. Nitrogen removal from wastewater through microbial electrolysis cells and cation exchange membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vulnerability of water resources to nutrients led to progressively stricter standards for wastewater effluents. Modification of the conventional procedures to meet the new standards is inevitable. New technologies should give a priority to nitrogen removal. In this paper, ammonium chloride and urine as nitrogen sources were used to investigate the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) configured by cation exchange membrane (CEM) for electrochemical removal of nitrogen over open-and closed-circuit potentials (OCP and CCP) during biodegradation of organic matter. Results obtained from this study indicated that CEM was permeable to both organic and ammonium nitrogen over OCP. Power substantially mediated ammonium migration from anodic wastewater to the cathode, as well. With a urine rich wastewater in the anode, the maximum rate of ammonium intake into the cathode varied from 34.2 to 40.6 mg/L.h over CCP compared to 10.5-14.9 mg/L.h over OCP. Ammonium separation over CCP was directly related to current. For 1.46-2.12 mmol electron produced, 20.5-29.7 mg-N ammonium was removed. Current also increased cathodic pH up to 12, a desirable pH for changing ammonium ion to ammonia gas. Results emphasized the potential for MEC in control of ammonium through ammonium separation and ammonia volatilization provided that membrane characteristic is considered in their development. PMID:24533446

  19. Removal of endogenous retrovirus-like particles from CHO-cell derived products using Q sepharose fast flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Daniel M; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt; Blank, Gregory S; Chen, Qi; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Retrovirus-like particles (RVLPs) that are expressed during the production of monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures must be removed during product recovery. Anion exchange chromatography (AEX) performed in product flow-through mode, a common component in the purification of monoclonal antibodies, has been shown to provide robust removal of a related retrovirus model, but it's ability to remove the actual RVLP impurities has not been directly investigated. We have determined the ability of a typical Q sepharose process to remove actual CHO RVLP impurities. Using small scale experiments with three model antibodies, we observe that this AEX process is capable of effectively removing both in-process and spiked RVLPs from different feedstocks containing different mAb products. In addition, we show that this AEX process also achieves a similarly high degree of RVLP removal during large scale manufacturing operations.

  20. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    PubMed

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents.

  1. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    PubMed

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents. PMID:26877036

  2. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  3. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.; Burnett, John; Rossi, John

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T-cells and macrophages that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here we combine the live cell-based SELEX with high throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as siRNA delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5 expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4+ T cells with a nanomolar IC50. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5 expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. PMID:25754473

  4. Single cell lineage tracing reveals that oriented cell division contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and regional specification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Miao, Lianjie; Shieh, David; Spiotto, Ernest; Li, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Paul, Antoni; Schwartz, Robert J.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Singer, Harold A.; Huang, Guoying; Wu, Mingfu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cardiac trabeculae are sheet-like structures extending from the myocardium that function to increase surface area. A lack of trabeculation causes embryonic lethality due to compromised cardiac function. To understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trabecular formation, we genetically labeled individual cardiomyocytes prior to trabeculation via the brainbow multicolor system, and traced and analyzed the labeled cells during trabeculation by whole-embryo clearing and imaging. The clones derived from labeled single cells displayed four different geometric patterns that are derived from different patterns of oriented cell division (OCD) and migration. Of the four types of clones, the inner, transmural, and mixed clones contributed to trabecular cardiomyocytes. Further studies showed that perpendicular OCD is an extrinsic asymmetric cell division that putatively contributes to trabecular regional specification. Furthermore, N-Cadherin deletion in labeled clones disrupted the clonal patterns. In summary, our data demonstrate that OCD contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and specification. PMID:27052172

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS CENTER TECHNOLOGY SPECIFIC TEST PLAN: REMOVAL OF MICROBIOLOGICL AND PARTICULATE CONTAMINANTS BY MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the Environmental technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of water treatment equipment for removal of microbiological and particulate contaminants using membrane filtration. This TSTP is to be used as a guide in the dev...

  6. Identification of bovine B cell reactive and B cell specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mukwedeya, D T; Takamatsu, H; Parkhouse, R M

    1993-11-01

    All monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the workshop panel were screened for reactivity with bovine surface immunoglobulin (sIg)+ cells (gated small dense lymphocytes from peripheral blood) by fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Eighteen temporary clusters--TCs 1-12, 15, 16, 18, 19, 25 and 26--contained mAbs reactive with sIg+ cells. mAb BAS21A (unclustered) and CC92 (TC25) were also reactive with sIg+ cells. Further FACS analysis with B cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and mesenteric lymph nodes, and B and T lymphoma cell lines, indicated that the majority of mAbs within TCs 2, 4, 15, 18 and 26 reacted specifically with bovine B cells. Bovine B cell specific mAbs within these clusters were TH14B, IL-A55, CACT101A, MUC76A from TC4, VPM30, GC65A, CACT65A from TC15, IL-A58, CC56, CC70, IL-A65 from TC18, and CC57 and 26A9 from TC26. Three mAbs--IL-A65, CC70, and BAQ15A--within TC18 defined WC3; mAbs TD9 and CC56 may also be related to WC3.

  7. Concise Review: Tissue-Specific Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Hannah K.; Canfield, Scott G.; Shusta, Eric V.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) display significant heterogeneity across tissue types, playing an important role in tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Recent work demonstrating the derivation of tissue-specific microvascular endothelial cells (TS-MVECs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has ignited the potential to generate tissue-specific models which may be applied to regenerative medicine and in vitro modeling applications. Here we review techniques by which hPSC-derived TS-MVECs have been made to date and discuss how current hPSC-EC differentiation protocols may be directed towards tissue-specific fates. We begin by discussing the nature of EC tissue specificity in vivo and review general hPSC-EC differentiation protocols generated over the last decade. Finally, we describe how specificity can be integrated into hPSC-EC protocols to generate hPSC-derived TS-MVECs in vitro, including EC and parenchymal cell co-culture, directed differentiation, and direct reprogramming strategies. PMID:25070152

  8. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Detect CD19-Specific T Cells in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:23469246

  9. A versatile method for the removal of melanin from ribonucleic acids in melanocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Satyamoorthy, K; Li, G; Van Belle, P A; Elder, D E; Herlyn, M

    2002-10-01

    Melanin pigments often co-purify during preparation of nucleic acids from cells or tissues of melanocytic origin. Contaminating melanin can severely impede subsequent analyses of RNA. We attempted to eliminate melanin in RNA preparations using selected gel matrices. We show here that co-purified melanin pigments can be largely eliminated from RNA samples after passing through polyacrylamide-based beads (Bio-Gel P-60). After isolation from the pigment-containing cells or tissues, RNA was subsequently processed through batch or column purification under acidic pH conditions. The resulting RNA was devoid of contaminating melanin pigments and amenable to molecular reactions such as polymerase chain reaction and cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase. Although the process results in some loss of input RNA, this purification procedure is simple, robust and can easily be adopted in any laboratory for the molecular analysis of RNA that requires removal of melanin contamination.

  10. Extremely small test cell structure for resistive random access memory element with removable bottom electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Sang-Gyu; Kishida, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kentaro

    2014-02-24

    We established a method of preparing an extremely small memory cell by fabricating a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) structure on the tip of a cantilever of an atomic force microscope. This structure has the high robustness against the drift of the cantilever, and the effective cell size was estimated to be less than 10 nm in diameter due to the electric field concentration at the tip of the cantilever, which was confirmed using electric field simulation. The proposed structure, which has a removable bottom electrode, enables not only the preparation of a tiny ReRAM structure but also the performance of unique experiments, by making the most of its high robustness against the drift of the cantilever.

  11. Cyclophilin D is required for mitochondrial removal by autophagy in cardiac cells

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Raquel S.; Lee, Youngil; Ghochani, Mariam; Gustafsson, Åsa B.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated intracellular degradation process by which cells remove cytosolic long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. The mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) results in mitochondrial depolarization and increased reactive oxygen species production, which can trigger autophagy. Therefore, we hypothesized that the MPT may have a role in signaling autophagy in cardiac cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential was lower in HL-1 cells subjected to starvation compared to cells maintained in full medium. Mitochondrial membrane potential was preserved in starved cells treated with cyclosporin A (CsA), suggesting the MPT pore is associated with starvation-induced depolarization. Starvation-induced autophagy in HL-1 cells, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and adult mouse cardiomyocytes was inhibited by CsA. Starvation failed to induce autophagy in CypD-deficient murine cardiomyocytes, whereas in myocytes from mice overexpressing CypD the levels of autophagy were enhanced even under fed conditions. Collectively, these results demonstrate a role for CypD and the MPT in the initiation of autophagy. We also analyzed the role of the MPT in the degradation of mitochondria by biochemical analysis and electron microscopy. HL-1 cells subjected to starvation in the presence of CsA had higher levels of mitochondrial proteins (by Western blot), more mitochondria and less autophagosomes (by electron microscopy) then cells starved in the absence of CsA. Our results suggest a physiologic function for CypD and the MPT in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. Starvation-induced autophagy regulated by CypD and the MPT may represent a homeostatic mechanism for cellular and mitochondrial quality control. PMID:20364102

  12. T-cell hybridoma specific for a cytochrome c peptide: specific antigen binding and interleukin 2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Carel, S; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1983-01-01

    T-cell hybridomas were obtained after fusion of BW 5147 thymoma and long-term cultured T cells specific for cytochrome c peptide 66-80 derivatized with a 2,4-dinitroaminophenyl (DNAP) group. The resulting hybridomas were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to soluble radiolabeled peptide antigen. One T-cell hybrid was positive for antigen binding. This hybrid T cell exhibits surface phenotypic markers of the parent antigen-specific T cells. The binding could be inhibited either by an excess of unlabeled homologous antigen or by cytochrome c peptide 11-25 derivatized with a 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl group. Several other peptide antigens tested failed to inhibit binding of the radioactive peptide. This suggests that a specific amino acid sequence, modified by a DNAP group, is the antigenic structure recognized by the putative T-cell receptor. In addition, direct interaction of DNAP-66-80 peptide with the hybridoma cell line induced production of the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2. Furthermore, supernatants derived from syngeneic macrophages pulsed with the relevant peptide also induced the antigen-specific hybridoma to produce interleukin 2. Images PMID:6192442

  13. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs. PMID:25173649

  14. Construction of cell type-specific logic models of signaling networks using CellNOpt.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melody K; Melas, Ioannis; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models are useful tools for understanding protein signaling networks because they provide an integrated view of pharmacological and toxicological processes at the molecular level. Here we describe an approach previously introduced based on logic modeling to generate cell-specific, mechanistic and predictive models of signal transduction. Models are derived from a network encoding prior knowledge that is trained to signaling data, and can be either binary (based on Boolean logic) or quantitative (using a recently developed formalism, constrained fuzzy logic). The approach is implemented in the freely available tool CellNetOptimizer (CellNOpt). We explain the process CellNOpt uses to train a prior knowledge network to data and illustrate its application with a toy example as well as a realistic case describing signaling networks in the HepG2 liver cancer cell line.

  15. Specific peptide interference reveals BCL6 transcriptional and oncogenic mechanisms in B-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Polo, Jose M; Dell'Oso, Tania; Ranuncolo, Stella Maris; Cerchietti, Leandro; Beck, David; Da Silva, Gustavo F; Prive, Gilbert G; Licht, Jonathan D; Melnick, Ari

    2004-12-01

    The BTB/POZ transcriptional repressor and candidate oncogene BCL6 is frequently misregulated in B-cell lymphomas. The interface through which the BCL6 BTB domain mediates recruitment of the SMRT, NCoR and BCoR corepressors was recently identified. To determine the contribution of this interface to BCL6 transcriptional and biological properties, we generated a peptide that specifically binds BCL6 and blocks corepressor recruitment in vivo. This inhibitor disrupts BCL6-mediated repression and establishment of silenced chromatin, reactivates natural BCL6 target genes, and abrogates BCL6 biological function in B cells. In BCL6-positive lymphoma cells, peptide blockade caused apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. BTB domain peptide inhibitors may constitute a novel therapeutic agent for B-cell lymphomas. PMID:15531890

  16. Specification of functional cranial placode derivatives from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Zehra; Piao, Jinghua; Niu, Lei; Ganat, Yosif; Kriks, Sonja; Zimmer, Bastian; Shi, Song-Hai; Tabar, Viviane; Studer, Lorenz

    2013-12-12

    Cranial placodes are embryonic structures essential for sensory and endocrine organ development. Human placode development has remained largely inaccessible despite the serious medical conditions caused by the dysfunction of placode-derived tissues. Here, we demonstrate the efficient derivation of cranial placodes from human pluripotent stem cells. Timed removal of the BMP inhibitor Noggin, a component of the dual-SMAD inhibition strategy of neural induction, triggers placode induction at the expense of CNS fates. Concomitant inhibition of fibroblast growth factor signaling disrupts placode derivation and induces surface ectoderm. Further fate specification at the preplacode stage enables the selective generation of placode-derived trigeminal ganglia capable of in vivo engraftment, mature lens fibers, and anterior pituitary hormone-producing cells that upon transplantation produce human growth hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone in vivo. Our results establish a powerful experimental platform to study human cranial placode development and set the stage for the development of human cell-based therapies in sensory and endocrine disease.

  17. The effect of adenovirus-specific antibodies on adenoviral vector–induced, transgene product–specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Small, Juliana C.; Haut, Larissa H.; Bian, Ang; Ertl, Hildegund C. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of neutralizing Abs to different serotypes of E1-deleted Ad vectors on the immunogenicity of the homologous Ad vector or a vector derived from a heterologous serotype. Our results showed that, as expected, even low titers of passively transferred neutralizing Abs significantly reduced the homologous vectors' ability to elicit transgene-specific CD8+ T cell responses. In addition, Abs changed the fate of transgene product–specific CD8+ T cells by promoting their transition into the central memory cell pool, which resulted in markedly enhanced expansion of transgene product–specific CD8+ T cells after a boost with a heterologous Ad vector. Non-neutralizing Abs specific to a distinct Ad serotype had no effect on the magnitude of transgene product-specific CD8+ T cells induced by a heterologous Ad vector, nor did such Abs promote induction of more resting memory CD8+ T cells. These results show that Abs to an Ad vaccine carrier affect not only the magnitude but also the profile of a vector-induced CD8+ T cell response. PMID:25082150

  18. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  19. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44highCD24lowHER2low cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  20. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses.

    PubMed

    Owens, Sean D; Kol, Amir; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection. PMID:27648075

  1. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection. PMID:27648075

  2. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection.

  3. Lineage-specific reprogramming as a strategy for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Radbod; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2008-06-15

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are endowed with extensive ability for self renewal and differentiation. These features make them a promising candidate for cell therapy. However, despite the enthusiasm and hype surrounding the potential therapeutic use of human ES cells and more recently induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, to date few reports have documented successful therapeutic outcome with ES-derived cell populations. This is probably due to two main caveats associated with ES cells, their capacity to form teratomas and the challenge of isolating the appropriate therapeutic cell population from differentiating ES cells. We have focused our efforts on the derivation of skeletal muscle progenitors from ES cells and here we will discuss the strategy of reprogramming lineage choices by overexpression of a master regulator, which has proven successful for the generation of the skeletal myogenic lineage from mouse ES cells.

  4. Analysis of T cell responses in liver allograft recipients. Evidence for deletion of donor-specific cytotoxic T cells in the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, J M; Marsh, J W; Susskind, B; Mohanakumar, T

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cell-mediated lympholysis in long-term liver allograft recipients indicated that there was a donor-specific unresponsiveness that could not be reversed by the addition of rIL-2 and/or mixed lymphocyte culture supernatant or by nonspecific stimulation of the cultures with PHA. Stimulation of recipient cells with semisyngeneic cells having both donor and third-party HLA antigens failed to reveal the presence of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific to the donor, whereas the CTL response to third-party antigens remained normal. Removal of B lymphocytes from the responding cell population did not influence the responses. Furthermore, limiting dilution analysis showed that the liver transplant recipients did not have detectable levels of CTL precursors (CTLp) reactive to the donor antigens, whereas their CTLp to third-party antigens remained normal. Donor-specific CTLp were present before and during the early post-transplant period; these cells were eliminated from the peripheral circulation by 10 mo after transplantation. Taken together, these results indicate that there is a deletion of CTLp specific to donor MHC antigens in the peripheral circulation of long-term liver allograft recipients that may account in part for the success of liver transplantation across MHC barriers. Images PMID:8450068

  5. Cell-specific viral gene therapy of a Hurthle cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rusheng; Straus, Francis H; DeGroot, Leslie J

    2002-03-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a replication-defective adenovirus-transducing thymidine kinase (TK) gene under the control of the rat Tg (rTg) promoter (AdrTgtk) in therapy of a human Hurthle cancer (XTC-1 cell) in vitro and in vivo. The ganciclovir (GCV) sensitivity of infected XTC-1 cells was assessed in vitro by H(3)-thymidine incorporation assay and Trypan-blue exclusion, and by an in vivo tumor development assay. Proliferation was strongly inhibited by adding GCV into the culture medium of infected cells, but not uninfected cells, proving cell infection and expression of TK in the XTC-1 cells. AdrTgtk, and also viruses that have the noncell-specific cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-directing expression of TK (AdCMVtk), or luciferase (AdCMVLuc), were used to transduce XTC-1 cells to evaluate killing effects. After infection with AdCMVtk or AdrTgtk, followed by GCV treatment, 70% of infected cells were killed in the presence of GCV, compared with less than 20% of cells infected by AdCMVLuc and treated with GCV. In vivo toxicity was studied in BALB/c mice. When adenovirus is given iv, liver is the major organ infected. No significant changes of the serum transaminase levels and no histological abnormalities were found in animals treated with AdrTgtk/GCV given iv, compared with control animals. High levels of serum transaminases, lymphocyte infiltration, some Kupffer's cell prominence, and extensive single-cell hepatocyte death were found in AdCMVtk/GCV-treated animals, indicating severe liver damage induced, as expected, by the noncell-specific CMV promoter. XTL-1 cells (2 x 10(6)) were injected sc into BALB/c-severe combined immunodeficient mice (BALB/c-SCID), and the mice developed tumors after 3 wk. After intratumoral injection of AdrTgtk and treatment with GCV, tumors stabilized in 15 of 17 mice within 3 wk, 9 tumors remained stabilized after 5 wk of treatment, and 2 disappeared during observation. In AdCMVLuc/GCV-treated control mice, almost all tumors grew

  6. Method of removing the effects of electrical shorts and shunts created during the fabrication process of a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nostrand, Gerald E.; Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    A method of removing the effects of electrical shorts and shunts created during the fabrication process and improving the performance of a solar cell with a thick film cermet electrode opposite to the incident surface by applying a reverse bias voltage of sufficient magnitude to burn out the electrical shorts and shunts but less than the break down voltage of the solar cell.

  7. Toxicity Minimized Cryoprotectant Addition and Removal Procedures for Adherent Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Allyson Fry; Glasscock, Cameron; McClanahan, Danielle R.; Benson, James D.; Higgins, Adam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-free cryopreservation, known as vitrification, is an appealing approach for banking of adherent cells and tissues because it prevents dissociation and morphological damage that may result from ice crystal formation. However, current vitrification methods are often limited by the cytotoxicity of the concentrated cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions that are required to suppress ice formation. Recently, we described a mathematical strategy for identifying minimally toxic CPA equilibration procedures based on the minimization of a toxicity cost function. Here we provide direct experimental support for the feasibility of these methods when applied to adherent endothelial cells. We first developed a concentration- and temperature-dependent toxicity cost function by exposing the cells to a range of glycerol concentrations at 21°C and 37°C, and fitting the resulting viability data to a first order cell death model. This cost function was then numerically minimized in our state constrained optimization routine to determine addition and removal procedures for 17 molal (mol/kg water) glycerol solutions. Using these predicted optimal procedures, we obtained 81% recovery after exposure to vitrification solutions, as well as successful vitrification with the relatively slow cooling and warming rates of 50°C/min and 130°C/min. In comparison, conventional multistep CPA equilibration procedures resulted in much lower cell yields of about 10%. Our results demonstrate the potential for rational design of minimally toxic vitrification procedures and pave the way for extension of our optimization approach to other adherent cell types as well as more complex systems such as tissues and organs. PMID:26605546

  8. Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

  9. Innate cell communication kick-starts pathogen-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C.; Yap, George S.; Gause, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Innate cells are responsible for the rapid recognition of infection and mediate essential mechanisms of pathogen elimination, and also facilitate adaptive immune responses. We review here the numerous intricate interactions among innate cells that initiate protective immunity. The efficient eradication of pathogens depends on the coordinated actions of multiple cells, including innate cells and epithelial cells. Rather than acting as isolated effector cells, innate cells are in constant communication with other responding cells of the immune system, locally and distally. These interactions are critically important for the efficient control of primary infections as well for the development of ‘trained’ innate cells that facilitate the rapid elimination of homologous or heterologous infections. PMID:27002843

  10. The bi-specific CD3 x NCAM antibody: a model to preactivate T cells prior to tumour cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M; Ernestus, K; Kemshead, J; Klehr, M; Von Bergwelt-Baildon, M S; Schinköthe, T; Schultze, J L; Berthold, F

    2003-11-01

    To target the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, CD56) on neuroblastoma by T cell-based immunotherapy we have generated a bi-specific CD3 x NCAM antibody (OE-1). This antibody can be used to redirect T cells to NCAM+ cells. Expectedly, the antibody binds specifically to NCAM+ neuroblastoma cells and CD3+ T cells. OE-1 induces T cell activation, expansion and effector function in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. T cell activation was shown to depend on the presence of normal natural killer (NK) cells in the culture. Interestingly, while PBMC- derived T cells were activated by OE-1, NK cells were almost completely depleted, suggesting that T cells activated by OE-1 deleted the NK cells. Activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells differentiate into a larger CCR7+ central memory and a smaller CCR7- effector memory cell population. Most importantly, preactivated T cells were highly cytotoxic for neuroblastoma cells. In eight of 11 experiments tumour-directed cytotoxicity was enhanced when NK cells were present during preactivation with OE-1. These data strongly support a bi-phasic therapeutic concept of primarily stimulating T cells with the bi-specific antibody in the presence of normal NCAM+ cells to induce T cell activation, migratory capacity and finally tumour cell lysis.

  11. Virus-specific T cells engineered to coexpress tumor-specific receptors: persistence and antitumor activity in individuals with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pule, Martin A; Savoldo, Barbara; Myers, G Doug; Rossig, Claudia; Russell, Heidi V; Dotti, Gianpietro; Huls, M Helen; Liu, Enli; Gee, Adrian P; Mei, Zhuyong; Yvon, Eric; Weiss, Heidi L; Liu, Hao; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2008-11-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed to nonviral tumor-associated antigens do not survive long term and have limited antitumor activity in vivo, in part because such tumor cells typically lack the appropriate costimulatory molecules. We therefore engineered Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific CTLs to express a chimeric antigen receptor directed to the diasialoganglioside GD2, a nonviral tumor-associated antigen expressed by human neuroblastoma cells. We reasoned that these genetically engineered lymphocytes would receive optimal costimulation after engagement of their native receptors, enhancing survival and antitumor activity mediated through their chimeric receptors. Here we show in individuals with neuroblastoma that EBV-specific CTLs expressing a chimeric GD2-specific receptor indeed survive longer than T cells activated by the CD3-specific antibody OKT3 and expressing the same chimeric receptor but lacking virus specificity. Infusion of these genetically modified cells seemed safe and was associated with tumor regression or necrosis in half of the subjects tested. Hence, virus-specific CTLs can be modified to function as tumor-directed effector cells.

  12. Virus-specific T cells engineered to coexpress tumor-specific receptors: persistence and antitumor activity in individuals with neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pule, Martin A; Savoldo, Barbara; Myers, G Doug; Rossig, Claudia; Russell, Heidi V; Dotti, Gianpietro; Huls, M Helen; Liu, Enli; Gee, Adrian P; Mei, Zhuyong; Yvon, Eric; Weiss, Heidi L; Liu, Hao; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed to nonviral tumor–associated antigens do not survive long term and have limited antitumor activity in vivo, in part because such tumor cells typically lack the appropriate costimulatory molecules. We therefore engineered Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific CTLs to express a chimeric antigen receptor directed to the diasialoganglioside GD2, a nonviral tumor–associated antigen expressed by human neuroblastoma cells. We reasoned that these genetically engineered lymphocytes would receive optimal costimulation after engagement of their native receptors, enhancing survival and antitumor activity mediated through their chimeric receptors. Here we show in individuals with neuroblastoma that EBV-specific CTLs expressing a chimeric GD2-specific receptor indeed survive longer than T cells activated by the CD3-specific antibody OKT3 and expressing the same chimeric receptor but lacking virus specificity. Infusion of these genetically modified cells seemed safe and was associated with tumor regression or necrosis in half of the subjects tested. Hence, virus-specific CTLs can be modified to function as tumor-directed effector cells. PMID:18978797

  13. Hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) removal from biologically treated landfill leachate by powder-activated carbon (PAC), granular-activated carbon (GAC) and biomimetic fat cell (BFC).

    PubMed

    Liyan, Song; Youcai, Zhao; Weimin, Sun; Ziyang, Lou

    2009-04-30

    Biological pretreatment efficiently remove organic matter from landfill leachate, but further removal of refractory hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) is hard even with advanced treatment. In this work, three-stage-aged refuse bioreactor (ARB) efficiently removed chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of fresh leachate produced in Shanghai laogang landfill, from 8603 to 451 mg L(-1) and 1368 to 30 mg L(-1), respectively. In downstream treatment, 3 g L(-1) powder-activated carbon (PAC), granular-activated carbon (GAC) and biomimetic fat cell (BFC) removed 89.2, 73.4 and 81.1% HOCs, but only 24.6, 19.1 and 8.9% COD, respectively. Through the specific HOCs accumulation characteristics of BFC, about 11.2% HOCs with low molecular weight (<1000 Da) in the biologically treated leachate were concluded. Since HOCs are competitively trapped by dissolved organic matters (DOM), the ultimate removal of HOCs from leachate is unreachable by activated carbon or BFC. It was also found that the biologically treated leachate effluent exhibited a wide molecular weight distribution (34-514,646 Da). These constitutes are derived from both autochthonous and allochthonous matters as well as biological activities.

  14. Synovium-derived stem cells: a tissue-specific stem cell for cartilage engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brendan A; Pei, Ming

    2012-08-01

    Articular cartilage is difficult to heal once injury or disease occurs. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation is a biological treatment with good prognosis, but donor site morbidity and limited cell source are disadvantages. Currently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising approach for cartilage regeneration. Despite there being various sources, the best candidate for cartilage regeneration is the one with the greatest chondrogenic potential and the least hypertrophic differentiation. These properties are able to insure that the regenerated tissue is hyaline cartilage of high quality. This review article will summarize relevant literature to justify synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) as a tissue-specific stem cell for chondrogenesis by comparing synovium and cartilage with respect to anatomical location and functional structure, comparing the growth characterization and chondrogenic capacity of SDSCs and MSCs, evaluating the application of SDSCs in regenerative medicine and diseases, and discussing potential future directions.

  15. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  16. Cell-type-specific modelling of intracellular calcium signalling: a urothelial cell model.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Peter A; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2013-09-01

    Calcium signalling plays a central role in regulating a wide variety of cell processes. A number of calcium signalling models exist in the literature that are capable of reproducing a variety of experimentally observed calcium transients. These models have been used to examine in more detail the mechanisms underlying calcium transients, but very rarely has a model been directly linked to a particular cell type and experimentally verified. It is important to show that this can be achieved within the general theoretical framework adopted by these models. Here, we develop a framework designed specifically for modelling cytosolic calcium transients in urothelial cells. Where possible, we draw upon existing calcium signalling models, integrating descriptions of components known to be important in this cell type from a number of studies in the literature. We then add descriptions of several additional pathways that play a specific role in urothelial cell signalling, including an explicit ionic influx term and an active pumping mechanism that drives the cytosolic calcium concentration to a target equilibrium. The resulting one-pool model of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-dependent calcium signalling relates the cytosolic, extracellular and ER calcium concentrations and can generate a wide range of calcium transients, including spikes, bursts, oscillations and sustained elevations in the cytosolic calcium concentration. Using single-variate robustness and multivariate sensitivity analyses, we quantify how varying each of the parameters of the model leads to changes in key features of the calcium transient, such as initial peak amplitude and the frequency of bursting or spiking, and in the transitions between bursting- and plateau-dominated modes. We also show that, novel to our urothelial cell model, the ionic and purinergic P2Y pathways make distinct contributions to the calcium transient. We then validate the model using human bladder epithelial cells grown in monolayer cell

  17. Transformation-specific cell killing by a cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor and cellular binding

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, Daniel K.; Isselbacher, Kurt J.

    1982-01-01

    Cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor (CAGA glycoprotein), a small glycoprotein purified from human malignant effusion that selectively kills transformed cells, was tritiated by reductive methylation in the presence of NaB3H4. CAGA-glycoprotein-sensitive cells (baby-hamster kidney cells transformed by polyoma virus and chick-embryo fibroblasts infected with Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus grown at 37°C, the permissive temperature) bound 3–5-fold more 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein than did their CAGA-glycoprotein-resistant non-transformed counterparts. The Rous-sarcoma-virus-infected chick-embryo fibroblasts grown at non-permissive temperature (41°C) bound an intermediate amount of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein; however, this intermediate amount appeared to be sufficient to induce inhibition of cell growth when the infected chick-embryo fibroblasts treated at 41°C were switched to 37°C. Binding of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was time- and temperature-dependent and was not inhibited by monosaccharide. Binding was completely inhibited by the oligosaccharide liberated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment or by exhaustive Pronase digestion of intact CAGA glycoprotein. However, the isolated oligosaccharide failed to demonstrate the growth-inhibition characteristics of the intact glycopeptide. Binding of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was unaffected by co-incubation with the peptide core released by endoglucosaminidase H treatment. 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein bound to intact cells could be removed by trypsin treatment up to 4h after addition of the glycoprotein but not thereafter. This time course paralleled the decreasing reversibility of growth inhibition. However, all 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was found in the supernatant when cells were first disrupted by sonication followed by trypsin treatment for up to 12h. 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein linked to Sepharose 4B failed to cause growth inhibition in CAGA

  18. Transformation-specific cell killing by a cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor and cellular binding.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, D K; Isselbacher, K J

    1982-11-15

    Cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor (CAGA glycoprotein), a small glycoprotein purified from human malignant effusion that selectively kills transformed cells, was tritiated by reductive methylation in the presence of NaB(3)H(4). CAGA-glycoprotein-sensitive cells (baby-hamster kidney cells transformed by polyoma virus and chick-embryo fibroblasts infected with Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus grown at 37 degrees C, the permissive temperature) bound 3-5-fold more (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein than did their CAGA-glycoprotein-resistant non-transformed counterparts. The Rous-sarcoma-virus-infected chick-embryo fibroblasts grown at non-permissive temperature (41 degrees C) bound an intermediate amount of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein; however, this intermediate amount appeared to be sufficient to induce inhibition of cell growth when the infected chick-embryo fibroblasts treated at 41 degrees C were switched to 37 degrees C. Binding of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was time- and temperature-dependent and was not inhibited by monosaccharide. Binding was completely inhibited by the oligosaccharide liberated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment or by exhaustive Pronase digestion of intact CAGA glycoprotein. However, the isolated oligosaccharide failed to demonstrate the growth-inhibition characteristics of the intact glycopeptide. Binding of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was unaffected by co-incubation with the peptide core released by endoglucosaminidase H treatment. (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein bound to intact cells could be removed by trypsin treatment up to 4h after addition of the glycoprotein but not thereafter. This time course paralleled the decreasing reversibility of growth inhibition. However, all (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was found in the supernatant when cells were first disrupted by sonication followed by trypsin treatment for up to 12h. (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein linked to Sepharose 4B failed to cause

  19. Region-Specific Microtubule Transport in Motile Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yvon, Anne-Marie C.; Wadsworth, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Photoactivation and photobleaching of fluorescence were used to determine the mechanism by which microtubules (MTs) are remodeled in PtK2 cells during fibroblast-like motility in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). The data show that MTs are transported during cell motility in an actomyosin-dependent manner, and that the direction of transport depends on the dominant force in the region examined. MTs in the leading lamella move rearward relative to the substrate, as has been reported in newt cells (Waterman-Storer, C.M., and E.D. Salmon. 1997. J. Cell Biol. 139:417–434), whereas MTs in the cell body and in the retraction tail move forward, in the direction of cell locomotion. In the transition zone between the peripheral lamella and the cell body, a subset of MTs remains stationary with respect to the substrate, whereas neighboring MTs are transported either forward, with the cell body, or rearward, with actomyosin retrograde flow. In addition to transport, the photoactivated region frequently broadens, indicating that individual marked MTs are moved either at different rates or in different directions. Mark broadening is also observed in nonmotile cells, indicating that this aspect of transport is independent of cell locomotion. Quantitative measurements of the dissipation of photoactivated fluorescence show that, compared with MTs in control nonmotile cells, MT turnover is increased twofold in the lamella of HGF-treated cells but unchanged in the retraction tail, demonstrating that microtubule turnover is regionally regulated. PMID:11086002

  20. DNA Replication Licensing Affects Cell Proliferation or Endoreplication in a Cell Type–Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    del Mar Castellano, María; Boniotti, María Beatrice; Caro, Elena; Schnittger, Arp; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the function of DNA replication licensing components (Cdc6 and Cdt1, among others) is crucial for cell proliferation and genome stability. However, little is known about their role in whole organisms and whether licensing control interfaces with differentiation and developmental programs. Here, we study Arabidopsis thaliana CDT1, its regulation, and the consequences of overriding licensing control. The availability of AtCDT1 is strictly regulated at two levels: (1) at the transcription level, by E2F and growth-arresting signals, and (2) posttranscriptionally, by CDK phosphorylation, a step that is required for its proteasome-mediated degradation. We also show that CDC6 and CDT1 are key targets for the coordination of cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. Indeed, altered CDT1 or CDC6 levels have cell type–specific effects in developing Arabidopsis plants: in leaf cells competent to divide, cell proliferation is stimulated, whereas in cells programmed to undergo differentiation-associated endoreplication rounds, extra endocycles are triggered. Thus, we propose that DNA replication licensing control is critical for the proper maintenance of proliferative potential, developmental programs, and morphogenetic patterns. PMID:15316110

  1. Equal modulation of endothelial cell function by four distinct tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate multiple end-stage mesenchymal cell types and constitute a promising population of cells for regenerative therapies. Additionally, there is increasing evidence supporting other trophic activities of MSCs, including the ability to enable formation of vasculature in vivo. Although MSCs were originally isolated from the bone marrow, the presence of these cells in the stromal vascular fraction of multiple adult tissues has been recently recognized. However, it is unknown whether the capacity to modulate vasculogenesis is ubiquitous to all MSCs regardless of their tissue of origin. Here, we demonstrated that tissue-resident MSCs isolated from four distinct tissues have equal capacity to modulate endothelial cell function, including formation of vascular networks in vivo. MSCs were isolated from four murine tissues, including bone marrow, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. In culture, all four MSC populations secreted a plethora of pro-angiogenic factors that unequivocally induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). In vivo, co-implantation of MSCs with ECFCs into mice generated an extensive network of blood vessels with ECFCs specifically lining the lumens and MSCs occupying perivascular positions. Importantly, there were no differences among all four MSCs evaluated. Our studies suggest that the capacity to modulate the formation of vasculature is a ubiquitous property of all MSCs, irrespective of their original anatomical location. These results validate multiple tissues as potential sources of MSCs for future cell-based vascular therapies.

  2. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Eri O.; Aure, Marit H.; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts. PMID:26751783

  3. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Eri O; Aure, Marit H; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts. PMID:26751783

  4. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Eri O; Aure, Marit H; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts.

  5. Removal of trace organic contaminants by nitrifying activated sludge and whole-cell and crude enzyme extract of Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shufan; Hai, Faisal I; Nghiem, Long D; Roddick, Felicity; Price, William E

    2013-01-01

    The resistance of certain anthropogenic trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) to conventional wastewater treatment and their potential adverse effects on human and ecological health raise significant concerns and have prompted research on their bioremediation by white-rot fungi. This study compared the removal efficiencies of four widespread TrOCs: carbamazepine (CBZ), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), bisphenol A (BPA) and diclofenac (DCF), by nitrifying activated sludge as well as whole-cell and extracellular enzyme (laccase) extract of the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Fungal whole-cell culture removed only BPA and DCF but with high efficiencies (>90%) while the mixed nitrifying culture removed all compounds, although by levels of only 5-40%. Rapid initial sorption on fungal mycelium (44 ± 13% for DCF) was observed; however, biodegradation governed the overall removal. Performance comparison between fungal whole-cell and extracellular extract revealed that, unlike BPA, a catalytic pathway independent of extracellular laccase was responsible for DCF removal. Addition of mediator (1-hydroxybenzotriazole) to extracellular extract improved the removal of SMX which bears an electron donor group, but not that of the resistant compound CBZ. PMID:23508144

  6. Most microbe-specific naïve CD4⁺ T cells produce memory cells during infection.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Fife, Brian T; Pagan, Antonio J; Kotov, Dmitri I; Goldberg, Michael F; Jenkins, Marc K

    2016-01-29

    Infection elicits CD4(+) memory T lymphocytes that participate in protective immunity. Although memory cells are the progeny of naïve T cells, it is unclear that all naïve cells from a polyclonal repertoire have memory cell potential. Using a single-cell adoptive transfer and spleen biopsy method, we found that in mice, essentially all microbe-specific naïve cells produced memory cells during infection. Different clonal memory cell populations had different B cell or macrophage helper compositions that matched effector cell populations generated much earlier in the response. Thus, each microbe-specific naïve CD4(+) T cell produces a distinctive ratio of effector cell types early in the immune response that is maintained as some cells in the clonal population become memory cells.

  7. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  8. Mechanical continuity and reversible chromosome disassembly within intact genomes removed from living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Bojanowski, K.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Chromatin is thought to be structurally discontinuous because it is packaged into morphologically distinct chromosomes that appear physically isolated from one another in metaphase preparations used for cytogenetic studies. However, analysis of chromosome positioning and movement suggest that different chromosomes often behave as if they were physically connected in interphase as well as mitosis. To address this paradox directly, we used a microsurgical technique to physically remove nucleoplasm or chromosomes from living cells under isotonic conditions. Using this approach, we found that pulling a single nucleolus or chromosome out from interphase or mitotic cells resulted in sequential removal of the remaining nucleoli and chromosomes, interconnected by a continuous elastic thread. Enzymatic treatments of interphase nucleoplasm and chromosome chains held under tension revealed that mechanical continuity within the chromatin was mediated by elements sensitive to DNase or micrococcal nuclease, but not RNases, formamide at high temperature, or proteases. In contrast, mechanical coupling between mitotic chromosomes and the surrounding cytoplasm appeared to be mediated by gelsolin-sensitive microfilaments. Furthermore, when ion concentrations were raised and lowered, both the chromosomes and the interconnecting strands underwent multiple rounds of decondensation and recondensation. As a result of these dynamic structural alterations, the mitotic chains also became sensitive to disruption by restriction enzymes. Ion-induced chromosome decondensation could be blocked by treatment with DNA binding dyes, agents that reduce protein disulfide linkages within nuclear matrix, or an antibody directed against histones. Fully decondensed chromatin strands also could be induced to recondense into chromosomes with pre-existing size, shape, number, and position by adding anti-histone antibodies. Conversely, removal of histones by proteolysis or heparin treatment produced chromosome

  9. Harnessing Candida tenuis and Pichia stipitis in whole-cell bioreductions of o-chloroacetophenone: stereoselectivity, cell activity, in situ substrate supply and product removal.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Christoph; Krahulec, Stefan; Nidetzky, Bernd; Kratzer, Regina

    2013-06-01

    Generally, recombinant and native microorganisms can be employed as whole-cell catalysts. The application of native hosts, however, shortens the process development time by avoiding multiple steps of strain construction. Herein, we studied the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of o-chloroacetophenone by isolated xylose reductases and their native hosts Candida tenuis and Pichia stipitis. The natural hosts were benchmarked against Escherichia coli strains co-expressing xylose reductase and a dehydrogenase for co-enzyme recycling. Xylose-grown cells of C. tenuis and P. stipitis displayed specific o-chloroacetophenone reductase activities of 366 and 90 U gCDW (-1) , respectively, in the cell-free extracts. Fresh biomass was employed in batch reductions of 100 mM o-chloroacetophenone using glucose as co-substrate. Reaction stops at a product concentration of about 15 mM, which suggests sensitivity of the catalyst towards the formed product. In situ substrate supply and product removal by the addition of 40% hexane increased catalyst stability. Optimisation of the aqueous phase led to a (S)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)ethanol concentration of 71 mM (ee > 99.9%) obtained with 44 gCDW L(-1) of C. tenuis. The final difference in productivities between native C. tenuis and recombinant E. coli was < 1.7-fold. The optically pure product is a required key intermediate in the synthesis of a new class of chemotherapeutic substances (polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors). PMID:23589466

  10. RNAi Reveals Phase-Specific Global Regulators of Human Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Chan, Jun-Wei; Chong, Zheng-Shan; Wang, Hao Fei; Guo, Hong Chao; Satapathy, Sandeep; Ma, Dongrui; Goh, Germaine Yen Lin; Khattar, Ekta; Yang, Lin; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chang, Young-Tae; Collins, James J; Daley, George Q; Wee, Keng Boon; Farran, Chadi A El; Li, Hu; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Bard, Frederic A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2016-06-21

    Incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms at work continues to hamper efforts to maximize reprogramming efficiency. Here, we present a systematic genome-wide RNAi screen to determine the global regulators during the early stages of human reprogramming. Our screen identifies functional repressors and effectors that act to impede or promote the reprogramming process. Repressors and effectors form close interacting networks in pathways, including RNA processing, G protein signaling, protein ubiquitination, and chromatin modification. Combinatorial knockdown of five repressors (SMAD3, ZMYM2, SFRS11, SAE1, and ESET) synergistically resulted in ∼85% TRA-1-60-positive cells. Removal of the novel splicing factor SFRS11 during reprogramming is accompanied by rapid acquisition of pluripotency-specific spliced forms. Mechanistically, SFRS11 regulates exon skipping and mutually exclusive splicing of transcripts in genes involved in cell differentiation, mRNA splicing, and chromatin modification. Our study provides insights into the reprogramming process, which comprises comprehensive and multi-layered transcriptional, splicing, and epigenetic machineries. PMID:27292646

  11. DNA conformation driven by AP-1 triggers cell-specific expression via a strong epithelial enhancer.

    PubMed

    Virolle, T; Djabari, Z; Ortonne, J P; Aberdam, D

    2000-10-01

    We report here the characterization of the regulatory region of the human LAMA3 gene, coding for the alpha3A chain of laminin-5. A 202 bp fragment is sufficient to confer epithelial-specific expression to a thymidine kinase promoter through the cooperative effect of three AP-1 binding sites. Remarkably, removal of the sequences located between the AP-1 sites does not modify the promoter activity in keratinocytes but allows strong expression in fibroblasts. Replacement of the deleted sequences by non-homologous ones fully restores the restricted enhancement in keratinocytes. Functional analysis and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that a minimal distance between the AP-1 sites is required for the enhancer DNA fragment to adopt a particular conformation driven by the binding of Jun-Fos heterodimers. In non-permissive cells, this conformation leads to the anchorage of non-DNA-binding fibroblastic cofactors to form an inhibitory ternary complex. Therefore, our results describe for the first time an unusual conformation-dependent epithelial-specific enhancer. PMID:11269498

  12. Gene-Specific Assessment of Guanine Oxidation as an Epigenetic Modulator for Cardiac Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonghoon; Park, Jong Woo; Oh, Hawmok; Maria, Fernanda S; Kang, Jaeku; Tian, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics have essential roles in development and human diseases. Compared to the complex histone modifications, epigenetic changes on mammalian DNA are as simple as methylation on cytosine. Guanine, however, can be oxidized as an epigenetic change which can undergo base-pair transversion, causing a genetic difference. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules for embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation, possibly through transient changes on genomic DNA such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). Technical limitations on detecting such DNA modifications, however, restrict the investigation of the role of 8-oxoG in ESC differentiation. Here, we developed a Hoogsteen base pairing-mediated PCR-sequencing assay to detect 8-oxoG lesions that can subsequently cause G to T transversions during PCR. We then used this assay to assess the epigenetic and transient 8-oxoG formation in the Tbx5 gene of R1 mouse ESCs subjected to oxidative stress by removing 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) from the culture media. To our surprise, significantly higher numbers of 8-oxoG-mediated G∙C to C∙G transversion, not G∙C to T∙A, were detected at 7th and 9th base position from the transcription start site of exon 1 of Tbx5 in ESCs in the (-)2ME than (+)2ME group (p < 0.05). This was consistent with the decrease in the amount of amplifiable of DNA harboring the 8-oxoG lesions at the Tbx5 promoter region in the oxidative stressed ESCs. The ESCs responded to oxidative stress, possibly through the epigenetic effects of guanine oxidation with decreased proliferation (p < 0.05) and increased formation of beating embryoid bodies (EBs; p < 0.001). Additionally, the epigenetic changes of guanine induced up-regulation of Ogg1 and PolB, two base excision repairing genes for 8-oxoG, in ESCs treated with (-)2ME (p < 0.01). Together, we developed a gene-specific and direct quantification assay for guanine oxidation. Using oxidative stressed

  13. Gene-Specific Assessment of Guanine Oxidation as an Epigenetic Modulator for Cardiac Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonghoon; Park, Jong Woo; Oh, Hawmok; Maria, Fernanda S.; Kang, Jaeku; Tian, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics have essential roles in development and human diseases. Compared to the complex histone modifications, epigenetic changes on mammalian DNA are as simple as methylation on cytosine. Guanine, however, can be oxidized as an epigenetic change which can undergo base-pair transversion, causing a genetic difference. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules for embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation, possibly through transient changes on genomic DNA such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). Technical limitations on detecting such DNA modifications, however, restrict the investigation of the role of 8-oxoG in ESC differentiation. Here, we developed a Hoogsteen base pairing-mediated PCR-sequencing assay to detect 8-oxoG lesions that can subsequently cause G to T transversions during PCR. We then used this assay to assess the epigenetic and transient 8-oxoG formation in the Tbx5 gene of R1 mouse ESCs subjected to oxidative stress by removing 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) from the culture media. To our surprise, significantly higher numbers of 8-oxoG-mediated G∙C to C∙G transversion, not G∙C to T∙A, were detected at 7th and 9th base position from the transcription start site of exon 1 of Tbx5 in ESCs in the (-)2ME than (+)2ME group (p < 0.05). This was consistent with the decrease in the amount of amplifiable of DNA harboring the 8-oxoG lesions at the Tbx5 promoter region in the oxidative stressed ESCs. The ESCs responded to oxidative stress, possibly through the epigenetic effects of guanine oxidation with decreased proliferation (p < 0.05) and increased formation of beating embryoid bodies (EBs; p < 0.001). Additionally, the epigenetic changes of guanine induced up-regulation of Ogg1 and PolB, two base excision repairing genes for 8-oxoG, in ESCs treated with (-)2ME (p < 0.01). Together, we developed a gene-specific and direct quantification assay for guanine oxidation. Using oxidative stressed

  14. Getting down to specifics: profiling gene expression and protein-DNA interactions in a cell type-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Colin D.; Southall, Tony D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of multicellular organisms are comprised of an extraordinary range of cell types, with different properties and gene expression profiles. Understanding what makes each cell type unique, and how their individual characteristics are attributed, are key questions for both developmental and neurobiologists alike. The brain is an excellent example of the cellular diversity expressed in the majority of eukaryotes. The mouse brain comprises of approximately 75 million neurons varying in morphology, electrophysiology, and preferences for synaptic partners. A powerful process in beginning to pick apart the mechanisms that specify individual characteristics of the cell, as well as their fate, is to profile gene expression patterns, chromatin states, and transcriptional networks in a cell type-specific manner, i.e. only profiling the cells of interest in a particular tissue. Depending on the organism, the questions being investigated, and the material available, certain cell type-specific profiling methods are more suitable than others. This chapter reviews the approaches presently available for selecting and isolating specific cell types and evaluates their key features. PMID:26410031

  15. Vaccination of human subjects expands both specific and bystander memory T cells but antibody production remains vaccine specific.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Gianfranco; Roddick, Joanna; McNicholl, Feargal; Stevenson, Freda K

    2006-04-01

    Human subjects maintain long-term immunologic memory against infective organisms but the mechanism is unclear. CD4+ T-helper memory (Thmem) cells are pivotal in controlling humoral and cellular responses, therefore their longevity and response to vaccination are critical for maintenance of protective immunity. To probe the dynamics of the Thmem-cell response to antigenic challenge, we investigated subjects following a booster injection with tetanus toxoid (TT). Expansion of TT-specific Thmem cells and cytokine production showed complex kinetics. Strikingly, parallel expansion and cytokine production occurred in pre-existing Thmem cells specific for 2 other common antigens: purified protein derivative of tuberculin and Candida albicans. Bystander expansion occurred in Thmem but not in Thnaive cells. Antibody production against TT peaked approximately 2 weeks after vaccination and gradually declined. However, pre-existing antibody against the other antigens did not change. It appears that although all Thmem cells are readily stimulated to expand, antibody responses are controlled by antigen availability. These findings relate to the maintenance of memory and have consequences for assessments of specific T-cell responses to vaccination.

  16. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4{sup +} T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Timothy J.; Castrucci, Maria R.; Padrick, Ryan C.; Bradley, Linda M.; Topham, David J. . E-mail: david_topham@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-09-30

    To track epitope-specific CD4{sup +} T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA{sub 323-339} epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVA{sub II}, replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4{sup +} T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4{sup +} T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA{sub 323-339} epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4{sup +} T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection.

  17. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E; El-Sayed, Mesbah A; Shoaib, Mahmoud B; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  18. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M.; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H.; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E.; El-Sayed, Mesbah A.; Shoaib, Mahmoud B.; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  19. Cell type-specific responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Greulich, C; Diendorf, J; Gessmann, J; Simon, T; Habijan, T; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Epple, M; Köller, M

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their remarkable antimicrobial activity. In biomedicine, Ag-NP are coated onto or embedded in wound dressings, surgical instruments and bone substitute biomaterials, such as silver-containing calcium phosphate cements. Free Ag-NP and silver ions are released from these coatings or after the degradation of a biomaterial, and may come into close contact with blood cells. Despite the widespread use of Ag-NP as an antimicrobial agent, there is a serious lack of information on the biological effects of Ag-NP on human blood cells. In this study, the uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral monocytes and lymphocytes (T-cells) was analyzed, and the influence of nanosilver on cell biological functions (proliferation, the expression of adhesion molecules, cytokine release and the generation of reactive oxygen species) was studied. After cell culture in the presence of monodispersed Ag-NP (5-30μgml(-1) silver concentration), agglomerates of nanoparticles were detected within monocytes (CD14+) but not in T-cells (CD3+) by light microscopy, flow cytometry and combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. The uptake rate of nanoparticles was concentration dependent, and the silver agglomerates were typically found in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a concentration-dependent activation (e.g. an increased expression of adhesion molecule CD54) of monocytes at Ag-NP concentrations of 10-15μgml(-1) was observed, and cytotoxicity of Ag-NP-treated monocytes was observed at Ag-NP levels of 25μgml(-1) and higher. However, no modulation of T-cell proliferation was observed in the presence of Ag-NP. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a cell-type-specific uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant cellular responses after exposure.

  20. The CellML 1.1 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Autumn; Hedley, Warren; Nelson, Melanie; Lloyd, Catherine; Halstead, Matt; Bullivant, David; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter; Nielsen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This document specifies CellML 1.1, an XML-based language for describing and exchanging models of cellular and subcellular processes. MathML embedded in CellML documents is used to define the underlying mathematics of models. Models consist of a network of reusable components, each with variables and equations manipulating those variables. Models may import other models to create systems of increasing complexity. Metadata may be embedded in CellML documents using RDF. PMID:26528557

  1. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal efficiency, and measures of velocity using several tools. Computational fluid dynamics was used first to characterize hydraulics in the proposed retrofit that included removal of the traditional Burrows pond dividing wall and establishment of four counter rotating cells with appropriate drains and inlet water jets. Hydraulic residence time was subsequently established in the four full scale test tanks using measures of conductivity of a salt tracer introduced into the systems both with and without fish present. Vertical and horizontal velocities were also measured with acoustic Doppler velocimetry in transects across each of the rearing systems. Finally, we introduced ABS sinking beads that simulated fish solids then followed the kinetics of their removal via the drains to establish relative purge rates. The mixed cell raceway provided higher mean velocities and a more uniform velocity distribution than did the Burrows pond. Vectors revealed well-defined, counter-rotating cells in the mixed cell raceway, and were likely contributing factors in achieving a relatively high particle removal efficiency-88.6% versus 8.0% during the test period. We speculate retrofits of rearing ponds to mixed cell systems will improve both the rearing environments for the fish and solids removal, improving the efficiency and bio-security of fish culture. We recommend further testing in hatchery production trials to evaluate fish physiology and growth.

  2. Removal of Cr{sup 6+} from waste water by dead cells of Pachymeniopsis sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Y.H.; Yang, J.E.; Rhee, H.I.

    1995-12-31

    A red algae, Pachymeniopsis sp., was screened as a Cr{sup +6} specific biosorbent and its adsorption characteristics for Cr{sup +6} were studied. It is well known that several heavy metal ions such as cadmium, nickel, mercury can be selectively adsorbed by some specific marine algae. However, so far there has been no report that the biosorbent specific for Cr{sup +6} adsorption was successfully developed. Thus, trials of searching for a high Cr{sup +6} selective biosorbent with high adsorption capacity were made by examination of the Cr{sup +6} adsorption capacities of about fifty species of red, brown, or green marine algae which were sampled from the east coast of Korea. As the result of screening, a red marine algae showed most excellent adsorption characteristics among them and it was classified as Pachymeniopsis sp. Adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics were investigated to examine the applicability of Pachymeniopsis sp. as a Cr{sup +6} specific biosorbent. Pachymeniopsis sp. showed high selectivity for Cr{sup +6} ions since it showed low adsorption capacities for other heavy metal ions such as cadmium and manganese ions. An investigation of adsorption isotherms of dried powder of the Pachymeniopsis sp. for Cr{sup +6} adsorption at 25 C, pH 5.0 and 7.0 showed Langmuir type dependence. The isotherms show that the maximum Cr{sup +6} adsorption capacity of selected algae is about 20 (mg/g dry wt. of adsorbent). The 500 ml of artificial waste water with initial Cr{sup +6} concentration of 100 ppm was treated with 2.5 g of dried powder of Pachymeniopsis sp. in a batch slurry reactor. About 30 ppm of Cr{sup +6} remained after 1 hr`s contacting, showing 70% removal of Cr{sup +6}.

  3. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  4. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis

    2016-02-09

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer.

  5. Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-09-23

    Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

  6. An experimental study of Au removal from solution by non-metabolizing bacterial cells and their exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Janice P. L.; Song, Zhen; Bunker, Bruce A.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we examine the initial interactions between aqueous Au(III)-hydroxide-chloride aqueous complexes and bacteria by measuring the effects of non-metabolizing cells on the speciation and distribution of Au. We conducted batch Au(III) removal experiments, measuring the kinetics and pH dependence of Au removal, and tracking valence state transformations and binding environments using XANES spectroscopy. These experiments were conducted using non-metabolizing cells of Bacillus subtilis or Pseudomonas putida suspended in a 5 ppm Au(III)-(hydroxide)-chloride starting solution of 0.1 M NaClO4 to buffer ionic strength. Both bacterial species removed greater than 85% of the Au from solution after 2 h of exposure time below approximately pH 5. Above pH 5, the extent of Au removed from solution decreased with increasing pH, with less than approximately 10% removal of Au from solution above pH 7.5. Kinetics experiments indicated that the Au removal with both bacterial species was rapid at pH 3, and slowed with increasing pH. Reversibility experiments demonstrated that (1) once the Au was removed from solution, adjusting 35 the pH alone did not remobilize the Au into solution and (2) the presence of cysteine in solution in the reversibility experiments caused Au to desorb, suggesting that the Au was not internalized within the bacterial cells. Our results suggest that Au removal occurs as a two-step pH-dependent adsorption reduction process. The speciation of the aqueous Au and the bacterial surface appears to control the rate of Au removal from solution. Under low pH conditions, the cell walls are only weakly negatively charged and aqueous Au complexes adsorb readily and rapidly. With increasing pH, the cell wall becomes more negatively charged, slowing adsorption significantly. The XANES data demonstrate that the reduction of Au(III) by bacterial exudates is slower and less extensive than the reduction observed in the bacteria-bearing systems, and we conclude that

  7. Effect of activated antigen-specific B cells on ES-62-mediated modulation of effector function of heterologous antigen-specific T cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Fraser A; Watson, Katherine A; Garside, Paul; Harnett, Margaret M; Harnett, William

    2008-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the idea of using helminth-derived molecules for therapeutic purposes and indeed we have shown that ES-62, a filarial nematode-derived phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein, significantly reduces the severity of arthritis in a murine model. Clearly, knowledge of mechanism of action is important when considering molecules for use in treating disease and although much is known regarding how ES-62 interacts with the immune system, gaps in our understanding remain. A feature of filarial nematode infection is a defective, T helper 2 (Th2)-polarized antigen-specific T-cell response and in relation to this we have recently shown that ES-62 inhibits clonal expansion and modulates effector function towards a Th2 phenotype, of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. ES-62 is also known to directly modulate B-cell behaviour and hence to determine whether it was mediating these effects on T cells by disrupting B–T-cell co-operation, we have investigated antigen-specific responses using an adoptive transfer system in which traceable numbers of tg ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells and hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-specific B cells respond to a chemically coupled form of OVA–HEL that contains linked epitopes that promote cognate T- and B-cell interactions. Surprisingly, these studies indicate that activated B cells restore T-cell expansion and prevent Th2-like polarization. However, ES-62-treated double cell transfer mice demonstrate a more generalized immunosuppression with reduced levels of Th1 and -2 type cytokines and antibody subclasses. Collectively, these results suggest that whilst ES-62 can target B–T-cell co-operation, this does not promote polarizing of T-cell responses towards a Th2-type phenotype. PMID:17961164

  8. The diversity of nanos expression in echinoderm embryos supports different mechanisms in germ cell specification.

    PubMed

    Fresques, Tara; Swartz, Steven Zachary; Juliano, Celina; Morino, Yoshiaki; Kikuchi, Mani; Akasaka, Koji; Wada, Hiroshi; Yajima, Mamiko; Wessel, Gary M

    2016-07-01

    Specification of the germ cell lineage is required for sexual reproduction in all animals. However, the timing and mechanisms of germ cell specification is remarkably diverse in animal development. Echinoderms, such as sea urchins and sea stars, are excellent model systems to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to germ cell specification. In several echinoderm embryos tested, the germ cell factor Vasa accumulates broadly during early development and is restricted after gastrulation to cells that contribute to the germ cell lineage. In the sea urchin, however, the germ cell factor Vasa is restricted to a specific lineage by the 32-cell stage. We therefore hypothesized that the germ cell specification program in the sea urchin/Euechinoid lineage has evolved to an earlier developmental time point. To test this hypothesis we determined the expression pattern of a second germ cell factor, Nanos, in four out of five extant echinoderm clades. Here we find that Nanos mRNA does not accumulate until the blastula stage or later during the development of all other echinoderm embryos except those that belong to the Echinoid lineage. Instead, Nanos is expressed in a restricted domain at the 32-128 cell stage in Echinoid embryos. Our results support the model that the germ cell specification program underwent a heterochronic shift in the Echinoid lineage. A comparison of Echinoid and non-Echinoid germ cell specification mechanisms will contribute to our understanding of how these mechanisms have changed during animal evolution. PMID:27402572

  9. Statistical estimation of red blood cell osmotic damage during cryoprotective agent removal from cryopreserved blood.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liangquan; Ding, Weiping; Ma, Yuncong; Sun, Sijie; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Dayong

    2013-10-01

    Statistical estimation of the osmotic damage of red blood cells (RBCs) during the removal of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) from cryopreserved blood has been a very difficult issue. In this paper, the discrete mass transfer model developed in our previous work is modified to study the volume variation of individual RBCs and thereby to estimate the osmotic damage of all RBCs statistically during CPA removal by the dilution-concentration method we proposed recently. The model is validated with respect to the experimental results either with or without RBCs. Then, it is used to investigate the effects of blood volume, hematocrit, blood and diluent flow rates on the osmotic damage of RBCs, as well as the washing time of CPAs. Our results show that both the increase of blood flow rates and the decrease of diluent flow rates can bring about a reduction in osmotic damage of RBCs; however, only the former can cause a decrease in the washing time of CPAs. The blood volume could also affect the osmotic damage of RBCs. For a given flow condition, there could exist an optimal blood volume range for the dilution-concentration system. The effect of blood volume could be alleviated by an increase in the dilution region volume. In addition, the osmotic damage of RBCs decreases as the hematocrit decreases. Therefore, in practice, the increase of blood flow rates is the best solution to reduce both the osmotic damage of RBCs and the washing time of CPAs simultaneously. A lower hematocrit in the cryopreserved blood and/or longer tubing in the dilution region are also recommended to achieve better performance for the dilution-concentration method. PMID:24835261

  10. Regulation of Lipid Specific and Vitamin Specific Non-MHC Restricted T Cells by Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Since initial reports, more than 25 years ago, that T cells recognize lipids in the context on non-polymorphic CD1 molecules, our understanding of antigen presentation to non-peptide-specific T cell populations has deepened. It is now clear that αβ T cells bearing semi-invariant T cell receptor, as well as subsets of γδ T cells, recognize a variety of self and non-self lipids and contribute to shaping immune responses via cross talk with dendritic cells and B cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that small molecules derived from the microbial riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (vitamin B2) bind monomorphic MR1 molecules and activate mucosal-associated invariant T cells, another population of semi-invariant T cells. Novel insights in the biological relevance of non-peptide-specific T cells have emerged with the development of tetrameric CD1 and MR1 molecules, which has allowed accurate enumeration and functional analysis of CD1- and MR1-restricted T cells in humans and discovery of novel populations of semi-invariant T cells. The phenotype and function of non-peptide-specific T cells will be discussed in the context of the known distribution of CD1 and MR1 molecules by different subsets of antigen-presenting cells at steady state and following infection. Concurrent modulation of CD1 transcription and lipid biosynthetic pathways upon TLR stimulation, coupled with efficient lipid antigen processing, result in the increased cell surface expression of antigenic CD1–lipid complexes. Similarly, MR1 expression is almost undetectable in resting APC and it is upregulated following bacterial infection, likely due to stabilization of MR1 molecules by microbial antigens. The tight regulation of CD1 and MR1 expression at steady state and during infection may represent an important mechanism to limit autoreactivity, while promoting T cell responses to foreign antigens. PMID:26284072

  11. A comparative review towards potential of microbial cells for heavy metal removal with emphasis on biosorption and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Arti; Kumar, Vipin; Anshumali

    2016-10-01

    The threat of heavy metal pollution to environmental health is getting worldwide attention due to their persistence and non-biodegradable nature. Ineffectiveness of various physicochemical methods due to economical and technical constraints resulted in the search for a cost-effective and eco-friendly biological technique for heavy metal removal from the environment. The two effective biotic methods used are biosorption and bioaccumulation. A comparison between these two processes demonstrated that biosorption is a better heavy metal removal process than bioaccumulation. This is due to the intoxication of heavy metal by inhibiting their entry into the microbial cell. Genes and enzymes related to bioremoval process are also discussed. On comparing the removal rate, bacteria are surpassed by algae and fungi. The aim of this review is to understand the biotic processes and to compare their metal removal efficiency. PMID:27565780

  12. A comparative review towards potential of microbial cells for heavy metal removal with emphasis on biosorption and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Arti; Kumar, Vipin; Anshumali

    2016-10-01

    The threat of heavy metal pollution to environmental health is getting worldwide attention due to their persistence and non-biodegradable nature. Ineffectiveness of various physicochemical methods due to economical and technical constraints resulted in the search for a cost-effective and eco-friendly biological technique for heavy metal removal from the environment. The two effective biotic methods used are biosorption and bioaccumulation. A comparison between these two processes demonstrated that biosorption is a better heavy metal removal process than bioaccumulation. This is due to the intoxication of heavy metal by inhibiting their entry into the microbial cell. Genes and enzymes related to bioremoval process are also discussed. On comparing the removal rate, bacteria are surpassed by algae and fungi. The aim of this review is to understand the biotic processes and to compare their metal removal efficiency.

  13. Simultaneous sulfide removal and electricity generation with corn stover biomass as co-substrate in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Ye, Zhengfang; Liu, Ye; Lei, Zhongfang; Huang, Wenli; Feng, Chuanping

    2013-06-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), representing a promising method to treat combined pollutants with energy recovery, were utilized to remove sulfide and recover power with corn stover filtrate (CSF) as the co-substrate in present study. A maximum power density of 744 mW/m(2) was achieved with sulfide removal of 91% during 72 h operation when the CSF concentrations (mg-COD/l) and the electrolyte conductivity were set at 800 mg/l and 10.06 mS/cm, respectively, while almost 52% COD was removed due to the microbial degradation of CSF to the volatile organic carbons. CSF concentrations and electrolyte conductivities had significant effects on the performance of the MFCs. Simultaneous removals of inorganic pollutant and complex organic compounds with electricity generation in MFCs are reported for the first time. These results provide a good reference for multiple contaminations treatment especially sulfide containing wastewaters based on the MFC technology.

  14. Methods for Evaluating Cell-Specific, Cell-Internalizing RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Luiza I.; Flenker, Katie S.; Hernandez, Frank J.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; II, James O. McNamara; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) highlight the need for robust delivery technologies that will facilitate the successful application of these therapeutics to humans. Arguably, cell targeting by conjugation to cell-specific ligands provides a viable solution to this problem. Synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) represent an emerging class of pharmaceuticals with great potential for targeted therapeutic applications. For targeted delivery of siRNAs with aptamers, the aptamer-siRNA conjugate must be taken up by cells and reach the cytoplasm. To this end, we have developed cell-based selection approaches to isolate aptamers that internalize upon binding to their cognate receptor on the cell surface. Here we describe methods to monitor for cellular uptake of aptamers. These include: (1) antibody amplification microscopy, (2) microplate-based fluorescence assay, (3) a quantitative and ultrasensitive internalization method (“QUSIM”) and (4) a way to monitor for cytoplasmic delivery using the ribosome inactivating protein-based (RNA-RIP) assay. Collectively, these methods provide a toolset that can expedite the development of aptamer ligands to target and deliver therapeutic siRNAs in vivo. PMID:23894227

  15. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  16. New Frontier in Regenerative Medicine: Site-Specific Gene Correction in Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garate, Zita; Davis, Brian R.; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Advances in cell and gene therapy are opening up new avenues for regenerative medicine. Because of their acquired pluripotency, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising source of autologous cells for regenerative medicine. They show unlimited self-renewal while retaining the ability, in principle, to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. Since Yamanaka and colleagues first reported the generation of hiPSCs in 2007, significant efforts have been made to understand the reprogramming process and to generate hiPSCs with potential for clinical use. On the other hand, the development of gene-editing platforms to increase homologous recombination efficiency, namely DNA nucleases (zinc finger nucleases, TAL effector nucleases, and meganucleases), is making the application of locus-specific gene therapy in human cells an achievable goal. The generation of patient-specific hiPSC, together with gene correction by homologous recombination, will potentially allow for their clinical application in the near future. In fact, reports have shown targeted gene correction through DNA-Nucleases in patient-specific hiPSCs. Various technologies have been described to reprogram patient cells and to correct these patient hiPSCs. However, no approach has been clearly more efficient and safer than the others. In addition, there are still significant challenges for the clinical application of these technologies, such as inefficient differentiation protocols, genetic instability resulting from the reprogramming process and hiPSC culture itself, the efficacy and specificity of the engineered DNA nucleases, and the overall homologous recombination efficiency. To summarize advances in the generation of gene corrected patient-specific hiPSCs, this review focuses on the available technological platforms, including their strengths and limitations regarding future therapeutic use of gene-corrected hiPSCs. PMID:23675640

  17. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  18. Proteome characterization of melanoma exosomes reveals a specific signature for metastatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Ikrame; Clement, Emily; Ducoux-Petit, Manuelle; Denat, Laurence; Soldan, Vanessa; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Balor, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Larue, Lionel; Muller, Catherine; Nieto, Laurence

    2015-07-01

    Exosomes are important mediators in cell-to-cell communication and, recently, their role in melanoma progression has been brought to light. Here, we characterized exosomes secreted by seven melanoma cell lines with varying degrees of aggressivity. Extensive proteomic analysis of their exosomes confirmed the presence of characteristic exosomal markers as well as melanoma-specific antigens and oncogenic proteins. Importantly, the protein composition differed among exosomes from different lines. Exosomes from aggressive cells contained specific proteins involved in cell motility, angiogenesis, and immune response, while these proteins were less abundant or absent in exosomes from less aggressive cells. Interestingly, when exposed to exosomes from metastatic lines, less aggressive cells increased their migratory capacities, likely due to transfer of pro-migratory exosomal proteins to recipient cells. Hence, this study shows that the specific protein composition of melanoma exosomes depends on the cells' aggressivity and suggests that exosomes influence the behavior of other tumor cells and their microenvironment.

  19. A specific molecular beacon probe for the detection of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Lin; McGoldrick, Christopher A; Yin, Deling; Zhao, Jing; Patel, Vini; Brannon, Marianne F; Lightner, Janet W; Krishnan, Koyamangalath; Stone, William L

    2012-06-01

    The small-molecule, water-soluble molecular beacon probe 1 is hydrolyzed by the lysate and living cells of human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP), resulting in strong green fluorescence. In contrast, probe 1 does not undergo significant hydrolysis in either the lysate or living cells of human nontumorigenic prostate cells (RWPE-1). These results, corroborated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and fluorescent microscopy, reveal that probe 1 is a sensitive and specific fluorogenic and chromogenic sensor for the detection of human prostate cancer cells among nontumorigenic prostate cells and that carboxylesterase activity is a specific biomarker for human prostate cancer cells.

  20. Gender Specific Mutation Incidence and Survival Associations in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (CCRCC).

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Christopher J; Linehan, W Marston

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is diagnosed in >200,000 individuals worldwide each year, accounting for ~2% of all cancers, but the spread of this disease amongst genders is distinctly uneven. In the U.S. the male:female incidence ratio is approximately 2:1. A potential hypothesis is mutation spectra may differ between tumors dependent upon the gender of the patient, such as mutations of X chromosome encoded genes being more prevalent in male-derived tumors. Combined analysis of three recent large-scale clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) mutation sequencing projects identified a significantly increased mutation frequency of PBRM1 and the X chromosome encoded KDM5C in tumors from male patients and BAP1 in tumors from female patients. Mutation of BAP1 had previously been significantly associated with poorer overall survival; however, when stratified by gender, mutation of BAP1 only significantly affected overall survival in female patients. Mutation of chromatin remodeling genes alters gene regulation, but the overall effect of these alterations may also be modified by the presence of other gender specific factors. Thus, the combination of gender and mutation of a specific gene, such as BAP1, may have implications not only for prognosis but also for understanding the role of chromatin remodeling gene mutations in kidney cancer progression.

  1. Vaccination Expands Antigen-Specific CD4+ Memory T Cells and Mobilizes Bystander Central Memory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Li Causi, Eleonora; Parikh, Suraj C; Chudley, Lindsey; Layfield, David M; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Stevenson, Freda K; Di Genova, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T helper memory (Thmem) cells influence both natural and vaccine-boosted immunity, but mechanisms for their maintenance remain unclear. Pro-survival signals from the common gamma-chain cytokines, in particular IL-7, appear important. Previously we showed in healthy volunteers that a booster vaccination with tetanus toxoid (TT) expanded peripheral blood TT-specific Thmem cells as expected, but was accompanied by parallel increase of Thmem cells specific for two unrelated and non cross-reactive common recall antigens. Here, in a new cohort of healthy human subjects, we compare blood vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells in terms of differentiation stage, function, activation and proliferative status. Both responses peaked 1 week post-vaccination. Vaccine-specific cytokine-producing Thmem cells were predominantly effector memory, whereas bystander cells were mainly of central memory phenotype. Importantly, TT-specific Thmem cells were activated (CD38High HLA-DR+), cycling or recently divided (Ki-67+), and apparently vulnerable to death (IL-7RαLow and Bcl-2 Low). In contrast, bystander Thmem cells were resting (CD38Low HLA-DR- Ki-67-) with high expression of IL-7Rα and Bcl-2. These findings allow a clear distinction between vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells, suggesting the latter do not derive from recent proliferation but from cells mobilized from as yet undefined reservoirs. Furthermore, they reveal the interdependent dynamics of specific and bystander T-cell responses which will inform assessments of responses to vaccines.

  2. Single exposure to heat induces stage-specific germ cell apoptosis in rats: role of intratesticular testosterone on stage specificity.

    PubMed

    Lue, Y H; Hikim, A P; Swerdloff, R S; Im, P; Taing, K S; Bui, T; Leung, A; Wang, C

    1999-04-01

    Short term exposure of the testis to heat causes degeneration of germ cells. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. The major objectives of this study were to determine whether the heat-induced loss of germ cells in the adult rat occurs via apoptosis, to document its stage-specific and cell-specific distribution, and to examine whether intratesticular testosterone (T) plays any role in the stage specificity of heat-induced germ cell death. Testes of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 22 C (control) or 43 C for 15 min. Animals were killed on days 1, 2, 9, and 56 after heat exposure. Germ cell apoptosis was characterized by DNA gel electrophoresis and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxy-UTP nick end labeling assay. The incidence of germ cell apoptosis [apoptotic index (AI)] was quite low in control rats (AI = 0.04-0.1). Mild hyperthermia within 1 or 2 days resulted in a marked activation (AI = 4.7-5.6) of germ cell apoptosis predominantly at early (I-IV) and late (XII-XIV) stages. Stages V-VI and VII-VIII were relatively protected from heat-induced apoptosis. Spermatocytes, including pachytenes at stages I-IV and IX-XII, diplotene and dividing spermatocytes at stages XIII-XIV, and early (steps 1-4) spermatids, were most susceptible to heat. On day 9, the majority of the tubules were severely damaged and displayed only a few remaining apoptotic germ cells. By day 56, spermatogenesis was completely recovered, and the incidence of germ cell apoptosis was compatible with the control levels. To determine whether intratesticular T plays a role in protecting germ cells at stages VII-VIII against heat-induced cell death, adult rats were exposed to local testicular heating on day 2 or were given a daily sc injection of GnRH antagonist (GnRH-A) for 4 days with and without a single exposure of testes to heat applied on day 2. By day 4, the incidence of increased germ cell apoptosis at stages other than VII

  3. Screening of aptamers specific to colorectal cancer cells and stem cells by utilizing On-chip Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Lien-Yu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Che, Yu-Jui; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer around the world, causing about 700,000 deaths every year. It is clear now that a small fraction of CRC, named colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs) exhibiting self-renewal and extensive proliferative activities, are hard to be eradicated. Unfortunately, highly specific biomarkers for colorectal CSC (CR-CSCs) are lacking that prohibits the development of effective therapeutic strategies. This study designed and manufactured a novel microfluidic system capable of performing a fully automated cell-based, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process. Eight CR-CSC/CRC-specific aptamers were successfully selected using the microfluidic chip. Three of the aptamers showed high affinities towards their respective target cells with a dissociation constant of 27.4, 28.5 and 12.3 nM, which are comparable to that of antibodies. PMID:25999049

  4. Ubiquitously expressed genes participate in cell-specific functions via alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guihai; Tong, Man; Xia, Baolong; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Wang, Meng; Xie, Dongfang; Wan, Haifeng; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Xiu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    How do different cell types acquire their specific identities and functions is a fundamental question of biology. Previously significant efforts have been devoted to search for cell-type-specifically expressed genes, especially transcription factors, yet how do ubiquitously expressed genes participate in the formation or maintenance of cell-type-specific features remains largely unknown. Here, we have identified 110 mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) specifically expressed transcripts with cell-stage-specific alternative transcription start sites (SATS isoforms) from 104 ubiquitously expressed genes, majority of which have active epigenetic modification- or stem cell-related functions. These SATS isoforms are specifically expressed in mESCs, and tend to be transcriptionally regulated by key pluripotency factors through direct promoter binding. Knocking down the SATS isoforms of Nmnat2 or Usp7 leads to differentiation-related phenotype in mESCs. These results demonstrate that cell-type-specific transcription factors are capable to produce cell-type-specific transcripts with alternative transcription start sites from ubiquitously expressed genes, which confer ubiquitously expressed genes novel functions involved in the establishment or maintenance of cell-type-specific features. PMID:27466324

  5. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  6. Idiotype-recognizing T helper cells that are not idiotype specific.

    PubMed

    McNamara, M; Kohler, H

    1983-09-01

    In this study T helper cells that recognize idiotypes as carriers for a hapten-specific B cell response were analyzed under limiting dilution conditions. T helper cells, induced by phosphorylcholine-hemocyanin (PC-Hy) priming, recognize trinitrophenylated TEPC-15 and MOPC-167 (TNP-T15, TNP-167) equally well. Limiting dilution analysis indicates identical frequencies of helper cells for TNP-T15 and TNP-167. Double immunization protocols using TNP-T15 and TNP-167 fail to demonstrate additive effects. Inhibition of carrier recognition in vitro using free hapten, PC, and unconjugated T15 or M167 indicates identical specificities of helper cells for T15 and M167. Collectively, these results provide strong evidence that PC-Hy priming induces only one population of idiotype-recognizing helper cells that are unable to distinguish between the T15 and the M167 idiotopes. The helper cell induction circuit was further analyzed. PC-Hy priming induces T15/167-specific helper T cells in X-linked immune defect-expressing F1 mice. This indicates that a B cell response to PC is not required to induce idiotype-recognizing T cells. Adoptive cotransfer of B cells from PC-Hy-primed mice together with normal T cells fails to induce idiotype-recognizing T cells. These results indicate the existence of a T helper1-T helper2 induction loop. In this scheme, the T helper1 cell carries T15-like receptors and the T helper2 cells, anti-T15-like receptors. Monoclonal antiidiotypic antibodies specific for T15 also induce a T15/167-recognizing T helper cell population. This finding demonstrates that idiotope-specific priming induces non-idiotype-specific T cells. Evidently, the idiotypic T cell network is based on a different selection of idiotope determinants than the selection of the B cell idiotype network.

  7. Selection of restriction specificities of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in the thymus: no evidence for a crucial role of antigen-presenting cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    The proposal was tested that (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressed predominantly P1-restricted T cells because donor derived stem cells were exposed to recipient derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus. Because P1 recipient-derived antigen-presenting cells are replaced only slowly after 6-8 wk by (P1 X P2) donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus and because replenished pools of mature T cells may by then prevent substantial numbers of P2-restricted T cells to be generated, a large portion of thymus cells and mature T cells were eliminated using the following treatments of 12-20-wk-old (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras: (a) cortisone plus antilymphocyte serum, (b) Cytoxan, (c) three doses of sublethal irradiation (300 rad) 2d apart, and (d) lethal irradiation (850 rad) and reconstitution with T cell-depleted (P1 X P2) F1 stem cells. 12-20 wk after this second treatment, (P1 X P2) leads to P1 chimeras were infected with vaccinia-virus. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity was expressed by chimeric T cells of (P1 X P(2) F1 origin and was restricted predominantly to P1. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, therefore, do not seem to be selected to measurable extent by the immigrating donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus; their selection depends apparently from the recipient-derived radioresistant thymus cells.

  8. Molecular beacon-enabled purification of living cells by targeting cell type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wile, Brian M; Ban, Kiwon; Yoon, Young-Sup; Bao, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are dual-labeled oligonucleotides that fluoresce only in the presence of complementary mRNA. The use of MBs to target specific mRNAs allows sorting of specific cells from a mixed cell population. In contrast to existing approaches that are limited by available surface markers or selectable metabolic characteristics, the MB-based method enables the isolation of a wide variety of cells. For example, the ability to purify specific cell types derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is important for basic research and therapeutics. In addition to providing a general protocol for MB design, validation and nucleofection into cells, we describe how to isolate a specific cell population from differentiating PSCs. By using this protocol, we have successfully isolated cardiomyocytes differentiated from mouse or human PSCs (hPSCs) with ∼ 97% purity, as confirmed by electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. After designing MBs, their ordering and validation requires 2 weeks, and the isolation process requires 3 h.

  9. B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia: a specific subgroup of mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Vincent H J; Hoogeveen, Patricia G; de Ridder, Dick; Schindler-van der Struijk, Magdalena; van Zelm, Menno C; Sanders, Mathijs; Karsch, Dennis; Beverloo, H Berna; Lam, King; Orfao, Alberto; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Langerak, Anton W; Kappers-Klunne, Mies; van Lom, Kirsten

    2014-07-17

    B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL) is a rare mature B-cell malignancy that may be hard to distinguish from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). B-PLL cases with a t(11;14) were redefined as MCL in the World Health Organization 2008 classification. We evaluated 13 B-PLL patients [7 being t(11;14)-positive (B-PLL+) and 6 negative (B-PLL-)] and compared them with MCL and CLL patients. EuroFlow-based immunophenotyping showed significant overlap between B-PLL+ and B-PLL-, as well as between B-PLL and MCL, whereas CLL clustered separately. Immunogenotyping showed specific IGHV gene usage partly resembling MCL. Gene expression profiling showed no separation between B-PLL+ and B-PLL- but identified 3 subgroups. One B-PLL subgroup clustered close to CLL and another subgroup clustered with leukemic MCL; both were associated with prolonged survival. A third subgroup clustered close to nodal MCL and was associated with short survival. Gene expression profiles of both B-PLL+ and B-PLL- showed best resemblance with normal immunoglobulin M-only B-cells. Our data confirm that B-PLL+ is highly comparable to MCL, indicate that B-PLL- also may be considered as a specific subgroup of MCL, and suggest that B-PLL is part of a spectrum, ranging from CLL-like B-PLL, to leukemic MCL-like B-PLL, to nodal MCL-like B-PLL.

  10. Enhanced Salt Removal in an Inverted Capacitive Deionization Cell Using Amine Modified Microporous Carbon Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Omosebi, Ayokunle; Landon, James; Liu, Kunlei

    2015-09-15

    Microporous SpectraCarb carbon cloth was treated using nitric acid to enhance negative surface charges of COO(-) in a neutral solution. This acid-treated carbon was further modified by ethylenediamine to attach -NH2 surface functional groups, resulting in positive surface charges of -NH3(+) via pronation in a neutral solution. Through multiple characterizations, in comparison to pristine SpectraCarb carbon, amine-treated SpectraCarb carbon displays a decreased potential of zero charge but an increased point of zero charge, which is opposed to the effect obtained for acid-treated SpectraCarb carbon. An inverted capacitive deionization cell was constructed using amine-treated cathodes and acid-treated anodes, where the cathode is the negatively polarized electrode and the anode is the positively polarized electrode. Constant-voltage switching operation using NaCl solution showed that the salt removal capacity was approximately 5.3 mg g(-1) at a maximum working voltage of 1.1/0 V, which is an expansion in both the salt capacity and potential window from previous i-CDI results demonstrated for carbon xerogel materials. This improved performance is accounted for by the enlarged cathodic working voltage window through ethylenediamine-derived functional groups, and the enhanced microporosity of the SpectraCarb electrodes for salt adsorption. These results expand the use of i-CDI for efficient desalination applications.

  11. A time dependent approach for removing the cell boundary error in elliptic homogenization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, Doghonay; Runborg, Olof

    2016-06-01

    This paper concerns the cell-boundary error present in multiscale algorithms for elliptic homogenization problems. Typical multiscale methods have two essential components: a macro and a micro model. The micro model is used to upscale parameter values which are missing in the macro model. To solve the micro model, boundary conditions are required on the boundary of the microscopic domain. Imposing a naive boundary condition leads to O (ε / η) error in the computation, where ε is the size of the microscopic variations in the media and η is the size of the micro-domain. The removal of this error in modern multiscale algorithms still remains an important open problem. In this paper, we present a time-dependent approach which is general in terms of dimension. We provide a theorem which shows that we have arbitrarily high order convergence rates in terms of ε / η in the periodic setting. Additionally, we present numerical evidence showing that the method improves the O (ε / η) error to O (ε) in general non-periodic media.

  12. Cell-free plasma hemoglobin removal by dialyzers with various permeability profiles.

    PubMed

    Hulko, Michael; Kunz, Melanie; Yildirim, Mehmet; Homeyer, Sandra; Amon, Oliver; Krause, Bernd

    2015-11-10

    The release of hemoglobin from mechanically stressed erythrocytes into plasma is a general side effect of extracorporeal therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or hemodialysis. In many reported cases dialysis patients showed elevated cell-free plasma hemoglobin (CPH) levels which are associated with pathophysiological effects. In this in vitro study, the CPH clearance capacity of various filters with different permeability profiles was measured. Simulated dialysis treatments were conducted and clearance was calculated from variations in CPH concentrations over time by measuring plasma absorbance at 405 nm. Conventional high-flux filters exhibited no detectable clearance of CPH. High-flux filters with extended permeability exhibited clearances between 5.8 ± 1.2 and 12.7 ± 1.7 ml/min when tested with plasma and between 5.8 ± 1.2 and 11.3 ± 1.6 ml/min when tested with whole blood. septeX high-cutoff filters had clearances between 13.8 ± 1.8 and 15.5 ± 1.7 ml/min when tested with plasma and of 22.6 ± 2.9 ml/min when tested with whole blood. This study demonstrated that filters with extended permeability and the septeX filter enable CPH removal when used as in chronic and acute settings.

  13. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  14. Specifically targeting ERK1 or ERK2 kills Melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Overcoming the notorious apoptotic resistance of melanoma cells remains a therapeutic challenge given dismal survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. However, recent clinical trials using a BRAF inhibitor revealed encouraging results for patients with advanced BRAF mutant bearing melanoma, but drug resistance accompanied by recovery of phospho-ERK (pERK) activity present challenges for this approach. While ERK1 and ERK2 are similar in amino acid composition and are frequently not distinguished in clinical reports, the possibility they regulate distinct biological functions in melanoma is largely unexplored. Methods Rather than indirectly inhibiting pERK by targeting upstream kinases such as BRAF or MEK, we directly (and near completely) reduced ERK1 and ERK2 using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to achieve sustained inhibition of pERK1 and/or pERK2. Results and discussion Using A375 melanoma cells containing activating BRAFV600E mutation, silencing ERK1 or ERK2 revealed some differences in their biological roles, but also shared roles by reduced cell proliferation, colony formation in soft agar and induced apoptosis. By contrast, chemical mediated inhibition of mutant BRAF (PLX4032) or MEK (PD0325901) triggered less killing of melanoma cells, although they did inhibit proliferation. Death of melanoma cells by silencing ERK1 and/or ERK2 was caspase dependent and accompanied by increased levels of Bak, Bad and Bim, with reduction in p-Bad and detection of activated Bax levels and loss of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Rare treatment resistant clones accompanied silencing of either ERK1 and/or ERK2. Unexpectedly, directly targeting ERK levels also led to reduction in upstream levels of BRAF, CRAF and pMEK, thereby reinforcing the importance of silencing ERK as regards killing and bypassing drug resistance. Conclusions Selectively knocking down ERK1 and/or ERK2 killed A375 melanoma cells and also increased the ability of PLX4032 to kill A375 cells

  15. A chemical genetics approach for specific differentiation of stem cells to somatic cells: a new promising therapeutical approach.

    PubMed

    Sachinidis, Agapios; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Seelig, Bianca; Berkessel, Albrecht; Hescheler, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy of severe degenerative diseases such as diabetes, myocardial infarction and Parkinson's disease through transplantation of somatic cells generated from embryonic stem (ES) cells is currently receiving considerable attention for the therapeutic applications. ES cells harvested from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the early embryo, can proliferate indefinitely in vitro while retaining the ability to differentiate into all somatic cells thereby providing an unlimited renewable source of somatic cells. In this context, identifying soluble factors, in particular chemically synthesized small molecules, and signal cascades involved in specific differentiation processes toward a defined tissue specific cell type are crucial for optimizing the generation of somatic cells in vitro for therapeutic approaches. However, experimental models are required allowing rapid and "easy-to-handle" parallel screening of chemical libraries to achieve this goal. Recently, the forward chemical genetic screening strategy has been postulated to screen small molecules in cellular systems for a specific desired phenotypic effect. The current review is focused on the progress of ES cell research in the context of the chemical genetics to identify small molecules promoting specific differentiation of ES cells to desired cell phenotype. Chemical genetics in the context of the cell ES-based cell replacement therapy remains a challenge for the near future for several scientific fields including chemistry, molecular biology, medicinal physics and robotic technologies.

  16. Comparison of adsorbents for H2S and D4 removal for biogas conversion in a solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sigot, Léa; Ducom, Gaëlle; Benadda, Belkacem; Labouré, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Biogas contains trace compounds detrimental for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application, especially sulphur-containing compounds and volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs). It is therefore necessary to remove these impurities from the biogas for fuelling an SOFC. In this paper, dynamic lab-scale adsorption tests were performed on synthetic polluted gas to evaluate the performance of a polishing treatment to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S - sulphur compound) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 - VOSiC). Three kinds of adsorbents were tested: an activated carbon, a silica gel (SG) and a zeolite (Z). Z proved to be the best adsorbent for H2S removal, with an adsorbed quantity higher than [Formula: see text] at the SOFC tolerance limit. However, as concerns D4 removal, SG was the most efficient adsorbent, with an adsorbed quantity of about 184 mgD4/gSG at the SOFC tolerance limit. These results could not be explained by structural characteristics of the adsorbents, but they were partly explained by chemical interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent. In these experiments, internal diffusion was the controlling step, Knudsen diffusion being predominant to molecular diffusion. As Z was also a good adsorbent for D4 removal, competition phenomena were investigated with Z for the simultaneous removal of H2S and D4. It was shown that H2S retention was dramatically decreased in the presence of D4, probably due to D4 polymerization resulting in pore blocking.

  17. Autoantigen-specific B-cell depletion overcomes failed immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L; Thomas, James W

    2012-08-01

    Eliminating autoantigen-specific B cells is an attractive alternative to global B-cell depletion for autoimmune disease treatment. To identify the potential for targeting a key autoimmune B-cell specificity in type 1 diabetes, insulin-binding B cells were tracked within a polyclonal repertoire using heavy chain B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic (VH125Tg) mice. Insulin-specific B cells are rare in the periphery of nonautoimmune VH125Tg/C57BL/6 mice and WT/NOD autoimmune mice, whereas they clearly populate 1% of mature B-cell subsets in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Autoantigen upregulates CD86 in anti-insulin B cells, suggesting they are competent to interact with T cells. Endogenous insulin occupies anti-insulin BCR beginning with antigen commitment in bone marrow parenchyma, as identified by a second anti-insulin monoclonal antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody selectively eliminates insulin-reactive B cells in vivo and prevents disease in WT/NOD mice. Unexpectedly, developing B cells are less amenable to depletion, despite increased BCR sensitivity. These findings exemplify how a critical type 1 diabetes B-cell specificity escapes immune tolerance checkpoints. Disease liability is corrected by eliminating this B-cell specificity, providing proof of concept for a novel therapeutic approach for autoimmune disease. PMID:22698916

  18. Design of aquifer remediation systems: (2) estimating site-specific performance and benefits of partial source removal.

    PubMed

    Wood, A Lynn; Enfield, Carl G; Espinoza, Felipe P; Annable, Michael; Brooks, Michael C; Rao, P S C; Sabatini, David; Knox, Robert

    2005-12-01

    A Lagrangian stochastic model is proposed as a tool that can be utilized in forecasting remedial performance and estimating the benefits (in terms of flux and mass reduction) derived from a source zone remedial effort. The stochastic functional relationships that describe the hydraulic "structure" and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) "architecture" have been described in a companion paper (Enfield, C.G., Wood, A.L., Espinoza, F.P., Brooks, M.C., Annable, M., Rao, P.S.C., this issue. Design of aquifer remediation systems: (1) describing hydraulic structure and NAPL architecture using tracers. J. Contam. Hydrol.). The previously defined functions were used along with the properties of the remedial fluids to describe remedial performance. There are two objectives for this paper. First, is to show that a simple analytic element model can be used to give a reasonable estimate of system performance. This is accomplished by comparing forecast performance to observed performance. The second objective is to display the model output in terms of change in mass flux and mass removal as a function of pore volumes of remedial fluid injected. The modelling results suggest that short term benefits are obtained and related to mass reduction at the sites where the model was tested.

  19. Utility of the Clostridial Site-Specific Recombinase TnpX To Clone Toxic-Product-Encoding Genes and Selectively Remove Genomic DNA Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Vicki; Bantwal, Radhika; Stevenson, Lauren; Cheung, Jackie K.; Awad, Milena M.; Nicholson, Joel; Carter, Glen P.; Mackin, Kate E.; Rood, Julian I.

    2014-01-01

    TnpX is a site-specific recombinase responsible for the excision and insertion of the transposons Tn4451 and Tn4453 in Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile, respectively. Here, we exploit phenotypic features of TnpX to facilitate genetic mutagenesis and complementation studies. Genetic manipulation of bacteria often relies on the use of antibiotic resistance genes; however, a limited number are available for use in the clostridia. The ability of TnpX to recognize and excise specific DNA fragments was exploited here as the basis of an antibiotic resistance marker recycling system, specifically to remove antibiotic resistance genes from plasmids in Escherichia coli and from marked chromosomal C. perfringens mutants. This methodology enabled the construction of a C. perfringens plc virR double mutant by allowing the removal and subsequent reuse of the same resistance gene to construct a second mutation. Genetic complementation can be challenging when the gene of interest encodes a product toxic to E. coli. We show that TnpX represses expression from its own promoter, PattCI, which can be exploited to facilitate the cloning of recalcitrant genes in E. coli for subsequent expression in the heterologous host C. perfringens. Importantly, this technology expands the repertoire of tools available for the genetic manipulation of the clostridia. PMID:24682304

  20. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  1. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  2. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  3. Cell-Type-Specific Alternative Splicing Governs Cell Fate in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaochang; Chen, Ming Hui; Wu, Xuebing; Kodani, Andrew; Fan, Jean; Doan, Ryan; Ozawa, Manabu; Ma, Jacqueline; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Reiter, Jeremy F; Black, Douglas L; Kharchenko, Peter V; Sharp, Phillip A; Walsh, Christopher A

    2016-08-25

    Alternative splicing is prevalent in the mammalian brain. To interrogate the functional role of alternative splicing in neural development, we analyzed purified neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons from developing cerebral cortices, revealing hundreds of differentially spliced exons that preferentially alter key protein domains-especially in cytoskeletal proteins-and can harbor disease-causing mutations. We show that Ptbp1 and Rbfox proteins antagonistically govern the NPC-to-neuron transition by regulating neuron-specific exons. Whereas Ptbp1 maintains apical progenitors partly through suppressing a poison exon of Flna in NPCs, Rbfox proteins promote neuronal differentiation by switching Ninein from a centrosomal splice form in NPCs to a non-centrosomal isoform in neurons. We further uncover an intronic human mutation within a PTBP1-binding site that disrupts normal skipping of the FLNA poison exon in NPCs and causes a brain-specific malformation. Our study indicates that dynamic control of alternative splicing governs cell fate in cerebral cortical development.

  4. Cell-Type-Specific Alternative Splicing Governs Cell Fate in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaochang; Chen, Ming Hui; Wu, Xuebing; Kodani, Andrew; Fan, Jean; Doan, Ryan; Ozawa, Manabu; Ma, Jacqueline; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Reiter, Jeremy F; Black, Douglas L; Kharchenko, Peter V; Sharp, Phillip A; Walsh, Christopher A

    2016-08-25

    Alternative splicing is prevalent in the mammalian brain. To interrogate the functional role of alternative splicing in neural development, we analyzed purified neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons from developing cerebral cortices, revealing hundreds of differentially spliced exons that preferentially alter key protein domains-especially in cytoskeletal proteins-and can harbor disease-causing mutations. We show that Ptbp1 and Rbfox proteins antagonistically govern the NPC-to-neuron transition by regulating neuron-specific exons. Whereas Ptbp1 maintains apical progenitors partly through suppressing a poison exon of Flna in NPCs, Rbfox proteins promote neuronal differentiation by switching Ninein from a centrosomal splice form in NPCs to a non-centrosomal isoform in neurons. We further uncover an intronic human mutation within a PTBP1-binding site that disrupts normal skipping of the FLNA poison exon in NPCs and causes a brain-specific malformation. Our study indicates that dynamic control of alternative splicing governs cell fate in cerebral cortical development. PMID:27565344

  5. A NOVel ELISPOT assay to quantify HLA-specific B cells in HLA-immunized individuals.

    PubMed

    Heidt, S; Roelen, D L; de Vaal, Y J H; Kester, M G D; Eijsink, C; Thomas, S; van Besouw, N M; Volk, H D; Weimar, W; Claas, F H J; Mulder, A

    2012-06-01

    Quantification of the humoral alloimmune response is generally achieved by measuring serum HLA antibodies, which provides no information about the cells involved in the humoral immune response. Therefore, we have developed an HLA-specific B-cell ELISPOT assay allowing for quantification of B cells producing HLA antibodies. We used recombinant HLA monomers as target in the ELISPOT assay. Validation was performed with human B-cell hybridomas producing HLA antibodies. Subsequently, we quantified B cells producing HLA antibodies in HLA-immunized individuals, non-HLA-immunized individuals and transplant patients with serum HLA antibodies. B-cell hybridomas exclusively formed spots against HLA molecules of corresponding specificity with the sensitivity similar to that found in total IgG ELISPOT assays. HLA-immunized healthy individuals showed up to 182 HLA-specific B cells per million total B cells while nonimmunized individuals had none. Patients who were immunized by an HLA-A2-mismatched graft had up to 143 HLA-A2-specific B cells per million total B cells. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a highly specific and sensitive HLA-specific B-cell ELISPOT assay, which needs further validation in a larger series of transplant patients. This technique constitutes a new tool for quantifying humoral immune responses. PMID:22390272

  6. Endothelial Cells Mediate Islet-Specific Maturation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Maria; Mathew, Shibin; Mamiya, Hikaru; Goh, Saik Kia

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) can be best achieved by closely recapitulating the in vivo developmental niche. Thus, implementation of directed differentiation strategies has yielded encouraging results in the area of pancreatic islet differentiation. These strategies have concentrated on direct addition of chemical signals, however, other aspect of the developmental niche are yet to be explored. During development, pancreatic progenitor (PP) cells grow as an epithelial sheet, which aggregates with endothelial cells (ECs) during the final stages of maturation. Several findings suggest that the interactions with EC play a role in pancreatic development. In this study, we recapitulated this phenomenon in an in vitro environment by maturing the human ESC (hESC)-derived PP cells in close contact with ECs. We find that co-culture with different ECs (but not fibroblast) alone results in pancreatic islet-specific differentiation of hESC-derived PP cells even in the absence of additional chemical induction. The differentiated cells responded to exogenous glucose levels by enhanced C-peptide synthesis. The co-culture system aligned well with endocrine development as determined by comprehensive analysis of involved signaling pathways. By recapitulating cell–cell interaction aspects of the developmental niche we achieved a differentiation model that aligns closely with islet organogenesis. PMID:24943736

  7. Defect behavior, carrier removal and predicted in-space injection annealing of InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Drevinsky, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    Defect behavior, observed by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), is used to predict carrier removal and the effects of simultaneous electron irradiation and injection annealing of the performance of InP solar cells. For carrier removal, the number of holes trapped per defect is obtained from measurements of both carrier concentrations and defect concentrations during an isochronal anneal. In addition, from kinetic considerations, the behavior of the dominant defect during injection annealing is used to estimate the degradation expected from exposure to the ambient electron environment in geostationary orbit.

  8. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vionnie W C; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H G P; Wu, Joy Y; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M; Baron, Roland; Scadden, David T

    2015-05-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn(+) cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell-based adaptive immunity.

  9. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  10. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Julius C; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H

    2014-05-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database.

  11. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets

    PubMed Central

    Barsi, Julius C.; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database. PMID:24604781

  12. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tejos, Ricardo I; Mercado, Ana V; Meisel, Lee A

    2010-01-01

    The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  13. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, T P; Shows, T B; Davidson, R L

    1994-01-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. Images PMID:8289799

  14. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. CD4+ T Cell Help Selectively Enhances High-Avidity Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Cuss, Steven M; Singh, Vinod; Gurusamy, Devikala; Shoe, Jennifer L; Leighty, Robert; Bronte, Vincenzo; Hurwitz, Arthur A

    2015-10-01

    Maintaining antitumor immunity remains a persistent impediment to cancer immunotherapy. We and others have previously reported that high-avidity CD8(+) T cells are more susceptible to tolerance induction in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we used a novel model where T cells derived from two independent TCR transgenic mouse lines recognize the same melanoma antigenic epitope but differ in their avidity. We tested whether providing CD4(+) T cell help would improve T cell responsiveness as a function of effector T cell avidity. Interestingly, delivery of CD4(+) T cell help during in vitro priming of CD8(+) T cells improved cytokine secretion and lytic capacity of high-avidity T cells, but not low-avidity T cells. Consistent with this observation, copriming with CD4(+) T cells improved antitumor immunity mediated by higher avidity, melanoma-specific CD8(+) T cells, but not T cells with similar specificity but lower avidity. Enhanced tumor immunity was associated with improved CD8(+) T cell expansion and reduced tolerization, and it was dependent on presentation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell epitopes by the same dendritic cell population. Our findings demonstrate that CD4(+) T cell help preferentially augments high-avidity CD8(+) T cells and provide important insight for understanding the requirements to elicit and maintain durable tumor immunity.

  16. Intrinsic sex-specific differences in microvascular endothelial cell phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bingaman, Susan; Huxley, Virginia H.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of gonadal hormones in the regulation of vascular function has been documented. An alternate and essential contribution of the sex chromosomes to sex differences in vascular function is poorly understood. We reported previously sex differences in microvessel permeability (Ps) responses to adenosine that were mediated by the cAMP signaling pathway (Wang J, PhD thesis, 2005; Wang J and Huxley V, Proceedings of the VIII World Congress of Microcirculation, 2007; Wang J and Huxley VH, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291: H3094–H3105, 2006). The two cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, central to the regulation of vascular barrier integrity, are hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterases (PDE). We hypothesized that microvascular endothelial cells (EC) would retain intrinsic and inheritable sexually dimorphic genes with respect to the PDEs modulating EC barrier function. Primary cultured microvascular EC from skeletal muscles isolated from male and female rats, respectively, were used. SRY (a sex-determining region Y gene) mRNA expression was observed exclusively in male, not female, cells. The predominant isoform among PDE1–5, present in both XY and XX EC, was PDE4. Expression mRNA levels of PDE1A (male > female) and PDE3B (male < female) were sex dependent; PDE2A, PDE4D, and PDE5A were sex independent. Barrier function, Ps, was determined from measures of albumin flux across confluent primary cultured microvessel XY and XX EC monolayers. Consistent with intact in situ microvessels, basal monolayer Ps did not differ between XY (1.7 ± 0.2 × 10−6 cm/s; n = 8) and XX (1.8 ± 0.1 × 10−6 cm/s; n = 10) EC. Cilostazol, a PDE3 inhibitor, reduced (11%, P < 0.05) Ps in XX, not XY, cells. These findings demonstrate the presence and maintenance of intrinsic sex-related differences in gene expression and cellular phenotype by microvascular EC in a gonadal-hormone-free environment. Furthermore, intrinsic cell-sex likely contributes significantly to sexual dimorphism in

  17. Cell Type-specific Translational Profiling in the Xenopus laevis Retina

    PubMed Central

    Watson, F.L.; Mills, E. A.; Wang, X.; Guo, C.; Chen, D.F.; Marsh-Armstrong, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP), a method recently developed to generate cell type-specific translational profiles, relies on creating transgenic lines of animals in which a tagged ribosomal protein is placed under regulatory control of a cell type-specific promoter. An antibody is then used to affinity purify the tagged ribosomes so that cell type-specific mRNAs can be isolated from whole tissue lysates. Results Here, cell type-specific transgenic lines were generated to enable TRAP studies for retinal ganglion cells and rod photoreceptors in the Xenopus laevis retina. Using real time quantitative PCR for assessing expression levels of cell type-specific mRNAs, the TRAP method was shown to selectively isolate mRNAs expressed in the targeted cell and was efficient at purifying mRNAs expressed at both high and low levels. Statistical measures used to distinguish cell type-specific RNAs from low level background and non-specific RNAs showed TRAP to be highly effective in Xenopus. Conclusions TRAP can be used to purify mRNAs expressed in rod photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells in Xenopus laevis. The generated transgenic lines will enable numerous studies into the development, disease and injury of the Xenopus laevis retina. PMID:23074098

  18. Survival and persistence of fecal host-specific Bacteroidales cells and their DNA assessed by PMA-qPCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Bombardelli, F.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding and managing microbial pollutions in water is one of the foremost challenges of establishing effective managements and remediation strategies to impaired water bodies polluted by uncharacterized fecal sources. Quantitative microbial source tracking (MST) approaches using fecal Bacteroidales and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure gene copies of host-specific 16S rRNA genetic markers are promising because they can allow for identifying and quantifying fecal loadings from a particular animal host and understanding the fate and transport of host-specific Bacteroidales over a range of conditions in water bodies. Similar to the case of traditional fecal indicator bacteria, a relatively long persistence of target DNA may hamper applied MST studies, if genetic markers cannot be linked to recent fecal pollution in water. We report a successful approach to removing the qPCR signal derived from free DNA and dead host-specific Bacteroidales cells by selectively binding the DNA and consequently inhibiting PCR amplification using light- activated propidium monoazide (PMA). Optimal PMA-qPCR conditions were determined as 100 µM of PMA concentration and a 10-min light exposure time at different solids concentrations in order to mimic a range of water samples. Under these conditions, PMA-qPCR resulted in the selective exclusion of DNA from heat- treated cells of non-culturable Bacteroidales in human feces and wastewater influent and effluent samples. Also, the persistence of feces-derived host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and their cells (determined by universal, human-, cow- and dog-specific Bacteroidales qPCR assays) in seawater was investigated in microcosms at environmental conditions. The average T99 (two log reduction) value for host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells was 28 h, whereas that for total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA was 177 h. Natural sunlight did not have a strong influence on the fate of fecal Bacteroidales cells and their DNA, presumably

  19. The Characterization of Varicella Zoster Virus Specific T Cells In Skin and Blood During Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Vukmanovic-Stejic, Milica; Sandhu, Daisy; Seidel, Judith A.; Patel, Neil; Sobande, Toni O.; Agius, Elaine; Jackson, Sarah E.; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Mabbott, Neil A.; Lacy, Katie E.; Ogg, Graham; Nestle, Frank O; Krueger, James G.; Rustin, Malcolm H.A.; Akbar, Arne N.

    2015-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) re-activation increases during ageing. Although the effects of VZV re-activation are observed in the skin (shingles) the number or functional capacity of cutaneous VZV specific T cells have not been investigated. The numbers of circulating IFN-γ secreting VZV specific CD4+ T cells are significantly decreased in old subjects however other measures of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells, including proliferative capacity to VZV antigen stimulation and identification of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells with a MHC class II tetramer (epitope of IE-63 protein), were similar in both age groups. The majority of T cells in the skin of both age groups expressed CD69, a characteristic of skin resident T cells. VZV-specific CD4+ T cells were significantly increased in the skin compared to the blood in young and old subjects and their function was similar in both age groups. In contrast the number of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 on CD4+ T cells were significantly increased in the skin of older humans. Therefore VZV-specific CD4+ T cells in the skin of older individuals are functionally competent. However their activity may be restricted by multiple inhibitory influences in situ. PMID:25734814

  20. Induction of Specific CD8+ T Cells against Intracellular Bacteria by CD8+ T-Cell-Oriented Immunization Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Toshi; Koide, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    For protection against intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, the cellular arm of adaptive immunity is necessary. A variety of immunization methods have been evaluated and are reported to induce specific CD8+ T cells against intracellular bacterial infection. Modified BCG vaccines have been examined to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. Naked DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce CD8+ T cells. In addition to this strategy, live attenuated intracellular bacteria such as Shigella, Salmonella, and Listeria have been utilized as carriers of DNA vaccines in animal models. Vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with antigenic peptides or the cells introduced antigen genes by virus vectors such as retroviruses is also a powerful strategy. Furthermore, vaccination with recombinant lentivirus has been attempted to induce specific CD8+ T cells. Combinations of these strategies (prime-boost immunization) have been studied for the efficient induction of intracellular bacteria-specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:20508818

  1. Generation of Patient-Specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Sendai Reprogramming Vectors.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology has changed preclinical research since their generation was described by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. iPSCs are derived from somatic cells after being reprogrammed back to an embryonic state by specific combination of reprogramming factors. These reprogrammed cells resemble all the characteristic of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The reprogramming technology is even more valuable to research diseases biology and treatment by opening gene and cell therapies in own patient's iPSC. Patient-specific iPSC can be generated from a large variety of patient cells by any of the myriad of reprogramming platforms described. Here, we describe the generation of patient-specific iPSC from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Sendai Reprogramming vectors.

  2. Microbial translocation augments the function of adoptively transferred self/tumor-specific CD8+ T cells via TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Kaiser,, Andrew; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Chieppa, Marcello; Cassard, Lydie; Palmer, Douglas C.; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Yu, Zhiya; Gattinoni, Luca; Antony, Paul A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with total body irradiation (TBI) increases the efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD8+ T cells by depleting inhibitory lymphocytes and increasing homeostatic cytokine levels. We found that TBI augmented the function of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells in mice genetically deficient in all lymphocytes, indicating the existence of another TBI mechanism of action. Additional investigation revealed commensal gut microflora in the mesenteric lymph nodes and elevated LPS levels in the sera of irradiated mice. These findings correlated with increased dendritic cell activation and heightened levels of systemic inflammatory cytokines. Reduction of host microflora using antibiotics, neutralization of serum LPS using polymyxin B, or removal of LPS signaling components using mice genetically deficient in CD14 and TLR4 reduced the beneficial effects of TBI on tumor regression. Conversely, administration of microbial ligand–containing serum or ultrapure LPS from irradiated animals to nonirradiated antibody-lymphodepleted mice enhanced CD8+ T cell activation and improved tumor regression. Administration of ultrapure LPS to irradiated animals further enhanced the number and function of the adoptively transferred cells, leading to long-term cure of mice with large B16F10 tumors and enhanced autoimmune vitiligo. Thus, disruption of the homeostatic balance between the host and microbes can enhance cell-based tumor immunotherapy. PMID:17657310

  3. β-cell-specific CD8 T cell phenotype in type 1 diabetes reflects chronic autoantigen exposure

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, James E.; Dolton, Garry; Matthews, Katherine K.; Gostick, Emma; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Eichmann, Martin; Knight, Robin R.; Heck, Susanne; Powrie, Jake; Bingley, Polly J.; Dayan, Colin M.; Miles, John J.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive CD8 T cells play a central role in the destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells that leads to type 1 diabetes, yet the key features of this immune-mediated process remain poorly defined. In this study, we combined high definition polychromatic flow cytometry with ultrasensitive peptide-human leukocyte antigen class I (pHLAI) tetramer staining to quantify and characterize β-cell-specific CD8 T cell populations in patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes and healthy controls. Remarkably, we found that β-cell-specific CD8 T cell frequencies in peripheral blood were similar between subject groups. In contrast to healthy controls, however, patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes displayed hallmarks of antigen-driven expansion uniquely within the β-cell-specific CD8 T cell compartment. Molecular analysis of selected β-cell-specific CD8 T cell populations further revealed highly skewed oligoclonal T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires comprising exclusively private clonotypes. Collectively, these data identify novel and distinctive features of disease-relevant CD8 T cells that inform the immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25249579

  4. β-cell-specific CD8 T cell phenotype in type 1 diabetes reflects chronic autoantigen exposure.

    PubMed

    Skowera, Ania; Ladell, Kristin; McLaren, James E; Dolton, Garry; Matthews, Katherine K; Gostick, Emma; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Eichmann, Martin; Knight, Robin R; Heck, Susanne; Powrie, Jake; Bingley, Polly J; Dayan, Colin M; Miles, John J; Sewell, Andrew K; Price, David A; Peakman, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Autoreactive CD8 T cells play a central role in the destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells that leads to type 1 diabetes, yet the key features of this immune-mediated process remain poorly defined. In this study, we combined high-definition polychromatic flow cytometry with ultrasensitive peptide-human leukocyte antigen class I tetramer staining to quantify and characterize β-cell-specific CD8 T cell populations in patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes and healthy control subjects. Remarkably, we found that β-cell-specific CD8 T cell frequencies in peripheral blood were similar between subject groups. In contrast to healthy control subjects, however, patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes displayed hallmarks of antigen-driven expansion uniquely within the β-cell-specific CD8 T cell compartment. Molecular analysis of selected β-cell-specific CD8 T cell populations further revealed highly skewed oligoclonal T cell receptor repertoires comprising exclusively private clonotypes. Collectively, these data identify novel and distinctive features of disease-relevant CD8 T cells that inform the immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25249579

  5. β-cell-specific CD8 T cell phenotype in type 1 diabetes reflects chronic autoantigen exposure.

    PubMed

    Skowera, Ania; Ladell, Kristin; McLaren, James E; Dolton, Garry; Matthews, Katherine K; Gostick, Emma; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Eichmann, Martin; Knight, Robin R; Heck, Susanne; Powrie, Jake; Bingley, Polly J; Dayan, Colin M; Miles, John J; Sewell, Andrew K; Price, David A; Peakman, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Autoreactive CD8 T cells play a central role in the destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells that leads to type 1 diabetes, yet the key features of this immune-mediated process remain poorly defined. In this study, we combined high-definition polychromatic flow cytometry with ultrasensitive peptide-human leukocyte antigen class I tetramer staining to quantify and characterize β-cell-specific CD8 T cell populations in patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes and healthy control subjects. Remarkably, we found that β-cell-specific CD8 T cell frequencies in peripheral blood were similar between subject groups. In contrast to healthy control subjects, however, patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes displayed hallmarks of antigen-driven expansion uniquely within the β-cell-specific CD8 T cell compartment. Molecular analysis of selected β-cell-specific CD8 T cell populations further revealed highly skewed oligoclonal T cell receptor repertoires comprising exclusively private clonotypes. Collectively, these data identify novel and distinctive features of disease-relevant CD8 T cells that inform the immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.

  6. Long-term in vivo provision of antigen-specific T cell immunity by programming hematopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2005-03-01

    A method to genetically program mouse hematopoietic stem cells to develop into functional CD8 or CD4 T cells of defined specificity in vivo is described. For this purpose, a bicistronic retroviral vector was engineered that efficiently delivers genes for both and chains of T cell receptor (TCR) to hematopoietic stem cells. When modified cell populations were used to reconstruct the hematopoietic lineages of recipient mice, significant percentages of antigen-specific CD8 or CD4 T cells were observed. These cells expressed normal surface markers and responded to peptide antigen stimulation by proliferation and cytokine production. Moreover, they could mature into memory cells after peptide stimulation. Using TCRs specific for a model tumor antigen, we found that the recipient mice were able to partially resist a challenge with tumor cells carrying the antigen. By combining cells modified with CD8- and CD4-specific TCRs, and boosting with dendritic cells pulsed with cognate peptides, complete suppression of tumor could be achieved and even tumors that had become established would regress and be eliminated after dendritic cell/peptide immunization. This methodology of "instructive immunotherapy" could be developed for controlling the growth of human tumors and attacking established pathogens.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of ectoderm specification to keratinocyte fate in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tadeu, Ana Mafalda Baptista; Lin, Samantha; Hou, Lin; Chung, Lisa; Zhong, Mei; Zhao, Hongyu; Horsley, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shed light into the processes that regulate epidermal specification and homeostasis. We previously showed that a broad-spectrum γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT promoted early keratinocyte specification in human embryonic stem cells triggered to undergo ectoderm specification. Here, we show that DAPT accelerates human embryonic stem cell differentiation and induces expression of the ectoderm protein AP2. Furthermore, we utilize RNA sequencing to identify several candidate regulators of ectoderm specification including those involved in epithelial and epidermal development in human embryonic stem cells. Genes associated with transcriptional regulation and growth factor activity are significantly enriched upon DAPT treatment during specification of human embryonic stem cells to the ectoderm lineage. The human ectoderm cell signature identified in this study contains several genes expressed in ectodermal and epithelial tissues. Importantly, these genes are also associated with skin disorders and ectodermal defects, providing a platform for understanding the biology of human epidermal keratinocyte development under diseased and homeostatic conditions.

  8. Peptide-β2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-β2-microglobulin–MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide–MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9·2 × 108 antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:17472719

  9. Peptide-beta2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-beta2-microglobulin-MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide-MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9.2 x 10(8) antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy.

  10. Patient-specific cardiovascular progenitor cells derived from integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells for vascular tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiang; Wang, Yongyu; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhao, Chao; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Forde, Kaitlynn; Wang, Lunchang; Wang, Jiangang; Baylink, David J; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Gao, Shaorong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in regenerating a live vascular replacement. However, the vascular cell source is limited, and it is crucial to develop a scaffold that accommodates new type of vascular progenitor cells and facilitates in vivo lineage specification of the cells into functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to regenerate vascular tissue. In the present study, integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were established from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells through episomal vector nucleofection of reprogramming factors. The established hiPSCs were then induced into mesoderm-originated cardiovascular progenitor cells (CVPCs) with a highly efficient directed lineage specification method. The derived CVPCs were demonstrated to be able to differentiate into functional VSMCs. Subcutaneous implantation of CVPCs seeded on macroporous nanofibrous poly(l-lactide) scaffolds led to in vivo VSMC lineage specification and matrix deposition inside the scaffolds. In summary, we established integration-free patient-specific hiPSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, derived CVPCs through directed lineage specification, and developed an advanced scaffold for these progenitor cells to further differentiate in vivo into VSMCs and regenerate vascular tissue in a subcutaneous implantation model. This study has established an efficient patient-specific approach towards in vivo regeneration of vascular tissue.

  11. THAP5 is a human cardiac-specific inhibitor of cell cycle that is cleaved by the proapoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease during cell death.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P; Cilenti, Lucia; Mashak, Zineb; Popat, Paiyal; Alnemri, Emad S; Zervos, Antonis S

    2009-08-01

    Omi/HtrA2 is a mitochondrial serine protease that has a dual function: while confined in the mitochondria, it promotes cell survival, but when released into the cytoplasm, it participates in caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent cell death. To investigate the mechanism of Omi/HtrA2's function, we set out to isolate and characterize novel substrates for this protease. We have identified Thanatos-associated protein 5 (THAP5) as a specific interactor and substrate of Omi/HtrA2 in cells undergoing apoptosis. This protein is an uncharacterized member of the THAP family of proteins. THAP5 has a unique pattern of expression and is found predominantly in the human heart, although a very low expression is also seen in the human brain and muscle. THAP5 protein is localized in the nucleus and, when ectopically expressed, induces cell cycle arrest. During apoptosis, THAP5 protein is degraded, and this process can be blocked using a specific Omi/HtrA2 inhibitor, leading to reduced cell death. In patients with coronary artery disease, THAP5 protein levels substantially decrease in the myocardial infarction area, suggesting a potential role of this protein in human heart disease. This work identifies human THAP5 as a cardiac-specific nuclear protein that controls cell cycle progression. Furthermore, during apoptosis, THAP5 is cleaved and removed by the proapoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. Taken together, we provide evidence to support that THAP5 and its regulation by Omi/HtrA2 provide a new link between cell cycle control and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. PMID:19502560

  12. Endosperm transfer cell-specific genes and proteins: structure, function and applications in biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lopato, Sergiy; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells (ETC) are one of four main types of cells in endosperm. A characteristic feature of ETC is the presence of cell wall in-growths that create an enlarged plasma membrane surface area. This specialized cell structure is important for the specific function of ETC, which is to transfer nutrients from maternal vascular tissue to endosperm. ETC-specific genes are of particular interest to plant biotechnologists, who use genetic engineering to improve grain quality and yield characteristics of important field crops. The success of molecular biology-based approaches to manipulating ETC function is dependent on a thorough understanding of the functions of ETC-specific genes and ETC-specific promoters. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing data on structure and function of ETC-specific genes and their products. Potential applications of ETC-specific genes, and in particular their promoters for biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:24578704

  13. Quantitative analysis of intercellular adhesive specificity in freshly explanted and cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A new method is presented for the quantitative analysis of intercellular adhesive specificity. In this assay, two cell types are mixed, one unlabeled and the other labeled with the fluorescent dye, fluorescamine [4-phenylspiro(feran-2[3H],1'-phthalan)-3,3'-dione]. The resulting aggregates are analyzed by fluorescence microscopy to determine the number of labeled and unlabeled cells per aggregate. Random (nonspecific) aggregation was characterized by a binomial distribution, and adhesive specificity was accordingly quantified by the deviation (as determined by a chi-square test) from the calculated binomial distribution. The labeling procedure was simple and rapid, and experiments with 18 different cell types showed that it did not affect cell viability, morphology, rate and extent of adhesion, plating efficiency, and the capability of myogenic cells to undergo terminal differentiation. Most important, assays with morphologically identifiable cell pairs indicated that the fluorescent label neither induced apparent nor destroyed existing adhesive specificity. The most pronounced adhesive specificities were observed with freshly explanted cells from adult tissues and also with mixtures of simian virus 40- transformed and nontransformed BALB/c 3T3 cells. A glucosamine-6- phosphate N-acetylase-deficient mutant 3T3 line (AD6), however, aggregated randomly with parental 3T3 cells. Lectin-resistant mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells displayed marginal adhesive specificity when mixed with normal CHO cells. PMID:6166626

  14. Transcription factors interfering with dedifferentiation induce cell type-specific transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hikichi, Takafusa; Matoba, Ryo; Ikeda, Takashi; Watanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Takuya; Yoshitake, Satoko; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Kimura, Takayuki; Kamon, Masayoshi; Shimura, Mari; Kawakami, Koichi; Okuda, Akihiko; Okochi, Hitoshi; Inoue, Takafumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Masui, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are able to regulate differentiation-related processes, including dedifferentiation and direct conversion, through the regulation of cell type-specific transcriptional profiles. However, the functional interactions between the TFs regulating different transcriptional profiles are not well understood. Here, we show that the TFs capable of inducing cell type-specific transcriptional profiles prevent the dedifferentiation induced by TFs for pluripotency. Of the large number of TFs expressed in a neural-lineage cell line, we identified a subset of TFs that, when overexpressed, strongly interfered with the dedifferentiation triggered by the procedure to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. This interference occurred through a maintenance mechanism of the cell type-specific transcriptional profile. Strikingly, the maintenance activity of the interfering TF set was strong enough to induce the cell line-specific transcriptional profile when overexpressed in a heterologous cell type. In addition, the TFs that interfered with dedifferentiation in hepatic-lineage cells involved TFs with known induction activity for hepatic-lineage cells. Our results suggest that dedifferentiation suppresses a cell type-specific transcriptional profile, which is primarily maintained by a small subset of TFs capable of inducing direct conversion. We anticipate that this functional correlation might be applicable in various cell types and might facilitate the identification of TFs with induction activity in efforts to understand differentiation. PMID:23550161

  15. Human Skin Cells That Express Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 3 Associate with Dermal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vega Crespo, Agustin; Awe, Jason P.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) is a glycosphingolipid that has previously been used to identify cells with stem cell-like, multipotent, and pluripotent characteristics. A rare subpopulation of SSEA3-expressing cells exists in the dermis of adult human skin. These SSEA3-expressing cells undergo a significant increase in cell number in response to injury, suggesting a possible role in regeneration. These SSEA3-expressing regeneration-associated (SERA) cells were derived through primary cell culture, purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and characterized. Longer in vitro culture of the primary skin cells led to lower SSEA3 expression stability after FACS-based purification, suggesting that the current culture conditions may need to be optimized to permit the large-scale expansion of SERA cells. The SERA cells demonstrated a global transcriptional state that was most similar to bone marrow- and fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and the highest expressing SSEA3-expressing cells co-expressed CD105 (clone 35). However, while a rare population of MSCs was observed in primary human skin cell cultures that could differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes, SERA cells did not possess this differentiation capacity, suggesting that there are at least two different rare subpopulations in adult human skin primary cultures. The identification, efficient purification, and large-scale expansion of these rare subpopulations (SERA cells and MSCs) from heterogeneous adult human skin primary cell cultures may have applications for future patient-specific cellular therapies. PMID:23514702

  16. Universal artificial antigen presenting cells to selectively propagate T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor independent of specificity.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-05-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to nonviral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through coculture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed 1 ligand that could activate CAR T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated that CARL aAPC propagate CAR T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Using CARL enables 1 aAPC to numerically expand all CAR T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  17. Universal Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells to Selectively Propagate T Cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Independent of Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to non-viral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR+ T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through co-culture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed one ligand that could activate CAR+ T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated CARL+ aAPC propagate CAR+ T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Employing CARL enables one aAPC to numerically expand all CAR+ T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR+ T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  18. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  19. Human Influenza A Virus-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Response Is Long-lived.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Hillaire, Marine L B; Geelhoed-Mieras, Martina M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-07-01

    Animal and human studies have demonstrated the importance of influenza A virus (IAV)-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in heterosubtypic cross-protective immunity. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained intermittently from healthy HLA-typed blood donors between 1999 and 2012, we were able to demonstrate that IAV-specific CTLs are long-lived. Intercurrent IAV infections transiently increase the frequency of functionally distinct subsets of IAV-specific CTLs, in particular effector and effector memory T cells.

  20. Analysis of possibilities for carbon removal from porous anode of solid oxide fuel cells after different failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotić, Vanja; Schluckner, Christoph; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Hochenauer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of possibilities for carbon removal from the fuel electrode of anode supported solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) after different degradation modes. To design the conditions which generally lead the cell in the range of carbon depositions the performed thermodynamic calculations show that the SOFC operating temperature range seems to be appropriate for formation of elemental carbon in various types. Concerning this the loaded large planar single SOFCs are fed with synthetic diesel reformate thus simulating realistic operating conditions and enabling the formation and deposition of carbon on the anode side. A mixture of hydrogen/water vapor/nitrogen is used to remove the detected carbon depositions in a cell-protecting manner. For the purpose of this investigation several failure modes are induced after which determination the already defined regeneration strategy is applied. The cathode degradation is first induced and secondly the fuel supply is interrupted to induce re-oxidation of nickel (Ni) on the anode side. The undertaken investigations determine that carbon can be fully removed from the anode surface after nickel oxidation, while cathode degradation disables the complete cell regeneration.

  1. Specific expression of human c-fgr in natural immunity effector cells.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, K; Yamamoto, T; Toyoshima, K

    1990-01-01

    The c-fgr gene product was shown by immune complex protein kinase assay with specific antibodies to be a 58-kilodalton protein (p58c-fgr) with tyrosine-specific autophosphorylating activity. On examination of peripheral blood cells by immunoblotting with anti-c-fgr antibodies, p58c-fgr was found only in the fractions of monocytes, granulocytes, and natural killer cells. On the other hand, histochemical studies of hybridization demonstrated accumulation of c-fgr transcripts on most monocytes and large lymphocytes. In hematopoietic cell lines, p58c-fgr was detected in differentiated granulocytic cells as well as in differentiated monocytic cells of HL-60-cell origin. These data suggest a specific role for p58c-fgr in natural immunity effector cells. Images PMID:2181286

  2. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2014-06-17

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, "targeted therapy" that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  3. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the “magic bullet” concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, “targeted therapy” that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges. PMID:24936916

  4. A silencer inhibitor confers specific expression of intestinal trefoil factor in gobletlike cell lines.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, D; Podolsky, D K

    2001-06-01

    Intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) is selectively expressed in intestinal goblet cells. Previous studies identified cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter of ITF, but these were insufficient to recapitulate the exquisite tissue- and cell-specific expression of native ITF in vivo. Preliminary studies suggested that goblet cell-specific expression of murine ITF requires elements far upstream that include a silencer element that effectively prevents ITF expression in non-goblet cells. Transient transfection studies using native or mutant ITF 5'-flanking sequences identified a region that restores expression in goblet cells. This element, designated goblet cell silencer inhibitor (GCSI) element, enables human and murine goblet cell-like cell lines to override the silencing effect of more proximal elements. The GCSI has no intrinsic enhancer activity and regulates expression only when the silencer element is present. Ligation of GCSI and silencer elements to sucrase-isomaltase conferred goblet cell-specific expression. Goblet cells but not non-goblet cells possess a nuclear protein that binds to the GCSI regulatory element (GCSI binding protein; GCSI-BP). Both transient transfection and gel mobility shift assay studies localize the GCSI and GCSI-BP to -2216 to -2204. We conclude that goblet cell-specific transcription of ITF in vivo depends on a regulatory element designated GCSI.

  5. Plasmonic nanobubbles for target cell-specific gene and drug delivery and multifunctional processing of heterogeneous cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Huye, Leslie E.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2014-03-01

    Cell and gene cancer therapies require ex vivo cell processing of human grafts. Such processing requires at least three steps - cell enrichment, cell separation (destruction), and gene transfer - each of which requires the use of a separate technology. While these technologies may be satisfactory for research use, they are of limited usefulness in the clinical treatment setting because they have a low processing rate, as well as a low transfection and separation efficacy and specificity in heterogeneous human grafts. Most problematic, because current technologies are administered in multiple steps - rather than in a single, multifunctional, and simultaneous procedure - they lengthen treatment process and introduce an unnecessary level of complexity, labor, and resources into clinical treatment; all these limitations result in high losses of valuable cells. We report a universal, high-throughput, and multifunctional technology that simultaneously (1) inject free external cargo in target cells, (2) destroys unwanted cells, and (3) preserve valuable non-target cells in heterogeneous grafts. Each of these functions has single target cell specificity in heterogeneous cell system, processing rate > 45 mln cell/min, injection efficacy 90% under 96% viability of the injected cells, target cell destruction efficacy > 99%, viability of not-target cells >99% The developed technology employs novel cellular agents, called plasmonic nanobubbles (PNBs). PNBs are not particles, but transient, intracellular events, a vapor nanobubbles that expand and collapse in mere nanoseconds under optical excitation of gold nanoparticles with short picosecond laser pulses. PNBs of different, cell-specific, size (1) inject free external cargo with small PNBs, (2) Destroy other target cells mechanically with large PNBs and (3) Preserve non-target cells. The multi-functionality, precision, and high throughput of all-in-one PNB technology will tremendously impact cell and gene therapies and other

  6. Antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells fail to respond to Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Stephanie P; Doling, Amy M; Giddings, Kara S; Phalipon, Armelle; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Goldberg, Marcia B; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes often play a primary role in adaptive immunity to cytosolic microbial pathogens. Surprisingly, CD8(+) T cells are not required for protective immunity to the enteric pathogen Shigella flexneri, despite the ability of Shigella to actively secrete proteins into the host cytoplasm, a location from which antigenic peptides are processed for presentation to CD8(+) T cells. To determine why CD8(+) T cells fail to play a role in adaptive immunity to S. flexneri, we investigated whether antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells are primed during infection but are unable to confer protection or, alternatively, whether T cells fail to be primed. To test whether Shigella is capable of stimulating an antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell response, we created an S. flexneri strain that constitutively secretes a viral CD8(+) T-cell epitope via the Shigella type III secretion system and characterized the CD8(+) T-cell response to this strain both in mice and in cultured cells. Surprisingly, no T cells specific for the viral epitope were stimulated in mice infected with this strain, and cells infected with the recombinant strain were not targeted by epitope-specific T cells. Additionally, we found that the usually robust T-cell response to antigens artificially introduced into the cytoplasm of cultured cells was significantly reduced when the antigen-presenting cell was infected with Shigella. Collectively, these results suggest that antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells are not primed during S. flexneri infection and, as a result, afford little protection to the host during primary or subsequent infection.

  7. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E.; Ladell, Kristin; Stryhn, Anette; Koofhethile, Catherine; Brener, Jacqui; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Graziano, Luzzi; Klenerman, Paul; Leslie, Alasdair; Buus, Søren; Price, David A.; Goulder, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection, their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion. The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD244 and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), which modulate the functional capabilities of CD8+ T cells. Design and methods: Here, we used an array of different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B∗15 : 03 and HLA-B∗42 : 01 tetramers to characterize inhibitory receptor expression as a function of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations (n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. Results: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated by effector memory CD8+ T cells. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels are influenced by peptide/HLA class I antigen exposure. PMID:24906112

  8. Cell-type specific gene expression profiles of leukocytes in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Chana; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A; Brown, Patrick O

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood is a complex tissue comprising numerous cell types with distinct functions and corresponding gene expression profiles. We attempted to define the cell type specific gene expression patterns for the major constituent cells of blood, including B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, lymphocytes and granulocytes. We did this by comparing the global gene expression profiles of purified B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, granulocytes, and lymphocytes using cDNA microarrays. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that similar cell populations from different donors share common gene expression profiles. Supervised analyses identified gene expression signatures for B-cells (427 genes), T-cells (222 genes), CD8+ T-cells (23 genes), granulocytes (411 genes), and lymphocytes (67 genes). No statistically significant gene expression signature was identified for CD4+ cells. Genes encoding cell surface proteins were disproportionately represented among the genes that distinguished among the lymphocyte subpopulations. Lymphocytes were distinguishable from granulocytes based on their higher levels of expression of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, while granulocytes exhibited characteristic expression of various cell surface and inflammatory proteins. Conclusion The genes comprising the cell-type specific signatures encompassed many of the genes already known to be involved in cell-type specific processes, and provided clues that may prove useful in discovering the functions of many still unannotated genes. The most prominent feature of the cell type signature genes was the enrichment of genes encoding cell surface proteins, perhaps reflecting the importance of specialized systems for sensing the environment to the physiology of resting leukocytes. PMID:16704732

  9. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  10. A laser microsurgical method of cell wall removal allows detection of large-conductance ion channels in the guard cell plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miedema, H.; Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Application of patch clamp techniques to higher-plant cells has been subject to the limitation that the requisite contact of the patch electrode with the cell membrane necessitates prior enzymatic removal of the plant cell wall. Because the wall is an integral component of plant cells, and because cell-wall-degrading enzymes can disrupt membrane properties, such enzymatic treatments may alter ion channel behavior. We compared ion channel activity in enzymatically isolated protoplasts of Vicia faba guard cells with that found in membranes exposed by a laser microsurgical technique in which only a tiny portion of the cell wall is removed while the rest of the cell remains intact within its tissue environment. "Laser-assisted" patch clamping reveals a new category of high-conductance (130 to 361 pS) ion channels not previously reported in patch clamp studies on plant plasma membranes. These data indicate that ion channels are present in plant membranes that are not detected by conventional patch clamp techniques involving the production of individual plant protoplasts isolated from their tissue environment by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. Given the large conductances of the channels revealed by laser-assisted patch clamping, we hypothesize that these channels play a significant role in the regulation of ion content and electrical signalling in guard cells.

  11. T cells expressing CD19-specific Engager Molecules for the Immunotherapy of CD19-positive Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Mireya Paulina; Torres, David; Iwahori, Kota; Kakarla, Sunitha; Arber, Caroline; Rodriguez-Cruz, Tania; Szoor, Arpad; Bonifant, Challice L.; Gerken, Claudia; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Song, Xiao-Tong; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or the infusion of bispecific T-cell engagers (BITEs) have shown antitumor activity in humans for CD19-positive malignancies. While BITEs redirect the large reservoir of resident T cells to tumors, CAR T cells rely on significant in vivo expansion to exert antitumor activity. We have shown that it is feasible to modify T cells to secrete solid tumor antigen-specific BITEs, enabling T cells to redirect resident T cells to tumor cells. To adapt this approach to CD19-positive malignancies we now generated T cells expressing secretable, CD19-specific BITEs (CD19-ENG T cells). CD19-ENG T cells recognized tumor cells in an antigen-dependent manner as judged by cytokine production and tumor killing, and redirected bystander T cells to tumor cells. Infusion of CD19-ENG T cells resulted in regression of leukemia or lymphoma in xenograft models and a survival advantage in comparison to control mice. Genetically modified T cells expressing engager molecules may present a promising addition to current CD19-targeted immunotherapies. PMID:27255991

  12. Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Lentoid Bodies Expressing a Lens Cell-Specific Fluorescent Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Garrels, Wiebke; Mukherjee, Ayan; Debowski, Katharina; Behr, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Curative approaches for eye cataracts and other eye abnormalities, such as myopia and hyperopia currently suffer from a lack of appropriate models. Here, we present a new approach for in vitro growth of lentoid bodies from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells as a tool for ophthalmological research. We generated a transgenic mouse line with lens-specific expression of a fluorescent reporter driven by the alphaA crystallin promoter. Fetal fibroblasts were isolated from transgenic fetuses, reprogrammed to iPS cells, and differentiated to lentoid bodies exploiting the specific fluorescence of the lens cell-specific reporter. The employment of cell type-specific reporters for establishing and optimizing differentiation in vitro seems to be an efficient and generally applicable approach for developing differentiation protocols for desired cell populations. PMID:27322380

  13. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens. PMID:25768227

  14. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens.

  15. Pumpkin phloem lectin genes are specifically expressed in companion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D E; Dannenhoffer, J M; Skaggs, M I; Lister, R M; Larkins, B A; Thompson, G A

    1992-01-01

    Pumpkin phloem exudate contains two abundant phloem proteins: PP1 is a 96-kD protein that forms polymeric filaments in vivo, and PP2 is a 48-kD dimeric lectin. Polyclonal antibodies raised against pumpkin phloem exudate were used to isolate several cDNAs corresponding to PP1 and PP2. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that PP1 is encoded by an mRNA of approximately 2500 nucleotides, whereas PP2 subunits are encoded by an mRNA of 1000 nucleotides. Sequence analysis of PP2 cDNAs revealed a 654-bp open reading frame encoding a 218-amino acid polypeptide; this polypeptide had the carbohydrate binding characteristics of a PP2 subunit. The PP2 mRNA was localized within the phloem of pumpkin hypocotyl cross-sections based on in situ hybridization of a digoxigenin-labeled antisense probe. PP2 mRNA was found within the companion cells in both the bicollateral vascular bundles and the extrafascicular phloem network. PMID:1467652

  16. Redirecting specificity of T-cell populations for CD19 using the Sleeping Beauty system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Manuri, Pallavi R; Olivares, Simon; Dara, Navid; Dawson, Margaret J; Huls, Helen; Hackett, Perry B; Kohn, Donald B; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2008-04-15

    Genetic modification of clinical-grade T cells is undertaken to augment function, including redirecting specificity for desired antigen. We and others have introduced a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to enable T cells to recognize lineage-specific tumor antigen, such as CD19, and early-phase human trials are currently assessing safety and feasibility. However, a significant barrier to next-generation clinical studies is developing a suitable CAR expression vector capable of genetically modifying a broad population of T cells. Transduction of T cells is relatively efficient but it requires specialized manufacture of expensive clinical grade recombinant virus. Electrotransfer of naked DNA plasmid offers a cost-effective alternative approach, but the inefficiency of transgene integration mandates ex vivo selection under cytocidal concentrations of drug to enforce expression of selection genes to achieve clinically meaningful numbers of CAR(+) T cells. We report a new approach to efficiently generating T cells with redirected specificity, introducing DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system to directly express a CD19-specific CAR in memory and effector T cells without drug selection. When coupled with numerical expansion on CD19(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells, this gene transfer method results in rapid outgrowth of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressing CAR to redirect specificity for CD19(+) tumor cells. PMID:18413766

  17. Cell-, tissue-, and position-specific monoclonal antibodies against the planarian Dugesia (Girardia) tigrina.

    PubMed

    Bueno, D; Baguñà, J; Romero, R

    1997-02-01

    To obtain specific immunological probes for studying molecular mechanisms involved in cell renewal, cell differentiation, and pattern formation in intact and regenerating planarians, we have produced a hybridoma library specific for the asexual race of the fresh-water planarian Dugesia (Girardia) tigrina. Among the 276 monoclonal antibodies showing tissue-, cell-, cell subtype-, subcellular- and position-specific staining, we have found monoclonal antibodies against all tissues and cell types with the exception of neoblasts, the undifferentiated totipotent stem-cells in planarians. We have also detected position-specific antigens that label anterior, central, and posterior regions. Patterns of expression uncovered an unexpected heterogeneity among previously thought single cell types, as well as interesting cross-reactivities that deserve further study. Characterization of some of these monoclonal antibodies suggests they may be extremely useful as molecular markers for studying cell renewal and cell differentiation in the intact and regenerating organism, tracing the origin, lineage, and differentiation of blastema cells, and characterizing the stages and mechanisms of early pattern formation. Moreover, two position-specific monoclonals, the first ones isolated in planarians, will be instrumental in describing in molecular terms how the new pattern unfolds during regeneration and in devising the pattern formation model that best fits classical data on regeneration in planarians.

  18. Specific phase arrest of cell cycle restores cell viability against tRNA cleavage by killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Megumi; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2012-04-20

    Zymocin and PaT are killer toxins that induce cell cycle arrest of sensitive yeast cells in G1 and S phase, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that these two toxins cleave specific tRNAs, indicating that the cell growth impairment is due to the tRNA cleavage. Additionally, we have previously shown that the active domain of colicin D (D-CRD), which also cleaves specific Escherichia coli tRNAs, statically impairs growth when expressed in yeast cells. To verify that phase-specific cell cycle arrest is also induced by the expression of D-CRD, D-CRD and the subunits of zymocin and PaT that have tRNA cleaving activity were expressed in yeast cells and cell cycle status was analyzed. Our results indicate that phase-specific arrest does not commonly occur by tRNA cleavage, and it saves the cell viability. Furthermore, the extent of protein synthesis impairment may determine the phase specificity of cell cycle arrest. PMID:22450321

  19. Cell-type-specific responses of RT4 neural cell lines to dibutyryl-cAMP: branch determination versus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Droms, K.; Sueoka, N.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the induction of cell-type-specific maturation, by dibutyryl-cAMP and testololactone, of neuronal and glial properties in a family of cell lines derived from a rat peripheral neurotumor, RT4. This maturation allows further understanding of the process of determination because of the close lineage relationship between the cell types of the RT4 family. The RT4 family is characterized by the spontaneous conversion of one of the cell types, RT4-AC (stem-cell type), to any of three derivative cell types, RT4-B, RT4-D, or RT4-E, with a frequency of about 10(-5). The RT4-AC cells express some properties characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Of these neural properties expressed by RT4-AC cells, only the neuronal properties are expressed by the RT4-B and RT4-E cells, and only the glial properties are expressed by the RT4-D cells. This in vitro cell-type conversion of RT4-AC to three derivative cell types is a branch point for the coordinate regulation of several properties and seems to resemble determination in vivo. In our standard culture conditions, several other neuronal and glial properties are not expressed by these cell types. However, addition of dibutyryl-cAMP induces expression of additional properties, in a cell-type-specific manner: formation of long cellular processes in the RT4-B8 and RT4-E5 cell lines and expression of high-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid, by a glial-cell-specific mechanism, in the RT4-D6-2 cell line. These new properties are maximally expressed 2-3 days after addition of dibutyryl-cAMP.

  20. Sleeping beauty system to redirect T-cell specificity for human applications.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sourindra N; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Dawson, Margaret; Figliola, Matthew; Olivares, Simon; Rao, Pullavathi; Zhao, Yi Jue; Multani, Asha; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Ling; Crossland, Denise; Ang, Sonny; Torikai, Hiroki; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A; Kebriaei, Partow; Hackett, Perry; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-02-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase DNA plasmid system is used to genetically modify cells for long-term transgene expression. We adapted the SB system for human application and generated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19. Electrotransfer of CD19-specific SB DNA plasmids in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and propagation on CD19 artificial antigen presenting cells was used to numerically expand CD3 T cells expressing CAR. By day 28 of coculture, >90% of expanded CD3 T cells expressed CAR. CAR T cells specifically killed CD19 target cells and consisted of subsets expressing biomarkers consistent with central memory, effector memory, and effector phenotypes. CAR T cells contracted numerically in the absence of the CD19 antigen, did not express SB11 transposase, and maintained a polyclonal TCR Vα and TCR Vβ repertoire. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that CAR T cells preserved the telomere length. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed CAR transposon integrated on average once per T-cell genome. CAR T cells in peripheral blood can be detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction at a sensitivity of 0.01%. These findings lay the groundwork as the basis of our first-in-human clinical trials of the nonviral SB system for the investigational treatment of CD19 B-cell malignancies (currently under 3 INDs: 14193, 14577, and 14739). PMID:23377665

  1. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  2. The Potential to Improve Cell Infiltration in Composite Fiber-Aligned Electrospun Scaffolds by the Selective Removal of Sacrificial Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Gee, Albert O.; Metter, Robert B.; Nathan, Ashwin S.; Marklein, Ross L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Aligned electrospun scaffolds are a promising tool for engineering fibrous musculoskeletal tissues as they reproduce the mechanical anisotropy of these tissues and can direct ordered neo-tissue formation. However, these scaffolds suffer from a slow cellular infiltration rate, likely due in part to their dense fiber packing. We hypothesized that cell ingress could be expedited in scaffolds by increasing porosity, while at the same time preserving overall scaffold anisotropy. To test this hypothesis, poly(ε-caprolactone) (a slow-degrading polyester) and poly(ethylene oxide) (a water-soluble polymer) were co-electrospun from two separate spinnerets to form dual-polymer composite fiber-aligned scaffolds. Adjusting fabrication parameters produced aligned scaffolds with a full range of sacrificial (PEO) fiber contents. Tensile properties of scaffolds were a function of the ratio of PCL to PEO in the composite scaffolds, and were altered in a predictable fashion with removal of the PEO component. When seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), increases in the starting sacrificial fraction (and porosity) improved cell infiltration and distribution after three weeks in culture. In pure PCL scaffolds, cells lined the scaffold periphery, while scaffolds containing >50% sacrificial PEO content had cells present throughout the scaffold. These findings indicate that cell infiltration can be expedited in dense fibrous assemblies with the removal of sacrificial fibers. This strategy may enhance in vitro and in vivo formation and maturation of a functional constructs for fibrous tissue engineering. PMID:18313138

  3. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  4. A Good Manufacturing Practice procedure to engineer donor virus-specific T cells into potent anti-leukemic effector cells

    PubMed Central

    van Loenen, Marleen M.; de Boer, Renate; van Liempt, Ellis; Meij, Pauline; Jedema, Inge; Falkenburg, J.H. Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A sequential, two-step procedure in which T-cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation is followed by treatment with donor lymphocyte infusion at 6 months can significantly reduce the risk and severity of graft-versus-host disease, with postponed induction of the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effect. However, patients with high-risk leukemia have a substantial risk of relapse early after transplantation, at a time when administration of donor lymphocytes has a high likelihood of resulting in graft-versus-host disease, disturbing a favorable balance between the graft-versus-leukemia effect and graft-versus-host disease. New therapeutic modalities are, therefore, required to allow early administration of T cells capable of exerting a graft-versus-leukemia effect without causing graft-versus-host disease. Here we describe the isolation of virus-specific T cells using Streptamer-based isolation technology and subsequent transfer of the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1-specific T-cell receptor using retroviral vectors. Isolation of virus-specific T cells and subsequent transduction with HA-1-T-cell receptor resulted in rapid in vitro generation of highly pure, dual-specific T cells with potent anti-leukemic reactivity. Due to the short production procedure of only 10–14 days and the defined specificity of the T cells, administration of virus-specific T cells transduced with the HA-1-T-cell receptor as early as 8 weeks after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is feasible. (This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu as EudraCT number 2010-024625-20). PMID:24334296

  5. A Good Manufacturing Practice procedure to engineer donor virus-specific T cells into potent anti-leukemic effector cells.

    PubMed

    van Loenen, Marleen M; de Boer, Renate; van Liempt, Ellis; Meij, Pauline; Jedema, Inge; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M

    2014-04-01

    A sequential, two-step procedure in which T-cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation is followed by treatment with donor lymphocyte infusion at 6 months can significantly reduce the risk and severity of graft-versus-host disease, with postponed induction of the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effect. However, patients with high-risk leukemia have a substantial risk of relapse early after transplantation, at a time when administration of donor lymphocytes has a high likelihood of resulting in graft-versus-host disease, disturbing a favorable balance between the graft-versus-leukemia effect and graft-versus-host disease. New therapeutic modalities are, therefore, required to allow early administration of T cells capable of exerting a graft-versus-leukemia effect without causing graft-versus-host disease. Here we describe the isolation of virus-specific T cells using Streptamer-based isolation technology and subsequent transfer of the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1-specific T-cell receptor using retroviral vectors. Isolation of virus-specific T cells and subsequent transduction with HA-1-T-cell receptor resulted in rapid in vitro generation of highly pure, dual-specific T cells with potent anti-leukemic reactivity. Due to the short production procedure of only 10-14 days and the defined specificity of the T cells, administration of virus-specific T cells transduced with the HA-1-T-cell receptor as early as 8 weeks after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is feasible. (This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu as EudraCT number 2010-024625-20).

  6. Molecular profiling of tumor-specific TH1 cells activated in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lorvik, Kristina Berg; Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner; Clancy, Trevor; Bogen, Bjarne; Corthay, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The central role of tumor-specific TH1 cells in anticancer immune responses is becoming increasingly appreciated. However, little is known about how these cells are generated in vivo. Here, we used flow cytometry and gene expression microarrays to characterize the primary activation and TH1 differentiation of naïve tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in a mouse model of cancer immunosurveillance. We took advantage of T-cell receptor-transgenic mice in which CD4+ T cells recognize a tumor-specific antigen secreted by MHC class II-negative MOPC315 myeloma cells. Cancer cells were injected subcutaneously and T-cell activation was analyzed in draining lymph nodes and at the incipient tumor site 8 d later. Upon activation and migration to incipient tumor sites, tumor-specific CD4+ T cells exhibited the upregulation of 29 cell-surface molecules (CD2, CD5, CD11a, CD18, CD25, CD28, CD44, CD45, CD49d, CD51, CD54, CD69, CD71, CD83, CD86, CD90, CD95, CD102, CD122, CD153, CD166, CD200, CD249, CD254, CD274, CD279, Ly6C, MHC class I and CCR7) and the downregulation of five (CD27, CD31, CD45RB, CD62L and CD126). Activated CD4+ T cells produced interferon γ, a cytokine consistent with a TH1-polarized response, tumor necrosis factor α as well as interleukin (IL)-2, IL-3 and IL-10. The activation of naïve tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in draining lymph nodes resulted in the upregulation of 609 genes and the downregulation of 284 genes. The bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed genes identified functional pathways related to tumor-specific TH1 cell activation. This study may represent a useful resource to guide the development of TH1-based immunotherapies against cancer. PMID:23762808

  7. Tissue-Specific B-Cell Dysfunction and Generalized Memory B-Cell Loss during Acute SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peruchon, Sandrine; Chaoul, Nada; Burelout, Chantal; Delache, Benoit; Brochard, Patricia; Laurent, Pascale; Cognasse, Fabrice; Prévot, Sophie; Garraud, Olivier; Le Grand, Roger; Richard, Yolande

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. Methods and Findings Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.). We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD−CD27+) B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus–B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. Conclusions These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid organs

  8. Genetic and epigenetic variation in the lineage specification of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Arvey, Aaron; van der Veeken, Joris; Plitas, George; Rich, Stephen S; Concannon, Patrick; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2015-10-28

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoimmunity and other inflammatory states, are characterized by a distinct set of genetic elements controlling their gene expression. However, the extent of genetic and associated epigenetic variation in the Treg cell lineage and its possible relation to disease states in humans remain unknown. We explored evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements and natural human inter-individual epigenetic variation in Treg cells to identify the core transcriptional control program of lineage specification. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in core lineage-specific enhancers revealed disease associations, which were further corroborated by high-resolution genotyping to fine map causal polymorphisms in lineage-specific enhancers. Our findings suggest that a small set of regulatory elements specify the Treg lineage and that genetic variation in Treg cell-specific enhancers may alter Treg cell function contributing to polygenic disease.

  9. Effect of antigen-induced suppressor B cells on development of memory B cells, carrier-specific helper T cells, and antibody-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinkovich, A.G.; Luganskaya, E.L.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1986-12-01

    This paper studies the presence of an Fc receptor on the surface of antigen-induced suppressor B cells (AISB), their sensitivity to antiproliferative agents, their interaction with other immunoregulator cells and with the precursors of antibody-forming cells (AFC). Mice were used in the experiments and were irradiated in a dose of 8.5 Gy (/sup 137/Cs). The effect of AISB on memory B cells is shown as is the effect of AISB on development of carrier-specific helper T cells. Also presented is the effect of AISB on development of AFC.

  10. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  11. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  12. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  13. Methodologies for the Analysis of HCV-Specific CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lokhande, Megha U.; Thimme, Robert; Klenerman, Paul; Semmo, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Virus-specific CD4+ T cells play a major role in viral infections, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV). Viral clearance is associated with vigorous and multi-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, while chronic infection has been shown to be associated with weak or absent T-cell responses. Most of these studies have used functional assays to analyze virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses; however, these and other detection methods have various limitations. Therefore, the important question of whether virus-specific CD4+ T cells are completely absent or primarily impaired in specific effector functions during chronic infection, has yet to be analyzed in detail. A novel assay, in which virus-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies can be determined by de novo CD154 (CD40 ligand) expression in response to viral antigens, can help to overcome some of the limitations of functional assays and restrictions of multimer-based methods. This and other current established methods for the detection of HCV-specific CD4+ T cells will be discussed in this review. PMID:25767470

  14. Spider Silk-Based Gene Carriers for Tumor Cell-Specific Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Reagan, Michaela R; Goldstein, Robert H; Rosenblatt, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2011-01-01

    The present study demonstrates pDNA complexes of recombinant silk proteins containing poly(L-lysine) and tumor-homing peptides (THPs), which are globular and approximately 150–250 nm in diameter, show significant enhancement of target specificity to tumor cells by additions of F3 and CGKRK THPs. We report herein the preparation and study of novel nano-scale silk-based ionic complexes containing pDNA able to home specifically to tumor cells. Particular focus was on how the THP, F3 (KDEPQRRSARLSAKPAPPKPEPKPKKAPAKK) and CGKRK, enhanced transfection specificity to tumor cells. Genetically engineered silk proteins containing both poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with pDNA and the THP to bind to specific tumor cells for target-specific pDNA delivery were prepared using Escherichia coli, followed by in-vitro and in-vivo transfection experiments into MDA-MB-435 melanoma cells and highly metastatic human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cells. Non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells were used as a control cell line for in-vitro tumor-specific delivery studies. These results demonstrate that combination of the bioengineered silk delivery systems and THP can serve as a versatile and useful new platform for non-viral gene delivery. PMID:21739966

  15. Detection and quantification of drug-specific T cells in penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Rozieres, A; Hennino, A; Rodet, K; Gutowski, M-C; Gunera-Saad, N; Berard, F; Cozon, G; Bienvenu, J; Nicolas, J-F

    2009-04-01

    Drug allergic reactions presenting as maculo-papular exanthema (MPE) are mediated by drug-specific T cells. In this study, the frequency of circulating specific T cells was analyzed by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot assay in 22 patients with an allergic MPE to amoxicillin (amox). Amox-specific circulating T cells were detected in 20/22 patients with frequencies ranging from 1 : 8000 to 1 : 30 000 circulating leucocytes. No reactivity was observed in 46 control patients, including 15 patients with immunoglobulin E-mediated allergy to amoxicillin, 11 patients with a history of drug-induced MPE but tolerant to amoxicillin and 20 healthy individuals. Furthermore, amox-specific T cells were still detectable several years after the occurrence of the allergic reaction even after strict drug avoidance. Finally, analysis of drug-specific T cells in one patient allergic to ticarcillin (a penicillin antibiotic distinct from amox) revealed the presence of IFN-gamma-producing T cells reactive to ticarcillin and several other betalactam antibiotics, suggesting that the IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay is able to detect T cell cross-reactivity against chemically related drugs. These findings confirm that drug-induced MPE is associated with the presence of specific T cells in blood and further suggest that the IFN-gamma ELISPOT is a sensitive assay which could improve the diagnosis of betalactam allergy. PMID:19154548

  16. Minimizing the Non-specific Binding of Nanoparticles to the Brain Enables Active Targeting of Fn14-positive Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Craig S.; Perez, Jimena G.; Cheng, Emily; Zhang, Clark; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Hanes, Justin; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Kim, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and deadly primary brain cancer, is delivery of therapeutics to invading tumor cells outside of the area that is safe for surgical removal. A promising way to target invading GBM cells is via drug-loaded nanoparticles that bind to fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), thereby potentially improving efficacy and reducing toxicity. However, achieving broad particle distribution and nanoparticle targeting within the brain remains a significant challenge due to the adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) and clearance mechanisms in the brain. In this work, we developed Fn14 monoclonal antibody-decorated nanoparticles that can efficiently penetrate brain tissue. We show these Fn14-targeted brain tissue penetrating nanoparticles are able to (i) selectively bind to recombinant Fn14 but not brain ECM proteins, (ii) associate with and be internalized by Fn14-positive GBM cells, and (iii) diffuse within brain tissue in a manner similar to non-targeted brain penetrating nanoparticles. In addition, when administered intracranially, Fn14-targeted nanoparticles showed improved tumor cell co-localization in mice bearing human GBM xenografts compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Minimizing non-specific binding of targeted nanoparticles in the brain may greatly improve the access of particulate delivery systems to remote brain tumor cells and other brain targets. PMID:25542792

  17. Alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated with a chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Katherine G.; Hoeppli, Romy E.; Huang, Qing; Gillies, Jana; Luciani, Dan S.; Orban, Paul C.; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a promising treatment for allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Emerging data indicate that, compared with polyclonal Tregs, disease-relevant antigen-specific Tregs may have numerous advantages, such as a need for fewer cells and reduced risk of nonspecific immune suppression. Current methods to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs rely on expansion with allogeneic antigen-presenting cells, which requires access to donor and recipient cells and multiple MHC mismatches. The successful use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the generation of antigen-specific effector T cells suggests that a similar approach could be used to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we have described the creation of an HLA-A2–specific CAR (A2-CAR) and its application in the generation of alloantigen-specific human Tregs. In vitro, A2-CAR–expressing Tregs maintained their expected phenotype and suppressive function before, during, and after A2-CAR–mediated stimulation. In mouse models, human A2-CAR–expressing Tregs were superior to Tregs expressing an irrelevant CAR at preventing xenogeneic GVHD caused by HLA-A2+ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that use of CAR technology to generate potent, functional, and stable alloantigen-specific human Tregs markedly enhances their therapeutic potential in transplantation and sets the stage for using this approach for making antigen-specific Tregs for therapy of multiple diseases. PMID:26999600

  18. Alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated with a chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Katherine G; Hoeppli, Romy E; Huang, Qing; Gillies, Jana; Luciani, Dan S; Orban, Paul C; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan K

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a promising treatment for allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Emerging data indicate that, compared with polyclonal Tregs, disease-relevant antigen-specific Tregs may have numerous advantages, such as a need for fewer cells and reduced risk of nonspecific immune suppression. Current methods to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs rely on expansion with allogeneic antigen-presenting cells, which requires access to donor and recipient cells and multiple MHC mismatches. The successful use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the generation of antigen-specific effector T cells suggests that a similar approach could be used to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we have described the creation of an HLA-A2-specific CAR (A2-CAR) and its application in the generation of alloantigen-specific human Tregs. In vitro, A2-CAR-expressing Tregs maintained their expected phenotype and suppressive function before, during, and after A2-CAR-mediated stimulation. In mouse models, human A2-CAR-expressing Tregs were superior to Tregs expressing an irrelevant CAR at preventing xenogeneic GVHD caused by HLA-A2+ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that use of CAR technology to generate potent, functional, and stable alloantigen-specific human Tregs markedly enhances their therapeutic potential in transplantation and sets the stage for using this approach for making antigen-specific Tregs for therapy of multiple diseases. PMID:26999600

  19. In vitro primary sensitization and restimulation of hapten-specific T cells by fresh and cultured human epidermal Langerhans' cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moulon, C; Péguet-Navarro, J; Courtellemont, P; Redziniak, G; Schmitt, D

    1993-01-01

    We examined the capacity of human Langerhans's cells (LC) to sensitize autologous T cells to the trinitrophenyl hapten (TNP) in vitro. Two-day cultured Langerhans' cells, but not freshly prepared Langerhans' cells, can induce in vitro primary proliferative reactions to the TNP hapten. Using a CD45RA+ naive T-cell subset, similar results were found, therefore making the possibility of a previous in vivo T-cell contact with the hapten unlikely. The primary in vitro response was strongly inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II, CD4 antigens and ICAM-1 and LFA-3 adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we found that fresh LC can prime T cells to TNP, as revealed by a significant secondary T-cell proliferation after restimulation of the recovered T lymphocytes by fresh hapten-modified autologous LC. Nevertheless, the ability of these fresh LC to stimulate in vitro secondary hapten-specific T-cell proliferation was very limited in comparison with that of 2-day incubated Langerhans' cells. After secondary stimulation with TNP-cultured LC, sensitized T cells could be non-specifically expanded without losing hapten specificity. The TNP-specific T-cell lines were mostly of the CD4+ phenotype. The present findings extend previous studies in the mouse, showing that culture LC are potent antigen-presenting cells (APC) in primary hapten-dependent proliferation assays. Furthermore, this in vitro priming assay, using cultured human Langerhans' cells as APC, might be useful to analyse the early steps of T-cell sensitization and subsequently to develop in vitro predictive tests allowing detection of sensitizing compounds. PMID:7507088

  20. Manipulation of regulatory T cells and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G

    2015-01-01

    The most potent killing machinery in our immune system is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Since the possibility for self-destruction by these cells is high, many regulatory activities exist to prevent autoimmune destruction by these cells. A tumour (cancer) grows from the cells of the body and is tolerated by the body's immune system. Yet, it has been possible to generate tumour-associated antigen (TAA) -specific CTL that are also self-antigen specific in vivo, to achieve a degree of therapeutic efficacy. Tumour-associated antigen-specific T-cell tolerance through pathways of self-tolerance generation represents a significant challenge to successful immunotherapy. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells, referred to as T regulatory (Treg) cells, are selected in the thymus as controllers of the anti-self repertoire. These cells are referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. According to the new consensus (Nature Immunology 2013; 14:307–308) these cells are to be termed as (tTreg). There is another class of CD4+ Treg cells also involved in regulatory function in the periphery, also phenotypically CD4+ CD25±, classified as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. These cells are to be termed as peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. In vitro-induced Treg cells with suppressor function should be termed as iTreg. These different Treg cells differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. The current challenges are to determine the degree of specificity of these Treg cells in recognizing the same TAA as the CTL population and to circumvent their regulatory constraints so as to achieve robust CTL responses against cancer. PMID:25243729

  1. Synthesis of milk specific fatty acids and proteins by dispersed goat mammary-gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H O; Tornehave, D; Knudsen, J

    1986-01-01

    The method now described for preparation of dispersed lactating goat mammary-gland cells gives a high yield of morphologically and functionally normal mammary cells. The cells synthesize specific goat milk fatty acids in the right proportions, and they respond to hormones by increased protein synthesis. The cells can be frozen and thawed without losing the above properties, which makes them an excellent tool for metabolic and hormonal studies. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3800930

  2. Differential Gag-Specific Polyfunctional T Cell Maturation Patterns in HIV-1 Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Casazza, Joseph P.; Leal, Manuel; Machmach, Kawthar; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Ángeles; Viciana, Pompeyo; Koup, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    A small fraction of HIV-infected individuals (<1%), referred to as elite controllers (EC), are able to maintain undetectable viral loads indefinitely without treatment. The role of the maturational phenotype of T cells in the control of HIV infection in these individuals is not well described. We compared the maturational and functional phenotypes of Gag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells from EC, who maintain undetectable viral loads without treatment; relative controllers (RC), who maintain viral loads of <1,000 copies/ml without treatment; and noncontrollers (NC), who fail to control viral replication. EC maintained higher frequencies of HIV-specific CD4 T cells, less mature polyfunctional Gag-specific CD4 T cells (CD27+ CD57− CD45RO+), and Gag-specific polyfunctional CD4 T cells than those observed in NC. In EC, the frequency of polyfunctional Gag-specific CD8 T cells was higher than that observed in RC and NC. RC had a similar functional phenotype to that observed in NC, despite consistently lower viral loads. Finally, we found a direct correlation between the frequency of Gag-specific CD27+ CD57− CD45RO+ CD4+ T cells and the frequency of mature HIV-specific CD8 T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that immature Gag-specific interleukin-2 (IL-2)-producing CD4+ T cells may play an important role in spontaneous control of HIV viremia by effectively supporting HIV-specific CD8 T lymphocytes. This difference appears to differentiate EC from RC. PMID:22278254

  3. Divergent members of a single autoreactive B cell clone retain specificity for apoptotic blebs.

    PubMed

    Neeli, Indira; Richardson, Mekel M; Khan, Salar N; Nicolo, Danielle; Monestier, Marc; Radic, Marko Z

    2007-03-01

    Specificity for double-stranded DNA can arise due to somatic mutations within one of the branches of an autoreactive B cell clone. However, it is not known whether a different autospecificity predates anti-dsDNA and whether separate offshoots of an expanding B cell clone retain or evolve alternative specificities. We compared 3H9, an anti-dsDNA IgG, to 4H8 and 1A11, antibodies produced by hybridomas representing an alternative branch of the 3H9 B cell clone. All three IgG bound chromatin in ELISA and apoptotic cells in confocal microscopy, yet only 3H9 bound dsDNA, as measured by plasmon resonance. Moreover, we demonstrate that despite the unique specificity of 3H9 for dsDNA, all three clone members exhibited indistinguishable binding to chromatin. The binding to chromatin and apoptotic cells was unaffected by N-linked glycosylation in L chain CDR1, a modification that results from a replacement of serine 26 with asparagine in 4H8 and 1A11. These data provide the first evidence that specificity for nucleosome epitopes on apoptotic cells provides the initial positive stimulus for somatic variants that comprise a B cell clone, including those that subsequently acquire specificity for dsDNA. Conversely, selection of autoreactive B cells for binding to apoptotic cells leads to clonal expansion, antibody diversification, and the development of linked sets of anti-nuclear autoantibodies.

  4. Cell type-specific affinity purification of nuclei for chromatin profiling in whole animals.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing cell differentiation during development in a complex organism requires the analysis of expression and chromatin profiles in individual cell types. Our laboratory has developed a simple and generally applicable strategy to purify specific cell types from whole organisms for simultaneous analysis of chromatin and expression. The method, termed INTACT for Isolation of Nuclei TAgged in specific Cell Types, depends on the expression of an affinity-tagged nuclear envelope protein in the cell type of interest. These nuclei can be affinity-purified from the total pool of nuclei and used as a source for RNA and chromatin. The method serves as a simple and scalable alternative to FACS sorting or laser capture microscopy to circumvent the need for expensive equipment and specialized skills. This chapter provides detailed protocols for the cell-type specific purification of nuclei from Caenorhabditis elegans.

  5. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  6. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  7. Kidney specific protein-positive cells derived from embryonic stem cells reproduce tubular structures in vitro and differentiate into renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Fujii, Shizuka; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Homma, Koichiro; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hideyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various organs and tissues, and are regarded as new tools for the elucidation of disease mechanisms as well as sources for regenerative therapies. However, a method of inducing organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells is urgently needed. Although many scientists have been developing methods to induce various organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells, renal lineage cells have yet to be induced in vitro because of the complexity of kidney structures and the diversity of kidney-component cells. Here, we describe a method of inducing renal tubular cells from mouse embryonic stem cells via the cell purification of kidney specific protein (KSP)-positive cells using an anti-KSP antibody. The global gene expression profiles of KSP-positive cells derived from ES cells exhibited characteristics similar to those of cells in the developing kidney, and KSP-positive cells had the capacity to form tubular structures resembling renal tubular cells when grown in a 3D culture in Matrigel. Moreover, our results indicated that KSP-positive cells acquired the characteristics of each segment of renal tubular cells through tubular formation when stimulated with Wnt4. This method is an important step toward kidney disease research using pluripotent stem cells, and the development of kidney regeneration therapies.

  8. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  9. Collaboration between tumor-specific CD4+ T cells and B cells in anti-cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Guy, Thomas V; Terry, Alexandra M; Bolton, Holly A; Hancock, David G; Zhu, Erhua; Brink, Robert; McGuire, Helen M; Shklovskaya, Elena; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-05-24

    The role of B cells and antibodies in anti-tumor immunity is controversial, with both positive and negative effects reported in animal models and clinical studies. We developed a murine B16.F10 melanoma model to study the effects of collaboration between tumor-specific CD4+ T cells and B cells on tumor control. By incorporating T cell receptor transgenic T cells and B cell receptor isotype switching B cells, we were able to track the responses of tumor-reactive T and B cells and the development of anti-tumor antibodies in vivo. In the presence of tumor-specific B cells, the number of tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells was reduced in lymphoid tissues and the tumor itself, and this correlated with poor tumor control. B cells had little effect on the Th1 bias of the CD4+ T cell response, and the number of induced FoxP3+ regulatory cells (iTregs) generated from within the original naive CD4+ T cell inoculum was unrelated to the degree of B cell expansion. In response to CD4+ T cell help, B cells produced a range of isotype-switched anti-tumor antibodies, principally IgG1, IgG2a/c and IgG2b. In the absence of CD4+ T cells, B cells responded to agonistic anti-CD40 administration by switching to production of IgG2a/c and, to a lesser extent, IgG1, IgG3, IgA and IgE, which reduced the number of lung metastases after i.v. tumor inoculation but had no effect on the growth of subcutaneous tumors.

  10. Collaboration between tumor-specific CD4+ T cells and B cells in anti-cancer immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Thomas V.; Terry, Alexandra M.; Bolton, Holly A.; Hancock, David G.; Zhu, Erhua; Brink, Robert; McGuire, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells and antibodies in anti-tumor immunity is controversial, with both positive and negative effects reported in animal models and clinical studies. We developed a murine B16.F10 melanoma model to study the effects of collaboration between tumor-specific CD4+ T cells and B cells on tumor control. By incorporating T cell receptor transgenic T cells and B cell receptor isotype switching B cells, we were able to track the responses of tumor-reactive T and B cells and the development of anti-tumor antibodies in vivo. In the presence of tumor-specific B cells, the number of tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells was reduced in lymphoid tissues and the tumor itself, and this correlated with poor tumor control. B cells had little effect on the Th1 bias of the CD4+ T cell response, and the number of induced FoxP3+ regulatory cells (iTregs) generated from within the original naive CD4+ T cell inoculum was unrelated to the degree of B cell expansion. In response to CD4+ T cell help, B cells produced a range of isotype-switched anti-tumor antibodies, principally IgG1, IgG2a/c and IgG2b. In the absence of CD4+ T cells, B cells responded to agonistic anti-CD40 administration by switching to production of IgG2a/c and, to a lesser extent, IgG1, IgG3, IgA and IgE, which reduced the number of lung metastases after i.v. tumor inoculation but had no effect on the growth of subcutaneous tumors. PMID:27121060

  11. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy in patients with iron overload after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Krahl, Rainer; Jaekel, Nadja; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Excess body iron could persist for years after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with possible deleterious sequels. An iron depletive therapy with phlebotomy seems rational. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy without erythropoietin support in non-thalassemic adult patients with iron overload after HCT and the impact of pre- and post-HCT hemochromatosis (HFE) genotype on iron mobilization were investigated. Patients and methods: Phlebotomy was initiated in 61 recipients of allografts due to hematologic malignancies (median age 48 years) after a median of 18 months. The prephlebotomy median serum ferritin (SF) was 1697ng/ml and the median number of blood transfusions 28 units. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphates (AP), and bilirubin were elevated in 55.7%, 64% and 11.5% patients respectively. HFE-genotype was elucidated by polymerase chain reaction using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. Results: Phlebotomy was well-tolerated irrespective of age or conditioning. A negative iron balance in 80% of patients (median SF 1086 ng/ml) and a rise in hemoglobin were observed (p<0.0001). Higher transfusional burden and SF were associated with a greater iron mobilization per session (p=0.02). In 58% of patients, a plateau after an initial steady decline in SF was followed by a second decline under further phlebotomy. The improvement in ALT (p=0.002), AST (p=0.03), AP (p=0.01), and bilirubin (p<0.0001) did not correlate with the decline in SF. Mutant HFE-gene variants were detected in 14/55 (25%) pre-HCT and 22/55 (40%) patients post-HCT. Overall, dissimilar pre- and posttransplantational HFE-genotypes were detected in 20/55 (40%) patients. Posttransplantational mutant HFE variants correlated with a slower decline in SF (p=0.007). Conclusions: Phlebotomy is a convenient therapy of iron overload in survivors of HCT. A negative iron balance and a rise in hemoglobin were observed in the majority of

  12. Generation and Characterization of Human Cryptorchid-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Urine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junmei; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Shengli; Gu, Yijun; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jing; Gao, Tongbin

    2013-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a common congenital birth defect in human beings with the possible complication of infertility. An in vitro model of cryptorchidism might be valuable due to the inaccessibility of human embryos for research purposes. In this study, we reprogrammed urine cells containing genetic variations in insulin-like factor 3, zinc finger (ZNF) 214, and ZNF215 from a cryptorchid patient by introducing human OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4 with lentivirus. The cells were then replated on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cultured with the human embryonic stem (ES) cell medium. The compact colonies with well-defined borders were manually picked, and 2 induced pluripotent cell lines were fully characterized. Our results demonstrated that these 2 cell lines were similar to human ES cells in morphological appearance, marker expression, and epigenetic status of the pluripotent cell-specific gene, OCT4. These cells could be differentiated into cells of all 3 germ layers in teratomas and in vitro, including into the VASA-positive germ cell lineage. Both parental urine cells and the reprogrammed cells possessed the normal karyotype and the same short tandem repeat loci, indicating that these 2 cell population share the same genetic identity. This establishment and characterization of human urine-derived cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells could present a good human genetic system for future studies investigating the molecular mechanism of cryptorchidism. PMID:23025704

  13. Cell type specific gene expression analysis of prostate needle biopsies resolves tumor tissue heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Walter, Max; Drendel, Vanessa; Werner, Martin; Jilg, Cordula A; Richter, Andreas S; Backofen, Rolf; McGarry, David; Follo, Marie; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Schüle, Roland

    2015-01-20

    A lack of cell surface markers for the specific identification, isolation and subsequent analysis of living prostate tumor cells hampers progress in the field. Specific characterization of tumor cells and their microenvironment in a multi-parameter molecular assay could significantly improve prognostic accuracy for the heterogeneous prostate tumor tissue. Novel functionalized gold-nano particles allow fluorescence-based detection of absolute mRNA expression levels in living cells by fluorescent activated flow cytometry (FACS). We use of this technique to separate prostate tumor and benign cells in human prostate needle biopsies based on the expression levels of the tumor marker alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR). We combined RNA and protein detection of living cells by FACS to gate for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) positive tumor and benign cells, EPCAM/CD45 double negative mesenchymal cells and CD45 positive infiltrating lymphocytes. EPCAM positive epithelial cells were further sub-gated into AMACR high and low expressing cells. Two hundred cells from each population and several biopsies from the same patient were analyzed using a multiplexed gene expression profile to generate a cell type resolved profile of the specimen. This technique provides the basis for the clinical evaluation of cell type resolved gene expression profiles as pre-therapeutic prognostic markers for prostate cancer.

  14. Generation and characterization of human cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from urine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junmei; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Shengli; Gu, Yijun; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jing; Gao, Tongbin; Chen, Fang

    2013-03-01

    Cryptorchidism is a common congenital birth defect in human beings with the possible complication of infertility. An in vitro model of cryptorchidism might be valuable due to the inaccessibility of human embryos for research purposes. In this study, we reprogrammed urine cells containing genetic variations in insulin-like factor 3, zinc finger (ZNF) 214, and ZNF215 from a cryptorchid patient by introducing human OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4 with lentivirus. The cells were then replated on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cultured with the human embryonic stem (ES) cell medium. The compact colonies with well-defined borders were manually picked, and 2 induced pluripotent cell lines were fully characterized. Our results demonstrated that these 2 cell lines were similar to human ES cells in morphological appearance, marker expression, and epigenetic status of the pluripotent cell-specific gene, OCT4. These cells could be differentiated into cells of all 3 germ layers in teratomas and in vitro, including into the VASA-positive germ cell lineage. Both parental urine cells and the reprogrammed cells possessed the normal karyotype and the same short tandem repeat loci, indicating that these 2 cell population share the same genetic identity. This establishment and characterization of human urine-derived cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells could present a good human genetic system for future studies investigating the molecular mechanism of cryptorchidism. PMID:23025704

  15. Cell type specific gene expression analysis of prostate needle biopsies resolves tumor tissue heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Krönig, Malte; Walter, Max; Drendel, Vanessa; Werner, Martin; Jilg, Cordula A.; Richter, Andreas S.; Backofen, Rolf; McGarry, David; Follo, Marie; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Schüle, Roland

    2015-01-01

    A lack of cell surface markers for the specific identification, isolation and subsequent analysis of living prostate tumor cells hampers progress in the field. Specific characterization of tumor cells and their microenvironment in a multi-parameter molecular assay could significantly improve prognostic accuracy for the heterogeneous prostate tumor tissue. Novel functionalized gold-nano particles allow fluorescence-based detection of absolute mRNA expression levels in living cells by fluorescent activated flow cytometry (FACS). We use of this technique to separate prostate tumor and benign cells in human prostate needle biopsies based on the expression levels of the tumor marker alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR). We combined RNA and protein detection of living cells by FACS to gate for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) positive tumor and benign cells, EPCAM/CD45 double negative mesenchymal cells and CD45 positive infiltrating lymphocytes. EPCAM positive epithelial cells were further sub-gated into AMACR high and low expressing cells. Two hundred cells from each population and several biopsies from the same patient were analyzed using a multiplexed gene expression profile to generate a cell type resolved profile of the specimen. This technique provides the basis for the clinical evaluation of cell type resolved gene expression profiles as pre-therapeutic prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:25514598

  16. Vascular endothelial cells have impaired capacity to present immunodominant, antigenic peptides: a mechanism of cell type-specific immune escape.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Marco; Lev, Avital; Reiter, Yoram; Biedermann, Barbara C

    2005-02-15

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) are an exposed target tissue in the course of CTL-mediated alloimmune diseases such as graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) or solid organ transplant rejection. The outcome of an interaction between CTL and target cells is determined by the amount of Ag presented and the costimulatory signals delivered by the target cells. We compared human EC with leukocytes and epithelial cells as targets for peptide-specific, MHC class I-restricted CTL clones. EC were poor targets for immunodominant CTL. Both endogenously processed antigenic proteins and exogenously added antigenic peptides are presented at 50- to 5000-fold lower levels on EC compared with any other target cell analyzed. This quantitative difference fully explained the poor CTL-mediated killing of EC. There was no evidence that lack of costimulation would contribute significantly to this cell type-specific difference in CTL activation. An HLA-A2-specific CTL clone that killed a broad selection of HLA A2-positive target cells equally well, killed EC less efficiently. Our data suggest that EC present a different Ag repertoire compared with other cell types. By this mechanism, these cells may escape an attack by effector CTL, which have been educated by professional APCs and are specific for immunodominant antigenic peptides. PMID:15699122

  17. Dual-specificity anti-sigma factor reinforces control of cell-type specific gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P; Henriques, Adriano O

    2015-04-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  18. Dual-Specificity Anti-sigma Factor Reinforces Control of Cell-Type Specific Gene Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R.; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  19. Generation of priming mesenchymal stem cells with enhanced potential to differentiate into specific cell lineages using extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Han, Na Rae; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Young Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Choonghyo; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eunsong; Lim, Jeong Mook; Lee, Seung Tae

    2013-07-01

    Poor understanding of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has resulted in a low differentiation yield, and has hindered their application in medicine. As a solution, priming MSCs sensitive to signaling, thus stimulating differentiation into a specific cell lineage, may improve the differentiation yield. To demonstrate this, priming MSCs were produced by using a gelatin matrix for the isolation of primary MSCs from bone-marrow-derived primary cells. Subsequently, cellular characteristics and sensitivity to specific differentiation signals were analyzed at passage five. Compared to non-priming MSCs, priming MSCs showed no significant differences in cellular characteristics, but demonstrated a significant increase in sensitivity to neurogenic differentiation signals. These results demonstrate that generation of priming MSCs by specific extracellular signaling increases the rate of differentiation into a cell-specific lineage.

  20. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  1. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen–specific (TA-specific) CD8+ T cells and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8+ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8+ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1+TIM-3+ TA-specific CD8+ T cells. PD-1+TIGIT+, PD-1–TIGIT+, and PD-1+TIGIT– CD8+ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand–expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8+ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:25866972

  2. Vaccination Against Human Papilloma Viruses Leads to a Favorable Cytokine Profile of Specific T Cells.

    PubMed

    Luckau, Stefanie; Wehrs, Tim P; Brandau, Sven; Horn, Peter A; Lindemann, Monika

    2016-10-01

    Several human papilloma viruses (HPV) are known to cause malignant transformation. The high-risk type HPV 16 is associated with cervical carcinoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. HPV 16-positive tumor cells exclusively carry the HPV 16 oncogenes E6 and E7. These oncogenes appear as excellent targets for an adoptive immunotherapy. We here addressed the question whether specific T cells from HPV-vaccinated healthy volunteers could be especially suitable for an HPV-specific cellular immunotherapy. Of note, vaccines contain HPV 16. To quantify HPV 16 E6-specific and E7-specific cells, enzyme-linked immunospot assays to measure interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (Th1-Th2 balance) and the secretion of the cytotoxic molecules granzyme B and perforin have been optimized. The frequency of peripheral blood mononuclear cells secreting IFN-γ and perforin was significantly (P<0.05) increased in HPV-vaccinated versus nonvaccinated volunteers. Overall, however, the median frequency of HPV 16-specific cells with a favorable secretion profile (Th1 balanced and cytotoxic) was low even in vaccinated volunteers (IFN-γ: 0.0018% and 0.0023%, perforin: 0.01% and 0.0087% for E6-specific and E7-specific cells, respectively). But some vaccinated volunteers showed up to 0.1% HPV-specific, IFN-γ or perforin-secreting cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that vaccinated volunteers are superior to nonvaccinated donors for HPV-specific cellular cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27548034

  3. HIV-specific CD8+ T cells: serial killers condemned to die?

    PubMed

    Petrovas, Constantinos; Mueller, Yvonne M; Katsikis, Peter D

    2004-04-01

    An increasing body of evidence supports a key role for cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTL) in controlling HIV infection. Although a vigorous HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response is raised during the primary infection, these cells ultimately fail to control virus and prevent disease progression. The failure of CTL to control HIV infection has been attributed to a number of strategies HIV employs to evade the immune system. Recently, intrinsic defects in the CTL themselves have been proposed to contribute to the failure of CTL to control HIV. HIV-specific CD8+ T cells differ in their effector/memory phenotype from other virus-specific CD8+ T cells indicating that their differentiation status differs. This altered differentiation may affect effector functions as well as homing properties of these cells. Other studies have indicated that activation of HIV-specific CTL may be impaired and this contributes to their dysfunction. The effector function of these CTL may also be affected. There are conflicting reports about their ability to kill, whereas IFNgamma production does not appear to be impaired in these cells. In this review we focus on recent work indicating that apoptosis may be an important mechanism through which HIV evades the CTL response. In particular, HIV-specific CD8+ T cells are highly susceptible to CD95/Fas-induced apoptosis. This leads to the hypothesis that virus-specific cytotoxic T cells can be eliminated upon binding CD95L/FasL on HIV-infected cells. Understanding the intrinsic defects of CTL in HIV infection could lead to new therapeutic strategies and optimized vaccination protocols that enhance the HIV-specific cytotoxic response.

  4. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  5. Gamma delta T cells recognize haptens and mount a hapten-specific response.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xun; Meyer, Christina; Huang, Jun; Newell, Evan W; Kidd, Brian A; Wei, Yu-Ling; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize small organic molecules and chemical modifications of host molecules is an essential capability of the adaptive immune system, which until now was thought to be mediated mainly by B cell antigen receptors. Here we report that small molecules, such as cyanine 3 (Cy3), a synthetic fluorescent molecule, and 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl (NP), one of the most noted haptens, are γδ T cell antigens, recognized directly by specific γδ TCRs. Immunization with Cy3 conjugates induces a rapid Cy3-specific γδ T cell IL-17 response. These results expand the role of small molecules and chemical modifications in immunity and underscore the role of γδ T cells as unique adaptive immune cells that couple B cell-like antigen recognition capability with T cell effector function. PMID:25255099

  6. Polarity and cell fate specification in the control of C. elegans gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Rohrschneider, Monica R.; Nance, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Gastrulation is a time during development when cells destined to produce internal tissues and organs move from the surface of the embryo into the interior. It is critical that the cell movements of gastrulation be precisely controlled, and coordinated with cell specification, in order for the embryo to develop normally. C. elegans gastrulation is relatively simple, can be observed easily in the transparent embryo, and can be manipulated genetically to uncover important regulatory mechanisms. Many of these cellular and molecular mechanisms – including cell shape, cytoskeletal, and cell cycle changes – appear to be conserved from flies to vertebrates. Here we review gastrulation in C. elegans, with an emphasis on recent data linking contact-induced cell polarity, PAR proteins, and cell fate specification to gastrulation control. PMID:19253398

  7. Rapid and specific electrochemical detection of prostate cancer cells using an aperture sensor array.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Mario; Bhimji, Alyajahan; Kelley, Shana O

    2013-03-01

    A rapid, simple and specific cancer cell counting sensor would allow for early detection and better disease management. We have developed a novel cell counting device that can specifically count 125 prostate cancer cells in both complex media with serum and a mixed cell population containing non-target cells within 15 min. The microfabricated glass chip with exposed gold apertures utilizes the anti-EpCAM antibody to selectively count prostate cancer cells via differential pulse voltammetry. The newly developed sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and selectivity. The cells remain viable throughout the counting process and can be used for further analysis. This device could have utility for future applications in early stage cancer diagnosis.

  8. Association Between Specific Timothy Grass Antigens and Changes in Thelper 1 and 2 Cell Responses Following Specific Immunotherap