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Sample records for cells specific removal

  1. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Haber, S I; Herrmann, S; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens--ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu56LLys35LPhe9) [(GluLysPhe)n]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to controls in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or "processing independent" antigens. In parallel studies 125I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. At least some of the biotin-insulin surface sites are immunologically relevant, because the presentation of processed biotin-insulin by fixed APC is blocked by avidin. This effect is specific. Avidin binding to biotin-insulin-exposed APC does not inhibit allospecific stimulation nor the presentation of unconjugated insulin. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen. PMID:3467371

  2. Specific removal of alloreactive T-cells to prevent GvHD in hemopoietic stem cell transplantation: rationale, strategies and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Di Cecca, Stefano; Montanari, Mauro; Moretta, Lorenzo; Manca, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    Hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a standard procedure for treatment of malignant and non-malignant hematological diseases. HSCT donors include HLA-identical siblings, matched or mismatched unrelated donors and haploidentical related donors. Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), mediated by donor alloreactive T-cells in the graft, can be triggered by minor histocompatibility antigens in HLA-identical pairs, by alleles at loci not considered for MUD-matching or by the mismatched haplotype in haplo-HSCT. Therefore, removal of donor T-cells, that contain the alloreactive precursors, is required, but T-cell depletion associates with opportunistic infections and with reduced graft-versus-leukemia effect. Selective T-cell depletion strategies have been introduced, like removal of αβ T-lymphocytes and of naive T-cells, two subsets including the alloreactive precursors, but the ultimate goal is specific removal of alloreactive T-cells. Here we review the different approaches to deplete alloreactive T-cells only and discuss pros and cons, specificity, efficiency and efficacy. Combinations of different methods and innovative approaches are also proposed for depleting specific alloreactive T-cells with high efficiency.

  3. Membrane Cholesterol Removal Changes Mechanical Properties of Cells and Induces Secretion of a Specific Pool of Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Roma, Paula Magda S.; Alves, Ana Paula; Rocha, Carolina D.; Valverde, Thalita M.; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique N.; Almeida, Fernando P.; Guimarães, Allan J.; Guatimosim, Cristina; Silva, Aristóbolo M.; Fernandes, Maria C.; Andrews, Norma W.; Viana, Nathan B.; Mesquita, Oscar N.; Agero, Ubirajara; Andrade, Luciana O.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study we had shown that membrane cholesterol removal induced unregulated lysosomal exocytosis events leading to the depletion of lysosomes located at cell periphery. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol triggered these exocytic events had not been uncovered. In this study we investigated the importance of cholesterol in controlling mechanical properties of cells and its connection with lysosomal exocytosis. Tether extraction with optical tweezers and defocusing microscopy were used to assess cell dynamics in mouse fibroblasts. These assays showed that bending modulus and surface tension increased when cholesterol was extracted from fibroblasts plasma membrane upon incubation with MβCD, and that the membrane-cytoskeleton relaxation time increased at the beginning of MβCD treatment and decreased at the end. We also showed for the first time that the amplitude of membrane-cytoskeleton fluctuation decreased during cholesterol sequestration, showing that these cells become stiffer. These changes in membrane dynamics involved not only rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but also de novo actin polymerization and stress fiber formation through Rho activation. We found that these mechanical changes observed after cholesterol sequestration were involved in triggering lysosomal exocytosis. Exocytosis occurred even in the absence of the lysosomal calcium sensor synaptotagmin VII, and was associated with actin polymerization induced by MβCD. Notably, exocytosis triggered by cholesterol removal led to the secretion of a unique population of lysosomes, different from the pool mobilized by actin depolymerizing drugs such as Latrunculin-A. These data support the existence of at least two different pools of lysosomes with different exocytosis dynamics, one of which is directly mobilized for plasma membrane fusion after cholesterol removal. PMID:24376622

  4. Preservation of Antigen-Specific Functions of αβ T Cells and B Cells Removed from Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants Suggests Their Use As an Alternative Cell Source for Advanced Manipulation and Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Di Cecca, Stefano; Biagini, Simone; Girolami, Elia; Cicchetti, Elisabetta; Bertaina, Valentina; Quintarelli, Concetta; Caruana, Ignazio; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Merli, Pietro; Pagliara, Daria; Brescia, Letizia Pomponia; Bertaina, Alice; Montanari, Mauro; Locatelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is standard therapy for numerous hematological diseases. The use of haploidentical donors, sharing half of the HLA alleles with the recipient, has facilitated the use of this procedure as patients can rely on availability of a haploidentical donor within their family. Since HLA disparity increases the risk of graft-versus-host disease, T-cell depletion has been used to remove alloreactive lymphocytes from the graft. Selective removal of αβ T cells, which encompass the alloreactive repertoire, combined with removal of B cells to prevent EBV-related lymphoproliferative disease, proved safe and effective in clinical studies. Depleted αβ T cells and B cells are generally discarded as by-products. Considering the possible use of donor T cells for donor lymphocyte infusions or for generation of pathogen-specific T cells as mediators of graft-versus-infection effect, we tested whether cells in the discarded fractions were functionally intact. Response to alloantigens and to viral antigens comparable to that of unmanipulated cells indicated a functional integrity of αβ T cells, in spite of the manipulation used for their depletion. Furthermore, B cells proved to be efficient antigen-presenting cells, indicating that antigen uptake, processing, and presentation were fully preserved. Therefore, we propose that separated αβ T lymphocytes could be employed for obtaining pathogen-specific T cells, applying available methods for positive selection, which eventually leads to indirect allodepletion. In addition, these functional T cells could undergo additional manipulation, such as direct allodepletion or genetic modification. PMID:28386262

  5. Polyclonal antibodies for specific detection of tobacco host cell proteins can be efficiently generated following RuBisCO depletion and the removal of endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Arfi, Zulfaquar Ahmad; Hellwig, Stephan; Drossard, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer; Buyel, Johannes Felix

    2016-03-01

    The production of biopharmaceutical proteins in plants requires efficient downstream processing steps that remove impurities such as host cell proteins (HCPs) and adventitious endotoxins produced by bacteria during transient expression. We therefore strived to develop effective routines for endotoxin removal from plant extracts and the subsequent use of the extracts to generate antibodies detecting a broad set of HCPs. At first, we depleted the superabundant protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) for which PEG precipitation achieved the best results, preventing a dominant immune reaction against this protein. We found that a mixture of sera from rabbits immunized with pre-depleted or post-depleted extracts detected more HCPs than the individual sera used alone. We also developed a powerful endotoxin removal procedure using Polymyxin B for extracts from wild type plants or a combination of fiber-flow filtration and EndoTrap Blue for tobacco plants infiltrated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The antibodies we generated will be useful for quality and performance assessment in future process development and the methods we present can easily be transferred to other expression systems rendering them useful in the field of plant molecular farming.

  6. Removing the Barriers: Accessibility Guidelines and Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotler, Stephen R.

    This guide provides guidelines for meeting the accessibility requirements of the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act in college and university buildings. The publication is divided into 10 chapters, the first 7 of which present construction drawings, evaluation criteria, and specifications for: (1) site accessibility (external path of travel,…

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the albumin gene depends on the removal of histone methylation marks by the FAD-dependent monoamine oxidase lysine-specific demethylase 1 in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Zempleni, Janos

    2014-07-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase (LSD) 1 is an FAD-dependent demethylase that catalyzes the removal of methyl groups from lysine-4 in histone H3, thereby mediating gene repression. Here we tested the hypothesis that riboflavin deficiency causes a loss of LSD1 activity in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cells, leading to an accumulation of lysine-4-dimethylated histone H3 (H3K4me2) marks in the albumin promoter and aberrant upregulation of albumin expression. Cells were cultured in riboflavin-defined media providing riboflavin at concentrations representing moderately deficient (3.1 nmol/L), sufficient (12.6 nmol/L), and supplemented (301 nmol/L) cells in humans for 7 d. The efficacy of treatment was confirmed by assessing glutathione reductase activity and concentrations of reduced glutathione as markers of riboflavin status. LSD activity was 21% greater in riboflavin-supplemented cells compared with riboflavin-deficient and -sufficient cells. The loss of LSD activity was associated with a gain in the abundance of H3K4me2 marks in the albumin promoter; the abundance of H3K4me2 marks was ∼170% higher in riboflavin-deficient cells compared with sufficient and supplemented cells. The abundance of the repression mark, K9-trimethylated histone H3, was 38% lower in the albumin promoter of riboflavin-deficient cells compared with the other treatment groups. The expression of albumin mRNA was aberrantly increased by 200% in riboflavin-deficient cells compared with sufficient and supplemented cells. In conclusion, riboflavin deficiency impairs gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms, mediated by a loss of LSD1 activity.

  8. Dust removal from solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  9. Dust Removal from Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  10. Should dialysis modalities be designed to remove specific uremic toxins?

    PubMed

    Baurmeister, Ulrich; Vienken, Joerg; Ward, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The definition of optimal dialysis therapy remains elusive. Randomized clinical trials have neither supported using urea as a surrogate marker for uremic toxicity nor provided clear cut evidence in favor of larger solutes. Thus, where to focus resources in the development of new membranes, and therapies remains unclear. Three basic questions remain unanswered: (i) what solute(s) should be used as a marker for optimal dialysis; (ii) should dialytic therapies be designed to remove a specific solute; and (iii) how can current therapies be modified to provide better control of uremic toxicity? Identification of a single, well-defined uremic toxin appears to be unlikely as new analytical tools reveal an increasingly complex uremic milieu. As a result, it is probable that membranes and therapies should be designed for the nonspecific removal of a wide variety of solutes retained in uremia. Removal of the widest range of solutes can best be achieved using existing therapies that incorporate convection in conjunction with longer treatment times and more frequent treatments. Membranes capable of removing solutes over an expanded effective molecular size range can already be fabricated; however, their use will require novel approaches to conserve proteins, such as albumin.

  11. Development of a device for selective removal of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hirokazu; Ninomiya, Kasumi; Yoshida, Makoto; Matsuo, Hidenori; Shibuya, Noritoshi

    2003-06-01

    To control antigen (Ag)-specific immune cells is important in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In particular, controlling the immune response of autoimmune T cells is effective in the treatment of these diseases. The development of a device that can remove CD4+ T cells specifically by extracorporeal circulation is now in progress, with the aim to deplete autoimmune T cells. We developed a removal material made of polypropylene non-woven fabrics with anti human CD4 monoclonal antibody immobilized on the surface. Using a column packed with the removal material, we succeeded in removing CD4+ T cells specifically from peripheral whole blood by direct perfusion. Moreover, CD4+ T cells can be specifically removed even from blood with lower surface antigen density by in vitro activation.

  12. FFTF/IEM cell fuel pin removal equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwell, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a fuel pin removal device used for pin removal from irradiated fuel assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). After irradiation in the FFTF, selected fuel assemblies are remotely disassembled in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell. The remote disassembly, following sodium removal, consists of slitting and removing the duct and then removing the fuel pins one-at-a-time by sliding the pins from parallel attachment rails. All pins are removed from one rail before starting on the next. The new pin removal equipment has been used very successfully on the last three fuel experiments disassembled in the IEM cell, including one assembly containing residual sodium. Pin removal time has been cut in half, and this once tedious and time-consuming activity has been turned into an almost effortless evolution.

  13. Electrochemical antimony removal from accumulator acid: results from removal trials in laboratory cells.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, M E Henry; Koparal, A Savas

    2011-11-30

    Regeneration of spent accumulator acid could be an alternative process for crystallization, neutralisation and disposal. Therefore, for the first time in a study of the possibilities of electrochemical removal of antimony and accumulator acid regeneration on a laboratory scale, two synthetic and several real systems containing sulfuric acid of concentrations ranging between 28% and 36%, and antimony species were tested. Discontinuous electrochemical reactors with anion exchange membranes were successfully used in these experiments, which were conducted at a temperature of 35°C. Removal of antimony using cells that were not divided by a separator, however, was not possible. In selected experiments, by varying the electrode material, type of electrolyte, and cell current, the concentration of antimony could be reduced from the range of 5 ppm to 0.15 ppm. This resulted in current efficiencies between 0.00002% and 0.001%, and in specific electroenergy demands between 100 Wh L(-1) and 2000 Wh L(-1). In other experiments on substances with antimony contents up to 3500 mg L(-1), the current efficiencies obtained were more than a thousandfold higher. In contrast to the formally high relative energy consumption parameters absolute demand parameters are relatively small and favour the electrochemical method in small scale application. Besides plate electrodes, 3D-cathodes were used. Copper- and graphite cathodes produced the best results.

  14. Benchmark specifications for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, T.; Briggs, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is hosting an IAEA-coordinated research project on benchmark analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor passive safety tests performed at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The benchmark project involves analysis of a protected and an unprotected loss of flow tests conducted during an extensive testing program within the framework of the U.S. Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate the inherently safety features of EBR-II as a pool-type, sodium-cooled fast reactor prototype. The project is intended to improve the participants' design and safety analysis capabilities for sodium-cooled fast reactors through validation and qualification of safety analysis codes and methods. This paper provides a description of the EBR-II tests included in the program, and outlines the benchmark specifications being prepared to support the IAEA-coordinated research project. (authors)

  15. Reaction heat used in static water removal from fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platner, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Reaction heat is used for removal of water formed at the hydrogen fuel electrode in a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell. A portion of the heat inherent in the fuel cell current generation reaction is used to transfer excess water into water vapor and cause it to be exhausted from the cell by a porous vapor transport membrane adjoining a vapor cavity.

  16. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  17. Mycoplasma Removal from Cell Culture Using Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hasebe, Akira; Ishikawa, Isao; Shamsul, Haque M.; Ohtani, Makoto; Segawa, Taku; Saeki, Ayumi; Tanizume, Naoho; Oouchi, Manabu; Okagami, Yoshihide; Okano, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in the removal of mycoplasmas from contaminated cells. Background data: Mycoplasmas often contaminate cell cultures. The cell-contaminating mycoplasmas are removed by antibiotics, but the use of antibiotics usually induces antibiotic-resistant bacteria. aPDT is expected to be a possible alternative to antibiotic treatments for suppressing infections. Materials and Methods: Mycoplasma salivarium (Ms)-infected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were irradiated using a red light-emitting diode (LED) in the presence of methylene blue (MB) as a photosensitizer. The Ms viable count was determined using culture on agar plates or using a mycoplasma detection kit. Results: aPDT performed using red LED irradiation was effective in decreasing live Ms in the presence of MB without damaging the HEK293 cells. aPDT removed live Ms from the infected cells after washing the cells with sterilized phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to decrease the initial number of live Ms before aPDT. Conclusions: This study suggests that aPDT could remove mycoplasmas from contaminated cells. PMID:23402393

  18. Cell specificity in DNA binding and repair of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, J A; Rickert, D E; Baranyi, B L; Goodman, J I

    1983-01-01

    Many animal models for organ specific neoplasia have been developed and used to study the pathogenesis of cancer. Morphologic studies have usually concentrated on the response of target cells, whereas biochemical investigations have usually employed whole organ homogenates. Since hepatocytes comprise nearly 90% of the liver's mass and 70-80% of its DNA, alterations in DNA replication, covalent binding and DNA repair of nonparenchymal cells are usually obscured when whole organ homogenates are used. By utilizing cell separation methods, we have been able to demonstrate differences between hepatocyte and nonparenchymal cell replication. DNA damage and repair following exposure to a variety of hepatocarcinogen. Differences in removal of simple O6-alkylguanine and DNA replication correlate with cell specific carcinogenesis of simply alkylating agents. For several other procarcinogens, including 2-acetylaminofluorene and dinitroluene, cell specificity appears to reside primarily in the differential metabolic competence of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. This results in greater covalent binding of the carcinogen to hepatocyte DNA, although the DNA adducts are removed at a similar rate in both cell types. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6832089

  19. Regulation of endothelial cell differentiation and specification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The circulatory system is the first organ system to develop in the vertebrate embryo and is critical throughout gestation for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to, as well as removal of metabolic waste products from, growing tissues. Endothelial cells, which constitute the luminal layer of all bl...

  20. High and stable substrate specificities of microorganisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants.

    PubMed

    Kindaichi, Tomonori; Nierychlo, Marta; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2013-06-01

    Microbial communities are typically characterized by conditions of nutrient limitation so the availability of the resources is likely a key factor in the niche differentiation across all species and in the regulation of the community structure. In this study we have investigated whether four species exhibit any in situ short-term changes in substrate uptake pattern when exposed to variations in substrate and growth conditions. Microautoradiography was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to investigate in situ cell-specific substrate uptake profiles of four probe-defined coexisting species in a wastewater treatment plant with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. These were the filamentous 'Candidatus Microthrix' and Caldilinea (type 0803), the polyphosphate-accumulating organism 'Candidatus Accumulibacter', and the denitrifying Azoarcus. The experimental conditions mimicked the conditions potentially encountered in the respective environment (starvation, high/low substrate concentration, induction with specific substrates, and single/multiple substrates). The results showed that each probe-defined species exhibited very distinct and constant substrate uptake profile in time and space, which hardly changed under any of the conditions tested. Such niche partitioning implies that a significant change in substrate composition will be reflected in a changed community structure rather than the substrate uptake response from the different species.

  1. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  2. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from a UV-irradiated shuttle vector introduced into human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, A.K.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1994-05-01

    A shuttle vector (pZH-1) carrying the E. Coli lacZ gene under control of the SV40 early promoter was irradiated with UV and introduced into repair-proficient or repair-deficient human cell lines. The expression of irradiated lacZ compared to unirradiated lacZ was greater in repair-proficient cells (HT-1080) than in repair-deficient cells (XP12RO-SV40) belonging to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A. To ascertain whether the expression of lacZ in the repair-proficient cells was correlated with the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), the authors purified DNA from the recipient cells and used the CPD-specific enzyme T4 endonuclease V to measure the frequency of CPDs remaining in the plasmid as a whole and in two restriction fragments derived from it. They found that removal of CPDs occurred in both fragments in the repair-proficient cells but not in the repair-deficient cells. The results provide the first direct evidence for the removal of CPDs from UV irradiated plasmids introduced into human cells and support the notion that expression of the UV-damaged lacZ gene in repair-proficient human cells reflects the removal of transcription blocking lesions from the gene.

  3. Germ cell specification and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Newmark, P A; Wang, Y; Chong, T

    2008-01-01

    In metazoans, two apparently distinct mechanisms specify germ cell fate: Determinate specification (observed in animals including Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, zebra fish, and Xenopus) uses cytoplasmic factors localized to specific regions of the egg, whereas epigenetic specification (observed in many basal metazoans, urodeles, and mammals) involves inductive interactions between cells. Much of our understanding of germ cell specification has emerged from studies of model organisms displaying determinate specification. In contrast, our understanding of epigenetic/inductive specification is less advanced and would benefit from studies of additional organisms. Freshwater planarians--widely known for their remarkable powers of regeneration--are well suited for studying the mechanisms by which germ cells can be induced. Classic experiments showed that planarians can regenerate germ cells from body fragments entirely lacking reproductive structures, suggesting that planarian germ cells could be specified by inductive signals. Furthermore, the availability of the genome sequence of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, coupled with the animal's susceptibility to systemic RNA interference (RNAi), facilitates functional genomic analyses of germ cell development and regeneration. Here, we describe recent progress in studies of planarian germ cells and frame some of the critical unresolved questions for future work.

  4. Impaired photoassimilate partitioning caused by phloem-specific removal of pyrophosphate can be complemented by a phloem-specific cytosolic yeast-derived invertase in transgenic plants.

    PubMed Central

    Lerchl, J; Geigenberger, P; Stitt, M; Sonnewald, U

    1995-01-01

    Constitutive expression of the Escherichia coli ppa gene encoding inorganic pyrophosphatase resulted in sugar accumulation in source leaves and stunted growth of transgenic tobacco plants. The reason for this phenotype was hypothesized to be reduced sucrose utilization and loading into the phloem. To study the role of PPi in phloem cells, a chimeric gene was constructed using the phloem-specific rolC promoter of Agrobacterium rhizogenes to drive the expression of the ppa gene. Removal of cytosolic PPi in those cells resulted in photoassimilate accumulation in source leaves, chlorophyll loss, and reduced plant growth. From these data, it was postulated that sucrose hydrolysis via sucrose synthase is essential for assimilate partitioning. To bypass the PPi-dependent sucrose synthase step, transgenic plants were produced that express various levels of the yeast suc2 gene, which encodes cytosolic invertase, in their phloem cells. To combine the phloem-specific expression of the ppa gene and the suc2 gene, crosses between invertase- and pyrophosphatase-containing transgenic plants were performed. Analysis of their offspring revealed that invertase can complement the phenotypic effects caused by the removal of PPi in phloem cells. PMID:7734961

  5. Removing symbiotic Wolbachia bacteria specifically inhibits oogenesis in a parasitic wasp

    PubMed Central

    Dedeine, Franck; Vavre, Fabrice; Fleury, Frédéric; Loppin, Benjamin; Hochberg, Michael E.; Boulétreau, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Wolbachia are bacteria that live in the cells of various invertebrate species to which they cause a wide range of effects on physiology and reproduction. We investigated the effect of Wolbachia infection in the parasitic wasp, Asobara tabida Nees (Hymenoptera, Braconidae). In the 13 populations tested, all individuals proved to be infected by Wolbachia. The removal of Wolbachia by antibiotic treatment had a totally unexpected effect—aposymbiotic female wasps were completely incapable of producing mature oocytes and therefore could not reproduce. In contrast, oogenesis was not affected in treated Asobara citri, a closely related species that does not harbor Wolbachia. No difference between natural symbiotic and cured individuals was found for other adult traits including male fertility, locomotor activity, and size, indicating that the effect on oogenesis is highly specific. We argue that indirect effects of the treatments used in our study (antibiotic toxicity or production of toxic agents) are very unlikely to explain the sterility of females, and we present results showing a direct relationship between oocyte production and Wolbachia density in females. We conclude that Wolbachia is necessary for oogenesis in these A. tabida strains, and this association would seem to be the first example of a transition from facultative to obligatory symbiosis in arthropod–Wolbachia associations. PMID:11353833

  6. Specification of germ cell fate in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Saitou, Mitinori; Payer, Bernhard; Lange, Ulrike C; Erhardt, Sylvia; Barton, Sheila C; Surani, M Azim

    2003-01-01

    An early fundamental event during development is the segregation of germ cells from somatic cells. In many organisms, this is accomplished by the inheritance of preformed germ plasm, which apparently imposes transcriptional repression to prevent somatic cell fate. However, in mammals, pluripotent epiblast cells acquire germ cell fate in response to signalling molecules. We have used single cell analysis to study how epiblast cells acquire germ cell competence and undergo specification. Germ cell competent cells express Fragilis and initially progress towards a somatic mesodermal fate. However, a subset of these cells, the future primordial germ cells (PGCs), then shows rapid upregulation of Fragilis with concomitant transcriptional repression of a number of genes, including Hox and Smad genes. This repression may be a key event associated with germ cell specification. Furthermore, PGCs express Stella and other genes, such as Oct-4 that are associated with pluripotency. While these molecules are also detected in mature oocytes as maternally inherited factors, their early role is to regulate development and maintain pluripotency, and they do not serve the role of classical germline determinants. PMID:14511483

  7. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell power plants are being developed for transit bus and passenger car applications that use methanol as the on-board fuel. Commodity methanol by itself contains very little sulfur; however, it may occasionally be contaminated with up to about 1% diesel fuel or gasoline in current liquid-fuel distribution systems, leading to the presence of sulfur in the methanol fuel. This sulfur must be removed because of its deleterious effect on the reforming catalysts. International Fuel Cells has set the allowable sulfur limit in the methanol fuel at less than 1 ppm. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess the feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon adsorber for the removal of sulfur from transportation fuel cell systems.

  8. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having a density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  9. Controlled removal of a nonviral episomal vector from transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Sina; Hagedorn, Claudia; Seruggia, Davide; Magnusson, Terese; Wagner, Ernst; Ogris, Manfred; Lipps, Hans J

    2010-10-15

    An ideal vector to be used in gene therapy should allow long-term and regulated expression of the therapeutic sequence, but in many cases, it would be most desirable to remove all ectopic vector sequences from the cell once expression is no longer required. The vector pEPI is the first nonviral autonomous replicon that was constructed for mammalian cells. It represents a minimal model system to study the epigenetic regulation of replication and transcription but is also regarded as a promising alternative to currently used viral vector systems in gene therapy. Its function relies on a transcription unit linked to an S/MAR sequence. We constructed an inducible pEPI vector system based on the Tet ON system in which transcription is switched on in the presence of doxycycline. We show that for vector replication and long-term maintenance an ongoing transcription running into the S/MAR element is required. Once established, the vector is lost from the cell upon switching off transcription from the gene linked to the S/MAR. This feature provides not only controlled transgene expression but also the possibility to remove all vector molecules from the cells upon demand. This inducible episomal nonviral vector system will find broad application in gene therapy but also in reprogramming of somatic cells or modification of stem cells.

  10. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Adhesion of stem cells - like most cells - is not just a membrane phenomenon. Most tissue cells need to adhere to a ``solid'' for viability, and over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that the physical ``elasticity'' of that solid is literally ``felt'' by cells. Here we show that Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) specify lineage and commit to phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to the elasticity typical of tissues [1]. In serum only media, soft matrices that mimic brain appear neurogenic, stiffer matrices that mimic muscle are myogenic, and comparatively rigid matrices that mimic collagenous bone prove osteogenic. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activity blocks all elasticity directed lineage specification, which indicates that the cytoskeleton pulls on matrix through adhesive attachments. Results have significant implications for `therapeutic' stem cells and have motivated development of a proteomic-scale method to identify mechano-responsive protein structures [2] as well as deeper physical studies of matrix physics [3] and growth factor pathways [4]. [4pt] [1] A. Engler, et al. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell (2006).[0pt] [2] C.P. Johnson, et al. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells. Science (2007).[0pt] [3] A.E.X. Brown, et al. Multiscale mechanics of fibrin polymer: Gel stretching with protein unfolding and loss of water. Science (2009).[0pt] [4] D.E. Discher, et al. Growth factors, matrices, and forces combine and control stem cells. Science (2009).

  11. Assessment of sulfur removal processes for advanced fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lorton, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study consisted of a technical evaluation and economic comparison of sulfur removal processes for integration into a coal gasification-molten carbonate (CGMC) fuel cell power plant. Initially, the performance characteristics of potential sulfur removal processes were evaluated and screened for conformance to the conditions and requirements expected in commercial CGMC power plants. Four of these processes, the Selexol process, the Benfield process, the Sulfinol process, and the Rectisol process, were selected for detailed technical and economic comparison. The process designs were based on a consistent set of technical criteria for a grass roots facility with a capacity of 10,000 tons per day of Illinois No. 6 coal. Two raw gas compositions, based on oxygen-blown and air-blown Texaco gasification, were used. The bulk of the sulfur was removed in the sulfur removal unit, leaving a small amount of sulfur compounds in the gas (1 ppMv or 25 ppMv). The remaining sulfur compounds were removed by reaction with zinc oxide in the sulfur polishing unit. The impact of COS hydrolysis pretreatment on sulfur removal was evaluated. Comprehensive capital and O and M cost estimates for each of the process schemes were developed for the essentially complete removal of sulfur compounds. The impact on the overall plant performance was also determined. The total capital requirement for sulfur removal schemes ranged from $59.4/kW to $84.8/kW for the oxygen-blown cases and from $89.5/kW to $133/kW for the air-blown cases. The O and M costs for sulfur removal for 70% plant capacity factor ranged from 0.82 mills/kWh to 2.76 mills/kWh for the oxygen-blown cases and from 1.77 mills/kWh to 4.88 mills/kWh for the air-blown cases. The Selexol process benefitted the most from the addition of COS hydrolysis pretreatment.

  12. 2,4-Dichlorophenol hydroxylase for chlorophenol removal: Substrate specificity and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hejun; Li, Qingchao; Zhan, Yang; Fang, Xuexun; Yu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) are common environmental pollutants. As such, different treatments have been assessed to facilitate their removal. In this study, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) hydroxylase was used to systematically investigate the activity and removal ability of 19CP congeners at 25 and 0 °C. Results demonstrated that 2,4-DCP hydroxylase exhibited a broad substrate specificity to CPs. The activities of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against specific CP congeners, including 3-CP, 2,3,6-trichlorophenol, 2-CP, and 2,3-DCP, were higher than those against 2,4-DCP, which is the preferred substrate of previously reported 2,4-DCP hydroxylase. To verify whether cofactors are necessary to promote hydroxylase activity against CP congeners, we added FAD and found that the added FAD induced a 1.33-fold to 5.13-fold significant increase in hydroxylase activity against different CP congeners. The metabolic pathways of the CP degradation in the enzymatic hydroxylation step were preliminarily proposed on the basis of the analyses of the enzymatic activities against 19CP congeners. We found that the high activity and removal rate of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against CPs at 0 °C enhance the low-temperature-adaptability of this enzyme to the CP congeners; as such, the proposed removal process may be applied to biochemical, bioremediation, and industrial processes, particularly in cold environments.

  13. Effective ammonium removal by anaerobic oxidation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Dipak A; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2015-01-01

    Dual-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs), made of clayware cylinder, were operated at different chemical oxygen demands: ammonium-nitrogen (COD:NH4+) ratio (1:1, 10:1 and 5:1) under batch mode for simultaneous removal of ammonia and organic matter from wastewater. Ammonium-N removal efficiencies of 63-32.66% were obtained for COD:NH4+ ratio of 1:10, respectively. Average COD removal efficiencies demonstrated by these MFCs were about 88%; indicating effective use of MFCs for treatment of wastewater containing organic matter and high ammonia concentration. MFCs operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 10:1 produced highest volumetric power density of 752.88 mW/m3. The ammonium-N removal slightly increased when microbes were exposed to only ammonium as a source of electron when organic source was not supplemented. When this MFC was operated with imposed potential on cathode and without aeration in the cathode chamber, oxidation of ammonium ions at a faster rate confirmed anaerobic oxidation. During the non-turnover condition of cyclic voltammetry, MFC operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 10:1 gave higher oxidative and reductive currents than MFC operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 1:1 due to higher redox species. Successful application of such an anammox process for ammonium oxidation in MFCs will be useful for treatment of wastewater containing higher ammonium concentration and harvesting energy in the form of electricity.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  15. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  16. Identifying and removing the cell-cycle effect from single-cell RNA-Sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is a revolutionary technique for discovering and describing cell types in heterogeneous tissues, yet its measurement of expression often suffers from large systematic bias. A major source of this bias is the cell cycle, which introduces large within-cell-type heterogeneity that can obscure the differences in expression between cell types. The current method for removing the cell-cycle effect is unable to effectively identify this effect and has a high risk of removing other biological components of interest, compromising downstream analysis. We present ccRemover, a new method that reliably identifies the cell-cycle effect and removes it. ccRemover preserves other biological signals of interest in the data and thus can serve as an important pre-processing step for many scRNA-Seq data analyses. The effectiveness of ccRemover is demonstrated using simulation data and three real scRNA-Seq datasets, where it boosts the performance of existing clustering algorithms in distinguishing between cell types. PMID:27670849

  17. Extrinsic regulation of satellite cell specification.

    PubMed

    Bentzinger, C Florian; von Maltzahn, Julia; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2010-08-26

    Cellular commitment during vertebrate embryogenesis is controlled by an interplay of intrinsic regulators and morphogenetic signals. These mechanisms recruit a subset of cells in the developing organism to become the ancestors of skeletal muscle. Signals that control progression through the myogenic lineage converge on a battery of hierarchically organized transcription factors which modulate the cells to either remain in a primitive state or allow their commitment and differentiation into skeletal muscle fibers. A small population of cells will retain a largely unspecified state throughout development. Such stem cells, in conjunction with more committed myogenic progenitors, form a heterogeneous population that colonizes adult skeletal muscle as satellite cells. The satellite cell pool is responsible for the remarkable regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. Similar to their counterparts during embryonic development, satellite cells are capable of self-renewal and can give rise to myogenic progeny. Impaired satellite cell homeostasis has been associated with numerous muscular disorders. Due to intense research efforts in the past two decades, the complex biology of muscle stem cells has now revealed some of its secrets and new avenues for the development of therapeutic molecules have emerged. In the present review we focus on the extrinsic mechanisms that control self-renewal, specification and differentiation of satellite cells and their significance for the development of biologic drugs.

  18. Cell cycle progression and de novo centriole assembly after centrosomal removal in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Uetake, Yumi; Lončarek, Jadranka; Nordberg, Joshua J.; English, Christopher N.; La Terra, Sabrina; Khodjakov, Alexey; Sluder, Greenfield

    2007-01-01

    How centrosome removal or perturbations of centrosomal proteins leads to G1 arrest in untransformed mammalian cells has been a mystery. We use microsurgery and laser ablation to remove the centrosome from two types of normal human cells. First, we find that the cells assemble centrioles de novo after centrosome removal; thus, this phenomenon is not restricted to transformed cells. Second, normal cells can progress through G1 in its entirety without centrioles. Therefore, the centrosome is not a necessary, integral part of the mechanisms that drive the cell cycle through G1 into S phase. Third, we provide evidence that centrosome loss is, functionally, a stress that can act additively with other stresses to arrest cells in G1 in a p38-dependent fashion. PMID:17227892

  19. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  20. Typical low cost biosorbents for adsorptive removal of specific organic pollutants from water.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van Son; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Shuang; Ton-That, Cuong; Zhang, Xinbo

    2015-04-01

    Specific organic pollutants (SOPs) such as phenolic compounds, PAHs, organic pesticides, and organic herbicides cause health and environmental problems due to their excessive toxic properties and poor biodegradability. Low-cost biosorbents are considered as a promising alternative for conventional adsorbents to remove SOPs from water. These materials have several advantages such as high sorption capacities, good modifiability and recoverability, insensitivity to toxic substances, simple operation in the treatment processes. However, previous reports on various types of biosorbents for removing SOPs are still moderately fragmented. Hence, this paper provides a comprehensive review on using typical low-cost biosorbents obtained from lignocellulose and chitin/chitosan for SOPs adsorption. Especially, their characteristics, biosorption mechanism together with utilization for eliminating SOPs are presented and discussed. The paper also gives a critical view regarding future applications of low-cost biosorbents in SOPs-contaminated water treatment.

  1. Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hyun; Arora, Natasha; Huo, Hongguang; Maherali, Nimet; Ahfeldt, Tim; Shimamura, Akiko; Lensch, M William; Cowan, Chad; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Daley, George Q

    2008-09-05

    Tissue culture of immortal cell strains from diseased patients is an invaluable resource for medical research but is largely limited to tumor cell lines or transformed derivatives of native tissues. Here we describe the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from patients with a variety of genetic diseases with either Mendelian or complex inheritance; these diseases include adenosine deaminase deficiency-related severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), Gaucher disease (GD) type III, Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), Parkinson disease (PD), Huntington disease (HD), juvenile-onset, type 1 diabetes mellitus (JDM), Down syndrome (DS)/trisomy 21, and the carrier state of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Such disease-specific stem cells offer an unprecedented opportunity to recapitulate both normal and pathologic human tissue formation in vitro, thereby enabling disease investigation and drug development.

  2. A preliminary report of designing removable partial denture frameworks using a specifically developed software package.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a method to digitally survey and build virtual patterns for removable partial denture (RPD) frameworks using a new three-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software package developed specifically for RPD design. The procedure included obtaining 3D data from partially dentate casts, deciding on the path of insertion, and modeling the shape of the components of the frameworks digitally. The completed model data were stored as stereolithography (STL) files, which are commonly used in transferring CAD/CAM models to rapid prototyping technologies. Finally, metal RPD frameworks were fabricated using a selective laser melting technique.

  3. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2006-11-01

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was ~ 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity used was ~ 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the depth of groove. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch of the tested TiAls, which facilitated both the detachments of developing chips and the pile-ups of materials on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction on the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the tested TiAls. The materiel removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall response of materials can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The obtained depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen the candidate materials for the specific purpose depending on whether the application is scratch-dominant or impact-dominant. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation in the material loss or material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size show a higher resistance against the indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and

  4. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Lin, H.-T.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    2006-11-30

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was {approx} 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity was {approx} 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the groove depth. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch test of the TiAls, which facilitated both the detachment of developing chips and pile-up of material on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction in the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the TiAls tested. The material removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall material response can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen candidate materials for the applications that are scratch-dominated versus impact-dominated. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation during material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size shows a higher resistance to indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and conclusions in this study can serve as a base line for the further

  5. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    PubMed Central

    Kessels, Helmut W. H. G.; van den Boom, Marly D.; Spits, Hergen; Hooijberg, Erik; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T cell variants is generated in vitro and introduced into a TCR-negative murine T cell line by retroviral transfer. We document the value of TCR display by the creation of a library of an influenza A-specific TCR and the subsequent in vitro selection of TCRs that either recognize the parental influenza epitope or that have acquired a specificity for a different influenza A strain. The resulting in vitro selected TCRs induce efficient T cell activation after ligand recognition and are of equal or higher potency than the in vivo generated parent receptor. TCR display should prove a useful strategy for the generation of high-affinity tumor-specific TCRs for gene transfer purposes. PMID:11121060

  6. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber for use as a sulfur removal subsystem in transportation fuel cell systems. Results suggest that an on-board GAC adsorber may not be attractive due to size and weight constraints. However, it may be feasible to install this GAC adsorber at methanol distribution stations, where space and weight are not a critical concern. Preliminary economic analysis indicated that the GAC adsorber concept will be attractive if the spent AC can be regenerated for reuse. These preliminary analyses were made on basis of very limited breakthrough data obtained from the bench-scale testing. Optimization on dynamic testing parameters and study on regeneration of spent AC are needed.

  7. Whole-animal senescent cytotoxic T cell removal using antibodies linked to magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rebo, Justin; Causey, Keith; Zealley, Ben; Webb, Tim; Hamalainen, Mark; Cook, Brian; Schloendorn, John

    2010-01-01

    A major type of unwanted cells that accumulate in aging are anergic cytotoxic T cells. These cells often have virus-specific T cell receptors, as well as other surface markers that distinguish them from their youthful counterparts, and they are thought to play a major role in the decline of the immune system with age. Here we consider two surface markers thought to define these cells in mice, CD8 and Killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1), and a means we developed to remove these cells from the blood of aged C57BL/6 mice. Using antibodies with magnetic nanoparticles linked to their Fc domains, we first developed a method to use magnets to filter out the unwanted cells from the blood and later constructed a device that does this automatically. We demonstrated that this device could reduce the KLRG1-positive CD8 cell count in aged mouse blood by a factor of 7.3 relative to the total CD8 cell compartment, reaching a level typically seen only in very young animals.

  8. Cell-Specific Cardiac Electrophysiology Models

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, Willemijn; Ortega, Francis A.; Kherlopian, Armen R.; Zygmunt, Andrew C.; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional cardiac model-building paradigm involves constructing a composite model using data collected from many cells. Equations are derived for each relevant cellular component (e.g., ion channel, exchanger) independently. After the equations for all components are combined to form the composite model, a subset of parameters is tuned, often arbitrarily and by hand, until the model output matches a target objective, such as an action potential. Unfortunately, such models often fail to accurately simulate behavior that is dynamically dissimilar (e.g., arrhythmia) to the simple target objective to which the model was fit. In this study, we develop a new approach in which data are collected via a series of complex electrophysiology protocols from single cardiac myocytes and then used to tune model parameters via a parallel fitting method known as a genetic algorithm (GA). The dynamical complexity of the electrophysiological data, which can only be fit by an automated method such as a GA, leads to more accurately parameterized models that can simulate rich cardiac dynamics. The feasibility of the method is first validated computationally, after which it is used to develop models of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes that simulate the electrophysiological dynamics significantly better than does a standard guinea pig model. In addition to improving model fidelity generally, this approach can be used to generate a cell-specific model. By so doing, the approach may be useful in applications ranging from studying the implications of cell-to-cell variability to the prediction of intersubject differences in response to pharmacological treatment. PMID:25928268

  9. Highly selective and rapid arsenic removal by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli cells expressing Fucus vesiculosus metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-05-01

    An arsenic-chelating metallothionein (fMT) from the arsenic-tolerant marine alga Fucus vesiculosus was expressed in Escherichia coli, resulting in 30- and 26-fold-higher As(III) and As(V) binding, respectively. Coexpression of the As(III)-specific transporter GlpF with fMT further improved arsenic accumulation and offered high selectivity toward As. Resting E. coli cells coexpressing fMT and GlpF completely removed trace amounts (35 ppb) of As(III) within 20 min, providing a promising technology for compliance with the As limit of 10 ppb newly recommended by the U.S. EPA.

  10. Removal of F-specific RNA bacteriophages in artificial recharge of groundwater--a field study.

    PubMed

    Niemi, R M; Kytövaara, A; Pääkkönen, J; Lahti, K

    2004-01-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater offers a semi-natural means to produce raw water for drinking-water plants. Surface water works are increasingly being replaced by artificial groundwater works in Finland. Two municipalities, one serving 30,000 and the other 170,000 inhabitants, have considered filtering river water through eskers for the production of potable water. In this study the removal of bacteriophages during infiltration of river water was estimated, for the evaluation of treatment adequacy in a field study. A 5-m-deep column of sand was constructed and used to mimic the percolating phase in infiltration. An artificial esker was constructed on the riverbank by isolating a 2-m-wide, 2-m-deep and 18-m-long bed of coarse sand with plastic. The sand bed represented the saturated zone. River water was pumped at a rate of 40 L/h to the sand column. The river water was spiked with F+ specific RNA phage MS2 by adding phage suspension during one week at an average concentration of 4.3 x 10(9) PFU/mL. Samples for phage assays were taken during one month, from four sampling sites, on the basis of detention time as estimated by a tracer experiment with sodium chloride. The median count of MS2 for percolated water was 2.4 x 10(5) PFU/mL, representing a 96.7% reduction. During the passage of 6 m in the saturated zone, a further reduction of 98.5% occurred. During the passage from 6 m to 12 m the additional reduction was 99.97%. The overall reduction was between 6 and 7 log10 units. The removal of MS2 phages was rather efficient, although the esker material was coarse, mainly sandy, gravel.

  11. Cell-specific analysis of tracheobronchial secretory cells and secretions

    SciTech Connect

    Finkbeiner, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    In these studies, two methods (cell culture and monoclonal antibody production) that allowed cell-specific analysis of tracheobronchial secretion were used. Bovine tracheal submucosal gland cells were isolated, placed into culture and serially propagated. In culture, the cells maintained features of serous cells. The cells incorporated {sup 35}S into high molecular weight molecules. {beta}-adrenergic agonists stimulated release of radiolabeled molecules and elevations in intracellular cAMP levels, responses that could be blocked by the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. Cyclic AMP appeared to be involved in the stimulus-secretion coupling events in serous cells since the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine potentiated the effects of isoproterenol on the secretory response and the elevation of intracellular cAMP levels. Furthermore, cAMP analogues elicited a secretory response in the absence of cAMP. The phosphorylation state of several cytosolic and particulate phosphoproteins was altered by cAMP-activated kinase activity. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against human airway secretions.

  12. [Flocculation and removal of water bloom cells Microcystis aeruginosa by chitosan-modified clays].

    PubMed

    Zou, Hua; Pan, Gang; Chen, Hao

    2004-11-01

    The kinetics of flocculation and removal of Microcystis aeruginosa by chitosan-modified clays was studied. The efficiency of flocculating and removing of algal cells was greatly improved after the modification of the clays. About 80% of algae cell was removed in 0.5 hour, and 90% in 2 hours, when 11 mg/L modified sepiolite was added. Algae-removal capacities of different clays were all improved to a similar level of >90% at a total loading of 11 mg/L after being modified with chitosan. The efficiency of algae-removing was reduced when the clay loading was larger or smaller than the optimum loading.

  13. Graphene-enhanced thermal interface materials for heat removal from photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadah, M.; Gamalath, D.; Hernandez, E.; Balandin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The increase in the temperature of photovoltaic (PV) solar cells affects negatively their power conversion efficiency and decreases their lifetime. The negative effects are particularly pronounced in concentrator solar cells. Therefore, it is crucial to limit the PV cell temperature by effectively removing the excess heat. Conventional thermal phase change materials (PCMs) and thermal interface materials (TIMs) do not possess the thermal conductivity values sufficient for thermal management of the next generation of PV cells. In this paper, we report the results of investigation of the increased efficiency of PV cells with the use of graphene-enhanced TIMs. Graphene reveals the highest values of the intrinsic thermal conductivity. It was also shown that the thermal conductivity of composites can be increased via utilization of graphene fillers. We prepared TIMs with up to 6% of graphene designed specifically for PV cell application. The solar cells were tested using the solar simulation module. It was found that the drop in the output voltage of the solar panel under two-sun concentrated illumination can be reduced from 19% to 6% when grapheneenhanced TIMs are used. The proposed method can recover up to 75% of the power loss in solar cells.

  14. Influence of Pulse Bursts on the Specific Removal Rate for Ultra-fast Pulsed Laser Micromachining of Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Neuenschwander, Beat; Jäggi, Beat; Remund, Stefan; Hunziker, Urs; Zürcher, Josef

    Compared to single pulses the utilization of pulse bursts on steel samples was reported to be more efficient. But with regards to the specific removal rate it can be shown that a maximum value is achieved when the applied peak fluence equals exp(2) times the threshold fluence. The higher reported efficiency is caused by the reduced energy of the single pulses nearer to the optimum value. Recent investigations on the application of pulse bursts on copper samples suggest an interaction of the single pulses in a pulse burst in terms of the specific removal rate. The specific removal rate drops to less than 50% for a 2-pulse-burst consisting of two pulses of identical pulse energy, whereas the maximum specific removal rate for a 3-pulse-burst exceeds that of a single pulse by approx. 20%. The results of investigations on the variation of pulse energy for 2-pulse-bursts and 3-pulse-bursts regarding specific removal rate and surface quality are presented.

  15. Specific requirement for CD3ɛ in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    DeJarnette, Jan B.; Sommers, Connie L.; Huang, Kun; Woodside, Kenneth J.; Emmons, Rebecca; Katz, Kenneth; Shores, Elizabeth W.; Love, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pre-TCR complexes are composed of clonotypic heterodimers in association with dimers of signal transducing invariant subunits (CD3γ, -δ, -ɛ, and ζ). The role of individual invariant subunits in T cell development has been investigated by generating gene-specific mutations in mice. Mutation of CD3γ, -δ, or ζ results in an incomplete block in development, characterized by reduced numbers of mature T cells that express low levels of TCR. In contrast, mature T cells are absent from CD3ɛ−/− mice, and thymocyte development is arrested at the early CD4−CD8− stage. Although these results suggest that CD3ɛ is essential for pre-TCR and TCR expression/function, their interpretation is complicated by the fact that expression of the CD3γ and CD3δ genes also is reduced in CD3ɛ−/− mice. Thus, it is unclear whether the phenotype of CD3ɛ−/− mice reflects the collective effects of CD3γ, -δ, and -ɛ deficiency. By removing the selectable marker (PGK-NEO) from the targeted CD3ɛ gene via Cre/loxP-mediated recombination, we generated mice that lack CD3ɛ yet retain normal expression of the closely linked CD3γ and CD3δ genes. These (CD3ɛΔ/Δ) mice exhibited an early arrest in T cell development, similar to that of CD3ɛ−/− mice. Moreover, the developmental defect could be rescued by expression of a CD3ɛ transgene. These results identify an essential role for CD3ɛ in T cell development not shared by the CD3γ, CD3δ, or ζ-family proteins and provide further evidence that PGK-NEO can influence the expression of genes in its proximity. PMID:9843989

  16. Preparation of a specific bamboo based activated carbon and its application for ciprofloxacin removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y X; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S

    2015-11-15

    The studied bamboo based activated carbon (BbAC) with high specific surface area (SSA) and high micro pore volume was prepared from bamboo scraps by the combined activation of H3PO4 and K2CO3. The BbAC was characterized based on the N2 adsorption isotherm at 77K. The results showed that the SSA and pore volume of BbAC increased with increasing impregnation ratio and reached maxima at the impregnation ratio of 3:1 at 750°C. Under these optimal conditions, the BbAC obtained could have a maximum SSA of 2237 m(2)/g and a maximum total pore volume of 1.23 cm(3)/g with the micro pore ratio of more than 90%. The adsorption performance of ciprofloxacin (CIP) on the BbAC was determined at 298 K. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were employed to describe the adsorption equilibrium and the kinetic data were fitted by pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetic models. The results showed that the Langmuir model and the pseudo second-order kinetic model presented better fittings for the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data, respectively. The maximum adsorption amount of CIP (613 mg/g) on the BbAC was much higher than the report in the literature. Conclusively, the BbAC could be a promising adsorption material for CIP removal from water.

  17. Assessment of sulfur removal processes for advanced fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorton, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics of potential sulfur removal processes were evaluated and four of these processes, the Selexol process, the Benfield process, the Sulfinol process, and the Rectisol process, were selected for detailed technical and economic comparison. The process designs were based on a consistent set of technical criteria for a grass roots facility with a capacity of 10,000 tons per day of Illinois No. 6 coal. Two raw gas compositions, based on oxygen blown and air blown Texaco gasification, were used. The bulk of the sulfur was removed in the sulfur removal unit, leaving a small amount of sulfur compounds in the gas. The remaining sulfur compounds were removed by reaction with zinc oxide in the sulfur polishing unit. The impact of COS hydrolysis pretreatment on sulfur removal was evaluated. Comprehensive capital and O and M cost estimates for each of the process schemes were developed.

  18. Induction of type I IFN is required for overcoming tumor-specific T-cell tolerance after stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Horkheimer, Ian; Quigley, Michael; Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Chao, Nelson J.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-specific T-cell tolerance represents one major mechanism of tumor-induced immune evasion. Myeloablative chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation may offer the best chance of achieving a state of minimal residual disease and, thus, minimize tumor-induced immune evasion. However, studies have shown that tumor-specific T-cell tolerance persists after transplantation. Here, we showed that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (TReg) cells play a critical role in tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell tolerance after transplantation. Removal of TReg cells from the donor lymphocyte graft did not overcome this tolerance because of rapid conversion of donor CD4+CD25− T cells into CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ TReg cells in recipients after transplantation, and depletion of TReg cells in recipients was necessary for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance. These results suggest that strategies capable of overcoming T-cell tolerance in recipients are required to promote antitumor immunity after transplantation. Toward this goal, we showed that dendritic cell (DC) vaccines coadministered with the TLR9 ligand, CpG could effectively overcome tumor-specific tolerance, leading to significant prolongation of tumor-free survival after transplantation. We further showed that CpG-induced type I interferon was critical for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance in vivo. Collectively, these results may suggest effective immunotherapeutic strategies for treating cancer after stem cell transplantation. PMID:19279333

  19. Induction of type I IFN is required for overcoming tumor-specific T-cell tolerance after stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Horkheimer, Ian; Quigley, Michael; Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Chao, Nelson J; Yang, Yiping

    2009-05-21

    Tumor-specific T-cell tolerance represents one major mechanism of tumor-induced immune evasion. Myeloablative chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation may offer the best chance of achieving a state of minimal residual disease and, thus, minimize tumor-induced immune evasion. However, studies have shown that tumor-specific T-cell tolerance persists after transplantation. Here, we showed that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (T(Reg)) cells play a critical role in tumor-specific CD8(+) T-cell tolerance after transplantation. Removal of T(Reg) cells from the donor lymphocyte graft did not overcome this tolerance because of rapid conversion of donor CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(Reg) cells in recipients after transplantation, and depletion of T(Reg) cells in recipients was necessary for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance. These results suggest that strategies capable of overcoming T-cell tolerance in recipients are required to promote antitumor immunity after transplantation. Toward this goal, we showed that dendritic cell (DC) vaccines coadministered with the TLR9 ligand, CpG could effectively overcome tumor-specific tolerance, leading to significant prolongation of tumor-free survival after transplantation. We further showed that CpG-induced type I interferon was critical for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance in vivo. Collectively, these results may suggest effective immunotherapeutic strategies for treating cancer after stem cell transplantation.

  20. Method of improving fuel cell performance by removing at least one metal oxide contaminant from a fuel cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Choi, Jong-Ho; Zelenay, Piotr

    2009-08-18

    A method of removing contaminants from a fuel cell catalyst electrode. The method includes providing a getter electrode and a fuel cell catalyst electrode having at least one contaminant to a bath and applying a voltage sufficient to drive the contaminant from the fuel cell catalyst electrode to the getter electrode. Methods of removing contaminants from a membrane electrode assembly of a fuel cell and of improving performance of a fuel cell are also provided.

  1. Development of standardized specifications for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A space silicon solar cell assembly (cell and coverglass) specification aimed at standardizing the diverse requirements of current cell or assembly specifications was developed. This specification was designed to minimize both the procurement and manufacturing costs for space qualified silicon solar cell assembilies. In addition, an impact analysis estimating the technological and economic effects of employing a standardized space silicon solar cell assembly was performed.

  2. Habitat-specific nutrient removal and release in Oregon salt marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Collie, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  5. Effect of isosmotic removal of extracellular Na+ on cell volume and membrane potential in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rasgado, C; Summers, J C; McGruder, K D; DeSantiago, J; Rasgado-Flores, H

    1994-09-01

    Isosmotic removal of extracellular Na+ (Nao) is a frequently performed manipulation. With the use of isolated voltage-clamped barnacle muscle cells, the effect of this manipulation on isosmotic cell volume was studied. Replacement of Nao by tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane produced membrane depolarization (approximately 20 mV) and cell volume loss (approximately 14%). The membrane depolarization was verapamil insensitive but depended on extracellular Ca2+ (Cao) and was probably due to activation of intracellular Ca2+ (Cai)-dependent nonselective cation channels. The cell volume loss did not require membrane depolarization but depended on Cao. This was probably due to an increase in Cai, mediated by activation of Ca2+ influx via Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Nao replacement by Li+ also promoted membrane depolarization (approximately 20 mV) and cell volume loss (20%). Both effects were reduced (approximately 73%) but were not abolished by Cao removal. Under this condition, the remaining membrane depolarization was probably due to a higher membrane permeability of Li+ over Na+. The remaining cell volume loss was due to membrane depolarization, which probably induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  6. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shaad M; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2014-02-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-cell resolution revealed the added value of ChIP data for modeling cell type-specific activities. Furthermore, clustering the top-scoring classifier sequence features identified novel cardiac and cell type-specific regulatory motifs. For example, we found that the Myb motif learned by the classifier is crucial for CC activity, and the Myb TF acts in concert with two forkhead domain TFs and Polo kinase to regulate cardiac progenitor cell divisions. In addition, differential motif enrichment and cis-trans genetic studies revealed that the Notch signaling pathway TF Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] discriminates PC from CC enhancer activities. Collectively, these studies elucidate molecular pathways used in the regulatory decisions for proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, implicate Su(H) in regulating cell fate decisions of these progenitors, and document the utility of enhancer modeling in uncovering developmental regulatory subnetworks.

  7. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Busser, Brian W.; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J.; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-cell resolution revealed the added value of ChIP data for modeling cell type-specific activities. Furthermore, clustering the top-scoring classifier sequence features identified novel cardiac and cell type-specific regulatory motifs. For example, we found that the Myb motif learned by the classifier is crucial for CC activity, and the Myb TF acts in concert with two forkhead domain TFs and Polo kinase to regulate cardiac progenitor cell divisions. In addition, differential motif enrichment and cis-trans genetic studies revealed that the Notch signaling pathway TF Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] discriminates PC from CC enhancer activities. Collectively, these studies elucidate molecular pathways used in the regulatory decisions for proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, implicate Su(H) in regulating cell fate decisions of these progenitors, and document the utility of enhancer modeling in uncovering developmental regulatory subnetworks. PMID:24496624

  8. Automated Cell Enrichment of Cytomegalovirus-specific T cells for Clinical Applications using the Cytokine-capture System.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Figliola, Mathew; Moyes, Judy S; Huls, M Helen; Tewari, Priti; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-10-05

    The adoptive transfer of pathogen-specific T cells can be used to prevent and treat opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Viral-specific T cells from allogeneic donors, including third party donors, can be propagated ex vivo in compliance with current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), employing repeated rounds of antigen-driven stimulation to selectively propagate desired T cells. The identification and isolation of antigen-specific T cells can also be undertaken based upon the cytokine capture system of T cells that have been activated to secrete gamma-interferon (IFN-γ). However, widespread human application of the cytokine capture system (CCS) to help restore immunity has been limited as the production process is time-consuming and requires a skilled operator. The development of a second-generation cell enrichment device such as CliniMACS Prodigy now enables investigators to generate viral-specific T cells using an automated, less labor-intensive system. This device separates magnetically labeled cells from unlabeled cells using magnetic activated cell sorting technology to generate clinical-grade products, is engineered as a closed system and can be accessed and operated on the benchtop. We demonstrate the operation of this new automated cell enrichment device to manufacture CMV pp65-specific T cells obtained from a steady-state apheresis product obtained from a CMV seropositive donor. These isolated T cells can then be directly infused into a patient under institutional and federal regulatory supervision. All the bio-processing steps including removal of red blood cells, stimulation of T cells, separation of antigen-specific T cells, purification, and washing are fully automated. Devices such as this raise the possibility that T cells for human application can be manufactured outside of dedicated good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and instead be produced

  9. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  10. Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1994-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  11. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C cells remove pyrimidine dimers selectively from the transcribed strand of active genes

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, J.; van Hoffen, A.; Karcagi, V.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mullenders, L.H. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA fragments of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes in primary normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells. Using strand-specific probes, we show that in normal cells, preferential repair of the 5{prime} part of the ADA gene is due to the rapid and efficient repair of the transcribed strand. Within 8 h after irradiation with UV at 10 J m-2, 70% of the pyrimidine dimers in this strand are removed. The nontranscribed strand is repaired at a much slower rate, with 30% dimers removed after 8 h. Repair of the transcribed strand in XP-C cells occurs at a rate indistinguishable from that in normal cells, but the nontranscribed strand is not repaired significantly in these cells. Similar results were obtained for the DHFR gene. In the 3{prime} part of the ADA gene, however, both normal and XP-C cells perform fast and efficient repair of either strand, which is likely to be caused by the presence of transcription units on both strands. The factor defective in XP-C cells is apparently involved in the processing of DNA damage in inactive parts of the genome, including nontranscribed strands of active genes. These findings have important implications for the understanding of the mechanism of UV-induced excision repair and mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  12. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  13. The accessibility of certain proteins on embryonic chick neural retina cells to iodination and tryptic removal is altered by calcium.

    PubMed

    Cook, J H; Lilien, J

    1982-06-01

    We have used cell-surface-specific labelling techniques and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify proteins on embryonic chick neural retina cells and to determine the effects of Ca2+ on their accessibility to labelling and tryptic removal. A number of proteins on these cells are, in the presence of Ca2+, relatively inaccessible to iodination and/or tryptic removal. Of these, a glycoprotein of Mr approx. 130 x 10(3), with a pI of approx. 4.8, is the major cell-surface-iodinatable species that is retained during trypsinization in the presence of Ca2+. The removal of Ca2+ renders this glycoprotein much more accessible to both procedures. Its accessibility to these probes decreases on re-addition of Ca2+. The accessibility of its oligosaccharide moiety to galactose oxidase is, however, unaltered by the removal of Ca2+. These characteristics, together with immunological data presented elsewhere suggest that this glycoprotein may be a component of the Ca2+-dependent adhesive system that can be demonstrated on these cells.

  14. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Chih-Ta; Huang, Kai-Yu

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  15. Effectiveness of two synthetic fiber filters for removing white cells from AS-1 red cells.

    PubMed

    Pikul, F J; Farrar, R P; Boris, M B; Estok, L; Marlo, D; Wildgen, M; Chaplin, H

    1989-09-01

    Two commercially available synthetic fiber filters were studied for their effectiveness at removing white cells (WBCs) from AS-1-preserved red cells (RBCs) stored less than or equal to 14 days. In all, 65 filtrations were performed. An automated microprocessor-controlled hydraulic system designed for use with cellulose acetate fiber filters was employed to prepare filtered RBCs before release for transfusion. Studies were also carried out on polyester fiber filters, which are designed to be used in-line during transfusion. Residual WBCs were below the accurate counting range of Coulter counters and of conventional manual chamber counts. An isosmotic ammonium chloride RBC lysis method, plus a modified chamber counting technique, permitted a 270-fold increase over the number of WBCs counted by the conventional manual method. For the polyester fiber-filtered products, residual WBCs per unit were not affected by speed of filtration, prior length of storage, or mechanical tapping during filtration. The effectiveness of WBC removal (mean 99.7%), total residual WBCs (means, 4.8 and 5.5 x 10(6], and RBC recovery (mean, 93%) was the same for both filters. The majority of residual WBCs were lymphocytes. WBC removal and RBC recovery were strikingly superior to results reported with nonfiltration methods.

  16. Gold-Nanoparticle-Immobilized Desalting Columns for Highly Efficient and Specific Removal of Radioactive Iodine in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi Hee; Shim, Ha-Eun; Yun, Seong-Jae; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Dae Seong; Jang, Beom-Su; Choi, Yong Jun; Jeon, Jongho

    2016-11-02

    There has been worldwide attention on the efficient removal of radioactive iodine, because it is commonly released in nuclear plant accidents. Increasing concerns on environmental problems due to the radioactive iodine are leading us to develop stable and sustainable technology for remediation of radioelement contaminants. In this work, we report a highly efficient chromatographic method for specific and rapid capture of radioactive iodine. The gold nanoparticles immobilized dextran gel columns showed excellent removal capabilities of radioactive iodine in various conditions. These results suggested that our platform technology can be a promising method for the desalination of radioactive iodines in water.

  17. Integrated Droplet-Based Microextraction with ESI-MS for Removal of Matrix Interference in Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Chao; Wei, Zhen-Wei; Gong, Xiao-Yun; Si, Xing-Yu; Zhao, Yao-Yao; Yang, Cheng-Dui; Zhang, Si-Chun; Zhang, Xin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Integrating droplet-based microfluidics with mass spectrometry is essential to high-throughput and multiple analysis of single cells. Nevertheless, matrix effects such as the interference of culture medium and intracellular components influence the sensitivity and the accuracy of results in single-cell analysis. To resolve this problem, we developed a method that integrated droplet-based microextraction with single-cell mass spectrometry. Specific extraction solvent was used to selectively obtain intracellular components of interest and remove interference of other components. Using this method, UDP-Glc-NAc, GSH, GSSG, AMP, ADP and ATP were successfully detected in single MCF-7 cells. We also applied the method to study the change of unicellular metabolites in the biological process of dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation. The method could not only realize matrix-free, selective and sensitive detection of metabolites in single cells, but also have the capability for reliable and high-throughput single-cell analysis. PMID:27126222

  18. Tyrosinase extract from Agaricus bisporus mushroom and its in natura tissue for specific phenol removal.

    PubMed

    Kameda, E; Langone, M A P; Coelho, M A Z

    2006-11-01

    Phenols are toxic pollutants found in industrial wastes imposing several risks to human health. Tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) is an oxygenase oxyreductase found in several life forms, like the mushroom Agaricus bisporus. This enzyme is readily available from this fungal tissue leading to high activity extracts without extensive purification, thus suggesting its potential as a biocatalyst for applications involving biomodification of phenols or bioremediation of phenol-polluted waters. The purpose of this work was to employ a crude extract from the Agaricus bisporus mushroom and its biomass for the removal of phenol from polluted water. Experiments were carried out without pH control. The initial phenol concentration in all solutions was 100 mg l(-1). Four enzymatic concentrations (50, 100, 200 and 400 U ml(-1)) were tested. Reactions, with 200 U ml(-1) and 400 U ml(-1) enzymatic activity, led to 90% of phenol removal. Chitosan was used as a coagulant, but no significant improvement was observed. The in natura fungi was also able to remove 90% of phenol, demostrating its viability as a biocatalyst in bioremediation process.

  19. Evaluating frequency and quality of pathogen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Grosso, Dolores; Flomenberg, Neal; Sykulev, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that enumeration and characterization of antigen-specific T cells provide essential information about potency of the immune response. Here, we report a new technique to determine the frequency and potency of antigen-specific CD8 T cells. The assay measures changes of intracellular Ca2+ in real time by fluorescent microscopy in individual CD8 T cells responding to cognate peptides. The T cells form continuous monolayer, enabling the cells to present the peptides to each other. This approach allows us to evaluate the kinetics of intracellular Ca2+ signalling that characterizes the quality of T cell response. We demonstrate the usefulness of the assay examining the frequency and quality of cytomegalovirus-specific CD8 T cells from healthy donor and patient after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. The new assay has a potential to provide essential information determining the status of the immune system, disease morbidity, potency of therapeutic intervention and vaccine efficacy. PMID:27786275

  20. Benzene and sulfide removal from groundwater treated in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Rakoczy, Jana; Feisthauer, Stefan; Wasmund, Kenneth; Bombach, Petra; Neu, Thomas R; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2013-12-01

    Sulfidic benzene-contaminated groundwater was used to fuel a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) over a period of 770 days. We aimed to understand benzene and sulfide removal processes in the anoxic anode chamber and describe the microbial community enriched over the operational time. Operated in batch feeding-like circular mode, supply of fresh groundwater resulted in a rapid increase in current production, accompanied by decreasing benzene and sulfide concentrations. The total electron recoveries for benzene and sulfide were between 18% and 49%, implying that benzene and sulfide were not completely oxidized at the anode. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from the anode-associated bacterial community revealed the dominance of δ-Proteobacteria (31%), followed by β-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, ϵ-Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes, most of which are known for anaerobic metabolism. Two-dimensional compound-specific isotope analysis demonstrated that benzene degradation was initiated by monohydroxylation, probably triggered by small amounts of oxygen which had leaked through the cation exchange membrane into the anode chamber. Experiments with [(13)C(6) ]-benzene revealed incorporation of (13)C into fatty acids of mainly Gram-negative bacteria, which are therefore candidates for benzene degradation. Our study demonstrated simultaneous benzene and sulfide removal by groundwater microorganisms which use an anode as artificial electron acceptor, thereby releasing an electrical current.

  1. Organ-Specific and Memory Treg Cells: Specificity, Development, Function, and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Campbell, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are essential for establishing and maintaining self-tolerance, and also inhibit immune responses to innocuous environmental antigens. Imbalances and dysfunction in Treg cells lead to a variety of immune-mediated diseases, as deficits in Treg cell function contribute to the development autoimmune disease and pathological tissue damage, whereas overabundance of Treg cells can promote chronic infection and tumorigenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the fact that Treg cells themselves are a diverse collection of phenotypically and functionally specialized populations, with distinct developmental origins, antigen-specificities, tissue-tropisms, and homeostatic requirements. The signals directing the differentiation of these populations, their specificities and the mechanisms by which they combine to promote organ-specific and systemic tolerance, and how they embody the emerging property of regulatory memory are the focus of this review. PMID:25076948

  2. Birthdating studies reshape models for pituitary gland cell specification.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2011-04-15

    The intermediate and anterior lobes of the pituitary gland are derived from an invagination of oral ectoderm that forms Rathke's pouch. During gestation proliferating cells are enriched around the pouch lumen, and they appear to delaminate as they exit the cell cycle and differentiate. During late mouse gestation and the postnatal period, anterior lobe progenitors re-enter the cell cycle and expand the populations of specialized, hormone-producing cells. At birth, all cell types are present, and their localization appears stratified based on cell type. We conducted a birth dating study of Rathke's pouch derivatives to determine whether the location of specialized cells at birth is correlated with the timing of cell cycle exit. We find that all of the anterior lobe cell types initiate differentiation concurrently with a peak between e11.5 and e13.5. Differentiation of intermediate lobe melanotropes is delayed relative to anterior lobe cell types. We discovered that specialized cell types are not grouped together based on birth date and are dispersed throughout the anterior lobe. Thus, the apparent stratification of specialized cells at birth is not correlated with cell cycle exit. Thus, the currently popular model of cell specification, dependent upon timing of extrinsic, directional gradients of signaling molecules, needs revision. We propose that signals intrinsic to Rathke's pouch are necessary for cell specification between e11.5 and e13.5 and that cell-cell communication likely plays an important role in regulating this process.

  3. Parametric Study to Characterize Low Activity Waste Tank Heat Removal Alternatives for Phase 1 Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    GRENARD, C.E.

    2000-09-11

    Alternative for removing heat from Phase 1, low-activity waste feed double-shell tanks using the ventilation systems have been analyzed for Phase 1 waste feed delivery. The analysis was a parametric study using a model that predicted the waste temperatures for a range of primary and annulus ventilation system flow rates. The analysis was performed to determine the ventilation flow required to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding the Limiting Conditions for Operation limits during normal operation and the Safety Limits during off-normal events.

  4. The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cooling, Michael T; Hunter, Peter

    2015-09-04

    The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 is a modular framework that describes how semantic annotations should be made about mathematical models encoded in the CellML (www.cellml.org) format, and their elements. In addition to the Core specification, there are several satellite specifications, each designed to cater for model annotation in a different context. Basic Model Information, Citation, License and Biological Annotation specifications are presented.

  5. A comparison of simultaneous organic carbon and nitrogen removal in microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Abid; Manuel, Michelle; Tartakovsky, Boris

    2016-05-15

    This study demonstrates simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal in laboratory-scale continuous flow microbial fuel cell (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and provides side-by side comparison of these bioelectrochemical systems. The maximum organic carbon removal rates in MFC and MEC tests were similar at 5.1 g L(-1) d(-1) and 4.16 g L(-1) d(-1), respectively, with a near 100% carbon removal efficiency at an organic load of 3.3 g L(-1) d(-1). An ammonium removal efficiency of 30-55% with near-zero nitrite and nitrate concentrations was observed in the MFC operated at an optimal external resistance, while open-circuit MFC operation resulted in a reduced carbon and ammonium removal of 53% and 21%, respectively. In the MEC ammonium removal was limited to 7-12% under anaerobic conditions, while micro-aerobic conditions increased the removal efficiency to 31%. Also, at zero applied voltage both carbon and ammonium removal efficiencies were reduced to 42% and 4%, respectively. Based on the observed performance under different operating conditions, it was concluded that simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal was facilitated by concurrent anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation pathways at the anode and cathode, which balanced bioelectrochemical nitrification and denitrification reactions.

  6. Removing T-cell epitopes with computational protein design

    PubMed Central

    King, Chris; Garza, Esteban N.; Mazor, Ronit; Linehan, Jonathan L.; Pastan, Ira; Pepper, Marion; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses can make protein therapeutics ineffective or even dangerous. We describe a general computational protein design method for reducing immunogenicity by eliminating known and predicted T-cell epitopes and maximizing the content of human peptide sequences without disrupting protein structure and function. We show that the method recapitulates previous experimental results on immunogenicity reduction, and we use it to disrupt T-cell epitopes in GFP and Pseudomonas exotoxin A without disrupting function. PMID:24843166

  7. Marker-specific sorting of rare cells using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyuan; Bessette, Paul H.; Qian, Jiangrong; Meinhart, Carl D.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Soh, Hyongsok T.

    2005-01-01

    Current techniques in high-speed cell sorting are limited by the inherent coupling among three competing parameters of performance: throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. Microfluidics provides an alternate strategy to decouple these parameters through the use of arrayed devices that operate in parallel. To efficiently isolate rare cells from complex mixtures, an electrokinetic sorting methodology was developed that exploits dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic channels. In this approach, the dielectrophoretic amplitude response of rare target cells is modulated by labeling cells with particles that differ in polarization response. Cell mixtures were interrogated in the DEP-activated cell sorter in a continuous-flow manner, wherein the electric fields were engineered to achieve efficient separation between the dielectrophoretically labeled and unlabeled cells. To demonstrate the efficiency of marker-specific cell separation, DEP-activated cell sorting (DACS) was applied for affinity-based enrichment of rare bacteria expressing a specific surface marker from an excess of nontarget bacteria that do not express this marker. Rare target cells were enriched by >200-fold in a single round of sorting at a single-channel throughput of 10,000 cells per second. DACS offers the potential for automated, surface marker-specific cell sorting in a disposable format that is capable of simultaneously achieving high throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. PMID:16236724

  8. THERMAL VACUUM TEST OF ORBITAL STATIC MOISTURE-REMOVAL FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report presents the results of a thermal vacuum chamber test of an orbital fuel cell of advanced design. The fuel cell package used a static moisture-removal system. The fuel cell , tested in the thermal vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson AFB, gave satisfactory results. This test constituted the second and final ground qualification of this orbital fuel cell prior to orbital test. (Author)

  9. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Methods and Findings By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Conclusions Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM. PMID:26871570

  10. In situ removal of copper from sediments by a galvanic cell.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Songhu; Wu, Chan; Wan, Jinzhong; Lu, Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    This study dealt with in situ removal of copper from sediments through an electrokinetic (EK) process driven by a galvanic cell. Iron (Fe) and carbon (C) were placed separately and connected with a conductive wire. Polluted sediments were put between them and water was filled above the sediments. The galvanic cell was thus formed due to the different electrode potentials of Fe and C. The cell could remove the pollutants in the sediments by electromigration and/or electroosmosis. Results showed that a weak voltage less than 1V was formed by the galvanic cell. The voltage decreased with the increase of time. A slight increase of sediment pH from the anode (Fe) to the cathode (C) was observed. The presence of supernatant water inhibited the variation of sediment pH because H(+) and OH(-) could diffuse into the water. The removal of copper was affected by the sediment pH and the distribution of electrolyte in sediment and supernatant water. Lower pH led to higher removal efficiency. More electrolyte in the sediment and/or less electrolyte in the supernatant water favored the removal of copper. The major removal mechanism was proposed on the basis of the desorption of copper from sediment to pore solution and the subsequent electromigration of copper from the anode to the cathode. The diffusion of copper from sediment to supernatant water was negligible.

  11. Entorhinal Cortical Ocean Cells Encode Specific Contexts and Drive Context-Specific Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takashi; Sun, Chen; Martin, Jared; Kitch, Lacey J; Schnitzer, Mark J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-09-23

    Forming distinct representations and memories of multiple contexts and episodes is thought to be a crucial function of the hippocampal-entorhinal cortical network. The hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 are known to contribute to these functions, but the role of the entorhinal cortex (EC) is poorly understood. Here, we show that Ocean cells, excitatory stellate neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into DG and CA3, rapidly form a distinct representation of a novel context and drive context-specific activation of downstream CA3 cells as well as context-specific fear memory. In contrast, Island cells, excitatory pyramidal neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into CA1, are indifferent to context-specific encoding or memory. On the other hand, Ocean cells are dispensable for temporal association learning, for which Island cells are crucial. Together, the two excitatory medial EC layer II inputs to the hippocampus have complementary roles in episodic memory.

  12. Gas block mechanism for water removal in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Issacci, Farrokh; Rehg, Timothy J.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention is directed to apparatus and method for cathode-side disposal of water in an electrochemical fuel cell. There is a cathode plate. Within a surface of the plate is a flow field comprised of interdigitated channels. During operation of the fuel cell, cathode gas flows by convection through a gas diffusion layer above the flow field. Positioned at points adjacent to the flow field are one or more porous gas block mediums that have pores sized such that water is sipped off to the outside of the flow field by capillary flow and cathode gas is blocked from flowing through the medium. On the other surface of the plate is a channel in fluid communication with each porous gas block mediums. The method for water disposal in a fuel cell comprises installing the cathode plate assemblies at the cathode sides of the stack of fuel cells and manifolding the single water channel of each of the cathode plate assemblies to the coolant flow that feeds coolant plates in the stack.

  13. pH-dependent ammonia removal pathways in microbial fuel cell system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Lee, Hyeryeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2016-09-01

    In this work, ammonia removal paths in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) under different initial pH conditions (pH 7.0, 8.0, and 8.6) were investigated. At a neutral pH condition (pH 7.0), MFC used an electrical energy of 27.4% and removed 23.3% of total ammonia by electrochemical pathway for 192h. At the identical pH condition, 36.1% of the total ammonia was also removed by the biological path suspected to be biological ammonia oxidation process (e.g., Anammox). With the initial pH increased, the electrochemical removal efficiency decreased to less than 5.0%, while the biological removal efficiency highly increased to 61.8%. In this study, a neutral pH should be maintained in the anode to utilize MFCs for ammonia recovery via electrochemical pathways from wastewater stream.

  14. A Learning Model for L/M Specificity in Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2016-01-01

    An unsupervised learning model for developing LM specific wiring at the ganglion cell level would support the research indicating LM specific wiring at the ganglion cell level (Reid and Shapley, 2002). Removing the contributions to the surround from cells of the same cone type improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the chromatic signals. The unsupervised learning model used is Hebbian associative learning, which strengthens the surround input connections according to the correlation of the output with the input. Since the surround units of the same cone type as the center are redundant with the center, their weights end up disappearing. This process can be thought of as a general mechanism for eliminating unnecessary cells in the nervous system.

  15. Ca(2+) removal mechanisms in freshly isolated rabbit aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Reznick, S; Li, P; Liang, W; van Breemen, C

    2002-06-01

    Calcium removal from the cytoplasm was investigated in freshly isolated aortic endothelial cells by monitoring changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) using ratiometric fura-2 fluorimetry. Blockade of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) by replacement of external sodium with equi-molar N-methyl-D-glutamine (0Na PSS) decreased the removal rate by 52%. Blockade of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) decreased the removal rate by 50%. Simultaneous application of CPA and 0Na PSS did not reduce the removal rate any further (53%). The lack of additivity of these two procedures, suggests that SERCA and the NCX function in series to lower [Ca(2+)](i). In addition, in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), removal of external Na(+) markedly reduced the rate of loss of Ca(2+) from the ER further supporting the hypothesis that NCX is functionally linked to ER calcium release channels, and thus, plays an important role in ER calcium unloading. To investigate the mechanism for the coupling of NCX and SERCA, the same protocols as described above were repeated after treating the cells with cytochalasin D, which disrupts the cytoskeleton. This treatment uncoupled the NCX from SERCA, as evidenced by the resulting additive inhibitory effects of application of CPA and removal of extracellular Na(+) on the rate of Ca(2+) removal from the cytoplasm. These data suggest that in endothelial cells NCX and SERCA function in series to remove about half of the free Ca(2+) from the cytosol, while PMCA contributes to the other half of the Ca(2+) removal process.

  16. A bioreactor model system specifically designed for Tetrahymena growth and cholesterol removal from milk.

    PubMed

    Noseda, D G; Gentili, H G; Nani, M L; Nusblat, A; Tiedtke, A; Florin-Christensen, J; Nudel, C B

    2007-06-01

    This work describes the configuration and operation of a bioreactor system especially designed for Tetrahymena cultivation and its use for milk improvement, particularly cholesterol elimination by the action of this cell. An advantage of the proposed method is the re-use of the growth medium; thus, the medium is used twice to provide two batches of Tetrahymena biomass without the need of further inoculation. This makes the procedure of producing the cell biomass faster and more economical. Cells are concentrated in the culture vessels by sedimentation at room temperature and then transferred to milk suspensions, where they can further grow for at least one generation with the benefit of reducing steeply cholesterol level. Milk treated according to this process is separated from the biomass by centrifugation. Under these conditions, less than 5% of the cells remain in the milk, and cholesterol elimination amounts to 75 +/- 10% of that initially present. No changes in sensorial properties of the milk, such as clotting or butyric odor, were observed as a result of this treatment. In addition, the bioreactor allows the aseptic recovery of the spent growth medium, which contains diverse enzymes of interest, and the cell pellets, to exploit particular lipids like phosphonolipids, abundant poly-unsaturated fatty acids and co-enzyme Q(8).

  17. Isolating specific embryonic cells of the sea urchin by FACS.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Celina; Swartz, S Zachary; Wessel, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Isolating cells based on specific gene expression enables a focused biochemical and molecular analysis. While cultured cells and hematopoietic cells, for example, are routinely isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), early embryonic cells are a relatively untapped source for FACS applications often because the embryos of many animals are quite limiting. Furthermore, many applications require genetic model organisms in which cells can be labeled by fluorescent transgenes, or antibodies against cell surface antigens. Here we define conditions in the sea urchin embryo for isolation of embryonic cells based on expression of specific proteins. We use the sea urchin embryo for which a nearly unlimited supply of embryonic cells is available and demonstrate the conditions for separation of the embryo into single cells, fixation of the cells for antibody penetration into the cells, and conditions for FACS of a rare cell type in the embryo. This protocol may be adapted for analysis of mRNA, chromatin, protein, or carbohydrates and depends only on the probe availability for the cell of interest. We anticipate that this protocol will be broadly applicable to embryos of other species.

  18. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  19. Uncoupling VEGFA functions in arteriogenesis and hematopoietic stem cell specification.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Pinheiro, Philip; Monteiro, Rui; Zuo, Jie; Vyas, Paresh; Patient, Roger; Porcher, Catherine

    2013-01-28

    VEGFA signaling is critical for endothelial and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) specification. However, blood defects resulting from perturbation of the VEGFA pathway are always accompanied by impaired vascular/arterial development. Because HSCs derive from arterial cells, it is unclear whether VEGFA directly contributes to HSC specification. This is an important question for our understanding of how HSCs are formed and for developing their production in vitro. Through knockdown of the regulator ETO2 in embryogenesis, we report a specific decrease in expression of medium/long Vegfa isoforms in somites. This leads to absence of Notch1 expression and failure of HSC specification in the dorsal aorta (DA), independently of vessel formation and arterial specification. Vegfa hypomorphs and isoform-specific (medium/long) morphants not only recapitulate this phenotype but also demonstrate that VEGFA short isoform is sufficient for DA development. Therefore, sequential, isoform-specific VEGFA signaling successively induces the endothelial, arterial, and HSC programs in the DA.

  20. Coupling of anaerobic digester and microbial fuel cell for COD removal and ammonia recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated for use in removing total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and residual COD from effluent digested in an anaerobic digester (AD) fed with actual swine wastewater for 32 days in batch mode. Cumulative COD removal in the AD was as high as 59,647±2096 mg/L (80.5% removed), whereas TAN removal in the AD was negligible at 296±116 mg-N/L (5.8% removed), causing a decrease in the COD/TAN ratio from 14.5 to 3.0. In a subsequent MFC system, 77.5% of TAN was removed at 36 days, leading to an increase in COD/TAN ratio from 4.6 to 8.1. As a result, the COD in the anode was further reduced from 19,319±417 mg/L to 7519±554 mg/L (61.1% removed). From these results, removing the TAN in MFCs was found to increase the COD/TAN ratio, with the COD being further degraded.

  1. Removing the mustard oil bomb from seeds: transgenic ablation of myrosin cells in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) produces MINELESS seeds.

    PubMed

    Borgen, Birgit Hafeld; Thangstad, Ole Petter; Ahuja, Ishita; Rossiter, John Trevor; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2010-06-01

    Many plant phytochemicals constitute binary enzyme-glucoside systems and function in plant defence. In brassicas, the enzyme myrosinase is confined to specific myrosin cells that separate the enzyme from its substrate; the glucosinolates. The myrosinase-catalysed release of toxic and bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates, upon activation or tissue damage, has been termed 'the mustard oil bomb' and characterized as a 'toxic mine' in plant defence. The removal of myrosin cells and the enzyme that triggers the release of phytochemicals have been investigated by genetically modifying Brassica napus plants to remove myrosinase-storing idioblasts. A construct with the seed myrosin cell-specific Myr1.Bn1 promoter was used to express a ribonuclease, barnase. Transgenic plants ectopically expressing barnase were embryo lethal. Co-expressing barnase under the control of the Myr1.Bn1 promoter with the barnase inhibitor, barstar, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enabled a selective and controlled death of myrosin cells without affecting plant viability. Ablation of myrosin cells was confirmed with light and electron microscopy, with immunohistological analysis and immunogold-electron microscopy analysis showing empty holes where myrosin cells normally are localized. Further evidence for a successful myrosin cell ablation comes from immunoblots showing absence of myrosinase and negligible myrosinase activity, and autolysis experiments showing negligible production of glucosinolate hydrolysis products. The plants where the myrosin defence cells have been ablated and named 'MINELESS plants'. The epithiospecifier protein profile and glucosinolate levels were changed in MINELESS plants, pointing to localization of myrosinases and a 35 kDa epithiospecifier protein in myrosin cells and a reduced turnover of glucosinolates in MINELESS plants.

  2. Leukocyte filtration mechanisms. Factors influencing the removal of infectious agents from red cell concentrates.

    PubMed

    Steneker, I; Pietersz, R N; Reesink, H W

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present overview was to determine the factors influencing the removal of infectious agents from red cell concentrates by filtration. In general, the efficacy of the filtration method depends on the physical as well as the functional properties of blood cells. These properties are highly influenced by the changes exerted on the blood cells during blood collection, processing and storage and the filtration method itself. In particular, the removal of infectious agents of red cell concentrates by filtration will be determined by the type of virus and therewith the binding towards leukocytes, the type of bacteria and holding period before filtration, the deformability of infected cells and the disintegration of cells in the filter.

  3. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-02-03

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor.

  4. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor. PMID:26837600

  5. Sprouty-2 regulates HIV-specific T cell polyfunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yen-Ling; Shan, Liang; Huang, Hailiang; Haupt, Carl; Bessell, Catherine; Canaday, David H.; Zhang, Hao; Ho, Ya-Chi; Powell, Jonathan D.; Oelke, Mathias; Margolick, Joseph B.; Blankson, Joel N.; Griffin, Diane E.; Schneck, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of individual T cells to perform multiple effector functions is crucial for protective immunity against viruses and cancer. This polyfunctionality is frequently lost during chronic infections; however, the molecular mechanisms driving T cell polyfunctionality are poorly understood. We found that human T cells stimulated by a high concentration of antigen lacked polyfunctionality and expressed a transcription profile similar to that of exhausted T cells. One specific pathway implicated by the transcription profile in control of T cell polyfunctionality was the MAPK/ERK pathway. This pathway was altered in response to different antigen concentrations, and polyfunctionality correlated with upregulation of phosphorylated ERK. T cells that were stimulated with a high concentration of antigen upregulated sprouty-2 (SPRY2), a negative regulator of the MAPK/ERK pathway. The clinical relevance of SPRY2 was confirmed by examining SPRY2 expression in HIV-specific T cells, where high levels of SPRY2 were seen in HIV-specific T cells and inhibition of SPRY2 expression enhanced the HIV-specific polyfunctional response independently of the PD-1 pathway. Our findings indicate that increased SPRY2 expression during chronic viral infection reduces T cell polyfunctionality and identify SPRY2 as a potential target for immunotherapy. PMID:24292711

  6. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  7. Cancer cell proliferation is inhibited by specific modulation frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J W; Pennison, M J; Brezovich, I; Yi, N; Yang, C T; Ramaker, R; Absher, D; Myers, R M; Kuster, N; Costa, F P; Barbault, A; Pasche, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is clinical evidence that very low and safe levels of amplitude-modulated electromagnetic fields administered via an intrabuccal spoon-shaped probe may elicit therapeutic responses in patients with cancer. However, there is no known mechanism explaining the anti-proliferative effect of very low intensity electromagnetic fields. Methods: To understand the mechanism of this novel approach, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells were exposed to 27.12 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields using in vitro exposure systems designed to replicate in vivo conditions. Cancer cells were exposed to tumour-specific modulation frequencies, previously identified by biofeedback methods in patients with a diagnosis of cancer. Control modulation frequencies consisted of randomly chosen modulation frequencies within the same 100 Hz–21 kHz range as cancer-specific frequencies. Results: The growth of HCC and breast cancer cells was significantly decreased by HCC-specific and breast cancer-specific modulation frequencies, respectively. However, the same frequencies did not affect proliferation of nonmalignant hepatocytes or breast epithelial cells. Inhibition of HCC cell proliferation was associated with downregulation of XCL2 and PLP2. Furthermore, HCC-specific modulation frequencies disrupted the mitotic spindle. Conclusion: These findings uncover a novel mechanism controlling the growth of cancer cells at specific modulation frequencies without affecting normal tissues, which may have broad implications in oncology. PMID:22134506

  8. Probing Coagulation Behavior of Individual Aluminum Species for Removing Corresponding Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: The Role of Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Hu, Chengzhi; Zhang, Di; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation behavior of aluminum chloride and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) for removing corresponding disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors was discussed in this paper. CHCl3, bromine trihalomethanes (THM-Br), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) formation potential yields were correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values in different molecular weight (MW) fractions of humic substances (HS), respectively. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis were performed to examine the relationships between SUVA and different DBP precursors. To acquire more structural characters of DBP precursors and aluminum speciation, freeze-dried precipitates were analyzed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and C 1s, Al 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that TCAA precursors (no MW limits), DCAA and CHCl3 precursors in low MW fractions (MW<30 kDa) had a relatively good relations with SUVA values. These DBP precursors were coagulated more easily by in situ Al13 of AlCl3 at pH 5.0. Due to relatively low aromatic content and more aliphatic structures, THM-Br precursors (no MW limits) and CHCl3 precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) were preferentially removed by PACl coagulation with preformed Al13 species at pH 5.0. Additionally, for DCAA precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) with relatively low aromatic content and more carboxylic structures, the greatest removal occurred at pH 6.0 through PACl coagulation with aggregated Al13 species. PMID:26824243

  9. Probing Coagulation Behavior of Individual Aluminum Species for Removing Corresponding Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: The Role of Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Hu, Chengzhi; Zhang, Di; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation behavior of aluminum chloride and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) for removing corresponding disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors was discussed in this paper. CHCl3, bromine trihalomethanes (THM-Br), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) formation potential yields were correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values in different molecular weight (MW) fractions of humic substances (HS), respectively. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis were performed to examine the relationships between SUVA and different DBP precursors. To acquire more structural characters of DBP precursors and aluminum speciation, freeze-dried precipitates were analyzed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and C 1s, Al 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that TCAA precursors (no MW limits), DCAA and CHCl3 precursors in low MW fractions (MW<30 kDa) had a relatively good relations with SUVA values. These DBP precursors were coagulated more easily by in situ Al13 of AlCl3 at pH 5.0. Due to relatively low aromatic content and more aliphatic structures, THM-Br precursors (no MW limits) and CHCl3 precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) were preferentially removed by PACl coagulation with preformed Al13 species at pH 5.0. Additionally, for DCAA precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) with relatively low aromatic content and more carboxylic structures, the greatest removal occurred at pH 6.0 through PACl coagulation with aggregated Al13 species.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide removal with magnetically responsive Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka

    2008-09-10

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is a promising chemical sanitizer for use in the food industry. Its residues have to be decomposed, usually using an enzyme process employing catalase. In order to offer an inexpensive biocatalyst and to simplify subsequent manipulation, we have prepared magnetically responsive alginate beads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles. Larger beads (2-3 mm in diameter) were prepared by dropping the mixture into calcium chloride solution, while microbeads (the diameter of majority of particles ranged between 50 and 100 microm) were prepared using the water in oil emulsification process. In general, microbeads enabled more efficient HP decomposition. The prepared microparticulate biocatalyst caused efficient decomposition of HP in water solutions (up to 2% concentration), leaving very low residual HP concentration after treatment (below 0.001% under appropriate conditions). The biocatalyst was stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 degrees C, and the microbeads could be used at least five times.

  11. The cell biology of synaptic specificity during development.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ryan; Shao, Zhiyong; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    Proper circuit connectivity is critical for nervous system function. Connectivity derives from the interaction of two interdependent modules: synaptic specificity and synaptic assembly. Specificity involves both targeting of neurons to specific laminar regions and the formation of synapses onto defined subcellular areas. In this review, we focus discussion on recently elucidated molecular mechanisms that control synaptic specificity and link them to synapse assembly. We use these molecular pathways to underscore fundamental cell biological concepts that underpin, and help explain, the rules governing synaptic specificity.

  12. Effect of isosmotic removal of extracellular Ca2+ and of membrane potential on cell volume in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rasgado, C; McGruder, K D; Summers, J C; Rasgado-Flores, H

    1994-09-01

    Isosmotic removal of extracellular Ca2+ (Cao) and changes in membrane potential (Vm) are frequently performed manipulations. Using isolated voltage-clamped barnacle muscle cells, we studied the effect of these manipulations on isosmotic cell volume. Replacing Cao by Mg2+ induced 1) verapamil-sensitive extracellular Na(+)-dependent membrane depolarization, 2) membrane depolarization-dependent cell volume reduction in cells whose sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was presumably loaded with Ca2+ [intracellular Ca2+ (Cai)-loaded cells], and 3) cell volume increase in cells whose SR was presumably depleted of Ca2+ (Cai-depleted cells) or in Cai-loaded cells whose Vm was held constant. Membrane depolarization induced 1) volume reduction in Cai-loaded cells or 2) verapamil-sensitive volume increase in Cai-depleted cells. This suggests tha, in Cai-loaded cells, membrane depolarization induces SR Ca2+ release, which in turn promotes volume reduction. Conversely, in Cai-depleted cells, the depolarization activates Na+ influx through a verapamil-sensitive pathway leading to the volume increase. This pathway is also revealed when Cao is removed in either Cai-depleted cells or in cells whose Vm is held constant.

  13. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes.

  14. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, M A; Paulson, J C

    1980-01-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphological characteristics. By either criterion, treatment of the cells with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase to remove cell surface sialic acids rendered them resistant to infection by Sendai virus. Endogenous replacement of receptors by the cell occurred slowly but supported maximal levels of infection within 6 hr. In contrast, sialylation during a 20-min incubation with CMP-sialic acid and beta-galactoside alpha 2,3-sialytransferase restored full susceptibility to infection. This enzyme elaborates the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid) sequence on glycoproteins and glycolipids. No restoration of infectivity was observed when neuraminidase-treated cells were sialylated by using beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialytransferase, which elaborates the NeuAc-alpha 2,6Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc sequence. These results suggest that sialyloligosaccharide receptor determinants of defined sequence are required for Sendai virus infection of host cells. Images PMID:6255459

  15. In Vitro Generation of Antigen-Specific T Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Antigen-Specific T Cell Origin.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from T lymphocyte (T-iPS cells) preserve the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β gene rearrangements identical to the original T cell clone. Re-differentiated CD8 single positive αβ T cells from the T-iPS cells exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity, improved proliferative response, and elongation of telomere indicating rejuvenation of antigen specific T cell immunity in vitro. To regenerate antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), first, we have optimized a method for reprogramming-resistant CD8 T cell clones into T-iPS cells by using sendaiviral vectors. Second, we have optimized stepwise differentiation methods for inducing hematopoietic progenitor cells, T cell progenitors, and functionally matured CD8 single positive CTL. These protocols provide useful in vitro tools and models both for research of antigen-specific T cell immunotherapy and for research of normal and pathological thymopoiesis.

  16. cell type–specific gene expression differences in complex tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shen-Orr, Shai S; Tibshirani, Robert; Khatri, Purvesh; Bodian, Dale L; Staedtler, Frank; Perry, Nicholas M; Hastie, Trevor; Sarwal, Minnie M; Davis, Mark M; Butte, Atul J

    2013-01-01

    We describe cell type–specific significance analysis of microarrays (cssam) for analyzing differential gene expression for each cell type in a biological sample from microarray data and relative cell-type frequencies. first, we validated cssam with predesigned mixtures and then applied it to whole-blood gene expression datasets from stable post-transplant kidney transplant recipients and those experiencing acute transplant rejection, which revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes that were otherwise undetectable. PMID:20208531

  17. Optimization of copper removal from aqueous solutions in a continuous electrochemical cell divided by cellulosic separator.

    PubMed

    Najafpoor, Ali Asghar; Davoudi, Mojtaba; Salmani, Elham Rahmanpour

    2017-03-01

    Copper, as an inseparable part of many industrial discharges, threatens both public and environmental health. In this work, an electrochemical cell utilizing a cellulosic separator was used to evaluate Cu removal using graphite anodes and stainless steel cathodes in a continuous-flow mode reactor. In the experimental matrix, Cu concentration (1-5 mg L(-1)), electrolysis time (20-90 min), and current intensity (0.1-0.4 A) were employed. Results showed that the maximum removal efficiency of copper was obtained as 99%. The removal efficiency was independent of initial copper concentration and directly related to electrolysis time and current intensity. Energy consumption was more dependent on current intensity than electrolysis time. Under optimal conditions (75.8 min electrolysis time, 0.18 A current intensity, and 3 mg L(-1) copper concentration), the removal efficiency was obtained as 91% while 7.05 kWh m(-3) electrical energy was consumed. The differences between the actual and predicted data under optimal conditions were 0.42% for copper removal and 0.23% for energy consumption, which signify the performance and reliability of the developed models. The results exhibited the suitability of the electrochemical reduction for copper removal from aqueous solutions, which was facilitated under alkaline conditions prevailing in the cathodic compartment due to applying a cell divided by a cellulosic separator.

  18. Recalcitrant organic matter removal from textile wastewater by an aerobic cell-immobilized pellet column.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonil; Han, Dukkyu; Cui, Fenghao; Bae, Wookeun

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of textile wastewater is difficult because of its recalcitrant organic content. The biological removal of recalcitrant organics requires a long retention time for microbial growth. Activated sludge was immobilized in a polyethylene glycol pellet to allow for sufficient sludge retention time. The pellets were filled in an aerobic cell-immobilized pellet column (CIPC) reactor in order to investigate the removal of recalcitrant organics from textile wastewater. A textile wastewater effluent treated by a conventional activated sludge reactor was used as a target wastewater. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of the aerobic CIPC reactor at various empty bed contact times was in the range of 42.2-60.5%. Half of the input COD was removed in the lower part (bottom 25% of the reactor volume) of the reactor when the organic loading rate was less than 1.5 kg COD/(m(3)•d). About 15-30% of the input COD was removed in the remaining part of the column reactor. The COD removed in this region was limitedly biodegradable. The biodegradation of recalcitrant organics could be carried out by the interactional functions of the various bacteria consortia by using a cell-immobilization process. The CIPC process could effectively treat textile wastewater using a short retention time because the microorganisms that degrade limitedly biodegradable organics were dominant in the reactor.

  19. Bioelectrochemical Chromium(VI) Removal in Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Habibul, Nuzahat; Hu, Yi; Wang, Yun-Kun; Chen, Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-04-05

    Plant-microbial fuel cell (PMFC) is a renewable and sustainable energy technology that generates electricity with living plants. However, little information is available regarding the application of PMFC for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated water or soil. In this study, the potential for the removal of heavy metal Cr(VI) using PMFC was evaluated, and the performance of the PMFC at various initial Cr(VI) contents was investigated. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency could reached 99% under various conditions. Both the Cr(VI) removal rates and the removal efficiencies increased with the increasing initial Cr(VI) concentration. Furthermore, the long-term operation of the PMFC indicated that the system was stable and sustainable for Cr(VI) removal. The mass balance results and XPS analysis results demonstrate that only a small amount of soluble Cr(III) remained in the PMFC and that most Cr(III) precipitated in the form of the Cr(OH)3(s) or was adsorbed onto the electrodes. The PMFC experiments of without acetate addition also show that plants can provide carbon source for MFC through secrete root exudates and bioelectrochemical reduction of Cr(VI) was the main mechanism for the Cr(VI) removal. These results extend the application fields of PMFC and might provide a new insight for Cr(VI) removal from wastewater or soil.

  20. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin fragment removes specific claudins from tight junction strands: Evidence for direct involvement of claudins in tight junction barrier.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, N; Furuse, M; Sasaki, H; Yonemura, S; Katahira, J; Horiguchi, Y; Tsukita, S

    1999-10-04

    Claudins, comprising a multigene family, constitute tight junction (TJ) strands. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), a single approximately 35-kD polypeptide, was reported to specifically bind to claudin-3/RVP1 and claudin-4/CPE-R at its COOH-terminal half. We examined the effects of the COOH-terminal half fragment of CPE (C-CPE) on TJs in L transfectants expressing claudin-1 to -4 (C1L to C4L, respectively), and in MDCK I cells expressing claudin-1 and -4. C-CPE bound to claudin-3 and -4 with high affinity, but not to claudin-1 or -2. In the presence of C-CPE, reconstituted TJ strands in C3L cells gradually disintegrated and disappeared from their cell surface. In MDCK I cells incubated with C-CPE, claudin-4 was selectively removed from TJs with its concomitant degradation. At 4 h after incubation with C-CPE, TJ strands were disintegrated, and the number of TJ strands and the complexity of their network were markedly decreased. In good agreement with the time course of these morphological changes, the TJ barrier (TER and paracellular flux) of MDCK I cells was downregulated by C-CPE in a dose-dependent manner. These findings provided evidence for the direct involvement of claudins in the barrier functions of TJs.

  1. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs.

  2. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  3. Differences in pyrimidine dimer removal between rat skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mullaart, E.; Lohman, P.H.; Vijg, J.

    1988-03-01

    Pyrimidine dimers, the most abundant type of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light (UV), are rapidly repaired in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. In the same cell type from rats, however, there is hardly any removal of such dimers. To investigate whether this low capacity of rat skin cells to repair lesions in their DNA is an inherent characteristic of this species or an artifact due to cell culturing, we measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from rat epidermal keratinocytes both in vitro and in vivo. Epidermal keratinocytes in vitro were unable to remove any dimers over the first 3 h after UV-irradiation, while only about 20% was removed during a repair period of 24 h. In this respect, these cells were not different from cultured rat fibroblasts. In contrast to the results obtained with keratinocytes in vitro, we observed a rapid repair of pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated keratinocytes in vivo over the first 3 h; this rapid repair phase was followed by a much slower repair phase between 3 and 24 h. These results are discussed in terms of the possibility that mammalian cells are able to switch from one DNA repair pathway to another.

  4. On-board removal of CO and other impurities in hydrogen for PEM fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cunping; Jiang, Ruichun; Elbaccouch, Mohamed; Muradov, Nazim; Fenton, James M.

    Carbon monoxide (CO) in the hydrogen (H 2) stream can cause severe performance degradation for an H 2 polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The on-board removal of CO from an H 2 stream requires a process temperature less than 80 °C, and a fast reaction rate in order to minimize the reactor volume. At the present time, few technologies have been developed that meet these two requirements. This paper describes a concept of electrochemical water gas shift (EWGS) process to remove low concentration CO under ambient conditions for on-board applications. No on-board oxygen or air supply is needed for CO oxidation. Experimental work has been carried out to prove the concept of EWGS and the results indicate that the process can completely remove low level CO and improve the performance of a PEM fuel cell to the level of a pure H 2 stream. Because the EWGS electrolyzer can be modified from a humidifier for a PEM fuel cell system, no additional device is needed for the CO removal. More experimental data are needed to determine the rate of CO electrochemical removal and to explore the mechanism of the proposed process.

  5. Targeting neural stem cells with titanium dioxide nanoparticles coupled to specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Elvira, Gema; Moreno, Berta; Valle, Ignacio Del; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A; Canillas, María; Chinarro, Eva; Jurado, José R; Silva, Augusto

    2012-05-01

    Aiming to characterize the use of biomaterials in cancer therapy, we took advantage of the n-type semiconductor properties, which upon irradiation excite their electrons into the conduction band to induce photoelectrochemical reactions generating oxygen reactive species (ROS). Indeed, photoactivated TiO(2) nanoparticles have been shown to kill in vitro either bacteria or tumor cells in culture following UV irradiation, as a consequence of the ROS levels generated; the killing was highly effective although devoid of specificity. In this report, we have directed the TiO(2) nanoparticles to particular targets by coupling them to the monoclonal antibody (mAb) Nilo1, recognizing a surface antigen in neural stem cells within a cell culture, to explore the possibility of making this process specific. TiO(2) nanoparticles generated with particular rutile/anatase ratios were coupled to Nilo1 antibody and the complexes formed were highly stable. The coupled antibody retained the ability to identify neural stem cells and upon UV irradiation, the TiO(2) nanoparticles were activated, inducing the selective photokilling of the antibody-targeted cells. Thus, these data indicate that antibody-TiO(2) complexes could be used to specifically remove target cell subpopulations, as demonstrated with neural stem cells. The possible applications in cancer therapy are discussed.

  6. Combination of specific allergen and probiotics induces specific regulatory B cells and enhances specific immunotherapy effect on allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gui; Luo, Xiang-Qian; Miao, Bei-Ping; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jun; Wen, Zhong; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Li, Jing; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Li, Hua-Bin; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) on allergic diseases is to be improved. Probiotics can regulate immune response. This study aims to promote the effect of SIT on allergic rhinitis (AR) by co-administration with Clostridium butyricum (Cb). In this study, patients with AR sensitized to mite allergens were enrolled to this study, and treated with SIT or/and Cb. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by the total nasal symptom scores (NSS), medication scores, serum specific IgE levels and T helper (Th)2 cytokine levels. The improvement of immune regulation in the AR patients was assessed by immunologic approaches. The results showed that treating AR patients with SIT alone markedly reduced NSS and medication scores; but did not alter the serum specific IgE, Th2 cytokines and skin prick test (SPT) index. The clinical symptoms on AR in SIT group relapsed one month after stopping SIT. Co-administration of Cb significantly enhanced the efficacy of SIT on AR as shown by suppression of NSS, medication scores, serum specific IgE, Th2 cytokines and SPT index; the regulatory B cell frequency was also markedly increased. Such an effect on AR was maintained throughout the observation period even after stopping the treatment. Butyrate blocked the activation of histone deacetylase-1, the downstream activities of epsilon chain promoter activation, and the IgE production in the antigen specific B cells. On the other hand, butyrate induced the IL-10 expression in B cells with a premise of the B cell receptor activation by specific antigens. In conclusion, administration with Cb can markedly enhance the efficacy of SIT on AR. PMID:27486985

  7. Limbal Stromal Tissue Specific Stem Cells and Their Differentiation Potential to Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Katikireddy, Kishore Reddy; Jurkunas, Ula V

    2016-01-01

    From the derivation of the first human embryonic stem (hES) cell line to the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells; it has become evident that tissue specific stem cells are able to differentiate into a specific somatic cell types. The understanding of key processes such as the signaling pathways and the role of the microenvironment in epidermal/epithelial development has provided important clues for the derivation of specific epithelial cell types.Various differentiation protocols/methods were used to attain specific epithelial cell types. Here, we describe in detail the procedure to follow for isolation of tissue specific stem cells, mimicking their microenvironment to attain stem cell characteristics, and their potential differentiation to corneal epithelial cells.

  8. Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

    2006-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

  9. Factors affecting the performance of microbial fuel cells for sulfur pollutants removal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Rahunen, Nelli; Varcoe, John R; Roberts, Alexander J; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Thumser, Alfred E; Slade, Robert C T

    2009-03-15

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed for removal of sulfur-based pollutants and can be used for simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity generation. This fuel cell uses an activated carbon cloth+carbon fibre veil composite anode, air-breathing dual cathodes and the sulfate-reducing species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. 1.16gdm(-3) sulfite and 0.97gdm(-3) thiosulfate were removed from the wastewater at 22 degrees C, representing sulfite and thiosulfate removal conversions of 91% and 86%, respectively. The anode potential was controlled by the concentration of sulfide in the compartment. The performance of the cathode assembly was affected by the concentration of protons in the cation-exchanging ionomer with which the electrocatalyst is co-bound at the three-phase (air, catalyst and support) boundary.

  10. Substrate replenishment and byproduct removal improve yeast cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Schoborg, Jennifer A; Hodgman, C Eric; Anderson, Mark J; Jewett, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) platforms are now considered a powerful tool for synthesizing a variety of proteins at scales from pL to 100 L with accelerated process development pipelines. We previously reported the advancement of a novel yeast-based CFPS platform. Here, we studied factors that cause termination of yeast CFPS batch reactions. Specifically, we characterized the substrate and byproduct concentrations in batch, fed-batch, and semi-continuous reaction formats through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and chemical assays. We discovered that creatine phosphate, the secondary energy substrate, and nucleoside triphosphates were rapidly degraded during batch CFPS, causing a significant drop in the reaction's energy charge (E.C.) and eventual termination of protein synthesis. As a consequence of consuming creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate accumulated as a toxic byproduct. Additionally, we measured amino acid concentrations and found that aspartic acid was rapidly consumed. By adopting a semi-continuous reaction format, where passive diffusion enables substrate replenishment and byproduct removal, we achieved over a 70% increase in active superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) as compared with the batch system. This study identifies targets for the future improvement of the batch yeast CFPS reaction. Moreover, it outlines a detailed, generalized method to characterize and improve other CFPS platforms.

  11. Rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression in human retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Polo, A; Farber, D B

    1995-01-01

    Retinoblastoma cells in culture have previously been shown to express cone-specific genes but not their rod counterparts. We have detected the messages for the rod alpha, beta, and gamma subunits of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE), the rod alpha subunit of transducin, rod opsin, and the cone alpha' subunit of PDE in RNA of human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells by reverse transcription-PCR. Quantitative analysis of the mRNAs for the rod alpha and cone alpha' PDE subunits revealed that they were expressed at comparable levels; however, the transcript encoding the rod beta PDE subunit was 10 times more abundant in these cells. Northern hybridization analysis of Y-79 cell RNA confirmed the presence of the transcripts for rod and cone PDE catalytic subunits. To test whether the transcriptional machinery required for the expression of rod-specific genes was endogenous in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells, cultures were transfected with a construct containing the promoter region of the rod beta PDE subunit gene attached to the firefly luciferase reporter vector. Significant levels of reporter enzyme activity were observed in the cell lysates. Our results demonstrate that the Y-79 retinoblastoma cell line is a good model system for the study of transcriptional regulation of rod-specific genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7732024

  12. Regulation of erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythropoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P. R.; Plumb, M.; Frampton, J.; Llewellyn, D.; Chester, J.; Chambers, I.; MacLeod, K.; Fleming, J.; O'Prey, J.; Walker, M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of our group's work over the past few years has been to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythroid cell differentiation. In addition to the alpha-globin gene, we have focussed on two non-globin genes of interest encoding the rabbit red cell-specific lipoxygenase (LOX) and the mouse glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX), an important seleno-enzyme responsible for protection against peroxide-damage. Characterisation of the GSHPX gene showed that the seleno-cysteine residue in the active site of the enzyme is encoded by UGA, which usually functions as a translation-termination codon. This novel finding has important implications regarding mRNA sequence context effects affecting codon recognition. The regulation of the GSHPX and red cell LOX genes has been investigated by functional transfection experiments. The 700 bp upstream of the GSHPX promoter seems to function equally well when linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and transfected into mouse erythroid or fibroblast cell lines. However, the presence of tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSS) in the 3' flanking region of the GSHPX gene suggests that such sites may be important in its regulation in the various cell types in which it is highly expressed, i.e., erythroid cells, liver and kidney. The transcription unit of the RBC LOX gene has also been defined and 5' and 3' flanking regions are being investigated for erythroid-specific regulatory elements: a region upstream of the LOX gene gives increased expression of a linked CAT gene when transfected into mouse erythroid cell lines compared to non-erythroid cell lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3151147

  13. FFTF/IEM (Fast Flux Test Facility/Interim Examination and Maintenance) cell fuel pin removal equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwell, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a fuel pin removal device used for pin removal from irradiated fuel assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). After irradiation in the FFTF, selected fuel assemblies are remotely disassembled in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell. The remote disassembly, following sodium removal, consists of slitting and removing the duct and then removing the fuel pins one-at-a-time by sliding the pins from parallel attachment rails. All pins are removed from one rail before starting on the next. The new pin removal equipment has been used very successfully on the last three fuel experiments disassembled in the IEM cell, including one assembly containing residual sodium. Pin removal time has been cut in half, and this once tedious and time-consuming activity has been turned into an almost effortless evolution.

  14. Cell specific cytotoxicity and uptake of graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Mullick Chowdhury, Sayan; Lalwani, Gaurav; Zhang, Kevin; Yang, Jeong Y; Neville, Kayla; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    . Additional analysis indicates that this increased uptake is the dominant cause of the significantly higher toxicity exhibited by HeLa cells. The results suggest that water-solubilized O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs have a heterogenous cell-specific cytotoxicity, and have significantly different cytotoxicity profile compared to graphene nanoparticles prepared by the modified Hummer's method (graphene nanoparticles prepared by oxidation of graphite, and its mechanical exfoliation) or its variations.

  15. Removal efficiency of nickel and lead from industrial wastewater using microbial desalination cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaienia, Fariba; Asadipour, Ali; Jafari, Ahmad Jonidi; Malakootian, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a new method of desalination. Its energy is supplied through microbial metabolism of organic materials. In this study, synthetic samples were provided with concentration of 25, 50, 75, 100 mg/L Ni and Pb. Removal efficiency of each metal was analyzed after 60, 90, 120 min, psychrophilic, mesophilic, thermophilic and 3-4, 4-5, 5-6 mg/L dissolved oxygen. Optimum conditions for removing Ni and Pb were achieved in 100, 4.5 and 4.6 mg/L dissolved oxygen, respectively, 26 °C and 120 min. Nickel and led were removed from wastewaters of Isfahan electroplating industry and steel company. The maximum removal efficiencies of Ni and Pb in real samples were 68.81 and 70.04%. MDC can be considered as a good choice for removing Ni and Pb from industrial wastewater. Due to microorganisms for decomposing organic material in municipal wastewater, metals from industrial wastewater can be removed simultaneously.

  16. Cell-Type Specific Four-Component Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, Timo; Franke, Katrin; Rist, Elke; Benz, Karin; Schlosshauer, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering. PMID:24475174

  17. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  18. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    PubMed

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  19. Size Specific Transfection to Mammalian Cells by Micropillar Array Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Lu, Yang; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Shengnian

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation serves as a promising non-viral gene delivery approach, while its current configuration carries several drawbacks associated with high-voltage electrical pulses and heterogeneous treatment on individual cells. Here we developed a new micropillar array electroporation (MAE) platform to advance the electroporation-based delivery of DNA and RNA probes into mammalian cells. By introducing well-patterned micropillar array texture on the electrode surface, the number of pillars each cell faces varies with its plasma membrane surface area, despite their large population and random locations. In this way, cell size specific electroporation is conveniently carried out, contributing to a 2.5~3 fold increase on plasmid DNA transfection and an additional 10–55% transgene knockdown with siRNA probes, respectively. The delivery efficiency varies with the number and size of micropillars as well as their pattern density. As MAE works like many single cell electroporation are carried out in parallel, the electrophysiology response of individual cells is representative, which has potentials to facilitate the tedious, cell-specific protocol screening process in current bulk electroporation (i.e., electroporation to a large population of cells). Its success might promote the wide adoption of electroporation as a safe and effective non-viral gene delivery approach needed in many biological research and clinical treatments. PMID:27924861

  20. Size Specific Transfection to Mammalian Cells by Micropillar Array Electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Lu, Yang; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Shengnian

    2016-12-01

    Electroporation serves as a promising non-viral gene delivery approach, while its current configuration carries several drawbacks associated with high-voltage electrical pulses and heterogeneous treatment on individual cells. Here we developed a new micropillar array electroporation (MAE) platform to advance the electroporation-based delivery of DNA and RNA probes into mammalian cells. By introducing well-patterned micropillar array texture on the electrode surface, the number of pillars each cell faces varies with its plasma membrane surface area, despite their large population and random locations. In this way, cell size specific electroporation is conveniently carried out, contributing to a 2.5~3 fold increase on plasmid DNA transfection and an additional 10–55% transgene knockdown with siRNA probes, respectively. The delivery efficiency varies with the number and size of micropillars as well as their pattern density. As MAE works like many single cell electroporation are carried out in parallel, the electrophysiology response of individual cells is representative, which has potentials to facilitate the tedious, cell-specific protocol screening process in current bulk electroporation (i.e., electroporation to a large population of cells). Its success might promote the wide adoption of electroporation as a safe and effective non-viral gene delivery approach needed in many biological research and clinical treatments.

  1. Specific binding of angiogenin to calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Badet, J; Soncin, F; Guitton, J D; Lamare, O; Cartwright, T; Barritault, D

    1989-11-01

    Specific binding of angiogenin (ANG) to calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells was demonstrated. Cellular binding at 4 degrees C of 125I-labeled human recombinant ANG was time and concentration dependent, reversible, and saturable in the presence of increasing amounts of the unlabeled molecules. The interaction was shown to be specific since a large excess of unlabeled ANG reduced labeled ANG binding by 80%, whereas similar doses of RNase A, a structurally related protein, had no effect. Scatchard analyses of binding data revealed two apparent components. High-affinity sites with an apparent dissociation constant of 5 x 10(-9) M were shown to represent cell-specific interactions. The second component, comprising low-affinity/high-capacity sites with an apparent dissociation constant of 0.2 x 10(-6) M, was essentially associated with pericellular components. High-affinity ANG binding sites varied with cell density and were found on other endothelial cells from bovine aorta, cornea, and adrenal cortex capillary but not on Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Divalent copper, a modulator of angiogenesis, was found to induce a severalfold increase in specific cell-bound radioactivity. Placental ribonuclease inhibitor, a tight-binding inhibitor of both ribonucleolytic and angiogenic activities of ANG, abolished 125I-labeled human recombinant ANG binding only in the absence of copper.

  2. Host cell cytotoxicity, cellular repopulation dynamics, and phase-specific cell survival in X-irradiated rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S. ); Kavanau, K.S.; Afzal, S.M.J.; Curtis, S.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Postirradiation tumor volume response, cellular repopulation dynamics, cell-cycle perturbations, and phase-specific cell survival were characterized in rat rhabdomyosarcoma R-1 tumors (the R2C5 subline) following an in situ 10-Gy dose of 225-kVp X rays. This X-ray dose produced a 7.5-day delay in tumor growth to twice the volume measured at the time of irradiation, and reduced the initial surviving fraction of R2C5 cells to 0.17 as measured by the excision assay procedure. The surviving fraction of R2C5 cells returned to unity by the 16th day after tumor irradiation. On the basis of flow cytometry measurements of DNA content in tumor cells stained with a noncytotoxic concentration of Hoechst 33342, a transient G{sub 2} block was observed 1 day after irradiation. Flow cytometry measurements also demonstrated that the tetraploid R2C5 cells constituted only 30% of the total tumor cell population, with the remainder being diploid host cells comprised of macrophages, monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Large numbers of host cells infiltrated the irradiated tumors, leading to an increase in the percentage of diploid cells by Day 2 and reaching a level of more than 80% of the total tumor cell population by 4 to 8 days after irradiation. The influx of host cells into irradiated tumors was correlated temporally with a significant 12-fold decrease in the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells that occurred between Days 2 and 4 postirradiation. When the diploid host cell population was removed by cell sorting procedures, the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells at Day 4 substantially greater than that in the presence of the host cells. Experiments involving the mixing of 4/1 and 12/1 ratios of diploid host cells and tetraploid tumor cells isolated from irradiated and unirradiated tumors demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of the host cells was specific for the irradiated tumor cells.

  3. Microvesicle removal of anticancer drugs contributes to drug resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kohan, Hamed Gilzad; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G.; Sudha, Thangirala; Sell, Stewart; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Boroujerdi, Mehdi; Davis, Paul J.; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    High mortality in pancreatic cancer patients is partly due to resistance to chemotherapy. We describe that human pancreatic cancer cells acquire drug resistance by a novel mechanism in which they expel and remove chemotherapeutic drugs from the microenvironment via microvesicles (MVs). Using human pancreatic cancer cells that exhibit varied sensitivity to gemcitabine (GEM), we show that GEM exposure triggers the cancer cells to release MVs in an amount that correlates with that cell line's sensitivity to GEM. The importance of MV-release in gaining drug resistance in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cells was confirmed when the inhibition of MV-release sensitized the cells to GEM treatment, both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, MVs remove drugs that are internalized into the cells and that are in the microenvironment. The differences between the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines tested here are explained based on the variable content of influx/efflux proteins present on MVs, which directly dictates the ability of MVs either to trap GEM or to allow GEM to flow back to the microenvironment. PMID:27391262

  4. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (<6%) was observed in all treatments of the HER2- cell line (BALB/3T3) and in treatments the HER2+ cell line (3T3/HER2) with light or trastuzumab only. There was significant light-induced cell death in HER2 expressing cells using Tra-TAM (3% dead without light, 20% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2) and Tra-Rho6G (5% dead without light, 22% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2). No efficacy was observed in treatment with Tra-RhoB, which was also non-specifically taken up by BALB/3T3 cells and which had weaker PS-antibody interactions (as demonstrated by visualization of protein and fluorescence on SDS-PAGE).

  5. Specific uptake of serotonin by murine lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.C.; Walker, R.F.; Brooks, W.H.; Roszman, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the authors confirmed and extended earlier observations that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) can influence immune function. Both 5HT and its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan inhibit the primary, in vivo antibody response to sheep red blood cells, in mice. Here, the authors report specific in vitro association of this amine with mouse splenocytes. Spleen cells from 6-8 week old CBA/J mice incorporated /sup 3/H-5HT(10/sup -8/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/M) in a saturable manner, at 37/sup 0/C. Specificity of uptake was indicated by competition with excess (10/sup -5/M) unlabelled 5HT and with 10/sup -5/M fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of active 5HT reuptake in rat brain. The 5HT receptor antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, also blocked 5HT uptake. Cell lysis and displacement studies revealed largely intracellular accumulation of /sup 3/H-5HT with little membrane association, in splenocytes. Hofstee analysis of uptake kinetics yielded an apparent Km of 0.82 +/- 0.22 x 10/sup -7/M and Vmax of 501 +/- 108 pM/3 x 10/sup 6/ cells/10 min. Spleen cells fractionated on Sephadex G10 showed virtually no specific 5HT uptake while peritoneal exudate cells from thioglycollate treated mice displayed 5HT uptake kinetics similar to those of splenocytes. The site of specific /sup 3/H-5HT incorporation within a population of spleen cells and the functional significance of this phenomenon to immunomodulation by 5HT remain to be elucidated.

  6. Dual Specificity Phosphatase 5 Is Essential for T Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Schauder, David M.; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Bordas, Michelle; Cui, Weiguo; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulates many key cellular processes such as differentiation, apoptosis, and survival. The final proteins in this pathway, ERK1/2, are regulated by dual specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5). DUSP5 is a nuclear, inducible phosphatase with high affinity and fidelity for ERK1/2. By regulating the final step in the MAPK signaling cascade, DUSP5 exerts strong regulatory control over a central cellular pathway. Like other DUSPs, DUSP5 plays an important role in immune function. In this study, we have utilized new knockout mouse reagents to explore its function further. We demonstrate that global loss of DUSP5 does not result in any gross phenotypic changes. However, loss of DUSP5 affects memory/effector CD8+ T cell populations in response to acute viral infection. Specifically, Dusp5-/- mice have decreased proportions of short-lived effector cells (SLECs) and increased proportions of memory precursor effector cells (MPECs) in response to infection. Further, we show that this phenotype is T cell intrinsic; a bone marrow chimera model restricting loss of DUSP5 to the CD8+ T cell compartment displays a similar phenotype. Dusp5-/- T cells also display increased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and altered metabolic profiles, suggesting that DUSP5 is a pro-survival protein in T cells. PMID:27936095

  7. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  8. SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2003-11-21

    Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

  9. Regulation of herpes simplex virus-specific cell-mediated immunity by a specific suppressor factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horohov, D W; Wyckoff, J H; Moore, R N; Rouse, B T

    1986-01-01

    Our study was designed to investigate the nature of an antigen-specific suppressor factor generated by antigen-stimulated herpes simplex virus (HSV)-immune splenocytes. Factor SF-200, a 90,000- to 100,000-dalton fraction obtained after Sephacryl gel filtration, suppressed the generation of HSV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and lymphoproliferative responses. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis of SF-200 indicated that it contained an I-J+, anti-idiotypic protein. It was possible to adsorb the suppressor activity of SF-200 to an anti-I-J immunoaffinity column. The suppressor activity could be eluted from the immunoaffinity column with a low-pH buffer. The acid-eluted material was determined to be both I-J+ and reactive with anti-HSV antiserum by Western blot analysis. Both SF-200 and the I-J+ suppressor activity suppressed only HSV-specific cell-mediated immunity responses. However, it was possible to generate nonspecific suppressor activity by incubating the I-J+ suppressor factor with Lyt 1+ splenocytes from HSV-immune mice. The implication of these results with respect to the model for a suppressor cell circuit regulating HSV-specific cell-mediated immunity responses is discussed. Images PMID:3009850

  10. Routine detection of Epstein-Barr virus specific T-cells in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to detect cytomegalovirus-specific T-cells (CD4(+)) in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry has been recently described by Picker et al. In this method, cells are incubated with viral antigen and responding (cytokine producing) T-cells are then identified by flow cytometry. To date, this technique has not been reliably used to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T-cells primarily due to the superantigen/mitogenic properties of the virus which non-specifically activate T-cells. By modifying culture conditions under which the antigens are presented, we have overcome this limitation and developed an assay to detect and quantitate EBV-specific T-cells. The detection of cytokine producing T-cells by flow cytometry requires an extremely strong signal (such as culture in the presence of PMA and ionomycin). Our data indicate that in modified culture conditions (early removal of viral antigen) the non-specific activation of T-cells by EBV is reduced, but antigen presentation will continue uninhibited. Using this method, EBV-specific T-cells may be legitimately detected using flow cytometry. No reduction in the numbers of antigen-specific T-cells was observed by the early removal of target antigen when verified using cytomegalovirus antigen (a virus with no non-specific T-cell activation properties). In EBV-seropositive individuals, the phenotype of the EBV-specific cytokine producing T-cells was evaluated using four-color flow cytometry and found to be CD45(+), CD3(+), CD4(+), CD45RA(-), CD69(+), CD25(-). This phenotype indicates the stimulation of circulating previously unactivated memory T-cells. No cytokine production was observed in CD4(+) T-cells from EBV-seronegative individuals, confirming the specificity of this assay. In addition, the use of four color cytometry (CD45, CD3, CD69, IFNgamma/IL-2) allows the total quantitative assessment of EBV-specific T-cells while monitoring the interference of EBV non-specific mitogenic activity. This method may

  11. Simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal coupled with electricity generation in Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Jiqiang; Xie, Zuofu; Li, Wei; Sun, Peide

    2013-02-01

    Two-chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (MFC) using graphite rods as electrodes were operated for simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal coupled with electricity generation. The MFC showed good ability to remove substrates. When the influent sulfide and nitrate concentrations were 780 mg/L and 135.49 mg/L, respectively, the removal percentages of sulfide and nitrate were higher than 90% and the main end products were nitrogen and sulfate. The MFC also showed good ability to generate electricity, and the voltage went up with the rise of influent substrate concentrations. When the external resistance was 1000 Ω, its highest steady voltage was 71 mV. Based on the linear relationship between the electrons released by substrates and accepted by electrode, it was concluded that the electricity generation was coupled with the substrate conversion in the MFC.

  12. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen and phosphorus removal and electricity production in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Luo, Jingjing; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Shaoqi; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo

    2014-07-01

    Performance of a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was evaluated with the influence of cathodic dissolved oxygen (DO). The maximum voltage, coulombic efficiency and maximum power density outputs of MFC decreased from 521 to 303 mV, 52.48% to 23.09% and 530 to 178 mW/m(2) with cathodic DO declining. Furthermore, a great deal of total phosphorus (TP) was removed owing to chemical precipitation (about 80%) and microbial absorption (around 4-17%). COD was first removed in anode chamber (>70%) then in cathode chamber (<5%). Most of nitrogen was removed when the cathodic DO was at low levels. Chemical precipitates formed in cathode chamber were verified as phosphate, carbonate and hydroxyl compound with the aid of scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  13. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  14. Specific organization of Golgi apparatus in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Vildanova, M S; Wang, W; Smirnova, E A

    2014-09-01

    Microtubules, actin filaments, and Golgi apparatus are connected both directly and indirectly, but it is manifested differently depending on the cell organization and specialization, and these connections are considered in many original studies and reviews. In this review we would like to discuss what underlies differences in the structural organization of the Golgi apparatus in animal and plant cells: specific features of the microtubule cytoskeleton organization, the use of different cytoskeleton components for Golgi apparatus movement and maintenance of its integrity, or specific features of synthetic and secretory processes. We suppose that a dispersed state of the Golgi apparatus in higher plant cells cannot be explained only by specific features of the microtubule system organization and by the absence of centrosome as an active center of their organization because the Golgi apparatus is organized similarly in the cells of other organisms that possess the centrosome and centrosomal microtubules. One of the key factors determining the Golgi apparatus state in plant cells is the functional uniformity or functional specialization of stacks. The functional specialization does not suggest the joining of the stacks to form a ribbon; therefore, the disperse state of the Golgi apparatus needs to be supported, but it also can exist "by default". We believe that the dispersed state of the Golgi apparatus in plants is supported, on one hand, by dynamic connections of the Golgi apparatus stacks with the actin filament system and, on the other hand, with the endoplasmic reticulum exit sites distributed throughout the endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Specification of Region-Specific Neurons Including Forebrain Glutamatergic Neurons from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Zheng; Park, Jung Woo; Zhan, Shuning; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Lichtler, Alexander; Liu, Hui-Xia; Chen, Fang-Ping; Yue, Lixia; Li, Xue-Jun; Xu, Ren-He

    2010-01-01

    Background Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE) cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders. PMID:20686615

  16. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  17. Cell state-specific metabolic dependency in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Israelsen, William J.; Lee, Dongjun; Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Jeanson, Nathaniel T.; Clish, Clary B; Cantley, Lewis C.; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Scadden, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The balance between oxidative and non-oxidative glucose metabolism is essential for a number of pathophysiological processes. By deleting enzymes that affect aerobic glycolysis with different potencies, we examine how modulating glucose metabolism specifically affects hematopoietic and leukemic cell populations. We find that deficiency in the M2 pyruvate kinase isoform (PKM2) reduces levels of metabolic intermediates important for biosynthesis and impairs progenitor function without perturbing hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), whereas lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDHA) deletion significantly inhibits the function of both HSC and progenitors during hematopoiesis. In contrast, leukemia initiation by transforming alleles putatively affecting either HSC or progenitors is inhibited in the absence of either PKM2 or LDHA, indicating that the cell state-specific responses to metabolic manipulation in hematopoiesis do not apply to the setting of leukemia. This finding suggests that fine-tuning the level of glycolysis may be therapeutically explored for treating leukemia while preserving HSC function. PMID:25215489

  18. Bioelectricity generation and microcystins removal in a blue-green algae powered microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Chen, Qing; Zhou, Shungui; Zhuang, Li; Hu, Pei

    2011-03-15

    Bioelectricity production from blue-green algae was examined in a single chamber tubular microbial fuel cell (MFC). The blue-green algae powered MFC produced a maximum power density of 11 4 mW/m(2) at a current density of 0.55 mA/m(2). Coupled with the bioenergy generation, high removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen were also achieved in MFCs. Over 78.9% of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), 80.0% of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), 91.0% of total nitrogen (total-N) and 96.8% ammonium-nitrogen (NH(3)-N) were removed under closed circuit conditions in 12 days, which were much more effective than those under open circuit and anaerobic reactor conditions. Most importantly, the MFC showed great ability to remove microcystins released from blue-green algae. Over 90.7% of MC-RR and 91.1% of MC-LR were removed under closed circuit conditions (500Ω). This study showed that the MFC could provide a potential means for electricity production from blue-green algae coupling algae toxins removal.

  19. Multi-chamber microbial desalination cell for improved organic matter and dissolved solids removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Harapriya; Ghangrekar, M M

    2014-01-01

    A five-chamber microbial desalination cell (MDC) with anode, cathode, one central desalination chamber and two concentrate chambers separated by ion exchange membranes was operated in batch mode for more than 60 days. The performance of the MDC was evaluated for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, total dissolved solids (TDS) removal and energy production. An average COD removal of 81 ± 2.1% was obtained using acetate-fed wastewater as substrate in the anodic chamber inoculated with mixed anaerobic sludge. TDS removals of 58, 70 and 78% were observed with salt concentration of 8, 20 and 30 g/L, respectively, in the middle desalination chamber. The MDC produced a maximum power output of 16.87 mW/m(2) during polarization. The highest Coulombic efficiency of 12 ± 2.4% was observed in this system using mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculum. The system effectively demonstrated capability for simultaneous organic matter removal and desalination along with power generation.

  20. Biogenic palladium enhances diatrizoate removal from hospital wastewater in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Soetaert, Maarten; Desloover, Joachim; Wille, Klaas; Verbeken, Kim; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2011-07-01

    To decrease the load of pharmaceuticals to the environment, decentralized wastewater treatment has been proposed for important point-sources such as hospitals. In this study, a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was used for the dehalogenation of the iodinated X-ray contrast medium diatrizoate. The presence of biogenic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) in the cathode significantly enhanced diatrizoate removal by direct electrochemical reduction and by reductive catalysis using the H(2) gas produced at the cathode of the MEC. Complete deiodination of 3.3 μM (2 mg L(-1)) diatrizoate from a synthetic medium was achieved after 24 h of recirculation at an applied voltage of -0.4 V. An equimolar amount of the deiodinated metabolite 3,5-diacetamidobenzoate (DAB) was detected. Higher cell voltages increased the dehalogenation rates, resulting in a complete removal after 2 h at -0.8 V. At this cell voltage, the MEC was also able to remove 85% of diatrizoate from hospital effluent containing 0.5 μM (292 μg L(-1)), after 24 h of recirculation. Complete removal was obtained when the effluent was continuously fed at a volumetric loading rate of 204 mg diatrizoate m(-3) total cathodic compartment (TCC) day(-1) to the MEC with a hydraulic retention time of 8 h. At -0.8 V, the MEC system could also eliminate 54% of diatrizoate from spiked urine during a 24 h recirculation experiment. The final product DAB was demonstrated to be removable by nitrifying biomass, which suggests that the combination of a MEC and bio-Pd in its cathode offers potential to dehalogenate pharmaceuticals, and to significantly lower the environmental burden of hospital waste streams.

  1. Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air cathode.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kyle S; Drew, David M; He, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) hold great promise for drinking water production because of potential energy savings during the desalination process. In this study, we developed a continuously operated MDC--upflow microbial desalination cell (UMDC) for the purpose of salt removal. During the 4-month operation, the UMDC constantly removed salts and generated bio-electricity. At a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days (salt solution) and current production of ∼62 mA, the UMDC was able to remove more than 99% of NaCl from the salt solution that had an initial salt concentration of 30 g total dissolved solids (TDS)/L. In addition, the TDS removal rate was 7.50 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (salt solution volume) or 5.25 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (wastewater volume), and the desalinated water met the drinking water standard, in terms of TDS concentration. A high charge transfer efficiency of 98.6% or 81% was achieved at HRT 1 or 4d. The UMDC produced a maximum power density of 30.8 W/m(3). The phenomena of bipolar electrodialysis and proton transport in the UMDC were discussed. These results demonstrated the potential of the UMDC as either a sole desalination process or a pre-desalination reactor for downstream desalination processes.

  2. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-08-12

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  3. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  4. Cell-specific proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuet, Kai P.; Doma, Meenakshi K.; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Tirrell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of rare cells in heterogeneous environments presents difficult challenges. Systematic methods are needed to enrich, identify, and quantify proteins expressed in specific cells in complex biological systems including multicellular plants and animals. Here, we have engineered a Caenorhabditis elegans phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase capable of tagging proteins with the reactive noncanonical amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine. We achieved spatiotemporal selectivity in the labeling of C. elegans proteins by controlling expression of the mutant synthetase using cell-selective (body wall muscles, intestinal epithelial cells, neurons, and pharyngeal muscle) or state-selective (heat-shock) promoters in several transgenic lines. Tagged proteins are distinguished from the rest of the protein pool through bioorthogonal conjugation of the azide side chain to probes that permit visualization and isolation of labeled proteins. By coupling our methodology with stable-isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we successfully profiled proteins expressed in pharyngeal muscle cells, and in the process, identified proteins not previously known to be expressed in these cells. Our results show that tagging proteins with spatiotemporal selectivity can be achieved in C. elegans and illustrate a convenient and effective approach for unbiased discovery of proteins expressed in targeted subsets of cells. PMID:25691744

  5. Removal of phenol in phenolic resin wastewater by a novel biomaterial: the Phanerochaete chrysosporium pellet containing chlamydospore-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hailei, Wang; Ping, Li; Yu, Qin; Hui, Yang

    2016-06-01

    A novel biomaterial, the Phanerochaete chrysosporium pellet (CP) composed of chlamydospore-like cells (CLCs), was prepared and its potential in treating phenolic resin wastewater was evaluated. CP possesses higher phenol removal ability in contrast with mycelial pellets of P. chrysosporium, and CLC can be seen as the naturally immobilized enzymes. At shake-flask level, the ideal pH value, temperature, and inoculation quantity of CP for treatment of 1430 mg/l phenol wastewater were pH 4-6, 30 °C, and 5.0 g/l, respectively, and the maximum specific removal rate, 41.1 mg phenol/g CP/h, was obtained in fixed bed reactor (FBR) when the flow rate of wastewater was 3.4 l/h. During the treatment, FBR harbored amounts of bacteria (135 genera) and eukaryotes, as analyzed by metagenomic sequencing. Bacterial pollution not only decreased reactor performance but also had a negative impact on reusability of CP. Hot water treatment (80-85 °C) is effective to inhibit bacterial pollution, and heat resistance of CLC makes the repeated regrowing of CP be feasible. This work presents an innovative and low-cost biomaterial for phenol removal and will be helpful for the practical application of P. chrysosporium in wastewater treatment.

  6. T cell responses induced by allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, E

    2010-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is recognized as a highly effective practice in the treatment of patients with severe allergic rhinitis and/or asthma and is recommended by World Health Organization as an integrated part of allergy management strategy. Several studies have shown that allergen-specific immunotherapy, based on the administration of increasing doses of allergen, achieves a hyposensitization and reduces both early and late responses occurring during the natural exposure to the allergen itself. This is the unique antigen-specific immunomodulatory treatment in current use for human diseases. Successful immunotherapy is associated with reductions in symptoms and medication scores and improved quality of life. After interruption it usually confers long-term remission of symptoms and prevents the onset of new sensitizations in children up to a number of years. Subcutaneous immunotherapy usually suppresses the allergen-induced late response in target organs, likely due to the reduction of the infiltration of T cells, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils. In addition to the reduction of cells of allergic inflammation, immunotherapy also decreases inflammatory mediators at the site of allergen exposure. This review provides an update on the immunological T cell responses induced by conventional subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy, and gives a unifying view to reconciling the old dualism between immunoredirecting and immunoregulating mechanisms. PMID:20408857

  7. Characterization of rat T-cell clones with bacterial specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Eastcott, J W; Yamashita, K; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated 10 rat T-cell clones from the spleen or lymph nodes of seven different donors. These rats were immunized with 2-5 x 10(8) killed Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteria, injected either subcutaneously (s.c.) in complete Freund's adjuvant or intraperitoneally (i.p.) in saline. Clones studied to date have demonstrated a T-helper (Th) phenotype W3/13+, W3/25+, OX8- and OX22-. Clones were not stimulated in vitro by purified Aa-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or heterologous Gram-negative bacteria, but proliferated when stimulated by bacteria representative of each of the three serological groups of Actinobacillus, indicating specificity for an Actinobacillus-common antigen other than LPS. One clone (A4) proliferated vigorously when stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) in vitro, produced interleukin-2 (IL-2) and was provisionally classified as a Th1 type. This appears to be one of the few Th1-type rat clones reported. All other clones tested did not produce IL-2, exhibited B-cell help to some extent, did not induce delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) when injected into the footpads of naive rats along with the specific antigen, and were classified as Th2 type. Adoptive transfer of 10(6) cells of one Th2-type Aa-specific clone into syngeneic recipients resulted in a specific splenocyte in vitro response to Aa 12-14 weeks after cell transfer, indicating survival of cloned cells in recipient animals. The use of such clones in studies of experimental periodontal disease is discussed. PMID:1698711

  8. Stable Upconversion Nanohybrid Particles for Specific Prostate Cancer Cell Immunodetection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; Shi, Bingyang; Dass, Arun V. Everest; Lu, Yiqing; Sayyadi, Nima; Kautto, Liisa; Willows, Robert D.; Chung, Roger; Piper, James; Nevalainen, Helena; Walsh, Bradley; Jin, Dayong; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the male killing diseases and early detection of prostate cancer is the key for better treatment and lower cost. However, the number of prostate cancer cells is low at the early stage, so it is very challenging to detect. In this study, we successfully designed and developed upconversion immune-nanohybrids (UINBs) with sustainable stability in a physiological environment, stable optical properties and highly specific targeting capability for early-stage prostate cancer cell detection. The developed UINBs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and luminescence spectroscopy. The targeting function of the biotinylated antibody nanohybrids were confirmed by immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis. The UINB system is able to specifically detect prostate cancer cells with stable and background-free luminescent signals for highly sensitive prostate cancer cell detection. This work demonstrates a versatile strategy to develop UCNPs based sustainably stable UINBs for sensitive diseased cell detection. PMID:27874051

  9. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg RP

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14912.001 PMID:27218453

  10. Red blood cells as innovative antigen carrier to induce specific immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cremel, Magali; Guérin, Nathalie; Horand, Françoise; Banz, Alice; Godfrin, Yann

    2013-02-25

    The route of administration, the dose of antigen as well as the type of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) targeted are important factors to induce immune tolerance. Despite encouraging results obtained in animal models, intravenous injection of soluble antigen is unsuccessful in human clinical trials on autoimmune disease due to inefficient antigen delivery. To improve antigen delivery, we used mouse red blood cells (RBCs) as antigen vehicles to specifically target APCs which are responsible for removal of senescent RBCs after phagocytosis. In this study, we demonstrated that antigen-delivery by RBCs induced a strong decrease in the humoral response compared with the ovalbumin (OVA) free form in mice. In addition, OVA-loaded RBC treated with [bis(sulphosuccinimidyl)] suberate (BS3), a chemical compound known to enhance RBC phagocytosis, induced an inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responses and an increase in the percentage of regulatory T cells. The state of tolerance induced is long lasting, antigen-specific and sufficiently robust to withstand immunization with antigen mixed with cholera toxin adjuvant. This RBC strategy, which does not abolish the immune system, constitutes an attractive approach for induction of tolerance compared to systemic immunosuppressant therapies already in use.

  11. Cation Type Specific Cell Remodeling Regulates Attachment Strength

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments indicate that integrin affinity is cation-type-dependent, but in spread cells integrins are engaged in complex focal adhesions (FAs), which can also regulate affinity. To better understand cation-type-dependent adhesion in fully spread cells, we investigated attachment strength by application of external shear. While cell attachment strength is indeed modulated by cations, the regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion is also exceedingly complex, cell specific, and niche dependent. In the presence of magnesium only, fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells remodel their cytoskeleton to align in the direction of applied shear in an α5-integrin/fibronectin-dependent manner, which allows them to withstand higher shear. In the presence of calcium or on collagen in modest shear, fibroblasts undergo piecewise detachment but fibrosarcoma cells exhibit increased attachment strength. These data augment the current understanding of force-mediated detachment by suggesting a dynamic interplay in situ between cell adhesion and integrins depending on local niche cation conditions. PMID:25014042

  12. [Establishment of hemophilia A patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells with urine cells].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqing; Hu, Xuyun; Pang, Jialun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin Peng, Siyuan; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induce endothelial differentiation. METHODS Tubular epithelial cells were isolated and cultured from the urine of HA patients. The iPSCs were generated by forced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) using retroviruses and characterized by cell morphology, pluripotent marker staining and in vivo differentiation through teratoma formation. Induced endothelial differentiation of the iPSCs was achieved with the OP9 cell co-culture method. RESULTS Patient-specific iPSCs were generated from urine cells of the HA patients, which could be identified by cell morphology, pluripotent stem cell surface marker staining and in vivo differentiation of three germ layers. The teratoma experiment has confirmed that such cells could differentiate into endothelial cells expressing the endothelial-specific markers CD144, CD31 and vWF. CONCLUSION HA patient-specific iPSCs could be generated from urine cells and can differentiate into endothelial cells. This has provided a new HA disease modeling approach and may serve as an applicable autologous cell source for gene correction and cell therapy studies for HA.

  13. A simple technique for red blood cell removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, G; Wernet, D; Northoff, H; Schneider, W

    1994-01-01

    A simple technique for red blood cell (RBC) removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation is reported requiring two centrifugation steps, special blood bags and a mechanical device to separate the buffy coat from RBCs within the bag. In 42 transplantations an average of 84% of nucleated cells was recovered with an average contamination of 7.5 ml packed RBCs. The preparations were well tolerated in all patients whose isoagglutinin titers had not been reduced. Bone marrow engraftment was not significantly different from control groups.

  14. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  15. Signalling pathways that control vertebrate haematopoietic stem cell specification

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Wilson K.; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are tissue-specific stem cells that replenish all mature blood lineages during the lifetime of an individual. Clinically, HSCs form the foundation of transplantation-based therapies for leukaemias and congenital blood disorders. Researchers have long been interested in understanding the normal signalling mechanisms that specify HSCs in the embryo, in part because recapitulating these requirements in vitro might provide a means to generate immune-compatible HSCs for transplantation. Recent embryological work has demonstrated the existence of previously unknown signalling requirements. Moreover, it is now clear that gene expression in the nearby somite is integrally involved in regulating the transition of the embryonic endothelium to a haemogenic fate. Here, we review current knowledge of the intraembryonic signals required for the specification of HSCs in vertebrates. PMID:23618830

  16. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-06-24

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies.

  17. Characterization of cell seeding and specific capture of B cells in microbubble well arrays

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Meghan C.; Kobie, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Development of micro-well array systems for use in high-throughput screening of rare cells requires a detailed understanding of the factors that impact the specific capture of cells in wells and the distribution statistics of the number of cells deposited into wells. In this study we investigate the development of microbubble (MB) well array technology for sorting antigen-specific B-cells. Using Poisson statistics we delineate the important role that the fractional area of MB well opening and the cell seeding density have on determining cell seeding distribution in wells. The unique architecture of the MB well hinders captured cells from escaping the well and provides a unique microenvironmental niche that enables media changes as needed for extended cell culture. Using cell lines and primary B and T cells isolated from human peripheral blood we demonstrate the use of affinity capture agents coated in the MB wells to enrich for the selective capture of B cells. Important differences were noted in the efficacy of bovine serum albumin to block the nonspecific adsorption of primary cells relative to cell lines as well as the efficacy of the capture coatings using mixed primary B and T cells samples. These results emphasize the importance of using primary cells in technology development and suggest the need to utilize B cell capture agents that are insensitive to cell activation. PMID:23358874

  18. Effect of Removal of Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) from In Vitro Culture on Gene Expression of Niche Factors in Bovine

    PubMed Central

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Niche cells, regulating Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) fate are believed to have a reciprocal communication with SSCs. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of SSC elimination on the gene expression of Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) and Kit Ligand (KITLG), which are the main growth factors regulating SSCs development and secreted by niche cells, primarily Sertoli cells. Methods: Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured for 12 days on extracellular matrix-coated plates. In the germ cell-removed group, the SSCs were removed from the in vitro culture using differential plating; however, in the control group, no intervention in the culture was performed. Colony formation of SSCs was evaluated using an inverted microscope. The gene expression of growth factors and spermatogonia markers were assessed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: SSCs colonies were developed in the control group but they were rarely observed in the germ cell-removed group; moreover, the expression of spermatogonia markers was detected in the control group while it was not observed in the germ cell-removed group, substantiating the success of SSCs removal. The expression of Gdnf and Fgf2 was greater in the germ cell-removed than control group (p<0.05), whereas the expression of Kitlg was lower in the germ cell-removed than control group (p< 0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, the results revealed that niche cells respond to SSCs removal by upregulation of GDNF and FGF2, and downregulation of KITLG in order to stimulate self-renewal and arrest differentiation. PMID:27563426

  19. Statistical Physics of T-Cell Development and Pathogen Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-04-01

    In addition to an innate immune system that battles pathogens in a nonspecific fashion, higher organisms, such as humans, possess an adaptive immune system to combat diverse (and evolving) microbial pathogens. Remarkably, the adaptive immune system mounts pathogen-specific responses, which can be recalled upon reinfection with the same pathogen. It is difficult to see how the adaptive immune system can be preprogrammed to respond specifically to a vast and unknown set of pathogens. Although major advances have been made in understanding pertinent molecular and cellular phenomena, the precise principles that govern many aspects of an immune response are largely unknown. We discuss complementary approaches from statistical mechanics and cell biology that can shed light on how key components of the adaptive immune system, T cells, develop to enable pathogen-specific responses against many diverse pathogens. The mechanistic understanding that emerges has implications for how host genetics may influence the development of T cells with differing responses to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  20. Selection of peptidoglycan-specific aptamers for bacterial cells identification.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Iêda Mendes; de Souza Lacerda, Camila Maria; de Faria, Lígia Santana; Corrêa, Cristiane Rodrigues; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    Peptidoglycan is a highly complex and essential macromolecule of bacterial outer cell wall; it is a heteropolymer made up of linear glycan strands cross-linked by peptides. Peptidoglycan has a particular composition which makes it a possible target for specific bacterial recognition. Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that bind to target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can be labeled with different radioisotopes and possess several properties that make them suitable for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study was to obtain aptamers for use as radiopharmaceutical in bacterial infection diagnosis. Two aptamers (Antibac1 and Antibac2) against peptidoglycan were selected through the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology. The dissociation constant (Kd) for Antibac1 was 0.415 + 0.047 μM and for Antibac2 was 1.261 + 0.280 μM. These aptamers labeled with (32)P showed high affinity for Staphylococcus aureus cells. The binding to S. aureus and Escherichia coli in vitro were significantly higher than for Candida albicans and human fibroblasts, demonstrating their specificity for bacterial cells. These results point Antibac1 and Antibac2 as promising tools for bacterial infections identification.

  1. Identifying states along the hematopoietic stem cell differentiation hierarchy with single cell specificity via Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ilin, Yelena; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A. C.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for expanding specific types of hematopoietic cells ex vivo for the treatment of blood cell pathologies is identifying the combinations of cellular and matrix cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to self-renew or differentiate into cell populations ex vivo. Microscale screening platforms enable minimizing the number of rare HSCs required to screen the effects of numerous cues on HSC fate decisions. These platforms create a strong demand for label-free methods that accurately identify the fate decisions of individual hematopoietic cells at specific locations on the platform. We demonstrate the capacity to identify discrete cells along the HSC differentiation hierarchy via multivariate analysis of Raman spectra. Notably, cell state identification is accurate for individual cells and independent of the biophysical properties of the functionalized polyacrylamide gels upon which these cells are cultured. We report partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models of single cell Raman spectra enable identifying four dissimilar hematopoietic cell populations across the HSC lineage specification. Successful discrimination was obtained for a population enriched for long-term repopulating HSCs (LT-HSCs) versus their more differentiated progeny, including closely-related short-term repopulating HSCs (ST-HSCs), and fully differentiated lymphoid (B cells) and myeloid (granulocytes) cells. The lineage-specific differentiation states of cells from these four sub-populations were accurately identified independent of the stiffness of the underlying biomaterial substrate, indicating subtle spectral variations that discriminated these populations were not masked by features from the culture substrate. This approach enables identifying the lineage-specific differentiation stages of hematopoietic cells on biomaterial substrates of differing composition, and may facilitate correlating hematopoietic cell fate decisions with the extrinsic cues that

  2. The use of air fuel cell cathodes to remove contaminants from spent chromium plating solutions.

    PubMed

    Huang, K L; Holsen, T M; Chou, T C; Yang, M C

    2004-01-01

    Results from experiments using an impregnation-reduction (I-R) Pt / Nafion membrane electrode assembly (MEA) in an air fuel cell cathode to remove contaminants (Cu(II), Ni(II), and Fe(III)) from spent chromium electroplating baths are presented in this study. A platinum-carbon (Pt-C) / Nafion MEA and a Pb planar cathode were also used for comparison. The average removal rates of Cu(II) and Ni(II) were almost the same (0.39 and 0.40 mM hr(-1) (or 0.117 and 0.12 mmol hr(-1)), respectively) but higher than that of Fe(III) (0.16 mM hr(-1), or 0.048 mmol hr(-1)) in accordance with the Nernst-Planck flux equation. The removal rates for the same cation were independent of the cathode used. The average removal rate of each impurity was approximately proportional to the product of its initial concentration and separator area/anolyte volume ratio using Pb cathodes. Under constant current conditions the system using the Pt-C / Nafion cathode needed the highest cell voltage, about 3 V more than needed for the system with the Pt / Nafion cathode. The cell voltage required using the Pt / Nafion cathode was similar to that using the conventional planar Pb cathode. Analyses of cathode deposits by SEM/EDS and XPS techniques indicated they were minimal on the Pb and Pt / Nafion cathode and more apparent on the Pt-C / Nafion cathode. The primary deposits on the Pb cathode were chromium oxides (e.g., Cr2O3) with minor amount of lead chromate (lead dichromate or lead trichromate) and other chromium solids (Cr black). As expected, the dominant deposit on the lead anode surface was PbO2.

  3. Effect of damage removal etch (DRE) on plasma textured, multi-crystalline solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S.; Pathak, M.; Chahar, N.; Sharan, A.; Saxena, A. K.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, a self-masked, dry, plasma texturing process for multi crystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers has been developed that results in a higher cell performance than that with un-textured wafers. Plasma textured samples prepared have low levels (∼4%) of reflectance. Plasma damage of textured wafers has been eliminated by a damage removal etch (DRE). The improvement in efficiency of mc-Si solar cells up to 15.1% has been attributed to complete suppression of reflectivity (4-5%) in a broad spectral range (350-800 nm) leading to black silicon surface. Also, DRE on plasma textured wafers has been found to result in reduced surface damage compared to cells without DRE leading to higher cell efficiencies.

  4. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  5. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  6. Cell Theory, Specificity, and Reproduction, 1837–1870

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental, but also the reproductive unit of life. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention by historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, i.e. that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question now was whether cells could be considered as independent agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus a stage in the development of the whole organism only. The question was an important one for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as independent agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of differential reproduction as a lawful process. PMID:20934643

  7. Cell theory, specificity, and reproduction, 1837-1870.

    PubMed

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2010-09-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental unit of life, but also the reproductive one. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention from historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, that is, that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question then became one of whether cells could be considered as autonomous agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus only a stage in the development of the whole organism. This question became an important issue for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as autonomous agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of inheritance as a lawful process.

  8. Effect of operating modes on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Qaisar, Mahmood; Xing, Yajuan

    2014-05-01

    The effect of operating modes on the simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal were studied in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The batch and continuous operating modes were compared and evaluated in terms of substrate removal and electricity generation. Upon gradual increase in the influent sulfide concentration from 60 to 1,020 S mg L(-1), and the hydraulic retention time decrease from 17.2 to 6 h, the MFC accomplished a good substrate removal efficiency whereby nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The removal efficiency of the MFC in the continuous mode was much higher than that in the batch mode, and its current densities in the continuous mode were more stable and higher than in the batch mode, which could be explained by the linear relationship between electrons released by the substrates and accepted on the electrodes. The electricity output in the continuous mode of the MFC was higher than that in the batch mode. MFC's operation in the continuous mode was a better strategy for the simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate.

  9. Heavy metal removal from multicomponent system by sulfate reducing bacteria: Mechanism and cell surface characterization.

    PubMed

    Kiran, M Gopi; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Das, Gopal

    2017-02-15

    This study evaluated the combined effect of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Pb(II) and Zn(II) on each other removal by anaerobic biomass under sulfate reducing condition. Statistically valid Plackett-Burman design of experiments was employed to carry out this mixture study. The results obtained showed a maximum removal of Cu(II) (98.9%), followed by Ni(II) (97%), Cd(II) (94.8%), Zn(II) (94.6%), Pb(II) (94.4%) and Fe(III) (93.9%). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the sulfate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction revealed that the effect due to copper was highly significant (P value<0.05) on sulfate and COD removal. To establish the role of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in the metal removal process, surface morphology and composition of the metal loaded biomass were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) integrated with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results obtained revealed that the metal precipitates are associated with the outer and inner cell surface of the SRB as a result of the sulfide generated by SRB.

  10. Degradation of algal organic matter using microbial fuel cells and its association with trihalomethane precursor removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Dongmei; Lu, Lu; Zhao, Zhiwei; Xu, Yongpeng; Cui, Fuyi

    2012-07-01

    In order to provide an alternative for removal of algal organic matter (AOM) produced during algal blooms in aquatic environment, microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to study AOM degradation and its association with THM precursor removal. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals in MFCs were 81 ± 6% and 73 ± 3% for AOM from Microcystis aeruginosa (AOM(M)) and Chlorella vulgaris (AOM(C)), respectively. THM precursor was also effectively degraded (AOM(M) 85 ± 2%, AOM(C) 72 ± 4%). The major AOM components (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) were obviously removed in MFCs. The contribution of each component to the THM formation potential (THMFP) was obtained based on calculation. The THMFP produced from soluble microbial products was very low. If the energy input during operation process was not considered, MFCs treatment could recover electrical energy of 0.29 ± 0.02 kWh/kg COD (AOM(M)) and 0.35 ± 0.06 kWh/kg COD (AOM(C)).

  11. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with /sup 125/I, or metabolically with (/sup 35/S) methionine or (/sup 3/H) mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen.

  12. Tissue-specific cell wall hydration in sugarcane stalks.

    PubMed

    Maziero, Priscila; Jong, Jennifer; Mendes, Fernanda M; Gonçalves, Adilson R; Eder, Michaela; Driemeier, Carlos

    2013-06-19

    Plant cell walls contain water, especially under biological and wet processing conditions. The present work characterizes this water in tissues of sugarcane stalks. Environmental scanning electron microscopy shows tissue deformation upon drying. Dynamic vapor sorption determines the equilibrium and kinetics of moisture uptake. Thermoporometry by differential scanning calorimetry quantifies water in nanoscale pores. Results show that cell walls from top internodes of stalks are more deformable, slightly more sorptive to moisture, and substantially more porous. These differences of top internode are attributed to less lignified walls, which is confirmed by lower infrared spectral signal from aromatics. Furthermore, cell wall nanoscale porosity, an architectural and not directly compositional characteristic, is shown to be tissue-specific. Nanoscale porosities are ranked as follows: pith parenchyma > pith vascular bundles > rind. This ranking coincides with wall reactivity and digestibility in grasses, suggesting that nanoscale porosity is a major determinant of wall recalcitrance.

  13. Bathophenanthrolene disulfonic acid and sodium dithionite effectively remove surface-bound iron from Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Glahn, R P; Gangloff, M B; Van Campen, D R; Miller, D D; Wien, E M; Norvell, W A

    1995-07-01

    Iron uptake by Caco-2 cell monolayers is commonly assessed by incubating the cells under radiolabeled iron solutions, removing the radiolabeled solution, rinsing to stop uptake and measuring the radioactivity retained by the cells. It is therefore essential to differentiate between iron that is nonspecifically bound to the cell surface from that which has been taken up by the cell. We report here on a method for removal of surface-bound iron from Caco-2 cell monolayers. We used a 140 mmol/L NaCl, 10 mmol/L PIPES, pH 6.7 solution containing 5.0 mmol/L sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) and 5.0 mmol/L bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid to reduce, remove and chelate iron bound to the cell surface. We validated our method by demonstrating the removal of 97% of an insoluble iron complex from the apical surface of Caco-2 cell monolayers. Our data indicate that the removal solution does not damage the apical membrane and thereby does not have access to intracellular iron; thus only surface bound iron is removed. The remaining cell-associated iron represents that which has been transported into the cell. We present data on the uptake and nonspecific binding of iron from iron complexes of both ferrous and ferric forms, and show that iron removal treatment resulted in uptake measurements that agree more closely with accepted principles of iron uptake by intestinal epithelium. The iron removal method used in this study should provide investigators with a valuable tool for accurately determining iron uptake by epithelial cells in culture.

  14. Supporting cells remove and replace sensory receptor hair cells in a balance organ of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Bucks, Stephanie A; Cox, Brandon C; Vlosich, Brittany A; Manning, James P; Nguyen, Tot B; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular hair cells in the inner ear encode head movements and mediate the sense of balance. These cells undergo cell death and replacement (turnover) throughout life in non-mammalian vertebrates. However, there is no definitive evidence that this process occurs in mammals. We used fate-mapping and other methods to demonstrate that utricular type II vestibular hair cells undergo turnover in adult mice under normal conditions. We found that supporting cells phagocytose both type I and II hair cells. Plp1-CreERT2-expressing supporting cells replace type II hair cells. Type I hair cells are not restored by Plp1-CreERT2-expressing supporting cells or by Atoh1-CreERTM-expressing type II hair cells. Destruction of hair cells causes supporting cells to generate 6 times as many type II hair cells compared to normal conditions. These findings expand our understanding of sensorineural plasticity in adult vestibular organs and further elucidate the roles that supporting cells serve during homeostasis and after injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18128.001 PMID:28263708

  15. Passive Dew Droplet Removal from Hydrogen Sensors for Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masataka; Ishii, Makoto; Yoshinaga, Haruo; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    This paper describes three structures to passively remove condensed water droplets from a gas heat conduction type hydrogen sensor for fuel cell applications. The three structures are A: water-repellent coating surrounded by water-absorbing porous ceramic coating, B: suspended porous membrane over a water-repellent sensor surface and C: wettability gradient for water droplet elimination. A real hydrogen sensor was used as a platform for the water-droplet-removal structures. Using helium instead of hydrogen, A and B type sensors and a reference sensor without water-droplet-removal structures were tested in a wet and hot atmosphere simulating a fuel cell environment. B type sensor showed normal output even after exposure to a dew-condensing atmosphere, while the reference and A type sensors showed abnormal output, suggesting dew condensation on the sensor surfaces. For C type sensor, a photochromic compound film on a super-water-repellent undercoat, which changes its wettability by ultraviolet exposure, was used. It was confirmed that the wettability could be controlled by ultraviolet exposure from 157.9° to 72.8° in water contact angle.

  16. SWI/SNF-directed stem cell lineage specification: dynamic composition regulates specific stages of skeletal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Toto, Paula Coutinho; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Albini, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are key regulators of the epigenetic modifications that determine whether stem cells maintain pluripotency or commit toward specific lineages through development and during postnatal life. Dynamic combinatorial assembly of multiple variants of SWI/SNF subunits is emerging as the major determinant of the functional versatility of SWI/SNF. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of the alternative SWI/SNF complexes that direct stem cell fate toward skeletal muscle lineage and control distinct stages of skeletal myogenesis. In particular, we will refer to recent evidence pointing to the essential role of two SWI/SNF components not expressed in embryonic stem cells—the catalytic subunit BRM and the structural component BAF60C—whose induction in muscle progenitors coincides with the expansion of their transcriptional repertoire. PMID:27207468

  17. Removing residual DNA from Vero-cell culture-derived human rabies vaccine by using nuclease.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-Ming; Bai, Fu-Liang; Xu, Wen-Juan; Yang, Yong-Bi; An, Ying; Li, Tian-He; Yu, Yin-Hang; Li, De-Shan; Wang, Wen-Fei

    2014-09-01

    The clearance of host cell DNA is a critical indicator for Vero-cell culture-derived rabies vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the clearance of DNA in Vero-cell culture-derived rabies vaccine by purification process utilizing ultrafiltration, nuclease digestion, and gel filtration chromatography. The results showed that the bioprocess of using nuclease decreased residual DNA. Dot-blot hybridization analysis showed that the residual host cell DNA was <100 pg/ml in the final product. The residual nuclease in rabies vaccine was less than 0.1 ng/ml protein. The residual nuclease could not paly the biologically active role of digestion of DNA. Experiments of stability showed that the freeze-drying rabies virus vaccine was stable and titers were >5.0 IU/ml. Immunogenicity test and protection experiments indicated mice were greatly induced generation of neutralizing antibodies and invoked protective effects immunized with intraperitoneal injections of the rabies vaccine. These results demonstrated that the residual DNA was removed from virus particles and nuclease was removed by gel filtration chromatography. The date indicated that technology was an efficient method to produce rabies vaccine for human use by using nuclease.

  18. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  19. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  20. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons

    PubMed Central

    Gnerer, Joshua P.; Venken, Koen J. T.; Dierick, Herman A.

    2015-01-01

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family. PMID:25712101

  1. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons.

    PubMed

    Gnerer, Joshua P; Venken, Koen J T; Dierick, Herman A

    2015-04-30

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family.

  2. Selective removal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells from differentiation cultures through HSV1 thymidine kinase and ganciclovir treatment.

    PubMed

    Naujok, Ortwin; Kaldrack, Joanna; Taivankhuu, Terbish; Jörns, Anne; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2010-09-01

    Pluripotent cell lines such as embryonic stem cells are an attractive source for a potential cell replacement therapy. However, transplantation of differentiated cells harbors the risk of teratoma formation, presenting a serious health risk. To overcome this obstacle, a negative selection system was established that permits selective removal of undifferentiated cells during in vitro differentiation. Use of the HSV1 thymidine kinase and eGFP under the control of the Oct4 promoter allowed the destruction of undifferentiated ES cells by ganciclovir treatment; differentiated cells were unharmed. Clonal ES cells remained pluripotent and showed positive staining for a wide range of embryonic markers. Thus, treatment with ganciclovir during in vitro differentiation effectively removed the population of undifferentiated cells and provided a pure population of completely differentiated cells. This approach may pave the way for a safe application of ES cells in regenerative medicine in the future.

  3. Diverse specificity of cellulosome attachment to the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Pinheiro, Benedita A.; Cameron, Kate; Cuskin, Fiona; Viegas, Aldino; Najmudin, Shabir; Bule, Pedro; Pires, Virginia M. R.; Romão, Maria João; Bayer, Edward A.; Spencer, Holly L.; Smith, Steven; Gilbert, Harry J.; Alves, Victor D.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, the cellulosome, one of Nature’s most intricate multi-enzyme complexes, has been continuously fine-tuned to efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant carbohydrates. To facilitate the uptake of released sugars, anaerobic bacteria use highly ordered protein-protein interactions to recruit these nanomachines to the cell surface. Dockerin modules located within a non-catalytic macromolecular scaffold, whose primary role is to assemble cellulosomal enzymatic subunits, bind cohesin modules of cell envelope proteins, thereby anchoring the cellulosome onto the bacterial cell. Here we have elucidated the unique molecular mechanisms used by anaerobic bacteria for cellulosome cellular attachment. The structure and biochemical analysis of five cohesin-dockerin complexes revealed that cell surface dockerins contain two cohesin-binding interfaces, which can present different or identical specificities. In contrast to the current static model, we propose that dockerins utilize multivalent modes of cohesin recognition to recruit cellulosomes to the cell surface, a mechanism that maximises substrate access while facilitating complex assembly. PMID:27924829

  4. Cost-effective copper removal by electrosorption powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Minghua; Hu, Youshuang; Yang, Weilu

    2016-03-01

    This work studied a cost-effective electrosorption that driven by microbial fuel cells (MFC-sorption) to remove Cu(2+) from wastewater without an external energy supply. The impact factors, adsorption isotherms and kinetics of the novel process were investigated. It indicated that a low electrolyte concentration and a high solution pH could enhance the Cu(2+) removal efficiency, while the adsorption capacity increased with the increase of numbers of MFCs in series and the initial Cu(2+) concentration. The adsorption isotherms study indicated that the monolayer adsorption in MFC-sorption was dominant. The kinetics study suggested the increase of initial Cu(2+) concentration could enhance the initial adsorption rate. The electrode characterizations verified the existence of Cu2O and Cu on the electrode surface of active carbon fibers (ACFs), suggesting that MFC-sorption was not only an adsorption process, but also a redox reaction process.

  5. Optimization of enhanced bioelectrical reactor with electricity from microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Feng, Chuanping; Wang, Zhijun; Cheng, Ming; Hu, Weiwu

    2016-01-01

    Factors influencing the performance of a continual-flow bioelectrical reactor (BER) intensified by microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal, including nitrate load, carbon source and hydraulic retention time (HRT), were investigated and optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). With the target of maximum nitrate removal and minimum intermediates accumulation, nitrate load (for nitrogen) of 60.70 mg/L, chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 849.55 mg/L and HRT of 3.92 h for the BER were performed. COD was the dominant factor influencing performance of the system. Experimental results indicated the undistorted simulation and reliable optimized values. These demonstrate that RSM is an effective method to evaluate and optimize the nitrate-reducing performance of the present system and can guide mathematical models development to further promote its practical applications.

  6. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  7. Periodic Shorting of SOM Cell to Remove Soluble Magnesium in Molten Flux and Improve Faradaic Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Su, Shizhao; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2014-12-01

    Solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis has been used for magnesium production directly from magnesium oxide. Magnesium dissolution in molten flux electrolyte is of particular concern in SOM electrolysis, because it imparts electronic conductivity to the flux and thereby decreases the faradaic current efficiency. In this work, a new approach for removing soluble magnesium in the flux is explored. Periodic shorting is performed between the anode and the cathode of SOM electrolysis cell. During shorting, soluble magnesium in the flux is oxidized to magnesium oxide. This significantly reduces the electronic current in the flux and therefore keeps the faradaic current efficiency high during SOM electrolysis. Electronic transference numbers in the flux are measured to assess the soluble magnesium concentration. Potentiodynamic scan results also confirm the feasibility of shorting the electrodes to remove soluble magnesium.

  8. Isolation from Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus cell walls of specific receptors for sugarcane glycoproteins, which act as recognition factors.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Y; Arroyo, M; Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    2005-11-04

    Glycoproteins from sugarcane stalks have been isolated from plants field-grown by size-exclusion chromatography. Some of these glycoproteins, previously labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, are able to bind to the cell wall of the sugarcane endophyte, N2-fixing Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, and largely removed after washing the bacterial cells with sucrose. This implies that sugarcane glycoproteins use beta-(1-->2)-fructofuranosyl fructose domains in their glycosidic moiety to bind to specific receptors in the bacterial cell walls. These receptors have been isolated by affinity chromatography on a sugarcane glycoprotein-agarose matrix, desorbed with sucrose and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophresisand capillary electrophoresis (CE).

  9. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  10. Stem/progenitor cells: a potential source of retina-specific cells for retinal repair.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yong-Yan; Feng, Dong-Fu; Pan, Dong-Chao

    2009-11-01

    Retinal injury generally results in permanent visual disturbance or even blindness. Any effort to restore vision in such condition would require replacement of the highly specialized retinal cells. Stem/progenitor cells have been proposed as a potential source of new retina-specific cells to replace those lost due to retina injury. Evidence to date suggests that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for retina injury. A wide range of stem/progenitor cells from various sources is currently being investigated for the treatment of retinal injury. This article reviews the recent achievements about stem/progenitor cell source for retinal repair.

  11. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-06

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment.

  12. Cell specific electrodes for neuronal network reconstruction and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bendali, Amel; Bouguelia, Sihem; Roupioz, Yoann; Forster, Valérie; Mailley, Pascal; Benosman, Ryad; Livache, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2014-07-07

    Direct interfacing of neurons with electronic devices has been investigated for both prosthetic and neuro-computing applications. In vitro neuronal networks provide great tools not only for improving neuroprostheses but also to take advantage of their computing abilities. However, it is often difficult to organize neuronal networks according to specific cell distributions. Our aim was to develop a cell-type specific immobilization of neurons on individual electrodes to produce organized in vitro neuronal networks on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). We demonstrate the selective capture of retinal neurons on antibody functionalized surfaces following the formation of self-assembled monolayers from protein-thiol conjugates by simple contact and protein-polypyrrole deposits by electrochemical functionalization. This neuronal selection was achieved on gold for either cone photoreceptors or retinal ganglion neurons using a PNA lectin or a Thy1 antibody, respectively. Anti-fouling of un-functionalized gold surfaces was optimized to increase the capture efficiencies. The technique was extended to electrode arrays by addressing electropolymerization of pyrrole monomers and pyrrole-protein conjugates to active electrodes. Retinal ganglion cell recording on the array further demonstrated the integrity of these neurons following their selection on polypyrrole-coated electrodes. Therefore, this protein-polypyrrole electrodeposition could provide a new approach to generate organized in vitro neuronal networks.

  13. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  14. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment. PMID:26855752

  15. The Macrophage Phagocytic Receptor CD36 Promotes Fibrogenic Pathways on Removal of Apoptotic Cells during Chronic Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pennathur, Subramaniam; Pasichnyk, Katie; Bahrami, Nadia M.; Zeng, Lixia; Febbraio, Maria; Yamaguchi, Ikuyo; Okamura, Daryl M.

    2016-01-01

    The removal of apoptotic cells is an innate function of tissue macrophages; however, its role in disease progression is unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the role of macrophage CD36, a recognized receptor of apoptotic cells and oxidized lipids, in two models of kidney injury: unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) and ischemia reperfusion. To differentiate the macrophage CD36-specific effects in vivo, we generated CD36 chimeric mice by bone marrow transplantation and evaluated the two models. Fibrosis severity was substantially decreased after UUO with a corresponding decrease in matrix synthesis in macrophage CD36-deficient mice. Despite a reduction in fibrosis severity, a 56% increase in apoptotic cells was found without an increase in apoptotic effectors. In addition, a substantial reduction was observed in tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-β1 mRNA levels and intracellular bioactive oxidized lipid levels in CD36-deficient macrophages. To validate the functional role of macrophage CD36, we performed unilateral ischemia reperfusion, followed by contralateral nephrectomy. Similarly, we found that the severity of fibrosis was reduced by 55% with a corresponding improvement in kidney function by 88% in macrophage CD36-deficient mice. Taken together, these data suggest that macrophage CD36 is a critical regulator of oxidative fibrogenic signaling and that CD36-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells may serve as an important pathway in the progression of fibrosis. PMID:26092500

  16. Identification of cell-type-specific mutations in nodal T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, T B; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Asabe, Y; Matsubara, D; Kano, J; Yoshida, K; Shiraishi, Y; Chiba, K; Tanaka, H; Miyano, S; Izutsu, K; Nakamura, N; Takeuchi, K; Miyoshi, H; Ohshima, K; Minowa, T; Ogawa, S; Noguchi, M; Chiba, S

    2017-01-01

    Recent genetic analysis has identified frequent mutations in ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2), DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) and ras homolog family member A (RHOA) in nodal T-cell lymphomas, including angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. We examined the distribution of mutations in these subtypes of mature T-/natural killer cell neoplasms to determine their clonal architecture. Targeted sequencing was performed for 71 genes in tumor-derived DNA of 87 cases. The mutations were then analyzed in a programmed death-1 (PD1)-positive population enriched with tumor cells and CD20-positive B cells purified by laser microdissection from 19 cases. TET2 and DNMT3A mutations were identified in both the PD1+ cells and the CD20+ cells in 15/16 and 4/7 cases, respectively. All the RHOA and IDH2 mutations were confined to the PD1+ cells, indicating that some, including RHOA and IDH2 mutations, being specific events in tumor cells. Notably, we found that all NOTCH1 mutations were detected only in the CD20+ cells. In conclusion, we identified both B- as well as T-cell-specific mutations, and mutations common to both T and B cells. These findings indicate the expansion of a clone after multistep and multilineal acquisition of gene mutations. PMID:28157189

  17. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  18. Primate-Specific Regulation of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parham, Peter; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Matevosyan, Lilit; Moesta, Achim K.; Norman, Paul J.; Aguilar, Anastazia M. Older; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating lymphocytes that function in innate immunity and placental reproduction. Regulating both development and function of NK cells is an array of variable and conserved receptors that interact with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Families of lectin-like and immunoglobulin-like receptors are determined by genes in the natural killer (NKC) and leukocyte receptor (LRC) complexes, respectively. As a consequence of the strong, varying pressures on the immune and reproductive systems, NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands evolve rapidly, are highly diverse, and exhibit dramatic species-specific differences. The variable, polymorphic family of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that regulate human NK cell development and function evolved recently, from a single-copy gene during the evolution of simian primates. Our studies of KIR and MHC class I genes in representative species show how these two unlinked but functionally intertwined genetic complexes have co-evolved. In humans, combinations of KIR and HLA class I factors are associated with infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, autoimmunity, reproductive success and the outcome of therapeutic transplantation. The extraordinary, and unanticipated, divergence of human NK cell receptors and MHC class I ligands from their mouse counterparts can in part explain the difficulties experienced in finding informative mouse models for human diseases. Non-human primate models have far greater potential, but to realize their promise will first require more complete definition of the genetics and function of KIR and MHC variation in non-human primate species, at a level comparable to that achieved for the human species. PMID:20618586

  19. Human Pancreatic β Cell lncRNAs Control Cell-Specific Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Ildem; Tu, Zhidong; Beucher, Anthony; Rolando, Delphine M Y; Sauty-Colace, Claire; Benazra, Marion; Nakic, Nikolina; Yang, Jialiang; Wang, Huan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Moran, Ignasi; Garcia-Hurtado, Javier; Castro, Natalia; Gonzalez-Franco, Roser; Stewart, Andrew F; Bonner, Caroline; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Groop, Leif; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Pattou, Francois; Argmann, Carmen; Schadt, Eric; Ravassard, Philippe; Ferrer, Jorge

    2017-02-07

    Recent studies have uncovered thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human pancreatic β cells. β cell lncRNAs are often cell type specific and exhibit dynamic regulation during differentiation or upon changing glucose concentrations. Although these features hint at a role of lncRNAs in β cell gene regulation and diabetes, the function of β cell lncRNAs remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of β cell-specific lncRNAs and transcription factors using transcript knockdowns and co-expression network analysis. This revealed lncRNAs that function in concert with transcription factors to regulate β cell-specific transcriptional networks. We further demonstrate that the lncRNA PLUTO affects local 3D chromatin structure and transcription of PDX1, encoding a key β cell transcription factor, and that both PLUTO and PDX1 are downregulated in islets from donors with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. These results implicate lncRNAs in the regulation of β cell-specific transcription factor networks.

  20. Role of specific endocytic pathways in electrotransfection of cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Chi; Wu, Mina; Yuan, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Electrotransfection is a technique utilized for gene delivery in both preclinical and clinical studies. However, its mechanisms are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to investigate specific pathways of endocytosis involved in electrotransfection. In the study, three different human cell lines (HEK293, HCT116, and HT29) were either treated with ice cold medium postelectrotransfection or endocytic inhibitors prior to electrotransfection. The inhibitors were pharmacological agents (chlorpromazine, genistein, and amiloride) or different small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules that could knockdown expression of clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), caveolin-1, and Rab34, respectively. The reduction in gene expressions was confirmed with western blot analysis at 48-72h post-siRNA treatment. It was observed that treatments with either ice cold medium, chlorpromazine, or genistein resulted in significant reductions in electrotransfection efficiency (eTE) in all three cell lines, compared to the matched controls, but amiloride treatment had insignificant effects on eTE. For cells treated with siRNA, only CLTC knockdown resulted in eTE reduction for all three cell lines. Together, these data demonstrated that the clathrin-mediated endocytosis played an important role in electrotransfection. PMID:26052524

  1. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  2. Immuno-Navigator, a batch-corrected coexpression database, reveals cell type-specific gene networks in the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Dinh, Viet H.; Mikami, Norihisa; Kitagawa, Yohko; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput gene expression data are one of the primary resources for exploring complex intracellular dynamics in modern biology. The integration of large amounts of public data may allow us to examine general dynamical relationships between regulators and target genes. However, obstacles for such analyses are study-specific biases or batch effects in the original data. Here we present Immuno-Navigator, a batch-corrected gene expression and coexpression database for 24 cell types of the mouse immune system. We systematically removed batch effects from the underlying gene expression data and showed that this removal considerably improved the consistency between inferred correlations and prior knowledge. The data revealed widespread cell type-specific correlation of expression. Integrated analysis tools allow users to use this correlation of expression for the generation of hypotheses about biological networks and candidate regulators in specific cell types. We show several applications of Immuno-Navigator as examples. In one application we successfully predicted known regulators of importance in naturally occurring Treg cells from their expression correlation with a set of Treg-specific genes. For one high-scoring gene, integrin β8 (Itgb8), we confirmed an association between Itgb8 expression in forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)-positive T cells and Treg-specific epigenetic remodeling. Our results also suggest that the regulation of Treg-specific genes within Treg cells is relatively independent of Foxp3 expression, supporting recent results pointing to a Foxp3-independent component in the development of Treg cells. PMID:27078110

  3. Linking the T cell receptor to the single cell transcriptome in antigen-specific human T cells.

    PubMed

    Eltahla, Auda A; Rizzetto, Simone; Pirozyan, Mehdi R; Betz-Stablein, Brigid D; Venturi, Vanessa; Kedzierska, Katherine; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneity of T cells is a hallmark of a successful adaptive immune response, harnessing the vast diversity of antigen-specific T cells into a coordinated evolution of effector and memory outcomes. The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is highly diverse to account for the highly heterogeneous antigenic world. During the response to a virus multiple individual clones of antigen specific CD8+ (Ag-specific) T cells can be identified against a single epitope and multiple epitopes are recognised. Advances in single-cell technologies have provided the potential to study Ag-specific T cell heterogeneity at both surface phenotype and transcriptome levels, thereby allowing investigation of the diversity within the same apparent sub-population. We propose a new method (VDJPuzzle) to reconstruct the native TCRαβ from single cell RNA-seq data of Ag-specific T cells and then to link these with the gene expression profile of individual cells. We applied this method using rare Ag-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood of a subject who cleared hepatitis C virus infection. We successfully reconstructed productive TCRαβ in 56 of a total of 63 cells (89%), with double α and double β in 18, and 7% respectively, and double TCRαβ in 2 cells. The method was validated via standard single cell PCR sequencing of the TCR. We demonstrate that single-cell transcriptome analysis can successfully distinguish Ag-specific T cell populations sorted directly from resting memory cells in peripheral blood and sorted after ex vivo stimulation. This approach allows a detailed analysis of the TCR diversity and its relationship with the transcriptional profile of different clones.

  4. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  5. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    PubMed

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents.

  6. Electrochemical removal of nitrate using ZVI packed bed bipolar electrolytic cell.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joo-Young; Kim, Han-Ki; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Joo-Yang

    2012-09-01

    The present study investigates the performance of the zero valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) packed bed bipolar electrolytic cell for nitrate removal. The packing mixture consists of ZVI as electronically conducting material and silica sand as non-conducting material between main cathode and anode electrodes. In the continuous column experiments for the simulated groundwater (initial nitrate and electrical conductivity of about 30 mg L(-1) as N and 300 μS cm(-1), respectively), above 99% of nitrate was removed at the applied potential of 600 V with the main anode placed on the bottom of reactor. The influx nitrate was converted to ammonia (20% to maximum 60%) and nitrite (always less than 0.5 mg L(-1) as N in the effluent). The optimum packing ratio (v/v) of silica sand to ZVI was found to be 1:1-2:1. Magnetite was observed on the surface of the used ZVI as corrosion product. The reduction at the lower part of the reactor in acidic condition and adsorption at the upper part of the reactor in alkaline condition are the major mechanism of nitrate removal.

  7. Simultaneous Removal of Phenol and Dissolved Solids from Wastewater Using Multichambered Microbial Desalination Cell.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Harapriya; Jain, Sumat Chand; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2015-12-01

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) has great potential toward direct electricity generation from wastewater and concurrent desalination through potential difference developed due to microbial activity. Degradation of phenol by isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa in anodic chamber and simultaneous desalination of water in middle desalination chamber of multichamber MDC is demonstrated in this study. Performance of the MDCs with different anodic inoculum conditions, namely pure culture of P. aeruginosa (MDC-1), 50 % v/v mixture of P. aeruginosa and anaerobic mixed consortia (MDC-2) and anaerobic mixed consortia (MDC-3), was evaluated to compare the phenol degradation in anodic chamber, bioelectricity generation, and simultaneous total dissolved solids (TDS) removal from saline water in desalination chamber. Synergistic effect between P. aeruginosa and mixed anaerobic consortia as inoculum was evident in MDC-2 demonstrating phenol degradation of 90 %, TDS removal of 75 % in 72 h of reaction time along with higher power generation of 27.5 mW/m(2) as compared to MDC-1 (95 %, 64 %, 12.8 mW/m(2), respectively) and MDC-3 (58 %, 52 %, 4.8 mW/m(2), respectively). The results illustrate that the multichamber MDC-2 is effective for simultaneous removal of phenol and dissolved solids contained in industrial wastewaters.

  8. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen prevents trinucleotide repeat expansions by promoting repeat deletion and hairpin removal

    PubMed Central

    Beaver, Jill M.; Lai, Yanhao; Rolle, Shantell J.; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    DNA base lesions and base excision repair (BER) within trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tracts modulate repeat instability through the coordination among the key BER enzymes DNA polymerase β, flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and DNA ligase I (LIG I). However, it remains unknown whether BER cofactors can also alter TNR stability. In this study, we discovered that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cofactor of BER, promoted CAG repeat deletion and removal of a CAG repeat hairpin during BER in a duplex CAG repeat tract and CAG hairpin loop, respectively. We showed that PCNA stimulated LIG I activity on a nick across a small template loop during BER in a duplex (CAG)20 repeat tract promoting small repeat deletions. Surprisingly, we found that during BER in a hairpin loop, PCNA promoted reannealing of the upstream flap of a double-flap intermediate, thereby facilitating the formation of a downstream flap and stimulating FEN1 cleavage activity and hairpin removal. Our results indicate that PCNA plays a critical role in preventing CAG repeat expansions by modulating the structures of dynamic DNA via cooperation with BER enzymes. We provide the first evidence that PCNA prevents CAG repeat expansions during BER by promoting CAG repeat deletion and removal of a TNR hairpin. PMID:27793507

  9. In situ product removal (ISPR) in whole cell biotechnology during the last twenty years.

    PubMed

    Stark, Daniel; von Stockar, Urs

    2003-01-01

    This review sums up the activity in the field of in situ product removal in whole cell bioprocesses over the last 20 years. It gives a complete summary of ISPR operations with microbial cells and cites a series of interesting ISPR applications in plant and animal cell technology. All the ISPR projects with microbial cells are categorized according to their products, their ISPR techniques, and their applied configurations of the ISPR set-up. Research on ISPR application has primarily increased in the field of microbial production of aromas and organic acids such lactic acid over the last ten years. Apart from the field of de novo formation of bioproducts, ISPR is increasingly applied to microbial bioconversion processes. However, despite of the large number of microbial whole cell ISPR projects (approximately 250), very few processes have been transferred to an industrial scale. The proposed processes have mostly been too complex and consequently not cost effective. Therefore, this review emphasizes that the planning of a successful whole cell ISPR process should not only consider the choice of ISPR technique according to the physicochemical properties of the product, but also the potential configuration of the whole process set-up. Furthermore, additional process aspects, biological and legal constraint need to be considered from the very beginning for the design of an ISPR project. Finally, future trends of new, modified or improved ISPR techniques are given.

  10. Chemically Modified Plastic Tube for High Volume Removal and Collection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaitas, Angelo; Kim, Gwangseong

    2015-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, we use a commercially available and chemically modified tube to selectively capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood stream by immobilizing human anti-EpCAM antibodies on the tube's interior surface. We describe the requisite and critical steps required to modify a tube into a cancer cell-capturing device. Using these simple modifications, we were able to capture or entrap about 85% of cancer cells from suspension and 44% of cancer cells from spiked whole blood. We also found that the percentage of cells captured was dependent on the tube's length and also the number of cancer cells present. It is our strong belief that with the utilization of appropriate tube lengths and procedures, we can ensure capture and removal of nearly the entire CTC population in whole blood. Importantly after a patient’s entire blood volume has circulated through the tube, the tube can then be trypsinized to release the captured live CTCs for further analysis and testing. PMID:26176235

  11. Automated red blood cell exchange for acute drug removal in a patient with sirolimus toxicity.

    PubMed

    Galera, Pallavi; Martin, Hannah C; Welch, Linda; Sulmasy, Paula; Cerny, Jan; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Weinstein, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Sirolimus is an immunosuppressant used to prevent graft versus host disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. It has a large volume of distribution (12 ± 7.5 l/kg) and within the intravascular space ∼95% of it is bound to red blood cells. Because of potential toxic effects at high trough levels, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended for sirolimus. We present a case of severe hepatic dysfunction due to Hepatitis B and sirolimus toxicity, in a 51-year-old male stem cell transplant recipient. An automated red cell exchange decreased his blood sirolimus level from 22.6 to 10.3 ng/ml (55% reduction) and improved his liver enzymes. Re-equilibration of sirolimus from other compartments to the blood necessitated a series of four red cell exchanges, after which the sirolimus level was 4.7 ng/ml. Although the patient ultimately succumbed to multiorgan failure, red cell exchange may be considered for acute removal of sirolimus in selected patients.

  12. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M; Molenaar, Jan J; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-11-03

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses.

  13. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: a novel strategy to delete specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Mackensen, Andreas; Zoso, Alessia; Halbritter, Dagmar; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2008-04-01

    Several cell-based immunotherapy strategies have been developed to specifically modulate T cell-mediated immune responses. These methods frequently rely on the utilization of tolerogenic cell-based antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, APCs are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T-cell responses, thus limiting their therapeutic capacity. Here, we describe a novel bead-based approach to modulate T-cell responses in an antigen-specific fashion. We have generated killer artificial APCs (kappaaAPCs) by coupling an apoptosis-inducing alpha-Fas (CD95) IgM mAb together with HLA-A2 Ig molecules onto beads. These kappaaAPCs deplete targeted antigen-specific T cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent fashion. T-cell depletion in cocultures is rapidly initiated (30 minutes), dependent on the amount of kappaaAPCs and independent of activation-induced cell death (AICD). kappaaAPCs represent a novel technology that can control T cell-mediated immune responses, and therefore has potential for use in treatment of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

  14. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kerry M; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (via trans interactions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (via cis interactions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition between cis and trans interactions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19058.001 PMID:27644106

  15. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS CENTER TECHNOLOGY SPECIFIC TEST PLAN: REMOVAL OF MICROBIOLOGICL AND PARTICULATE CONTAMINANTS BY MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the Environmental technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of water treatment equipment for removal of microbiological and particulate contaminants using membrane filtration. This TSTP is to be used as a guide in the dev...

  17. The removal of Microcystis ichthyoblabe cells and its hepatotoxin microcystin-LR during electrooxidation process using Pt/Ti electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bong-Seok; Han, Jisun; Kim, Seog-Ku; Oh, Hye-Cheol; Park, Ho-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Electrooxidation is widely used to remove harmful organic and inorganic substances as well as pathogenic microorganisms. This study investigates the removal of Microcystis ichthyoblabe cells and their hepatotoxin microcystin-LR by the electrooxidation process using Pt/Ti electrodes. Additionally, the morphology changes and cell sizes were determined by scanning electron microscopy and a particle size analyzer, respectively. The algal cells were severely damaged by the electrooxidation process. During the initial treatment, intracellular microcystin-LR was released from the cells, increasing the extracellular microcystin-LR concentration. The electrooxidation charge required to remove cells and MC-LR was 3 × 10(4) C and 6 × 10(4) C, respectively. The removal efficiencies of M. ichthyoblabe cells and microcystin-LR were insensitive to initial cell density, initial microcystin-LR concentration and solution conductivity, but were heavily reduced at large algal suspension volume. Therefore, to achieve simultaneous removal of Microcystis cells and their MC, it is necessary to control the volume of algal suspension.

  18. Derivation of Patient Specific Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Clinically Discarded Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Lin, Chen-Ju; Wang, Sheng-Wen; Cheng, An-Sheng; Lu, Jean; Lu, Chung-Hao; Sung, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are powerful tools for basic and translational research, as well as regenerative medicine. In routine human in vitro fertilization (IVF) practices, cumulus cells (CCs) are discarded, representing a potential source of biological materials for regenerative medicine. In this study, we derived patient-specific iPSCs using CCs from human infertility clinics for the first time. The human cumulus cell derived iPSCs (hc-iPSCs) were characterized for growth, karyotype, expression of pluripotency genes, and were subjected to embryoid bodies (EBs) and teratoma assays to evaluate their differentiation capacity. Hc-iPSCs display typical iPSC characteristics, and are capable of differentiating into all germ layers in vitro and in vivo. We further show that putative primordial germ cell like cells (PGCLCs) can be derived using hc-iPSCs. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of deriving patient-specific pluripotent stem cells using CCs. PMID:27802323

  19. Microbial fuel cell assisted nitrate nitrogen removal using cow manure and soil.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ankisha; Vaishnava, Monika; Chhabra, Meenu

    2016-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are emerging wastewater treatment systems with a proven potential for denitrification. In this study, we have developed a high-rate denitrifying MFC. The anode consisted of cow manure and fruit waste and the cathode consisted of cow manure and soil. The initial chemical oxygen demand (COD)/nitrate nitrogen (NO3 (-)-N) was varied from 2 to 40 at the cathode while keeping the anode ratio fixed at 100. NO3 (-)-N removal rate of 7.1 ± 0.9 kg NO3 (-)-N/m(3) net cathodic compartment (NCC)/day was achieved at cathode COD/NO3 (-)-N ratio 7.31 with the current density of 190 ± 9.1 mA/m(2) and power density of 31.92 ± 4 mW/m(2) of electrode surface area. We achieved an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 410 ± 20 mV at initial cathodic NO3 (-)-N of 0.345 g/l. The cathode COD/NO3 (-)-N ratio had a significant influence on MFC's OCV and nitrate removal rate. Lower OCV (<150 mV) and NO3 (-)-N removal rates were observed at COD/NO3 (-)-N ratio >12 and <7. Experiments done at different cathode pH values indicated that the optimum pH for denitrification was 7. Under optimized biochemical conditions, nitrate removal rate of 6.5 kg NO3 (-)-N/m(3) net cathodic compartment (NCC)/day and power density of 210 mW/m(2) were achieved in a low resistance MFC. The present study thus demonstrates the utility of MFCs for the treatment of high nitrate wastes.

  20. Connexin-specific cell-to-cell transfer of short interfering RNA by gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Valiunas, V; Polosina, YY; Miller, H; Potapova, IA; Valiuniene, L; Doronin, S; Mathias, RT; Robinson, RB; Rosen, MR; Cohen, IS; Brink, PR

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether oligonucleotides the size of siRNA are permeable to gap junctions and whether a specific siRNA for DNA polymerase β (pol β) can move from one cell to another via gap junctions, thus allowing one cell to inhibit gene expression in another cell directly. To test this hypothesis, fluorescently labelled oligonucleotides (morpholinos) 12, 16 and 24 nucleotides in length were synthesized and introduced into one cell of a pair using a patch pipette. These probes moved from cell to cell through gap junctions composed of connexin 43 (Cx43). Moreover, the rate of transfer declined with increasing length of the oligonucleotide. To test whether siRNA for pol β was permeable to gap junctions we used three cell lines: (1) NRK cells that endogenously express Cx43; (2) Mβ16tsA cells, which express Cx32 and Cx26 but not Cx43; and (3) connexin-deficient N2A cells. NRK and Mβ16tsA cells were each divided into two groups, one of which was stably transfected to express a small hairpin RNA (shRNA), which gives rise to siRNA that targets pol β. These two pol β knockdown cell lines (NRK-kcdc and Mβ16tsA-kcdc) were co-cultured with labelled wild type, NRK-wt or Mβ16tsA-wt cells or N2A cells. The levels of pol β mRNA and protein were determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Co-culture of Mβ16tsA-kcdc cells with Mβ16tsA-wt, N2A or NRK-wt cells had no effect on pol β levels in these cells. Similarly, co-culture of NRK-kcdc with N2A cells had no effect on pol β levels in the N2A cells. In contrast, co-culture of NRK-kcdc with NRK-wt cells resulted in a significant reduction in pol β in the wt cells. The inability of Mβ16tsA-kcdc cells to transfer siRNA is consistent with the fact that oligonucleotides of the 12 nucleotide length were not permeable to Cx32/Cx26 channels. This suggested that Cx43 but not Cx32/Cx26 channels allowed the cell-to-cell movement of the siRNA. These results support the novel hypothesis

  1. Isolation of cell type-specific apoptotic bodies by fluorescence-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Atkin-Smith, Georgia K.; Paone, Stephanie; Zanker, Damien J.; Duan, Mubing; Phan, Than K.; Chen, Weisan; Hulett, Mark D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.

    2017-01-01

    Apoptotic bodies (ApoBDs) are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles that can mediate intercellular communication in physiological and pathological settings. By combining recently developed analytical strategies with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), we have developed a method that enables the isolation of ApoBDs from cultured cells to 99% purity. In addition, this approach also enables the identification and isolation of cell type-specific ApoBDs from tissue, bodily fluid and blood-derived samples. PMID:28057919

  2. Selective control of human glioma cell proliferation by specific cell interaction.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, C M; Freshney, R I; Hart, E; Graham, D I

    1985-01-01

    Cells cultured from anaplastic astrocytoma (Kernohan and Sayre, grades III and IV) will proliferate on confluent monolayers of normal glia, while cells cultured from normal brain will not. The growth of a cell line containing a high proportion of well-differentiated glioma cells (G-CCM) was partially inhibited, though not as much as normal glia, while the growth of a cell line made up of less differentiated cells (G-UVW) was enhanced by the normal glia. Although non-glial confluent monolayers also inhibited the growth of normal glia, this was less specific, as one normal glial line (N-DUT) grew on fibroblasts and intestinal epithelium, although it was unable to do so on normal glia. It is suggested that this may be a useful method for examining reduced density limitation of growth, discriminating between normal and malignant glia, and for separating glioma cells from contaminating normal cells.

  3. Chromatin Dynamics Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage Specification and Differentiation to Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai; Gordon, Jonathan A.R.; Whitfield, Troy W.; Tai, Phillip W.L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are critical for regeneration of multiple tissues. Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental regulators of lineage specification and cell fate, and as such, we addressed the question of which epigenetic modifications characterize the transition of nascent MSCs to a tissue specific MSC-derived phenotype. By profiling the temporal changes of seven histone marks correlated to gene expression during proliferation, early commitment, matrix deposition, and mineralization stages, we identified distinct epigenetic mechanisms that regulate transcriptional programs necessary for tissue-specific phenotype development. Patterns of stage-specific enrichment of histone modifications revealed distinct modes of repression and activation of gene expression that would not be detected using single endpoint analysis. We discovered that at commitment, H3K27me3 is removed from genes that are upregulated and is not acquired on downregulated genes. Additionally, we found that the absence of H3K4me3 modification at promoters defined a subset of osteoblast-specific upregulated genes, indicating acquisition of acetyl modifications drive activation of these genes. Significantly, loss or gain of H3K36me3 was the primary predictor of dynamic changes in temporal gene expression. Using unsupervised pattern discovery analysis the signature of osteogenic-related histone modifications identified novel functional cis regulatory modules associated with enhancer regions that control tissue-specific genes. Our work provides a cornerstone to understand the epigenetic regulation of transcriptional programs that are important for MSC lineage commitment and lineage, as well as insights to facilitate MSC-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:28077316

  4. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  5. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  6. Cell-specific targeting strategies for electroporation-mediated gene delivery in cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Dean, David A

    2013-10-01

    The use of electroporation to facilitate gene transfer is an extremely powerful and useful method for both in vitro and in vivo applications. One of its great strengths is that it induces functional destabilization and permeabilization of cell membranes throughout a tissue leading to widespread gene transfer to multiple cells and cell types within the electric field. While this is a strength, it can also be a limitation in terms of cell-specific gene delivery. The ability to restrict gene delivery and expression to particular cell types is of paramount importance for many types of gene therapy, since ectopic expression of a transgene could lead to deleterious host inflammatory responses or dysregulation of normal cellular functions. At present, there are relatively few ways to obtain cell-specific targeting of nonviral vectors, molecular probes, small molecules, and imaging agents. We have developed a novel means of restricting gene delivery to desired cell types based on the ability to control the transport of plasmids into the nuclei of desired cell types. In this article, we discuss the mechanisms of this approach and several applications in living animals to demonstrate the benefits of the combination of electroporation and selective nuclear import of plasmids for cell-specific gene delivery.

  7. Post-growth process for flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunwoo; Kang, Yoonmook; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrated a flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell with high specific power of approximately 254 W/kg. A flexible and ultra-light weight CdS/CdTe cell treated with pre-NP etch process exhibited high conversion efficiency of 13.56% in superstrate configuration. Morphological, structural and optical changes of CdS/CdTe thin films were characterized when pre-NP etch step was incorporated to the conventional post-deposition process. Improvement of photovoltaic parameters can be attributed to the removal of the oxide and the formation of Te-rich layer, which benefit the activation process. Pre-NP etched cell maintained their flexibility and performance under the repeated tensile strain of 0.13%. Our method can pave a way for manufacturing flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power for mobile and aerospace applications.

  8. Oncolytic viruses & their specific targeting to tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prafull K.; Doley, Juwar; Kumar, G. Ravi; Sahoo, A.P.; Tiwari, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide. In spite of achieving significant successes in medical sciences in the past few decades, the number of deaths due to cancer remains unchecked. The conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy have limited therapeutic index and a plethora of treatment related side effects. This situation has provided an impetus for search of novel therapeutic strategies that can selectively destroy the tumour cells, leaving the normal cells unharmed. Viral oncotherapy is such a promising treatment modality that offers unique opportunity for tumour targeting. Numerous viruses with inherent anti-cancer activity have been identified and are in different phases of clinical trials. In the era of modern biotechnology and with better understanding of cancer biology and virology, it has become feasible to engineer the oncolytic viruses (OVs) to increase their tumour selectivity and enhance their oncolytic activity. In this review, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses kill the tumour cells have been discussed as also the development made in virotherapy for cancer treatment with emphasis on their tumour specific targeting. PMID:23168697

  9. Rare earth fluorescent nanoparticles for specific cancer cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F.

    2016-07-01

    Terbium layered hydroxide nanoparticles (Tb2(OH)5NO3) were synthesized by a one-pot coprecipitation method. The characterization of this preparation revealed highly oriented fluorescent nanoparticles. An attempt to improve the properties of Tb2(OH)5NO3 resulted in the preparation of two optimized nanoparticles. In particular, Tb2(OH)5NO3:Eu and Tb2(OH)5NO3-FA were prepared when Tb2(OH)5NO3 was doped with Europium and when the surface was modified with folic acid (FA), respectively. The size of the above nanoparticles was below 100 nm, and thus they have the potential to be used for biomedical applications. The interaction of nanoparticles with human cells was studied using confocal microscopy. This study revealed that only the nanoparticles modified with folic acid have the ability to be targeted to HeLa cells. This specific identification of cancer cells, in combination with the fluorescent properties of Tb2(OH)5NO3, could render these nanoparticles appropriate for biomedical applications.

  10. Late onset cytopenias following haematopoietic stem cell transplant associated with viral infection and cell specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Geoff; Culliford, Steven; Bendukidze, Nina; Dahlstrom, Julia; Grandage, Victoria; Carpenter, Ben; Hough, Rachael

    2017-02-04

    This report describes a patient who received an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant and who, following a viral infection, developed late onset cytopenias associated with antibodies against red cells, platelets and granulocytes. Investigation of these cytopenias revealed the presence of lineage specific auto- and allo-antibodies, which were not present in either the donor or in the recipient prior to the viral infection. This case provides further evidence for the concept that viral challenges following HSCT can result in the production of cell specific antibodies that can have significant implications for patient management.

  11. Novel mixed matrix membranes for sulfur removal and for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ligang; Wang, Andong; Zhang, Longhui; Dong, Meimei; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2012-12-01

    Sulfur removal is significant for fuels used as hydrogen source for fuel cell applications and to avoid sulfur poisoning of therein used catalysts. Novel mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) with well-defined transport channels are proposed for sulfur removal. MMMs are fabricated using polyimide (PI) as matrix material and Y zeolites as adsorptive functional materials. The influence of architecture conditions on the morphology transition from finger-like to sponge-like structure and the “short circuit” effect are investigated. The adsorption and regeneration behavior of MMMs is discussed, combining the detailed analysis of FT-IR, morphology, XPS, XRD and thermal properties of MMMs, the process-structure-function relationship is obtained. The results show that the functional zeolites are incorporated into three-dimensional network and the adsorption capacity of MMMs comes to 8.6 and 9.5 mg S g-1 for thiophene and dibenzothiophene species, respectively. And the regeneration behavior suggests that the spent membranes can recover about 88% and 96% of the desulfurization capacity by solvent washing and thermal treating regeneration, respectively. The related discussions provide some general suggestions in promoting the novel application of MMMs on the separation of organic-organic mixtures, and a potential alternative for the production of sulfur-free hydrogen source for fuel cell applications.

  12. Removal and recovery of phosphorus as struvite from swine wastewater using microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, O; Hirooka, K

    2012-06-01

    Air-cathode single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were operated with swine wastewater. The maximum power density, the maximum current density, the average value of COD-removal efficiency, and the coulombic efficiency were 1-2.3 W/m(2), 6.0-7.0 A/m(2), 76-91%, and 37-47%, respectively. During operation, 70-82% of the phosphorus was removed from the influent, and some precipitations were observed on the surface of the liquid side of the cathodes. The amount of phosphorus contained in these precipitates was estimated to be equivalent 4.6-27% of the influent. The main component of these precipitates was revealed by X-ray diffraction analysis to be struvite. Furthermore, our results indicate that phosphorus in suspended solid form was first dissolved, and then precipitated on the cathode. By scanning electron microscope observation, the morphology of the precipitates was irregularly shaped, including crystals with hexagonal cross-section surfaces, and was different from the familiar needle-like ones. These results indicate that simultaneous recovery of electrical power and phosphorus from wastewater by microbial fuel cell is possible.

  13. Single-Cell mRNA Profiling Reveals Cell-Type Specific Expression of Neurexin Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Fuccillo, Marc V.; Földy, Csaba; Gökce, Özgün; Rothwell, Patrick E.; Sun, Gordon L.; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurexins are considered central organizers of synapse architecture that are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Expression of neurexins in hundreds of alternatively spliced isoforms suggested that individual neurons might exhibit a cell type-specific neurexin expression pattern (a neurexin code). To test this hypothesis, we quantified the single-cell levels of neurexin isoforms and other trans-synaptic cell-adhesion molecules by microfluidics-based RT-PCR. We show that the neurexin repertoire displays pronounced cell-type specificity that is remarkably consistent within each type of neuron. Furthermore, we uncovered region-specific regulation of neurexin transcription and splice-site usage. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional profiles of neurexins can be altered in an experience-dependent fashion by exposure to a drug of abuse. Our data provide evidence of cell type-specific expression patterns of multiple neurexins at the single-cell level, and suggest that expression of synaptic cell-adhesion molecules overlaps with other key features of cellular identity and diversity. PMID:26182417

  14. Antigen-specific regulation of IgE antibodies by non-antigen-specific γδ T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yafei; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Loomis, Joshua; MacLeod, Megan K.; McKee, Amy S.; Kirchenbaum, Greg; Jakubzick, Claudia V.; Kedl, Ross M.; Sun, Deming; Jacobelli, Jordan; O'Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2013-01-01

    We re-examined the observation that γδ T cells, when transferred from mice tolerized to an inhaled conventional antigen (Ag), suppress the allergic IgE response to this Ag specifically. Using ovalbumin and hen egg lysozyme in crisscross fashion, we confirmed the Ag-specific IgE regulatory effect of the γδ T cells. Although only Vγ4+ γδ T cells are regulators, the Ag specificity does not stem from specificity of their γδ TCRs. Instead, the Vγ4+ γδ T cells failed to respond to either Ag, but rapidly acquired Ag-specific regulatory function in vivo following i.v. injection of non-T cells derived from the spleen of Ag-tolerized mice. This correlated with their in vivo Ag acquisition from i.v. injected Ag-loaded splenic non-T cells, and in vivo transfer of membrane label provided evidence for direct contact between the injected splenic non-T cells and the Vγ4+ γδ T cells. Together, our data suggest that Ag itself, when acquired by γδ T cells, directs the specificity of their IgE suppression. PMID:23275606

  15. Target-cell-specific fluorescence silica nanoprobes for imaging and theranostics of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Henan; Mu, Yawen; Lu, Jusheng; Wei, Wei; Wan, Yakun; Liu, Songqin

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) has been identified as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and predictors of drug response for many diseases, including a broad range of cancers, heart disease, and neurological diseases. The noninvasive theranostics system for miRNAs is very important for diagnosis and therapy of the cellular disease. Herein, a target-cell-specific theranostics nanoprobe for target-cell-specific delivery, cancer cells and intracellular miRNA-21 imaging, and cancer cell growth inhibition was proposed. The nanoprobe (FS-AS/MB) was prepared by simultaneously coupling of the AS1411 aptamer and miRNA-21 molecular beacon (miR-21-MB) onto the surface of Ru(bpy)₃²⁺-encapsulated silica (FS) nanoparticles. The FS nanoparticles synthesized by a facile reverse microemulsion method showed nearly monodisperse spherical shape with a smooth surface, good colloidal stability, a fluorescence quantum yield of ~21%, and low cytotoxicity. The antibiofouling polymer PEG grafted onto a silica shell reduced nonspecific uptake of cells. The ability of FS-AS/MB for target-specific cells delivery, simultaneous cancer cells, intracellular miRNA-21 imaging, and inhibition of miRNA-21 function and suppression of cell growth in vitro, were also demonstrated. The results of the present study suggested that the proposed nanoprobes would be a promising theranostics for different cancers by imaging and inhibiting other intracellular genes.

  16. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  17. Notch signaling alters sensory or neuronal cell fate specification of inner ear stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sang-Jun; Fujioka, Masato; Kim, Shi-Chan; Edge, Albert S B

    2011-06-08

    Multipotent progenitor cells in the otic placode give rise to the specialized cell types of the inner ear, including neurons, supporting cells, and hair cells. The mechanisms governing acquisition of specific fates by the cells that form the cochleovestibular organs remain poorly characterized. Here we show that whereas blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor increased the conversion of inner ear stem cells to hair cells by a mechanism that involved the upregulation of bHLH transcription factor, Math1 (mouse Atoh1), differentiation to a neuronal lineage was increased by expression of the Notch intracellular domain. The shift to a neuronal lineage could be attributed in part to continued cell proliferation in cells that did not undergo sensory cell differentiation due to the high Notch signaling, but also involved upregulation of Ngn1. The Notch intracellular domain influenced Ngn1 indirectly by upregulation of Sox2, a transcription factor expressed in many neural progenitor cells, and directly by an interaction with an RBP-J binding site in the Ngn1 promoter/enhancer. The induction of Ngn1 was blocked partially by mutation of the RBP-J site and nearly completely when the mutation was combined with inhibition of Sox2 expression. Thus, Notch signaling had a significant role in the fate specification of neurons and hair cells from inner ear stem cells, and decisions about cell fate were mediated in part by a differential effect of combinatorial signaling by Notch and Sox2 on the expression of bHLH transcription factors.

  18. Regression of subcutaneous lymphoma following removal of an ovarian granulosatheca cell tumor in a horse.

    PubMed

    Henson, K L; Alleman, A R; Cutler, T J; Ginn, P E; Kelley, L C

    1998-05-01

    A 9-year-old Arabian mare was admitted for evaluation of multiple subcutaneous nodules and infertility. Fine-needle aspiration of one of the subcutaneous nodules resulted in a cytologic diagnosis of histiolymphocytic lymphoma. Palpation per rectum and transrectal ultrasonography revealed a mass associated with the left ovary. Excision of the ovarian tumor was performed, and a histopathologic diagnosis of granulosa-theca cell tumor was made. After removal of the granulosa-theca cell tumor, subcutaneous nodules regressed. The referring veterinarian reported that the nodules had also disappeared and then recurred after administration of a synthetic progestin. To further characterize the lymphoma and investigate this possible hormonal relationship, immunophenotyping and estrogen and progesterone receptor assays were performed. The subcutaneous lymphoma was classified as a T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma, results of estrogen receptor assays were negative, and results of progesterone receptor assays were positive. Clinical observations of subcutaneous lymphoma in horses indicate that the waxing and waning nature of these tumors may be associated with the estrous cycle, pregnancy, foaling, and lactation. Clinical observations and identification of progesterone receptors suggest that a relationship between serum steroid hormone concentrations, such as estrogen and progesterone, and subcutaneous lymphoma may exists.

  19. Removal naturally occurring radionuclides from drinking water using a filter specifically designed for Drinking Water Treatment Plants.

    PubMed

    Baeza, A; Salas, A; Guillén, J; Muñoz-Serrano, A; Ontalba-Salamanca, M Á; Jiménez-Ramos, M C

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of naturally occurring radionuclides in drinking water can pose health hazards in some populations, especially taking into account that routine procedures in Drinking Water Treatment Plants (DWTPs) are normally unable to remove them efficiently from drinking water. In fact, these procedures are practically transparent to them, and in particular to radium. In this paper, the characterization and capabilities of a patented filter designed to remove radium from drinking water with high efficiency is described. This filter is based on a sandwich structure of silica and green sand, with a natural high content manganese oxide. Both sands are authorized by Spanish authorities to be used in Drinking Water Treatment Plants. The Mn distribution in the green sand was found to be homogenous, thus providing a great number of adsorption sites for radium. Kinetic studies showed that the (226)Ra adsorption on green sand was influenced by the content of major cations solved in the treated water, but the saturation level, about 96-99%, was not affected by it. The physico-chemical parameters of the treated water were unaltered by the filter. The efficiency of the filter for the removal of (226)Ra remained unchanged with large water volumes passed through it, proving its potential use in DWTP. This filter was also able to remove initially the uranium content due to the presence of Fe2O3 particles in it, although it is saturated faster than radium.

  20. Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

  1. Removal of sialic acid from the surface of human MCF-7 mammary cancer cells abolishes E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion in an aggregation assay.

    PubMed

    Deman, J J; Van Larebeke, N A; Bruyneel, E A; Bracke, M E; Vermeulen, S J; Vennekens, K M; Mareel, M M

    1995-09-01

    MCF-7 human breast cancer cells express E-cadherin and show, at least in some circumstances, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion (Bracke et al., 1993). The MCF-7/AZ variant spontaneously displays E-cadherin-dependent fast aggregation; in the MCF-7/6 variant, E-cadherin appeared not to be spontaneously functional in the conditions of the fast aggregation assay, but function could be induced by incubation of the suspended cells in the presence of insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) (Bracke et al., 1993). E-cadherin from MCF-7 cells was shown to contain sialic acid. Treatment with neuraminidase was shown to remove this sialic acid, as well as most of the sialic acid present at the cell surface. Applied to MCF-7/AZ, and MCF-7/6 cells, pretreatment with neuraminidase abolished spontaneous as well as IGF-I induced, E-cadherin-dependent fast cell-cell adhesion of cells in suspension, as measured in the fast aggregation assay. Treatment with neuraminidase did not, however, inhibit the possibly different, but equally E-cadherin-mediated, process of cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 cells on a flat plastic substrate as assessed by determining the percentage of cells remaining isolated (without contact with other cells) 24 h after plating.

  2. Cardiomyocyte Expression and Cell-specific Processing of Procholecystokinin*

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Jens P.; Johnsen, Anders H.; Kistorp, Caroline; Gustafsson, Finn; Johnbeck, Camilla B.; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Heart muscle cells produce peptide hormones such as natriuretic peptides. Developing hearts also express the gene for the classic intestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) in amounts similar to those in the intestine and brain. However, cardiac expression of peptides other than natriuretic peptides has only been suggested using transcriptional measures or methods, with the post-translational phase of gene expression unaddressed. In this study, we examined the cardiac expression of the CCK gene in adult mammals and its expression at the protein level. Using quantitative PCR, a library of sequence-specific pro-CCK assays, peptide purification, and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the mammalian heart expresses pro-CCK in amounts comparable to natriuretic prohormones and processes it to a unique, triple-sulfated, and N-terminally truncated product distinct from intestinal and cerebral CCK peptides. Isoprenaline rapidly stimulated cardiac CCK gene expression in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that the cardiac-specific truncated pro-CCK may have pathophysiological relevance as a new marker of heart failure. The suggestion is confirmed by measurement of plasma from heart failure patients. PMID:25627687

  3. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  4. Influenza virus and endothelial cells: a species specific relationship

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kirsty R.; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J. B.; Reperant, Leslie A.; Richard, Mathilde; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is an important cause of respiratory disease in humans. The original reservoirs of IAV are wild waterfowl and shorebirds, where virus infection causes limited, if any, disease. Both in humans and in wild waterbirds, epithelial cells are the main target of infection. However, influenza virus can spread from wild bird species to terrestrial poultry. Here, the virus can evolve into highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Part of this evolution involves increased viral tropism for endothelial cells. HPAI virus infections not only cause severe disease in chickens and other terrestrial poultry species but can also spread to humans and back to wild bird populations. Here, we review the role of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection in wild birds, terrestrial poultry and humans with a particular focus on HPAI viruses. We demonstrate that whilst the endothelium is an important target of virus infection in terrestrial poultry and some wild bird species, in humans the endothelium is more important in controlling the local inflammatory milieu. Thus, the endothelium plays an important, but species-specific, role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection. PMID:25520707

  5. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  6. Are folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary gland supportive cells or organ-specific stem cells?

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Mogi, C; Ogawa, S; Tomida, M; Miyai, S

    2002-04-01

    Folliculo-stellate cells (FS-cells) in the anterior pituitary gland are star-shaped cells and form tiny follicles. FS-cells are positive for S-100 protein and produce many cytokines or growth factors, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, it is generally accepted that FS-cells regulate endocrine cells through these growth factors. FS-cells also exhibit a phagocytotic activity and are known to work as scavenger cells. In addition to these functions, FS-cells are considered to have some unknown functions. In order to reveal the biological significance of FS-cells in the anterior pituitary gland, we performed a morphological study and obtained some new findings. First, we were interested in the colloid formation in the senescent porcine pituitary gland. We analyzed the colloids and found that clusterin is a major protein in them. We also found that the accumulation of clusterin in the colloids is related to the phagocytotic activity of FS-cells. In our next study, we found that FS-cells have the potential to differentiate into striated muscle cells. From FS-cells show multi-potent cell character and other cytological evidence, we propose that FS-cells are candidate of organ-specific stem cells in the anterior pituitary gland.

  7. Method of removing the effects of electrical shorts and shunts created during the fabrication process of a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nostrand, Gerald E.; Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    A method of removing the effects of electrical shorts and shunts created during the fabrication process and improving the performance of a solar cell with a thick film cermet electrode opposite to the incident surface by applying a reverse bias voltage of sufficient magnitude to burn out the electrical shorts and shunts but less than the break down voltage of the solar cell.

  8. Removal of copper from aqueous solution by electrodeposition in cathode chamber of microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu-Chun; Liang, Min; Li, Wei; Zhang, Li-Juan; Ni, Jin-Ren; Wu, Wei-Min

    2011-05-15

    Based on energetic analysis, a novel approach for copper electrodeposition via cathodic reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was proposed for the removal of copper and recovery of copper solids as metal copper and/or Cu(2)O in a cathode with simultaneous electricity generation with organic matter. This was examined by using dual-chamber MFCs (chamber volume, 1L) with different concentrations of CuSO(4) solution (50.3 ± 5.8, 183.3 ± 0.4, 482.4 ± 9.6, 1007.9 ± 52.0 and 6412.5 ± 26.7 mg Cu(2+)/L) as catholyte at pH 4.7, and different resistors (0, 15, 390 and 1000 Ω) as external load. With glucose as a substrate and anaerobic sludge as an inoculum, the maximum power density generated was 339 mW/m(3) at an initial 6412.5 ± 26.7 mg Cu(2+)/L concentration. High Cu(2+) removal efficiency (>99%) and final Cu(2+) concentration below the USA EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water (1.3mg/L) was observed at an initial 196.2 ± 0.4 mg Cu(2+)/L concentration with an external resistor of 15 Ω, or without an external resistor. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that Cu(2+) was reduced to cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O) and metal copper (Cu) on the cathodes. Non-reduced brochantite precipitates were observed as major copper precipitates in the MFC with a high initial Cu(2+) concentration (0.1M) but not in the others. The sustainability of high Cu(2+) removal (>96%) by MFC was further examined by fed-batch mode for eight cycles.

  9. Toxicity Minimized Cryoprotectant Addition and Removal Procedures for Adherent Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Allyson Fry; Glasscock, Cameron; McClanahan, Danielle R.; Benson, James D.; Higgins, Adam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-free cryopreservation, known as vitrification, is an appealing approach for banking of adherent cells and tissues because it prevents dissociation and morphological damage that may result from ice crystal formation. However, current vitrification methods are often limited by the cytotoxicity of the concentrated cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions that are required to suppress ice formation. Recently, we described a mathematical strategy for identifying minimally toxic CPA equilibration procedures based on the minimization of a toxicity cost function. Here we provide direct experimental support for the feasibility of these methods when applied to adherent endothelial cells. We first developed a concentration- and temperature-dependent toxicity cost function by exposing the cells to a range of glycerol concentrations at 21°C and 37°C, and fitting the resulting viability data to a first order cell death model. This cost function was then numerically minimized in our state constrained optimization routine to determine addition and removal procedures for 17 molal (mol/kg water) glycerol solutions. Using these predicted optimal procedures, we obtained 81% recovery after exposure to vitrification solutions, as well as successful vitrification with the relatively slow cooling and warming rates of 50°C/min and 130°C/min. In comparison, conventional multistep CPA equilibration procedures resulted in much lower cell yields of about 10%. Our results demonstrate the potential for rational design of minimally toxic vitrification procedures and pave the way for extension of our optimization approach to other adherent cell types as well as more complex systems such as tissues and organs. PMID:26605546

  10. Gene-specific repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide DNA damage in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Denisenko, M.F.; Venkatachalam, S.; Wani, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    Gene-specific preferential repair of UV damage has been well documented in a variety of organisms. Less is known about many other types of critical DNA lesions, the data available being not numerous and contradictory. To date, the majority of observations with UV were obtained by using T4 endonuclease V system. Recent report questions the applicability of UvrABC nuclease incision method for detecting gene-specific repair. This has stimulated our search for simple and sensitive approach based on a different principle. We have employed the idea of detection by the Southern hybridization of restriction cleavage inhibition at rare sites and developed a method for the analysis of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (anti-BPDE) DNA damage in human H-ras proto-oncogene. Damage-dependent induction of individual facultative bands resulting from cleavage inhibition was observed in in vitro modified (4-50 adducts/10{sup 3}kb) p220-ras plasmid DNA digested with EcoRI/NotI, Xhol/Xbal/PstI, and SstI/XbaI/Pst/I. In vivo lesion formation and removal was monitored at several PstI sites distributed along the 6.4 kb single copy ras sequence. Rapid gene-specific repair was seen in primary culture of normal human fibroblasts and in SV40 transformed GM00637 cells. Surprisingly, SV40 transformed XP12BE (complementation group A) GM4429 fibroblasts also repaired anti-BPDE DNA damage at comparable levels. All investigated sites within ras sequence were repaired faster than the genome overall. The results show the utility of the above approach for fine mapping of anti-BPDE DNA lesions. Data suggests that the xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) fibroblasts have a capacity of removing these bulky adducts at least from the active genes.

  11. An Efficient Antipodal Cell Isolation Method for Screening of Cell Type-Specific Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng-xiang

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, the mature embryo sac consists of seven cells, namely two synergid cells and an egg cell at the micropylar end, one central cell, and three antipodal cells at the chalazal end. Excluding the antipodal cell, as a model for the study of cell fate determination and cell type specification, the roles of these embryo sac component cells in fertilization and seed formation have been widely investigated. At this time, little is known regarding the function of antipodal cells and their cell type-specific gene expression patterns. One reason for this is difficulties related to the observation and isolation of cells for detailed functional analyses. Here, we report a method for antipodal cell isolation and transcriptome analysis. We identified antipodal cell-specific marker line K44-1, and based on this marker line, established a procedure allowing us to isolate antipodal cells with both high quality and quantity. PCR validation of antipodal-specific genes from antipodal cell cDNA showed that the isolated cells are qualified and can be used for transcriptome analysis and screening of cell type-specific marker genes. The isolated cells could keep viable for a week in culture condition. This method can be used to efficiently isolate antipodal cells of high quality and will promote the functional investigation of antipodal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. This increases our understanding of the molecular regulatory mechanism of antipodal cell specification. PMID:27875553

  12. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  13. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+) tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  14. The role of syntaxins in the specificity of vesicle targeting in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    ter Beest, Martin B A; Chapin, Steven J; Avrahami, Dana; Mostov, Keith E

    2005-12-01

    In polarized epithelial cells syntaxin 3 is at the apical plasma membrane and is involved in delivery of proteins from the trans-Golgi network to the apical surface. The highly related syntaxin 4 is at the basolateral surface. The complementary distribution of these syntaxins suggests that they play a role in the specificity of membrane traffic to the two surfaces. We constructed a chimeric syntaxin where we removed the N-terminal 29 residues of syntaxin 3 and replaced it with the corresponding portion of syntaxin 4. When expressed in polarized epithelial cells, this chimera was exclusively localized to the basolateral surface. This indicates that the N-terminal domain of syntaxin 3 contains information for its polarized localization. In contrast to the apical localization of syntaxin 3, the basolateral localization of syntaxin 4 was not dependent on its N-terminal domain. Syntaxin 3 normally binds to Munc18b, but not to the related Munc18c. Overexpression of the chimera together with overexpression of Munc18b caused membrane and secretory proteins that are normally sent primarily to the apical surface to exhibit increased delivery to the basolateral surface. We suggest that syntaxins may play a role in determining the specificity of membrane targeting by permitting fusion with only certain target membranes.

  15. Purification of specific cell population by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Basu, Sreemanti; Campbell, Hope M; Dittel, Bonnie N; Ray, Avijit

    2010-07-10

    Experimental and clinical studies often require highly purified cell populations. FACS is a technique of choice to purify cell populations of known phenotype. Other bulk methods of purification include panning, complement depletion and magnetic bead separation. However, FACS has several advantages over other available methods. FACS is the preferred method when very high purity of the desired population is required, when the target cell population expresses a very low level of the identifying marker or when cell populations require separation based on differential marker density. In addition, FACS is the only available purification technique to isolate cells based on internal staining or intracellular protein expression, such as a genetically modified fluorescent protein marker. FACS allows the purification of individual cells based on size, granularity and fluorescence. In order to purify cells of interest, they are first stained with fluorescently-tagged monoclonal antibodies (mAb), which recognize specific surface markers on the desired cell population (1). Negative selection of unstained cells is also possible. FACS purification requires a flow cytometer with sorting capacity and the appropriate software. For FACS, cells in suspension are passed as a stream in droplets with each containing a single cell in front of a laser. The fluorescence detection system detects cells of interest based on predetermined fluorescent parameters of the cells. The instrument applies a charge to the droplet containing a cell of interest and an electrostatic deflection system facilitates collection of the charged droplets into appropriate collection tubes (2). The success of staining and thereby sorting depends largely on the selection of the identifying markers and the choice of mAb. Sorting parameters can be adjusted depending on the requirement of purity and yield. Although FACS requires specialized equipment and personnel training, it is the method of choice for isolation of

  16. Concise Review: Tissue-Specific Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Hannah K.; Canfield, Scott G.; Shusta, Eric V.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) display significant heterogeneity across tissue types, playing an important role in tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Recent work demonstrating the derivation of tissue-specific microvascular endothelial cells (TS-MVECs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has ignited the potential to generate tissue-specific models which may be applied to regenerative medicine and in vitro modeling applications. Here we review techniques by which hPSC-derived TS-MVECs have been made to date and discuss how current hPSC-EC differentiation protocols may be directed towards tissue-specific fates. We begin by discussing the nature of EC tissue specificity in vivo and review general hPSC-EC differentiation protocols generated over the last decade. Finally, we describe how specificity can be integrated into hPSC-EC protocols to generate hPSC-derived TS-MVECs in vitro, including EC and parenchymal cell co-culture, directed differentiation, and direct reprogramming strategies. PMID:25070152

  17. The removal of cholesterol from aortic smooth muscle cells in culture and Landschutz ascites cells by fractions of human high-density apolipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Stein, Y; Glangeaud, M C; Fainaru, M; Stein, O

    1975-01-24

    Ascites cells were labeled by intraperitoneal injection of [3H]cholesterol and aortic smooth muscle cells by addition of [3H]cholesterol to the serum component of the culture medium. The release of cholesterol from cells into a serum-free medium supplemented with the various "acceptors" was studied using ascites cells in suspension and aortic smooth muscle cells in a multilayer culture. Unfractionated human high-density apolipoprotein was somewhat more effective in the removal of labeled cellular free cholesterol, in both cell types, than apolipoprotein derived from rat high-density lipoprotein. Following separation of human high-density apolipoprotein into four fractions by Sephadex chromatography, the effect of each fraction on the removal of cellular cholesterol from ascites cells was studied. The individual fractions had a lower capacity for cholesterol removal than the original unfractionated high-density apolipoprotein and the lowest activity was detected in Fraction II which comprised 75% of the total apolipoprotein. The effectiveness to remove cholesterol could be restored to all the fractions, as well as enhanced, by addition of sonicated suspensions of lecithin or sphingomyelin, which by themselves promoted a more limited removal of cellular cholesterol. Negatively stained preparations of mixtures of the four fractions and sonicated dispersion of lecithin were shown to consist of vesicles and discs of various sizes. Addition of the apolipoprotein fractions (especially Fractions II and IV) to sonicated dispersion of sphingomyelin resulted in a pronounced formation of discs which showed a high tendency towards stack formation. Mixtures of Fraction II and lecithin or sphingomyelin were effective in the release of cellular cholesterol from multilayers of aortic smooth muscle cells in culture. These results show the feasibility of net removal of cholesterol from cells which grow in a form resembling a tissue and thus provide a model to study the role of

  18. Deletion of Virus-specific T-cells Enhances Remyelination in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Denic, Aleksandar; Wootla, Bharath; Zoecklein, Laurie; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    We used transgenic expression of capsid antigens to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) to study how the immune response to VP1 and VP2 influences spinal cord demyelination, remyelination and axonal loss during the acute and chronic phases of infection. Expression from birth of capsid antigen under the ubiquitin promoter resulted in tolerance to the antigen and absence of an immune response to the respective capsid antigen following virus infection. The transgenic mice were crossed to B10.Q mice normally susceptible to demyelination but which, when compared to FVB mice of the same H2 (q) haplotype, show poor remyelination. The major finding in this study was that VP1+ and VP2+ animals featured more remyelination at all three chronic time points (90, 180 and 270 dpi) than transgene-negative controls. Interestingly, at 270 dpi, remyelination in VP1+ mice tended to be higher and more complete than that in VP2+ mice. Compared with transgene- negative controls, VP1+ and VP2+ animals showed similar demyelination in but less only late in the disease (270 dpi). The number of mid-thoracic axons at the last time point correlated with the levels of remyelination. The increase in number of axons in VP1+ mice with remyelination was driven by counts in medium- and large-caliber axons. This study supports the hypothesis that expression of viral capsid proteins as self and subsequent genetic deletion of capsid-specific T cells influences the extent of spinal cord remyelination following Theiler's virus-induced demyelination. We propose that VP1- and, to a lesser extent, VP2-specific CD8(+) T cells limit and/or prevent the naturally occurring process of remyelination. This finding may have relevance to human multiple sclerosis, as targeted removal of CD8(+) T cells specific for a yet-to-be-discovered causative peptide may enhance remyelination and prevent axonal loss in patients.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen removal and enhanced methane production in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Villano, Marianna; Scardala, Stefano; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    2013-02-01

    The anode of a two-chamber methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was poised at +0.200V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) and continuously fed (1.08gCOD/Ld) with acetate in anaerobic mineral medium. A gas mixture (carbon dioxide 30vol.% in N(2)) was continuously added to the cathode for both pH control and carbonate supply. At the anode, 94% of the influent acetate was removed, mostly through anaerobic oxidation (91% coulombic efficiency); the resulting electric current was mainly recovered as methane (79% cathode capture efficiency). Low biomass growth was observed at the anode and ammonium was transferred through the cationic membrane and concentrated at the cathode. These findings suggest that the MEC can be used for the treatment of low-strength wastewater, with good energy efficiency and low sludge production.

  20. Enhanced water removal in a fuel cell stack by droplet atomization using structural and acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palan, Vikrant; Shepard, W. Steve

    This work examines new methods for enhancing product water removal in fuel cell stacks. Vibration and acoustic based methods are proposed to atomize condensed water droplets in the channels of a bipolar plate or on a membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The vibration levels required to atomize water droplets of different sizes are first examined using two different approaches: (1) exciting the droplet at the same energy level required to form that droplet; and (2) by using a method called 'vibration induced droplet atomization', or VIDA. It is shown analytically that a 2 mm radius droplet resting on a bipolar-like plate can be atomized by inducing acceleration levels as low as 250 g at a certain frequency. By modeling the direct structural excitation of a simplified bipolar plate using a realistic source, the response levels that can be achieved are then compared with those required levels. Furthermore, a two-cell fuel cell finite element model and a boundary element model of the MEA were developed to demonstrate that the acceleration levels required for droplet atomization may be achieved in both the bipolar plate as well as the MEA through proper choice of excitation frequency and source strength.

  1. CD8+ T Cells Induce Fatal Brainstem Pathology during Cerebral Malaria via Luminal Antigen-Specific Engagement of Brain Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Phillip A.; Hart, Geoffrey T.; Russo, Matthew V.; Nayak, Debasis; Yazew, Takele; Peña, Mirna; Khan, Shahid M.; Pierce, Susan K.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection that results in thousands of deaths each year, mostly in African children. The in vivo mechanisms underlying this fatal condition are not entirely understood. Using the animal model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), we sought mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of CM. Fatal disease was associated with alterations in tight junction proteins, vascular breakdown in the meninges / parenchyma, edema, and ultimately neuronal cell death in the brainstem, which is consistent with cerebral herniation as a cause of death. At the peak of ECM, we revealed using intravital two-photon microscopy that myelomonocytic cells and parasite-specific CD8+ T cells associated primarily with the luminal surface of CNS blood vessels. Myelomonocytic cells participated in the removal of parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) from cerebral blood vessels, but were not required for the disease. Interestingly, the majority of disease-inducing parasite-specific CD8+ T cells interacted with the lumen of brain vascular endothelial cells (ECs), where they were observed surveying, dividing, and arresting in a cognate peptide-MHC I dependent manner. These activities were critically dependent on IFN-γ, which was responsible for activating cerebrovascular ECs to upregulate adhesion and antigen-presenting molecules. Importantly, parasite-specific CD8+ T cell interactions with cerebral vessels were impaired in chimeric mice rendered unable to present EC antigens on MHC I, and these mice were in turn resistant to fatal brainstem pathology. Moreover, anti-adhesion molecule (LFA-1 / VLA-4) therapy prevented fatal disease by rapidly displacing luminal CD8+ T cells from cerebrovascular ECs without affecting extravascular T cells. These in vivo data demonstrate that parasite-specific CD8+ T cell-induced fatal vascular breakdown and subsequent neuronal death during ECM is associated with luminal, antigen

  2. Removal of trace organic contaminants by nitrifying activated sludge and whole-cell and crude enzyme extract of Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shufan; Hai, Faisal I; Nghiem, Long D; Roddick, Felicity; Price, William E

    2013-01-01

    The resistance of certain anthropogenic trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) to conventional wastewater treatment and their potential adverse effects on human and ecological health raise significant concerns and have prompted research on their bioremediation by white-rot fungi. This study compared the removal efficiencies of four widespread TrOCs: carbamazepine (CBZ), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), bisphenol A (BPA) and diclofenac (DCF), by nitrifying activated sludge as well as whole-cell and extracellular enzyme (laccase) extract of the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Fungal whole-cell culture removed only BPA and DCF but with high efficiencies (>90%) while the mixed nitrifying culture removed all compounds, although by levels of only 5-40%. Rapid initial sorption on fungal mycelium (44 ± 13% for DCF) was observed; however, biodegradation governed the overall removal. Performance comparison between fungal whole-cell and extracellular extract revealed that, unlike BPA, a catalytic pathway independent of extracellular laccase was responsible for DCF removal. Addition of mediator (1-hydroxybenzotriazole) to extracellular extract improved the removal of SMX which bears an electron donor group, but not that of the resistant compound CBZ.

  3. GFP-specific CD8 T cells enable targeted cell depletion and visualization of T-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Judith; Ruzo, Albert; Park, Eun Sook; Sweeney, Robert; Kana, Veronika; Wu, Meng; Zhao, Yong; Egli, Dieter; Merad, Miriam; Brown, Brian D

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous cell types with scarcely understood functions, whose interactions with the immune system are not well characterized. To facilitate their study, we generated a mouse bearing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-specific CD8(+) T cells. Transfer of the T cells into EGFP reporter animals can be used to kill EGFP-expressing cells, allowing selective depletion of desired cell types, or to interrogate T-cell interactions with specific populations. Using this system, we eliminate a rare EGFP-expressing cell type in the heart and demonstrate its role in cardiac function. We also show that naive T cells are recruited into the mouse brain by antigen-expressing microglia, providing evidence of an immune surveillance pathway in the central nervous system. The just EGFP death-inducing (Jedi) T cells enable visualization of a T-cell antigen. They also make it possible to utilize hundreds of existing EGFP-expressing mice, tumors, pathogens and other tools, to study T-cell interactions with many different cell types, to model disease states and to determine the functions of poorly characterized cell populations.

  4. Islet Cell Surface Antibodies from Insulin-dependent Diabetics Bind Specifically to Pancreatic B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van De Winkel, M.; Smets, G.; Gepts, W.; Pipeleers, D.

    1982-01-01

    Viable rat islet cells were used to detect islet cell surface antibodies (ICSA) in the sera of diabetic and control patients. ICSA were present in almost all recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetics younger than 30 yr (15/16); their incidence in other diabetics (6/22) was also higher than in normal controls (1/18) or in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (1/12). The varying specificity of the ICSA for the different islet cell types led to the recognition of class I sera, whose ICSA bind exclusively to B cells, class II sera, binding only to A and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells and class III sera, reacting with the three islet cell types but not with D cells. Most recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetics younger than 30 contained class I-ICSA, which is consistent with an autoimmune basis of their disease and with an involvement of surface antibodies in the B cell destruction. The presence of class II ICSA in three older diabetics and in one normal control raises the question whether autoimmune reactions against A and PP cells exist and are associated with a distinct entity in islet disease. It is concluded that the autoimmune form of diabetes mellitus represents a heterogeneous group, in which ICSA-positive patients can be distinguished on the basis of their ICSA-binding to one or more islet cell types. Three techniques can be used for the further identification of circulating ICSA, namely binding experiments with purified A or B cells, electron microscopical analysis of ICSA-binding islet cells purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the immunocytochemical characterization of ICSA-positive cells. Images PMID:6123526

  5. Specification of functional cranial placode derivatives from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Zehra; Piao, Jinghua; Niu, Lei; Ganat, Yosif; Kriks, Sonja; Zimmer, Bastian; Shi, Song-Hai; Tabar, Viviane; Studer, Lorenz

    2013-12-12

    Cranial placodes are embryonic structures essential for sensory and endocrine organ development. Human placode development has remained largely inaccessible despite the serious medical conditions caused by the dysfunction of placode-derived tissues. Here, we demonstrate the efficient derivation of cranial placodes from human pluripotent stem cells. Timed removal of the BMP inhibitor Noggin, a component of the dual-SMAD inhibition strategy of neural induction, triggers placode induction at the expense of CNS fates. Concomitant inhibition of fibroblast growth factor signaling disrupts placode derivation and induces surface ectoderm. Further fate specification at the preplacode stage enables the selective generation of placode-derived trigeminal ganglia capable of in vivo engraftment, mature lens fibers, and anterior pituitary hormone-producing cells that upon transplantation produce human growth hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone in vivo. Our results establish a powerful experimental platform to study human cranial placode development and set the stage for the development of human cell-based therapies in sensory and endocrine disease.

  6. Mechanical continuity and reversible chromosome disassembly within intact genomes removed from living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Bojanowski, K.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Chromatin is thought to be structurally discontinuous because it is packaged into morphologically distinct chromosomes that appear physically isolated from one another in metaphase preparations used for cytogenetic studies. However, analysis of chromosome positioning and movement suggest that different chromosomes often behave as if they were physically connected in interphase as well as mitosis. To address this paradox directly, we used a microsurgical technique to physically remove nucleoplasm or chromosomes from living cells under isotonic conditions. Using this approach, we found that pulling a single nucleolus or chromosome out from interphase or mitotic cells resulted in sequential removal of the remaining nucleoli and chromosomes, interconnected by a continuous elastic thread. Enzymatic treatments of interphase nucleoplasm and chromosome chains held under tension revealed that mechanical continuity within the chromatin was mediated by elements sensitive to DNase or micrococcal nuclease, but not RNases, formamide at high temperature, or proteases. In contrast, mechanical coupling between mitotic chromosomes and the surrounding cytoplasm appeared to be mediated by gelsolin-sensitive microfilaments. Furthermore, when ion concentrations were raised and lowered, both the chromosomes and the interconnecting strands underwent multiple rounds of decondensation and recondensation. As a result of these dynamic structural alterations, the mitotic chains also became sensitive to disruption by restriction enzymes. Ion-induced chromosome decondensation could be blocked by treatment with DNA binding dyes, agents that reduce protein disulfide linkages within nuclear matrix, or an antibody directed against histones. Fully decondensed chromatin strands also could be induced to recondense into chromosomes with pre-existing size, shape, number, and position by adding anti-histone antibodies. Conversely, removal of histones by proteolysis or heparin treatment produced chromosome

  7. Specific estradiol biosynthetic pathway in choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mélanie; Labrie, Fernand; Luu-The, Van

    2009-09-01

    Estradiol (E2) plays a crucial role in all reproduction processes. In the placenta, it is well recognized that E2 is synthesized from fetal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). However, there is some controversy about the biosynthetic pathway involved, some authors suggest that E2 is produced by aromatization of testosterone (T), while others suggest that E2 is produced by the conversion of estrone (E1) into E2 by type 1 17beta-HSD, subsequent to the aromatization of 4-androstenedione (4-dione) into E1. In the present report, using the precursor [(14)C]DHEA, inhibitors of steroidogenic enzymes (chemical inhibitors and siRNA) and a choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line that expresses all the enzymes necessary to transform DHEA into E2, we could determine the sequential steps and the specific steroidogenic enzymes involved in the transformation of DHEA into E2. Quantification of mRNA expression levels using real-time PCR, strongly suggests that type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD1), aromatase and type 1 17beta-HSD (17beta-HSD1) that are highly expressed in JEG-3 cells are the enzymes responsible for the transformation of DHEA into E2. Analysis of the intermediates produced in the absence and presence of 3beta-HSD, aromatase and 17beta-HSD1 inhibitors permits to determine the following sequential steps: DHEA is transformed into 4-dione by 3beta-HSD1, then 4-dione is aromatized into E1 by aromatase and E1 is finally transformed into E2 by 17beta-HSD1. Our data are clearly in favor of the pathway in which the step of aromatization precedes the step of reduction by 17beta-HSD.

  8. The effect of adenovirus-specific antibodies on adenoviral vector–induced, transgene product–specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Small, Juliana C.; Haut, Larissa H.; Bian, Ang; Ertl, Hildegund C. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of neutralizing Abs to different serotypes of E1-deleted Ad vectors on the immunogenicity of the homologous Ad vector or a vector derived from a heterologous serotype. Our results showed that, as expected, even low titers of passively transferred neutralizing Abs significantly reduced the homologous vectors' ability to elicit transgene-specific CD8+ T cell responses. In addition, Abs changed the fate of transgene product–specific CD8+ T cells by promoting their transition into the central memory cell pool, which resulted in markedly enhanced expansion of transgene product–specific CD8+ T cells after a boost with a heterologous Ad vector. Non-neutralizing Abs specific to a distinct Ad serotype had no effect on the magnitude of transgene product-specific CD8+ T cells induced by a heterologous Ad vector, nor did such Abs promote induction of more resting memory CD8+ T cells. These results show that Abs to an Ad vaccine carrier affect not only the magnitude but also the profile of a vector-induced CD8+ T cell response. PMID:25082150

  9. Regulation of visual Wulst cell responsiveness by imprinting causes stimulus-specific activation of rostral cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Kato, Tomomi; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Imprinting behaviour in chicks can be induced exclusively during a short period after hatching. During this period, visual information on the imprinting stimulus is conveyed to the visual Wulst (VW) in the telencephalon, which corresponds to the visual cortex of mammals, and then to the memory-storing region known as the intermediate medial mesopallium. These two regions are indispensable for imprinting. We previously showed that imprinting training altered the response pattern of the VW to the imprinting stimulus; however, the precise distribution of cells and the mechanism involved with this altered response remains unclear. Here we showed that a specific population of rostral VW cells responded to the imprinting stimulus by analysing the subcellular localization of Arc/arg3.1 transcripts in VW cells. GABAergic parvalbumin (PV) cells are abundant in the dorsal region of this area, and imprinting training doubled the number of activated PV-positive neurons. An injection of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in the dorsal VW disturbed the rostral distribution of responsive cells and thus resulted in a lack of imprinting. These results suggest that activated PV cells restrict VW cells response to dorsal area to form a specific imprinting pathway. PMID:28230107

  10. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs.

  11. Removal of sulphur-containing odorants from fuel gases for fuel cell-based combined heat and power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wild, P. J.; Nyqvist, R. G.; de Bruijn, F. A.; Stobbe, E. R.

    Natural gas (NG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are important potential feedstocks for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell-based (e.g. proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or solid oxide fuel Cells (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) applications. To prevent detrimental effects on the (electro)catalysts in fuel cell-based combined heat and power installations (FC-CHP), sulphur removal from the feedstock is mandatory. An experimental bench-marking study of adsorbents has identified several candidates for the removal of sulphur containing odorants at low temperature. Among these adsorbents a new material has been discovered that offers an economically attractive means to remove TetraHydroThiophene (THT), the main European odorant, from natural gas at ambient temperature. The material is environmentally benign, easy to use and possesses good activity (residual sulphur levels below 20 ppbv) and capacity for the common odorant THT in natural gas. When compared to state-of-the-art metal-promoted active carbon the new material has a THT uptake capacity that is up to 10 times larger, depending on temperature and pressure. Promoted versions of the new material have shown potential for the removal of THT at higher temperatures and/or for the removal of other odorants such as mercaptans from natural gas or from LPG.

  12. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  13. Regional Cell Specific RNA Expression Profiling of FACS Isolated Drosophila Intestinal Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Devanjali; Buchon, Nicolas; Xiang, Jinyi; Edgar, Bruce A

    2015-08-03

    The adult Drosophila midgut is built of five distinct cell types, including stem cells, enteroblasts, enterocytes, enteroendocrine cells, and visceral muscles, and is divided into five major regions (R1 to R5), which are morphologically and functionally distinct from each other. This unit describes a protocol for the isolation of Drosophila intestinal cell populations for the purpose of cell type-specific transcriptome profiling from the five different regions. A method to select a cell type of interest labeled with green or yellow fluorescent protein (GFP, YFP) by making use of the GAL4-UAS bipartite system and fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) is presented. Total RNA is isolated from the sorted cells of each region, and linear RNA amplification is used to obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for analysis by microarray, RT-PCR, or RNA sequencing. This method will be useful for quantitative transcriptome comparison across intestinal cell types in the different regions under normal and various experimental conditions.

  14. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection. PMID:27648075

  15. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal efficiency, and measures of velocity using several tools. Computational fluid dynamics was used first to characterize hydraulics in the proposed retrofit that included removal of the traditional Burrows pond dividing wall and establishment of four counter rotating cells with appropriate drains and inlet water jets. Hydraulic residence time was subsequently established in the four full scale test tanks using measures of conductivity of a salt tracer introduced into the systems both with and without fish present. Vertical and horizontal velocities were also measured with acoustic Doppler velocimetry in transects across each of the rearing systems. Finally, we introduced ABS sinking beads that simulated fish solids then followed the kinetics of their removal via the drains to establish relative purge rates. The mixed cell raceway provided higher mean velocities and a more uniform velocity distribution than did the Burrows pond. Vectors revealed well-defined, counter-rotating cells in the mixed cell raceway, and were likely contributing factors in achieving a relatively high particle removal efficiency-88.6% versus 8.0% during the test period. We speculate retrofits of rearing ponds to mixed cell systems will improve both the rearing environments for the fish and solids removal, improving the efficiency and bio-security of fish culture. We recommend further testing in hatchery production trials to evaluate fish physiology and growth.

  16. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonmi; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Molina-Estevez, Francisco Javier; Vanuytsel, Kim; Skvir, Nick; Leung, Amy; Rozelle, Sarah S; Shaikho, Elmutaz Mohammed; Weir, Isabelle; Jiang, Zhihua; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Chui, David H K; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Alsultan, Abdulraham; Al-Ali, Amein; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Murphy, George J

    2017-04-11

    Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB) haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS) mutation.

  17. Removal of regulatory T cell activity reverses hyporesponsiveness and leads to filarial parasite clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew D; LeGoff, Laetitia; Harris, Anjanette; Malone, Eva; Allen, Judith E; Maizels, Rick M

    2005-04-15

    Human filarial parasites cause chronic infection associated with long-term down-regulation of the host's immune response. We show here that CD4+ T cell regulation is the main determinant of parasite survival. In a laboratory model of infection, using Litomosoides sigmodontis in BALB/c mice, parasites establish for >60 days in the thoracic cavity. During infection, CD4+ T cells at this site express increasing levels of CD25, CTLA-4, and glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor family-related gene (GITR), and by day 60, up to 70% are CTLA-4(+)GITR(high), with a lesser fraction coexpressing CD25. Upon Ag stimulation, CD4(+)CTLA-4(+)GITR(high) cells are hyporesponsive for proliferation and cytokine production. To test the hypothesis that regulatory T cell activity maintains hyporesponsiveness and prolongs infection, we treated mice with Abs to CD25 and GITR. Combined Ab treatment was able to overcome an established infection, resulting in a 73% reduction in parasite numbers (p < 0.01). Parasite killing was accompanied by increased Ag-specific immune responses and markedly reduced levels of CTLA-4 expression. The action of the CD25(+)GITR+ cells was IL-10 independent as in vivo neutralization of IL-10R did not restore the ability of the immune system to kill parasites. These data suggest that regulatory T cells act, in an IL-10-independent manner, to suppress host immunity to filariasis.

  18. Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-09-23

    Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

  19. Id3 Controls Cell Death of 2B4+ Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells in Chronic Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Menner, Alexandra J; Rauch, Katharina S; Aichele, Peter; Pircher, Hanspeter; Schachtrup, Christian; Schachtrup, Kristina

    2015-09-01

    Sustained Ag persistence in chronic infection results in a deregulated CD8(+) T cell response that is characterized by T cell exhaustion and cell death of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Yet, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms regulating CD8(+) T cell exhaustion and cell death are poorly defined. Using the experimental mouse model of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, we demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator Id3 controls cell death of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in chronic infection. By comparing acute and chronic infection, we showed that Id3 (-) virus-specific CD8(+) T cells were less abundant, whereas the absolute numbers of Id3 (+) virus-specific CD8(+) T cells were equal in chronic and acute infection. Phenotypically, Id3 (-) and Id3 (+) cells most prominently differed with regard to expression of the surface receptor 2B4; although Id3 (-) cells were 2B4(+), almost all Id3 (+) cells lacked expression of 2B4. Lineage-tracing experiments showed that cells initially expressing Id3 differentiated into Id3 (-)2B4(+) cells; in turn, these cells were terminally differentiated and highly susceptible to cell death under conditions of persisting Ag. Enforced Id3 expression specifically increased the persistence of 2B4(+) virus-specific CD8(+) T cells by decreasing susceptibility to Fas/Fas ligand-mediated cell death. Thus, our findings reveal that the transcriptional regulator Id3 promotes the survival of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in chronic infection and suggest that targeting Id3 might be beneficial for preventing cell death of CD8(+) T cells in chronic infection or for promoting cell death of uncontrolled, hyperactive CD8(+) T cells to prevent immunopathology.

  20. Mapping cell type-specific transcriptional enhancers using high affinity, lineage-specific Ep300 bioChIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Zhang, Lina; Akerberg, Brynn N; Ma, Qing; Li, Kai; He, Aibin; Lin, Zhiqiang; Stevens, Sean M; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell type-specific transcriptional programs requires developing a lexicon of their genomic regulatory elements. We developed a lineage-selective method to map transcriptional enhancers, regulatory genomic regions that activate transcription, in mice. Since most tissue-specific enhancers are bound by the transcriptional co-activator Ep300, we used Cre-directed, lineage-specific Ep300 biotinylation and pulldown on immobilized streptavidin followed by next generation sequencing of co-precipitated DNA to identify lineage-specific enhancers. By driving this system with lineage-specific Cre transgenes, we mapped enhancers active in embryonic endothelial cells/blood or skeletal muscle. Analysis of these enhancers identified new transcription factor heterodimer motifs that likely regulate transcription in these lineages. Furthermore, we identified candidate enhancers that regulate adult heart- or lung- specific endothelial cell specialization. Our strategy for tissue-specific protein biotinylation opens new avenues for studying lineage-specific protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22039.001 PMID:28121289

  1. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting for Analysis of Cell Type-Specific Responses to Salinity Stress in Arabidopsis and Rice

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Aurelie; Bargmann, Bastiaan O.R.; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Tester, Mark; Baumann, Ute; Johnson, Alexander A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) provides a rapid means of isolating large numbers of fluorescently tagged cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells. Collections of transgenic plants with cell type-specific expression of fluorescent marker genes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) are ideally suited for FACS-assisted studies of individual cell types. Here we describe the use of Arabidopsis and rice enhancer trap lines with tissue-specific GFP expression patterns in the root to isolate specific cell types of root tissues using FACS. Additionally, protocols are provided to impose a ramped salinity stress for 48 h prior to cell sorting. PMID:22895766

  2. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  3. Coupling of T cell receptor specificity to natural killer T cell development by bivalent histone H3 methylation.

    PubMed

    Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Kim, Jong Kyong; Marcello, Jonas; Fang, Terry C; Prinjha, Rab; Bosselut, Remy; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    The fidelity of T cell immunity depends greatly on coupling T cell receptor signaling with specific T cell effector functions. Here, we describe a chromatin-based mechanism that enables integration of TCR specificity into definite T cell lineage commitment. Using natural killer T cells (iNKT cell) as a model of a T cell subset that differentiates in response to specific TCR signaling, we identified a key role of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in coupling iNKT cell TCR specificity with the generation of iNKT cells. We found that the Zbtb16/PLZF gene promoter that drives iNKT cell differentiation possesses a bivalent chromatin state characterized by the simultaneous presence of negative and positive H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications. Depletion of H3K27me3 at the Zbtb16/PLZF promoter leads to uncoupling of iNKT cell development from TCR specificity and is associated with accumulation of iNKT-like CD4(+) cells that express a non-iNKT cell specific T cell repertoire. In turn, stabilization of H3K27me3 leads to a drastic reduction of the iNKT cell population. Our data suggest that H3K27me3 levels at the bivalent Zbtb16/PLZF gene define a threshold enabling precise coupling of TCR specificity to lineage commitment.

  4. BC1 RNA: transcriptional analysis of a neural cell-specific RNA polymerase III transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Martignetti, J A; Brosius, J

    1995-01-01

    Rodent BC1 RNA represents the first example of a neural cell-specific RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription product. By developing a rat brain in vitro system capable of supporting Pol III-directed transcription, we showed that the rat BC1 RNA intragenic promoter elements, comprising an A box element and a variant B box element, as well as its upstream region, containing octamer-binding consensus sequences and functional TATA and proximal sequence element sites, are necessary for transcription. The BC1 B box, lacking the invariant A residue found in the consensus B boxes of tRNAs, represents a functionally related and possibly distinct promoter element. The transcriptional activity of the BC1 B box element is greatly increased, in both a BC1 RNA and a chimeric tRNA(Leu) gene construct, when the BC1 5' flanking region is present and is appropriately spaced. Moreover, a tRNA consensus B-box sequence can efficiently replace the BC1 B box only if the BC1 upstream region is removed. These interactions, identified only in a homologous in vitro system, between upstream Pol II and intragenic Pol III promoters suggest a mechanism by which the tissue-specific BC1 RNA gene and possibly other Pol III-transcribed genes can be regulated. PMID:7862155

  5. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  6. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  7. Getting down to specifics: profiling gene expression and protein-DNA interactions in a cell type-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Colin D.; Southall, Tony D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of multicellular organisms are comprised of an extraordinary range of cell types, with different properties and gene expression profiles. Understanding what makes each cell type unique, and how their individual characteristics are attributed, are key questions for both developmental and neurobiologists alike. The brain is an excellent example of the cellular diversity expressed in the majority of eukaryotes. The mouse brain comprises of approximately 75 million neurons varying in morphology, electrophysiology, and preferences for synaptic partners. A powerful process in beginning to pick apart the mechanisms that specify individual characteristics of the cell, as well as their fate, is to profile gene expression patterns, chromatin states, and transcriptional networks in a cell type-specific manner, i.e. only profiling the cells of interest in a particular tissue. Depending on the organism, the questions being investigated, and the material available, certain cell type-specific profiling methods are more suitable than others. This chapter reviews the approaches presently available for selecting and isolating specific cell types and evaluates their key features. PMID:26410031

  8. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4{sup +} T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Timothy J.; Castrucci, Maria R.; Padrick, Ryan C.; Bradley, Linda M.; Topham, David J. . E-mail: david_topham@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-09-30

    To track epitope-specific CD4{sup +} T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA{sub 323-339} epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVA{sub II}, replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4{sup +} T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4{sup +} T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA{sub 323-339} epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4{sup +} T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection.

  9. Glycosylation of the T-cell antigen-specific receptor and its potential role in lectin-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, S.C.; Kranz, D.M.; Longmore, G.D.; Sitkovsky, M.V.; Eisen, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) normally destroy only those cells (target cells) whose surface antigens they recognize. However, in the presence of lectins such as Con A, CTLs destroy virtually any cell, regardless of its antigens. The oligosaccharides of the T-cell antigen-specific receptor, a dimeric surface glycoprotein composed of disulfide-linked ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits, are of interest because of their potential involvement in this lectin-dependent cytotoxic activity. The authors report here that three or four asparagine-linked oligosaccharides could be enzymatically removed from each of the receptor subunits expressed by a cloned line of murine CTLs (clone 2C), consistent with the presence of glycosylation sites deduced from cDNA sequences of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. genes expressed in this clone. All the N-linked glycans on the ..cap alpha.. subunit were of the complex type, but the ..beta.. subunit carried two or three endoglycosidase H-sensitive oligosaccharides. High-mannose glycans can bind tightly to Con A and, indeed, this lectin was found to bind specifically to solubilized 2C T-cell receptor. The Con A-dependent cytotoxic activity of clone 2C, but not of other CTL clones, was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody (1B2) that is specific for the T-cell receptor of clone 2C. Antibody 1B2 also inhibited clone 2C cytotoxicity mediated by phytohemagglutinin, lentil-lectin, and wheat-germ agglutinin. These results suggest that, although lectin-dependent lysis of target cells by CTLs is antigen nonspecific, the cytolytic activity can be triggered by binding of the lectin to the T-cell antigen-specific receptor.

  10. Optimizing osmotic pressure removes EBV particles from B95-8 host cells while maintaining normal activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Shen, Jing; Cai, Jie

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the removal of virus particles from B95-8 host cells that maintain normal activity under optimal osmotic pressure. After infecting B95-8 cells with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) particles, the cells were treated with isosmotic solution [0.90% NaCl (330 mOsm/kg H(2)O)], hyposmotic solutions [0.36% NaCl (115 mOsm/kg H(2)O) and 0.27% NaCl (93 mOsm/kg H(2)O)] and distilled water. The pumping levels of virus particles were observed by inverse phase contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment with the hyposmotic solutions, the following results were observed: firstly, after culturing for 24 and 48 h, the B95-8 cells in the hyposmotic solutions grew as well as the cells cultured in the isosmotic solution. Secondly, the virus particles in the B95-8 host cells overflowed onto the surface of the cells, while the organelle structures remained intact. This phenomenon was repeated in the removal of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from leukomonocytes. By optimizing the osmotic pressure, the activity of the B95-8 host cells was retained and the EBV particles were transported from the cells onto the cell surface.

  11. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  12. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8+ cells produce transforming growth factor beta that can suppress HCV-specific T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Alatrakchi, Nadia; Graham, Camilla S; van der Vliet, Hans J J; Sherman, Kenneth E; Exley, Mark A; Koziel, Margaret James

    2007-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T-cell responses are rarely detected in peripheral blood, especially in the presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Based on recent evidence that T-regulatory cells may be increased in chronic HCV, we hypothesized that functional blockade of regulatory cells could raise HCV-specific responses and might be differentially regulated in the setting of HIV coinfection. Three groups of subjects were studied: HCV monoinfected, HCV-HIV coinfected, and healthy controls. Frequencies of peripheral T cells specific for peptides derived from HCV core, HIV type 1 p24, and recall antigens were analyzed by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immuno-spot assay. HCV-specific T-cell responses were very weak in groups with HCV and HCV-HIV infections. Addition of blocking antibodies against transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), -2, and -3 and interleukin-10 specifically increased the HCV-specific T-cell responses in both infected groups; however, this increase was attenuated in the group with HCV-HIV coinfection compared to HCV infection alone. No increase in recall antigen- or HIV-specific responses was observed. Flow cytometric sorter analysis demonstrated that regulatory-associated cytokines were produced by HCV-specific CD3(+)CD8(+)CD25(-) cells. Enhancement of the IFN-gamma effect was observed for both CD4 and CD8 T cells and was mediated primarily by TGF-beta1, -2, and -3 neutralization. In conclusion, blockade of TGF-beta secretion could enhance peripheral HCV-specific T-cell responses even in the presence of HIV coinfection.

  13. The CellML 1.1 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Autumn; Hedley, Warren; Nelson, Melanie; Lloyd, Catherine; Halstead, Matt; Bullivant, David; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter; Nielsen, Poul

    2015-09-04

    This document specifies CellML 1.1, an XML-based language for describing and exchanging models of cellular and subcellular processes. MathML embedded in CellML documents is used to define the underlying mathematics of models. Models consist of a network of reusable components, each with variables and equations manipulating those variables. Models may import other models to create systems of increasing complexity. Metadata may be embedded in CellML documents using RDF.

  14. Live-cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans reveals the distinct roles of dynamin self-assembly and guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis in the removal of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Yu, Xiaomeng; Margolis, Moran; Liu, Xianghua; Leng, Xiaohong; Etzion, Yael; Zheng, Fei; Lu, Nan; Quiocho, Florante A; Danino, Dganit; Zhou, Zheng

    2010-02-15

    Dynamins are large GTPases that oligomerize along membranes. Dynamin's membrane fission activity is believed to underlie many of its physiological functions in membrane trafficking. Previously, we reported that DYN-1 (Caenorhabditis elegans dynamin) drove the engulfment and degradation of apoptotic cells through promoting the recruitment and fusion of intracellular vesicles to phagocytic cups and phagosomes, an activity distinct from dynamin's well-known membrane fission activity. Here, we have detected the oligomerization of DYN-1 in living C. elegans embryos and identified DYN-1 mutations that abolish DYN-1's oligomerization or GTPase activities. Specifically, abolishing self-assembly destroys DYN-1's association with the surfaces of extending pseudopods and maturing phagosomes, whereas inactivating guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding blocks the dissociation of DYN-1 from these membranes. Abolishing the self-assembly or GTPase activities of DYN-1 leads to common as well as differential phagosomal maturation defects. Whereas both types of mutations cause delays in the transient enrichment of the RAB-5 GTPase to phagosomal surfaces, only the self-assembly mutation but not GTP binding mutation causes failure in recruiting the RAB-7 GTPase to phagosomal surfaces. We propose that during cell corpse removal, dynamin's self-assembly and GTP hydrolysis activities establish a precise dynamic control of DYN-1's transient association to its target membranes and that this control mechanism underlies the dynamic recruitment of downstream effectors to target membranes.

  15. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M.; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H.; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E.; El-Sayed, Mesbah A.; Shoaib, Mahmoud B.; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  16. Enhanced cell-permeant Cre protein for site-specific recombination in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Jo, Daewoong; Gebre-Amlak, Kassatihun D; Ruley, H Earl

    2004-01-01

    Background Cell-permeant Cre DNA site-specific recombinases provide an easily controlled means to regulate gene structure and function in living cells. Since recombination provides a stable and unambiguous record of protein uptake, the enzyme may also be used for quantitative studies of cis- and trans-acting factors that influence the delivery of proteins into cells. Results In the present study, 11 recombinant fusion proteins were analyzed to characterize sequences and conditions that affect protein uptake and/or activity and to develop more active cell-permeant enzymes. We report that the native enzyme has a low, but intrinsic ability to enter cells. The most active Cre proteins tested contained either an N-terminal 6xHis tag and a nuclear localization sequence from SV40 large T antigen (HNC) or the HIV Tat transduction sequence and a C-terminal 6xHis tag (TCH6). The NLS and 6xHis elements separately enhanced the delivery of the HNC protein into cells; moreover, transduction sequences from fibroblast growth factor 4, HIV Tat or consisting of the (KFF)3K sequence were not required for efficient protein transduction and adversely affected enzyme solubility. Transduction of the HNC protein required 10 to 15 min for half-maximum uptake, was greatly decreased at 4°C and was inhibited by serum. Efficient recombination was observed in all cell types tested (a T-cell line, NIH3T3, Cos7, murine ES cells, and primary splenocytes), and did not require localization of the enzyme to the nucleus. Conclusions The effects of different sequences on the delivery and/or activity of Cre in cultured cells could not be predicted in advance. Consequently, the process of developing more active cell-permeant recombinases was largely empirical. The HNC protein, with an excellent combination of activity, solubility and yield, will enhance the use of cell-permeant Cre proteins to regulate gene structure and function in living cells. PMID:15500682

  17. Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States Differentially Prime Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor-Initiating Cells for Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Nassar, Dany; Beck, Benjamin; Boumahdi, Soufiane; Wang, Li; Brisebarre, Audrey; Dubois, Christine; Nkusi, Erwin; Lenglez, Sandrine; Checinska, Agnieszka; Vercauteren Drubbel, Alizée; Devos, Michael; Declercq, Wim; Yi, Rui; Blanpain, Cédric

    2017-02-02

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells has been associated with metastasis, stemness, and resistance to therapy. Some tumors undergo EMT while others do not, which may reflect intrinsic properties of their cell of origin. However, this possibility is largely unexplored. By targeting the same oncogenic mutations to discrete skin compartments, we show that cell-type-specific chromatin and transcriptional states differentially prime tumors to EMT. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) derived from interfollicular epidermis (IFE) are generally well differentiated, while hair follicle (HF) stem cell-derived SCCs frequently exhibit EMT, efficiently form secondary tumors, and possess increased metastatic potential. Transcriptional and epigenomic profiling revealed that IFE and HF tumor-initiating cells possess distinct chromatin landscapes and gene regulatory networks associated with tumorigenesis and EMT that correlate with accessibility of key epithelial and EMT transcription factor binding sites. These findings highlight the importance of chromatin states and transcriptional priming in dictating tumor phenotypes and EMT.

  18. Design of aquifer remediation systems: (2) Estimating site-specific performance and benefits of partial source removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, A. Lynn; Enfield, Carl G.; Espinoza, Felipe P.; Annable, Michael; Brooks, Michael C.; Rao, P. S. C.; Sabatini, David; Knox, Robert

    2005-12-01

    A Lagrangian stochastic model is proposed as a tool that can be utilized in forecasting remedial performance and estimating the benefits (in terms of flux and mass reduction) derived from a source zone remedial effort. The stochastic functional relationships that describe the hydraulic "structure" and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) "architecture" have been described in a companion paper (Enfield, C.G., Wood, A.L., Espinoza, F.P., Brooks, M.C., Annable, M., Rao, P.S.C., this issue. Design of aquifer remediation systems: (1) describing hydraulic structure and NAPL architecture using tracers. J. Contam. Hydrol.). The previously defined functions were used along with the properties of the remedial fluids to describe remedial performance. There are two objectives for this paper. First, is to show that a simple analytic element model can be used to give a reasonable estimate of system performance. This is accomplished by comparing forecast performance to observed performance. The second objective is to display the model output in terms of change in mass flux and mass removal as a function of pore volumes of remedial fluid injected. The modelling results suggest that short term benefits are obtained and related to mass reduction at the sites where the model was tested.

  19. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from ammonium at low applied voltage in a single-compartment microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lixia; Li, Daping; Su, Wentao; Tao, Yong; Qian, Junwei

    2012-07-01

    A new approach was developed to achieve autotrophic nitrogen removal from ammonium at low applied voltage in a single-compartment 3-dimensional microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The MEC consisted of anodic and cathodic electrodes, on which nitrifying and denitrifying biofilms, respectively, were attached. Nitrogen removal can be enhanced at an applied voltage in the MEC. Besides, the nitrogen removal efficiency gradually increased from 70.3% to 92.6% with the increase of applied voltage from 0.2 to 0.4V, as well as the maximum current was varied from 4.4 to 14 mA. The corresponding coulombic efficiency also increased from 82% to 94.4%, indicating that the increasing applied voltage could enhance electron extraction from ammonium during its oxidative removal. The DO was found to be a critical factor which affected the nitrogen removal in this MEC system. These results demonstrated that the MEC process was applicable to achieve autotrophic nitrogen removal from wastewater containing ammonium.

  20. Comparison of adsorbents for H2S and D4 removal for biogas conversion in a solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sigot, Léa; Ducom, Gaëlle; Benadda, Belkacem; Labouré, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Biogas contains trace compounds detrimental for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application, especially sulphur-containing compounds and volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs). It is therefore necessary to remove these impurities from the biogas for fuelling an SOFC. In this paper, dynamic lab-scale adsorption tests were performed on synthetic polluted gas to evaluate the performance of a polishing treatment to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S - sulphur compound) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 - VOSiC). Three kinds of adsorbents were tested: an activated carbon, a silica gel (SG) and a zeolite (Z). Z proved to be the best adsorbent for H2S removal, with an adsorbed quantity higher than [Formula: see text] at the SOFC tolerance limit. However, as concerns D4 removal, SG was the most efficient adsorbent, with an adsorbed quantity of about 184 mgD4/gSG at the SOFC tolerance limit. These results could not be explained by structural characteristics of the adsorbents, but they were partly explained by chemical interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent. In these experiments, internal diffusion was the controlling step, Knudsen diffusion being predominant to molecular diffusion. As Z was also a good adsorbent for D4 removal, competition phenomena were investigated with Z for the simultaneous removal of H2S and D4. It was shown that H2S retention was dramatically decreased in the presence of D4, probably due to D4 polymerization resulting in pore blocking.

  1. Specificity of islet cell autoantibodies and coexistence with other organ specific autoantibodies in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Pipi, Elena; Soufleros, Konstantinos

    2009-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been shown to be a disease characterized by immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing islet beta-cells (beta-cells) in the pancreas. Intensive studies, in both patients and animal models are trying to elucidate the specific antigenic targets that are responsible for islet cell autoimmunity. So far, the most important molecules that have been recognized are the native insulin, the 65-kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(65)) and the insulinoma-antigen 2 (IA-2). Identification of those specific autoantibodies that are involved in the primary immunological events of the autoimmune disease process will allow the development of novel diagnostic procedures for early detection and initiation of potential therapy prior to irreversible loss of beta-cells. Within the framework of polyglandular disorders, T1DM may coexist with other organ specific autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), autoimmune gastritis (AG), celiac disease (CD) and Addison's disease (AD), which are associated with the production of organ-specific autoantibodies. So, as a subset of patients with those autoantibodies will develop clinical disease, screening T1DM patients could prognosticate morbidity relative to unrecognised clinical entities. The close follow-up of patients with organ-specific autoantibodies could lead to seasonable identification of those requiring therapy.

  2. Active tissue-specific DNA demethylation conferred by somatic cell nuclei in stable heterokaryons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Pomerantz, Jason H.; Sen, George; Palermo, Adam T.; Blau, Helen M.

    2007-01-01

    DNA methylation is among the most stable epigenetic marks, ensuring tissue-specific gene expression in a heritable manner throughout development. Here we report that differentiated mesodermal somatic cells can confer tissue-specific changes in DNA methylation on epidermal progenitor cells after fusion in stable multinucleate heterokaryons. Myogenic factors alter regulatory regions of genes in keratinocyte cell nuclei, demethylating and activating a muscle-specific gene and methylating and silencing a keratinocyte-specific gene. Because these changes occur in the absence of DNA replication or cell division, they are mediated by an active mechanism. Thus, the capacity to transfer epigenetic changes to other nuclei is not limited to embryonic stem cells and oocytes but is also a property of highly specialized mammalian somatic cells. These results suggest the possibility of directing the reprogramming of readily available postnatal human progenitor cells toward specific tissue cell types. PMID:17360535

  3. Repression of the soma-specific transcriptome by Polycomb-repressive complex 2 promotes male germ cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Weipeng; Starmer, Joshua; Fedoriw, Andrew M.; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes the methylation of histone H3 Lys27 (H3K27) and functions as a critical epigenetic regulator of both stem cell pluripotency and somatic differentiation, but its role in male germ cell development is unknown. Using conditional mutagenesis to remove the core PRC2 subunits EED and SUZ12 during male germ cell development, we identified a requirement for PRC2 in both mitotic and meiotic germ cells. We observed a paucity of mutant spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which appears independent of repression of the known cell cycle inhibitors Ink4a/Ink4b/Arf. Moreover, mutant spermatocytes exhibited ectopic expression of somatic lamins and an abnormal distribution of SUN1 proteins on the nuclear envelope. These defects were coincident with abnormal chromosome dynamics, affecting homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis. We observed acquisition of H3K27me3 on stage-specific genes during meiotic progression, indicating a requirement for PRC2 in regulating the meiotic transcriptional program. Together, these data demonstrate that transcriptional repression of soma-specific genes by PRC2 facilitates homeostasis and differentiation during mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:25228648

  4. Maternal deployment of the embryonic SKN-1-->MED-1,2 cell specification pathway in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Maduro, Morris F; Broitman-Maduro, Gina; Mengarelli, Isabella; Rothman, Joel H

    2007-01-15

    We have previously shown that the MED-1,2 divergent GATA factors act apparently zygotically to specify the fates of the MS (mesoderm) and E (endoderm) sister cells, born at the 7-cell stage of C. elegans embryogenesis. In the E cell, MED-1,2 activate transcription of the endoderm-promoting end-1 and end-3 genes. We demonstrate by in situ hybridization that med transcripts accumulate both in the EMS cell and in the maternal germline in a SKN-1-dependent manner. Removal of zygotic med function alone results in a weakly impenetrant loss of endoderm. However, med-1,2(-) embryos made by mothers in which germline med transcripts have been abrogated by transgene cosuppression fail to make endoderm 50% of the time, similar to the phenotype seen by RNAi. We also find that reduction of Med or End activity results in aberrant numbers of intestinal cells in embryos that make endoderm. We further show that regulation of the paralogous end-1 and end-3 genes consists of both shared and distinct inputs, and that END-3 activates end-1 expression. Our data thus reveal three new properties of C. elegans endoderm specification: both maternal and zygotic activities of the med genes act to specify endoderm, defects in endoderm specification also result in defects in gut cell number, and activation of the paralogous end-1 and end-3 genes differs qualitatively in the relative contributions of their upstream regulators.

  5. Tegument-Specific, Virus-Reactive CD4 T Cells Localize to the Cornea in Herpes Simplex Virus Interstitial Keratitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, David M.; Reymond, Sigrid N.; Chen, Hongbo; Kwok, William W.; McClurkan, Christopher; Gyaltsong, Tashi; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Rotkis, Walter; Talley, Audrey R.; Harrison, Devin A.

    2000-01-01

    Herpes stromal keratitis (HSK) is a prevalent and frequently vision-threatening disease associated with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. In mice, HSK progression occurs after viral clearance and requires T cells and neutrophils. One model implicates Th1-like CD4 T cells with cross-reactivity between the HSV-1 protein UL6 and a corneal autoantigen. HSK can be prevented by establishing specific immunological tolerance. However, HSK can also occur in T-cell receptor-transgenic X SCID mice lacking HSV-specific T cells. To study the pathogenesis of HSK in the natural host species, we measured local HSV-specific T-cell responses in HSK corneas removed at transplant surgery (n = 5) or control corneas (n = 2). HSV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in two specimens. HSV-specific CD4 T cells were enriched in three of the five HSK specimens and were not detectable in the control specimens. Reactivity with peptide epitopes within the tegument proteins UL21 and UL49 was documented. Responses to HSV-1 UL6 were not detected. Diverse HLA DR and DP alleles restricted these local responses. Most clones secreted gamma interferon, but not interleukin-5, in response to antigen. HSV-specific CD8 cells were also recovered. Some clones had cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte activity. The diverse specificities and HLA-restricting alleles of local virus-specific T cells in HSK are consistent with their contribution to HSK by a proinflammatory effect. PMID:11069987

  6. Cell-type specific posttranslational processing of peptides by different pituitary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, I M; Mains, R E

    1990-07-01

    In order to compare prohormone processing in two distinct pituitary cell types, somatomammotrope cells (GH3) and corticotrope cells (AtT-20) were stably transfected with vectors encoding preproneuropeptide Y (preproNPY) containing four different pairs of basic amino acids at the single endoproteolytic cleavage site: wildtype or KR (lysine-arginine), RR, RK, and KK. The GH-NPY cell lines cleaved proNPY to a similar extent, regardless of the sequence of the basic amino acids at the cleavage site (KR = RR = RK = KK). AtT-20-NPY cells are known to exhibit a strong hierarchy of cleavage site preference when processing wildtype and mutated proNPY forms (KR = RR greater than RK much greater than KK). All four types of GH-NPY and AtT-NPY cells faithfully produced NPY (1-36) NH2 from proNPY (1-69), regardless of the amino acid sequence at the cleavage site. All four types of GH-NPY cells produced some of the expected proNPY-COOH-terminal peptide with Ser40 at its NH2-terminal [proNPY (40-69)]. GH3 cells expressing the RR, RK, and KK forms of proNPY yielded in addition some proNPY-COOH-terminal peptide retaining the amino terminals Lys39 or Arg39 residue. In contrast, AtT-NPY-RK cells produced only the Lys39 form of proNPY-COOH-terminal peptide while the other three AtT-NPY lines (KR, RR, and KK) produced only the Ser40 form of proNPY-COOH-terminal peptide. The residence time of proNPY and NPY in GH3 cells was dramatically increased by treatment with insulin, estradiol, and epidermal growth factor, in concert with the expected increase in PRL synthesis and decrease in GH synthesis; increased residence time in the cells did not result in an increase in the extent of cleavage of proNPY to NPY. AtT-20 cells did not respond to the somatomammotrope-specific set of hormones. Thus, there are several important differences in the posttranslational processing and storage of peptide hormones in corticotropes and somatomammotropes.

  7. Defect behavior, carrier removal and predicted in-space injection annealing of InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Drevinsky, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    Defect behavior, observed by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), is used to predict carrier removal and the effects of simultaneous electron irradiation and injection annealing of the performance of InP solar cells. For carrier removal, the number of holes trapped per defect is obtained from measurements of both carrier concentrations and defect concentrations during an isochronal anneal. In addition, from kinetic considerations, the behavior of the dominant defect during injection annealing is used to estimate the degradation expected from exposure to the ambient electron environment in geostationary orbit.

  8. Colour removal from aqueous solutions of metal-complex azo dyes using bacterial cells of Shewanella strain J18 143.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie; Guthrie, James Thomas

    2010-06-01

    The decoloration treatment of textile dye effluents through biodegradation, using bacterial cells, has been studied as a possible means of solving some of the problems that are associated with the pollution of water sources by colorants. In this paper, the use of whole bacterial cells of Shewanella J18 143 for the reduction of aqueous solutions of selected mono-azo, metal-complex dyes, namely Irgalan Grey GLN, Irgalan Black RBLN and Irgalan Blue 3GL, was investigated. The effects of temperature, pH and dye concentration on colour removal were also investigated and shown to be important. The operative conditions for the removal of colour were 30 degrees C, at pH 6.8, with a final dye concentration of 0.12 g/L in the colour reduction system. This study provides an extension to the application of Shewanella strain J18 143 bacterial cells in the decoloration of textile wastewaters.

  9. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  10. The possible role of virus-specific CD8(+) memory T cells in decidual tissue.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, A; van der Keur, C; Swings, G M J S; Scherjon, S A; Claas, F H J

    2016-02-01

    The most abundant lymphocyte present in decidual tissue is the CD8(+) T cell. It has been shown that most decidual CD8(+) T cells have an effector-memory phenotype, but expressed reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B compared with the peripheral CD8(+) effector-memory T cells. The specificity of these CD8(+) memory T cells has yet to be determined. One hypothesis is that the decidual memory T cells are virus-specific T cells that should protect the fetus against incoming pathogens. As virus-specific CD8(+) memory T cells can cross-react with human leukocyte alloantigens, an alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypothesis is that these CD8(+) T cells are fetus-specific. Using virus-specific tetramers, we found increased percentages of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in decidual tissue compared with peripheral blood after uncomplicated pregnancy. So far, no evidence has been obtained for a cross-reactive response of these virus-specific T cells to fetal human leukocyte antigens. These results suggest that the virus-specific memory T cells accumulate in the placenta to protect the fetus from a harmful infection.

  11. Particulate matter inflammation and receptor sensitivity are target cell specific.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Bellina; de Haar, Colin; Roy, Josee; Oortgiesen, Marga

    2002-02-01

    The complexity of primary source particulate matter (PM) and the various cell types encountered by its inhalation raise the possibility that target cells are differentially activated. Since epithelial cells, which line the nasal-tracheal-bronchial airways, and sensory C fibers, which terminate throughout this epithelial layer, are initially targeted by inhaled PM, we compared their relative biological response in vitro to PM originating from volcanic (MSH), anthropogenic (diesel), residential (woodstove), urban ambient (St. Louis, Ottawa), and industrial emission (coal fly ash, CFA; residual oil fly ash, ROFA; oil fly ash, OFA) sources. Increases in intracellular calcium (i.e., [Ca(2+)](i)) are a second-messenger event that indicates cellular activation and signal transduction, in both nerve and epithelial cells. Single-cell calcium imaging recordings were taken of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) exposed to selected PM (50 microg/ml or 30 microg/cm(2)). These cells responded with variable increases in [Ca(2+)](i) ranging from abrupt increases, which returned to baseline upon washing of the cells, to oscillations of the [Ca(2+)](i) that did not wash out. Increases in [Ca(2+)](i) and inflammatory cytokine (i.e., interleukin 6, IL-6) release were measured in populations of BEAS-2B cells exposed to PM (50 microg/ml) and were shown to significantly correlate (r(2) =.80). BEAS-2B cells, stained histochemically with cobalt, displayed a concentration-dependent precipitation in response to acid pH and capsaicin, indicating the presence of acid-sensitive pathways (e.g., VR1 and acid-sensitive receptors). To demonstrate the relevance of these pathways to inflammatory cytokine (i.e., IL-6) release, BEAS-2B cells were pretreated (15 min) with antagonists to the vanilloid (VR1) receptor (i.e., capsazepine, CPZ) or acid-sensitive pathways (i.e., amiloride) before their exposure to the selected PM. A significant reduction of IL-6 release occurred in response to all PM

  12. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  13. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  14. A Single Cell Functions as a Tissue-Specific Stem Cell and the In Vitro Niche-Forming Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Moumita; Helm, Karen M.; Smith, Russell W.; Giordanengo, Matthew S.; Li, Bilan; Shen, Hongmei

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-specific stem cell (TSC) behavior is determined by the stem cell niche. However, delineation of the TSC–niche interaction requires purification of both entities. We reasoned that the niche could be defined by the location of the TSC. We demonstrate that a single CD49fbright/Sca1+/ALDH+ basal cell generates rare label-retaining cells and abundant label-diluting cells. Label-retaining and label-diluting cells were located in the rimmed domain of a unique clone type, the rimmed clone. The TSC property of self-renewal was tested by serial passage at clonal density and analysis of clone-forming cell frequency. A single clone could be passaged up to five times and formed only rimmed clones. Thus, rimmed clone formation was a cell-intrinsic property. Differentiation potential was evaluated in air–liquid interface cultures. Homogenous cultures of rimmed clones were highly mitotic but were refractory to standard differentiation signals. However, rimmed clones that were cocultured with unfractionated tracheal cells generated each of the cell types found in the tracheal epithelium. Thus, the default niche is promitotic: Multipotential differentiation requires adaptation of the niche. Because lung TSCs are typically evaluated after injury, the behavior of CD49fbright/Sca1+/ALDH+ cells was tested in normal and naphthalene-treated mice. These cells were mitotically active in the normal and repaired epithelium, their proliferation rate increased in response to injury, and they retained label for 34 days. We conclude that the CD49fbright/Sca1+/ALDH+ tracheal basal cell is a TSC, that it generates its own niche in vitro, and that it participates in tracheal epithelial homeostasis and repair. PMID:21131442

  15. A single cell functions as a tissue-specific stem cell and the in vitro niche-forming cell.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Helm, Karen M; Smith, Russell W; Giordanengo, Matthew S; Li, Bilan; Shen, Hongmei; Reynolds, Susan D

    2011-09-01

    Tissue-specific stem cell (TSC) behavior is determined by the stem cell niche. However, delineation of the TSC-niche interaction requires purification of both entities. We reasoned that the niche could be defined by the location of the TSC. We demonstrate that a single CD49f(bright)/Sca1(+)/ALDH(+) basal cell generates rare label-retaining cells and abundant label-diluting cells. Label-retaining and label-diluting cells were located in the rimmed domain of a unique clone type, the rimmed clone. The TSC property of self-renewal was tested by serial passage at clonal density and analysis of clone-forming cell frequency. A single clone could be passaged up to five times and formed only rimmed clones. Thus, rimmed clone formation was a cell-intrinsic property. Differentiation potential was evaluated in air-liquid interface cultures. Homogenous cultures of rimmed clones were highly mitotic but were refractory to standard differentiation signals. However, rimmed clones that were cocultured with unfractionated tracheal cells generated each of the cell types found in the tracheal epithelium. Thus, the default niche is promitotic: Multipotential differentiation requires adaptation of the niche. Because lung TSCs are typically evaluated after injury, the behavior of CD49f(bright)/Sca1(+)/ALDH(+) cells was tested in normal and naphthalene-treated mice. These cells were mitotically active in the normal and repaired epithelium, their proliferation rate increased in response to injury, and they retained label for 34 days. We conclude that the CD49f(bright)/Sca1(+)/ALDH(+) tracheal basal cell is a TSC, that it generates its own niche in vitro, and that it participates in tracheal epithelial homeostasis and repair.

  16. Differentiation of antigen-specific T cells with limited functional capacity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hee; Jeon, Bo-Young; Gu, Sun-Hwa; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Chang, Jun; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Despite the generation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cell immune responses during the course of infection, only 5 to 10% of exposed individuals develop active disease, while others develop a latent infection. This phenomenon suggests defective M. tuberculosis-specific immunity, which necessitates more careful characterization of M. tuberculosis-specific T cell responses. Here, we longitudinally analyzed the phenotypes and functions of M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. In contrast to the functional exhaustion of T cells observed after chronic infection, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells differentiated into either effector (CD127(lo) CD62L(lo)) or effector memory (CD127(hi) CD62L(lo)) cells, but not central memory cells (CD127(hi) CD62L(hi)), with low programmed death 1 (PD-1) expression, even in the presence of high levels of bacteria. Additionally, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells produced substantial levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), but not interleukin 2 (IL-2), upon in vitro restimulation. Among M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells, CD127(hi) effector memory cells displayed slower ongoing turnover but greater survival potential. In addition, these cells produced more IFN-γ and TNF-α and displayed lytic activity upon antigen stimulation. However, the effector function of M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) CD127(hi) effector memory T cells was inferior to that of canonical CD8(+) CD127(hi) memory T cells generated after acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Collectively, our data demonstrate that M. tuberculosis-specific T cells can differentiate into memory T cells during the course of M. tuberculosis infection independent of the bacterial burden but with limited functionality. These results provide a framework for further understanding the mechanisms of M. tuberculosis infection that can be used to develop more effective vaccines.

  17. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells eradicate myeloma cells genetically deficient in MHC class II display

    PubMed Central

    Tveita, Anders; Fauskanger, Marte; Bogen, Bjarne; Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been shown to reject tumor cells with no detectable expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II). However, under certain circumstances, induction of ectopic MHC II expression on tumor cells has been reported. To confirm that CD4+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity can be successful in the complete absence of antigen display on the tumor cells themselves, we eliminated MHC II on tumor cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Our results demonstrate that ablation of the relevant MHC II (I-Ed) in multiple myeloma cells (MOPC315) does not hinder rejection by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. These findings provide conclusive evidence that CD4+ T cells specific for tumor antigens can eliminate malignant cells in the absence of endogenous MHC class II expression on the tumor cells. This occurs through antigen uptake and indirect presentation on tumor-infiltrating macrophages. PMID:27626487

  18. Stimulation of HIV-specific T cell clonotypes using allogeneic HLA.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Coral-Ann; van Miert, Paula; O'Driscoll, Kane; Zoet, Yvonne M; Chopra, Abha; Watson, Mark; de Santis, Dianne; Witt, Campbell; John, Mina; Claas, Frans H J; D'Orsogna, Lloyd J

    2017-03-28

    We hypothesized that HIV-specific CD8 T cell clonotypes can be stimulated by allogeneic HLA molecules. Multiple HIV-specific CD8 T cell clones were derived from 12 individuals with chronic HIV infection, specific for 13 different HIV Gag antigens and restricted to 7 different HLA molecules. The generated T cell clones were assayed for alloreactivity against a panel of single HLA class I expressing cell lines (SALs). HIV-specific T cells recognising at least one allogeneic HLA molecule could be identified from 7 of 12 patients tested. Allorecognition was associated with IFNγ cytokine production, CD137 upregulation and cytotoxicity, suggesting high avidity allo-stimulation. Allo-HLA recognition by HIV-specific T cells was specific to the HIV target peptide/HLA restriction and TCR TRBV usage of the T cells. HIV-specific T cells do crossreact against allogeneic HLA molecules in an epitope and TRBV specific manner. Therefore allo-HLA stimulation could be exploited to induce or augment HIV-specific T cell responses.

  19. Generation of V α13/β21+T cell specific target CML cells by TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xianfeng; Xu, Ling; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Zhang, Yikai; Lu, Yuhong; Yu, Zhi; Li, Bo; Wu, Xiuli; Zheng, Wenjie; Li, Yangqiu

    2016-12-20

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T cells can be effective for treating melanoma and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, to obtain sufficient antigen-specific T cells for treatment, the T cells have to be cultured for several weeks in vitro, but in vitro T cell expansion is difficult to control. Alternatively, the transfer of T cell receptors (TCRs) with defined antigen specificity into recipient T cells may be a simple solution for generating antigen-specific T cells. The objective of this study was to identify CML-associated, antigen-specific TCR genes and generate CML-associated, antigen-specific T cells with T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer. Our previous study has screened an oligoclonal Vβ21 with a different oligoclonal Vα partner in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from patients with CML. In this study, oligoclonally expanded TCR α genes, which pair with TCR Vβ21, were cloned into the pIRES eukaryotic expression vector (TCR Vα-IRES-Vβ21). Next, two recombinant plasmids, TCR Vα13-IRES-Vβ21 and TCR Vα18-IRES-Vβ21, were successfully transferred into T cells, and the TCR gene-modified T cells acquired CML-specific cytotoxicity with the best cytotoxic effects for HLA-A11+ K562 cells observed for the TCR Vα13/Vβ21 gene redirected T cells. In summary, our data confirmed TCRVα13/Vβ21 as a CML-associated, antigen-specific TCR. This study provided new evidence that genetically engineered antigen-specific TCR may become a druggable approach for gene therapy of CML.

  20. Simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell equipped with an oxic cathode.

    PubMed

    Bao, Renbing; Zhang, Shaohui; Zhao, Li; Zhong, Liuxiang

    2017-02-01

    With sulfide as an anodic electron donor and ammonium as a cathodic substrate, the feasibility of simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation was investigated in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) equipped with an oxic cathode. Successful simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation in this MFC were achieved in 35 days, with the sulfide and ammonium removal percent of 92.7 ± 1.4 and 96.4 ± 0.3%, respectively. The maximum power density increased, but the internal resistance decreased with the increase of feeding sulfide concentration from 62.9 ± 0.3 to 238.5 ± 0.2 mg S/L. Stable ammonium removal with complete nitrification, preparing for future denitrification, was obtained throughout the current study. Sulfide removal loading significantly increased with the increase of feeding sulfide concentration at each external resistance, but no significant correlation between sulfide removal loading and external resistance was found at each feeding sulfide concentration. The charge recovery and anodic coulombic efficiency (CE) significantly decreased with the increase of external resistance. High feeding sulfide concentration led to low anodic CE. Granular sulfur deposition was found on the anode graphite fiber. The appropriate feeding sulfide concentration for sulfide removal and sulfur deposition was deemed to be 178.0 ± 1.7 mg S/L, achieving a sulfur deposition percent of 69.7 ± 0.6%.

  1. Analysis of possibilities for carbon removal from porous anode of solid oxide fuel cells after different failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotić, Vanja; Schluckner, Christoph; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Hochenauer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of possibilities for carbon removal from the fuel electrode of anode supported solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) after different degradation modes. To design the conditions which generally lead the cell in the range of carbon depositions the performed thermodynamic calculations show that the SOFC operating temperature range seems to be appropriate for formation of elemental carbon in various types. Concerning this the loaded large planar single SOFCs are fed with synthetic diesel reformate thus simulating realistic operating conditions and enabling the formation and deposition of carbon on the anode side. A mixture of hydrogen/water vapor/nitrogen is used to remove the detected carbon depositions in a cell-protecting manner. For the purpose of this investigation several failure modes are induced after which determination the already defined regeneration strategy is applied. The cathode degradation is first induced and secondly the fuel supply is interrupted to induce re-oxidation of nickel (Ni) on the anode side. The undertaken investigations determine that carbon can be fully removed from the anode surface after nickel oxidation, while cathode degradation disables the complete cell regeneration.

  2. Salicylic Acid Has Cell-Specific Effects on Tobacco mosaic virus Replication and Cell-to-Cell Movement1

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Alex M.; Carr, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to probe the effects of salicylic acid (SA) on the cell biology of viral infection. Treatment of tobacco with SA restricted TMV.GFP to single-epidermal cell infection sites for at least 6 d post inoculation but did not affect infection sites of Cucumber mosaic virus expressing GFP. Microinjection experiments, using size-specific dextrans, showed that SA cannot inhibit TMV movement by decreasing the plasmodesmatal size exclusion limit. In SA-treated transgenic plants expressing TMV movement protein, TMV.GFP infection sites were larger, but they still consisted overwhelmingly of epidermal cells. TMV replication was strongly inhibited in mesophyll protoplasts isolated from SA-treated nontransgenic tobacco plants. Therefore, it appears that SA has distinct cell type-specific effects on virus replication and movement in the mesophyll and epidermal cell layers, respectively. Thus, SA can have fundamentally different effects on the same pathogen in different cell types. PMID:11842159

  3. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  4. Adipose lineage specification of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Susan M.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy; Erickson, Paul F.; Kong, Raymond; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Nemenoff, Raphael; Moldovan, Radu; Morandi, Shelley A.; Davis, James A.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported the production of white adipocytes in adipose tissue from hematopoietic progenitors arising from bone marrow. However, technical challenges have hindered detection of this adipocyte population by certain other laboratories. These disparate results highlight the need for sensitive and definitive techniques to identify bone marrow progenitor (BMP)-derived adipocytes. In these studies we exploited new models and methods to enhance detection of this adipocyte population. Here we showed that confocal microscopy with spectrum acquisition could effectively identify green fluorescent protein (GFP) positive BMP-derived adipocytes by matching their fluorescence spectrum to that of native GFP. Likewise, imaging flow cytometry made it possible to visualize intact unilocular and multilocular GFP-positive BMP-derived adipocytes and distinguished them from non-fluorescent adipocytes and cell debris in the cytometer flow stream. We also devised a strategy to detect marker genes in flow-enriched adipocytes from which stromal cells were excluded. This technique also proved to be an efficient means for detecting genetically labeled adipocytes and should be applicable to models in which marker gene expression is low or absent. Finally, in vivo imaging of mice transplanted with BM from adipocyte-targeted luciferase donors showed a time-dependent increase in luciferase activity, with the bulk of luciferase activity confined to adipocytes rather than stromal cells. These results confirmed and extended our previous reports and provided proof-of-principle for sensitive techniques and models for detection and study of these unique cells. PMID:23700536

  5. Molecular beacon-enabled purification of living cells by targeting cell type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wile, Brian M; Ban, Kiwon; Yoon, Young-Sup; Bao, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are dual-labeled oligonucleotides that fluoresce only in the presence of complementary mRNA. The use of MBs to target specific mRNAs allows sorting of specific cells from a mixed cell population. In contrast to existing approaches that are limited by available surface markers or selectable metabolic characteristics, the MB-based method enables the isolation of a wide variety of cells. For example, the ability to purify specific cell types derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is important for basic research and therapeutics. In addition to providing a general protocol for MB design, validation and nucleofection into cells, we describe how to isolate a specific cell population from differentiating PSCs. By using this protocol, we have successfully isolated cardiomyocytes differentiated from mouse or human PSCs (hPSCs) with ∼ 97% purity, as confirmed by electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. After designing MBs, their ordering and validation requires 2 weeks, and the isolation process requires 3 h.

  6. Endothelial cells mediate islet-specific maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Maria; Mathew, Shibin; Mamiya, Hikaru; Goh, Saik Kia; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) can be best achieved by closely recapitulating the in vivo developmental niche. Thus, implementation of directed differentiation strategies has yielded encouraging results in the area of pancreatic islet differentiation. These strategies have concentrated on direct addition of chemical signals, however, other aspect of the developmental niche are yet to be explored. During development, pancreatic progenitor (PP) cells grow as an epithelial sheet, which aggregates with endothelial cells (ECs) during the final stages of maturation. Several findings suggest that the interactions with EC play a role in pancreatic development. In this study, we recapitulated this phenomenon in an in vitro environment by maturing the human ESC (hESC)-derived PP cells in close contact with ECs. We find that co-culture with different ECs (but not fibroblast) alone results in pancreatic islet-specific differentiation of hESC-derived PP cells even in the absence of additional chemical induction. The differentiated cells responded to exogenous glucose levels by enhanced C-peptide synthesis. The co-culture system aligned well with endocrine development as determined by comprehensive analysis of involved signaling pathways. By recapitulating cell-cell interaction aspects of the developmental niche we achieved a differentiation model that aligns closely with islet organogenesis.

  7. Formation of nickel-doped magnetite hollow nanospheres with high specific surface area and superior removal capability for organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhu; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2016-12-01

    A strategy for the formation of magnetic Ni x Fe3-x O4 hollow nanospheres with very high specific surface areas was designed through a facile solvothermal method in mixed solvents of ethylene glycol and water in this work. The Ni/Fe ratios and the crystal phases of the Ni x Fe3-x O4 hollow nanocrystals can be readily tuned by changing the molar ratios of Ni to Fe in the precursors. An inside-out Ostwald ripening mechanism was proposed for the formation of uniform Ni x Fe3-x O4 hollow nanospheres. Moreover, the obtained Ni x Fe3-x O4 hollow nanospheres exhibited excellent adsorption capacity towards organic molecules such as Congo red in water. The maximum adsorption capacities of Ni x Fe3-x O4 hollow nanospheres for Congo red increase dramatically from 263 to 500 mg g-1 with the increase of the Ni contents (x) in Ni x Fe3-x O4 hollow nanospheres from 0.2 to 0.85. The synthesized Ni x Fe3-x O4 nanoparticles can be potentially applied for waste water treatment.

  8. Evaluation of the time of uncapping and removing dead brood from cells by hygienic and non-hygienic honey bees.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Maria Alejandra; Flores, Jose Manuel; Figini, Emilio; Ruffinengo, Sergio; Escande, Alberto; Bedascarrasbure, Enrique; Rodriguez, Edgardo; Gonçalves, Lionel Segui

    2005-03-31

    Most research on hygienic behavior has recorded the time taken by the colony to remove an experimental amount of dead brood, usually after one or two days. We evaluated the time that hygienic (H) and non-hygienic (NH) honey bees take to uncap and remove dead brood in observation hives after the brood was killed using the pin-killing assay. Four experimental colonies were selected as the extreme cases among 108 original colonies. Thirty brood cells were perforated with a pin in two H and two NH colonies and observations were made after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 24 h. Different stages of uncapping and removing were recorded. Differences in uncapping and removal between H and NH colonies were significant for all comparisons made at the different times after perforation. Using observation hives one obtains a better and faster discrimination between H and NH colonies than in full size colonies. It is possible to differentiate H and NH within a few hours after perforating the cells.

  9. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens.

  10. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 identifies human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Noriaki; Murata, Satoko; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Yanagita, Takeshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-03-10

    Embryonic stem cell-associated antigens are expressed in a variety of adult stem cells as well as embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated whether stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 can be used to isolate dental pulp (DP) stem cells. DP cells showed plastic adherence, specific surface antigen expression, and multipotent differentiation potential, similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). SSEA-4+ cells were found in cultured DP cells in vitro as well as in DP tissue in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 45.5% of the DP cells were SSEA-4+. When the DP cells were cultured in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid, marked downregulation of SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 and the upregulation of SSEA-1 were observed. SSEA-4+ DP cells showed a greater telomere length and a higher growth rate compared to ungated and SSEA-4- cells. A clonal assay demonstrated that 65.5% of the SSEA-4+ DP cells had osteogenic potential, and the SSEA-4+ clonal DP cells showed multilineage differentiation potential toward osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons in vitro. In addition, the SSEA-4+ DP cells had the capacity to form ectopic bone in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that SSEA-4 is a specific cell surface antigen that can be used to identify DP stem cells.

  11. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  12. CXCL10 and trafficking of virus-specific T cells during coronavirus-induced demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Linda N.; Liu, Michael T.; Kane, Joy A. C.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in the central nervous system (CNS) following infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) is associated with an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. Treatment of mice with anti-CXCL10 neutralizing antibody results in limited CD4+ T cell infiltration into the CNS accompanied by a reduction in white matter damage. The current study determines the antigen-specificity of the T lymphocytes present during chronic disease and evaluates how blocking CXCL10 signaling affects retention of virus-specific T cells within the CNS. CXCL10 neutralization selectively reduced accumulation and/or retention of virus-specific CD4+ T cells, yet exhibited limited effect on virus-specific CD8+ T cells. The response of CXCL10 neutralization on virus-specific T cell subsets is not due to differential expression of the CXCL10 receptor CXCR3 on T cells as there was no appreciable difference in receptor expression on virus-specific T cells during either acute or chronic disease. These findings emphasize the importance of virus-specific CD4+ T cells in amplifying demyelination in JHMV-infected mice. In addition, differential signals are required for trafficking and retention of virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during chronic demyelination in JHMV-infected mice. PMID:19626487

  13. Use of altered-specificity binding Oct-4 suggests an absence of pluripotent cell-specific cofactor usage

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander E. F.; Ford, Kevin G.

    2005-01-01

    Oct-4 is a POU domain transcription factor that is critical for maintaining pluripotency and for stem cell renewal. Previous studies suggest that transcription regulation by Oct-4 at particular enhancers requires the input of a postulated E1A-like cofactor that is specific to pluripotent cells. However, such studies have been limited to the use of enhancer elements that bind other POU-protein family members in addition to Oct-4, thus preventing a ‘clean’ assessment of any Oct-4:cofactor relationships. Other attempts to study Oct-4 functionality in a more ‘stand-alone’ situation target Oct-4 transactivation domains to DNA using heterologous binding domains, a methodology which is known to generate artificial data. To circumvent these issues, an altered-specificity binding Oct-4 (Oct-4RR) and accompanying binding site, which binds Oct-4RR only, were generated. This strategy has previously been shown to maintain Oct-1:cofactor interactions that are highly binding-site and protein/binding conformation specific. This system therefore allows a stand-alone study of Oct-4 function in pluripotent versus differentiated cells, without interference from endogenous POU factors and with minimal deviation from bound wild-type protein characteristics. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that Oct-4RR and the highly transactive regions of its N-terminus determined here, and its C-terminus, have the same transactivation profile in pluripotent and differentiated cells, thus providing strong evidence against the existence of such a pluripotent cell-specific Oct-4 cofactor. PMID:16243786

  14. A laser microsurgical method of cell wall removal allows detection of large-conductance ion channels in the guard cell plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miedema, H.; Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Application of patch clamp techniques to higher-plant cells has been subject to the limitation that the requisite contact of the patch electrode with the cell membrane necessitates prior enzymatic removal of the plant cell wall. Because the wall is an integral component of plant cells, and because cell-wall-degrading enzymes can disrupt membrane properties, such enzymatic treatments may alter ion channel behavior. We compared ion channel activity in enzymatically isolated protoplasts of Vicia faba guard cells with that found in membranes exposed by a laser microsurgical technique in which only a tiny portion of the cell wall is removed while the rest of the cell remains intact within its tissue environment. "Laser-assisted" patch clamping reveals a new category of high-conductance (130 to 361 pS) ion channels not previously reported in patch clamp studies on plant plasma membranes. These data indicate that ion channels are present in plant membranes that are not detected by conventional patch clamp techniques involving the production of individual plant protoplasts isolated from their tissue environment by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. Given the large conductances of the channels revealed by laser-assisted patch clamping, we hypothesize that these channels play a significant role in the regulation of ion content and electrical signalling in guard cells.

  15. Cell Type-specific Alternative Splicing Governs Cell Fate in the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaochang; Chen, Ming Hui; Wu, Xuebing; Kodani, Andrew; Fan, Jean; Doan, Ryan; Ozawa, Manabu; Ma, Jacqueline; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Reiter, Jeremy F.; Black, Douglas L.; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing is prevalent in the mammalian brain. To interrogate the functional role of alternative splicing in neural development, we analyzed purified neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons from developing cerebral cortices, revealing hundreds of differentially spliced exons that preferentially alter key protein domains—especially in cytoskeletal proteins—and can harbor disease-causing mutations. We show that Ptbp1 and Rbfox proteins antagonistically govern the NPC-to-neuron transition by regulating neuron-specific exons. While Ptbp1 maintains apical progenitors partly through suppressing a poison exon of Flna in NPCs, Rbfox proteins promote neuronal differentiation by switching Ninein from a centrosomal splice form in NPCs to a non-centrosomal isoform in neurons. We further uncover an intronic human mutation within a PTBP1 binding site that disrupts normal skipping of the FLNA poison exon in NPCs and causes a brain-specific malformation. Our study indicates that dynamic control of alternative splicing governs cell fate in cerebral cortical development. PMID:27565344

  16. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  17. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) unmasks specific high affinity FSH-binding sites in cell-free membrane preparations of porcine granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, K.A.; LaBarbera, A.R.

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine whether changes in FSH receptors correlated with FSH-induced attenuation of FSH-responsive adenylyl cyclase in immature porcine granulosa cells. Cells were incubated with FSH (1-1000 ng/ml) for up to 24 h, treated with acidified medium (pH 3.5) to remove FSH bound to cells, and incubated with (125I)iodo-porcine FSH to quantify FSH-binding sites. FSH increased binding of FSH in a time-, temperature-, and FSH concentration-dependent manner. FSH (200 ng/ml) increased binding approximately 4-fold within 16 h. Analysis of equilibrium saturation binding data indicated that the increase in binding sites reflected a 2.3-fold increase in receptor number and a 5.4-fold increase in apparent affinity. The increase in binding did not appear to be due to 1) a decrease in receptor turnover, since the basal rate of turnover appeared to be very slow; 2) an increase in receptor synthesis, since agents that inhibit protein synthesis and glycosylation did not block the increase in binding; or 3) an increase in intracellular receptors, since agents that inhibit cytoskeletal components had no effect. Agents that increase intracellular cAMP did not affect FSH binding. The increase in binding appeared to result from unmasking of cryptic FSH-binding sites, since FSH increased binding in cell-free membrane preparations to the same extent as in cells. Unmasking of cryptic sites was hormone specific, and the sites bound FSH specifically. Unmasking of sites was reversible in a time- and temperature-dependent manner after removal of bound FSH. The similarity between the FSH dose-response relationships for unmasking of FSH-binding sites and attenuation of FSH-responsive cAMP production suggests that the two processes are functionally linked.

  18. Survival and persistence of fecal host-specific Bacteroidales cells and their DNA assessed by PMA-qPCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Bombardelli, F.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding and managing microbial pollutions in water is one of the foremost challenges of establishing effective managements and remediation strategies to impaired water bodies polluted by uncharacterized fecal sources. Quantitative microbial source tracking (MST) approaches using fecal Bacteroidales and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure gene copies of host-specific 16S rRNA genetic markers are promising because they can allow for identifying and quantifying fecal loadings from a particular animal host and understanding the fate and transport of host-specific Bacteroidales over a range of conditions in water bodies. Similar to the case of traditional fecal indicator bacteria, a relatively long persistence of target DNA may hamper applied MST studies, if genetic markers cannot be linked to recent fecal pollution in water. We report a successful approach to removing the qPCR signal derived from free DNA and dead host-specific Bacteroidales cells by selectively binding the DNA and consequently inhibiting PCR amplification using light- activated propidium monoazide (PMA). Optimal PMA-qPCR conditions were determined as 100 µM of PMA concentration and a 10-min light exposure time at different solids concentrations in order to mimic a range of water samples. Under these conditions, PMA-qPCR resulted in the selective exclusion of DNA from heat- treated cells of non-culturable Bacteroidales in human feces and wastewater influent and effluent samples. Also, the persistence of feces-derived host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and their cells (determined by universal, human-, cow- and dog-specific Bacteroidales qPCR assays) in seawater was investigated in microcosms at environmental conditions. The average T99 (two log reduction) value for host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells was 28 h, whereas that for total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA was 177 h. Natural sunlight did not have a strong influence on the fate of fecal Bacteroidales cells and their DNA, presumably

  19. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  20. Focused specificity of intestinal TH17 cells towards commensal bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Torchinsky, Miriam B; Gobert, Michael; Xiong, Huizhong; Xu, Mo; Linehan, Jonathan L; Alonzo, Francis; Ng, Charles; Chen, Alessandra; Lin, Xiyao; Sczesnak, Andrew; Liao, Jia-Jun; Torres, Victor J; Jenkins, Marc K; Lafaille, Juan J; Littman, Dan R

    2014-06-05

    T-helper-17 (TH17) cells have critical roles in mucosal defence and in autoimmune disease pathogenesis. They are most abundant in the small intestine lamina propria, where their presence requires colonization of mice with microbiota. Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are sufficient to induce TH17 cells and to promote TH17-dependent autoimmune disease in animal models. However, the specificity of TH17 cells, the mechanism of their induction by distinct bacteria, and the means by which they foster tissue-specific inflammation remain unknown. Here we show that the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire of intestinal TH17 cells in SFB-colonized mice has minimal overlap with that of other intestinal CD4(+) T cells and that most TH17 cells, but not other T cells, recognize antigens encoded by SFB. T cells with antigen receptors specific for SFB-encoded peptides differentiated into RORγt-expressing TH17 cells, even if SFB-colonized mice also harboured a strong TH1 cell inducer, Listeria monocytogenes, in their intestine. The match of T-cell effector function with antigen specificity is thus determined by the type of bacteria that produce the antigen. These findings have significant implications for understanding how commensal microbiota contribute to organ-specific autoimmunity and for developing novel mucosal vaccines.

  1. Critical evaluation of regulatory T cells in autoimmunity: are the most potent regulatory specificities being ignored?

    PubMed

    Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2008-09-01

    The identification of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells as natural regulators of immunity in the periphery and tissues has stimulated tremendous interest in developing therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases. In this review, the site of origin, antigen specificity, homing markers and cytokine profiles of Treg cells were evaluated in autoimmune colitis and type 1 diabetes, two examples in which Treg cells were effective as therapy. These studies were compared with studies of Treg cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis, where successful therapy has not yet been achieved. Antigen-specific Treg cells appear to have more potent activity than polyclonal Treg cells and therefore hold more promise as therapeutic agents. However, Treg cells specific for the pathogenic T effector cells themselves have largely been overlooked and deserve consideration in future studies.

  2. Site-Specific Cleavage of Ribosomal RNA in Escherichia coli-Based Cell-Free Protein Synthesis Systems

    PubMed Central

    Failmezger, Jurek; Nitschel, Robert; Sánchez-Kopper, Andrés; Kraml, Michael; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis, which mimics the biological protein production system, allows rapid expression of proteins without the need to maintain a viable cell. Nevertheless, cell-free protein expression relies on active in vivo translation machinery including ribosomes and translation factors. Here, we examined the integrity of the protein synthesis machinery, namely the functionality of ribosomes, during (i) the cell-free extract preparation and (ii) the performance of in vitro protein synthesis by analyzing crucial components involved in translation. Monitoring the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, elongation factors and ribosomal protein S1, we show that processing of a cell-free extract results in no substantial alteration of the translation machinery. Moreover, we reveal that the 16S rRNA is specifically cleaved at helix 44 during in vitro translation reactions, resulting in the removal of the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence. These defective ribosomes accumulate in the cell-free system. We demonstrate that the specific cleavage of the 16S rRNA is triggered by the decreased concentrations of Mg2+. In addition, we provide evidence that helix 44 of the 30S ribosomal subunit serves as a point-of-entry for ribosome degradation in Escherichia coli. Our results suggest that Mg2+ homeostasis is fundamental to preserving functional ribosomes in cell-free protein synthesis systems, which is of major importance for cell-free protein synthesis at preparative scale, in order to create highly efficient technical in vitro systems. PMID:27992588

  3. Niemann-Pick type C1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells display disease specific hallmarks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene. In this lysosomal storage disorder the intracellular transport and sequestration of several lipids like cholesterol is severely impaired, resulting in an accumulation of lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes. The neurological manifestation of the disease is caused by dysfunction and cell death in the central nervous system. Several animal models were used to analyze the impaired pathways. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are still not completely understood and the genetic variability in humans cannot be reflected in these models. Therefore, a human model using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells provides a promising approach. Methods We reprogrammed human fibroblasts from a NPC1 patient and a healthy control by retroviral transduction with Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc. The obtained human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were characterized by immunocytochemical analyses. Neural progenitor cells were generated and patch clamp recordings were performed for a functional analysis of derived neuronal cells. Filipin stainings and the Amplex Red assay were used to demonstrate and quantify cholesterol accumulation. Results The hiPSCs expressed different stem cell markers, e.g. Nanog, Tra-1-81 and SSEA4. Using the embryoid body assay, the cells were differentiated in cells of all three germ layers and induced teratoma in immunodeficient mice, demonstrating their pluripotency. In addition, neural progenitor cells were derived and differentiated into functional neuronal cells. Patch clamp recordings revealed voltage dependent channels, spontaneous action potentials and postsynaptic currents. The accumulation of cholesterol in different tissues is the main hallmark of NPC1. In this study we found an accumulation of cholesterol in fibroblasts of a NPC1 patient, derived hiPSCs, and neural progenitor cells, but not in

  4. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. The role of macrophages in the removal of apoptotic B-cells in the sheep ileal Peyer's patch.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Hardeep S; Kennedy, Laurie J; Babic, Kelly; Reynolds, John D

    2004-06-01

    In the process of generating the cells that populate the sheep's B-cell pool, the ileal Peyer's patch (PP) produces an immense number of B-cells and then destroys most of them by apoptosis. Rapid clearance of these apoptotic cells is essential for tissue homeostasis and for preventing pathology. Macrophages comprise a small percentage of cells in the follicles. They resemble macrophages found in other tissues and can be identified by the expression of MHC Class II and CD14. In this study, enriched macrophages co-cultured with apoptotic ileal PP cells showed increased DNA content as they ingested apoptotic cells. The higher the proportion of apoptotic cells in culture the greater the increase in DNA content of the macrophages. This occurred when B-cell apoptosis was initiated by a period in culture or in response to treating the animals with steroids. Thus, macrophages resident in the ileal PP follicle mediate the phagocytosis and removal of discarded B-cells.

  6. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy in patients with iron overload after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Krahl, Rainer; Jaekel, Nadja; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Excess body iron could persist for years after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with possible deleterious sequels. An iron depletive therapy with phlebotomy seems rational. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy without erythropoietin support in non-thalassemic adult patients with iron overload after HCT and the impact of pre- and post-HCT hemochromatosis (HFE) genotype on iron mobilization were investigated. Patients and methods: Phlebotomy was initiated in 61 recipients of allografts due to hematologic malignancies (median age 48 years) after a median of 18 months. The prephlebotomy median serum ferritin (SF) was 1697ng/ml and the median number of blood transfusions 28 units. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphates (AP), and bilirubin were elevated in 55.7%, 64% and 11.5% patients respectively. HFE-genotype was elucidated by polymerase chain reaction using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. Results: Phlebotomy was well-tolerated irrespective of age or conditioning. A negative iron balance in 80% of patients (median SF 1086 ng/ml) and a rise in hemoglobin were observed (p<0.0001). Higher transfusional burden and SF were associated with a greater iron mobilization per session (p=0.02). In 58% of patients, a plateau after an initial steady decline in SF was followed by a second decline under further phlebotomy. The improvement in ALT (p=0.002), AST (p=0.03), AP (p=0.01), and bilirubin (p<0.0001) did not correlate with the decline in SF. Mutant HFE-gene variants were detected in 14/55 (25%) pre-HCT and 22/55 (40%) patients post-HCT. Overall, dissimilar pre- and posttransplantational HFE-genotypes were detected in 20/55 (40%) patients. Posttransplantational mutant HFE variants correlated with a slower decline in SF (p=0.007). Conclusions: Phlebotomy is a convenient therapy of iron overload in survivors of HCT. A negative iron balance and a rise in hemoglobin were observed in the majority of

  7. Rapid generation of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) THELPER1 cells for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Simone; Boβ, Cristina; Feucht, Judith; Witte, Kai-Erik; Scheu, Alexander; Bülow, Hans-Jörg; Joachim, Stefanie; Stevanović, Stefan; Schumm, Michael; Rittig, Susanne M; Lang, Peter; Röcken, Martin; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Tumor-associated antigens such as NY-ESO-1 are expressed in a variety of solid tumors but absent in mature healthy tissues with the exception of germline cells. The immune system anti-cancer attack is mediated by cell lysis or induction of growth arrest through paralysis of tumor cells, the latter of which can be achieved by tumor-specific CD4(+), IFNγ-producing THelper type 1 (TH1) cells. Translation of these immune-mediated mechanisms into clinical application has been limited by availability of immune effectors, as well as the need for complex in vitro protocols and regulatory hurdles. Here, we report a procedure to generate cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1-targeting CD4(+) TH1 cells in vitro for cancer immunotherapy in the clinic. After in vitro sensitization by stimulating T cells with protein-spanning, overlapping peptide pools of NY-ESO-1 in combination with IL-7 and low dose IL-2, antigen-specific T cells were isolated using IFNγ capture technique and subsequently expanded with IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15. Large numbers of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells with a TH1 cytokine profile and lower numbers of cytokine-secreting CD8(+) T cells could be generated from healthy donors with a high specificity and expansion potential. Manufactured CD4(+) T cells showed strong specific TH1-responses with IFNγ(+), TNFα(+), IL-2(+) and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells. The protocol is GMP-grade and approved by the regulatory authorities. The tumor-antigen specific CD4(+) TH1 lymphocytes can be adoptively transferred as a T-cell therapy to boost anticancer immunity and this novel cancer treatment approach is applicable to both T cells from healthy allogeneic donors as well as to autologous T cells derived from cancer patients.

  8. Different GATA factors dictate CCR3 transcription in allergic inflammatory cells in a cell type-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Kong, Su-Kang; Kim, Byung Soo; Uhm, Tae Gi; Lee, Wonyong; Lee, Gap Ryol; Park, Choon-Sik; Lee, Chul-Hoon; Chung, Il Yup

    2013-06-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 is expressed in prominent allergic inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, and Th2 cells. We previously identified a functional GATA element within exon 1 of the CCR3 gene that is responsible for GATA-1-mediated CCR3 transcription. Because allergic inflammatory cells exhibit distinct expression patterns of different GATA factors, we investigated whether different GATA factors dictate CCR3 transcription in a cell type-specific manner. GATA-2 was expressed in EoL-1 eosinophilic cells, GATA-1 and GATA-2 were expressed in HMC-1 mast cells, and GATA-3 was preferentially expressed in Jurkat cells. Unlike a wild-type CCR3 reporter, reporters lacking the functional GATA element were not active in any of the three cell types, implying the involvement of different GATA factors in CCR3 transcription. RNA interference assays showed that small interfering RNAs specific for different GATA factors reduced CCR3 reporter activity in a cell type-specific fashion. Consistent with these findings, chromatin immunoprecipitation and EMSA analyses demonstrated cell type-specific binding of GATA factors to the functional GATA site. More importantly, specific inhibition of the CCR3 reporter activity by different GATA small interfering RNAs was well preserved in respective cell types differentiated from cord blood; in particular, GATA-3 was entirely responsible for reporter activity in Th2 cells and replaced the role predominantly played by GATA-1 and GATA-2. These results highlight a mechanistic role of GATA factors in which cell type-specific expression is the primary determinant of transcription of the CCR3 gene in major allergic inflammatory cells.

  9. Deconstructing the peptide-MHC specificity of T cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Michael E.; Mendoza, Juan L.; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Dong, Shen; Glanville, Jacob; Dobbins, Jessica; Özkan, Engin; Davis, Mark M.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Summary In order to survey a universe of MHC-presented peptide antigens whose numbers greatly exceed the diversity of the T cell repertoire, T cell receptors (TCRs) are thought to be cross-reactive. However, the nature and extent of TCR cross-reactivity has not been conclusively measured experimentally. We developed a system to identify MHC-presented peptide ligands by combining TCR selection of highly diverse yeast-displayed peptide-MHC libraries with deep sequencing. While we identified hundreds of peptides reactive with each of five different mouse and human TCRs, the selected peptides possessed TCR recognition motifs that bore a close resemblance to their known antigens. This structural conservation of the TCR interaction surface allowed us to exploit deep sequencing information to computationally identify activating microbial and self-ligands for human autoimmune TCRs. The mechanistic basis of TCR cross-reactivity described here enables effective surveillance of diverse self and foreign antigens, but without necessitating degenerate recognition of non-homologous peptides. PMID:24855945

  10. Identification and visualization of multidimensional antigen-specific T-cell populations in polychromatic cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Frelinger, Jacob; Jiang, Wenxin; Finak, Greg; Seshadri, Chetan; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; McElrath, Julie; DeRosa, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    An important aspect of immune monitoring for vaccine development, clinical trials, and research is the detection, measurement, and comparison of antigen-specific T-cells from subject samples under different conditions. Antigen-specific T-cells compose a very small fraction of total T-cells. Developments in cytometry technology over the past five years have enabled the measurement of single-cells in a multivariate and high-throughput manner. This growth in both dimensionality and quantity of data continues to pose a challenge for effective identification and visualization of rare cell subsets, such as antigen-specific T-cells. Dimension reduction and feature extraction play pivotal role in both identifying and visualizing cell populations of interest in large, multi-dimensional cytometry datasets. However, the automated identification and visualization of rare, high-dimensional cell subsets remains challenging. Here we demonstrate how a systematic and integrated approach combining targeted feature extraction with dimension reduction can be used to identify and visualize biological differences in rare, antigen-specific cell populations. By using OpenCyto to perform semi-automated gating and features extraction of flow cytometry data, followed by dimensionality reduction with t-SNE we are able to identify polyfunctional subpopulations of antigen-specific T-cells and visualize treatment-specific differences between them.

  11. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    PubMed

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  12. Binding specificity of mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding protein from the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bonay, P; Molina, R; Fresno, M

    2001-09-01

    The sugar binding specificity of the recently described mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBP) isolated to homogeneity from both the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi has been studied by quantitative hapten inhibition of the biotinylated CBPs to immobilized thyroglobulin using model oligosaccharides. The results clearly show a differential specificity toward high-mannose glycans between the CBPs from the two developmental stages. Thus, the isolated CBP from epimastigotes exhibited stronger affinity for higher mannose oligomers containing the Manalpha1-2Manalpha1-6Manalpha1-6 structure. Its affinity decreased, as did the number of mannose residues on the oligomer or removal of the terminal Manalpha1-2-linked mannose. By contrast the CBP isolated from the trypomastigote stage showed about 400-fold lower avidity than the epimastigote form, and contrary to it, it was slightly more specific toward Man5GlcNAc than Man9GlcNAc. Analysis of the interaction of epimastigote-Man-CBP with its ligands by UV difference spectroscopy indicates the existence of an extended binding site in that protein with a large enthalpic contribution to the binding. The thermodynamic parameters of binding were obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry and been found that the DeltaH values to be in good agreement with the van't Hoff values. The binding reactions are mainly enthalpically driven and exhibit enthalpy-enthropy compensation. In addition, analysis of the high-mannose glycans from different parts of the digestive tract of the reduviid insect vector of T. cruzi suggest a role of the CBP in the retention of the epimastigote stage in the anterior portion of the gut.

  13. Generation of Patient-Specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Sendai Reprogramming Vectors.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology has changed preclinical research since their generation was described by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. iPSCs are derived from somatic cells after being reprogrammed back to an embryonic state by specific combination of reprogramming factors. These reprogrammed cells resemble all the characteristic of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The reprogramming technology is even more valuable to research diseases biology and treatment by opening gene and cell therapies in own patient's iPSC. Patient-specific iPSC can be generated from a large variety of patient cells by any of the myriad of reprogramming platforms described. Here, we describe the generation of patient-specific iPSC from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Sendai Reprogramming vectors.

  14. Endosperm transfer cell-specific genes and proteins: structure, function and applications in biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lopato, Sergiy; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells (ETC) are one of four main types of cells in endosperm. A characteristic feature of ETC is the presence of cell wall in-growths that create an enlarged plasma membrane surface area. This specialized cell structure is important for the specific function of ETC, which is to transfer nutrients from maternal vascular tissue to endosperm. ETC-specific genes are of particular interest to plant biotechnologists, who use genetic engineering to improve grain quality and yield characteristics of important field crops. The success of molecular biology-based approaches to manipulating ETC function is dependent on a thorough understanding of the functions of ETC-specific genes and ETC-specific promoters. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing data on structure and function of ETC-specific genes and their products. Potential applications of ETC-specific genes, and in particular their promoters for biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:24578704

  15. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Søren; Thorn, Mette; Stryhn, Anette; Leisner, Christian; Claesson, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Development of methods for efficient in vitro stimulation and expansion of peptide specific CD8(+) T cells is compelling not only with respect to adoptive T cell therapy but also regarding analysis of T cell responses and search for new immunogenic peptides. In the present study, a new approach to in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (NA-PBMCs) with PB-MHC/CMVp resulted in significant expansion of CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, which was comparable to that achieved by CMVp pulsed mature dendritic cells (DCs). By repeated exposure of NA-PBMCs to PB-MHC/CMVp more than 60% CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, representing a 240-fold expansion, were reached after only two stimulations. Although stimulation with PB-MHC/CMVp clearly demonstrated efficient peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells, there was a tendency to proliferative exhaustion of the cells after 3-4 stimulations. Thus, it will be of interest to examine the effect of new stimulatory cocktails, e.g. cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, by use of the present rapid and easy-to-use method of expanding peptide specific T cells.

  16. Patient-specific cardiovascular progenitor cells derived from integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells for vascular tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiang; Wang, Yongyu; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhao, Chao; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Forde, Kaitlynn; Wang, Lunchang; Wang, Jiangang; Baylink, David J.; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Gao, Shaorong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Y. Eugene; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in regenerating a live vascular replacement. However, the vascular cell source is limited, and it is crucial to develop a scaffold that accommodates new type of vascular progenitor cells and facilitates in vivo lineage specification of the cells into functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to regenerate vascular tissue. In the present study, integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were established from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells through episomal vector nucleofection of reprogramming factors. The established hiPSCs were then induced into mesoderm-originated cardiovascular progenitor cells (CVPCs) with a highly efficient directed lineage specification method. The derived CVPCs were demonstrated to be able to differentiate into functional VSMCs. Subcutaneous implantation of CVPCs seeded on macroporous nanofibrous poly(l-lactide) scaffolds led to in vivo VSMC lineage specification and matrix deposition inside the scaffolds. In summary, we established integration-free patient-specific hiPSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, derived CVPCs through directed lineage specification, and developed an advanced scaffold for these progenitor cells to further differentiate in vivo into VSMCs and regenerate vascular tissue in a subcutaneous implantation model. This study has established an efficient patient-specific approach towards in vivo regeneration of vascular tissue. PMID:26398309

  17. Expediting COD removal in microbial electrolysis cells by increasing biomass concentration.

    PubMed

    Aboutalebi, Hanieh; Sathasivan, Arumugam; Krishna, K C Bal; Kohpaei, Ahmad Jabari

    2011-02-01

    Microorganisms catalyse the reaction and in this study, mainly the effect of different concentration of biomass on COD removal was investigated. Three sets of two-compartment reactors were established. The cation exchange membrane (CEM) was employed in each reactor and 0.5 V of electricity was supplied. Graphite rod employed in cathodic part and a combination of graphite rod and graphite granules were used in anodic chamber. The highest rate of COD removal (40 ± 2.0 ppm/h) was achieved in the reactor which had initial VSS at 6130 mg/l, whereas the slowest rate of 23 ± 1.2 ppm/h in the reactor started with 3365 mgVSS/l. Some ammonia removal was also noticed during the operation. Further understanding and improvement is needed to be competitive against traditional wastewater treatment processes.

  18. Efficient Inactivation of Burkholderia pseudomallei or Francisella tularensis in infected Cells for Safe Removal from Biosafety Level 3 Containment Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Felicia D.; Stabenow, Jennifer M.; Miller, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Working with infectious agents that require BSL-3 level containment agents offers many challenges for researchers. BSL-3 containment laboratories are usually not equipped with expensive specialty equipment that is needed for studies such as flow cytometric analysis, microscopy, and proteomic analyses. Therefore, for most researchers that are working with BSL-3 level infectious agents, removal of samples from BSL-3 labs for these types of studies is necessary, and methods for complete and dependable inactivation of the samples are required. In this report we have done a thorough characterization of the effectiveness of paraformaldehyde fixation for inactivation of cell samples infected with the intracellular bacterial agents Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) and Francisella tularensis (Ft), both of which are Tier 1 select agent pathogens that require BSL-3 containment. We have demonstrated that cells infected with these pathogens are completely inactivated via 5-minute treatment with 4% paraformaldehyde. Moreover, a 15-minute treatment with 2% paraformaldehyde completely sterilized both Bp- and Ft-infected cells. These studies also revealed that Bp is significantly more sensitive to paraformaldehyde treatment than Ft. Our findings have clearly demonstrated that a 15-minute treatment of Bp- or Ft-infected cells with 4% paraformaldehyde solution will allow for safe removal of the cell samples from BSL-3 labs for downstream studies. PMID:24449562

  19. Tumor-specific delivery of biologics by a novel T-cell line HOZOT.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Teppei; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Takeuchi, Makoto; Otani, Takeshi; Nakamura, Shuji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Yuzo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2016-11-30

    "Cell-in-cell" denotes an invasive phenotype in which one cell actively internalizes in another. The novel human T-cell line HOZOT, established from human umbilical cord blood, was shown to penetrate a variety of human cancer cells but not normal cells. Oncolytic viruses are emerging as biological therapies for human cancers; however, efficient viral delivery is limited by a lack of tumor-specific homing and presence of pre-existing or therapy-induced neutralizing antibodies. Here, we report a new, intriguing approach using HOZOT cells to transmit biologics such as oncolytic viruses into human cancer cells by cell-in-cell invasion. HOZOT cells were successfully loaded via human CD46 antigen with an attenuated adenovirus containing the fiber protein of adenovirus serotype 35 (OBP-401/F35), in which the telomerase promoter regulates viral replication. OBP-401/F35-loaded HOZOT cells were efficiently internalized into human cancer cells and exhibited tumor-specific killing by release of viruses, even in the presence of anti-viral neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, intraperitoneal administration of HOZOT cells loaded with OBP-401/F35 significantly suppressed peritoneally disseminated tumor growth in mice. This unique cell-in-cell property provides a platform for selective delivery of biologics into human cancer cells, which has important implications for the treatment of human cancers.

  20. Luminescent microporous metal-organic framework with functional lewis basic sites on the pore surface: specific sensing and removal of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Jayaramulu, Kolleboyina; Narayanan, Raghu Pradeep; George, Subi J; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2012-10-01

    A three-dimensional luminescent metal-organic framework, {Mg(DHT)(DMF)(2)}(n) (1), based on an excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) responsive linker, 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalic acid (H(2)DHT), has been synthesized, and its desolvated microporous framework with pendent -OH groups on the pore surface was exploited for the binding and specific sensing of metal ions via Lewis acid-base interactions. The luminescence intensity significantly quenches with Cu(II) among various s- and d-block metal ions, and highly selective sensing of Cu(II) ions has been realized in both solid and solution states (up to nanomolar concentration). The immobilized Cu(II) metal ions can be selectively removed by chelating agents like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid without any structural disintegration of the framework, as revealed by the luminescence and gas-adsorption studies.

  1. Fabrication of a biomimetic adsorbent imprinted with a common specificity determinant for the removal of α- and β-amanitin from plasma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; He, Rong; Li, Yongxian; Liang, Yong; Li, He; Tang, Youwen

    2016-08-12

    α-Amanitin and β-amanitin are the main toxins of mushroom poisoning. The application of traditional non-selective adsorbents is not satisfactory in clinical treatment of amanita mushroom poisoning due to lack of specificity adsorption capability of these adsorbents toward amanitin toxins. In the current work, we introduce a novel molecularly imprinted biomimetic adsorbent based on a ligand specificity determinant through surface imprinted strategy. Owing to the expensive price of the amanitin sources, we selected a typical common moiety of α, β-amanitin as specificity determinant to synthesize a template necessary for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Computer simulation was used to initially select acidic methacrylic acid (MAA) and basic 4-vinyl pyridine (4-VP) together as functional monomers. The experiments further demonstrated that the synergistic interaction of MAA and 4-VP played a primary role in the recognition of α, β-amanitin by MIPs. By means of batch and packed-bed column experiment and the hemocompatibility evaluation, the resultant biomimetic adsorbent has been proved to be capable of selectively removing α, β-amanitin and possess good hemocompatibility. This novel adsorbent has great potential to find application in human plasma purification.

  2. Simultaneous detection of many T-cell specificities using combinatorial tetramer staining

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Evan W.; Klein, Lawrence O.; Yu, Wong; Davis, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    The direct detection of antigen-specific T cells using tetramers of soluble peptide-major histocompatibilty complex (pMHC) molecules is widely used in both basic and clinical immunology. However, the number of specificities that can be assessed simultaneously has been a major limitation. Here we describe and validate a method using combinations of fluorescent pMHC tetramers to simultaneously detect large numbers (≥ 15) of T cell specificities in a single human blood sample. PMID:19543286

  3. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  4. [Presence of autocomplementary RNA with viral specificity in cells infected with herpes virus].

    PubMed

    Béchet, J M; Montagnier, L; Latarjet, R

    1975-01-13

    RNA from cells infected with Herpes simplex virus contain a higher percentage of double-stranded RNA than non-infected cells. This percentage increases three-fold upon self-annealing. The complementary RNA sequences were shown to be virus-specific by the following criteria: (1) high melting temperature than double-stranded RNA from non infected cells; (2) higher density in caesium sulphate; (3) specific hybridization with viral DNA.

  5. CTLA-4 suppresses the pathogenicity of self antigen-specific T cells by cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ise, Wataru; Kohyama, Masako; Nutsch, Katherine M; Lee, Hyang Mi; Suri, Anish; Unanue, Emil R; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2010-02-01

    The inhibitory immunoregulatory receptor CTLA-4 is critical in maintaining self-tolerance, but the mechanisms of its actions have remained controversial. Here we examined the antigen specificity of tissue-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells in Ctla4(-/-) mice. After adoptive transfer, T cells isolated from tissues of Ctla4(-/-) mice showed T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-dependent accumulation in the tissues from which they were derived, which suggested reactivity to tissue-specific antigens. We identified the pancreas-specific enzyme PDIA2 as an autoantigen in Ctla4(-/-) mice. CTLA-4 expressed either on PDIA2-specific effector cells or on regulatory T cells was sufficient to control tissue destruction mediated by PDIA2-specific T cells. Our results demonstrate that both cell-intrinsic and non-cell-autonomous actions of CTLA-4 operate to maintain T cell tolerance to a self antigen.

  6. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3.

  7. Screening specific polypeptides of breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Qi, Chun-Ling; Kong, Mian; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Lei; Li, Bao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify polypeptides that specifically bond to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random 12 peptide library, in addition to the affinity and specificity of polypeptides. A phage display random 12 peptide library was screened using breast cancer stem cells as targets isolated from the MDA-MB-231 cell line using the serum-free culture technique with hs578bst and MDA-MB-231 cells as subtract-screening cells. Positive and specific binding clones were amplified and sent for sequencing. The affinity and specificity of the positive clones were subsequently identified by ELISA and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine staining. The results demonstrated that phages were gathered ~500 times following three rounds of biopanning. ELISA identified that the affinity to breast cancer stem cells of the no. 6 phage was 6.14 times higher than that in the control group. In addition, immunohistochemistry observed that the no. 6 phage exhibited high-specificity bonding to breast cancer stem cells, and the peptide sequence of the positive phage was GYSASRSTIPGK following DNA sequencing and translation. Thus, the present study isolated a specific peptide that bonds to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library, which may facilitate further studies regarding the stem cell-targeted therapy of breast cancer. PMID:28105180

  8. Accumulation of specific sterol precursors targets a MAP kinase cascade mediating cell-cell recognition and fusion.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Martin; Lichius, Alexander; Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Gottschalk, Johannes; Nawrath, Thorben; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Read, Nick D; Schulz, Stefan; Fleißner, André

    2016-10-18

    Sterols are vital components of eukaryotic cell membranes. Defects in sterol biosynthesis, which result in the accumulation of precursor molecules, are commonly associated with cellular disorders and disease. However, the effects of these sterol precursors on the metabolism, signaling, and behavior of cells are only poorly understood. In this study, we show that the accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain specifically disrupts cell-cell communication and fusion in the fungus Neurospora crassa Genetically identical germinating spores of this fungus undergo cell-cell fusion, thereby forming a highly interconnected supracellular network during colony initiation. Before fusion, the cells use an unusual signaling mechanism that involves the coordinated and alternating switching between signal sending and receiving states of the two fusion partners. Accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain disrupts this coordinated cell-cell communication and suppresses cell fusion. These specific sterol precursors target a single ERK-like mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAK-1)-signaling cascade, whereas a second MAP kinase pathway (MAK-2), which is also involved in cell fusion, is unaffected. These observations indicate that a minor specific change in sterol structure can exert a strong detrimental effect on a key signaling pathway of the cell, resulting in the absence of cell fusion.

  9. Cell-type specific gene expression profiles of leukocytes in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Chana; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A; Brown, Patrick O

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood is a complex tissue comprising numerous cell types with distinct functions and corresponding gene expression profiles. We attempted to define the cell type specific gene expression patterns for the major constituent cells of blood, including B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, lymphocytes and granulocytes. We did this by comparing the global gene expression profiles of purified B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, granulocytes, and lymphocytes using cDNA microarrays. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that similar cell populations from different donors share common gene expression profiles. Supervised analyses identified gene expression signatures for B-cells (427 genes), T-cells (222 genes), CD8+ T-cells (23 genes), granulocytes (411 genes), and lymphocytes (67 genes). No statistically significant gene expression signature was identified for CD4+ cells. Genes encoding cell surface proteins were disproportionately represented among the genes that distinguished among the lymphocyte subpopulations. Lymphocytes were distinguishable from granulocytes based on their higher levels of expression of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, while granulocytes exhibited characteristic expression of various cell surface and inflammatory proteins. Conclusion The genes comprising the cell-type specific signatures encompassed many of the genes already known to be involved in cell-type specific processes, and provided clues that may prove useful in discovering the functions of many still unannotated genes. The most prominent feature of the cell type signature genes was the enrichment of genes encoding cell surface proteins, perhaps reflecting the importance of specialized systems for sensing the environment to the physiology of resting leukocytes. PMID:16704732

  10. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  11. Studies on thyroglobulin-specific suppressor T cell function in autoimmune thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, H.; Hamada, N.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1985-08-01

    T cell regulation of the generation of thyroglobulin plaque-forming cells (Tg PFC) and protein A plaque-forming cells (Prot A PFC) was investigated using lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. T and B cell mixed cultures (T-B MC) were carried out without mitogenic or antigenic stimulation to identify physiological T cell effects in the system. Tg PFC were found in 8 (44%) of 18 patients who had high titers of thyroglobulin antibody in their sera. Tg-specific and nonspecific immunoregulation by T cells from patients and normal subjects was studied using B cells from these eight patients in the T-B MC system. Remarkably lower values of Tg PFC induction compared to Prot A PFC induction were found after T cell addition. Normal T cells inhibited Tg PFC induction, but patient T cells did not, while the same extent of helper effects were found on Prot A PFC induction by the addition of patient and normal T cells. Irradiation (1500 rads) of T cells from patients and normal subjects significantly enhanced both Tg PFC and Prot A PFC induction. Thus, Tg-specific suppressor T cells are present in all normal subjects as part of the radiosensitive suppressor T cell subset. The increase in Tg-PFC caused by irradiation-induced inhibition of Tg-specific suppressor T cell function was significantly greater in normal subjects than in patients. Histamine type 2 receptor-bearing T cells inhibited Prot A PFC induction, but not Tg PFC induction, in the autologous T-B MC system. No Tg PFC were induced from normal B cells in any combination with untreated T cells, irradiated T cells, or histamine type 2 receptor-negative T cells from patients or normal subjects.

  12. Tumor-specific delivery of biologics by a novel T-cell line HOZOT

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Teppei; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Takeuchi, Makoto; Otani, Takeshi; Nakamura, Shuji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Yuzo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cell-in-cell” denotes an invasive phenotype in which one cell actively internalizes in another. The novel human T-cell line HOZOT, established from human umbilical cord blood, was shown to penetrate a variety of human cancer cells but not normal cells. Oncolytic viruses are emerging as biological therapies for human cancers; however, efficient viral delivery is limited by a lack of tumor-specific homing and presence of pre-existing or therapy-induced neutralizing antibodies. Here, we report a new, intriguing approach using HOZOT cells to transmit biologics such as oncolytic viruses into human cancer cells by cell-in-cell invasion. HOZOT cells were successfully loaded via human CD46 antigen with an attenuated adenovirus containing the fiber protein of adenovirus serotype 35 (OBP-401/F35), in which the telomerase promoter regulates viral replication. OBP-401/F35–loaded HOZOT cells were efficiently internalized into human cancer cells and exhibited tumor-specific killing by release of viruses, even in the presence of anti-viral neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, intraperitoneal administration of HOZOT cells loaded with OBP-401/F35 significantly suppressed peritoneally disseminated tumor growth in mice. This unique cell-in-cell property provides a platform for selective delivery of biologics into human cancer cells, which has important implications for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:27901098

  13. Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Lentoid Bodies Expressing a Lens Cell-Specific Fluorescent Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Garrels, Wiebke; Mukherjee, Ayan; Debowski, Katharina; Behr, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Curative approaches for eye cataracts and other eye abnormalities, such as myopia and hyperopia currently suffer from a lack of appropriate models. Here, we present a new approach for in vitro growth of lentoid bodies from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells as a tool for ophthalmological research. We generated a transgenic mouse line with lens-specific expression of a fluorescent reporter driven by the alphaA crystallin promoter. Fetal fibroblasts were isolated from transgenic fetuses, reprogrammed to iPS cells, and differentiated to lentoid bodies exploiting the specific fluorescence of the lens cell-specific reporter. The employment of cell type-specific reporters for establishing and optimizing differentiation in vitro seems to be an efficient and generally applicable approach for developing differentiation protocols for desired cell populations. PMID:27322380

  14. Comparison of influenza and SIV specific CD8 T cell responses in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Reece, Jeanette C; De Rose, Robert; Stambas, John; Sullivan, Lucy; Brooks, Andrew G; Kent, Stephen J; Sexton, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Macaques are a potentially useful non-human primate model to compare memory T-cell immunity to acute virus pathogens such as influenza virus and effector T-cell responses to chronic viral pathogens such as SIV. However, immunological reagents to study influenza CD8(+) T-cell responses in the macaque model are limited. We recently developed an influenza-SIV vaccination model of pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina) and used this to study both influenza-specific and SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells in 39 pigtail macaques expressing the common Mane-A*10(+) (Mane-A01*084) MHC-I allele. To perform comparative studies between influenza and SIV responses a common influenza nucleoprotein-specific CD8(+) T-cell response was mapped to a minimal epitope (termed RA9), MHC-restricted to Mane-A*10 and an MHC tetramer developed to study this response. Influenza-specific memory CD8(+) T-cell response maintained a highly functional profile in terms of multitude of effector molecule expression (CD107a, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-2) and showed high avidity even in the setting of SIV infection. In contrast, within weeks following active SIV infection, SIV-specific CD8(+) effector T-cells expressed fewer cytokines/degranulation markers and had a lower avidity compared to influenza specific CD8(+) T-cells. Further, the influenza specific memory CD8 T-cell response retained stable expression of the exhaustion marker programmed death-marker-1 (PD-1) and co-stimulatory molecule CD28 following infection with SIV. This contrasted with the effector SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells following SIV infection which expressed significantly higher amounts of PD-1 and lower amounts of CD28. Our results suggest that strategies to maintain a more functional CD8(+) T-cell response, profile may assist in controlling HIV disease.

  15. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Shokri, Leila; Tansey, Terese R; Gamble, Caitlin E; Bulyk, Martha L; Michelson, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain (HD) proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs) having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs), but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs)). Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs) for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin) as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory networks

  16. Association of type- and group-specific antigens with the cell wall of serotype III group B streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, T I; Mattingly, S J

    1982-01-01

    The type-specific antigens (TSA) of group B streptococcus (GBS) represent the primary virulence factors for these organisms, yet little is known about their relationship to the cell surface of GBS. Crude cell walls of serotype III GBS strain 110 were purified by extraction with sodium dodecyl sulfate, LiCl, and urea, which removed essentially all of the protein associated with the cell wall as determined by amino acid analysis. Only those amino acids found in peptidoglycan were present, which included alanine, lysine, and glutamate (3.5:1:1 molar ratio). In contrast, these procedures resulted in the release of only 4.6% of the wall-associated TSA, indicating that protein was not the primary means by which TSA was bound to the cell surface. Mutanolysin (20 micrograms/ml) treatment of purified cell walls resulted in the release of 95% of the wall-associated TSA. The covalent association of TSA, the group B polysaccharide, and the peptidoglycan was demonstrated by the presence of N-acetylmuramic acid, rhamnose, alanine, glutamate, and lysine in mutanolysin-extracted TSA material purified by DEAE-Sephacel anion exchange and Sepharose 4B gel chromatography. Chemical analysis of purified cell walls revealed that group B antigen and peptidoglycan comprised 37.4 and 36.5%, respectively, whereas TSA accounted for 22.1 to 24.5% of the weight of the purified walls. Of the total 283.5 mg of TSA produced per 10-liter culture of GBS strain 110, 8.4% was released into the supernatant fluid. The remainder (249 mg) comprised the cell wall antigen. As described above, 4.6% of the cell wall antigen was extractable by nonenzymatic methods, which represented 3.8% of the total TSA, whereas 87.8% of the total TSA produced appeared to be covalently attached to the cell wall. PMID:7047392

  17. Affinity hemodialysis for antiviral therapy. I. Removal of HIV-1 from cell culture supernatants, plasma, and blood.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Richard H; Duffin, R Paul; Zech, Marvin; Ambrus, Julian L

    2002-06-01

    We tested an affinity hemodialysis technique designed to efficiently remove HIV and toxic viral proteins from blood. Miniature polyethersulfone hollow-fiber dialysis cartridges (200-500 nm pore) were packed with anti-HIV antibodies covalently coupled to agarose beads and sealed inside the cartridge. Cell culture fluids, plasma, or infected blood (7-15 ml) containing HIV-1 were circulated over the cartridge at 0.7-10 ml/min and the rate of removal of HIV measured by PCR and p24 ELISA. The technique removed up to 98% of HIV-1 particles from cell culture supernatants. Affinity hemodialysis also efficiently captured cultured HIV from human blood plasma (90%) and native HIV from infected blood (83% to 100%). Viral capture followed first-order kinetics (t(1/2) = 2.8 h). Variations in antibody type, matrix linkage (protein G versus direct coupling), bead pore size, and temperature of operation (25-37 degrees C) had only small effects. Although some binding was nonspecific, direct binding to the immobilized antibodies appeared to be the predominant mechanism.

  18. N protein is the predominant antigen recognized by vesicular stomatitis virus-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Puddington, L; Bevan, M J; Rose, J K; Lefrançois, L

    1986-01-01

    The specificity of anti-vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific cytotoxic T cells was explored with cell lines expressing VSV genes introduced by electroporation. Low levels of nucleocapsid (N) protein were detected on the surface of VSV-infected cells, but N protein could not be detected on the plasma membrane of transfected EL4 cells. Intracellular N protein was detectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoprecipitation in some of the transfected cell lines but not in others, unless the transfected genes were induced by sodium butyrate. However, all of the stably transfected EL4 cell lines expressing the VSV-Indiana N protein were efficiently lysed by serotype-specific and cross-reactive anti-VSV cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Primary cross-reactive anti-VSV CTLs appeared to be specific solely for N protein, based on cold-target competition assays using infected and transfected target cells. Cell lines expressing 100- to 1,000-fold less N protein than did VSV-infected cells were efficiently lysed by both primary and secondary anti-VSV CTLs. Cell lines expressing 100-fold less G protein than did VSV-infected cells were not lysed by either population of effectors. Significantly, cold-target competition studies with secondary CTLs demonstrated that N protein-expressing cell lines were more efficient competitors than were VSV-infected cells even though the latter expressed 100- to 1,000-fold more N protein. This was not an artifact of viral infection since infection of the transfected cell lines did not affect their ability to compete. The possibility that cell lines constitutively expressing internal virus proteins present antigen more effectively than infected cells do is discussed. Images PMID:3022003

  19. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  20. Nuclear factor I and epithelial cell-specific transcription of human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed Central

    Apt, D; Chong, T; Liu, Y; Bernard, H U

    1993-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is mediated by the viral enhancer. Epithelial cell-specific activation is achieved by the cooperative interaction of apparently ubiquitous transcriptional factors. One of them, nuclear factor I (NFI), binds seven sites within the HPV-16 enhancer. Point mutations on enhancer fragments, which retain epithelial cell specificity, verify the functional contribution of NFI. In band shift experiments, the epithelial cell-derived NFI proteins CTF-1, CTF-2, and CTF-3 form a characteristic pattern of heterodimeric complexes which are observed in all epithelial cells tested. Divergence from this pattern in fibroblasts, liver cells, and lymphoid cells correlates with the lack of HPV-16 enhancer activation. The HPV-16 enhancer can be activated by CTF-1 in SL-2 cells, which lack NFI-like proteins. However, exogenous CTF-1 fails to overcome the inactivity of the viral enhancer in fibroblasts. Western immunoblot and supershift analysis shows that exogenously introduced CTF-1 proteins form different heterodimer complexes with the given subset of endogenous NFI proteins in epithelial or fibroblast cells. Polymerase chain reaction analysis and cDNA library screens identified the endogenous fibroblast type NFI as NFI-X, an NFI family member originally cloned from hamster liver cells. The strict correlation between the activation or lack of activation of the HPV-16 enhancer and cell-specific subsets of NFI proteins argues for the pivotal role of NFI binding sites in the epithelial cell-specific function of the viral enhancer. Images PMID:8392590

  1. Distal Regions of the Human IFNG Locus Direct Cell Type-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Patrick L.; Chang, Shaojing; Henderson, Melodie; Soutto, Mohammed; Davis, Georgia M.; McLoed, Allyson G.; Townsend, Michael J.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Aune, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Genes, such as IFNG, which are expressed in multiple cell lineages of the immune system, may employ a common set of regulatory elements to direct transcription in multiple cell types or individual regulatory elements to direct expression in individual cell lineages. By employing a bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic system, we demonstrate that IFNG employs unique regulatory elements to achieve lineage-specific transcriptional control. Specifically, a one 1-kb element 30 kb upstream of IFNG activates transcription in T cells and NKT cells but not in NK cells. This distal regulatory element is a Runx3 binding site in Th1 cells and is needed for RNA polymerase II recruitment to IFNG, but it is not absolutely required for histone acetylation of the IFNG locus. These results support a model whereby IFNG utilizes cis-regulatory elements with cell type-restricted function. PMID:20574006

  2. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-07-04

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis.

  3. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-01-27

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities - a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated with a chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Katherine G; Hoeppli, Romy E; Huang, Qing; Gillies, Jana; Luciani, Dan S; Orban, Paul C; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan K

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a promising treatment for allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Emerging data indicate that, compared with polyclonal Tregs, disease-relevant antigen-specific Tregs may have numerous advantages, such as a need for fewer cells and reduced risk of nonspecific immune suppression. Current methods to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs rely on expansion with allogeneic antigen-presenting cells, which requires access to donor and recipient cells and multiple MHC mismatches. The successful use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the generation of antigen-specific effector T cells suggests that a similar approach could be used to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we have described the creation of an HLA-A2-specific CAR (A2-CAR) and its application in the generation of alloantigen-specific human Tregs. In vitro, A2-CAR-expressing Tregs maintained their expected phenotype and suppressive function before, during, and after A2-CAR-mediated stimulation. In mouse models, human A2-CAR-expressing Tregs were superior to Tregs expressing an irrelevant CAR at preventing xenogeneic GVHD caused by HLA-A2+ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that use of CAR technology to generate potent, functional, and stable alloantigen-specific human Tregs markedly enhances their therapeutic potential in transplantation and sets the stage for using this approach for making antigen-specific Tregs for therapy of multiple diseases.

  5. Spider silk-based gene carriers for tumor cell-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Reagan, Michaela R; Goldstein, Robert H; Rosenblatt, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2011-08-17

    The present study demonstrates pDNA complexes of recombinant silk proteins containing poly(L-lysine) and tumor-homing peptides (THPs), which are globular and approximately 150-250 nm in diameter, show significant enhancement of target specificity to tumor cells by additions of F3 and CGKRK THPs. We report herein the preparation and study of novel nanoscale silk-based ionic complexes containing pDNA able to home specifically to tumor cells. Particular focus was on how the THP, F3 (KDEPQRRSARLSAKPAPPKPEPKPKKAPAKK), and CGKRK, enhanced transfection specificity to tumor cells. Genetically engineered silk proteins containing both poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with pDNA and the THP to bind to specific tumor cells for target-specific pDNA delivery were prepared using Escherichia coli, followed by in vitro and in vivo transfection experiments into MDA-MB-435 melanoma cells and highly metastatic human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cells. Non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells were used as a control cell line for in vitro tumor-specific delivery studies. These results demonstrate that combination of the bioengineered silk delivery systems and THP can serve as a versatile and useful new platform for nonviral gene delivery.

  6. Detection and quantification of drug-specific T cells in penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Rozieres, A; Hennino, A; Rodet, K; Gutowski, M-C; Gunera-Saad, N; Berard, F; Cozon, G; Bienvenu, J; Nicolas, J-F

    2009-04-01

    Drug allergic reactions presenting as maculo-papular exanthema (MPE) are mediated by drug-specific T cells. In this study, the frequency of circulating specific T cells was analyzed by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot assay in 22 patients with an allergic MPE to amoxicillin (amox). Amox-specific circulating T cells were detected in 20/22 patients with frequencies ranging from 1 : 8000 to 1 : 30 000 circulating leucocytes. No reactivity was observed in 46 control patients, including 15 patients with immunoglobulin E-mediated allergy to amoxicillin, 11 patients with a history of drug-induced MPE but tolerant to amoxicillin and 20 healthy individuals. Furthermore, amox-specific T cells were still detectable several years after the occurrence of the allergic reaction even after strict drug avoidance. Finally, analysis of drug-specific T cells in one patient allergic to ticarcillin (a penicillin antibiotic distinct from amox) revealed the presence of IFN-gamma-producing T cells reactive to ticarcillin and several other betalactam antibiotics, suggesting that the IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay is able to detect T cell cross-reactivity against chemically related drugs. These findings confirm that drug-induced MPE is associated with the presence of specific T cells in blood and further suggest that the IFN-gamma ELISPOT is a sensitive assay which could improve the diagnosis of betalactam allergy.

  7. Resistance of leukemia cells to cytarabine chemotherapy is mediated by bone marrow stroma, involves cell-surface equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 removal and correlates with patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Macanas-Pirard, Patricia; Broekhuizen, Richard; González, Alfonso; Oyanadel, Claudia; Ernst, Daniel; García, Patricia; Montecinos, Viviana P; Court, Felipe; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Ramirez, Pablo; Nervi, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    The interaction between acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML) with the bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) determines a protective environment that favors tumor development and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We showed that BMSCs secrete soluble factors that protect AML cells from Ara-C induced cytotoxicity. This leukemia chemoresistance is associated with a decrease in the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1) activity by inducing removal of ENT1 from the cell surface. Reduction of cell proliferation was also observed with activation of AKT and mTOR-dependent cell survival pathways, which may also contribute to the tumor chemoprotection. Analysis of primary BMSC cultures has demonstrated that AML patients with stroma capable to confer Ara-C resistance in vitro compared to AML patients without this stroma capacity were associated with a worse prognosis. The two year overall survival rate was 0% versus 80% respectively (p=0.0001). This is the first report of a chemoprotection mechanism based on the removal of a drug transporter from the cell surface and most importantly the first time that a stroma phenotype has correlated with prognostic outcome in cancer.

  8. The enhancement of ammonium removal from ethanolamine wastewater using air-cathode microbial fuel cells coupled to ferric reduction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ja-Won; Seo, Seok-Ju; Maitlo, Hubdar Ali; Park, Joo-Yang

    2015-08-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) with biological Fe(III) reduction was implemented for simultaneous ethanolamine (ETA) degradation and electrical energy generation. In the feasibility experiment using acetate as a substrate in a single-chamber MFC with goethite and ammonium at a ratio of 3.0(mol/mol), up to 96.1% of the ammonium was removed through the novel process related to Fe(III). In addition, the highest voltage output (0.53V) and maximum power density (0.49Wm(-2)) were obtained. However, the ammonium removal and electrical performance decreased as acetate was replaced with ETA. In the long-term experiment, the electrical performance markedly decreased where the voltage loss increased due to Fe deposition on the membranes.

  9. From microbial fuel cell (MFC) to microbial electrochemical snorkel (MES): maximizing chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Erable, Benjamin; Etcheverry, Luc; Bergel, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The paper introduces the concept of the microbial electrochemical snorkel (MES), a simplified design of a "short-circuited" microbial fuel cell (MFC). The MES cannot provide current but it is optimized for wastewater treatment. An electrochemically active biofilm (EAB) was grown on graphite felt under constant polarization in an urban wastewater. Controlling the electrode potential and inoculating the bioreactor with a suspension of an established EAB improved the performance and the reproducibility of the anodes. Anodes, colonized by an EAB were tested for the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from urban wastewater using a variety of bio-electrochemical processes (microbial electrolysis, MFC, MES). The MES technology, as well as a short-circuited MFC, led to a COD removal 57% higher than a 1000 Ω-connected MFC, confirming the potential for wastewater treatment.

  10. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  11. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  12. Lentivirally engineered dendritic cells activate AFP-specific T cells which inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2011-07-01

    α-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the anti-tumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered Dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and anti-tumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DCs. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DCs vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DCs-based vaccines.

  13. Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Accessory Cells and Chorion During Development of Ciona intestinalis Type B Embryos and the Impact of Their Removal on Cell Morphology.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Helen; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2015-06-01

    Spawned ascidian oocytes are surrounded by a membrane called the chorion (or vitelline coat) and associated with two populations of maternally-supplied cells. Outside the chorion are follicle cells, which may affect the buoyancy of eggs. Inside the chorion are test cells, which during oogenesis provision the egg and which after fertilisation contribute to the larval tunic. The structure of maternal cells may vary between species. The model ascidian Ciona intestinalis has been recently split into two species, currently named type A and type B. The ultrastructure of extraembryonic cells and structures from type A embryos has been reported. Here we describe the ultrastructure of follicle and test cells from C. intestinalis type B embryos. Test cells are about 5 µm in diameter and line the inside of the chorion of developing embryos in a dense sheet. Follicle cells are large (> 100 µm long) and spike-shaped, with many large vesicles. Terminal electron dense granules are found towards the tips of spikes, adjacent to cytoplasm containing numerous small electron dense bodies connected by filaments. These are probably vesicles containing material for the terminal granules. Removal of maternal structures and cells just after fertilisation, as commonly used in many experiments manipulating C. intestinalis development, has been reported to affect embryonic patterning. We examined the impact of this on embryonic ectoderm cells by scanning electron microscopy. Cells of embryos that developed without maternal structures still developed cilia, but had indistinct cell boundaries and a more flattened appearance than those that developed within the chorion.

  14. Divergent members of a single autoreactive B cell clone retain specificity for apoptotic blebs.

    PubMed

    Neeli, Indira; Richardson, Mekel M; Khan, Salar N; Nicolo, Danielle; Monestier, Marc; Radic, Marko Z

    2007-03-01

    Specificity for double-stranded DNA can arise due to somatic mutations within one of the branches of an autoreactive B cell clone. However, it is not known whether a different autospecificity predates anti-dsDNA and whether separate offshoots of an expanding B cell clone retain or evolve alternative specificities. We compared 3H9, an anti-dsDNA IgG, to 4H8 and 1A11, antibodies produced by hybridomas representing an alternative branch of the 3H9 B cell clone. All three IgG bound chromatin in ELISA and apoptotic cells in confocal microscopy, yet only 3H9 bound dsDNA, as measured by plasmon resonance. Moreover, we demonstrate that despite the unique specificity of 3H9 for dsDNA, all three clone members exhibited indistinguishable binding to chromatin. The binding to chromatin and apoptotic cells was unaffected by N-linked glycosylation in L chain CDR1, a modification that results from a replacement of serine 26 with asparagine in 4H8 and 1A11. These data provide the first evidence that specificity for nucleosome epitopes on apoptotic cells provides the initial positive stimulus for somatic variants that comprise a B cell clone, including those that subsequently acquire specificity for dsDNA. Conversely, selection of autoreactive B cells for binding to apoptotic cells leads to clonal expansion, antibody diversification, and the development of linked sets of anti-nuclear autoantibodies.

  15. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting to examine cell-type-specific gene expression in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M

    2015-05-28

    The brain is comprised of four primary cell types including neurons, astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Though they are not the most abundant cell type in the brain, neurons are the most widely studied of these cell types given their direct role in impacting behaviors. Other cell types in the brain also impact neuronal function and behavior via the signaling molecules they produce. Neuroscientists must understand the interactions between the cell types in the brain to better understand how these interactions impact neural function and disease. To date, the most common method of analyzing protein or gene expression utilizes the homogenization of whole tissue samples, usually with blood, and without regard for cell type. This approach is an informative approach for examining general changes in gene or protein expression that may influence neural function and behavior; however, this method of analysis does not lend itself to a greater understanding of cell-type-specific gene expression and the effect of cell-to-cell communication on neural function. Analysis of behavioral epigenetics has been an area of growing focus which examines how modifications of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) structure impact long-term gene expression and behavior; however, this information may only be relevant if analyzed in a cell-type-specific manner given the differential lineage and thus epigenetic markers that may be present on certain genes of individual neural cell types. The Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) technique described below provides a simple and effective way to isolate individual neural cells for the subsequent analysis of gene expression, protein expression, or epigenetic modifications of DNA. This technique can also be modified to isolate more specific neural cell types in the brain for subsequent cell-type-specific analysis.

  16. Quantifying Biomass Changes of Single CD8+ T Cells during Antigen Specific Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Colleen; Witte, Owen N.; Teitell, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Existing approaches that quantify cytotoxic T cell responses rely on bulk or surrogate measurements which impede the direct identification of single activated T cells of interest. Single cell microscopy or flow cytometry methodologies typically rely on fluorescent labeling, which limits applicability to primary cells such as human derived T lymphocytes. Here, we introduce a quantitative method to track single T lymphocyte mediated cytotoxic events within a mixed population of cells using live cell interferometry (LCI), a label-free microscopy technique that maintains cell viability. LCI quantifies the mass distribution within individual cells by measuring the phase shift caused by the interaction of light with intracellular biomass. Using LCI, we imaged cytotoxic T cells killing cognate target cells. In addition to a characteristic target cell mass decrease of 20–60% over 1–4 h following attack by a T cell, there was a significant 4-fold increase in T cell mass accumulation rate at the start of the cytotoxic event and a 2–3 fold increase in T cell mass relative to the mass of unresponsive T cells. Direct, label-free measurement of CD8+ T and target cell mass changes provides a kinetic, quantitative assessment of T cell activation and a relatively rapid approach to identify specific, activated patient-derived T cells for applications in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23935904

  17. Glioma-specific and cell cycle-regulated herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon viral vector.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ivy A W; Hui, Kam M; Lam, Paula Y P

    2004-05-01

    We have engineered a novel herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based amplicon viral vector, whereby gene expression is controlled by cell cycle events. In nondividing cells, trans-activation of the cyclin A promoter via interaction of the Gal4/NF-YA fusion protein with the Gal4-binding sites is prevented by the presence of a repressor protein, cell cycle-dependent factor 1 (CDF-1). CDF-1 is specifically expressed during the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle and its binding site is located within the cyclin A promoter. In actively proliferating cells, trans-activation could take place because of the absence of CDF-1. Our results showed that when all these cell cycle-specific regulatory elements are incorporated in cis into a single HSV-1 amplicon plasmid vector backbone (pC8-36), reporter luciferase activity is greatly enhanced. Transgene expression mediated by this series of HSV-1 amplicon plasmid vectors and amplicon viral vectors could be regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner in a variety of cell lines. In a further attempt to target transgene expression to a selected group of actively proliferating cells such as glial cells, we have replaced the cytomegalovirus promoter of the pC8-36 amplicon plasmid with the glial cell-specific GFAP enhancer element. With this latter viral construct, cell type-specific and cell cycle-dependent transgene expression could subsequently be demonstrated specifically in glioma-bearing animals. Taken together, our results suggest that this series of cell cycle-regulatable HSV-1 amplicon viral vectors could potentially be adapted as useful tools for the treatment of human cancers.

  18. Cell type-specific affinity purification of nuclei for chromatin profiling in whole animals.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing cell differentiation during development in a complex organism requires the analysis of expression and chromatin profiles in individual cell types. Our laboratory has developed a simple and generally applicable strategy to purify specific cell types from whole organisms for simultaneous analysis of chromatin and expression. The method, termed INTACT for Isolation of Nuclei TAgged in specific Cell Types, depends on the expression of an affinity-tagged nuclear envelope protein in the cell type of interest. These nuclei can be affinity-purified from the total pool of nuclei and used as a source for RNA and chromatin. The method serves as a simple and scalable alternative to FACS sorting or laser capture microscopy to circumvent the need for expensive equipment and specialized skills. This chapter provides detailed protocols for the cell-type specific purification of nuclei from Caenorhabditis elegans.

  19. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  20. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  1. Tissue-specific DNA demethylation is required for proper B-cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Orlanski, Shari; Labi, Verena; Reizel, Yitzhak; Spiro, Adam; Lichtenstein, Michal; Levin-Klein, Rena; Koralov, Sergei B.; Skversky, Yael; Rajewsky, Klaus; Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2016-01-01

    There is ample evidence that somatic cell differentiation during development is accompanied by extensive DNA demethylation of specific sites that vary between cell types. Although the mechanism of this process has not yet been elucidated, it is likely to involve the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC by Tet enzymes. We show that a Tet2/Tet3 conditional knockout at early stages of B-cell development largely prevents lineage-specific programmed demethylation events. This lack of demethylation affects the expression of nearby B-cell lineage genes by impairing enhancer activity, thus causing defects in B-cell differentiation and function. Thus, tissue-specific DNA demethylation appears to be necessary for proper somatic cell development in vivo. PMID:27091986

  2. Identification of specific relaxin-binding cells in the cervix, mammary glands, nipples, small intestine, and skin of pregnant pigs.

    PubMed

    Min, G; Sherwood, O D

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that relaxin promotes growth and softening of the cervix and development of the mammary glands in the pregnant pig. An important aspect of understanding relaxin's mechanism of action in these tissues is to identify the specific cell type(s) that contains relaxin receptors, that is, to identify those cells that initiate relaxin's effects. The objective of the present study was to identify relaxin-binding cells in tissues known to respond to relaxin (cervix and mammary gland) as well as in tissues suspected of being responsive to relaxin (nipple, small intestine, and skin) in the pregnant pig. To accomplish that objective we developed an in vitro modification of an immunohistochemical technique recently developed for identification of relaxin-binding cells. Two groups of pregnant gilts were used: intact control (group C) and ovariectomized progesterone-treated (group OP). Group OP was ovariectomized on Day 40 of gestation (Day 40) and treated with progesterone (50 mg/2 ml corn oil i.m., twice daily) until Day 110 to maintain pregnancy. On Day 110, tissues from both groups were removed, cut into cubes (2-3 cm3), frozen in liquid nitrogen, and cryosectioned (8 microns). Specific cell types that bind relaxin were identified by sequential application of a biotinylated relaxin probe, antibiotin immunoglobulin G conjugated to 1 nm colloidal gold, and silver for signal amplification. The study demonstrates for the first time that relaxin binds with specificity to 1) blood vessels (cervix, mammary glands, nipples, small intestine); 2) smooth muscles in small intestine (circular, longitudinal, muscularis mucosa); and 3) skin from sites other than the mammary nipples (back, ear, thigh, leg). In addition, consistent with previous findings in the rat, prominent labeling was observed in epithelial cells in the cervix, mammary glands, and nipples; in smooth muscle cells in the cervix and mammary nipples; and in the skin of the nipples. There were no

  3. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E.; Ostberg, Julie R.; Priceman, Saul J.; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Jensen, Michael C.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  4. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer.

  5. Adoptive immunotherapy with the use of regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells derived from cord blood.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick J; Bollard, Catherine M; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2015-06-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood-derived products that have shown promise in early-phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease, respectively. We describe how current strategies that use cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients.

  6. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiming; Modiano, Jaime F; Ito, Daisuke

    2017-03-30

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1(-) and SSEA-1(+) cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines.

  7. High frequency of malaria-specific T cells in non-exposed humans.

    PubMed

    Zevering, Y; Amante, F; Smillie, A; Currier, J; Smith, G; Houghten, R A; Good, M F

    1992-03-01

    A major goal of current candidate malaria vaccines is to stimulate the expansion of clones of malaria-specific lymphocytes. We have examined the in vitro T cell responses of a group of malaria exposed and non-exposed adult Caucasian donors to recombinant circumsporozoite (CS) proteins, one of which is undergoing clinical trials, to blood-stage parasites, and to synthetic peptides copying the CS protein and defined blood-stage proteins. In nearly all individuals tested, CD4 T cell proliferation or lymphokine production occurred in response to whole parasite or CS protein stimulation, and T cells from many individuals responded to synthetic peptides. T cell responses were major histocompatibility complex-restricted, and stimulation of T cells with malaria parasites or CS protein did not appear to expand a population of T cell receptor gamma/delta cells. Malaria-specific responses were independent of prior malaria exposure, and in some cases exceeded the magnitude of response to tetanus toxoid. Specific T cells are present in high frequency in the peripheral blood of many donors who have never been exposed to malaria. Although malaria-specific CD4 T cells play an important role in immunity, these data question whether vaccines need to stimulate such cells, and focus attention on other aspects of malaria immunity which may be more critical to a successful vaccine.

  8. Inhibition of murine nephritogenic effector T cells by a clone-specific suppressor factor.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, C M; Kelly, C J

    1994-01-01

    We have used a murine model of organ-specific autoimmunity to characterize therapeutic modalities capable of down-regulating the cellular limb of the autoimmune response. Murine interstitial nephritis is an autoimmune disease mediated by tubular antigen-specific CD8+ nephritogenic effector T cells which are delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactive and cytotoxic to renal epithelial cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that disease can be suppressed with experimentally induced populations of T cells (Ts1 and Ts2 cells) obtained after injection of tubular antigen-coupled splenocytes into syngeneic mice. As the target of Ts2 is the CD8+ effector T cell, we have evaluated its effects on nephritogenic effector T cell clones isolated from diseased animals. Our studies demonstrate that soluble proteins expressed by Ts2 cells (TsF2) specifically abrogate the DTH, cytotoxic, and nephritogenic potential of M52 cells, although T cell receptor and IL-2 receptor expression are unchanged in these unresponsive M52 clones. TsF2-induced inhibition is dependent on new mRNA and protein synthesis. In a cytotoxic clone, M52.26, exposure to TsF2 induces expression of TGF-beta 1 which is, in turn, required for inhibition of cytotoxicity and nephritogenicity. Our studies are consistent with TGF-beta 1 behaving, at least in some T cells, as a nonspecific final effector of clone-specific suppression. Images PMID:7962556

  9. Kidney specific protein-positive cells derived from embryonic stem cells reproduce tubular structures in vitro and differentiate into renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Fujii, Shizuka; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Homma, Koichiro; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hideyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various organs and tissues, and are regarded as new tools for the elucidation of disease mechanisms as well as sources for regenerative therapies. However, a method of inducing organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells is urgently needed. Although many scientists have been developing methods to induce various organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells, renal lineage cells have yet to be induced in vitro because of the complexity of kidney structures and the diversity of kidney-component cells. Here, we describe a method of inducing renal tubular cells from mouse embryonic stem cells via the cell purification of kidney specific protein (KSP)-positive cells using an anti-KSP antibody. The global gene expression profiles of KSP-positive cells derived from ES cells exhibited characteristics similar to those of cells in the developing kidney, and KSP-positive cells had the capacity to form tubular structures resembling renal tubular cells when grown in a 3D culture in Matrigel. Moreover, our results indicated that KSP-positive cells acquired the characteristics of each segment of renal tubular cells through tubular formation when stimulated with Wnt4. This method is an important step toward kidney disease research using pluripotent stem cells, and the development of kidney regeneration therapies.

  10. Dual-Specificity Anti-sigma Factor Reinforces Control of Cell-Type Specific Gene Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R.; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  11. UV-induced Oxygen Removal for Photostable High Efficiency PTB7-Th: PC71BM Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan; Mantilla-Perez, Paola; Montes Bajo, Miguel; Romero-Gomez, Pablo; Martorell, Jordi

    2016-10-03

    Solution-processed ZnO sol-gel or nanoparticles are widely used as the electron transporting layer (ETL) in optoelectronic devices. However, chemisorbed oxygen on the ZnO layer surface has been shown to be detrimental for the device performance as well as stability. Herein, we demonstrate that a chemisorbed oxygen removal based on a UV illumination of the ZnO surface layer under a nitrogen atmosphere can, simultaneously, improve power conversion efficiency and photostability of PTB7-Th: PC71BM based inverted polymer solar cells. By a systematic study of such UV illumination procedure, we obtained optimal conditions where, both, the cell efficiency and stability were improved. We fabricated cells with a power conversion efficiency higher than 9.8%, and with a T80 lifetime larger than 500 hours, corresponding to about a 2.5-fold enhancement relative to non-UV treated ZnO reference devices.

  12. Effect of capillary pressure on liquid water removal in the cathode gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wanyuan; Kurihara, Eru; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    In order to investigate the effect of capillary pressure on the transport of liquid water in the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, a one-dimensional steady-state mathematical model was developed, including the effect of temperature on the capillary pressure. Numerical results indicate that the liquid water saturation significantly increases with increases in the operating temperature of the fuel cell. An elevated operating temperature has an undesirable influence on the removal of liquid water inside the GDL. A reported peculiar phenomenon in which the flooding of the fuel cell under a high operating temperature and an over-saturated environment is more serious in a GDL combined with a micro-porous layer (MPL) than in a GDL without an MPL [Lim and Wang, Electrochim. Acta 49 (2004), 4149-4156] is explained based on the present analysis.

  13. Absence of transitive and systemic pathways allows cell-specific and isoform-specific RNAi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    ROIGNANT, JEAN-YVES; CARRÉ, CLÉMENT; MUGAT, BRUNO; SZYMCZAK, DIMITRI; LEPESANT, JEAN-ANTOINE; ANTONIEWSKI, CHRISTOPHE

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) designates the multistep process by which double-stranded RNA induces the silencing of homologous endogenous genes. Some aspects of RNAi appear to be conserved throughout evolution, including the processing of trigger dsRNAs into small 21–23-bp siRNAs and their use to guide the degradation of complementary mRNAs. Two remarkable features of RNAi were uncovered in plants and Caenorhabditid elegans. First, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities allow the synthesis of siRNA complementary to sequences upstream of or downstream from the initial trigger region in the target mRNA, leading to a transitive RNAi with sequences that had not been initially targeted. Secondly, systemic RNAi may cause the targeting of gene silencing in one tissue to spread to other tissues. Using transgenes expressing dsRNA, we investigated whether transitive and systemic RNAi occur in Drosophila. DsRNA-producing transgenes targeted RNAi to specific regions of alternative mRNA species of one gene without transitive effect directed to sequences downstream from or upstream of the initial trigger region. Moreover, specific expression of a dsRNA, using either cell-specific GAL4 drivers or random clonal activation of a GAL4 driver, mediated a cell-autonomous RNAi. Together, our results provide evidence that transitive and systemic aspects of RNAi are not conserved in Drosophila and demonstrate that dsRNA-producing transgenes allow powerful reverse genetic approaches to be conducted in this model organism, by knocking down gene functions at the resolution of a single-cell type and of a single isoform. PMID:12592004

  14. Collaboration between tumor-specific CD4+ T cells and B cells in anti-cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Guy, Thomas V; Terry, Alexandra M; Bolton, Holly A; Hancock, David G; Zhu, Erhua; Brink, Robert; McGuire, Helen M; Shklovskaya, Elena; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-05-24

    The role of B cells and antibodies in anti-tumor immunity is controversial, with both positive and negative effects reported in animal models and clinical studies. We developed a murine B16.F10 melanoma model to study the effects of collaboration between tumor-specific CD4+ T cells and B cells on tumor control. By incorporating T cell receptor transgenic T cells and B cell receptor isotype switching B cells, we were able to track the responses of tumor-reactive T and B cells and the development of anti-tumor antibodies in vivo. In the presence of tumor-specific B cells, the number of tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells was reduced in lymphoid tissues and the tumor itself, and this correlated with poor tumor control. B cells had little effect on the Th1 bias of the CD4+ T cell response, and the number of induced FoxP3+ regulatory cells (iTregs) generated from within the original naive CD4+ T cell inoculum was unrelated to the degree of B cell expansion. In response to CD4+ T cell help, B cells produced a range of isotype-switched anti-tumor antibodies, principally IgG1, IgG2a/c and IgG2b. In the absence of CD4+ T cells, B cells responded to agonistic anti-CD40 administration by switching to production of IgG2a/c and, to a lesser extent, IgG1, IgG3, IgA and IgE, which reduced the number of lung metastases after i.v. tumor inoculation but had no effect on the growth of subcutaneous tumors.

  15. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM BY ION-EXCHANGE MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic acid formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. Cell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in pro...

  16. Is Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 4 a Marker for Human Ductal Stem/Progenitor Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Ayse; Lopez, Ana; Hayek, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The presence of pancreatic stem cells (PnSCs) has not been firmly demonstrated in the human or animal pancreas. Previous reports have suggested that ductal and acinar structures in the exocrine pancreas can be a potential source of progenitor cells. More recently, immature insulin precursors in the periphery of human islets have been found to self-replicate and differentiate to endocrine cells in vitro. Transplantation of these cells under the kidney capsule improves the diabetic state in mice. The controversy surrounding where PnSCs reside could be resolved if a specific marker were to be found that allowed their identification, purification, and directed differentiation to endocrine cells. We have identified in human pancreas cells positive for the stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 (SSEA4), a stem cell marker. These cells also express ductal, pancreatic progenitor, and stem cell protein markers. Interestingly, some of the SSEA4+ cells scattered in the ducts do not show a ductal cell phenotype. SSEA4+-sorted cells formed aggregate-like spheres in culture and robustly differentiated to pancreatic hormone-expressing cells in conditions of high glucose concentration and B27 supplementation. We hypothesize that SSEA4+ cells or a subpopulation of those cells residing in the pancreatic ducts may be the elusive PnSCs, and in this case, SSEA4 may represent a potential surface antigen marker for human PnSCs. The discovery of specific markers for the identification and purification of human PnSCs would greatly facilitate studies aimed at the expansion of these cells and the development of targeting tools for their potential induction to insulin-producing cells. PMID:23515456

  17. Dendritic cell editing by activated natural killer cells results in a more protective cancer-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Barbara; Mortara, Lorenzo; Chiossone, Laura; Accolla, Roberto S; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, several studies have extensively reported that activated natural killer (NK) cells can kill autologous immature dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro, whereas they spare fully activated DCs. This led to the proposal that activated NK cells might select a more immunogenic subset of DCs during a protective immune response. However, there is no demonstration that autologous DC killing by NK cells is an event occurring in vivo and, consequently, the functional relevance of this killing remains elusive. Here we report that a significant decrease of CD11c(+) DCs was observed in draining lymph nodes of mice inoculated with MHC-devoid cells as NK cell targets able to induce NK cell activation. This in vivo DC editing by NK cells was perforin-dependent and it was functionally relevant, since residual lymph node DCs displayed an improved capability to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, in a model of anti-cancer vaccination, the administration of MHC-devoid cells together with tumor cells increased the number of tumor-specific CTLs and resulted in a significant increase in survival of mice upon challenge with a lethal dose of tumor cells. Depletion of NK cells or the use of perforin knockout mice strongly decreased the tumor-specific CTL expansion and its protective role against tumor cell challenge. As a whole, our data support the hypothesis that NK cell-mediated DC killing takes place in vivo and is able to promote expansion of cancer-specific CTLs. Our results also indicate that cancer vaccines could be improved by strategies aimed at activating NK cells.

  18. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen–specific (TA-specific) CD8+ T cells and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8+ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8+ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1+TIM-3+ TA-specific CD8+ T cells. PD-1+TIGIT+, PD-1–TIGIT+, and PD-1+TIGIT– CD8+ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand–expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8+ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:25866972

  19. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  20. Coculturing human endometrial epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts alters cell-specific gene expression and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C.; Erikson, David W.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Meyer, Michelle R.; Barragan, Fatima; McIntire, Ramsey H.; Tamaresis, John S.; Vo, Kim Chi; Giudice, Linda C.; Irwin, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of coculturing endometrial epithelial cells (eEC) with paired endometrial stromal fibroblasts (eSF) on cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion patterns. Design In vitro study. Setting University research laboratory. Patient(s) Endometrial biopsies were obtained from premenopausal women. Intervention(s) Polarized eEC and subject-paired eSF were cultured for 12.5 hours alone (monoculture) or combined in a two-chamber coculture system without cell-cell contact. Cells and conditioned media were analyzed for global gene expression and cytokine secretion, respectively. Purified, endometrial tissue-derived eEC and eSF isolated by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) were used as noncultured controls. Main Outcome Measure(s) Cell-specific global gene expression profiling and analysis of secreted cytokines in eEC/eSF cocultures and respective monocultures. Result(s) Transepithelial resistance, diffusible tracer exclusion, expression of tight junction proteins, and apical/basolateral vectorial secretion confirmed eEC structural and functional polarization. Distinct transcriptomes of eEC and eSF were consistent with their respective lineages and their endometrial origin. Coculture of eEC with eSF resulted in altered cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion. Conclusion(s) This coculture model provides evidence that interactions between endometrial functionally polarized epithelium and stromal fibroblasts affect cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion underscoring their relevance when modeling endometrium in vitro. PMID:23849844

  1. In vitro expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells distorts the T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Koning, Dan; Costa, Ana I; Hasrat, Raiza; Grady, Bart P X; Spijkers, Sanne; Nanlohy, Nening; Keşmir, Can; van Baarle, Debbie

    2014-03-01

    Short-term in vitro expansion of antigen-specific T cells is an appreciated assay for the analysis of small memory T-cell populations. However, how well short-term expanded T cells represent the direct ex vivo situation remains to be elucidated. In this study we compared the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells directly ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation with antigen. Our data show that the antigen-specific T cell repertoire significantly alters after in vitro culture. Clear shifts in clonotype hierarchy were observed, with the most dominant ex vivo clonotype decreasing after stimulation at the expense of several previously subdominant clonotypes. Notably, these alterations were more pronounced in polyclonal T-cell populations compared to mono- or oligoclonal repertoires. Furthermore, TCR diversity significantly increased after culture with antigen. These results suggest that the T-cell repertoire is highly subjective to variation after in vitro stimulation with antigen. Hence, although short-term expansion of T cells provides a simple and efficient tool to examine antigen-specific immune responses, caution is required if T-cell populations are expanded prior to detailed, clonotypic analyses or other repertoire-based investigations.

  2. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Birgit G

    2014-12-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR PCR kit, Qiagen, UK; reference method). For immunohistochemistry, antibodies against exon19 deletions (clone 6B6), exon21 mutations (clone 43B2) from Cell Signaling Technology (Boston, USA) and EGFR variantIII (clone 218C9) from Dako (Copenhagen, DK) were applied. Protein expression was evaluated, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94.4-99.4%). Sensitivity of exon19 antibody was 63.2% (95% confidence interval=38.4-83.7%) and of exon21 antibody was 80.0% (95% confidence interval=44.4-97.5%). Seven exon19 and four exon21 mutations were false negatives (immunohistochemistry negative, RT-PCR positive). Two exon19 and three exon21 mutations were false positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC

  3. Rapid and specific electrochemical detection of prostate cancer cells using an aperture sensor array.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Mario; Bhimji, Alyajahan; Kelley, Shana O

    2013-03-07

    A rapid, simple and specific cancer cell counting sensor would allow for early detection and better disease management. We have developed a novel cell counting device that can specifically count 125 prostate cancer cells in both complex media with serum and a mixed cell population containing non-target cells within 15 min. The microfabricated glass chip with exposed gold apertures utilizes the anti-EpCAM antibody to selectively count prostate cancer cells via differential pulse voltammetry. The newly developed sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and selectivity. The cells remain viable throughout the counting process and can be used for further analysis. This device could have utility for future applications in early stage cancer diagnosis.

  4. Tracking antigen specific CD4+ T-cells with soluble MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Kwok, William W

    2007-01-01

    The advent of soluble MHC multimer technology has allowed for the flow-cytometric direct identification of specific-MHC restricted antigen-specific T cells in mixed cell populations and also enabled the direct phenotyping and cloning of these cells at the same time. To date, MHC multimers have been used in characterizing the adaptive T cell repertoire under infectious, cancerous, and autoimmune states and has increased our understanding of the dynamics of T-cell immunity. Recombinant MHC multimers have been produced where MHC-binding peptide antigens are either covalently or noncovalently bound to the MHC, with the latter having the advantage of the ability to use a single recombinant MHC to investigate multiple MHC-binding peptides and their interacting T cells. In this method we describe how to generate recombinant non-covalently bound peptide MHC-multimers in insect cells. MHC multimers are generated as tetravalent complexes using a streptavidin scaffold.

  5. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  6. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  7. Atypical protein kinase C regulates primary dendrite specification of cerebellar Purkinje cells by localizing Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Koji; Kani, Shuichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bae, Young-Ki; Abe, Takaya; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-12-15

    Neurons have highly polarized structures that determine what parts of the soma elaborate the axon and dendrites. However, little is known about the mechanisms that establish neuronal polarity in vivo. Cerebellar Purkinje cells extend a single primary dendrite from the soma that ramifies into a highly branched dendritic arbor. We used the zebrafish cerebellum to investigate the mechanisms by which Purkinje cells acquire these characteristics. To examine dendritic morphogenesis in individual Purkinje cells, we marked the cell membrane using a Purkinje cell-specific promoter to drive membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. We found that zebrafish Purkinje cells initially extend multiple neurites from the soma and subsequently retract all but one, which becomes the primary dendrite. In addition, the Golgi apparatus specifically locates to the root of the primary dendrite, and its localization is already established in immature Purkinje cells that have multiple neurites. Inhibiting secretory trafficking through the Golgi apparatus reduces dendritic growth, suggesting that the Golgi apparatus is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis. We also demonstrated that in a mutant of an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), Prkci, Purkinje cells retain multiple primary dendrites and show disrupted localization of the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, a mosaic inhibition of Prkci in Purkinje cells recapitulates the aPKC mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the aPKC cell autonomously controls the Golgi localization and thereby regulates the specification of the primary dendrite of Purkinje cells.

  8. Removal of cholesteryl ester from hepatic reticuloendothelial cells in vivo is not enhanced by plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Stein, O; Dabach, Y; Hollander, G; Stein, Y

    1991-01-28

    The putative role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the removal of cholesteryl ester from hepatic reticuloendothelial cells in vivo was studied in hamsters. The parameter tested was retention of [3H]cholesteryl linoleyl ether ([3H]CLE), a nonhydrolysable analog of cholesteryl ester, in the liver after injection of [3H]CLE labeled acetylated LDL, which is targetted to nonparenchymatous littoral cells. In hamsters fed laboratory chow, plasma cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) was 10.6 +/- 0.9 units and the retention of [3H]CLE in the liver 28 days after injection was 86% of the 4 h value. It was about 55% in rats fed the same diet, in which CETA was not detectable. When the diet was supplemented with 2% cholesterol and 15% margarine, CETA activity in hamsters increased 2-fold, yet no change in retention of [3H]CLE in liver was seen after 28 days. In rats, the retention of [3H]CLE in the liver was also not changed by the dietary fat supplementation. These results do not support the role of CETP in vivo in removal of cholesteryl ester from intact reticuloendothelial cells.

  9. Removal program priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-31

    The directive contains general policy guidelines regarding removal program priorities as it specifically relates to the 10 regional offices. Emphasis is placed on addressing the most serious public health and environmental threats (classic emergencies, time-critical removals at NPL sites, and time-critical removals at non-NPL sites). Regions are urged to pursue cleanup by the responsible parties (RP) and manage the removal program within the boundaries of their resources.

  10. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenggang; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2015-01-01

    Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s). In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC), a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general