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Sample records for cells suggests molecular

  1. Cellular and Molecular Changes Associated with Onion Skin Formation Suggest Involvement of Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Galsurker, Ortal; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Daus, Avinoam; Fridman, Yael; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Skin formation of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulb involves scale desiccation accompanied by scale senescence, resulting in cell death and tissue browning. Understanding the mechanism of skin formation is essential to improving onion skin and bulb qualities. Although onion skin plays a crucial role in postharvest onion storage and shelf life, its formation is poorly understood. We investigated the mode of cell death in the outermost scales that are destined to form the onion skin. Surprisingly, fluorescein diacetate staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the outer scale desiccates from the inside out. This striking observation suggests that cell death in the outer scales, during skin formation, is an internal and organized process that does not derive only from air desiccation. DNA fragmentation, a known hallmark of programmed cell death (PCD), was revealed in the outer scales and gradually decreased toward the inner scales of the bulb. Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the outer scales which were absent from the inner scales. De novo transcriptome assembly for three different scales: 1st (outer), 5th (intermediate) and 8th (inner) fleshy scales identified 2,542 differentially expressed genes among them. GO enrichment for cluster analysis revealed increasing metabolic processes in the outer senescent scale related to defense response, PCD processes, carbohydrate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis, whereas increased metabolism and developmental growth processes were identified in the inner scales. High expression levels of PCD-related genes were identified in the outer scale compared to the inner ones, highlighting the involvement of PCD in outer-skin development. These findings suggest that a program to form the dry protective skin exists and functions only in the outer scales of onion.

  2. Cellular and Molecular Changes Associated with Onion Skin Formation Suggest Involvement of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Galsurker, Ortal; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Daus, Avinoam; Fridman, Yael; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Skin formation of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulb involves scale desiccation accompanied by scale senescence, resulting in cell death and tissue browning. Understanding the mechanism of skin formation is essential to improving onion skin and bulb qualities. Although onion skin plays a crucial role in postharvest onion storage and shelf life, its formation is poorly understood. We investigated the mode of cell death in the outermost scales that are destined to form the onion skin. Surprisingly, fluorescein diacetate staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the outer scale desiccates from the inside out. This striking observation suggests that cell death in the outer scales, during skin formation, is an internal and organized process that does not derive only from air desiccation. DNA fragmentation, a known hallmark of programmed cell death (PCD), was revealed in the outer scales and gradually decreased toward the inner scales of the bulb. Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the outer scales which were absent from the inner scales. De novo transcriptome assembly for three different scales: 1st (outer), 5th (intermediate) and 8th (inner) fleshy scales identified 2,542 differentially expressed genes among them. GO enrichment for cluster analysis revealed increasing metabolic processes in the outer senescent scale related to defense response, PCD processes, carbohydrate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis, whereas increased metabolism and developmental growth processes were identified in the inner scales. High expression levels of PCD-related genes were identified in the outer scale compared to the inner ones, highlighting the involvement of PCD in outer-skin development. These findings suggest that a program to form the dry protective skin exists and functions only in the outer scales of onion. PMID:28119713

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of cell-free fetal RNA suggests a specific molecular phenotype in trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Koide, Keiko; Slonim, Donna K; Johnson, Kirby L; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Cowan, Janet M; Bianchi, Diana W

    2011-03-01

    Trisomy 18 is a common human aneuploidy that is associated with significant perinatal mortality. Unlike the well-characterized "critical region" in trisomy 21 (21q22), there is no corresponding region on chromosome 18 associated with its pathogenesis. The high morbidity and mortality of affected individuals has limited extensive investigations. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the congenital anomalies observed in this condition, we investigated the in utero gene expression profile of second trimester fetuses affected with trisomy 18. Total RNA was extracted from cell-free amniotic fluid supernatant from aneuploid fetuses and euploid controls matched for gestational age and hybridized to Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Individual differentially expressed transcripts were obtained by two-tailed t tests. Over-represented functional pathways among these genes were identified with DAVID and Ingenuity(®) Pathways Analysis. Results show that three hundred and fifty-two probe sets representing 251 annotated genes were statistically significantly differentially expressed between trisomy 18 and controls. Only 7 genes (2.8% of the annotated total) were located on chromosome 18, including ROCK1, an up-regulated gene involved in valvuloseptal and endocardial cushion formation. Pathway analysis indicated disrupted function in ion transport, MHCII/T cell mediated immunity, DNA repair, G-protein mediated signaling, kinases, and glycosylation. Significant down-regulation of genes involved in adrenal development was identified, which may explain both the abnormal maternal serum estriols and the pre and postnatal growth restriction in trisomy 18. Comparison of this gene set to one previously generated for trisomy 21 fetuses revealed only six overlapping differentially regulated genes. This study contributes novel information regarding functional developmental gene expression differences in fetuses with trisomy 18.

  4. Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment components suggests potential targets for new therapeutic approaches in mobile tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Dan; Salo, Tuula; Salo, Sirpa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Costea, Daniela Elena; Vered, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    We characterized tumor microenvironment (TME) components of mobile tongue (MT) cancer patients in terms of overall inflammatory infiltrate, focusing on the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes and on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in order to determine their interrelations and associations with clinical outcomes. In addition, by culturing tongue carcinoma cells (HSC-3) on a three-dimensional myoma organotypic model that mimics TME, we attempted to investigate the possible existence of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Analysis of 64 cases of MT cancer patients revealed that the overall density of the inflammatory infiltrate was inversely correlated to the density of CAFs (P = 0.01), but that the cumulative density of the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes, including regulatory T cells (Tregs, Foxp3+), tumor-associated macrophages (TAM2, CD163+), and potentially Tregs-inducing immune cells (CD80+), was directly correlated with the density of CAFs (P = 0.01). The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence in a TME rich in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+ was 2.9 (95% CI 1.03–8.6, P = 0.043 compared with low in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+). The HR for recurrence in a TME rich in CAFs was 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–12.8, P = 0.012 compared with low in CAFs). In vitro studies showed cancer-derived exosomes, epithelial–mesenchymal transition process, fibroblast-to-CAF-like cell transdifferentiation, and reciprocal interrelations between different cytokines suggesting the presence of molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Collectively, these results highlighted the emerging need of new therapies targeting this crosstalk between the cancer cells and TME components in MT cancer. PMID:23342263

  5. Molecular and biochemical analysis of rainbow trout LCK suggests a conserved mechanism for T-cell signaling in gnathostomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Dutton, S.; Hansen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Two genes were identified in rainbow trout that display high sequence identity to vertebrate Lck. Both of the trout Lck transcripts are associated with lymphoid tissues and were found to be highly expressed in IgM-negative lymphocytes. In vitro analysis of trout lymphocytes indicates that trout Lck mRNA is up-regulated by T-cell mitogens, supporting an evolutionarily conserved function for Lck in the signaling pathways of T-lymphocytes. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a specific monoclonal antibody raised against the N-terminal domains of recombinant trout Lck that can recognize Lck protein(s) from trout thymocyte lysates that are similar in size (???57 kDa) to mammalian Lck. This antibody also reacted with permeabilized lymphocytes during FACS analysis, indicating its potential usage for cellular analyses of trout lymphocytes, thus representing an important tool for investigations of salmonid T-cell function.

  6. Molecular Signatures of Cardiac Defects in Down Syndrome Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines Suggest Altered Ciliome and Hedgehog Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Clémentine; Rivals, Isabelle; Ait Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Dauphinot, Luce; Paly, Evelyne; Mircher, Clothilde; Ravel, Aimé; Grattau, Yann; Bléhaut, Henri; Mégarbane, André; Dembour, Guy; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Touraine, Renaud; Créau, Nicole; Potier, Marie Claude; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial septal defect (ASD). Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD−; n = 22) were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD+; n = 21). After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD) carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD− and AVSD and CHD− and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset). Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21. PMID:22912673

  7. Molecular profiling of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm reveals a unique pattern and suggests selective sensitivity to NF-kB pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, M R; Fuligni, F; Agostinelli, C; Tripodo, C; Righi, S; Laginestra, M A; Pileri, A; Mancini, M; Rossi, M; Ricci, F; Gazzola, A; Melle, F; Mannu, C; Ulbar, F; Arpinati, M; Paulli, M; Maeda, T; Gibellini, D; Pagano, L; Pimpinelli, N; Santucci, M; Cerroni, L; Croce, C M; Facchetti, F; Piccaluga, P P; Pileri, S A

    2014-08-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare disease of controversial origin recently recognized as a neoplasm deriving from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Nevertheless, it remains an orphan tumor with obscure biology and dismal prognosis. To better understand the pathobiology of BPDCN and discover new targets for effective therapies, the gene expression profile (GEP) of 25 BPDCN samples was analyzed and compared with that of pDCs, their postulated normal counterpart. Validation was performed by immunohistochemistry (IHC), whereas functional experiments were carried out ex vivo. For the first time at the molecular level, we definitely recognized the cellular derivation of BPDCN that proved to originate from the myeloid lineage and in particular, from resting pDCs. Furthermore, thanks to an integrated bioinformatic approach we discovered aberrant activation of the NF-kB pathway and suggested it as a novel therapeutic target. We tested the efficacy of anti-NF-kB-treatment on the BPDCN cell line CAL-1, and successfully demonstrated by GEP and IHC the molecular shutoff of the NF-kB pathway. In conclusion, we identified a molecular signature representative of the transcriptional abnormalities of BPDCN and developed a cellular model proposing a novel therapeutic approach in the setting of this otherwise incurable disease.

  8. Physiological, molecular and ultrastructural analyses during ripening and over-ripening of banana (Musa spp., AAA group, Cavendish sub-group) fruit suggest characteristics of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Maricruz; Huber, Donald J; Vallejos, C Eduardo; Kelley, Karen

    2017-06-30

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a part of plant development that has been studied for petal senescence and vegetative tissue but has not been thoroughly investigated for fleshy fruits. The purpose of this research was to examine ripening and over-ripening in banana fruit to determine if there were processes in common to previously described PCD. Loss of cellular integrity (over 40%) and development of senescence related dark spot (SRDS) occurred after day 8 in banana peel. Nuclease and protease activity in the peel increased during ripening starting from day 2, and decreased during over-ripening. The highest activity was for proteases and nucleases with apparent molecular weights of 86 kDa and 27 kDa, respectively. Images of SRDS showed shrinkage of the upper layers of cells, visually suggesting cell death. Decrease of electron dense areas was evident in TEM micrographs of nuclei. This study shows for the first time that ripening and over-ripening of banana peel share physiological and molecular processes previously described in plant PCD. SRDS could represent a morphotype of PCD that characterizes a structural and biochemical failure in the upper layers of the peel, thereafter spreading to lower and adjacent layers of cells. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and Hodgkin's disease in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: an immunohistological, molecular and clinical study of four cases suggesting a heterogeneous pathogenetic background.

    PubMed

    Pescarmona, E; Pignoloni, P; Mauro, F R; Cerretti, R; Anselmo, A P; Mandelli, F; Baroni, C D

    2000-08-01

    We report the immunohistological, molecular and clinical findings in four patients affected by B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) who developed "Richter's syndrome with Hodgkin's disease (HD) features" or "CLL with Hodgkin's transformation", all characterised by the presence of typical Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells in lymph node biopsies. In three cases the nodal involvement by CLL was demonstrated both by the presence of a predominant background of CD5/CD19/CD23+ small lymphocytes and an IgH monoclonal rearrangement revealed by PCR analysis. Conversely, in the remaining case there was neither immunohistological nor molecular evidence of lymph node involvement by CLL. In all four cases H/RS cells were Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein (LMP-1) positive. These findings suggest that the presence of H/RS cells in the first three patients, who had CLL/HD nodal involvement, might be related to transformation or clonal evolution of CLL cells in H/RS cells, which is in keeping with use of the term "CLL with Hodgkin's transformation". In the fourth case a de novo HD may be postulated, representing a second malignancy presumably not clonally related to CLL. In all cases a key pathogenetic role of EBV is suggested by the expression of LMP-1 in H/RS cells. Our findings indicate that the presence of typical H/RS cells in lymph node biopsies in CLL patients may reflect a heterogeneous pathogenetic background. The different clinico-pathologic settings should be taken into consideration because of their possible implications for patients' treatment and prognosis.

  10. Molecular Dynamic Screening Sesquiterpenoid Pogostemon Herba as Suggested Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Raharjo, Sentot Joko; Kikuchi, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Virtual molecular dynamic sesquiterpenoid Pogostemon Herba (CID56928117, CID94275, CID107152, and CID519743) have screening as cyclooxygenase (COX-1/COX-2) selective inhibitor. Molecular interaction studies sesquiterpenoid compounds with COX-1 and COX-2 were using the molecular docking tools by Hex 8.0 and interactions were further visualized using by Discovery Studio Client 3.5 software tool and Virtual Molecular Dynamic 1.9.1 software. The binding energy calculation of molecular dynamic interaction was calculated by AMBER12 software. The analysis of the sesquiterpenoid compounds showed that CID56928117, CID94275, CID107152, and CID519743 have suggested as inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2. Collectively, the scoring binding energy calculation (with PBSA Model Solvent) sesquiterpenoid compounds: CID519743 had suggested as candidate for non-selective inhibitor; CID56928117 and CID94275 had suggested as candidate for a selective COX-1 inhibitor; and CID107152 had suggested as candidate for a selective COX-2 inhibitor.

  11. Molecular Dynamic Screening Sesquiterpenoid Pogostemon Herba as Suggested Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Raharjo, Sentot Joko; Kikuchi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Virtual molecular dynamic sesquiterpenoid Pogostemon Herba (CID56928117, CID94275, CID107152, and CID519743) have screening as cyclooxygenase (COX-1/COX-2) selective inhibitor. Methods: Molecular interaction studies sesquiterpenoid compounds with COX-1 and COX-2 were using the molecular docking tools by Hex 8.0 and interactions were further visualized using by Discovery Studio Client 3.5 software tool and Virtual Molecular Dynamic 1.9.1 software. The binding energy calculation of molecular dynamic interaction was calculated by AMBER12 software. Result: The analysis of the sesquiterpenoid compounds showed that CID56928117, CID94275, CID107152, and CID519743 have suggested as inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2. Conclusion: Collectively, the scoring binding energy calculation (with PBSA Model Solvent) sesquiterpenoid compounds: CID519743 had suggested as candidate for non-selective inhibitor; CID56928117 and CID94275 had suggested as candidate for a selective COX-1 inhibitor; and CID107152 had suggested as candidate for a selective COX-2 inhibitor. PMID:28077888

  12. A Suggested Molecular Pathology Curriculum for Residents: A Report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Aisner, Dara L; Berry, Anna; Dawson, D Brian; Hayden, Randall T; Joseph, Loren; Hill, Charles E

    2016-03-01

    Molecular pathology is an essential element of pathology training. As more molecular tests have become available, there is an increasing need for pathology trainees to receive a strong foundation in molecular pathology. Appointed by the Training and Education Committee of the Association for Molecular Pathology, the Molecular Curriculum Task Force has developed a suggested curriculum in molecular pathology for residents. The foundations of molecular pathology are presented as a series of goals and objectives that residency programs can use to develop their educational programs. As pathologists continue to expand their roles to include regular clinical consultations in the realm of molecular testing, a strong foundation in molecular pathology and genomic medicine has become essential to the practice of pathology.

  13. Molecular spectroscopic study for suggested mechanism of chrome tanned leather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashy, Elshahat H. A.; Osman, Osama; Mahmoud, Abdel Aziz; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-03-01

    Collagen represents the structural protein of the extracellular matrix, which gives strength of hides and/or skin under tanning process. Chrome tan is the most important tanning agent all over the world. The methods for production of leather evolved over several centuries as art and engineering with little understanding of the underlying science. The present work is devoted to suggest the most probable mechanistic action of chrome tan on hide proteins. First the affect of Cr upon hide protein is indicated by the studied mechanical properties. Then the spectroscopic characterization of the hide protein as well as chrome tanned leather was carried out with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflection (HATR) FT-IR. The obtained results indicate how the chromium can attached with the active sites of collagen. Molecular modeling confirms that chromium can react with amino as well as carboxylate groups. Four schemes were obtained to describe the possible interactions of chrome tan with hide proteins.

  14. Network-based differential gene expression analysis suggests cell cycle related genes regulated by E2F1 underlie the molecular difference between smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Differential gene expression (DGE) analysis is commonly used to reveal the deregulated molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. However, traditional DGE analysis (e.g., the t test or the rank sum test) tests each gene independently without considering interactions between them. Top-ranked differentially regulated genes prioritized by the analysis may not directly relate to the coherent molecular changes underlying complex diseases. Joint analyses of co-expression and DGE have been applied to reveal the deregulated molecular modules underlying complex diseases. Most of these methods consist of separate steps: first to identify gene-gene relationships under the studied phenotype then to integrate them with gene expression changes for prioritizing signature genes, or vice versa. It is warrant a method that can simultaneously consider gene-gene co-expression strength and corresponding expression level changes so that both types of information can be leveraged optimally. Results In this paper, we develop a gene module based method for differential gene expression analysis, named network-based differential gene expression (nDGE) analysis, a one-step integrative process for prioritizing deregulated genes and grouping them into gene modules. We demonstrate that nDGE outperforms existing methods in prioritizing deregulated genes and discovering deregulated gene modules using simulated data sets. When tested on a series of smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma data sets, we show that top differentially regulated genes identified by the rank sum test in different sets are not consistent while top ranked genes defined by nDGE in different data sets significantly overlap. nDGE results suggest that a differentially regulated gene module, which is enriched for cell cycle related genes and E2F1 targeted genes, plays a role in the molecular differences between smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma. Conclusions In this paper, we develop nDGE to prioritize

  15. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane. PMID:27774041

  16. PSF/SFPQ is a very common gene fusion partner in TFE3 rearrangement-associated perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) and melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular characteristics suggesting classification as a distinct entity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qiu; Shen, Qin; Xia, Qiu-yuan; Wang, Zi-yu; Liu, Biao; Shi, Shan-shan; Shi, Qun-li; Yin, Hong-lin; Wu, Bo; Ye, Sheng-bing; Li, Li; Chen, Jie-Yu; Pan, Min-hong; Li, Qing; Li, Rui; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Ru-song; Yu, Bo; Ma, Heng-hui; Lu, Zhen-feng; Zhou, Xiao-jun

    2015-09-01

    An increasing number of TFE3 rearrangement-associated tumors, such as TFE3 rearrangement-associated perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas), melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers, and melanotic Xp11 neoplasms, have recently been reported. We examined 12 such cases, including 5 TFE3 rearrangement-associated PEComas located in the pancreas, cervix, or pelvis and 7 melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers, using clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular analyses. All the tumors shared a similar morphology, including a purely nested or sheet-like architecture separated by a delicate vascular network, purely epithelioid cells displaying a clear or granular eosinophilic cytoplasm, a lack of papillary structures and spindle cell or fat components, uniform round or oval nuclei containing small visible nucleoli, and, in most cases (11/12), melanin pigmentation. The levels of mitotic activity and necrosis varied. All 12 cases displayed moderately (2+) or strongly (3+) positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 and cathepsin K. One case labeled focally for HMB45 and Melan-A, whereas the others typically labeled moderately (2+) or strongly (3+) for 1 of these markers. None of the cases were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, desmin, CKpan, S100, or PAX8. PSF-TFE3 fusion genes were confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in cases (7/7) in which a novel PSF-TFE3 fusion point was identified. All of the cases displayed TFE3 rearrangement associated with Xp11 translocation. Furthermore, we developed a PSF-TFE3 fusion fluorescence in situ hybridization assay for the detection of the PSF-TFE3 fusion gene and detected it in all 12 cases. Clinical follow-up data were available for 7 patients. Three patients died, and 2 patients (cases 1 and 3) remained alive with no evidence of disease after initial resection. Case 2 experienced recurrence and remained alive with disease. Case 5, a recent case, remained alive with extensive abdominal cavity

  17. Global gene expression profiling of oral cavity cancers suggests molecular heterogeneity within anatomic subsites

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Patricia; Alvares, Adriana M; Michaluart, Pedro; Okamoto, Oswaldo K; Nunes, Fabio D; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A; Tajara, Eloiza H

    2008-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a frequent neoplasm, which is usually aggressive and has unpredictable biological behavior and unfavorable prognosis. The comprehension of the molecular basis of this variability should lead to the development of targeted therapies as well as to improvements in specificity and sensitivity of diagnosis. Results Samples of primary OSCCs and their corresponding surgical margins were obtained from male patients during surgery and their gene expression profiles were screened using whole-genome microarray technology. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Components Analysis were used for data visualization and One-way Analysis of Variance was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Samples clustered mostly according to disease subsite, suggesting molecular heterogeneity within tumor stages. In order to corroborate our results, two publicly available datasets of microarray experiments were assessed. We found significant molecular differences between OSCC anatomic subsites concerning groups of genes presently or potentially important for drug development, including mRNA processing, cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis, metabolic process, cell cycle and apoptosis. Conclusion Our results corroborate literature data on molecular heterogeneity of OSCCs. Differences between disease subsites and among samples belonging to the same TNM class highlight the importance of gene expression-based classification and challenge the development of targeted therapies. PMID:19014556

  18. Rift Valley fever phlebovirus NSs protein core domain structure suggests molecular basis for nuclear filaments.

    PubMed

    Barski, Michal; Brennan, Benjamin; Miller, Ona K; Potter, Jane A; Vijayakrishnan, Swetha; Bhella, David; Naismith, James H; Elliott, Richard M; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich

    2017-09-15

    Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV) is a clinically and economically important pathogen increasingly likely to cause widespread epidemics. RVFV virulence depends on the interferon antagonist non-structural protein (NSs), which remains poorly characterized. We identified a stable core domain of RVFV NSs (residues 83-248), and solved its crystal structure, a novel all-helical fold organized into highly ordered fibrils. A hallmark of RVFV pathology is NSs filament formation in infected cell nuclei. Recombinant virus encoding the NSs core domain induced intranuclear filaments, suggesting it contains all essential determinants for nuclear translocation and filament formation. Mutations of key crystal fibril interface residues in viruses encoding full-length NSs completely abrogated intranuclear filament formation in infected cells. We propose the fibrillar arrangement of the NSs core domain in crystals reveals the molecular basis of assembly of this key virulence factor in cell nuclei. Our findings have important implications for fundamental understanding of RVFV virulence.

  19. Apical Groove Type and Molecular Phylogeny Suggests Reclassification of Cochlodinium geminatum as Polykrikos geminatum

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Dajun; Huang, Liangmin; Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally Cocholodinium and Gymnodinium sensu lato clade are distinguished based on the cingulum turn number, which has been increasingly recognized to be inadequate for Gymnodiniales genus classification. This has been improved by the combination of the apical groove characteristics and molecular phylogeny, which has led to the erection of several new genera (Takayama, Akashiwo, Karenia, and Karlodinium). Taking the apical groove characteristics and molecular phylogeny combined approach, we reexamined the historically taxonomically uncertain species Cochlodinium geminatum that formed massive blooms in Pearl River Estuary, China, in recent years. Samples were collected from a bloom in 2011 for morphological, characteristic pigment, and molecular analyses. We found that the cingulum in this species wraps around the cell body about 1.2 turns on average but can appear under the light microscopy to be >1.5 turns after the cells have been preserved. The shape of its apical groove, however, was stably an open-ended anticlockwise loop of kidney bean shape, similar to that of Polykrikos. Furthermore, the molecular phylogenetic analysis using 18S rRNA-ITS-28S rRNA gene cistron we obtained in this study also consistently placed this species closest to Polykrikos within the Gymnodinium sensu stricto clade and set it far separated from the clade of Cochlodinium. These results suggest that this species should be transferred to Polykrikos as Polykrikos geminatum. Our results reiterate the need to use the combination of apical groove morphology and molecular phylogeny for the classification of species within the genus of Cochlodinium and other Gymnodiniales lineages. PMID:23990946

  20. Similarity in gene-regulatory networks suggests that cancer cells share characteristics of embryonic neural cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zan; Lei, Anhua; Xu, Liyang; Chen, Lu; Chen, Yonglong; Zhang, Xuena; Gao, Yan; Yang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Min; Cao, Ying

    2017-08-04

    Cancer cells are immature cells resulting from cellular reprogramming by gene misregulation, and redifferentiation is expected to reduce malignancy. It is unclear, however, whether cancer cells can undergo terminal differentiation. Here, we show that inhibition of the epigenetic modification enzyme enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), histone deacetylases 1 and 3 (HDAC1 and -3), lysine demethylase 1A (LSD1), or DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), which all promote cancer development and progression, leads to postmitotic neuron-like differentiation with loss of malignant features in distinct solid cancer cell lines. The regulatory effect of these enzymes in neuronal differentiation resided in their intrinsic activity in embryonic neural precursor/progenitor cells. We further found that a major part of pan-cancer-promoting genes and the signal transducers of the pan-cancer-promoting signaling pathways, including the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) mesenchymal marker genes, display neural specific expression during embryonic neurulation. In contrast, many tumor suppressor genes, including the EMT epithelial marker gene that encodes cadherin 1 (CDH1), exhibited non-neural or no expression. This correlation indicated that cancer cells and embryonic neural cells share a regulatory network, mediating both tumorigenesis and neural development. This observed similarity in regulatory mechanisms suggests that cancer cells might share characteristics of embryonic neural cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Evidences Suggesting Involvement of Viruses in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanupriya; Metgud, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers and it constitutes a major health problem particularly in developing countries. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents the most frequent of all oral neoplasms. Several risk factors have been well characterized to be associated with OSCC with substantial evidences. The etiology of OSCC is complex and involves many factors. The most clearly defined potential factors are smoking and alcohol, which substantially increase the risk of OSCC. However, despite this clear association, a substantial proportion of patients develop OSCC without exposure to them, emphasizing the role of other risk factors such as genetic susceptibility and oncogenic viruses. Some viruses are strongly associated with OSCC while the association of others is less frequent and may depend on cofactors for their carcinogenic effects. Therefore, the exact role of viruses must be evaluated with care in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of OSCC. Although a viral association within a subset of OSCC has been shown, the molecular and histopathological characteristics of these tumors have yet to be clearly defined. PMID:24455418

  2. Molecular machines open cell membranes.

    PubMed

    García-López, Víctor; Chen, Fang; Nilewski, Lizanne G; Duret, Guillaume; Aliyan, Amir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Robinson, Jacob T; Wang, Gufeng; Pal, Robert; Tour, James M

    2017-08-30

    Beyond the more common chemical delivery strategies, several physical techniques are used to open the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes. These include using electric and magnetic fields, temperature, ultrasound or light to introduce compounds into cells, to release molecular species from cells or to selectively induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) or uncontrolled cell death (necrosis). More recently, molecular motors and switches that can change their conformation in a controlled manner in response to external stimuli have been used to produce mechanical actions on tissue for biomedical applications. Here we show that molecular machines can drill through cellular bilayers using their molecular-scale actuation, specifically nanomechanical action. Upon physical adsorption of the molecular motors onto lipid bilayers and subsequent activation of the motors using ultraviolet light, holes are drilled in the cell membranes. We designed molecular motors and complementary experimental protocols that use nanomechanical action to induce the diffusion of chemical species out of synthetic vesicles, to enhance the diffusion of traceable molecular machines into and within live cells, to induce necrosis and to introduce chemical species into live cells. We also show that, by using molecular machines that bear short peptide addends, nanomechanical action can selectively target specific cell-surface recognition sites. Beyond the in vitro applications demonstrated here, we expect that molecular machines could also be used in vivo, especially as their design progresses to allow two-photon, near-infrared and radio-frequency activation.

  3. Molecular machines open cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-López, Víctor; Chen, Fang; Nilewski, Lizanne G.; Duret, Guillaume; Aliyan, Amir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Robinson, Jacob T.; Wang, Gufeng; Pal, Robert; Tour, James M.

    2017-08-01

    Beyond the more common chemical delivery strategies, several physical techniques are used to open the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes. These include using electric and magnetic fields, temperature, ultrasound or light to introduce compounds into cells, to release molecular species from cells or to selectively induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) or uncontrolled cell death (necrosis). More recently, molecular motors and switches that can change their conformation in a controlled manner in response to external stimuli have been used to produce mechanical actions on tissue for biomedical applications. Here we show that molecular machines can drill through cellular bilayers using their molecular-scale actuation, specifically nanomechanical action. Upon physical adsorption of the molecular motors onto lipid bilayers and subsequent activation of the motors using ultraviolet light, holes are drilled in the cell membranes. We designed molecular motors and complementary experimental protocols that use nanomechanical action to induce the diffusion of chemical species out of synthetic vesicles, to enhance the diffusion of traceable molecular machines into and within live cells, to induce necrosis and to introduce chemical species into live cells. We also show that, by using molecular machines that bear short peptide addends, nanomechanical action can selectively target specific cell-surface recognition sites. Beyond the in vitro applications demonstrated here, we expect that molecular machines could also be used in vivo, especially as their design progresses to allow two-photon, near-infrared and radio-frequency activation.

  4. Shared Pluripotency Programs Suggest Derivation of Vertebrate Neural Crest from Blastula Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Delgado, Elsy; Nordin, Kara; Rao, Anjali; Geary, Lauren; LaBonne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Neural Crest cells, unique to vertebrates, are derived from the ectoderm but also generate mesodermal cell types. This broad developmental potential persists past the time when most ectoderm-derived cells have become lineage restricted. The ability of neural crest to contribute mesodermal derivatives to the bauplan has raised questions about how this apparent gain in developmental potential is achieved. Here we describe shared molecular underpinnings of potency in neural crest and blastula cells. We show that in Xenopus, key neural crest regulatory factors are also expressed in blastula animal pole cells and promote pluripotency in both cell types. We suggest that neural crest cells may have evolved as a consequence of a subset of blastula animal pole cells retaining activity of the regulatory network underlying pluripotency. PMID:25931449

  5. DNA binding properties of human Cdc45 suggest a function as molecular wedge for DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Szambowska, Anna; Tessmer, Ingrid; Kursula, Petri; Usskilat, Christian; Prus, Piotr; Pospiech, Helmut; Grosse, Frank

    2014-02-01

    The cell division cycle protein 45 (Cdc45) represents an essential replication factor that, together with the Mcm2-7 complex and the four subunits of GINS, forms the replicative DNA helicase in eukaryotes. Recombinant human Cdc45 (hCdc45) was structurally characterized and its DNA-binding properties were determined. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy revealed that hCdc45 exists as an alpha-helical monomer and possesses a structure similar to its bacterial homolog RecJ. hCdc45 bound long (113-mer or 80-mer) single-stranded DNA fragments with a higher affinity than shorter ones (34-mer). hCdc45 displayed a preference for 3' protruding strands and bound tightly to single-strand/double-strand DNA junctions, such as those presented by Y-shaped DNA, bubbles and displacement loops, all of which appear transiently during the initiation of DNA replication. Collectively, our findings suggest that hCdc45 not only binds to but also slides on DNA with a 3'-5' polarity and, thereby acts as a molecular 'wedge' to initiate DNA strand displacement.

  6. Molecular force spectroscopy on cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to study how mechanics regulates biology, especially the mechanical regulation of molecular interactions and its impact on cellular functions. This force-driven methodology has uncovered a wealth of new information of the physical chemistry of molecular bonds for various biological systems. The new concepts, qualitative and quantitative measures describing bond behavior under force, and structural bases underlying these phenomena have substantially advanced our fundamental understanding of the inner workings of biological systems from the nanoscale (molecule) to the microscale (cell), elucidated basic molecular mechanisms of a wide range of important biological processes, and provided opportunities for engineering applications. Here, we review major force spectroscopic assays, conceptual developments of mechanically regulated kinetics of molecular interactions, and their biological relevance. We also present current challenges and highlight future directions.

  7. Monocyte cytokine synthesis in response to extracellular cell stress proteins suggests these proteins exhibit network behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Frank; Steptoe, Andrew; Thompson, Stephen; Henderson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes were exposed to single or pairs of cell stress proteins (CSPs), specifically Hsp10, Hsp27, Hsp60 and Hsp70-the former two having anti-inflammatory actions while the latter pair being assumed to be pro-inflammatory in activity. This study was to test if these proteins exhibited any network behaviour. To control for possible lipopolysaccharide contamination, polymyxin B was used. Surprisingly, at concentrations higher than 1 μg/ml, polymyxin B itself could induce cytokine synthesis. A number of commercial sources of the molecular chaperones were tested, and marked variations in monocyte cytokine synthesis were found. All four CSPs stimulated the same profile of IL-1/IL-6 synthesis and IL-10/TNF-α synthesis although the kinetics of production of these two pairs of cytokines were very different. A key question was whether extracellular molecular chaperones exhibited network behaviour. To test this, monocytes were cultured with suboptimal concentrations of single CSP and pairs of CSP to look for additive, synergistic or antagonistic cell responses. The major finding was that pairs of molecular chaperones, including chaperones thought to stimulate monocyte cytokine synthesis, could produce significant antagonistic cellular responses. This demonstrates that extracellular CSPs constitute an additional potent layer within the complex cytokine network and furthermore suggests that monocytes have evolved to dampen their immune responses upon exposure to extracellular networks of CSPs-perhaps as a mechanism for protecting cells against detrimental cellular stress responses.

  8. Use of multivariate analysis to suggest a new molecular classification of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Enric; Ramamoorthy, Rajarajan; Oukrif, Dahmane; Rosmarin, Daniel; Presz, Michal; Wang, Haitao; Pulker, Hannah; Lockstone, Helen; Hveem, Tarjei; Cranston, Treena; Danielsen, Havard; Novelli, Marco; Davidson, Brian; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Molloy, Peter; Johnstone, Elaine; Holmes, Christopher; Midgley, Rachel; Kerr, David; Sieber, Oliver; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Molecular classification of colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently based on microsatellite instability (MSI), KRAS or BRAF mutation and, occasionally, chromosomal instability (CIN). Whilst useful, these categories may not fully represent the underlying molecular subgroups. We screened 906 stage II/III CRCs from the VICTOR clinical trial for somatic mutations. Multivariate analyses (logistic regression, clustering, Bayesian networks) identified the primary molecular associations. Positive associations occurred between: CIN and TP53 mutation; MSI and BRAF mutation; and KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Negative associations occurred between: MSI and CIN; MSI and NRAS mutation; and KRAS mutation, and each of NRAS, TP53 and BRAF mutations. Some complex relationships were elucidated: KRAS and TP53 mutations had both a direct negative association and a weaker, confounding, positive association via TP53–CIN–MSI–BRAF–KRAS. Our results suggested a new molecular classification of CRCs: (1) MSI+ and/or BRAF-mutant; (2) CIN+ and/or TP53– mutant, with wild-type KRAS and PIK3CA; (3) KRAS- and/or PIK3CA-mutant, CIN+, TP53-wild-type; (4) KRAS– and/or PIK3CA-mutant, CIN–, TP53-wild-type; (5) NRAS-mutant; (6) no mutations; (7) others. As expected, group 1 cancers were mostly proximal and poorly differentiated, usually occurring in women. Unexpectedly, two different types of CIN+ CRC were found: group 2 cancers were usually distal and occurred in men, whereas group 3 showed neither of these associations but were of higher stage. CIN+ cancers have conventionally been associated with all three of these variables, because they have been tested en masse. Our classification also showed potentially improved prognostic capabilities, with group 3, and possibly group 1, independently predicting disease-free survival. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23165447

  9. Use of multivariate analysis to suggest a new molecular classification of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Enric; Ramamoorthy, Rajarajan; Oukrif, Dahmane; Rosmarin, Daniel; Presz, Michal; Wang, Haitao; Pulker, Hannah; Lockstone, Helen; Hveem, Tarjei; Cranston, Treena; Danielsen, Havard; Novelli, Marco; Davidson, Brian; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Molloy, Peter; Johnstone, Elaine; Holmes, Christopher; Midgley, Rachel; Kerr, David; Sieber, Oliver; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-02-01

    Molecular classification of colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently based on microsatellite instability (MSI), KRAS or BRAF mutation and, occasionally, chromosomal instability (CIN). Whilst useful, these categories may not fully represent the underlying molecular subgroups. We screened 906 stage II/III CRCs from the VICTOR clinical trial for somatic mutations. Multivariate analyses (logistic regression, clustering, Bayesian networks) identified the primary molecular associations. Positive associations occurred between: CIN and TP53 mutation; MSI and BRAF mutation; and KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Negative associations occurred between: MSI and CIN; MSI and NRAS mutation; and KRAS mutation, and each of NRAS, TP53 and BRAF mutations. Some complex relationships were elucidated: KRAS and TP53 mutations had both a direct negative association and a weaker, confounding, positive association via TP53-CIN-MSI-BRAF-KRAS. Our results suggested a new molecular classification of CRCs: (1) MSI(+) and/or BRAF-mutant; (2) CIN(+) and/or TP53(-) mutant, with wild-type KRAS and PIK3CA; (3) KRAS- and/or PIK3CA-mutant, CIN(+) , TP53-wild-type; (4) KRAS(-) and/or PIK3CA-mutant, CIN(-) , TP53-wild-type; (5) NRAS-mutant; (6) no mutations; (7) others. As expected, group 1 cancers were mostly proximal and poorly differentiated, usually occurring in women. Unexpectedly, two different types of CIN(+) CRC were found: group 2 cancers were usually distal and occurred in men, whereas group 3 showed neither of these associations but were of higher stage. CIN(+) cancers have conventionally been associated with all three of these variables, because they have been tested en masse. Our classification also showed potentially improved prognostic capabilities, with group 3, and possibly group 1, independently predicting disease-free survival. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Cryptic Caribbean species of Scorpaena (Actinopterygii: Scorpaeniformes) suggested by cytogenetic and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Nirchio, M; Oliveira, C; Siccha-Ramirez, Z R; Sene, V F; Sánchez-Romero, O R; Ehemann, N R; Milana, V; Rossi, A R; Sola, L

    2016-10-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular analyses enabled identification of two cytotypes among individuals of the spotted scorpion fish Scorpaena plumieri from Margarita Island, Venezuela. Cytotype 1 was characterized by 48 subtelo-acrocentric chromosomes and fundamental number (number of chromosome arms; FN) equalled 48, while cytotype 2 was characterized by two metacentric and 46 subtelo-acrocentric chromosomes and FN was 50. These cytotypes also differed in the location of the ribosomal gene clusters and in the distribution of the constitutive heterochromatin. Moreover, fish from the cytotypes 1 and 2 were found to belong to distinct mitochondrial lineages. The presence of two S. plumieri cytotypes from two lineages separated by high genetic distance suggests that they correspond to sympatric cryptic species.

  11. Molecular evidence to suggest the origin of a colonization: Drosophila subobscura in America.

    PubMed

    Araúz, Pedro A; Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Latorre, Amparo; Serra, Luís; Mestres, Francesc

    2011-12-01

    The recent colonization of America by Drosophila subobscura represents a great opportunity for evolutionary biology studies. Knowledge of the populations from which the colonization started would provide an understanding of how genetic composition changed during adaptation to the new environment. Thus, a 793 nucleotide fragment of the Odh (Octanol dehydrogenase) gene was sequenced in 66 chromosomal lines from Barcelona (western Mediterranean) and in 66 from Mt. Parnes (Greece, eastern Mediterranean). No sequence of Odh fragment in Barcelona or Mt. Parnes was identical to any of those previously detected in America. However, an Odh sequence from Barcelona differed in only one nucleotide from another found in American populations. In both cases, the chromosomal lines presented the same inversion: O(7), and the Odh gene was located within this inversion. This evidence suggests a possible western Mediterranean origin for the colonization. Finally, the molecular and inversion data indicate that the colonization was not characterized by multiple reintroductions.

  12. Nanotubule and Tour Molecule Based Molecular Electronics: Suggestion for a Hybrid Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical attempts and results indicate two distinct broad pathways towards future molecular electronic devices and architectures. The first is the approach via Tour type ladder molecules and their junctions which can be fabricated with solution phase chemical approaches. Second are fullerenes or nanotubules and their junctions which may have better conductance, switching and amplifying characteristics but can not be made through well controlled and defined chemical means. A hybrid approach combining the two pathways to take advantage of the characteristics of both is suggested. Dimension and scale of such devices would be somewhere in between isolated molecule and nanotubule based devices but it maybe possible to use self-assembly towards larger functional and logicalunits.

  13. Molecular phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of Hexapoda and suggest the paraphyly of Entognatha.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Go; Ishiwata, Keisuke; Machida, Ryuichiro; Miyata, Takashi; Su, Zhi-Hui

    2013-10-31

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses have revealed that Hexapoda and Crustacea form a common clade (the Pancrustacea), which is now widely accepted among zoologists; however, the origin of Hexapoda remains unresolved. The main problems are the unclear relationships among the basal hexapod lineages, Protura (proturans), Collembola (springtails), Diplura (diplurans), and Ectognatha (bristletails, silverfishes, and all winged insects). Mitogenomic analyses have challenged hexapod monophyly and suggested the reciprocal paraphyly of Hexapoda and Crustacea, whereas studies based on nuclear molecular data support the monophyletic origin of hexapods. Additionally, there are significant discrepancies with respect to these issues between the results of morphological and molecular studies. To investigate these problems, we performed phylogenetic analyses of Pancrustacea based on the protein sequences of three orthologous nuclear genes encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta and the largest and second largest subunits of RNA polymerase II from 64 species of arthropods, including representatives of all hexapod orders. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted based on the inferred amino acid (aa) sequences (~3400 aa in total) of the three genes using the maximum likelihood (ML) method and Bayesian inference. Analyses were also performed with additional datasets generated by excluding long-branch taxa or by using different outgroups. These analyses all yielded essentially the same results. All hexapods were clustered into a common clade, with Branchiopoda as its sister lineage, whereas Crustacea was paraphyletic. Within Hexapoda, the lineages Ectognatha, Palaeoptera, Neoptera, Polyneoptera, and Holometabola were each confirmed to be monophyletic with robust support, but monophyly was not supported for Entognatha (Protura + Collembola + Diplura), Ellipura (Protura + Collembola), or Nonoculata (Protura + Diplura). Instead, our results showed that Protura is

  14. Molecular phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of Hexapoda and suggest the paraphyly of Entognatha

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular phylogenetic analyses have revealed that Hexapoda and Crustacea form a common clade (the Pancrustacea), which is now widely accepted among zoologists; however, the origin of Hexapoda remains unresolved. The main problems are the unclear relationships among the basal hexapod lineages, Protura (proturans), Collembola (springtails), Diplura (diplurans), and Ectognatha (bristletails, silverfishes, and all winged insects). Mitogenomic analyses have challenged hexapod monophyly and suggested the reciprocal paraphyly of Hexapoda and Crustacea, whereas studies based on nuclear molecular data support the monophyletic origin of hexapods. Additionally, there are significant discrepancies with respect to these issues between the results of morphological and molecular studies. To investigate these problems, we performed phylogenetic analyses of Pancrustacea based on the protein sequences of three orthologous nuclear genes encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta and the largest and second largest subunits of RNA polymerase II from 64 species of arthropods, including representatives of all hexapod orders. Results Phylogenetic analyses were conducted based on the inferred amino acid (aa) sequences (~3400 aa in total) of the three genes using the maximum likelihood (ML) method and Bayesian inference. Analyses were also performed with additional datasets generated by excluding long-branch taxa or by using different outgroups. These analyses all yielded essentially the same results. All hexapods were clustered into a common clade, with Branchiopoda as its sister lineage, whereas Crustacea was paraphyletic. Within Hexapoda, the lineages Ectognatha, Palaeoptera, Neoptera, Polyneoptera, and Holometabola were each confirmed to be monophyletic with robust support, but monophyly was not supported for Entognatha (Protura + Collembola + Diplura), Ellipura (Protura + Collembola), or Nonoculata (Protura + Diplura). Instead, our results showed

  15. The nuclear envelope lamina network has elasticity and a compressibility limit suggestive of a molecular shock absorber.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Kahn, Samuel M; Wilson, Katherine L; Discher, Dennis E

    2004-09-15

    Mechanical properties of the nuclear envelope have implications for cell and nuclear architecture as well as gene regulation. Using isolated Xenopus oocyte nuclei, we have established swelling conditions that separate the intact nuclear envelope (membranes, pore complexes and underlying lamin filament network) from nucleoplasm and the majority of chromatin. Swelling proves reversible with addition of high molecular mass dextrans. Micropipette aspiration of swollen and unswollen nuclear envelopes is also reversible and yields a network elastic modulus, unaffected by nucleoplasm, that averages 25 mN/m. Compared to plasma membranes of cells, the nuclear envelope is much stiffer and more resilient. Our results suggest that the nuclear lamina forms a compressed network shell of interconnected rods that is extensible but limited in compressibility from the native state, thus acting as a 'molecular shock absorber'. In light of the conservation of B-type lamins in metazoan evolution, the mechanical properties determined in this investigation suggest physical mechanisms by which mutated lamins can either destabilize nuclear architecture or influence nuclear responses to mechanical signals in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, progeria syndromes (premature 'aging') and other laminopathies.

  16. Application of an Integrative Computational Framework in Trancriptomic Data of Atherosclerotic Mice Suggests Numerous Molecular Players

    PubMed Central

    Papadodima, Olga; Sirsjö, Allan; Kolisis, Fragiskos N.; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease involving a lot of genes and proteins recruited throughout its manifestation. The present study aims to exploit bioinformatic tools in order to analyze microarray data of atherosclerotic aortic lesions of ApoE knockout mice, a model widely used in atherosclerosis research. In particular, a dynamic analysis was performed among young and aged animals, resulting in a list of 852 significantly altered genes. Pathway analysis indicated alterations in critical cellular processes related to cell communication and signal transduction, immune response, lipid transport, and metabolism. Cluster analysis partitioned the significantly differentiated genes in three major clusters of similar expression profile. Promoter analysis applied to functional related groups of the same cluster revealed shared putative cis-elements potentially contributing to a common regulatory mechanism. Finally, by reverse engineering the functional relevance of differentially expressed genes with specific cellular pathways, putative genes acting as hubs, were identified, linking functionally disparate cellular processes in the context of traditional molecular description. PMID:23193398

  17. Extensive Molecular Analysis Suggested the Strong Genetic Heterogeneity of Idiopathic Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sofia, Valentina Maria; Da Sacco, Letizia; Surace, Cecilia; Tomaiuolo, Anna Cristina; Genovese, Silvia; Grotta, Simona; Gnazzo, Maria; Petrocchi, Stefano; Ciocca, Laura; Alghisi, Federico; Montemitro, Enza; Martemucci, Luigi; Elce, Ausilia; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Angioni, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Genetic features of chronic pancreatitis (CP) have been investigated extensively, mainly by testing genes associated to the trypsinogen activation pathway. However, different molecular pathways involving other genes may be implicated in CP pathogenesis. A total of 80 patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) were investigated using a Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach with a panel of 70 genes related to six different pancreatic pathways: premature activation of trypsinogen, modifier genes of cystic fibrosis phenotype, pancreatic secretion and ion homeostasis, calcium signaling and zymogen granules (ZG) exocytosis, autophagy and autoimmune pancreatitis-related genes. We detected mutations in 34 out of 70 genes examined; of the 80 patients, 64 (80.0%) were positive for mutations in one or more genes and 16 (20.0%) had no mutations. Mutations in CFTR were detected in 32 of the 80 patients (40.0%) and 22 of them exhibited at least one mutation in genes of other pancreatic pathways. Of the remaining 48 patients, 13/80 (16.3%) had mutations in genes involved in premature activation of trypsinogen and 19/80 (23.8%) had mutations only in genes of the other pathways: 38 (59.3%) of the 64 patients positive for mutations showed variants in two or more genes. Our data, although to be extended with functional analysis of novel mutations, suggest a high rate of genetic heterogeneity in CP and that trans-heterozygosity may predispose to the ICP phenotype. PMID:27264265

  18. Molecular studies suggest that cartilaginous fishes have a terminal position in the piscine tree.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, A S; Arnason, U

    1999-03-02

    The Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) are commonly accepted as being sister group to the other extant Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). To clarify gnathostome relationships and to aid in resolving and dating the major piscine divergences, we have sequenced the complete mtDNA of the starry skate and have included it in phylogenetic analysis along with three squalomorph chondrichthyans-the common dogfish, the spiny dogfish, and the star spotted dogfish-and a number of bony fishes and amniotes. The direction of evolution within the gnathostome tree was established by rooting it with the most closely related non-gnathostome outgroup, the sea lamprey, as well as with some more distantly related taxa. The analyses placed the chondrichthyans in a terminal position in the piscine tree. These findings, which also suggest that the origin of the amniote lineage is older than the age of the oldest extant bony fishes (the lungfishes), challenge the evolutionary direction of several morphological characters that have been used in reconstructing gnathostome relationships. Applying as a calibration point the age of the oldest lungfish fossils, 400 million years, the molecular estimate placed the squalomorph/batomorph divergence at approximately 190 million years before present. This dating is consistent with the occurrence of the earliest batomorph (skates and rays) fossils in the paleontological record. The split between gnathostome fishes and the amniote lineage was dated at approximately 420 million years before present.

  19. Molecular studies suggest that cartilaginous fishes have a terminal position in the piscine tree

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Ann-Sofie; Arnason, Ulfur

    1999-01-01

    The Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) are commonly accepted as being sister group to the other extant Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). To clarify gnathostome relationships and to aid in resolving and dating the major piscine divergences, we have sequenced the complete mtDNA of the starry skate and have included it in phylogenetic analysis along with three squalomorph chondrichthyans—the common dogfish, the spiny dogfish, and the star spotted dogfish—and a number of bony fishes and amniotes. The direction of evolution within the gnathostome tree was established by rooting it with the most closely related non-gnathostome outgroup, the sea lamprey, as well as with some more distantly related taxa. The analyses placed the chondrichthyans in a terminal position in the piscine tree. These findings, which also suggest that the origin of the amniote lineage is older than the age of the oldest extant bony fishes (the lungfishes), challenge the evolutionary direction of several morphological characters that have been used in reconstructing gnathostome relationships. Applying as a calibration point the age of the oldest lungfish fossils, 400 million years, the molecular estimate placed the squalomorph/batomorph divergence at ≈190 million years before present. This dating is consistent with the occurrence of the earliest batomorph (skates and rays) fossils in the paleontological record. The split between gnathostome fishes and the amniote lineage was dated at ≈420 million years before present. PMID:10051614

  20. Behavioral and molecular analyses suggest that circadian output is disrupted by disconnected mutants in D. melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, P E; Hall, J C; Rosbash, M

    1992-01-01

    Mutations in the disconnected (disco) gene act to disrupt neural cell patterning in the Drosophila visual system. These mutations also affect adult locomotor activity rhythms, as disco flies are arrhythmic under conditions of constant darkness (DD). To determine the state of the circadian pacemaker in disco mutants, we constructed with pers double mutants (a short period allele of the period gene) and assayed their behavioral rhythms in light-dark cycles (LD), and their biochemical rhythms of period gene expression under both LD and DD conditions. The results demonstrate that disco flies are rhythmic, indicating that they have an active circadian pacemaker that can be entrained by light. They also suggest that disco mutants block or interfere with elements of the circadian system located between the central pacemaker and its outputs that mediate overt rhythms. Images PMID:1740100

  1. Mixed signals? Morphological and molecular evidence suggest a color polymorphism in some neotropical polythore damselflies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Herrera, Melissa; Kuhn, William R; Lorenzo-Carballa, Maria Olalla; Harding, Kathleen M; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Beatty, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these "wingforms" do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and the

  2. Mixed Signals? Morphological and Molecular Evidence Suggest a Color Polymorphism in Some Neotropical Polythore Damselflies

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kathleen M.; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N.; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L.; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these “wingforms” do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and

  3. Cytogenetic and molecular evidence suggest multiple origins and geographical parthenogenesis in Nothoscordum gracile (Alliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Crosa, Orfeo; Speranza, Pablo; Guerra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nothoscordum gracile is an apomitic tetraploid widely distributed throughout the Americas and naturalized in many temperate regions of other continents. It has been suggested to form a species complex with sexual and apomictic N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon. Tetraploids of these species also share a structurally heterozygous chromosome complement 2n = 19 (13M + 6A). In this work, the origin of N. gracile and its relationships with its related species was investigated based on cytological and molecular data. Methods Cytogenetic analyses were based on meiotic behaviour, CMA bands, localization of 5S and 45S rDNA sites, and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Nuclear ITS and plastidial trnL-trnF sequences were also obtained for most individuals. Key Results Proximal CMA bands were observed in the long arms of all acrocentrics of 2x and 4x N. macrostemon but not in diploid and some tetraploid cytotypes of N. nudicaule. Samples of N. gracile showed a variable number of CMA bands in the long arms of acrocentrics. Analysis of ITS sequences, dot-blot, GISH, and 5S and 45S rDNA sites, revealed no differentiation among the three species. The trnL-trnF cpDNA fragment showed variation with a trend to geographical structuring irrespective of morphospecies and fully congruent with karyotype variation. Conclusions The 2n = 19 karyotype was probably formed by a centric fusion event occurring in N. nudicaule and later transmitted to tetraploid cytotypes of N. macrostemon. Diploids of N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon appeared as consistent recently diverged species, whereas tetraploid apomicts seem to constitute an assemblage of polyploid hybrids originating from multiple independent hybridization events between them, part of which are morphologically recognizable as N. gracile. PMID:22362660

  4. Molecular profiles suggest two types of liver cancer should be treated as one | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    A comprehensive molecular analysis of two types of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), has identified common molecular subtypes that can be found among patients with either disease. Although HCC and ICC are considered separate diseases, the finding suggests that a unified clinical approach could benefit patients with both types of liver cancer.  Read more...

  5. Graphical Modeling of Gene Expression in Monocytes Suggests Molecular Mechanisms Explaining Increased Atherosclerosis in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Verdugo, Ricardo A.; Zeller, Tanja; Rotival, Maxime; Wild, Philipp S.; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J.; Weidmann, Henri; Ninio, Ewa; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Cambien, François; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tiret, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for atherosclerosis with reported widespread effects on gene expression in circulating blood cells. We hypothesized that a molecular signature mediating the relation between smoking and atherosclerosis may be found in the transcriptome of circulating monocytes. Genome-wide expression profiles and counts of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries were collected in 248 smokers and 688 non-smokers from the general population. Patterns of co-expressed genes were identified by Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and network structure of the pattern-specific gene modules was inferred by the PC-algorithm. A likelihood-based causality test was implemented to select patterns that fit models containing a path “smoking→gene expression→plaques”. Robustness of the causal inference was assessed by bootstrapping. At a FDR ≤0.10, 3,368 genes were associated to smoking or plaques, of which 93% were associated to smoking only. SASH1 showed the strongest association to smoking and PPARG the strongest association to plaques. Twenty-nine gene patterns were identified by ICA. Modules containing SASH1 and PPARG did not show evidence for the “smoking→gene expression→plaques” causality model. Conversely, three modules had good support for causal effects and exhibited a network topology consistent with gene expression mediating the relation between smoking and plaques. The network with the strongest support for causal effects was connected to plaques through SLC39A8, a gene with known association to HDL-cholesterol and cellular uptake of cadmium from tobacco, while smoking was directly connected to GAS6, a gene reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis and to be up-regulated in the placenta of women smoking during pregnancy. Our analysis of the transcriptome of monocytes recovered genes relevant for association to smoking and atherosclerosis, and connected genes that before, were only studied in separate contexts

  6. Differential expression in normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence suggests complex molecular carcinogenesis in colon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungkoo; Bang, Seunghyun; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

    2006-10-01

    The majority of colon cancers develop from pre-existing adenomas. We analyzed the expression profiles in the sequence of normal colon crypts, adenomas and early-stage carcinomas using microdissected cells from tubular adenomas with foci of malignant transformation. Differentially expressed genes were detected between normal-adenoma and adenoma-carcinoma, and were grouped according to the patterns of expression changes in the sequence. Down-regulated genes in the sequence included PLA2G2A, TSPAN1, PDCD4, FCGBP, AATK, EPLIN, FABP1, AGR2, MTUS1, TSC1, galectin 4 and MT1F. PLA2G2A has been shown to suppress colon tumorigenesis in mice, but the pathobiological role in humans has been controversial. Our data showed continuous down-regulation of PLA2G2A in the sequence supporting an implication in human colon cancer. Tumor suppressor and/ or proapoptotic activities have also been reported in other genes. Up-regulated genes included ribosomal proteins, IER3 and TPR. TGF-beta2 and matrix metalloproteinase 23B were up-regulated in carcinoma but not in adenoma, supporting the pathobiological roles in malignant transformation. Differentially expressed genes partly coincided with those in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of the stomach, which was published previously, suggesting a partial overlap between the adenoma-carcinoma sequences of the colon and stomach.

  7. Suggestions for the nomenclature of human alleles: relevance to ecogenetics, pharmacogenetics and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W

    2000-06-01

    The current number of 9422 symbols for human gene names (http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature/) is expected to increase 7- to 15-fold over the next 2 years. In and around each gene, a tremendous degree of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) heterogeneity is now realized to exist. This review is intended to be visionary, to point out some of the enormously complex nomenclature issues that we face, and to offer some reasonable solutions to these issues. For example, I believe that a 'gene' should be defined as that region from the furthest 5'-ward enhancer to at least 150 bases downstream of the last exon. Just as established rules are critically important for the systematic naming of all new genes, standardized nomenclature rules for the naming of allelic variants are also desperately needed. The evolving consensus for naming the alleles of all human genes (ideally based on evolutionarily diverging haplotype patterns) is described herein. Because of the anticipated explosion in finding new genes and allelic variants due to high-throughput resequencing and DNA-chip technologies, this excess of new knowledge will undoubtedly overwhelm their publication by scientific journals alone. I suggest that the best approach to this staggering 'information overload' is to place the data on appropriate web sites--with numerous links between sites, and frequent updates of all information--so that colleagues in all fields of medical and genetic research can remain knowledgeable. Examples of successful web sites to date include those for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes and human CYP alleles, UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes and human alleles, human N-acetylaminotransferase (NAT2, NAT1) alleles, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes and human alleles. Many more web sites will be necessary. For each site, the webmaster will need to be responsible, accurate, energetic, highly organized, and keen to keep the site current. I believe that interactive discussions on these sites

  8. Heterogeneous estrogen receptor expression in circulating tumor cells suggests diverse mechanisms of fulvestrant resistance.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Larios, Jose M; Muñiz, Maria C; Aung, Kimberly; Cannell, Emily M; Darga, Elizabeth P; Kidwell, Kelley M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Tokudome, Nahomi; Brown, Martha E; Connelly, Mark C; Chianese, David A; Schott, Anne F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    Fulvestrant is a dose dependent selective estrogen receptor (ER) down-regulator (SERD) used in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Nearly all patients develop resistance. We performed molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTC) to gain insight into fulvestrant resistance. Preclinical studies were performed with cultured breast cancer cells spiked into human blood and analyzed on the CellSearch(®) system. Clinical data are limited to a subset of patients with ER-positive MBC from a previously reported pilot trial whose disease was progressing on fulvestrant (N = 7) or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (N = 10). CTCs were enumerated and phenotyped for ER and B-cell lymphoma (BCL2) using the CellSearch(®) CXC kit. In preclinical modeling, tamoxifen and AIs resulted in stabilized ER expression, whereas fulvestrant eliminated it. Five of seven patients progressing on fulvestrant had ≥5CTC/7.5 ml WB. Two of these five, treated with 500 mg/month fulvestrant, had no detectable CTC-expression of ER and BCL2 (an ER regulated gene). Three patients had heterogeneous CTC-ER and BCL2 expression indicating incomplete degradation of the ER target by fulvestrant. Two of these patients received 250 mg/month whereas the third patient received 500 mg/month fulvestrant. Her cancer harbored a mutation (Y537S) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1). All seven ER positive patients progressing on AIs had heterogeneous CTC-ER expression. These results suggest heterogeneous mechanisms of resistance to fulvestrant, including insufficient dosage, ESR1 mutation, or conversion to dependence on non-ER pathways. CTC enumeration, phenotyping, and genotyping might identify patients who would benefit from fulvestrant dose escalation versus switching to alternative therapies.

  9. Rotational quenching of H 2CO by molecular hydrogen - Suggestion on the work of Wiesenfeld & Faure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mohit Kumar; Sharma, Monika; Chandra, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Wiesenfeld and Faure investigated rotational quenching of H 2CO by molecular hydrogen where they considered 40 rotational levels of o-H 2CO and 41 rotational levels of p-H 2CO. Data on energies of rotational levels of the molecule are fundamental in the investigation. We have found that the sequence of levels reported by Wiesenfeld and Faure is not as per convention of molecular physics. Their results are also available on the website: http://www.home.strw.leidenuniv.nl/ moldata/datafiles/ph2co-h2.dat, where the collisional transitions are shown even between the levels having equal energies. Data for such transitions should not be there.

  10. Deceptive Desmas: Molecular Phylogenetics Suggests a New Classification and Uncovers Convergent Evolution of Lithistid Demosponges

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Astrid; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Pisera, Andrzej; Hooper, John; Bryce, Monika; Fromont, Jane; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Reconciling the fossil record with molecular phylogenies to enhance the understanding of animal evolution is a challenging task, especially for taxa with a mostly poor fossil record, such as sponges (Porifera). ‘Lithistida’, a polyphyletic group of recent and fossil sponges, are an exception as they provide the richest fossil record among demosponges. Lithistids, currently encompassing 13 families, 41 genera and >300 recent species, are defined by the common possession of peculiar siliceous spicules (desmas) that characteristically form rigid articulated skeletons. Their phylogenetic relationships are to a large extent unresolved and there has been no (taxonomically) comprehensive analysis to formally reallocate lithistid taxa to their closest relatives. This study, based on the most comprehensive molecular and morphological investigation of ‘lithistid’ demosponges to date, corroborates some previous weakly-supported hypotheses, and provides novel insights into the evolutionary relationships of the previous ‘order Lithistida’. Based on molecular data (partial mtDNA CO1 and 28S rDNA sequences), we show that 8 out of 13 ‘Lithistida’ families belong to the order Astrophorida, whereas Scleritodermidae and Siphonidiidae form a separate monophyletic clade within Tetractinellida. Most lithistid astrophorids are dispersed between different clades of the Astrophorida and we propose to formally reallocate them, respectively. Corallistidae, Theonellidae and Phymatellidae are monophyletic, whereas the families Pleromidae and Scleritodermidae are polyphyletic. Family Desmanthidae is polyphyletic and groups within Halichondriidae – we formally propose a reallocation. The sister group relationship of the family Vetulinidae to Spongillida is confirmed and we propose here for the first time to include Vetulina into a new Order Sphaerocladina. Megascleres and microscleres possibly evolved and/or were lost several times independently in different

  11. A new battery-charging method suggested by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Abou Hamad, Ibrahim; Novotny, M A; Wipf, D O; Rikvold, P A

    2010-03-20

    Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a new charging method that should be capable of charging a lithium-ion battery in a fraction of the time needed when using traditional methods. This charging method uses an additional applied oscillatory electric field. Our simulation results show that this charging method offers a great reduction in the average intercalation time for Li(+) ions, which dominates the charging time. The oscillating field not only increases the diffusion rate of Li(+) ions in the electrolyte but, more importantly, also enhances intercalation by lowering the corresponding overall energy barrier.

  12. Emerging molecular approaches in stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Jaishankar, Amritha; Vrana, Kent

    2009-04-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple adult cell types. Although substantial progress has been made over the last decade in understanding stem cell biology, recent technological advances in molecular and systems biology may hold the key to unraveling the mystery behind stem cell self-renewal and plasticity. The most notable of these advances is the ability to generate induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of molecular similarities and differences among various stem cell types. Moreover, we survey the current state of systems biology and forecast future needs and direction in the stem cell field.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Suggests Possible Interaction Patterns at Early Steps of β2-Microglobulin Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Viglino, Paolo; Zuccato, Pierfrancesco; Pieri, Lidia; Faccioli, Pietro; Bellotti, Vittorio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    Early events in aggregation of proteins are not easily accessible by experiments. In this work, we perform a 5-ns molecular dynamics simulation of an ensemble of 27 copies of β2-microglobulin in explicit solvent. During the simulation, the formation of intermolecular contacts is observed. The simulation highlights the importance of apical residues and, in particular, of those at the N-terminus end of the molecule. The most frequently found pattern of interaction involves a head-to-head contact arrangement of molecules. Hydrophobic contacts appear to be important for the establishment of long-lived (on the simulation timescale) contacts. Although early events on the pathway to aggregation and fibril formation are not directly related to the end-state of the process, which is reached on a much longer timescale, simulation results are consistent with experimental data and in general with a parallel arrangement of intermolecular β-strand pairs. PMID:17158575

  14. Structural and Molecular Evidence Suggesting Coronavirus-driven Evolution of Mouse Receptor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guiqing; Yang, Yang; Pasquarella, Joseph R; Xu, Liqing; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V; Li, Fang

    2017-02-10

    Hosts and pathogens are locked in an evolutionary arms race. To infect mice, mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) has evolved to recognize mouse CEACAM1a (mCEACAM1a) as its receptor. To elude MHV infections, mice may have evolved a variant allele from the Ceacam1a gene, called Ceacam1b, producing mCEACAM1b, which is a much poorer MHV receptor than mCEACAM1a. Previous studies showed that sequence differences between mCEACAM1a and mCEACAM1b in a critical MHV-binding CC' loop partially account for the low receptor activity of mCEACAM1b, but detailed structural and molecular mechanisms for the differential MHV receptor activities of mCEACAM1a and mCEACAM1b remained elusive. Here we have determined the crystal structure of mCEACAM1b and identified the structural differences and additional residue differences between mCEACAM1a and mCEACAM1b that affect MHV binding and entry. These differences include conformational alterations of the CC' loop as well as residue variations in other MHV-binding regions, including β-strands C' and C'' and loop C'C''. Using pseudovirus entry and protein-protein binding assays, we show that substituting the structural and residue features from mCEACAM1b into mCEACAM1a reduced the viral receptor activity of mCEACAM1a, whereas substituting the reverse changes from mCEACAM1a into mCEACAM1b increased the viral receptor activity of mCEACAM1b. These results elucidate the detailed molecular mechanism for how mice may have kept pace in the evolutionary arms race with MHV by undergoing structural and residue changes in the MHV receptor, providing insight into this possible example of pathogen-driven evolution of a host receptor protein.

  15. Molecular phylogeny of beetle associated diplogastrid nematodes suggests host switching rather than nematode-beetle coevolution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Werner E; Herrmann, Matthias; Sommer, Ralf J

    2009-08-24

    Nematodes are putatively the most species-rich animal phylum. They have various life styles and occur in a variety of habitats, ranging from free-living nematodes in aquatic or terrestrial environments to parasites of animals and plants. The rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most important model organisms in modern biology. Pristionchus pacificus of the family of the Diplogastridae has been developed as a satellite model for comparison to C. elegans. The Diplogastridae, a monophyletic clade within the rhabditid nematodes, are frequently associated with beetles. How this beetle-association evolved and whether beetle-nematode coevolution occurred is still elusive. As a prerequisite to answering this question a robust phylogeny of beetle-associated Diplogastridae is needed. Sequences for the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA and for 12 ribosomal protein encoding nucleotide sequences were collected for 14 diplogastrid taxa yielding a dataset of 5996 bp of concatenated aligned sequences. A molecular phylogeny of beetle-associated diplogastrid nematodes was established by various algorithms. Robust subclades could be demonstrated embedded in a phylogenetic tree topology with short internal branches, indicating rapid ancestral divergences. Comparison of the diplogastrid phylogeny to a comprehensive beetle phylogeny revealed no major congruence and thus no evidence for a long-term coevolution. Reconstruction of the phylogenetic history of beetle-associated Diplogastridae yields four distinct subclades, whose deep phylogenetic divergence, as indicated by short internal branch lengths, shows evidence for evolution by successions of ancient rapid radiation events. The stem species of the Diplogastridae existed at the same time period when the major radiations of the beetles occurred. Comparison of nematode and beetle phylogenies provides, however, no evidence for long-term coevolution of diplogastrid nematodes and their beetle hosts. Instead, frequent

  16. Unexpected Genome Variability at Multiple Loci Suggests Cacao Swollen Shoot Virus Comprises Multiple, Divergent Molecular Variants.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cacao swollen shoot virus (CSSV) [Badnavirus, Caulimoviridae] causes swollen shoot disease of Theobroma cacao L. in West Africa. Since ~2000, various diagnostic tests have failed to detect CSSV in ~50-70% of symptomatic cacao plants, suggesting the possible emergence of new, previously uncharacteriz...

  17. Molecular characterization of a family 5 glycoside hydrolase suggests an induced-fit enzymatic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberato, Marcelo V.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Prates, Érica T.; de Araujo, Evandro A.; Pellegrini, Vanessa O. A.; Camilo, Cesar M.; Kadowaki, Marco A.; Neto, Mario De O.; Popov, Alexander; Skaf, Munir S.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) play fundamental roles in the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomaterials. Here, we report the full-length structure of a cellulase from Bacillus licheniformis (BlCel5B), a member of the GH5 subfamily 4 that is entirely dependent on its two ancillary modules (Ig-like module and CBM46) for catalytic activity. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that the C-terminal CBM46 caps the distal N-terminal catalytic domain (CD) to establish a fully functional active site via a combination of large-scale multidomain conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. The Ig-like module is pivoting the packing and unpacking motions of CBM46 relative to CD in the assembly of the binding subsite. This is the first example of a multidomain GH relying on large amplitude motions of the CBM46 for assembly of the catalytically competent form of the enzyme.

  18. Molecular characterization of a family 5 glycoside hydrolase suggests an induced-fit enzymatic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liberato, Marcelo V; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Prates, Érica T; de Araujo, Evandro A; Pellegrini, Vanessa O A; Camilo, Cesar M; Kadowaki, Marco A; Neto, Mario de O; Popov, Alexander; Skaf, Munir S; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) play fundamental roles in the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomaterials. Here, we report the full-length structure of a cellulase from Bacillus licheniformis (BlCel5B), a member of the GH5 subfamily 4 that is entirely dependent on its two ancillary modules (Ig-like module and CBM46) for catalytic activity. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that the C-terminal CBM46 caps the distal N-terminal catalytic domain (CD) to establish a fully functional active site via a combination of large-scale multidomain conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. The Ig-like module is pivoting the packing and unpacking motions of CBM46 relative to CD in the assembly of the binding subsite. This is the first example of a multidomain GH relying on large amplitude motions of the CBM46 for assembly of the catalytically competent form of the enzyme.

  19. Molecular models and mutational analyses of plant specifier proteins suggest active site residues and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Wolfgang; Backenköhler, Anita; Schulze, Eva; Plock, Antje; Herberg, Thomas; Roese, Elin; Wittstock, Ute

    2014-01-01

    As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, specifier proteins contribute to the diversity of chemical defenses that have evolved in plants of the Brassicales order as a protection against herbivores and pathogens. Glucosinolates are thioglucosides that are stored separately from their hydrolytic enzymes, myrosinases, in plant tissue. Upon tissue disruption, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases yielding instable aglucones that rearrange to form defensive isothiocyanates. In the presence of specifier proteins, other products, namely simple nitriles, epithionitriles and organic thiocyanates, can be formed instead of isothiocyanates depending on the glucosinolate side chain structure and the type of specifier protein. The biochemical role of specifier proteins is largely unresolved. We have used two thiocyanate-forming proteins and one epithiospecifier protein with different substrate/product specificities to develop molecular models that, in conjunction with mutational analyses, allow us to propose an active site and docking arrangements with glucosinolate aglucones that may explain some of the differences in specifier protein specificities. Furthermore, quantum-mechanical calculations support a reaction mechanism for benzylthiocyanate formation including a catalytic role of the TFP involved. These results may serve as a basis for further theoretical and experimental investigations of the mechanisms of glucosinolate breakdown that will also help to better understand the evolution of specifier proteins from ancestral proteins with functions outside glucosinolate metabolism.

  20. Molecular characterization of a family 5 glycoside hydrolase suggests an induced-fit enzymatic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liberato, Marcelo V.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Prates, Érica T.; de Araujo, Evandro A.; Pellegrini, Vanessa O. A.; Camilo, Cesar M.; Kadowaki, Marco A.; Neto, Mario de O.; Popov, Alexander; Skaf, Munir S.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) play fundamental roles in the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomaterials. Here, we report the full-length structure of a cellulase from Bacillus licheniformis (BlCel5B), a member of the GH5 subfamily 4 that is entirely dependent on its two ancillary modules (Ig-like module and CBM46) for catalytic activity. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that the C-terminal CBM46 caps the distal N-terminal catalytic domain (CD) to establish a fully functional active site via a combination of large-scale multidomain conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. The Ig-like module is pivoting the packing and unpacking motions of CBM46 relative to CD in the assembly of the binding subsite. This is the first example of a multidomain GH relying on large amplitude motions of the CBM46 for assembly of the catalytically competent form of the enzyme. PMID:27032335

  1. Molecular marker suggests rapid changes of sex-determining mechanisms in Australian dragon lizards.

    PubMed

    Ezaz, Tariq; Quinn, Alexander E; Sarre, Stephen D; O'Meally, Denis; Georges, Arthur; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Distribution of sex-determining mechanisms across Australian agamids shows no clear phylogenetic segregation, suggesting multiple transitions between temperature-dependent (TSD) and genotypic sex determination (GSD). These taxa thus present an excellent opportunity for studying the evolution of sex chromosomes, and evolutionary transitions between TSD and GSD. Here we report the hybridization of a 3 kb genomic sequence (PvZW3) that marks the Z and W microchromosomes of the Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) to chromosomes of 12 species of Australian agamids from eight genera using fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). The probe hybridized to a single microchromosome pair in 11 of these species, but to the tip of the long arm of chromosome pair 2 in the twelfth (Physignathus lesueurii), indicating a micro-macro chromosome rearrangement. Three TSD species shared the marked microchromosome, implying that it is a conserved autosome in related species that determine sex by temperature. C-banding identified the marked microchromosome as the heterochromatic W chromosome in two of the three GSD species. However, in Ctenophorus fordi, the probe hybridized to a different microchromosome from that shown by C-banding to be the heterochromatic W, suggesting an independent origin for the ZW chromosome pair in that species. Given the haphazard distribution of GSD and TSD in this group and the existence of at least two sets of sex microchromosomes in GSD species, we conclude that sex-determining mechanisms in this family have evolved independently, multiple times in a short evolutionary period.

  2. Metabolomic data suggest regulation of black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra) diet composition at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Amato, Katherine R; Ulanov, Alexander; Ju, Kou-San; Garber, Paul A

    2016-12-09

    In addition to macronutrients, foods consist of a complex set of chemical compounds that can influence dietary selectivity and consumer physiology. Metabolomics allow us to describe this complexity by quantifying all small molecules, or metabolites, in a food item. In this study we use GC-MS based metabolomics to describe the metabolite profiles of foods consumed by one population of Mexican black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) over a 10-month period. Our data indicate that each food exhibited a distinct metabolite profile, and the average weekly intake of metabolites such as neochlorogenic acid and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) was correlated with the consumption of certain plant parts. We speculate that these patterns result in temporal changes in howler monkey physiology such as food retention time. In contrast, variation in the weekly intake of metabolites such as oxalic acid was 70% less than variation in the concentration of the same metabolites across food items, suggesting that howler monkeys regulated the intake of these metabolites, possibly to avoid physiological consequences such as kidney stone formation. Finally, seasonal variation in the consumption of individual nutrient and non-nutrient metabolites were correlated with changes in the relative abundances of associated gut microbial taxa, implying indirect effects of food item metabolites on howler monkey nutritional ecology that likely drive foraging decisions. While additional research is needed to validate these findings, the patterns we report serve as important baseline data for understanding the effects of plant metabolites on the food choice in primates.

  3. Cutaneous epithelioid cell histiocytoma: immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings suggesting endothelial origin.

    PubMed

    Manente, L; Schmitt, I; Onetti, A M; Peris, K; Caracciolo, E; Chimenti, S

    1997-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with a polypoid nodule localized in the groin. Although the clinical and histopathological features corresponded to previously described diagnostic criteria of epithelioid cell histiocytoma, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings suggested vascular differentiation of the epithelioid cells. In particular, the immunohistochemical negativity of the epithelioid cell elements for Factor XIIIa failed to substantiate the previously forwarded hypothesis that this lesion represents a dendrocytoma. Instead, the presence of histiocytoid, vacuolated cells occasionally containing sparse red blood cells, positive staining for Factor VIII-related antigen, and ultrastructural evidence of endothelial characteristics in epithelioid neoplastic cells favor the hypothesis that "epithelioid cell histiocytoma" is of endothelial origin. We suggest the descriptive term cutaneous histiocytoid hemangioendothelioma for this lesion.

  4. Gene expression profiles from discordant monozygotic twins suggest that molecular pathways are shared among multiple systemic autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to determine if multiple systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID) share gene expression pathways that could provide insights into pathogenic mechanisms common to these disorders. Methods RNA microarray analyses (Agilent Human 1A(V2) 20K oligo arrays) were used to quantify gene expression in peripheral blood cells from 20 monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for SAID. Six affected probands with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), six with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), eight with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), and their same-gendered unaffected twins, were enrolled. Comparisons were made between discordant twin pairs and these were also each compared to 40 unrelated control subjects (matched 2:1 to each twin by age, gender and ethnicity) using statistical and molecular pathway analyses. Relative quantitative PCR was used to verify independently measures of differential gene expression assessed by microarray analysis. Results Probands and unrelated, matched controls differed significantly in gene expression for 104 probes corresponding to 92 identifiable genes (multiple-comparison adjusted P values < 0.1). Differentially expressed genes involved several overlapping pathways including immune responses (16%), signaling pathways (24%), transcription/translation regulators (26%), and metabolic functions (15%). Interferon (IFN)-response genes (IFI27, OASF, PLSCR1, EIF2AK2, TNFAIP6, and TNFSF10) were up-regulated in probands compared to unrelated controls. Many of the abnormally expressed genes played regulatory roles in multiple cellular pathways. We did not detect any probes expressed differentially in comparisons among the three SAID phenotypes. Similarly, we found no significant differences in gene expression when comparing probands to unaffected twins or unaffected twins to unrelated controls. Gene expression levels for unaffected twins appeared intermediate between that of probands and unrelated controls for 6535 probes

  5. Comparative secretome analysis suggests low plant cell wall degrading capacity in Frankia symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Mastronunzio, Juliana E; Tisa, Louis S; Normand, Philippe; Benson, David R

    2008-01-01

    Background Frankia sp. strains, the nitrogen-fixing facultative endosymbionts of actinorhizal plants, have long been proposed to secrete hydrolytic enzymes such as cellulases, pectinases, and proteases that may contribute to plant root penetration and formation of symbiotic root nodules. These or other secreted proteins might logically be involved in the as yet unknown molecular interactions between Frankia and their host plants. We compared the genome-based secretomes of three Frankia strains representing diverse host specificities. Signal peptide detection algorithms were used to predict the individual secretomes of each strain, and the set of secreted proteins shared among the strains, termed the core Frankia secretome. Proteins in the core secretome may be involved in the actinorhizal symbiosis. Results The Frankia genomes have conserved Sec (general secretory) and Tat (twin arginine translocase) secretion systems. The potential secretome of each Frankia strain comprised 4–5% of the total proteome, a lower percentage than that found in the genomes of other actinobacteria, legume endosymbionts, and plant pathogens. Hydrolytic enzymes made up only a small fraction of the total number of predicted secreted proteins in each strain. Surprisingly, polysaccharide-degrading enzymes were few in number, especially in strain CcI3, with more esterolytic, lipolytic and proteolytic enzymes having signal peptides. A total of 161 orthologous proteins belong to the core Frankia secretome. Of these, 52 also lack homologs in closely related actinobacteria, and are termed "Frankia-specific." The genes encoding these conserved secreted proteins are often clustered near secretion machinery genes. Conclusion The predicted secretomes of Frankia sp. are relatively small and include few hydrolases, which could reflect adaptation to a symbiotic lifestyle. There are no well-conserved secreted polysaccharide-degrading enzymes present in all three Frankia genomes, suggesting that plant

  6. Molecular Hallmarks of Adult T Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) comprise outstanding deregulations of signaling pathways that control the cell cycle, resistance to apoptosis, and proliferation of leukemic cells, all of which have been identified by early excellent studies. Nevertheless, we are now confronted the therapeutic difficulties of ATL that is a most aggressive T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Using next-generation strategies, emerging molecular characteristics such as specific surface markers and an additional catalog of signals affecting the fate of leukemic cells have been added to the molecular hallmarks that constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of ATL. Although human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is undoubtedly involved in ATL leukemogenesis, most leukemic cells do not express the viral protein Tax. Instead, cellular gene expression changes dominate homeostasis disorders of infected cells and characteristics of ATL. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of ATL molecular pathology, which supports the biological properties of leukemic cells. In addition, we discuss the recent discovery of two molecular hallmarks of potential generality; an abnormal microRNA pattern and epigenetic reprogramming, which strongly involve the imbalance of the molecular network of lymphocytes. Global analyses of ATL have revealed the functional impact of crosstalk between multifunctional pathways. Clinical and biological studies on signaling inhibitory agents have also revealed novel oncogenic drivers that can be targeted in future. ATL cells, by deregulation of such pathways and their interconnections, may become masters of their own destinies. Recognizing and understanding of the widespread molecular applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of novel strategies for treating ATL. PMID:23060864

  7. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  8. Molecular Biomarker Analyses Using Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Punnoose, Elizabeth A.; Atwal, Siminder K.; Spoerke, Jill M.; Savage, Heidi; Pandita, Ajay; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Pirzkall, Andrea; Fine, Bernard M.; Amler, Lukas C.; Chen, Daniel S.; Lackner, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evaluation of cancer biomarkers from blood could significantly enable biomarker assessment by providing a relatively non-invasive source of representative tumor material. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) isolated from blood of metastatic cancer patients hold significant promise in this regard. Methodology/Principal Findings Using spiked tumor-cells we evaluated CTC capture on different CTC technology platforms, including CellSearch® and two biochip platforms, and used the isolated CTCs to develop and optimize assays for molecular characterization of CTCs. We report similar performance for the various platforms tested in capturing CTCs, and find that capture efficiency is dependent on the level of EpCAM expression. We demonstrate that captured CTCs are amenable to biomarker analyses such as HER2 status, qRT-PCR for breast cancer subtype markers, KRAS mutation detection, and EGFR staining by immunofluorescence (IF). We quantify cell surface expression of EGFR in metastatic lung cancer patient samples. In addition, we determined HER2 status by IF and FISH in CTCs from metastatic breast cancer patients. In the majority of patients (89%) we found concordance with HER2 status from patient tumor tissue, though in a subset of patients (11%), HER2 status in CTCs differed from that observed in the primary tumor. Surprisingly, we found CTC counts to be higher in ER+ patients in comparison to HER2+ and triple negative patients, which could be explained by low EpCAM expression and a more mesenchymal phenotype of tumors belonging to the basal-like molecular subtype of breast cancer. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggests that molecular characterization from captured CTCs is possible and can potentially provide real-time information on biomarker status. In this regard, CTCs hold significant promise as a source of tumor material to facilitate clinical biomarker evaluation. However, limitations exist from a purely EpCAM based capture system and addition of antibodies

  9. Deeply Embedded Protostellar Population in the Central Molecular Zone Suggested by H2O Masers and Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xing; Zhang, Qizhou; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Longmore, Steven N.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Battersby, Cara

    2017-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), usually referring to the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy, contains a dozen of massive (~105 M ⊙) molecular clouds. Are these clouds going to actively form stars like Sgr B2? How are they affected by the extreme physical conditions in the CMZ, such as strong turbulence? Here we present a first step towards answering these questions. Using high-sensitivity, high angular resolution radio and (sub)millimeter observations, we studied deeply embedded star formation in six massive clouds in the CMZ, including the 20 and 50 km s-1 clouds, Sgr B1 off (as known as dust ridge clouds e/f), Sgr C, Sgr D, and G0.253 - 0.016. The VLA water maser observations suggest a population of deeply embedded protostellar candidates, many of which are new detections. The SMA 1.3 mm continuum observations reveal peaks in dust emission associated with the masers, suggesting the existence of dense cores. While our findings confirm that clouds such as G0.253 - 0.016 lack internal compact substructures and are quiescent in terms of star formation, two clouds (the 20 km s-1 cloud and Sgr C) stand out with clusters of water masers with associated dense cores which may suggest a population of deeply embedded protostars at early evolutionary phases. Follow-up observations with VLA and ALMA are necessary to confirm their protostellar nature.

  10. Molecular mobility of scaffolds' biopolymers influences cell growth.

    PubMed

    Podlipec, Rok; Gorgieva, Selestina; Jurašin, Darija; Urbančič, Iztok; Kokol, Vanja; Strancar, Janez

    2014-09-24

    Understanding biocompatibility of materials and scaffolds is one of the main challenges in the field of tissue engineering and regeneration. The complex nature of cell-biomaterial interaction requires extensive preclinical functionality testing by studying specific cell responses to different biomaterial properties, from morphology and mechanics to surface characteristics at the molecular level. Despite constant improvements, a more general picture of biocompatibility is still lacking and tailormade scaffolds are not yet available. The scope of our study was thus the investigation of the correlation of fibroblast cell growth on different gelatin scaffolds with their morphological, mechanical as well as surface molecular properties. The latter were thoroughly investigated via polymer molecular mobility studied by site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) for the first time. Anisotropy of the rotational motion of the gelatin side chain mobility was identified as the most correlated quantity with cell growth in the first days after adhesion, while weaker correlations were found with scaffold viscoelasticity and no correlations with scaffold morphology. Namely, the scaffolds with highly mobile or unrestricted polymers identified with the cell growth being five times less efficient (N(cells) = 60 ± 25 mm(-2)) as compared to cell growth on the scaffolds with considerable part of polymers with the restricted rotational motion (N(cells) = 290 ± 25 mm(-2)). This suggests that molecular mobility of scaffold components could play an important role in cell response to medical devices, reflecting a new aspect of the biocompatibility concept.

  11. Plasma proteomic profiles from disease-discordant monozygotic twins suggest that molecular pathways are shared in multiple systemic autoimmune diseases*

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Although systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID) share many clinical and laboratory features, whether they also share some common features of pathogenesis remains unclear. We assessed plasma proteomic profiles among different SAID for evidence of common molecular pathways that could provide insights into pathogenic mechanisms shared by these diseases. Methods Differential quantitative proteomic analyses (one-dimensional reverse-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) were performed to assess patterns of plasma protein expression. Monozygotic twins (four pairs discordant for systemic lupus erythematosus, four pairs discordant for juvenile idiopathic arthritis and two pairs discordant for juvenile dermatomyositis) were studied to minimize polymorphic gene effects. Comparisons were also made to 10 unrelated, matched controls. Results Multiple plasma proteins, including acute phase reactants, structural proteins, immune response proteins, coagulation and transcriptional factors, were differentially expressed similarly among the different SAID studied. Multivariate Random Forest modeling identified seven proteins whose combined altered expression levels effectively segregated affected vs. unaffected twins. Among these seven proteins, four were also identified in univariate analyses of proteomic data (syntaxin 17, α-glucosidase, paraoxonase 1, and the sixth component of complement). Molecular pathway modeling indicated that these factors may be integrated through interactions with a candidate plasma biomarker, PON1 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Conclusions Together, these data suggest that different SAID may share common alterations of plasma protein expression and molecular pathways. An understanding of the mechanisms leading to the altered plasma proteomes common among these SAID may provide useful insights into their pathogeneses. PMID:22044644

  12. Molecular multiproxy analysis of ancient root systems suggests strong alteration of deep subsoil organic matter by rhizomicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocke, Martina; Huguet, Arnaud; Derenne, Sylvie; Kolb, Steffen; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.

    2013-04-01

    Roots have a high potential capacity to store large amounts of CO2 in the subsoil. However, associated with rooting, microorganisms enter the subsoil and might contribute to priming effects of carbon mineralisation in the microbial hotspot rhizosphere. Although these processes are well known for recent surface soils, it remains questionable, if and how microorganisms contribute to priming effects in the subsoil and if these effects can be traced after the roots' lifetime. The current study implies several state-of-the-art techniques like DNA and lipid molecular proxies to trace remains of microbial biomass in ancient root systems. These can provide valuable information if parts of the root and rhizomicrobial biomass are preserved, e.g. by encrustation with secondary carbonate during the root's lifespan or shortly thereafter. At the Late Pleistocene loess-paleosol sequence near Nussloch (SW Germany), rhizoliths (calcified roots) occur highly abundant in the deep subsoil from 1 to 9 m depth and below. They were formed by Holocene woody vegetation. Their size can account for up to several cm in diameter and up to > 1 m length. Rhizoliths and surrounding sediment with increasing distances of up to 10 cm, as well as reference loess without visible root remains were collected at several depth intervals. Samples were analysed for n-fatty acids (FAs) and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs; membrane lipids from Archaea and some Bacteria), as well as structural diversity based on the RNA gene of the prokaryotic ribosome subunit 16S (16S rRNA). GDGT represent organic remains from microbial biomass, whereas FA comprise both microbial remains and degradation products. 16S rRNA indicates the presence of both living cells and/or cell fragments. Despite the general low RNA contents in the sample set, results pointed to a much higher abundance of bacterial compared to archaeal RNA. The latter occured in notable amounts only in some rhizoliths. This was in part enforced by

  13. The Molecular Control of Blood Cell Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Leo

    1987-12-01

    The establishment of a cell culture system for the clonal development of blood cells has made it possible to identify the proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of different blood cell lineages and to discover the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cell development in blood forming tissues. A model system with myeloid blood cells has shown that (i) normal blood cells require different proteins to induce cell multiplication (growth inducers) and cell differentiation (differentiation inducers), (ii) there is a hierarchy of growth inducers as cells become more restricted in their developmental program, and (iii) a cascade of interactions between proteins determines the correct balance between immature and mature cells in normal blood cell development. Gene cloning has shown that there is a family of different genes for these proteins. Normal protein regulators of blood cell development can control the abnormal growth of certain types of leukemic cells and suppress malignancy by incuding differentiation to mature nondividing cells. Chromosome abnormalities that give rise to malignancy in these leukemic cells can be bypassed and their effects nullified by inducing differentiation, which stops cells from multiplying. These blood cell regulatory proteins are active in culture and in the body, and they can be used clinically to correct defects in blood cell development.

  14. Grid cells correlation structure suggests organized feedforward projections into superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tocker, Gilad; Barak, Omri; Derdikman, Dori

    2015-12-01

    Navigation requires integration of external and internal inputs to form a representation of location. Part of this integration is considered to be carried out by the grid cells network in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). However, the structure of this neural network is unknown. To shed light on this structure, we measured noise correlations between 508 pairs of simultaneous previously recorded grid cells. We differentiated between pure grid and conjunctive cells (pure grid in Layers II, III, and VI vs. conjunctive in Layers III and V--only Layer III was bi-modal), and devised a new method to classify cell pairs as belonging/not-belonging to the same module. We found that pairs from the same module show significantly more correlations than pairs from different modules. The correlations between pure grid cells decreased in strength as their relative spatial phase increased. However, correlations were mostly at 0 time-lag, suggesting that the source of correlations was not only synaptic, but rather resulted mostly from common input. Given our measured correlations, the two functional groups of grid cells (pure vs. conjunctive), and the known disorganized recurrent connections within Layer II, we propose the following model: conjunctive cells in deep layers form an attractor network whose activity is governed by velocity-controlled signals. A second manifold in Layer II receives organized feedforward projections from the deep layers, giving rise to pure grid cells. Numerical simulations indicate that organized projections induce such correlations as we measure in superficial layers. Our results provide new evidence for the functional anatomy of the entorhinal circuit-suggesting that strong phase-organized feedforward projections support grid fields in the superficial layers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation. PMID:27005656

  16. Dictyostelium discoideum: Molecular approaches to cell biology

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The central point of this book is to present Dictyostelium as a valuable eukaryotic organism for those interested in molecular studies that require a combined biochemical, structural, and genetic approach. The book is not meant to be a comprehensive compilation of all methods involving Dictyostelium, but instead is a selective set of chapters that demonstrates the utility of the organism for molecular approaches to interesting cell biological problems.

  17. Proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer in suggested metal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burkandt, Andreas; Katzer, Alexander; Thaler, Karlheinz; Von Baehr, Volker; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Rüther, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael; Zustin, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Synovial tissues in joints with prostheses display characteristic morphological changes in cases with aseptic failure, particularly macrophage infiltration. Since proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer represents a feature characteristic of autoimmune joint diseases, the possibility of morphological changes of the synovial lining cell layer in periprosthetic tissues was investigated. Synovial biopsies from five groups of morphologically well-defined lesions (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, aseptic loosened metal-on-polyethylene and metal-on-metal arthroplasty and suggested metal hypersensitivity) were compared using a conventional staining method and immunohistochemistry. The synovial lining cell layer was substantially enlarged in both rheumatoid arthritis and cases suggestive of metal hypersensitivity. Macrophage infiltrates were apparent in rheumatoid arthritis and all specimens from retrieved hip arthroplasties. Although both synovial and subsynovial macrophages were positive for CD163 (indicating synovial M2 macrophages), the remaining fibroblast-like synoviocytes and scattered stromal fibroblasts showed a positive reaction with the D2-40 antibody (indicating fibroblast-like synoviocytes). Furthermore, in contrast to CD163-positive macrophages, the enlarged D2-40-positive fibroblast-like synoviocytes displayed cytoplasmatic tubular projections. Proliferation of the periprosthetic synovial lining cell layer occurred in cases with unexplained groin pain following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty, suggestive of hypersensitivity. Despite some important study limitations, the present observation adds to the evidence that metal hypersensitivity shares characteristic morphological features with autoimmune diseases of the joints.

  18. Expression patterns of TEL genes in Poaceae suggest a conserved association with cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Nicolas; Bernadet, Marie; Morin, Halima; Traas, Jan; Dron, Michel; Charon, Celine

    2005-06-01

    Poaceae species present a conserved distichous phyllotaxy (leaf position along the stem) and share common properties with respect to leaf initiation. The goal of this work was to determine if these common traits imply common genes. Therefore, homologues of the maize TERMINAL EAR1 gene in Poaceae were studied. This gene encodes an RNA-binding motif (RRM) protein, that is suggested to regulate leaf initiation. Using degenerate primers, one unique tel (terminal ear1-like) gene from seven Poaceae members, covering almost all the phylogenetic tree of the family, was identified by PCR. These genes present a very high degree of similarity, a much conserved exon-intron structure, and the three RRMs and TEL characteristic motifs. The evolution of tel sequences in Poaceae strongly correlates with the known phylogenetic tree of this family. RT-PCR gene expression analyses show conserved tel expression in the shoot apex in all species, suggesting functional orthology between these genes. In addition, in situ hybridization experiments with specific antisense probes show tel transcript accumulation in all differentiating cells of the leaf, from the recruitment of leaf founder cells to leaf margins cells. Tel expression is not restricted to initiating leaves as it is also found in pro-vascular tissues, root meristems, and immature inflorescences. Therefore, these results suggest that TEL is not only associated with leaf initiation but more generally with cell differentiation in Poaceae.

  19. The stem cell system in demosponges: suggested involvement of two types of cells: archeocytes (active stem cells) and choanocytes (food-entrapping flagellated cells).

    PubMed

    Funayama, Noriko

    2013-03-01

    Major questions about stem cell systems include what type(s) of stem cells are involved (unipotent/totipotent/pluripotent/multipotent stem cells) and how the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells are regulated. Sponges, the sister group of all other animals and probably the earliest branching multicellular lineage of extant animals, are thought to possess totipotent stem cells. This review introduces what is known about the stem cells in sponges based on histological studies and also on recent molecular biological studies that have started to reveal the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the stem cell system in sponges (mainly in demosponges). The currently proposed model of the stem cell system in demosponges is described, and the possible applicability of this model to other classes of sponges is discussed. Finally, a possible scenario of the evolution of stem cells, including how migrating stem cells arose in the urmetazoan (the last common ancestor of metazoans) and the evolutionary origin of germ line cells in the urbilaterian (the last common ancestor of bilaterians), are discussed.

  20. Novel HLA-B27-restricted Epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis Generated upon Endogenous Processing of Bacterial Proteins Suggest a Role of Molecular Mimicry in Reactive Arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J.; Dos Santos, Helena G.; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na+-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27+ cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330–338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211–223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211–223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA. PMID:23867464

  1. Novel HLA-B27-restricted epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis generated upon endogenous processing of bacterial proteins suggest a role of molecular mimicry in reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J; Dos Santos, Helena G; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A

    2013-09-06

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na(+)-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27(+) cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330-338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211-223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211-223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA.

  2. Molecular Theories of Cell Life and Death.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-27

    AD-A195 524 MOLECULAR THEORIES OF CELL LIFE AND DETH(U) RUTGERS - / TH STATE UNIV PI CATAWAY NJ DEPT OF PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY S JI 27 JUL 87...6448 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO0. 61102F 2312 A5 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) M0=M2UAR THEORIES OF CM IFE= AND DEATH 12. PERSONAL...7/27I49 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION The lectures given in the symposium are being assembled into a book entitled, "Molecular Theories of Cell Life and

  3. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of nuclear genes suggests a Cenozoic over-water dispersal origin for the Cuban solenodon

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Jun J.; Ohdachi, Satoshi D.; Echenique-Diaz, Lazaro M.; Borroto-Páez, Rafael; Begué-Quiala, Gerardo; Delgado-Labañino, Jorge L.; Gámez-Díez, Jorgelino; Alvarez-Lemus, José; Nguyen, Son Truong; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Kita, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The Cuban solenodon (Solenodon cubanus) is one of the most enigmatic mammals and is an extremely rare species with a distribution limited to a small part of the island of Cuba. Despite its rarity, in 2012 seven individuals of S. cubanus were captured and sampled successfully for DNA analysis, providing new insights into the evolutionary origin of this species and into the origins of the Caribbean fauna, which remain controversial. We conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear genes (Apob, Atp7a, Bdnf, Brca1 and Rag1; total, 4,602 bp) from 35 species of the mammalian order Eulipotyphla. Based on Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses, the family Solenodontidae diverged from other eulipotyphlan in the Paleocene, after the bolide impact on the Yucatan Peninsula, and S. cubanus diverged from the Hispaniolan solenodon (S. paradoxus) in the Early Pliocene. The strikingly recent divergence time estimates suggest that S. cubanus and its ancestral lineage originated via over-water dispersal rather than vicariance events, as had previously been hypothesised. PMID:27498968

  4. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of nuclear genes suggests a Cenozoic over-water dispersal origin for the Cuban solenodon.

    PubMed

    Sato, Jun J; Ohdachi, Satoshi D; Echenique-Diaz, Lazaro M; Borroto-Páez, Rafael; Begué-Quiala, Gerardo; Delgado-Labañino, Jorge L; Gámez-Díez, Jorgelino; Alvarez-Lemus, José; Nguyen, Son Truong; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Kita, Masaki

    2016-08-08

    The Cuban solenodon (Solenodon cubanus) is one of the most enigmatic mammals and is an extremely rare species with a distribution limited to a small part of the island of Cuba. Despite its rarity, in 2012 seven individuals of S. cubanus were captured and sampled successfully for DNA analysis, providing new insights into the evolutionary origin of this species and into the origins of the Caribbean fauna, which remain controversial. We conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear genes (Apob, Atp7a, Bdnf, Brca1 and Rag1; total, 4,602 bp) from 35 species of the mammalian order Eulipotyphla. Based on Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses, the family Solenodontidae diverged from other eulipotyphlan in the Paleocene, after the bolide impact on the Yucatan Peninsula, and S. cubanus diverged from the Hispaniolan solenodon (S. paradoxus) in the Early Pliocene. The strikingly recent divergence time estimates suggest that S. cubanus and its ancestral lineage originated via over-water dispersal rather than vicariance events, as had previously been hypothesised.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Schwann Cell Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Boerboom, Angélique; Dion, Valérie; Chariot, Alain; Franzen, Rachelle

    2017-01-01

    Schwann cell incredible plasticity is a hallmark of the utmost importance following nerve damage or in demyelinating neuropathies. After injury, Schwann cells undergo dedifferentiation before redifferentiating to promote nerve regeneration and complete functional recovery. This review updates and discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in the negative regulation of myelination as well as in the reprogramming of Schwann cells taking place early following nerve lesion to support repair. Significant advance has been made on signaling pathways and molecular components that regulate SC regenerative properties. These include for instance transcriptional regulators such as c-Jun or Notch, the MAPK and the Nrg1/ErbB2/3 pathways. This comprehensive overview ends with some therapeutical applications targeting factors that control Schwann cell plasticity and highlights the need to carefully modulate and balance this capacity to drive nerve repair. PMID:28261057

  6. Mutational spectrum of Barrett's stem cells suggests paths to initiation of a precancerous lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wang, Xia; Bertrand, Denis; Kern, Florian; Zhang, Ting; Duleba, Marcin; Srivastava, Supriya; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hu, Yuanyu; Wilson, Lane H.; Blaszyk, Hagen; Rolshud, Daniil; Teh, Ming; Liu, Jianjun; Howitt, Brooke E.; Vincent, Matthew; Crum, Christopher P.; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Ho, Khek Yu; McKeon, Frank; Xian, Wa

    2016-01-01

    The precancerous lesion known as Barrett's oesophagus can evolve to oesophageal adenocarcinoma in decades-long processes of regenerative growth. Here we report the isolation and propagation of distinct, patient-matched stem cells of Barrett's, gastric and oesophageal epithelia that yield divergent tumour types following in vitro transformation and xenografting. Genomic analyses reveal a broad mutational spectrum unique to Barrett's stem cells that likely reflects their risk for oncogenesis. Remarkably, 25% of cases show no cancer-related genomic changes, suggesting that Barrett's initiates without driver mutations. Most cases, however, sustain patterns of deletions almost identical to adenocarcinoma though tumour-associated gene amplifications were absent. Notably, those suspected of low-grade dysplasia have p53 mutations or undergo amplifications of proto-oncogenes and receptor tyrosine kinases, implicating these events in lethal transitions. Our findings suggest paths for the initiation and progression of Barrett's and define a discrete stem cell underlying its regenerative growth whose eradication could prevent oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26783136

  7. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  8. A Common Molecular Motif Characterizes Extracellular Allosteric Enhancers of GPCR Aminergic Receptors and Suggests Enhancer Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Robert Root; Dillon, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Several classes of compounds that have no intrinsic activity on aminergic systems nonetheless enhance the potency of aminergic receptor ligands three-fold or more while significantly increasing their duration of activity, preventing tachyphylaxis and reversing fade. Enhancer compounds include ascorbic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, cortico-steroids, opioid peptides, opiates and opiate antagonists. This paper provides the first review of aminergic enhancement, demonstrating that all enhancers have a common, inobvious molecular motif and work through a common mechanism that is manifested by three common characteristics. First, aminergic enhancers bind directly to the amines they enhance, suggesting that the common structural motif is reflected in common binding targets. Second, one common target is the first extracellular loop of aminergic receptors. Third, at least some enhancers are antiphosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that aminergic enhancers act on the extracellular surface of aminergic receptors to keep the receptor in its high affinity state, trapping the ligand inside the receptor. Enhancer binding produces allosteric modifications of the receptor structure that interfere with phosphorylation of the receptor, thereby inhibiting down-regulation of the receptor. The mechanism explains how enhancers potentiate aminergic activity and increase duration of activity and makes testable predictions about additional compounds that should act as aminergic enhancers. PMID:25174918

  9. How a Small Change in Retinal Leads to G-Protein Activation: Initial Events Suggested by Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Paul S.; Stevens, Mark J.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein coupled receptor, coupling light activation with high efficiency to signaling molecules. The dark-state X-ray structures of the protein provide a starting point for consideration of the relaxation from initial light activation to conformational changes that may lead to signaling. In this study we create an energetically unstable retinal in the light activated state and then use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the types of compensation, relaxation, and conformational changes that occur following the cis–trans light activation. The results suggest that changes occur throughout the protein, with changes in the orientation of Helices 5 and 6, a closer interaction between Ala 169 on Helix 4 and retinal, and a shift in the Schiff base counterion that also reflects changes in sidechain interactions with the retinal. Taken together, the simulation is suggestive of the types of changes that lead from local conformational change to light-activated signaling in this prototypical system. PMID:17109408

  10. Axonal regulation of Schwann cell integrin expression suggests a role for alpha 6 beta 4 in myelination

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Ensheathment and myelination of axons by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system requires contact with a basal lamina. The molecular mechanism(s) by which the basal lamina promotes myelination is not known but is likely to reflect the activity of integrins expressed by Schwann cells. To initiate studies on the role of integrins during myelination, we characterized the expression of two integrin subunits, beta 1 and beta 4, in an in vitro myelination system and compared their expression to that of the glial adhesion molecule, the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). In the absence of neurons, Schwann cells express significant levels of beta 1 but virtually no beta 4 or MAG. When Schwann cells are cocultured with dorsal root ganglia neurons under conditions promoting myelination, expression of beta 4 and MAG increased dramatically in myelinating cells, whereas beta 1 levels remained essentially unchanged. (In general agreement with these findings, during peripheral nerve development in vivo, beta 4 levels also increase during the period of myelination in sharp contrast to beta 1 levels which show a striking decrease.) In cocultures of neurons and Schwann cells, beta 4 and MAG appear to colocalize in nascent myelin sheaths but have distinct distributions in mature sheaths, with beta 4 concentrated in the outer plasma membrane of the Schwann cell and MAG localized to the inner (periaxonal) membrane. Surprisingly, beta 4 is also present at high levels with MAG in Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that primary Schwann cells express beta 1 in association with the alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunits, while myelinating Schwann cells express alpha 6 beta 4 and possibly alpha 1 beta 1. beta 4 is also downregulated during Wallerian degeneration in vitro, indicating that its expression requires continuous Schwann cell contact with the axon. These results indicate that axonal contact induces the expression of beta 4 during Schwann cell

  11. Transdifferentiation: a cell and molecular reprogramming process.

    PubMed

    Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Matin, Maryam M

    2012-06-01

    Evidence has emerged recently indicating that differentiation is not entirely a one-way process, and that it is possible to convert one cell type to another, both in vitro and in vivo. This phenomenon is called transdifferentiation, and is generally defined as the stable switch of one cell type to another. Transdifferentiation plays critical roles during development and in regeneration pathways in nature. Although this phenomenon occurs rarely in nature, recent studies have been focused on transdifferentiation and the reprogramming ability of cells to produce specific cells with new phenotypes for use in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Thus, understanding the principles and the mechanism of this process is important for producing desired cell types. Here some well-documented examples of transdifferentiation, and their significance in development and regeneration are reviewed. In addition, transdifferentiation pathways are considered and their potential molecular mechanisms, especially the role of master switch genes, are considered. Finally, the significance of transdifferentiation in regenerative medicine is discussed.

  12. Cloning and expression of three zebrafish roundabout homologs suggest roles in axon guidance and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Ray, R; Chien, C B

    2001-06-01

    We report the cloning and expression patterns of three novel zebrafish Roundabout homologs. The Roundabout (robo) gene encodes a transmembrane receptor that is essential for axon guidance in Drosophila and Robo family members have been implicated in cell migration. Analysis of extracellular domains and conserved cytoplasmic motifs shows that zebrafish Robo1 and Robo2 are orthologs of mammalian Robo1 and Robo2, respectively, while zebrafish Robo3 is likely to be an ortholog of mouse Rig-1. The three zebrafish robos are expressed in distinct but overlapping patterns during embryogenesis. They are highly expressed in the developing nervous system, including the olfactory system, visual system, hindbrain, cranial ganglia, spinal cord, and posterior lateral line primordium. They are also expressed in several nonneuronal tissues, including somites and fin buds. The timing and patterns of expression suggest roles for zebrafish robos in axon guidance and cell migration. Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Free Energy of Translocating an Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide across a Lipid Bilayer Suggests Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism and energetics of the translocation of arginine-rich, cell-penetrating peptides through membranes are still under debate. One possible mechanism involves the formation of a water pore in the membrane such that the hydrophilic residues of the peptide are solvated throughout the translocating process. In this work, employing two different order parameters, we calculate the free energies of translocating a cyclic Arg9 peptide into a lipid bilayer along one path that involves a water-pore formation and another path that does not form a separate pore. The free-energy barrier of translocating the peptide along a pore path is 80 kJ/mol lower than along a pore-free path. This suggests that the peptide translocation is more likely associated with a water-pore formation. PMID:23442863

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2016-03-09

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4⁺ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4⁺ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation.

  15. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  16. T Cell Allorecognition via Molecular Mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Whitney A.; Chen, Zhenjun; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Clements, Craig S.; Bharadwaj, Mandvi; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Saunders, Philippa M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Crawford, Fran; Stadinsky, Brian; Jackson, David; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Kappler, John W.; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James

    2010-08-16

    T cells often alloreact with foreign human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Here we showed the LC13 T cell receptor (TCR), selected for recognition on self-HLA-B*0801 bound to a viral peptide, alloreacts with B44 allotypes (HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4405) bound to two different allopeptides. Despite extensive polymorphism between HLA-B*0801, HLA-B*4402, and HLA-B*4405 and the disparate sequences of the viral and allopeptides, the LC13 TCR engaged these peptide-HLA (pHLA) complexes identically, accommodating mimicry of the viral peptide by the allopeptide. The viral and allopeptides adopted similar conformations only after TCR ligation, revealing an induced-fit mechanism of molecular mimicry. The LC13 T cells did not alloreact against HLA-B*4403, and the single residue polymorphism between HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4403 affected the plasticity of the allopeptide, revealing that molecular mimicry was associated with TCR specificity. Accordingly, molecular mimicry that is HLA and peptide dependent is a mechanism for human T cell alloreactivity between disparate cognate and allogeneic pHLA complexes.

  17. Molecular genetic analysis of cucumber mosaic virus populations infecting pepper suggests unique patterns of evolution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeong-Jin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Studying genetic structure and diversity of viruses is important to understand the evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain variations in viral populations. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is endemic in most pepper fields in Korea. Currently, no effective methods for control of CMV are available due to many environmental and biological factors such as the extensive evolutionary capacity of CMV. Thus, analyzing the genetic structure of CMV populations may facilitate the development of strategies for the control of CMV. In this study, 252 pepper (Capsicum annuum) samples showing virus symptoms were collected by field surveys performed throughout Korea in 2007. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that, in total, 165 collected samples were infected with CMV. Forty-five CMV isolates were randomly selected within each regional subpopulation and analyzed by full-genome sequencing. Analyses of genetic diversity showed that the 2b gene of CMV is under weaker purifying selection than the other genes. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of RNA1, the CMV isolates from pepper were divided into three clusters in subgroup I. Our full-genome sequence-based molecular analyses of the CMV Korean population suggest that the subpopulations of CMV have been geographically localized in pepper fields in Korea.

  18. Genomic, RNAseq, and Molecular Modeling Evidence Suggests That the Major Allergen Domain in Insects Evolved from a Homodimeric Origin

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Thomas A.; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects. PMID:24253356

  19. Genomic, RNAseq, and molecular modeling evidence suggests that the major allergen domain in insects evolved from a homodimeric origin.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas A; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E; Mueller, Geoffrey A

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects.

  20. Different sucrose-isomaltase response of Caco-2 cells to glucose and maltose suggests dietary maltose sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Min-Wen; Chegeni, Mohammad; Kim, Kee-Hong; Zhang, Genyi; Benmoussa, Mustapha; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Nichols, Buford L.; Hamaker, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Using the small intestine enterocyte Caco-2 cell model, sucrase-isomaltase (SI, the mucosal α-glucosidase complex) expression and modification were examined relative to exposure to different mono- and disaccharide glycemic carbohydrates. Caco-2/TC7 cells were grown on porous supports to post-confluence for complete differentiation, and dietary carbohydrate molecules of glucose, sucrose (disaccharide of glucose and fructose), maltose (disaccharide of two glucoses α-1,4 linked), and isomaltose (disaccharide of two glucoses α-1,6 linked) were used to treat the cells. qRT-PCR results showed that all the carbohydrate molecules induced the expression of the SI gene, though maltose (and isomaltose) showed an incremental increase in mRNA levels over time that glucose did not. Western blot analysis of the SI protein revealed that only maltose treatment induced a higher molecular weight band (Mw ~245 kDa), also at higher expression level, suggesting post-translational processing of SI, and more importantly a sensing of maltose. Further work is warranted regarding this putative sensing response as a potential control point for starch digestion and glucose generation in the small intestine. PMID:24426192

  1. How Environment Supports a State: Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Two States in Bacteriorhodopsin Suggest Lipid and Water Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Crozier, Paul S.; Stevens, Mark J.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2004-01-01

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a transmembrane protein that uses large conformational changes for proton transfer from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular regions. Crystal structures, due to their solvent conditions, do not resolve the effect of lipid molecules on these protein conformational changes. To begin to understand the molecular details behind such large conformational changes, we simulated two conformations of wild-type bacteriorhodopsin, one of the dark-adapted state and the second of an intermediate (MO) state, each within an explicit dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer. The simulations included all-hydrogen and all-atom representations of protein, lipid, and water and were performed for 20 ns. We investigate the equilibrium properties and the dynamic motions of the two conformations in the lipid setting. We note that the conformational state of the MO intermediate bR remains markedly different from the dark-adapted bR state in that the MO intermediate shows rearrangement of the cytoplasmic portions of helices C, F, and G, and nearby loops. This difference in the states remained throughout the simulations, and the results are stable on the molecular dynamics timescale and provide an illustration of the changes in both lipid and water that help to stabilize a particular state. Our analysis focuses on how the environment adjusts to these two states and on how the dynamics of the helices, loops, and water molecules can be related to the pump mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin. For example, water generally behaves in the same manner on the extracellular sides of both simulations but is decreased in the cytoplasmic region of the MO intermediate. We suspect that the different water behavior is closely related to the fluctuations of microcavities volume in the protein interior, which is strongly coupled to the collective motion of the protein. Our simulation result suggests that experimental observation can be useful to

  2. Recent Advances in the Molecular Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, Lori E.; Allan, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were first observed over a century ago, lack of sensitive methodology precluded detailed study of these cells until recently. However, technological advances have now facilitated the identification, enumeration, and characterization of CTCs using a variety of methods. The majority of evidence supporting the use of CTCs in clinical decision-making has been related to enumeration using the CellSearch® system and correlation with prognosis. Growing evidence also suggests that CTC monitoring can provide an early indication of patient treatment response based on comparison of CTC levels before and after therapy. However, perhaps the greatest potential that CTCs hold for oncology lies at the level of molecular characterization. Clinical treatment decisions may be more effective if they are based on molecular characteristics of metastatic cells rather than on those of the primary tumor alone. Molecular characterization of CTCs (which can be repeatedly isolated in a minimally invasive fashion) provides the opportunity for a “real-time liquid biopsy” that allows assessment of genetic drift, investigation of molecular disease evolution, and identification of actionable genomic characteristics. This review focuses on recent advances in this area, including approaches involving immunophenotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex RT-PCR, microarray, and genomic sequencing. PMID:24633084

  3. Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests a Strategy of Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitro and exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1α, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result in altered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters that were exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite. PMID:23429540

  4. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J; Aagaard, Per; Mackey, Abigail; Kjaer, Michael; Conboy, Irina

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans. Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular understanding, combined with data that human satellite cells remain intrinsically young, introduced novel therapeutic targets. Indeed, activation of MAPK/Notch restored ‘youthful’ myogenic responses to satellite cells from 70-year-old humans, rendering them similar to cells from 20-year-old humans. These findings strongly suggest that aging of human muscle maintenance and repair can be reversed by ‘youthful’ calibration of specific molecular pathways. PMID:20049743

  5. Molecular misreading in non-neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, F W; Hol, E M; Hermanussen, R W; Sonnemans, M A; Moraal, E; Fischer, D F; Evans, D A; Chooi, K F; Burbach, J P; Murphy, D

    2000-08-01

    +1 Frame-shifted proteins such as amyloid precursor protein(+1) and ubiquitin-B(+1) have been identified in the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. These frameshifts are caused by dinucleotide deletions in GAGAG motifs of messenger RNA encoded by genes that have maintained the unchanged wild-type DNA sequence. This process is termed 'molecular misreading'. A key question is whether this process is confined to neurons or whether it could also occur in non-neuronal cells. A transgenic mouse line (MV-B) carrying multiple copies of a rat vasopressin minigene as a reporter driven by the MMTV-LTR promotor was used to screen non-neuronal tissues for molecular misreading by means of detection of the rat vasopressin(+1) protein and mutated mRNA. Molecular misreading was demonstrated to occur in several organs (e.g., epididymis and the parotid gland) where transgenic vasopressin expression is abundant, but its penetrance is variable both between and within tissues. This implies that non-neural tissues too, could be affected by cellular derangements caused by molecular misreading.

  6. Single molecular force across single integrins dictates cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Farhan; Doğanay, Sultan; Singh, Rishi; Wang, Xuefeng; Seong, Jihye; Lee, Sang-Hak; Park, Seongjin; Wang, Ning; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    Cells’ ability to sense and interpret mechanical signals from the extracellular milieu modulates the degree of cell spreading. Yet how cells detect such signals and activate downstream signaling at the molecular level remain elusive. Herein, we utilize tension gauge tether (TGT) platform to investigate underlying molecular mechanism of cell spreading. Our data from both differentiated cells of cancerous and non-cancerous origin show that for the same stiff underlying glass substrates and for same ligand density it is the molecular forces across single integrins that ultimately determine cell spreading responses. Furthermore, by decoupling molecular stiffness and molecular tension we demonstrate that molecular stiffness has little influence on cell spreading. Our data provide strong evidence that links molecular forces at the cell-substrate interface to the degree of cell spreading. PMID:26143887

  7. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  8. Early events following experimental infection with Peste-Des-Petits ruminants virus suggest immune cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Pope, Robert A; Parida, Satya; Bailey, Dalan; Brownlie, Joe; Barrett, Thomas; Banyard, Ashley C

    2013-01-01

    Peste-des-petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is a viral pathogen that causes a devastating plague of small ruminants. PPRV is an economically significant disease that continues to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world. The current understanding of PPRV pathogenesis has been heavily assumed from the closely related rinderpest virus (RPV) and other morbillivirus infections alongside data derived from field outbreaks. There have been few studies reported that have focused on the pathogenesis of PPRV and very little is known about the processes underlying the early stages of infection. In the present study, 15 goats were challenged by the intranasal route with a virulent PPRV isolate, Côte d'Ivoire '89 (CI/89) and sacrificed at strategically defined time-points post infection to enable pre- and post-mortem sampling. This approach enabled precise monitoring of the progress and distribution of virus throughout the infection from the time of challenge, through peak viraemia and into a period of convalescence. Observations were then related to findings of previous field studies and experimental models of PPRV to develop a clinical scoring system for PPRV. Importantly, histopathological investigations demonstrated that the initial site for virus replication is not within the epithelial cells of the respiratory mucosa, as has been previously reported, but is within the tonsillar tissue and lymph nodes draining the site of inoculation. We propose that virus is taken up by immune cells within the respiratory mucosa which then transport virus to lymphoid tissues where primary virus replication occurs, and from where virus enters circulation. Based on these findings we propose a novel clinical scoring methodology for PPRV pathogenesis and suggest a fundamental shift away from the conventional model of PPRV pathogenesis.

  9. Early Events following Experimental Infection with Peste-Des-Petits Ruminants Virus Suggest Immune Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Robert A.; Parida, Satya; Bailey, Dalan; Brownlie, Joe; Barrett, Thomas; Banyard, Ashley C.

    2013-01-01

    Peste-des-petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is a viral pathogen that causes a devastating plague of small ruminants. PPRV is an economically significant disease that continues to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world. The current understanding of PPRV pathogenesis has been heavily assumed from the closely related rinderpest virus (RPV) and other morbillivirus infections alongside data derived from field outbreaks. There have been few studies reported that have focused on the pathogenesis of PPRV and very little is known about the processes underlying the early stages of infection. In the present study, 15 goats were challenged by the intranasal route with a virulent PPRV isolate, Côte d’Ivoire ’89 (CI/89) and sacrificed at strategically defined time-points post infection to enable pre- and post-mortem sampling. This approach enabled precise monitoring of the progress and distribution of virus throughout the infection from the time of challenge, through peak viraemia and into a period of convalescence. Observations were then related to findings of previous field studies and experimental models of PPRV to develop a clinical scoring system for PPRV. Importantly, histopathological investigations demonstrated that the initial site for virus replication is not within the epithelial cells of the respiratory mucosa, as has been previously reported, but is within the tonsillar tissue and lymph nodes draining the site of inoculation. We propose that virus is taken up by immune cells within the respiratory mucosa which then transport virus to lymphoid tissues where primary virus replication occurs, and from where virus enters circulation. Based on these findings we propose a novel clinical scoring methodology for PPRV pathogenesis and suggest a fundamental shift away from the conventional model of PPRV pathogenesis. PMID:23418464

  10. Molecular and morphometric data suggest the presence of a neglected species in the marine gastropod family Conidae.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Alyssa J; Duda, Thomas F

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge concerning the taxonomic diversity of marine organisms is crucial for understanding processes associated with species diversification in geographic areas that are devoid of obvious barriers to dispersal. The marine gastropod family Conidae contains many species complexes due to lack of clear morphological distinctiveness and existence of morphological intergradations among described species. Conus flavidus Lamarck, 1810 and Conus frigidus Reeve, 1848 are currently recognized as distinct taxa, but are often difficult to distinguish by morphological characters and include several synonyms, including Conus peasei Brazier, 1877. C. peasei was originally described by Pease in 1861 (as Conus neglectus) based on slight morphological differences of a population of C. flavidus from Hawaii that distinguished it from C. flavidus from elsewhere. To evaluate the systematics of this group and specifically test the hypothesis of synonymy of C. peasei with C. flavidus, we examined molecular and morphometric data from specimens of C. flavidus, C. frigidus and C. peasei (i.e., C. flavidus from Hawaii). Multiple clades that contain individuals from particular geographic regions are apparent in gene trees constructed from sequences of a mitochondrial gene region. In particular, sequences of C. peasei cluster together separately from sequences of C. flavidus and C. frigidus. Although individuals of C. peasei, C. flavidus and C. frigidus each contain a unique set of alleles for a nuclear locus, a conotoxin gene, alleles of C. peasei are more similar to those of C. flavidus. In addition, sequences of a region of a second nuclear gene are identical among C. peasei and C. flavidus though they are distinct from sequences of C. frigidus. Morphometric data revealed that shells of C. peasei are distinct in some aspects, but are more similar to those of C. flavidus than to those of C. frigidus. Taken together, these results suggest that C. peasei represents a distinct species

  11. The molecular cues regulating immune cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    TAKEDA, Akira; SASAKI, Naoko; MIYASAKA, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Lymphocyte recirculation between the blood and the lymphoid/non-lymphoid tissues is an essential homeostatic mechanism that regulates humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. This system promotes the encounter of naïve T and B cells with their specific cognate antigen presented by dendritic cells, and with the regulatory cells with which they need to interact to initiate, maintain, and terminate immune responses. The constitutive lymphocyte trafficking is mediated by particular types of blood vessels, including the high endothelial venules (HEVs) in lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches, and the flat-walled venules in non-lymphoid tissues including the skin. The lymphocyte migration across HEVs involves tethering/rolling, arrest/firm adhesion/intraluminal crawling, and transendothelial migration. On the other hand, relatively little is known about how lymphocytes and other types of cells migrate across the venules of non-lymphoid tissues. Here we summarize recent findings about the molecular mechanisms that govern immune cell trafficking, including the roles of chemokines and lysophospholipids in regulating immune cell motility and endothelial permeability. PMID:28413196

  12. Molecular regulation of the diatom cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Huysman, Marie J J; Vyverman, Wim; De Veylder, Lieven

    2014-06-01

    Accounting for almost one-fifth of the primary production on Earth, the unicellular eukaryotic group of diatoms plays a key ecological and biogeochemical role in our contemporary oceans. Furthermore, as producers of various lipids and pigments, and characterized by their finely ornamented silica cell wall, diatoms hold great promise for different industrial fields, including biofuel production, nanotechnology, and pharmaceutics. However, in spite of their major ecological importance and their high commercial value, little is known about the mechanisms that control the diatom life and cell cycle. To date, both microscopic and genomic analyses have revealed that diatoms exhibit specific and unique mechanisms of cell division compared with those found in the classical model organisms. Here, we review the structural peculiarities of diatom cell proliferation, highlight the regulation of their major cell cycle checkpoints by environmental factors, and discuss recent progress in molecular cell division research. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Small molecule chemokine mimetics suggest a molecular basis for the observation that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are allosteric ligands of CXCR3

    PubMed Central

    Nedjai, Belinda; Li, Hubert; Stroke, Ilana L; Wise, Emma L; Webb, Maria L; Merritt, J Robert; Henderson, Ian; Klon, Anthony E; Cole, Andrew G; Horuk, Richard; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Pease, James E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The chemokine receptor CXCR3 directs migration of T-cells in response to the ligands CXCL9/Mig, CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL11/I-TAC. Both ligands and receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders, including atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we describe the molecular mechanism by which two synthetic small molecule agonists activate CXCR3. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH As both small molecules are basic, we hypothesized that they formed electrostatic interactions with acidic residues within CXCR3. Nine point mutants of CXCR3 were generated in which an acidic residue was mutated to its amide counterpart. Following transient expression, the ability of the constructs to bind and signal in response to natural and synthetic ligands was examined. KEY RESULTS The CXCR3 mutants D112N, D195N and E196Q were efficiently expressed and responsive in chemotaxis assays to CXCL11 but not to CXCL10 or to either of the synthetic agonists, confirmed with radioligand binding assays. Molecular modelling of both CXCL10 and CXCR3 suggests that the small molecule agonists mimic a region of the ‘30s loop’ (residues 30–40 of CXCL10) which interacts with the intrahelical CXCR3 residue D112, leading to receptor activation. D195 and E196 are located in the second extracellular loop and form putative intramolecular salt bridges required for a CXCR3 conformation that recognizes CXCL10. In contrast, CXCL11 recognition by CXCR3 is largely independent of these residues. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS We provide here a molecular basis for the observation that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are allosteric ligands of CXCR3. Such findings may have implications for the design of CXCR3 antagonists. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by O'Boyle, pp. 895–897 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01759.x PMID:21895630

  14. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  15. Molecular imaging of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Narsinh, Kazim H; Cao, Feng; Wu, Joseph C

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a renewable source of differentiated cell types that may be employed in various tissue regeneration strategies. However, clinical implementation of cell transplantation therapy is hindered by legitimate concerns regarding the in vivo teratoma formation of undifferentiated hESCs and host immune reactions to allogenic cells. Investigating in vivo hESC behaviour and the ultimate feasibility of cell transplantation therapy necessitates the development of novel molecular imaging techniques to longitudinally monitor hESC localization, proliferation, and viability in living subjects. An innovative approach to harness the respective strengths of various imaging platforms is the creation and use of a fusion reporter construct composed of red fluorescent protein (RFP), firefly luciferase (fluc), and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk). The imaging modalities made available by use of this construct, including optical fluorescence, bioluminescence, and positron emission tomography (PET), mat be adapted to investigate a variety of physiological phenomena, including the spatio-temporal kinetics of hESC engraftment and proliferation in living subjects. This chapter describes the applications of reporter gene imaging to accelerate basic science research and clinical studies involving hESCs through (1) isolation of a homogenous hESC population, (2) noninvasive, longitudinal tracking of the location and proliferation of hESCs administered to a living subject, and (3) ablation of the hESC graft in the event of cellular misbehavior.

  16. Molecular basis of mast cell disease.

    PubMed

    Soucie, Erinn; Brenet, Fabienne; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is an incurable and sometimes fatal haematological disorder grossly described as the accumulation of abnormal mast cells in the bone marrow and other organs causing tissue and organ damage. The clinical manifestations of this disease are extremely variable; disease phenotypes range from indolent to aggressive, and often present with associated non-mast cell haematological disorders (AHNMD), mainly myeloproliferative neoplasm and myelodysplastic syndromes. Recent efforts to genetically dissect the mechanisms that define aggressive and non-aggressive mastocytosis have generated a list of recurrent somatic mutations in mastocytosis patients that are associated with and may predict the evolution towards aggressive disease phenotypes. Here we review these mutations and discuss the molecular mechanisms associated with these mutations in an effort to better understand the biology of this disease and to predict its onset and evolution, with the ultimate goal of devising new and improved treatment strategies.

  17. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  18. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data.

  19. Mechano-logical model of C. elegans germ line suggests feedback on the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Atwell, Kathryn; Qin, Zhao; Gavaghan, David; Kugler, Hillel; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Osborne, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans germ line is an outstanding model system in which to study the control of cell division and differentiation. Although many of the molecules that regulate germ cell proliferation and fate decisions have been identified, how these signals interact with cellular dynamics and physical forces within the gonad remains poorly understood. We therefore developed a dynamic, 3D in silico model of the C. elegans germ line, incorporating both the mechanical interactions between cells and the decision-making processes within cells. Our model successfully reproduces key features of the germ line during development and adulthood, including a reasonable ovulation rate, correct sperm count, and appropriate organization of the germ line into stably maintained zones. The model highlights a previously overlooked way in which germ cell pressure may influence gonadogenesis, and also predicts that adult germ cells might be subject to mechanical feedback on the cell cycle akin to contact inhibition. We provide experimental data consistent with the latter hypothesis. Finally, we present cell trajectories and ancestry recorded over the course of a simulation. The novel approaches and software described here link mechanics and cellular decision-making, and are applicable to modeling other developmental and stem cell systems. PMID:26428008

  20. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation: Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui-Hsu Yang, Tracy; Craise, Laurie M.; Mei, Man-Tong; Tobias, Cornelius A.

    Experimental data on molecular mechanisms are essential for understanding the bioeffects of radiation and for developing biophysical models, which can help in determining the shape of dose-response curves at very low doses, e.g., doses less than 1 cGy. Although it has been shown that ionizing radiation can cause neoplastic cell transformation directly, that high-LET heavy ions in general can be more effective than photons in transforming cells, and that the radiogenic cell transformation is a multi-step processes, we know very little about the molecular nature of lesions important for cell transformation, the relationship between lethal and transformational damages, and the evolution of initial damages into final chromosomal aberrations which alter the growth control of cells. Using cultured mouse embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) as a model system, we have collected quantitative data on dose-response curves for heavy ions with various charges and energies. An analysis of these quantitative data suggested that two DNA breaks formed within 80 Å may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 Å may be lethal. Through studies with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, we have found that DNA double strand breaks, including both blunt- and cohesive-ended breaks, can cause cell transformation in vitro. These results indicate that DNA double strand breaks can be important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship is similar for HGPRT gene mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, suggesting common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects. The high RBE of high-LET radiation for cell killing and neoplastic cell transformation is most likely related to its effectiveness in producing DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells. At

  1. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Craise, L M; Mei, M T; Tobias, C A

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data on molecular mechanisms are essential for understanding the bioeffects of radiation and for developing biophysical models, which can help in determining the shape of dose-response curves at very low doses, e.g., doses less than 1 cGy. Although it has been shown that ionizing radiation can cause neoplastic cell transformation directly, that high-LET heavy ions in general can be more effective than photons in transforming cells, and that the radiogenic cell transformation is a multi-step process [correction of processes], we know very little about the molecular nature of lesions important for cell transformation, the relationship between lethal and transformational damages, and the evolution of initial damages into final chromosomal aberrations which alter the growth control of cells. Using cultured mouse embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) as a model system, we have collected quantitative data on dose-response curves for heavy ions with various charges and energies. An analysis of these quantitative data suggested that two DNA breaks formed within 80 angstroms may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 angstroms may be lethal. Through studies with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, we have found that DNA double strand breaks, including both blunt- and cohesive-ended breaks, can cause cell transformation in vitro. These results indicate that DNA double strand breaks can be important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship is similar for HGPRT gene mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, suggesting common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects. The high RBE of high-LET radiation for cell killing and neoplastic cell transformation is most likely related to its effectiveness in producing DNA double

  2. Molecular dissection of the valproic acid effects on glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoja, Sabine; Schulze, Markus; Rehli, Michael; Proescholdt, Martin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Hau, Peter; Riemenschneider, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    Many glioblastoma patients suffer from seizures why they are treated with antiepileptic agents. Valproic acid (VPA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that apart from its anticonvulsive effects in some retrospective studies has been suggested to lead to a superior outcome of glioblastoma patients. However, the exact molecular effects of VPA treatment on glioblastoma cells have not yet been deciphered. We treated glioblastoma cells with VPA, recorded the functional effects of this treatment and performed a global and unbiased next generation sequencing study on the chromatin (ChIP) and RNA level. 1) VPA treatment clearly sensitized glioma cells to temozolomide: A protruding VPA-induced molecular feature in this context was the transcriptional upregulation/reexpression of numerous solute carrier (SLC) transporters that was also reflected by euchromatinization on the histone level and a reexpression of SLC transporters in human biopsy samples after VPA treatment. DNA repair genes were adversely reduced. 2) VPA treatment, however, also reduced cell proliferation in temozolomide-naive cells: On the molecular level in this context we observed a transcriptional upregulation/reexpression and euchromatinization of several glioblastoma relevant tumor suppressor genes and a reduction of stemness markers, while transcriptional subtype classification (mesenchymal/proneural) remained unaltered. Taken together, these findings argue for both temozolomide-dependent and -independent effects of VPA. VPA might increase the uptake of temozolomide and simultaneously lead to a less malignant glioblastoma phenotype. From a mere molecular perspective these findings might indicate a surplus value of VPA in glioblastoma therapy and could therefore contribute an additional ratio for clinical decision making. PMID:27556305

  3. Paired octamer rings of retinoschisin suggest a junctional model for cell-cell adhesion in the retina.

    PubMed

    Tolun, Gökhan; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Huang, Rick; Zeng, Yong; Li, Yan; Steven, Alasdair C; Sieving, Paul A; Heymann, J Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Retinoschisin (RS1) is involved in cell-cell junctions in the retina, but is unique among known cell-adhesion proteins in that it is a soluble secreted protein. Loss-of-function mutations in RS1 lead to early vision impairment in young males, called X-linked retinoschisis. The disease is characterized by separation of inner retinal layers and disruption of synaptic signaling. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we report the structure at 4.1 Å, revealing double octamer rings not observed before. Each subunit is composed of a discoidin domain and a small N-terminal (RS1) domain. The RS1 domains occupy the centers of the rings, but are not required for ring formation and are less clearly defined, suggesting mobility. We determined the structure of the discoidin rings, consistent with known intramolecular and intermolecular disulfides. The interfaces internal to and between rings feature residues implicated in X-linked retinoschisis, indicating the importance of correct assembly. Based on this structure, we propose that RS1 couples neighboring membranes together through octamer-octamer contacts, perhaps modulated by interactions with other membrane components.

  4. Targeted next-generation sequencing and non-coding RNA expression analysis of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma suggests distinct pathological mechanisms from other renal tumour subtypes.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Charles H; Larrea, Erika; Larrinaga, Gorka; Goicoechea, Ibai; Arestin, María; Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Hes, Ondrej; Cáceres, Francisco; Manterola, Lorea; López, José I

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a recently described rare renal malignancy that displays characteristic gross, microscopic and immunohistochemical differences from other renal tumour types. However, CCPRCC remains a very poorly understood entity. We therefore sought to elucidate some of the molecular mechanisms involved in this neoplasm by carrying out targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify associated mutations, and in addition examined the expression of non-coding (nc) RNAs. We identified multiple somatic mutations in CCPRCC cases, including a recurrent [3/14 cases (21%)] non-synonymous T992I mutation in the MET proto-oncogene, a gene associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using a microarray approach, we found that the expression of mature (n = 1105) and pre-miRNAs (n = 1105), as well as snoRNA and scaRNAs (n = 2214), in CCPRCC cases differed from that of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) or papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) tumours. Surprisingly, and unlike other renal tumour subtypes, we found that all five members of the miR-200 family were over-expressed in CCPRCC cases. As these miRNAs are intimately involved with EMT, we stained CCPRCC cases for E-cadherin, vimentin and β-catenin and found that the tumour cells of all cases were positive for all three markers, a combination rarely reported in other renal tumours that could have diagnostic implications. Taken together with the mutational analysis, these data suggest that EMT in CCPRCC tumour cells is incomplete or blocked, consistent with the indolent clinical course typical of this malignancy. In summary, as well as describing a novel pathological mechanism in renal carcinomas, this study adds to the mounting evidence that CCPRCC should be formally considered a distinct entity. Microarray data have been deposited in the GEO database [GEO accession number (GSE51554)]. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland

  5. Mouse Genetics Suggests Cell-Context Dependency for Myc-Regulated Metabolic Enzymes during Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Lisa M.; Kreutzer, Christiane; Pretsch, Walter; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Nilsson, Jonas A.

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc (hereafter called Myc) belongs to a family of transcription factors that regulates cell growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Myc initiates the transcription of a large cast of genes involved in cell growth by stimulating metabolism and protein synthesis. Some of these, like those involved in glycolysis, may be part of the Warburg effect, which is defined as increased glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of adequate oxygen supply. In this study, we have taken a mouse-genetics approach to challenge the role of select Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes in tumorigenesis in vivo. By breeding λ-Myc transgenic mice, Apc Min mice, and p53 knockout mice with mouse models carrying inactivating alleles of Lactate dehydrogenase A (Ldha), 3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) and Serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (Shmt1), we obtained offspring that were monitored for tumor development. Very surprisingly, we found that these genes are dispensable for tumorigenesis in these genetic settings. However, experiments in fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells expressing oncogenic Ras show that these cells are sensitive to Ldha knockdown. Our genetic models reveal cell context dependency and a remarkable ability of tumor cells to adapt to alterations in critical metabolic pathways. Thus, to achieve clinical success, it will be of importance to correctly stratify patients and to find synthetic lethal combinations of inhibitors targeting metabolic enzymes. PMID:22438825

  6. Molecular modeling suggests induced fit of Family I carbohydrate-binding modules with a broken-chain cellulose surface.

    PubMed

    Nimlos, Mark R; Matthews, James F; Crowley, Michael F; Walker, Ross C; Chukkapalli, Giridhar; Brady, John W; Adney, William S; Cleary, Joseph M; Zhong, Linghao; Himmel, Michael E

    2007-04-01

    Cellobiohydrolases are the most effective single component of fungal cellulase systems; however, their molecular mode of action on cellulose is not well understood. These enzymes act to detach and hydrolyze cellodextrin chains from crystalline cellulose in a processive manner, and the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) is thought to play an important role in this process. Understanding the interactions between the CBM and cellulose at the molecular level can assist greatly in formulating selective mutagenesis experiments to confirm the function of the CBM. Computational molecular dynamics was used to investigate the interaction of the CBM from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I with a model of the (1,0,0) cellulose surface modified to display a broken chain. Initially, the CBM was located in different positions relative to the reducing end of this break, and during the simulations it appeared to translate freely and randomly across the cellulose surface, which is consistent with its role in processivity. Another important finding is that the reducing end of a cellulose chain appears to induce a conformational change in the CBM. Simulations show that the tyrosine residues on the hydrophobic surface of the CBM, Y5, Y31 and Y32 align with the cellulose chain adjacent to the reducing end and, importantly, that the fourth tyrosine residue in the CBM (Y13) moves from its internal position to form van der Waals interactions with the cellulose surface. As a consequence of this induced change near the surface, the CBM straddles the reducing end of the broken chain. Interestingly, all four aromatic residues are highly conserved in Family I CBM, and thus this recognition mechanism may be universal to this family.

  7. Molecular signature of Epstein Barr virus-positive Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder suggest different roles for Epstein Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Navari, Mohsen; Fuligni, Fabio; Laginestra, Maria A.; Etebari, Maryam; Ambrosio, Maria R.; Sapienza, Maria R.; Rossi, Maura; De Falco, Giulia; Gibellini, Davide; Tripodo, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano A.; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Piccaluga, Pier P.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection is commonly associated with human cancer and, in particular, with lymphoid malignancies. Although the precise role of the virus in the pathogenesis of different lymphomas is largely unknown, it is well recognized that the expression of viral latent proteins and miRNA can contribute to its pathogenetic role. In this study, we compared the gene and miRNA expression profile of two EBV-associated aggressive B non-Hodgkin lymphomas known to be characterized by differential expression of the viral latent proteins aiming to dissect the possible different contribution of such proteins and EBV-encoded miRNAs. By applying extensive bioinformatic inferring and an experimental model, we found that EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma presented with significant over-expression of EBV-encoded miRNAs that were likely to contribute to its global molecular profile. On the other hand, EBV+ post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas presented a significant enrichment in genes regulated by the viral latent proteins. Based on these different viral and cellular gene expression patterns, a clear distinction between EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas was made. In this regard, the different viral and cellular expression patterns seemed to depend on each other, at least partially, and the latency type most probably played a significant role in their regulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that EBV influence over B-cell malignant clones may act through different mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and suggest that potentially different pathogenetic mechanisms may depend upon the conditions of the interaction between EBV and the host that finally determine the latency pattern. PMID:25566237

  8. Molecular Profiling of Clear Cell Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Michael L.; Russell, Kenneth; Millis, Sherri; Gatalica, Zoran; Bender, Ryan; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced stage/recurrent clear cell ovarian cancers (CCOCs) are characterized by a low response to chemotherapy and a poor prognosis. There is growing interest in investigating novel/molecular targeted therapies in patients with CCOC in histotype-specific trials. However, CCOCs are not a uniform entity and comprise a number of molecular subtypes and it is unlikely that a single approach to treatment will be appropriate for all patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of a multiplatform profiling panel in CCOCs to identify potential therapeutic targets. Patients and Methods Tumor profiling was performed on 521 CCOCs. They were grouped into pure (n = 422) and mixed (n = 99) CCOC for analysis. Testing included a combination of DNA sequencing (including next-generation sequencing) using a 46-gene panel, immunohistochemistry, fluorescent or chromogenic in situ hybridization, and RNA fragment analysis. Results The most common findings were in the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway, with 61% of all CCOCs showing a molecular alteration in one of these pathway components. Next-generation sequencing revealed PIK3CA mutations in 50% of pure CCOCs. Significant differences were observed between pure and mixed CCOCs with respect to hormone receptor expression (9% vs 34.7% for ER, 13.45 vs 26.4% for PR), cMET (24.1% vs 11.6%), PD-1 tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (48.1% vs 100%), expression of PD-L1 (7.4% vs 25%), and TOPO1 (41% vs 27.1%) on immunohistochemistry, whereas next-generation sequencing revealed significant differences in mutation frequency in PIK3CA (50% vs 18.5%), TP53 (18.1% vs 57.7%), KRAS (12.4% vs 3.7%), and cMET (1.9% vs 11.1%). Conclusions This large study confirms that the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway is commonly altered in CCOCs, and highlights the significant differences between pure and mixed CCOCs. Clear cell ovarian cancers are molecularly heterogeneous and there are a number of potential therapeutic targets which could be tested in clinical

  9. A diagnostic assessment for introductory molecular and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia; Wood, William B; Martin, Jennifer M; Guild, Nancy A; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed for use as a pre- and posttest to measure student learning gains. To develop the assessment, we first worked with faculty to create a set of learning goals that targeted important concepts in the field and seemed likely to be emphasized by most instructors teaching these subjects. We interviewed students using open-ended questions to identify commonly held misconceptions, formulated multiple-choice questions that included these ideas as distracters, and reinterviewed students to establish validity of the instrument. The assessment was then evaluated by 25 biology experts and modified based on their suggestions. The complete revised assessment was administered to more than 1300 students at three institutions. Analysis of statistical parameters including item difficulty, item discrimination, and reliability provides evidence that the IMCA is a valid and reliable instrument with several potential uses in gauging student learning of key concepts in molecular and cell biology.

  10. A Diagnostic Assessment for Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William B.; Martin, Jennifer M.; Guild, Nancy A.; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed for use as a pre- and posttest to measure student learning gains. To develop the assessment, we first worked with faculty to create a set of learning goals that targeted important concepts in the field and seemed likely to be emphasized by most instructors teaching these subjects. We interviewed students using open-ended questions to identify commonly held misconceptions, formulated multiple-choice questions that included these ideas as distracters, and reinterviewed students to establish validity of the instrument. The assessment was then evaluated by 25 biology experts and modified based on their suggestions. The complete revised assessment was administered to more than 1300 students at three institutions. Analysis of statistical parameters including item difficulty, item discrimination, and reliability provides evidence that the IMCA is a valid and reliable instrument with several potential uses in gauging student learning of key concepts in molecular and cell biology. PMID:21123692

  11. C2′-endo nucleotides as molecular timers suggested by the folding of an RNA domain

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Stefanie A.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    A striking and widespread observation is that higher-order folding for many RNAs is very slow, often requiring minutes. In some cases, slow folding reflects the need to disrupt stable, but incorrect, interactions. However, a molecular explanation for slow folding in most RNAs is unknown. The specificity domain of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P ribozyme undergoes a rate-limiting folding step on the minute time-scale. This RNA also contains a C2′-endo nucleotide at A130 that exhibits extremely slow local conformational dynamics. This nucleotide is evolutionarily conserved and essential for tRNA recognition by RNase P. Here we show that deleting this single nucleotide accelerates folding by an order of magnitude even though this mutation does not change the global fold of the RNA. These results demonstrate that formation of a single stacking interaction at a C2′-endo nucleotide comprises the rate-determining step for folding an entire 154 nucleotide RNA. C2′-endo nucleotides exhibit slow local dynamics in structures spanning isolated helices to complex tertiary interactions. Because the motif is both simple and ubiquitous, C2′-endo nucleotides may function as molecular timers in many RNA folding and ligand recognition reactions. PMID:19717440

  12. Immunoprofiling of glial tumours of the neurohypophysis suggests a common pituicytic origin of neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Christian; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Bergmann, Markus; Giese, Armin; Flitsch, Jörg; Lüdecke, Dieter K; Glatzel, Markus; Saeger, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    To analyse the antigen expression profiles of 27 cases of pituicytoma, spindle cell oncocytoma, and granular cell tumour of the sellar region concerning a common pituicytic origin of neoplastic cells. Material from 12 female and 15 male patients (13 granular cell tumours of the sellar region, 10 pituicytomas, four spindle cell oncocytomas) collected in the German Registry of Pituitary Tumours between 1993 and 2015 was re-evaluated according to the current WHO classification of tumours of the central nervous system and supplementary immunohistochemistry including S100-protein, CD56, CD68, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), and Ki-67 was performed. S100-protein was detected in all 27 tumours and TTF-1 in all 16 tumours that were assessed. Vimentin was expressed in all 13 cases investigated whereas broad spectrum cytokeratin was not detected in any of 14 evaluated cases. GFAP was observed in nine out of 21 cases. 15 out of 17 investigated lesions showed some CD68 expression and five out of 14 cases were labelled with CD56 antibodies. Proliferative activity did not differ significantly between the three tumour subgroups although one primary and one recurrent pituicytoma showed exceptionally high Ki-67-proliferation indices of 15.3 and 12.7 %, respectively (means: granular cell tumour of the sellar region 2.0 %, pituicytoma 2.8 %, spindle cell oncocytoma 2.7 %). The study confirms and expands earlier data and is in line with the notion that the three tumour types are variants of pituicytoma.

  13. Structure of anthrax lethal toxin prepore complex suggests a pathway for efficient cell entry

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Lucien; Santelli, Eugenio; Mountassif, Driss; Donoghue, Annemarie; Hanein, Dorit; Volkmann, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin comprises three soluble proteins: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). PA must be cleaved by host proteases before it oligomerizes and forms a prepore, to which LF and EF bind. After endocytosis of this tripartite complex, the prepore transforms into a narrow transmembrane pore that delivers unfolded LF and EF into the host cytosol. Here, we find that translocation of multiple 90-kD LF molecules is rapid and efficient. To probe the molecular basis of this translocation, we calculated a three-dimensional map of the fully loaded (PA63)7–(LF)3 prepore complex by cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM). The map shows three LFs bound in a similar way to one another, via their N-terminal domains, to the surface of the PA heptamer. The model also reveals contacts between the N- and C-terminal domains of adjacent LF molecules. We propose that this molecular arrangement plays an important role in the maintenance of translocation efficiency through the narrow PA pore. PMID:27670897

  14. Molecular biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Exposito, R; Merino, M; Aguayo, C

    2016-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common solid tumors in young adult men. They constitute a unique pathology because of their embryonic and germ origin and their special behavior. Genetic predisposition, environmental factors involved in their development and genetic aberrations have been under study in many works throughout the last years trying to explain the susceptibility and the transformation mechanism of TGCTs. Despite the high rate of cure in this type of tumors because its particular sensitivity to cisplatin, there are tumors resistant to chemotherapy for which it is needed to find new therapies. In the present work, it has been carried out a literature review on the most important molecular aspects involved in the onset and development of such tumors, as well as a review of the major developments regarding prognostic factors, new prognostic biomarkers and the possibility of new targeted therapies.

  15. Acid stress suggests different determinants for polystyrene and HeLa cell adhesion in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Haddaji, N; Khouadja, S; Fdhila, K; Krifi, B; Ben Ismail, M; Lagha, R; Bakir, K; Bakhrouf, A

    2015-07-01

    Adhesion has been regarded as one of the basic features of probiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of acid stress on the functional properties, such as hydrophobicity, adhesion to HeLa cells, and composition of membrane fatty acids, of Lactobacillus probiotics strains. Two strains of Lactobacillus casei were used. Adhesion on polystyrene, hydrophobicity, epithelial cells adhesion, and fatty acids analysis were evaluated. Our results showed that the membrane properties such as hydrophobicity and fatty acid composition of stressed strains were significantly changed with different pH values. However, we found that acid stress caused a change in the proportions of unsaturated and saturated fatty acid. The ratio of saturated fatty acid to unsaturated fatty acids observed in acid-stressed Lactobacillus casei cells was significantly higher than the ration in control cells. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in the adhesion ability of these strains to HeLa cells and to a polystyrene surface at low pH. The present finding could first add new insight about the acid stress adaptation and, thus, enable new strategies to be developed aimed at improving the industrial performance of this species under acid stress. Second, no relationship was observed between changes in membrane composition and fluidity induced by acid treatment and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces. In fact, the decrease of cell surface hydrophobicity and the adhesion ability to abiotic surface and the increase of the capacity of adhesion to biotic surface demonstrate that adhesive characteristics will have little relevance in probiotic strain-screening procedures. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Bortezomib Resistant Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Erika; Demo, Susan; Deu, Edgar; Keats, Jonathan; Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Bennett, Mark K.; Kirk, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Bortezomib (Velcade™) is a reversible proteasome inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). Despite its demonstrated clinical success, some patients are deprived of treatment due to primary refractoriness or development of resistance during therapy. To investigate the role of the duration of proteasome inhibition in the anti-tumor response of bortezomib, we established clonal isolates of HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells adapted to continuous exposure of bortezomib. These cells were ∼30-fold resistant to bortezomib. Two novel and distinct mutations in the β5 subunit, Cys63Phe, located distal to the binding site in a helix critical for drug binding, and Arg24Cys, found in the propeptide region were found in all resistant clones. The latter mutation is a natural variant found to be elevated in frequency in patients with MM. Proteasome activity and levels of both the constitutive and immunoproteasome were increased in resistant cells, which correlated to an increase in subunit gene expression. These changes correlated with a more rapid recovery of proteasome activity following brief exposure to bortezomib. Increased recovery rate was not due to increased proteasome turnover as similar findings were seen in cells co-treated with cycloheximide. When we exposed resistant cells to the irreversible proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib we noted a slower rate of recovery of proteasome activity as compared to bortezomib in both parental and resistant cells. Importantly, carfilzomib maintained its cytotoxic potential in the bortezomib resistant cell lines. Therefore, resistance to bortezomib, can be overcome with irreversible inhibitors, suggesting prolonged proteasome inhibition induces a more potent anti-tumor response. PMID:22216088

  17. Cytogenetic and Molecular Data Suggest Deuterodon pedri Eigenmann, 1907 (Teleostei: Characidae) Is a Member of an Ancient Coastal Group.

    PubMed

    Coutinho-Sanches, Natália; Dergam, Jorge Abdala

    2015-10-01

    The genus Deuterodon has been taxonomically recently redefined. Seven of its species have been included in this genus, whereas three others are regarded as Incertae Sedis in Characidae. One of latter is Deuterodon pedri, an endemic species from Santo Antônio River in Minas Gerais. Cytogenetic and molecular data on 21 specimens of D. pedri allowed to reevaluate the phylogenetic position of this taxon. The specimens showed karyotypic formula 12m+12sm+20st+6a, low heterochromatin content, nucleolar organizer regions present in two chromosome pairs, and 10 and 2 labeled regions by fluorescence in situ hybridization with 18S and 5S probes respectively, a karyotype similar to Deuterodon stigmaturus. The phylogenetic tree generated by a cytochrome oxidase subunit I fragment revealed that D. pedri and Deuterodon singularis are closely related and are the sister-group of Deuterodon parahybae, Deuterodon iguape, Astyanax giton, Astyanax intermedius, Astyanax ribeirae, Astyanax scabripinnis, and Probolodus heterostomus. The same arrangement was partially recovered with the nuclear gene RAG2. Our data indicate the genus Deuterodon is not monophyletic and that it is closely related to other species that occur in Brazil coastal basins.

  18. Molecular and evolutionary analyses of formyl peptide receptors suggest the absence of VNO-specific FPRs in primates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Shi, Peng

    2010-12-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) were observed to expand in rodents and were recently suggested as candidate vomeronasal chemosensory receptors. Since vomeronasal chemosensory receptors usually underwent positive selection and evolved concordantly with the vomeronasal organ (VNO) morphology, we surveyed FPRs in primates in which VNO morphology is greatly diverse and thus it would provide us a clearer view of VNO-FPRs evolution. By screening available primate genome sequences, we obtained the FPR repertoires in representative primate species. As a result, we did not find FPR family size expansion in primates. Further analyses showed no evolutionary force variance between primates with or without VNO structure, which indicated that there was no functional divergence among primates FPRs. Our results suggest that primates lack the VNO-specific FPRs and the FPR expansion is not a common phenomenon in mammals outside rodent lineage, regardless of VNO complexity.

  19. STAT3 Targets Suggest Mechanisms of Aggressive Tumorigenesis in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, Jennifer; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Zhang, Yuping; Kundaje, Anshul; Lacroute, Philippe; Snyder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that, when dysregulated, becomes a powerful oncogene found in many human cancers, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and has two major subtypes: germinal center B-cell−like and activated B–cell—like. Compared with the germinal center B-cell−like form, activated B-cell−like lymphomas respond much more poorly to current therapies and often exhibit overexpression or overactivation of STAT3. To investigate how STAT3 might contribute to this aggressive phenotype, we have integrated genome-wide studies of STAT3 DNA binding using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing with whole-transcriptome profiling using RNA-sequencing. STAT3 binding sites are present near almost a third of all genes that differ in expression between the two subtypes, and examination of the affected genes identified previously undetected and clinically significant pathways downstream of STAT3 that drive oncogenesis. Novel treatments aimed at these pathways may increase the survivability of activated B-cell−like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:24142927

  20. Role of vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in hantavirus pulmonary syndrome suggests targeted therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Mackow, Erich R; Gorbunova, Elena E; Dalrymple, Nadine A; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N

    2013-09-01

    Hantaviruses in the Americas cause a highly lethal acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Hantaviruses nonlytically infect microvascular and lymphatic endothelial cells and cause dramatic changes in barrier functions without disrupting the endothelium. Hantaviruses cause changes in the function of infected endothelial cells that normally regulate fluid barrier functions. The endothelium of arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels are unique and central to the function of vast pulmonary capillary beds that regulate pulmonary fluid accumulation. We have found that HPS-causing hantaviruses alter vascular barrier functions of microvascular and lymphatic endothelial cells by altering receptor and signaling pathway responses that serve to permit fluid tissue influx and clear tissue edema. Infection of the endothelium provides several mechanisms for hantaviruses to cause acute pulmonary edema, as well as potential therapeutic targets for reducing the severity of HPS disease. Here we discuss interactions of HPS-causing hantaviruses with the endothelium, roles for unique lymphatic endothelial responses in HPS, and therapeutic targeting of the endothelium as a means of reducing the severity of HPS disease.

  1. Genome-wide Runx2 occupancy in prostate cancer cells suggests a role in regulating secretion

    PubMed Central

    Little, Gillian H.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Baniwal, Sanjeev K.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Frenkel, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    Runx2 is a metastatic transcription factor (TF) increasingly expressed during prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Using PCa cells conditionally expressing Runx2, we previously identified Runx2-regulated genes with known roles in epithelial–mesenchymal transition, invasiveness, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix proteolysis and osteolysis. To map Runx2-occupied regions (R2ORs) in PCa cells, we first analyzed regions predicted to bind Runx2 based on the expression data, and found that recruitment to sites upstream of the KLK2 and CSF2 genes was cyclical over time. Genome-wide ChIP-seq analysis at a time of maximum occupancy at these sites revealed 1603 high-confidence R2ORs, enriched with cognate motifs for RUNX, GATA and ETS TFs. The R2ORs were distributed with little regard to annotated transcription start sites (TSSs), mainly in introns and intergenic regions. Runx2-upregulated genes, however, displayed enrichment for R2ORs within 40 kb of their TSSs. The main annotated functions enriched in 98 Runx2-upregulated genes with nearby R2ORs were related to invasiveness and membrane trafficking/secretion. Indeed, using SDS–PAGE, mass spectrometry and western analyses, we show that Runx2 enhances secretion of several proteins, including fatty acid synthase and metastasis-associated laminins. Thus, combined analysis of Runx2's transcriptome and genomic occupancy in PCa cells lead to defining its novel role in regulating protein secretion. PMID:22187159

  2. Single-cell analysis of early B-lymphocyte development suggests independent regulation of lineage specification and commitment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Sasan; Åhsberg, Josefine; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Stjernberg, Jenny; Qian, Hong; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the process of B-lymphocyte lineage restriction, we have investigated molecular and functional properties in early B-lineage cells from Pax-5–deficient animals crossed to a B-lineage–restricted reporter mouse, allowing us to identify B-lineage–specified progenitors independently of conventional surface markers. Pax-5 deficiency resulted in a dramatic increase in the frequency of specified progenitor B-cells marked by expression of a λ5 (Igll1) promoter-controlled reporter gene. Gene expression analysis of ex vivo isolated progenitor cells revealed that Pax-5 deficiency has a minor impact on B-cell specification. However, single-cell in vitro differentiation analysis of ex vivo isolated cells revealed that specified B-lineage progenitors still displayed a high degree of plasticity for development into NK or T lineage cells. In contrast, we were unable to detect any major changes in myeloid lineage potential in specified Pax-5–deficient cells. By comparison of gene expression patterns in ex vivo isolated Pax-5– and Ebf-1–deficient progenitors, it was possible to identify a set of B-cell–restricted genes dependent on Ebf-1 but not Pax-5, supporting the idea that B-cell specification and commitment is controlled by distinct regulatory networks. PMID:23019372

  3. Molecular dynamics calculations suggest a conduction mechanism for the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ekta; Dal Peraro, Matteo; DeVane, Russell; Vemparala, Satyavani; DeGrado, William F; Klein, Michael L

    2009-01-27

    The M2 protein of the influenza A virus is activated by low endosomal pH and performs the essential function of proton transfer into the viral interior. The resulting decrease in pH within the virion is essential for the uncoating and further replication of the viral genetic material. The x-ray crystal [Stouffer AL, et al. (2008) Nature 451:596-599] and solution NMR [Schnell JR, Chou JJ (2008) Nature 451:591-595] structures of the transmembrane region of the M2 homo-tetrameric bundle both revealed pores with narrow constrictions at one end, leaving a question as to how protons enter the channel. His-37, which is essential for proton-gating and selective conduction of protons, lies in the pore of the crystallographic and NMR structures. Here, we explore the different protonation states of the His-37 residues of the M2 bundle in a bilayer using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. When the His-37 residues are neutral, the protein prefers an Open(out)-Closed(in) conformation in which the channel is open to the environment on the outside of the virus but closed to the interior environment of the virus. Diffusion of protons into the channel from the outside of the virus and protonation of His-37 residues in the tetramer stabilizes an oppositely gated Closed(out)-Open(in) conformation. Thus, protons might be conducted through a transporter-like mechanism, in which the protein alternates between Open(out)-Closed(in) and Closed(out)-Open(in) conformations, and His-37 is protonated/deprotonated during each turnover. The transporter-like mechanism is consistent with the known properties of the M2 bundle, including its relatively low rate of proton flux and its strong rectifying behavior.

  4. Comparative modeling and molecular dynamics suggest high carboxylase activity of the Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 RbcL protein.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; de Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez, João Lídio; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-03-01

    Rubisco catalyzes the first step reaction in the carbon fixation pathway, bonding atmospheric CO2/O2 to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate; it is therefore considered one of the most important enzymes in the biosphere. Genetic modifications to increase the carboxylase activity of rubisco are a subject of great interest to agronomy and biotechnology, since this could increase the productivity of biomass in plants, algae and cyanobacteria and give better yields in crops and biofuel production. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize in silico the catalytic domain of the rubisco large subunit (rbcL gene) of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14, and identify target sites to improve enzyme affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. A three-dimensional model was built using MODELLER 9.14, molecular dynamics was used to generate a 100 ns trajectory by AMBER12, and the binding free energy was calculated using MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA and SIE methods with alanine scanning. The model obtained showed characteristics of form-I rubisco, with 15 beta sheets and 19 alpha helices, and maintained the highly conserved catalytic site encompassing residues Lys175, Lys177, Lys201, Asp203, and Glu204. The binding free energy of the enzyme-substrate complexation of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 showed values around -10 kcal mol(-1) using the SIE method. The most important residues for the interaction with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were Arg295 followed by Lys334. The generated model was successfully validated, remaining stable during the whole simulation, and demonstrated characteristics of enzymes with high carboxylase activity. The binding analysis revealed candidates for directed mutagenesis sites to improve rubisco's affinity.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that RNA three-way junctions can act as flexible RNA structural elements in the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Beššeová, Ivana; Réblová, Kamila; Leontis, Neocles B.; Šponer, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    We present extensive explicit solvent molecular dynamics analysis of three RNA three-way junctions (3WJs) from the large ribosomal subunit: the 3WJ formed by Helices 90–92 (H90–H92) of 23S rRNA; the 3WJ formed by H42–H44 organizing the GTPase associated center (GAC) of 23S rRNA; and the 3WJ of 5S rRNA. H92 near the peptidyl transferase center binds the 3′-CCA end of amino-acylated tRNA. The GAC binds protein factors and stimulates GTP hydrolysis driving protein synthesis. The 5S rRNA binds the central protuberance and A-site finger (ASF) involved in bridges with the 30S subunit. The simulations reveal that all three 3WJs possess significant anisotropic hinge-like flexibility between their stacked stems and dynamics within the compact regions of their adjacent stems. The A-site 3WJ dynamics may facilitate accommodation of tRNA, while the 5S 3WJ flexibility appears to be essential for coordinated movements of ASF and 5S rRNA. The GAC 3WJ may support large-scale dynamics of the L7/L12-stalk region. The simulations reveal that H42–H44 rRNA segments are not fully relaxed and in the X-ray structures they are bent towards the large subunit. The bending may be related to L10 binding and is distributed between the 3WJ and the H42–H97 contact. PMID:20507916

  6. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae Proteins into Infected Cells Suggests an Active Role of Microsporidia in the Control of Host Programs and Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Senderskiy, Igor V.; Timofeev, Sergey A.; Seliverstova, Elena V.; Pavlova, Olga A.; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs. PMID:24705470

  7. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae proteins into infected cells suggests an active role of microsporidia in the control of host programs and metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Senderskiy, Igor V; Timofeev, Sergey A; Seliverstova, Elena V; Pavlova, Olga A; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs.

  8. Persistence of DNA threads in human anaphase cells suggests late completion of sister chromatid decatenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Speicher, Michael R; Nigg, Erich A

    2008-04-01

    PICH (Plk1-interacting checkpoint helicase) was recently identified as an essential component of the spindle assembly checkpoint and shown to localize to kinetochores, inner centromeres, and thin threads connecting separating chromosomes even during anaphase. In this paper, we have used immuno-fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromatin-immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PICH associates with centromeric chromatin during anaphase. Furthermore, by careful analysis of PICH-positive anaphase threads through FISH as well as bromo-deoxyurdine and CREST labeling, we strengthen the evidence that these threads comprise mainly alphoid centromere deoxyribonucleic acid. Finally, by timing the addition of ICRF-193 (a specific inhibitor of topoisomerase-II alpha) to cells synchronized in anaphase, we demonstrate that topoisomerase activity is required specifically to resolve PICH-positive threads during anaphase (as opposed to being required to prevent the formation of such threads during earlier cell cycle stages). These data indicate that PICH associates with centromeres during anaphase and that most PICH-positive threads evolve from inner centromeres as these stretch in response to tension. Moreover, they show that topoisomerase activity is required during anaphase for the resolution of PICH-positive threads, implying that the complete separation of sister chromatids occurs later than previously assumed.

  9. BROADBAND TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ 1214b SUGGESTS A LOW MEAN MOLECULAR WEIGHT ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Croll, Bryce; Jayawardhana, Ray; Albert, Loic; Kempton, Eliza Miller-Ricci; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Murray, Norman; Neilson, Hilding

    2011-08-01

    We use the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to observe four transits of the super-Earth planet GJ 1214b in the near-infrared. For each transit, we observe GJ 1214 in two bands nearly simultaneously by rapidly switching the WIRCam filter wheel back and forth for the duration of the observations. By combining all our J-band ({approx}1.25 {mu}m) observations we find a transit depth, analogous to the planet-to-star radius ratio squared, in this band of (R{sub PJ} /R{sub *}){sup 2} = (1.338 {+-} 0.013)%-a value consistent with the optical transit depth reported by Charbonneau and collaborators. However, our best-fit combined K{sub s}-band ({approx}2.15 {mu}m) transit depth is deeper: (R{sub PKs} /R{sub *}){sup 2} = (1.438 {+-} 0.019)%. Formally, our K{sub s}-band transits are deeper than the J-band transits observed simultaneously by a factor of (R{sub PKs} /R{sub PJ}){sup 2} = 1.072 {+-} 0.018-a 4{sigma} discrepancy. The most straightforward explanation for our deeper K{sub s}-band transit depth is a spectral absorption feature from the limb of the atmosphere of the planet; for the spectral absorption feature to be this prominent, the atmosphere of GJ 1214b must have a large-scale height and a low mean molecular weight. That is, its atmosphere would have to be hydrogen/helium dominated and this planet would be better described as a mini-Neptune. However, recently published observations from 0.78 to 1.0 {mu}m, by Bean and collaborators, show a lack of spectral features and transit depths consistent with those obtained by Charbonneau and collaborators. The most likely atmospheric composition for GJ 1214b that arises from combining all these observations is less clear; if the atmosphere of GJ 1214b is hydrogen/helium dominated, then it must have either a haze layer that is obscuring transit-depth differences at shorter wavelengths or significantly different spectral features from what current models predict. Our observations

  10. RNA in situ hybridization characterization of non-enzymatic derived bovine intervertebral disc cell lineages suggests progenitor cell potential.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Petra; Yerden, Rachel; Kocsis, Victoria; Lufkin, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a meritorious target for therapeutic cell based regenerative medicine approaches, however, controversy over what defines the precise identity of mature IVD cells and lack of single cell based quality control measures is of concern. Bos taurus and human IVDs are histologically more similar than is Mus musculus. The mature bovine IVD is well suited as model system for technology development to be translated into therapeutic cell based regenerative medicine applications. We present a reproducible non-enzymatic protocol to isolate cell progenitor populations of three distinct areas of the mature bovine IVD. Bovine specific RNA probes were validated in situ and employed to assess fate changes, heterogeneity, stem cell characteristics and differentiation potential of the cultures. Quality control measures with single cell resolution like RNA in situ hybridization to assess culture heterogeneity (PISH) followed by optimization of culture conditions could be translated to human IVD cell culture to increase the safety of cell based regenerative medicine.

  11. Polyfunctional and IFN-γ monofunctional human CD4+ T cell populations are molecularly distinct

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Julie G.; Apte, Simon H.; Groves, Penny L.; McCarthy, James S.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen-specific polyfunctional T cell responses have been associated with favorable clinical outcomes, but it is not known whether molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional cytokine-producing T cells. Here, we report that polyfunctional CD4+ T cells induced during Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) blood-stage infection in humans have a unique transcriptomic profile compared with IFN-γ monofunctional CD4+ T cells and, thus, are molecularly distinct. The 14-gene signature revealed in P. falciparum–reactive polyfunctional T cells is associated with cytokine signaling and lymphocyte chemotaxis, and systems biology analysis identified IL-27 as an upstream regulator of the polyfunctional gene signature. Importantly, the polyfunctional gene signature is largely conserved in Influenza-reactive polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, suggesting that polyfunctional T cells have core characteristics independent of pathogen specificity. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that consistent molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional CD4+ T cells. PMID:28194431

  12. In vitro analysis suggests that difference in cell movement during direct interaction can generate various pigment patterns in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kondo, Shigeru

    2014-02-04

    Pigment patterns of organisms have invoked strong interest from not only biologists but also, scientists in many other fields. Zebrafish is a useful model animal for studying the mechanism of pigment pattern formation. The zebrafish stripe pattern is primarily two types of pigment cells: melanophores and xanthophores. Previous studies have reported that interactions among these pigment cells are important for pattern formation. In the recent report, we found that the direct contact by xanthophores induces the membrane depolarization of melanophores. From analysis of jaguar mutants, it is suggested that the depolarization affects the movements of melanophores. To analyze the cell movement in detail, we established a unique in vitro system. It allowed us to find that WT xanthophores induced repulsive movement of melanophores through direct contact. The xanthophores also chased the melanophores. As a result, they showed run-and-chase movements. We also analyzed the cell movement of pigment cells from jaguar and leopard mutants, which have fuzzy stripes and spot patterns, respectively. jaguar cells showed inhibited run-and-chase movements, and leopard melanophores scarcely showed repulsive response. Furthermore, we paired mutant and WT cells and showed which of the melanophores and xanthophores have responsibility for the altered cell movements. These results suggested that there is a correspondence relationship between the cell movements and pigment patterns. The correspondence relationship highlighted the importance of the cell movements in the pattern formation and showed that our system is a quite useful system for future study in this field.

  13. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  14. Molecular signatures in response to Isoliquiritigenin in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Nam, Hye-Young; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified the inhibitory effect of ISL on cell proliferation of LCLs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ISL-induced genes and miRNAs through microarray approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs associated with ISL effect. -- Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of various cancer cells. However, genetic factors regulating ISL effects remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular signatures involved in ISL-induced cell death of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) using microarray analyses. For gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) microarray experiments, each of 12 LCL strains was independently treated with ISL or DMSO as a vehicle control for a day prior to total RNA extraction. ISL treatment inhibited cell proliferation of LCLs in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis showed that ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway, having a potential as regulators in LCL survival and sensitivity to ISL-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, 36 miRNAs including five miRNAs with unknown functions were differentially expressed in ISL-treated LCLs. The integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs. Among them, miR-1207-5p and miR-575 were negatively correlated with p53 pathway- and cell cycle-associated genes, respectively. In conclusion, our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in ISL-induced cytotoxicity in LCLs by targeting signaling pathways including p53 pathway and cell cycle.

  15. Molecular and metabolic profiles suggest that increased lipid catabolism in adipose tissue contributes to leanness in domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bo; Middleton, Jesse L; Ernest, Ben; Saxton, Arnold M; Lamont, Susan J; Campagna, Shawn R; Voy, Brynn H

    2014-05-01

    Domestic broiler chickens rapidly accumulate fat and are naturally hyperglycemic and insulin resistant, making them an attractive model for studies of human obesity. We previously demonstrated that short-term (5 h) fasting rapidly upregulates pathways of fatty acid oxidation in broiler chickens and proposed that activation of these pathways may promote leanness. The objective of the current study was to characterize adipose tissue from relatively lean and fatty lines of chickens and determine if heritable leanness in chickens is associated with activation of some of the same pathways induced by fasting. We compared adipose gene expression and metabolite profiles in white adipose tissue of lean Leghorn and Fayoumi breeds to those of fattier commercial broiler chickens. Both lipolysis and expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation were upregulated in lean chickens compared with broilers. Although there were strong similarities between the lean lines compared with broilers, distinct expression signatures were also found between Fayoumi and Leghorn, including differences in adipogenic genes. Similarities between genetically lean and fasted chickens suggest that fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue is adaptively coupled to lipolysis and plays a role in heritable differences in fatness. Unique signatures of leanness in Fayoumi and Leghorn lines highlight distinct pathways that may provide insight into the basis for leanness in humans. Collectively, our results provide a number of future directions through which to fully exploit chickens as unique models for the study of human obesity and adipose metabolism.

  16. Molecular Diversity of Anthracnose Pathogen Populations Associated with UK Strawberry Production Suggests Multiple Introductions of Three Different Colletotrichum Species

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Zapparata, Antonio; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Sukno, Serenella A.; Lane, Charles R.; Thon, Michael R.; Vannacci, Giovanni; Holub, Eric; Sreenivasaprasad, Surapareddy

    2015-01-01

    Fragaria × ananassa (common name: strawberry) is a globally cultivated hybrid species belonging to Rosaceae family. Colletotrichum acutatum sensu lato (s.l.) is considered to be the second most economically important pathogen worldwide affecting strawberries. A collection of 148 Colletotrichum spp. isolates including 67 C. acutatum s.l. isolates associated with the phytosanitary history of UK strawberry production were used to characterize multi-locus genetic variation of this pathogen in the UK, relative to additional reference isolates that represent a worldwide sampling of the diversity of the fungus. The evidence indicates that three different species C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae are associated with strawberry production in the UK, which correspond to previously designated genetic groups A2, A4 and A3, respectively. Among these species, 12 distinct haplotypes were identified suggesting multiple introductions into the country. A subset of isolates was also used to compare aggressiveness in causing disease on strawberry plants and fruits. Isolates belonging to C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae representative of the UK anthracnose pathogen populations showed variation in their aggressiveness. Among the three species, C. nymphaeae and C. fioriniae appeared to be more aggressive compared to C. godetiae. This study highlights the genetic and pathogenic heterogeneity of the C. acutatum s.l. populations introduced into the UK linked to strawberry production. PMID:26086351

  17. Molecular modeling and docking of novel laccase from multiple serotype of Yersinia enterocolitica suggests differential and multiple substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepti; Sharma, Krishna Kant; Dhar, Mahesh Shanker; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2014-06-20

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are widely distributed in bacteria, where they are responsible for metal homeostasis, acquisition and oxidation. Using specific primers, yacK coding for MCO was amplified from different serotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1A. Homology modeling of the protein followed by docking with five well-known substrates for different MCO's (viz., 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid [ABTS], syringaldazine, L-tyrosine, ammonium ferrous sulfate and guaiacol), lignin monomers (Coniferyl alcohol, p-coumaryl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol) and two inhibitors i.e., kojic acid and N-hydroxyglycine was done. The docking gave maximum GoldScore i.e., 91.93 and 72.64 with ammonium ferrous sulfate and ABTS, respectively. Similarly, docking with ICM gave -82.10 and -83.61 docking score, confirming the protein to be true laccase with ferroxidase activity. Further, validation with ammonium ferrous sulfate as substrate gave laccase activity of 0.36Units/L/min. Guaiacol, L-tyrosine, and lignin monomers showed good binding affinity with protein models with GoldScores of 35.89, 41.82, 40.41, 41.12 and 43.10, respectively. The sequence study of all the cloned Yack genes showed serotype specific clade in dendrogram. There was distinct discrimination in the ligand binding affinity of Y. enterocolitica laccase, among strains of same clonal groups, suggesting it as a tool for phylogenetic studies.

  18. Large-scale analysis of conserved rare codon clusters suggests an involvement in co-translational molecular recognition events.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Matthieu; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2012-06-01

    An increasing amount of evidence from experimental and computational analysis suggests that rare codon clusters are functionally important for protein activity. Most of the studies on rare codon clusters were performed on a limited number of proteins or protein families. In the present study, we present the Sherlocc program and how it can be used for large scale protein family analysis of evolutionarily conserved rare codon clusters and their relation to protein function and structure. This large-scale analysis was performed using the whole Pfam database covering over 70% of the known protein sequence universe. Our program Sherlocc, detects statistically relevant conserved rare codon clusters and produces a user-friendly HTML output. Statistically significant rare codon clusters were detected in a multitude of Pfam protein families. The most statistically significant rare codon clusters were predominantly identified in N-terminal Pfam families. Many of the longest rare codon clusters are found in membrane-related proteins which are required to interact with other proteins as part of their function, for example in targeting or insertion. We identified some cases where rare codon clusters can play a regulating role in the folding of catalytically important domains. Our results support the existence of a widespread functional role for rare codon clusters across species. Finally, we developed an online filter-based search interface that provides access to Sherlocc results for all Pfam families. The Sherlocc program and search interface are open access and are available at http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca

  19. Structure of the ectodomain of Drosophila peptidoglycan-recognition protein LCa suggests a molecular mechanism for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-I; Ihara, Kentaro; Chelliah, Yogarany; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2005-07-19

    The peptidoglycan-recognition protein LCa (PGRP-LCa) is a transmembrane receptor required for activation of the Drosophila immune deficiency pathway by monomeric Gram-negative peptidoglycan. We have determined the crystal structure of the ectodomain of PGRP-LCa at 2.5-A resolution and found two unique helical insertions in the LCa ectodomain that disrupt an otherwise L-shaped peptidoglycan-docking groove present in all other known PGRP structures. The deficient binding of PGRP-LCa to monomeric peptidoglycan was confirmed by biochemical pull-down assays. Recognition of monomeric peptidoglycan involves both PGRP-LCa and -LCx. We showed that association of the LCa and LCx ectodomains in vitro depends on monomeric peptidoglycan. The presence of a defective peptidoglycan-docking groove, while preserving a unique role in mediating monomeric peptidoglycan induction of immune response, suggests that PGRP-LCa recognizes the exposed structural features of a monomeric muropeptide when the latter is bound to and presented by the ectodomain of PGRP-LCx. Such features include N-acetyl glucosamine and the anhydro bond in the glycan of the muropeptide, which have been demonstrated to be critical for immune stimulatory activity.

  20. Structure of the ectodomain of Drosophila peptidoglycan-recognition protein LCa suggests a molecular mechanism for pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-I; Ihara, Kentaro; Chelliah, Yogarany; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2005-01-01

    The peptidoglycan-recognition protein LCa (PGRP-LCa) is a transmembrane receptor required for activation of the Drosophila immune deficiency pathway by monomeric Gram-negative peptidoglycan. We have determined the crystal structure of the ectodomain of PGRP-LCa at 2.5-Å resolution and found two unique helical insertions in the LCa ectodomain that disrupt an otherwise L-shaped peptidoglycan-docking groove present in all other known PGRP structures. The deficient binding of PGRP-LCa to monomeric peptidoglycan was confirmed by biochemical pull-down assays. Recognition of monomeric peptidoglycan involves both PGRP-LCa and -LCx. We showed that association of the LCa and LCx ectodomains in vitro depends on monomeric peptidoglycan. The presence of a defective peptidoglycan-docking groove, while preserving a unique role in mediating monomeric peptidoglycan induction of immune response, suggests that PGRP-LCa recognizes the exposed structural features of a monomeric muropeptide when the latter is bound to and presented by the ectodomain of PGRP-LCx. Such features include N-acetyl glucosamine and the anhydro bond in the glycan of the muropeptide, which have been demonstrated to be critical for immune stimulatory activity. PMID:16006509

  1. A Diagnostic Assessment for Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jia; Wood, William B.; Martin, Jennifer M.; Guild, Nancy A.; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed…

  2. A Diagnostic Assessment for Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jia; Wood, William B.; Martin, Jennifer M.; Guild, Nancy A.; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed…

  3. Hsp10 nuclear localization and changes in lung cells response to cigarette smoke suggest novel roles for this chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Corrao, Simona; Anzalone, Rita; Lo Iacono, Melania; Corsello, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Antonino; D'Anna, Silvestro Ennio; Balbi, Bruno; Carone, Mauro; Sala, Anna; Corona, Davide; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Farina, Felicia; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J. L.; Cappello, Francesco; La Rocca, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Heat-shock protein (Hsp)10 is the co-chaperone for Hsp60 inside mitochondria, but it also resides outside the organelle. Variations in its levels and intracellular distribution have been documented in pathological conditions, e.g. cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Here, we show that Hsp10 in COPD undergoes changes at the molecular and subcellular levels in bronchial cells from human specimens and derived cell lines, intact or subjected to stress induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Noteworthy findings are: (i) Hsp10 occurred in nuclei of epithelial and lamina propria cells of bronchial mucosa from non-smokers and smokers; (ii) human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) and lung fibroblast (HFL-1) cells, in vitro, showed Hsp10 in the nucleus, before and after CSE exposure; (iii) CSE stimulation did not increase the levels of Hsp10 but did elicit qualitative changes as indicated by molecular weight and isoelectric point shifts; and (iv) Hsp10 nuclear levels increased after CSE stimulation in HFL-1, indicating cytosol to nucleus migration, and although Hsp10 did not bind DNA, it bound a DNA-associated protein. PMID:25355063

  4. Large-scale analysis of conserved rare codon clusters suggests an involvement in co-translational molecular recognition events

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Matthieu; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: An increasing amount of evidence from experimental and computational analysis suggests that rare codon clusters are functionally important for protein activity. Most of the studies on rare codon clusters were performed on a limited number of proteins or protein families. In the present study, we present the Sherlocc program and how it can be used for large scale protein family analysis of evolutionarily conserved rare codon clusters and their relation to protein function and structure. This large-scale analysis was performed using the whole Pfam database covering over 70% of the known protein sequence universe. Our program Sherlocc, detects statistically relevant conserved rare codon clusters and produces a user-friendly HTML output. Results: Statistically significant rare codon clusters were detected in a multitude of Pfam protein families. The most statistically significant rare codon clusters were predominantly identified in N-terminal Pfam families. Many of the longest rare codon clusters are found in membrane-related proteins which are required to interact with other proteins as part of their function, for example in targeting or insertion. We identified some cases where rare codon clusters can play a regulating role in the folding of catalytically important domains. Our results support the existence of a widespread functional role for rare codon clusters across species. Finally, we developed an online filter-based search interface that provides access to Sherlocc results for all Pfam families. Availability: The Sherlocc program and search interface are open access and are available at http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca Contact: rafael.najmanovich@usherbrooke.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22467916

  5. Molecular inferences suggest multiple host shifts of rabies viruses from bats to mesocarnivores in Arizona during 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Ivan V; Shi, Mang; Orciari, Lillian A; Yager, Pamela A; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Kuzmina, Natalia A; Streicker, Daniel G; Bergman, David L; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In nature, rabies virus (RABV; genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae) represents an assemblage of phylogenetic lineages, associated with specific mammalian host species. Although it is generally accepted that RABV evolved originally in bats and further shifted to carnivores, mechanisms of such host shifts are poorly understood, and examples are rarely present in surveillance data. Outbreaks in carnivores caused by a RABV variant, associated with big brown bats, occurred repeatedly during 2001-2009 in the Flagstaff area of Arizona. After each outbreak, extensive control campaigns were undertaken, with no reports of further rabies cases in carnivores for the next several years. However, questions remained whether all outbreaks were caused by a single introduction and further perpetuation of bat RABV in carnivore populations, or each outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of a bat virus. Another question of concern was related to adaptive changes in the RABV genome associated with host shifts. To address these questions, we sequenced and analyzed 66 complete and 20 nearly complete RABV genomes, including those from the Flagstaff area and other similar outbreaks in carnivores, caused by bat RABVs, and representatives of the major RABV lineages circulating in North America and worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that each Flagstaff outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of bat RABV into populations of carnivores. Positive selection analysis confirmed the absence of post-shift changes in RABV genes. In contrast, convergent evolution analysis demonstrated several amino acids in the N, P, G and L proteins, which might be significant for pre-adaptation of bat viruses to cause effective infection in carnivores. The substitution S/T₂₄₂ in the viral glycoprotein is of particular merit, as a similar substitution was suggested for pathogenicity of Nishigahara RABV strain. Roles of the amino acid changes, detected in our study, require

  6. Phylogenetic relationships of Mesoamerican spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi): Molecular evidence suggests the need for a revised taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Morales-Jimenez, Alba Lucia; Cortés-Ortiz, Liliana; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mesoamerican spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi sensu lato) are widely distributed from Mexico to northern Colombia. This group of primates includes many allopatric forms with morphologically distinct pelage color and patterning, but its taxonomy and phylogenetic history are poorly understood. We explored the genetic relationships among the different forms of Mesoamerican spider monkeys using mtDNA sequence data, and we offer a new hypothesis for the evolutionary history of the group. We collected up to ∼800 bp of DNA sequence data from hypervariable region 1 (HV1) of the control region, or D-loop, of the mitochondrion for multiple putative subspecies of Ateles geoffroyi sensu lato. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian reconstructions, using Ateles paniscus as an outgroup, showed that (1) A. fusciceps and A. geoffroyi form two different monophyletic groups and (2) currently recognized subspecies of A. geoffroyi are not monophyletic. Within A. geoffroyi, our phylogenetic analysis revealed little concordance between any of the classifications proposed for this taxon and their phylogenetic relationships, therefore a new classification is needed for this group. Several possible clades with recent divergence times (1.7-0.8 Ma) were identified within Ateles geoffroyi sensu lato. Some previously recognized taxa were not separated by our data (e.g., A. g. vellerosus and A. g. yucatanensis), while one distinct clade had never been described as a different evolutionary unit based on pelage or geography (Ateles geoffroyi ssp. indet. from El Salvador). Based on well-supported phylogenetic relationships, our results challenge previous taxonomic arrangements for Mesoamerican spider monkeys. We suggest a revised arrangement based on our data and call for a thorough taxonomic revision of this group. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Ameloblastin expression and putative autoregulation in mesenchymal cells suggest a role in early bone formation and repair

    PubMed Central

    Tamburstuen, Margareth V.; Reseland, Janne E.; Spahr, Axel; Brookes, Steven J.; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Slaby, Ivan; Snead, Malcolm L.; Lyngstadaas, S. Petter

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastin is mainly known as a dental enamel protein, synthesized and secreted into developing enamel matrix by the enamel-forming ameloblasts. The function of ameloblastin in tooth development remains unclear, but it has been suggested to be involved in processes varying from regulating crystal growth to activity as a growth factor or partaking in cell signaling. Recent studies suggest that some enamel matrix proteins also might have important functions outside enamel formation. In this context ameloblastin has recently been reported to induce dentin and bone repair, as well as being present in the early bone and cartilage extracellular matrices during embryogenesis. However, what cells express ameloblastin in these tissues still remain unclear. Thus, the expression of ameloblastin was examined in cultured primary mesenchymal cells and in vivo during healing of bone defects in a “proof of concept” animal study. The real time RT-PCR analysis revealed human ameloblastin (AMBN) mRNA expression in human mesenchymal stem cells and primary osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Expression of AMBN mRNA was also confirmed in human CD34 positive cells and osteoclasts. Western and dot blot analysis of cell lysates and medium confirmed the expression and secretion of ameloblastin from mesenchymal stem cells, primary human osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Expression of ameloblastin was also detected in newly formed bone in experimental bone defects in adult rats. Together these findings suggest a role of this protein in early bone formation and repair. PMID:20854943

  8. Mechanistic modelling suggests that the size of preneoplastic lesions is limited by intercellular induction of apoptosis in oncogenically transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Kundrát, Pavel; Bauer, Georg; Jacob, Peter; Friedland, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Selective removal of oncogenically transformed cells by apoptosis induced via signalling by surrounding cells has been suggested to represent a natural anticarcinogenic process. To investigate its potential effect in detail, a mechanistic model of this process is proposed. The model is calibrated against in vitro data on apoptosis triggered in transformed cells by defined external inducers as well as through signalling by normal cells under coculture conditions. The model predicts that intercellular induction of apoptosis is capable of balancing the proliferation of oncogenically transformed cells and limiting the size of their populations over long times, even if their proliferation per se were unlimited. Experimental research is desired to verify whether the predicted stable population of transformed cells corresponds to a kind of dormancy during early-stage carcinogenesis (dormant preneoplastic lesions), and how this process relates to other anticarcinogenic mechanisms taking place under in vivo conditions. PMID:22045028

  9. Low density of membrane particles in auditory hair cells of lizards and birds suggests an absence of somatic motility.

    PubMed

    Köppl, Christine; Forge, Andrew; Manley, Geoffrey A

    2004-11-08

    Hair cells are the mechanoreceptive cells of the vertebrate lateral line and inner ear. In addition to their sensory function, hair cells display motility and thus themselves generate mechanical energy, which is thought to enhance sensitivity. Two principal cellular mechanism are known that can mediate hair-cell motility in vitro. One of these is based on voltage-dependent changes of an intramembrane protein and has so far been demonstrated only in outer hair cells of the mammalian cochlea. Correlated with this, the cell membranes of outer hair cells carry an extreme density of embedded particles, as revealed by freeze fracturing. The present study explored the possibility of membrane-based motility in hair cells of nonmammals, by determining their density of intramembrane particles. Replicas of freeze-fractured membrane were prepared from auditory hair cells of a lizard, the Tokay gecko, and a bird, the barn owl. These species were chosen because of independent evidence for active cochlear mechanics, in the form of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. For quantitative comparison, mammalian inner and outer hair cells, as well as vestibular hair, cells were reevaluated. Lizard and bird hair cells displayed median densities of 2,360 and 1,880 intramembrane particles/microm2, respectively. This was not significantly different from the densities in vestibular and mammalian inner hair cells; however, it was about half the density in of mammalian outer hair cells. This suggests that nonmammalian hair cells do not possess high densities of motor protein in their membranes and are thus unlikely to be capable of somatic motility. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Molecular Network Analysis Suggests a Logical Hypothesis for the Pathological Role of C9orf72 in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Yoji; Kitano, Shouta; Takitani, Mika; Asahina, Naohiro; Kino, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeats, ranging from hundreds to thousands in number, located in the noncoding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene represent the most common genetic abnormality for familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (abbreviated as C9ALS). Currently, three pathological mechanisms, such as haplo insufficiency of C9orf72, formation of nuclear RNA foci composed of sense and antisense repeats, and accumulation of unconventionally transcribed dipeptide-repeat (DPR) proteins, are proposed for C9ALS. However, at present, the central mechanism underlying neurodegeneration in C9ALS remains largely unknown. METHODS By using three distinct pathway analysis tools of bioinformatics, we studied molecular networks involved in C9ALS pathology by focusing on C9orf72 omics datasets, such as proteome of C9orf72 repeat RNA-binding proteins, transcriptome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)-derived motor neurons of patients with C9ALS, and transcriptome of purified motor neurons of patients with C9ALS. RESULTS We found that C9orf72 repeat RNA-binding proteins play a crucial role in the regulation of post-transcriptional RNA processing. The expression of a wide range of extracellular matrix proteins and matrix metalloproteinases was reduced in iPSC-derived motor neurons of patients with C9ALS. The regulation of RNA processing and cytoskeletal dynamics is disturbed in motor neurons of patients with C9ALS in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Bioinformatics data mining approach suggests a logical hypothesis that C9orf72 repeat expansions that deregulate post-transcriptional RNA processing disturb the homeostasis of cytoskeletal dynamics and remodeling of extracellular matrix, leading to degeneration of stress-vulnerable neurons in the brain and spinal cord of patients with C9ALS. PMID:25210488

  11. Molecular biology of cantharidin in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Rolf; Kahl, Stefan; Boechzelt, Herbert; Bauer, Rudolf; Kaina, Bernd; Efferth, Thomas

    2007-07-04

    Herbal medicine is one of the forms of traditional medical practice. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and traditional Vietnamese medicine (TVM) are well-known for their long-standing tradition of herbal medicine. Secreted by many species of blister beetle, most notably by the 'Spanish fly' (Lytta vesicatoria), cantharidin inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1, PP2A). Blister beetle has been used in Asian traditional medicine to treat Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) infections and associated warts, and is now also used for cancer treatment. A combination of both genomic and postgenomic techniques was used in our studies to identify candidate genes affecting sensitivity or resistance to cantharidin. Cantharidin was not found to be related to multidrug resistance phenotype, suggesting its potential usefulness for the treatment of refractory tumors. Oxidative stress response genes diminish the activity of cantharidin by inducing DNA strand breaks which may be subject to base excision repair and induce apoptosis in a p53- and Bcl2-dependent manner. Cantharidin is one of many natural products used in traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Vietnamese medicine for cancer treatment. Combined methods of pharmaceutical biology and molecular biology can help elucidate modes of action of these natural products.

  12. Quantitative analysis of Plasmodium ookinete motion in three dimensions suggests a critical role for cell shape in the biomechanics of malaria parasite gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Kan, Andrey; Tan, Yan-Hong; Angrisano, Fiona; Hanssen, Eric; Rogers, Kelly L; Whitehead, Lachlan; Mollard, Vanessa P; Cozijnsen, Anton; Delves, Michael J; Crawford, Simon; Sinden, Robert E; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Leckie, Christopher; Bailey, James; Baum, Jake

    2014-05-01

    analysis suggests that the molecular basis of cell shape may, in addition to motor force, be a key adaptive strategy for malaria parasite dissemination and, as such, transmission.

  13. Quantum dot imaging platform for single-cell molecular profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-03-01

    Study of normal cell physiology and disease pathogenesis heavily relies on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. To achieve this goal, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of microenvironment is required. Here we report the development of a multicolour multicycle in situ imaging technology capable of creating detailed quantitative molecular profiles for individual cells at the resolution of optical imaging. A library of stoichiometric fluorescent probes is prepared by linking target-specific antibodies to a universal quantum dot-based platform via protein A in a quick and simple procedure. Surprisingly, despite the potential for multivalent binding between protein A and antibody and the intermediate affinity of this non-covalent bond, fully assembled probes do not aggregate or exchange antibodies, facilitating highly multiplexed parallel staining. This single-cell molecular profiling technology is expected to open new opportunities in systems biology, gene expression studies, signalling pathway analysis and molecular diagnostics.

  14. Microarray analysis of glial cells resistant to JCV infection suggests a correlation between viral infection and inflammatory cytokine gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Kate; Gee, Gretchen V; Simkevich, Carl P; Sedivy, John M; Atwood, Walter J

    2007-01-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCV, has a highly restricted tropism and primarily infects glial cells. The mechanisms restricting infection of cells by JCV are poorly understood. Previously we developed and described a glial cell line that was resistant to JCV infection with the aim of using these cells to identify factors that determine JCV tropism. Gene expression profiling of susceptible and resistant glial cells revealed a direct correlation between the expression of inflammatory cytokines and susceptibility to JCV infection. This correlation manifested at the level of viral gene transcription. Previous studies have suggested a link between an increase in cytokine gene expression in HIV patients and the development of PML and these data support this hypothesis. PMID:17555786

  15. An orthotopic xenograft model of intraneural NF1 MPNST suggests a potential association between steroid hormones and tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, George Q; Li, Hua; Fishbein, Lauren; Thomson, Susanne A; Hwang, Min S; Scarborough, Mark T; Yachnis, Anthony T; Wallace, Margaret R; Mareci, Thomas H; Muir, David

    2007-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are the most aggressive cancers associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Here we report a practical and reproducible model of intraneural NF1 MPNST, by orthotopic xenograft of an immortal human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cell line into the sciatic nerves of female scid mice. Intraneural injection of the cell line sNF96.2 consistently produced MPNST-like tumors that were highly cellular and showed extensive intraneural growth. These xenografts had a high proliferative index, were angiogenic, had significant mast cell infiltration and rapidly dominated the host nerve. The histopathology of engrafted intraneural tumors was consistent with that of human NF1 MPNST. Xenograft tumors were readily examined by magnetic resonance imaging, which also was used to assess tumor vascularity. In addition, the intraneural proliferation of sNF96.2 cell tumors was decreased in ovariectomized mice, while replacement of estrogen or progesterone restored tumor cell proliferation. This suggests a potential role for steroid hormones in supporting tumor cell growth of this MPNST cell line in vivo. The controlled orthotopic implantation of sNF96.2 cells provides for the precise initiation of intraneural MPNST-like tumors in a model system suitable for therapeutic interventions, including inhibitors of angiogenesis and further study of steroid hormone effects on tumor cell growth.

  16. Increasing UV-B induces biphasic leaf cell expansion in Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting multiple mechanisms for controlling plant growth.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Lenore; Evans, Marc A; Edwards, Gerald E

    2006-01-01

    Leaf expansion, comprising cell division and cell enlargement, is controlled by light quality and quantity. The role of UV-B irradiance on leaf cell enlargement has not been determined. We studied the effect of a wide range of UV-B irradiances on the cell-enlargement-driven expansion of Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv. Contender (bush bean) leaf discs. Our growth method allowed separation of the cell enlargement phase of leaf expansion from the cell division phase. In two series of experiments with different types of UV-B screening filters, the effect of increasing levels of UV-B on the area of excised P. vulgaris leaf discs was investigated. One set of experiments utilized polyester (UV-B-absorbing) and cellulose acetate (UV-B-transmitting) filters. The other set utilized UV-B-absorbing and UV-B-transmitting acrylic filters. Regardless of which type of filter was used for screening, high (above summer solstice) levels of supplemental UV-B inhibited cell enlargement in a linear, dose-dependent manner, resulting in smaller leaf discs than treatment with UV-B-absorbing filters. Conversely, low levels of supplemental UV-B enhanced cell enlargement in a linear, dose-dependent manner, resulting in larger leaf discs than did treatment with UV-B-absorbing filters. The results suggest a biphasic response to UV-B, and that there is an optimum UV-B level that results in maximum leaf expansion by cell enlargement.

  17. The pattern of xylan acetylation suggests xylan may interact with cellulose microfibrils as a twofold helical screw in the secondary plant cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Gomes, Thiago C F; Tryfona, Theodora; Nikolovski, Nino; Stott, Katherine; Grantham, Nicholas J; Bolam, David N; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between xylan and cellulose microfibrils is important for secondary cell wall properties in vascular plants; however, the molecular arrangement of xylan in the cell wall and the nature of the molecular bonding between the polysaccharides are unknown. In dicots, the xylan backbone of β-(1,4)-linked xylosyl residues is decorated by occasional glucuronic acid, and approximately one-half of the xylosyl residues are O-acetylated at C-2 or C-3. We recently proposed that the even, periodic spacing of GlcA residues in the major domain of dicot xylan might allow the xylan backbone to fold as a twofold helical screw to facilitate alignment along, and stable interaction with, cellulose fibrils; however, such an interaction might be adversely impacted by random acetylation of the xylan backbone. Here, we investigated the arrangement of acetyl residues in Arabidopsis xylan using mass spectrometry and NMR. Alternate xylosyl residues along the backbone are acetylated. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we found that a twofold helical screw conformation of xylan is stable in interactions with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose faces. Tight docking of xylan on the hydrophilic faces is feasible only for xylan decorated on alternate residues and folded as a twofold helical screw. The findings suggest an explanation for the importance of acetylation for xylan–cellulose interactions, and also have implications for our understanding of cell wall molecular architecture and properties, and biological degradation by pathogens and fungi. They will also impact strategies to improve lignocellulose processing for biorefining and bioenergy. PMID:24889696

  18. Cell death in mammalian cell culture: molecular mechanisms and cell line engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Krampe, Britta

    2010-01-01

    Cell death is a fundamentally important problem in cell lines used by the biopharmaceutical industry. Environmental stress, which can result from nutrient depletion, by-product accumulation and chemical agents, activates through signalling cascades regulators that promote death. The best known key regulators of death process are the Bcl-2 family proteins which constitute a critical intracellular checkpoint of apoptosis cell death within a common death pathway. Engineering of several members of the anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 family genes in several cell types has extended the knowledge of their molecular function and interaction with other proteins, and their regulation of cell death. In this review, we describe the various modes of cell death and their death pathways at molecular and organelle level and discuss the relevance of the growing knowledge of anti-apoptotic engineering strategies to inhibit cell death and increase productivity in mammalian cell culture. PMID:20502964

  19. Gene expression profiling of CD8(+) T cells induced by ovarian cancer cells suggests a possible mechanism for CD8(+) Treg cell production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Lou, Jianfang; Zhang, Shuping; Chen, Xian; Huang, Lei; Sun, Ruihong; Huang, Peijun; Pan, Shiyang; Wang, Fang

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a possible mechanism of CD8(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) production in an ovarian cancer (OC) microenvironment. Agilent microarray was used to detect changes in gene expression between CD8(+) T cells cultured with and without the SKOV3 ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line. QRT-PCR was performed to determine glycolysis gene expression in CD8(+) T cells from a transwell culturing system and OC patients. We also detected protein levels of glycolysis-related genes using Western blot analysis. Comparing gene expression profiles revealed significant differences in expression levels of 1420 genes, of which 246 were up-regulated and 1174 were down-regulated. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis indicated that biological processes altered in CD8(+) Treg are particularly associated with energy metabolism. CD8(+) Treg cells induced by co-culture with SKOV3 had lower glycolysis gene expression compared to CD8(+) T cells cultured alone. Glycolysis gene expression was also decreased in the CD8(+) T cells of OC patients. These findings provide a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of DEGs in CD8(+) T cells cultured with and without SKOV3 and suggests that metabolic processes may be a possible mechanism for CD8(+) Treg induction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cell and molecular mechanisms of insulin-induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Petreaca, Melissa; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessel from pre-existing vessels, is a key process in the formation of the granulation tissue during wound healing. The appropriate development of new blood vessels, along with their subsequent maturation and differentiation, establishes the foundation for functional wound neovasculature. We performed studies in vivo and used a variety of cellular and molecular approaches in vitro to show that insulin stimulates angiogenesis and to elucidate the signalling mechanisms by which this protein stimulates microvessel development. Mice skin injected with insulin shows longer vessels with more branches, along with increased numbers of associated α-smooth muscle actin-expressing cells, suggesting the appropriate differentiation and maturation of the new vessels. We also found that insulin stimulates human microvascular endothelial cell migration and tube formation, and that these effects occur independently of VEGF/VEGFR signalling, but are dependent upon the insulin receptor itself. Downstream signalling pathways involve PI3K, Akt, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and Rac1; inhibition of these pathways results in elimination of endothelial cell migration and tube formation and significantly decreases the development of microvessels. Our findings strongly suggest that insulin is a good candidate for the treatment of ischaemic wounds and other conditions in which blood vessel development is impaired. PMID:19602055

  1. A Simple Mathematical Model Based on the Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis Suggests Kinetic Commonalities in Solid Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Peña, Rodolfo; Álvarez, Mario Moisés

    2012-01-01

    Background The Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) hypothesis has gained credibility within the cancer research community. According to this hypothesis, a small subpopulation of cells within cancerous tissues exhibits stem-cell-like characteristics and is responsible for the maintenance and proliferation of cancer. Methodologies/Principal Findings We present a simple compartmental pseudo-chemical mathematical model for tumor growth, based on the CSC hypothesis, and derived using a “chemical reaction” approach. We defined three cell subpopulations: CSCs, transit progenitor cells, and differentiated cells. Each event related to cell division, differentiation, or death is then modeled as a chemical reaction. The resulting set of ordinary differential equations was numerically integrated to describe the time evolution of each cell subpopulation and the overall tumor growth. The parameter space was explored to identify combinations of parameter values that produce biologically feasible and consistent scenarios. Conclusions/Significance Certain kinetic relationships apparently must be satisfied to sustain solid tumor growth and to maintain an approximate constant fraction of CSCs in the tumor lower than 0.01 (as experimentally observed): (a) the rate of symmetrical and asymmetrical CSC renewal must be in the same order of magnitude; (b) the intrinsic rate of renewal and differentiation of progenitor cells must be half an order of magnitude higher than the corresponding intrinsic rates for cancer stem cells; (c) the rates of apoptosis of the CSC, transit amplifying progenitor (P) cells, and terminally differentiated (D) cells must be progressively higher by approximately one order of magnitude. Simulation results were consistent with reports that have suggested that encouraging CSC differentiation could be an effective therapeutic strategy for fighting cancer in addition to selective killing or inhibition of symmetric division of CSCs. PMID:22363395

  2. Gene Expression Profile of Adult Human Olfactory Bulb and Embryonic Neural Stem Cell Suggests Distinct Signaling Pathways and Epigenetic Control

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hany E. S.; Ahmed, Abd-Elmaksoud; Michetti, Fabrizio; Pescatori, Mario; Pallini, Roberto; Casalbore, Patricia; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Elhadidy, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Global gene expression profiling was performed using RNA from human embryonic neural stem cells (hENSC), and adult human olfactory bulb-derived neural stem cells (OBNSCs), to define a gene expression pattern and signaling pathways that are specific for each cell lineage. We have demonstrated large differences in the gene expression profile of human embryonic NSC, and adult human OBNSCs, but less variability between parallel cultures. Transcripts of genes involved in neural tube development and patterning (ALDH1A2, FOXA2), progenitor marker genes (LMX1a, ALDH1A1, SOX10), proliferation of neural progenitors (WNT1 and WNT3a), neuroplastin (NPTN), POU3F1 (OCT6), neuroligin (NLGN4X), MEIS2, and NPAS1 were up-regulated in both cell populations. By Gene Ontology, 325 out of 3875 investigated gene sets were scientifically different. 41 out of the 307 investigated Cellular Component (CC) categories, 45 out of the 620 investigated Molecular Function (MF) categories, and 239 out of the 2948 investigated Biological Process (BP) categories were significant. KEGG Pathway Class Comparison had revealed that 75 out of 171 investigated gene sets passed the 0.005 significance threshold. Levels of gene expression were explored in three signaling pathways, Notch, Wnt, and mTOR that are known to be involved in NS cell fates determination. The transcriptional signature also deciphers the role of genes involved in epigenetic modifications. SWI/SNF DNA chromatin remodeling complex family, including SMARCC1 and SMARCE1, were found specifically up-regulated in our OBNSC but not in hENSC. Differences in gene expression profile of transcripts controlling epigenetic modifications, and signaling pathways might indicate differences in the therapeutic potential of our examined two cell populations in relation to in cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation following engraftments in different CNS insults. PMID:22485144

  3. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid action in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Oppong, Emmanuel; Flink, Nesrin; Cato, Andrew C B

    2013-11-05

    Glucocorticoids are compounds that have successfully been used over the years in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. They are known to exhibit their effects through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that acts to downregulate the action of proinflammatory transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-κB. The GR also exerts anti-inflammatory effects through activation of distinct genes. In addition to their anti-inflammatory actions, glucocorticoids are also potent antiallergic compounds that are widely used in conditions such as asthma and anaphylaxis. Nevertheless the mechanism of action of this hormone in these disorders is not known. In this article, we have reviewed reports on the effects of glucocorticoids in mast cells, one of the important immune cells in allergy. Building on the knowledge of the molecular action of glucocorticoids and the GR in the treatment of inflammation in other cell types, we have made suggestions as to the likely mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in mast cells. We have further identified some important questions and research directions that need to be addressed in future studies to improve the treatment of allergic disorders.

  4. Posterior elongation in the annelid Platynereis dumerilii involves stem cells molecularly related to primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Gazave, Eve; Béhague, Julien; Laplane, Lucie; Guillou, Aurélien; Préau, Laetitia; Demilly, Adrien; Balavoine, Guillaume; Vervoort, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Like most bilaterian animals, the annelid Platynereis dumerilii generates the majority of its body axis in an anterior to posterior temporal progression with new segments added sequentially. This process relies on a posterior subterminal proliferative body region, known as the "segment addition zone" (SAZ). We explored some of the molecular and cellular aspects of posterior elongation in Platynereis, in particular to test the hypothesis that the SAZ contains a specific set of stem cells dedicated to posterior elongation. We cloned and characterized the developmental expression patterns of orthologs of 17 genes known to be involved in the formation, behavior, or maintenance of stem cells in other metazoan models. These genes encode RNA-binding proteins (e.g., tudor, musashi, pumilio) or transcription factors (e.g., myc, id, runx) widely conserved in eumetazoans. Most of these genes are expressed both in the migrating primordial germ cells and in overlapping ring-like patterns in the SAZ, similar to some previously analyzed genes (piwi, vasa). The SAZ patterns are coincident with the expression of proliferation markers cyclin B and PCNA. EdU pulse and chase experiments suggest that new segments are produced through many rounds of divisions from small populations of teloblast-like posterior stem cells. The shared molecular signature between primordial germ cells and posterior stem cells in Platynereis thus corresponds to an ancestral "stemness" program. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human molecular cytogenetics: From cells to nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Mariluce

    2014-03-01

    The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  6. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and cell staining suggest the existence of C4 photosynthesis in Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Liu, L; Zhao, P; Yang, C; Wang, G C

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms for carbon fixation via photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin were studied recently but there remains a long-standing debate concerning the occurrence of C4 photosynthesis in this species. A thorough investigation of carbon metabolism and the evidence for C4 photosynthesis based on organelle partitioning was needed. In this study, we identified the flux ratios between C3 and C4 compounds in P. tricornutum using (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis, and stained cells with various cell-permeant fluorescent probes to investigate the likely organelle partitioning required for single-cell C4 photosynthesis. Metabolic flux ratio analysis indicated the C3/C4 exchange ratios were high. Cell staining indicated organelle partitioning required for single-cell C4 photosynthesis might exist in P. tricornutum. The results of (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis and cell staining suggest single-cell C4 photosynthesis exists in P. tricornutum. This study provides insights into photosynthesis patterns of P. tricornutum and the evidence for C4 photosynthesis based on (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis and organelle partitioning. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Regulation of histone mRNA in the unperturbed cell cycle: evidence suggesting control at two posttranscriptional steps.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M E; Böhni, R; Schneiderman, M H; Ramamurthy, L; Schümperli, D; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    The levels of histone mRNA increase 35-fold as selectively detached mitotic CHO cells progress from mitosis through G1 and into S phase. Using an exogenous gene with a histone 3' end which is not sensitive to transcriptional or half-life regulation, we show that 3' processing is regulated as cells progress from G1 to S phase. The half-life of histone mRNA is similar in G1- and S-phase cells, as measured after inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D (dactinomycin) or indirectly after stabilization by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Taken together, these results suggest that the change in histone mRNA levels between G1- and S-phase cells must be due to an increase in the rate of biosynthesis, a combination of changes in transcription rate and processing efficiency. In G2 phase, there is a rapid 35-fold decrease in the histone mRNA concentration which our results suggest is due primarily to an altered stability of histone mRNA. These results are consistent with a model for cell cycle regulation of histone mRNA levels in which the effects on both RNA 3' processing and transcription, rather than alterations in mRNA stability, are the major mechanisms by which low histone mRNA levels are maintained during G1. Images PMID:2017161

  8. Nano-guided cell networks as conveyors of molecular communication

    PubMed Central

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Barber, Nathan B.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided unprecedented physical means to sample molecular space. Living cells provide additional capability in that they identify molecules within complex environments and actuate function. We have merged cells with nanotechnology for an integrated molecular processing network. Here we show that an engineered cell consortium autonomously generates feedback to chemical cues. Moreover, abiotic components are readily assembled onto cells, enabling amplified and ‘binned' responses. Specifically, engineered cell populations are triggered by a quorum sensing (QS) signal molecule, autoinducer-2, to express surface-displayed fusions consisting of a fluorescent marker and an affinity peptide. The latter provides means for attaching magnetic nanoparticles to fluorescently activated subpopulations for coalescence into colour-indexed output. The resultant nano-guided cell network assesses QS activity and conveys molecular information as a ‘bio-litmus' in a manner read by simple optical means. PMID:26455828

  9. Autonomous Molecular Cascades for Evaluation of Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P.; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs1–4. Previously studied nucleic acid-based-automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata3,5) and finite-state automata for analysis of nucleic acids6 with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells7,8. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement9,10 cascades directed by antibodies that can analyze cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a molecular automaton that successfully completes its analysis is the presence of a unique molecular tag on the cell surface of a specific subpopulation of lymphocytes within human blood cells. PMID:23892986

  10. High Fidelity Drug Repurposing, Molecular Profiling, and Cell Reprogramming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0288 TITLE: High Fidelity Drug Repurposing, Molecular Profiling, and Cell Reprogramming PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...SUBTITLE High Fidelity Drug Repurposing, Molecular Profiling, and Cell Reprogramming 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...network pharmacology and CRCs) to discover and test repurposed drugs that target PCa on an individual patient basis. Objective 1: We will enrich the FDA

  11. Mutagenesis of beryllium-specific T cell receptors suggests an unusual binding topology for antigen recognition1

    PubMed Central

    Bowerman, Natalie A.; Falta, Michael T.; Mack, Douglas G.; Kappler, John W.; Fontenot, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Unconventional antigens, such as metals, stimulate T cells in a very specific manner. To delineate the binding landscape for metal-specific T cell recognition, alanine screens were performed on a set of beryllium (Be)-specific T cell receptors (TCR) derived from the lung of a chronic beryllium disease patient. These TCRs are HLA-DP2-restricted and express nearly identical TCR Vβ5.1 chains coupled with different TCR α-chains. Site-specific mutagenesis of all amino acids comprising the complementarity determining regions of the TCRA and TCRB genes showed a dominant role for Vβ5.1 residues in Be recognition, with little contribution from the TCR α-chain. Solvent-exposed residues along the α-helices of the HLA-DP2 α- and β-chains were also mutated to alanine. Two β-chain residues, located near the proposed Be binding site of HLA-DP2, played a dominant role in T cell recognition with no contribution from the HLA-DP2 α-chain. These findings suggest that Be-specific T cells recognize antigen using an unconventional binding topology, with the majority of interactions contributed by TCR Vβ5.1 residues and the HLA-DP2 β1-chain. Thus, unusual docking topologies are not exclusively used by autoreactive T cells, but also for the recognition of unconventional metal antigens, such as Be. PMID:21873524

  12. Progesterone receptor expression during prostate cancer progression suggests a role of this receptor in stromal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Yang, Ou; Fazli, Ladan; Rennie, Paul S; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-07-01

    The progesterone receptor, like the androgen receptor, belongs to the steroid receptor superfamily. Our previous studies have reported that the PR is expressed specifically in prostate stroma. PR inhibits proliferation of, and regulates cytokine secretion by stromal cells. However, PR protein expression in cancer-associated stroma during prostate cancer progression has not been profiled. Since the phenotypes of prostate stromal cells change dynamically as tumors progress, whether the PR plays a role in regulating stromal cell differentiation needs to be investigated. Immunohistochemistry assays measured PR protein levels on human prostate tissue microarrays containing 367 tissue cores from benign prostate, prostate tumors with different Gleason scores, tumors under various durations of castration therapy, and tumors at the castration-resistant stage. Immunoblotting assays determined whether PR regulated the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin, and fibroblast specific protein (FSP) in human prostate stromal cells. PR protein levels decreased in cancer-associated stroma when compared with that in benign prostate stroma. This reduction in PR expression was not correlated with Gleason scores. PR protein levels were elevated by castration therapy, but reduced to pre-castration levels when tumors progressed to the castration-resistant stage. Enhanced PR expression in human prostate stromal cells increased α-SMA, but decreased vimentin and FSP protein levels ligand-independently. These results suggest that PR plays an active role in regulating stromal cell phenotypes during prostate cancer progression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The molecular heterogeneity of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen synthesized by tumor cells and granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Kuroki, M; Moore, G E; Ichiki, S; Matsuoka, Y

    1988-01-01

    The molecular heterogeneity of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) was examined. Metabolically-labeled glycoproteins were precipitated from cell lysates of human tumor cell lines and of normal peripheral granulocytes with antibodies specific for NCA, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. NCA components synthesized by three tumor cell lines, QGP-1 (pancreas), HLC-1 (lung) and CAOV-2 (ovary) showed slightly different migration patterns on SDS-PAGE, but the molecular weights of their unglycosylated peptides synthesized in the presence of tunicamycin were all found to be 35K. On the other hand, two molecular species of NCA were identified in normal granulocytes: an 80K mature form derived from a 69K precursor peptide and a 58K mature form from a 41K precursor peptide. Upon SDS-PAGE, the migration pattern of the unglycosylated NCA peptides from tumor cells was affected by the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, while that of the peptides of granulocytes was not. All the NCAs identified in this study possessed antigenic determinants common to carcinoembryonic antigen as well as those unique to NCA. These results suggest that the molecular heterogeneity of NCA observed thus far resulted from diverse glycosylation of the three fundamental molecular forms of unglycosylated peptides: one with a molecular weight of 35K produced by tumor cells and two with molecular weights of 69K and 41K produced by granulocytes.

  14. High-resolution particle analysis--its application to platelet counting and suggestions for further application in blood cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Haynes, J L

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of an instrument for high-resolution particle analysis in flow are discussed. It employs a combination of hydrodynamic focusing, fluid resistors, and electronic techniques to achieve precision and ease of use heretofore unobtainable in a moderate-cost clinical instrument. Its application to whole blood platelet counting is discussed, and suggestions are made for its possible application to a wide variety of blood cell measurements.

  15. Comprehensive molecular characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2013-07-04

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (for example, VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (for example, PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumours using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI(3)K/AKT pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving downregulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 (also known as MIR21) and GRB10. Remodelling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumour stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment.

  16. COMPREHENSIVE MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF CLEAR CELL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (e.g. VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (e.g. PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumors using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI3K/Akt pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving down-regulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, up-regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 and GRB10. Remodeling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumor stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment. PMID:23792563

  17. Photoactive molecules for applications in molecular imaging and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing; Xing, Bengang

    2010-08-01

    Photoactive technology has proven successful for non-invasive regulation of biological activities and processes in living cells. With the light-directed generation of biomaterials or signals, mechanisms in cell biology can be investigated at the molecular level with spatial and temporal resolution. In this tutorial review, we aim to introduce the important applications of photoactive molecules for elucidating cell biology on aspects of protein engineering, fluorescence labelling, gene regulation and cell physiological functions.

  18. Role of molecular cell biology in understanding disease.

    PubMed Central

    Savill, J.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular techniques have revolutionised our knowledge of cell and tissue function in both health and disease. We already have new and powerful treatments based on an understanding of communication between cells by messenger molecules called cytokines. Furthermore, there is great therapeutic promise in defining molecules which regulate cell adhesion, motility, proliferation, survival, and death. Rational manipulation of cell and tissue function for therapeutic ends may be much closer than you think. PMID:9022440

  19. Molecular profiling of endometrial carcinoma precursor, primary and metastatic lesions suggests different targets for treatment in obese compared to non-obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Anna; Hoivik, Erling A.; Mjøs, Siv; Holst, Frederik; Werner, Henrica M. J.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Gibson, William J.; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Wik, Elisabeth; Trovik, Jone; Halle, Mari K.; Øyan, Anne M.; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Stefansson, Ingunn; Mills, Gordon B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Salvesen, Helga B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is linked to increased incidence of endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) and complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). We here explore pattern and sequence of molecular alterations characterizing endometrial carcinogenesis in general and related to body mass index (BMI), to improve diagnostic stratification and treatment strategies. We performed molecular characterization of 729 prospectively collected EEC and CAH. Candidate biomarkers were identified in frozen samples by whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, oligonucleotide gene expression and Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (investigation cohort) and further explored in formalin fixed tissues by immunohistochemistry and Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization (validation cohort). We here demonstrate that PIK3CA mutations, PTEN loss, PI3K and KRAS activation are early events in endometrial carcinogenesis. Molecular changes related to KRAS activation and inflammation are more common in obese CAH patients, suggesting different prevention and systemic treatment strategies in obese and non-obese patients. We also found that oncoprotein Stathmin might improve preoperative diagnostic distinction between premalignant and malignant endometrial lesions. PMID:25415225

  20. [Molecular and metabolic changes in human clear cell liver foci].

    PubMed

    Ribback, S; Calvisi, D F; Cigliano, A; Rausch, J; Heidecke, C-D; Birth, M; Dombrowski, F

    2015-11-01

    Activation of the AKT/mTOR and Ras/MAPK pathways and the lipogenic phenotype are evident both in human hepatocellular carcinoma and in the rat model of insulin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in the earliest preneoplastic lesions, i.e. clear cell foci (CCF) of altered hepatocytes. These CCFs have also been described in the human liver but characterization of molecular and metabolic changes are still pending. In this study, human sporadic CCFs were investigated in a collection of human non-cirrhotic liver specimens using histology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and molecular pathological analysis. Human CCFs occurred in approximately 33 % of non-cirrhotic livers and stored masses of glycogen in the cytoplasm, largely due to reduced activity of glucose-6-phosphatase. Hepatocytes revealed an upregulation of the AKT/mTOR and the Ras/MAPK pathways, the insulin receptor, glucose transporters and enzymes of glycolysis and de novo lipogenesis. Proliferative activity was 2-fold higher than in extrafocal tissue. The CCFs of altered hepatocytes are metabolically and proliferatively active lesions even in humans. They resemble the well-known preneoplastic lesions from experimental models in terms of morphology, glycogen storage, overexpression of protooncogenic signaling pathways and activation of the lipogenic phenotype, which are also known in human hepatocellular carcinoma. This suggests that hepatic CCFs also represent very early lesions of hepatocarcinogenesis in humans.

  1. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the “molecular clutch” description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of Major Sperm Protein (MSP), which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. PMID:25383039

  2. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  3. Spatial expression of CLAVATA3 in the shoot apical meristem suggests it is not a stem cell marker in soybean.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chui E; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2013-12-01

    CLAVATA3 (CLV3), a stem cell marker in Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes a secreted peptide that maintains the stem cell population within the shoot apical meristem. This work investigated the CLV3 orthologue in a major legume crop, soybean (GmCLV3). Instead of being expressed in the three outermost layers of the meristem as in Arabidopsis, GmCLV3 was expressed deeper in the central zone beneath the fourth layer (L4) of the meristem, overlapping with the expression of soybean WUSCHEL. Subsequent investigation using an alternative stem cell marker (GmLOG1) revealed its expression within layers L2-L4, indicating that GmCLV3 is not a stem cell marker. Overexpression studies of GmCLV3 in Arabidopsis and complementation of clv3-2 mutant suggest similar functional capacity to that of Arabidopsis CLV3. The expression of soybean CLV1, which encodes a receptor for CLV3 in Arabidopsis, was not detectable in the central zone of the meristem via reverse-transcription PCR analysis of amplified RNA from laser-microdissected samples or in situ, implicating a diverged pathway in soybean. This study also reports the novel expression of GmLOG1 in initials of axillary meristem in the boundary region between the SAM and developing leaf primordia, before the expression of GmWUS or GmCLV3, indicating cytokinin as one of the earliest signals in initiating and specifying the stem cell population.

  4. Dental pulp stem cells: state of the art and suggestions for a true translation of research into therapy.

    PubMed

    La Noce, Marcella; Paino, Francesca; Spina, Anna; Naddeo, Pasqualina; Montella, Roberta; Desiderio, Vincenzo; De Rosa, Alfredo; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Tirino, Virginia; Laino, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    Stem cells have the ability to rescue and/or repair injured tissue. In humans, it is possible to isolate different types of stem cells from the body. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. In particular they represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. An electronic search was conducted on PubMed databases and supplemented with a manual study of relevant references. All research described in this review highlight that DPSCs are mesenchymal stem cells that could be used in clinical applications. Unfortunately, very few clinical trials have been reported. Major obstacles imposed on researchers are hindering the translation of potentially effective therapies to the clinic. Both researchers and regulatory institutions need to develop a new approach to this problem, drawing up a new policy for good manufacturing practice (GMP) procedures. We strongly suggest that only general rules be standardized rather than everything. Importantly, this would not have an effect on the safety of patients, but may very well affect the results, which cannot be identical for all patients, due to physiological diversity in the biology of each patient. Alternatively, it would be important to study the role of specific molecules that recruit endogenous stem cells for tissue regeneration. In this way, the clinical use of stem cells could be successfully developed. DPSCs are mesenchymal stem cells that differentiate into different tissues, maintain their characteristics after cryopreservation, differentiate into bone-like tissues when loaded on scaffolds in animal models, and regenerate bone in human grafts. In summary, all data reported up to now should encourage the development of clinical procedures using DPSCs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  5. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke. PMID:24222920

  6. Multimodality molecular imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke.

    PubMed

    Chao, Fangfang; Shen, Yehua; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke.

  7. Where's the glass? Biomarkers, molecular clocks, and microRNAs suggest a 200-Myr missing Precambrian fossil record of siliceous sponge spicules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, E. A.; Robinson, J.; Pisani, D.; Peterson, K.

    2010-12-01

    The earliest evidence for animal life comes from the fossil record of 24-isopropylcholestane, a sterane found in Cryogenian deposits, and whose precursors are found in modern demosponges, but not choanoflagellates, calcareans, hexactinellids, or eumetazoans. However, many modern demosponges are also characterized by the presence of siliceous spicules, and there are no convincing demosponge spicules in strata older than the Cambrian. This temporal disparity highlights a problem with our understanding of the Precambrian fossil record - either these supposed demosponge-specific biomarkers were derived from the sterols of some other organism and are simply retained in modern demosponges, or spicules do not primitively characterize crown-group demosponges. Resolving this issue requires resolving the phylogenetic placement of another group of sponges, the hexactinellids, which not only make a spicule thought to be homologous to the spicules of demosponges, but also make their first appearance near the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. Using two independent analytical approaches and data sets - traditional molecular phylogenetic analyses and the presence or absence of specific microRNA genes - we show that demosponges are monophyletic, and that hexactinellids are their sister group (together forming the Silicea). Thus, spicules must have evolved before the last common ancestor of all living siliceans, suggesting the presence of a significant gap in the silicean spicule fossil record. Molecular divergence estimates date the origin of this last common ancestor well within the Cryogenian, consistent with the biomarker record, and strongly suggests that siliceous spicules were present during the Precambrian but were not preserved.

  8. Where's the glass? Biomarkers, molecular clocks, and microRNAs suggest a 200-Myr missing Precambrian fossil record of siliceous sponge spicules.

    PubMed

    Sperling, E A; Robinson, J M; Pisani, D; Peterson, K J

    2010-01-01

    The earliest evidence for animal life comes from the fossil record of 24-isopropylcholestane, a sterane found in Cryogenian deposits, and whose precursors are found in modern demosponges, but not choanoflagellates, calcareans, hexactinellids, or eumetazoans. However, many modern demosponges are also characterized by the presence of siliceous spicules, and there are no convincing demosponge spicules in strata older than the Cambrian. This temporal disparity highlights a problem with our understanding of the Precambrian fossil record--either these supposed demosponge-specific biomarkers were derived from the sterols of some other organism and are simply retained in modern demosponges, or spicules do not primitively characterize crown-group demosponges. Resolving this issue requires resolving the phylogenetic placement of another group of sponges, the hexactinellids, which not only make a spicule thought to be homologous to the spicules of demosponges, but also make their first appearance near the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. Using two independent analytical approaches and data sets--traditional molecular phylogenetic analyses and the presence or absence of specific microRNA genes--we show that demosponges are monophyletic, and that hexactinellids are their sister group (together forming the Silicea). Thus, spicules must have evolved before the last common ancestor of all living siliceans, suggesting the presence of a significant gap in the silicean spicule fossil record. Molecular divergence estimates date the origin of this last common ancestor well within the Cryogenian, consistent with the biomarker record, and strongly suggests that siliceous spicules were present during the Precambrian but were not preserved.

  9. Central European parasitic flatworms of the family Renicolidae Dollfus, 1939 (Trematoda: Plagiorchiida): molecular and comparative morphological analysis rejects the synonymization of Renicola pinguis complex suggested by Odening.

    PubMed

    Heneberg, Petr; Sitko, Jiljí; Bizos, Jiří; Horne, Elizabeth C

    2016-10-01

    The Renicolidae are digenean parasites of piscivorous and molluscivorous birds. Although they exhibit few morphological autapomorphies and are highly variable, the numerous suggested re-classifications within the family have never been supported by any molecular analyses. We address the possible synonymization of species within the Renicola pinguis complex suggested previously by Odening. We provide and analyse sequences of two nuclear (ITS2, 28S rDNA) and two mitochondrial (CO1, ND1) DNA loci of central European species of the Renicolidae, namely Renicola lari, Renicola pinguis and Renicola sternae sp. n., and we also provide first sequences of Renicola sloanei. The combined molecular and comparative morphological analysis confirms the previously questioned validity of the three Renicola spp. of highly similar morphology, which display strict niche separation in terms of host specificity and selectivity. We identify two previously unreported clades within the genus Renicola; however, only one of them is supported by the analysis of adult worms. We also provide comparative measurements of the three examined closely related central European renicolids, and describe the newly proposed tern-specialized species Renicola sternae sp. n., which was previously repeatedly misidentified as Renicola paraquinta. Based on the extensive dataset collected in 1962-2015, we update the host spectrum of Renicolidae parasitizing central European birds (Renicola bretensis, R. lari, Renicola mediovitellata, R. pinguis, Renicola secunda and R. sternae sp. n.) and discuss their host-specific prevalence and intensity of infections.

  10. Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest Mechanisms Involving Early B-Cell Development in Canine IgA Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Frankowiack, Marcel; Kierczak, Marcin; Bergvall, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik; Tintle, Linda; Marti, Eliane; Roosje, Petra; Leeb, Tosso; Hedhammar, Åke; Hammarström, Lennart; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immune deficiency disorder in both humans and dogs, characterized by recurrent mucosal tract infections and a predisposition for allergic and other immune mediated diseases. In several dog breeds, low IgA levels have been observed at a high frequency and with a clinical resemblance to human IgAD. In this study, we used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genomic regions associated with low IgA levels in dogs as a comparative model for human IgAD. We used a novel percentile groups-approach to establish breed-specific cut-offs and to perform analyses in a close to continuous manner. GWAS performed in four breeds prone to low IgA levels (German shepherd, Golden retriever, Labrador retriever and Shar-Pei) identified 35 genomic loci suggestively associated (p <0.0005) to IgA levels. In German shepherd, three genomic regions (candidate genes include KIRREL3 and SERPINA9) were genome-wide significantly associated (p <0.0002) with IgA levels. A ~20kb long haplotype on CFA28, significantly associated (p = 0.0005) to IgA levels in Shar-Pei, was positioned within the first intron of the gene SLIT1. Both KIRREL3 and SLIT1 are highly expressed in the central nervous system and in bone marrow and are potentially important during B-cell development. SERPINA9 expression is restricted to B-cells and peaks at the time-point when B-cells proliferate into antibody-producing plasma cells. The suggestively associated regions were enriched for genes in Gene Ontology gene sets involving inflammation and early immune cell development. PMID:26225558

  11. Cell and molecular mechanics of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G.; Suresh, S.

    2003-11-01

    Living cells can sense mechanical forces and convert them into biological responses. Similarly, biological and biochemical signals are known to influence the abilities of cells to sense, generate and bear mechanical forces. Studies into the mechanics of single cells, subcellular components and biological molecules have rapidly evolved during the past decade with significant implications for biotechnology and human health. This progress has been facilitated by new capabilities for measuring forces and displacements with piconewton and nanometre resolutions, respectively, and by improvements in bio-imaging. Details of mechanical, chemical and biological interactions in cells remain elusive. However, the mechanical deformation of proteins and nucleic acids may provide key insights for understanding the changes in cellular structure, response and function under force, and offer new opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. This review discusses some basic features of the deformation of single cells and biomolecules, and examines opportunities for further research.

  12. Physiological and proteomic changes suggest an important role of cell walls in the high tolerance to metals of Elodea nuttallii.

    PubMed

    Larras, Floriane; Regier, Nicole; Planchon, Sébastien; Poté, John; Renaut, Jenny; Cosio, Claudia

    2013-12-15

    Macrophytes bioaccumulate metals, the suggestion being made that they be considered for phytoremediation. However, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of metal tolerance in these plants is necessary to allow full optimization of this approach. The present study was undertaken to gain insight into Hg and Cd accumulation and their effects in a representative macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii. Exposure to methyl-Hg (23 ng dm(-3)) had no significant effect while inorganic Hg (70 ng dm(-3)) and Cd (281 μg dm(-3)) affected root growth but did not affect shoots growth, photosynthesis, or antioxidant enzymes. Phytochelatins were confirmed as having a role in Cd tolerance in this plant while Hg tolerance seems to rely on different mechanisms. Histology and subcellular distribution revealed a localized increase in lignification, and an increased proportion of metal accumulation in cell wall over time. Proteomics further suggested that E. nuttallii was able to efficiently adapt its energy sources and the structure of its cells during Hg and Cd exposure. Storage in cell walls to protect cellular machinery is certainly predominant at environmental concentrations of metals in this plant resulting in a high tolerance highlighted by the absence of toxicity symptoms in shoots despite the significant accumulation of metals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene expression in bryozoan larvae suggest a fundamental importance of pre-patterned blastemic cells in the bryozoan life-cycle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bryozoa is a clade of aquatic protostomes. The bryozoan life cycle typically comprises a larval stage, which metamorphoses into a sessile adult that proliferates by asexual budding to form colonies. The homology of bryozoan larvae with other protostome larvae is enigmatic. Bryozoan larvae exhibit blastemic tissues that contribute to build the adult during morphogenesis. However, it remains unclear if the cells of these tissues are pre-determined according to their future fate or if the cells are undifferentiated, pluripotent stem cells. Gene expression studies can help to identify molecular patterning of larval and adult tissues and enlighten the evolution of bryozoan life cycle stages. Results We investigated the spatial expression of 13 developmental genes in the larval stage of the gymnolaemate bryozoan Bugula neritina. We found most genes expressed in discrete regions in larval blastemic tissues that form definitive components of the adult body plan. Only two of the 13 genes, BnTropomyosin and BnFoxAB, were exclusively expressed in larval tissues that are discarded during metamorphosis. Conclusions Our results suggest that the larval blastemas in Bugula are pre-patterned according to their future fate in the adult. The gene expression patterns indicate that some of the bryozoan blastemas can be interpreted to correspond to homologous adult tissues of other animals. This study challenges an earlier proposed view that metazoan larvae share homologous undifferentiated "set-aside cells", and instead points to an independent origin of the bryozoan larval stage with respect to other lophotrochozoans. PMID:21645327

  14. Effect of morphine on PC12 cells with molecular radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Yu, Xiaoli; Lu, Jiuyi; Zhang, Chunyang; Jin, Lei; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Dacheng; Chen, Die Yan

    2000-10-01

    Molecular Radar (MR) is a new method to detect biological processes in living cells at the level of molecular, it is also the newest means to get intracellular information. In this paper we study the effect of morphine on PC12 cells using MR. The results show that the effect of morphine on PC12 cells is time- and concentration-dependent. Morphine treating for short time induces the increase and fluctuation of intracellular (CA2+), while morphine treating for long time induces chromatin condensation, loss of mitochondria membrane potential apoptosis.

  15. Molecular pathogenesis of human prostate basal cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Henry, Gervaise; Malewska, Alicia; Mauck, Ryan; Gahan, Jeffrey; Hutchinson, Ryan; Torrealba, Jose; Francis, Franto; Roehrborn, Claus; Strand, Douglas

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of distinct phenotypes in human benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is essential to improving therapeutic intervention. Current therapies target smooth muscle and luminal epithelia for relief of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to BPH, but basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) remains untargeted. The incidence of has been reported at 8-10%, but a molecular and cellular characterization has not been performed on this phenotype. Using freshly digested tissue from surgical specimens, we performed RNA-seq analysis of flow cytometry-purified basal epithelia from 3 patients with and 4 patients without a majority BCH phenotype. qPCR was performed on 28 genes identified as significant from 13 non-BCH and 7 BCH specimens to confirm transcriptomic analysis. IHC was performed on several non-BCH and BCH specimens for 3 proteins identified as significant by transcriptomic analysis. A total of 141 human BPH specimens were analyzed for the presence of BCH. Clinical characteristics of non-BCH and BCH cohorts revealed no significant differences in age, PSA, prostate volume, medical treatment, or comorbidities. Quantitation of cellular subsets by flow cytometry in 11 BCH patients vs. 11 non-BCH patients demonstrated a significant increase in the ratio of basal to luminal epithelia in patients with BCH (P <0.05), but no significant differences in the total number of leukocytes. RNA-seq data from flow cytometry isolated basal epithelia from patients with and without BCH were subjected to gene set enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes, which revealed increased expression of members of the epidermal differentiation complex. Transcriptomic data were complemented by immunohistochemistry for members of the epidermal differentiation complex, revealing a morphological similarity to other stratified squamous epithelial layers. Increased expression of epidermal differentiation complex members and altered epithelial stratification resembles

  16. [Targeted molecular therapy based on advanced cancer stem cell model].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Improvement of cell purification and transplantation techniques have contributed to the identification of cell populations known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Although it was hypothesized that tumors are organized as hierarchies of tumor cells that are sustained by rare TICs, like normal tissue stem cells, there are several controversies towards such cancer stem cell model, e.g. reversible change of stem cell like population based on epigenetic changes, clonal genetic evolution and problems in xenotransplantation system. Despite complexity in cancer stem cell models, studies in cancer stem cell field have revealed that there are close relationship between cancer malignancy and stem cell properties, called "stemness". Understanding molecular mechanisms for controlling stemness would contribute to establishment of novel diagnostics or therapeutics for cancer.

  17. Reconstitution of Torso signaling in cultured cells suggests a role for both Trunk and Torso-like in receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Amarnath, Smita; Stevens, Leslie M; Stein, David S

    2017-02-15

    Formation of the Drosophila embryonic termini is controlled by the localized activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Torso. Both Torso and Torso's presumed ligand, Trunk, are expressed uniformly in the early embryo. Polar activation of Torso requires Torso-like, which is expressed by follicle cells adjacent to the ends of the developing oocyte. We find that Torso expressed at high levels in cultured Drosophila cells is activated by individual application of Trunk, Torso-like or another known Torso ligand, Prothoracicotropic Hormone. In addition to assays of downstream signaling activity, Torso dimerization was detected using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Trunk and Torso-like were active when co-transfected with Torso and when presented to Torso-expressing cells in conditioned medium. Trunk and Torso-like were also taken up from conditioned medium specifically by cells expressing Torso. At low levels of Torso, similar to those present in the embryo, Trunk and Torso-like alone were ineffective but acted synergistically to stimulate Torso signaling. Our results suggest that Torso interacts with both Trunk and Torso-like, which cooperate to mediate dimerization and activation of Torso at the ends of the Drosophila embryo. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. The Molecular Basis of Communication between Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical messengers mediate long-range hormonal communication and short-range neural communication between cells. Background information on peptides, steroids, neuropeptides, and specialized enzymes is given. Investigations reveal that the two systems have many common intercellular messenger molecules. (DH)

  19. The Molecular Basis of Communication between Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical messengers mediate long-range hormonal communication and short-range neural communication between cells. Background information on peptides, steroids, neuropeptides, and specialized enzymes is given. Investigations reveal that the two systems have many common intercellular messenger molecules. (DH)

  20. Cell and molecular biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This document contains only the abstracts of 92 presentations on the biology of Chlamydomonas. Topics include gene transformations, gene regulation, biosynthetic pathways, cell surfaces, circadian clocks, and the development and structure of the flagellar apparatus. (TEM)

  1. Molecular design of materials for cell separation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, K

    1988-12-01

    There has been a strong demand in biomedical sciences to isolate viable cell populations with high yield and purity. An important facet of this work was to develop new polymeric adsorbent for the separation of lymphocyte subpopulations. Based on our strategy of separating cells through their differential ionic affinity toward multiphase-structured adsorbent with ionically derivatized microdomains, a series of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/polyamine graft copolymers (HA copolymers) was prepared. HA copolymer columns were found to show specific adsorption affinity toward B lymphocytes, and allows for separation of B and T lymphocytes in high yield and purity with a short operating time. Separation mechanism involved in the resolution of B and T lymphocytes by HA copolymer column is discussed in this paper. Further, photo-induced desorption of cells from the adsorbent derivatized with photo-responsive functional group (azobenzene group) was demonstrated to emphasize the feasibility of photo-regulated chromatography as a novel tool in cell separation technology.

  2. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol's effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  3. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol’s effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  4. Molecular force sensors to measure stress in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2017-06-01

    Molecularly generated forces are essential for most activities of biological cells, but also for the maintenance of steady state or homeostasis. To quantitatively understand cellular dynamics in migration, division, or mechanically guided differentiation, it will be important to exactly measure stress fields within the cell and the extracellular matrix. Traction force microscopy and related techniques have been established to determine the stress transmitted from adherent cells to their substrates. However, different approaches are needed to directly assess the stress generated inside the cell. This has recently led to the development of novel molecular force sensors. In this topical review, we briefly mention methods used to measure cell-external forces, and then summarize and explain different designs for the measurement of cell-internal forces with their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  5. The phenotype and activation status of T and NK cells in porcine colostrum suggest these are central/effector memory cells.

    PubMed

    Hlavova, Karolina; Stepanova, Hana; Faldyna, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In pigs, the epitheliochorial placenta does not allow transfer of maternally derived antibodies or immune cells to the fetus. Thus, piglets are dependent on intake of colostrum for acquisition of passive immunity during the neonatal period. As well as immunoglobulin G (IgG), cellular components of colostrum, mainly lymphocytes, can enter the systemic circulation and secondary lymphoid organs of the neonate. In order to understand the function and immunological role of these cells, a flow cytometric study was undertaken to characterise the cellular profile and phenotype of T cells and NK cells present in porcine colostrum. The results indicated that the greatest numbers of lymphocytes were found on the first day of lactation. The predominant cell types in colostrum were CD8(+) single positive T cells (53.6%), followed by CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive T cells (21.1%), CD2(+)CD8(+) γδ T cells (15.0%) and NK cells (13.5%). CD4(+) single positive T cells (4.4%) and other γδ T cell subpopulations (1.8% CD2(-)CD8(-) and 0.4% CD2(+)CD8(-)) were present in colostrum at low levels. Although the profile of the T cell subpopulations during the first 3 days of lactation remained constant, the absolute numbers of T and NK cells decreased significantly in the first few hours of lactation. Expression of CCR7, CD11b, CD25, CD45RA and MHC class II was used to assess the activation status of T and NK cells in colostrum. T cell subpopulations expressed markers consistent with an effector memory phenotype, indicating that these were antigen-experienced cells. The phenotype of colostral T and NK cells suggests a role in mucosal immunity and potentially in transfer of passive immunity from sow to piglet.

  6. Comparison of molecular mechanisms mediating cell contact phenomena in model developmental systems: an exploration of universality.

    PubMed

    Bowers-Morrow, Vivienne M; Ali, Sinan O; Williams, Keith L

    2004-08-01

    system. However, comparison of molecular models for dynamic adhesion in sponges and in vertebrates indicates that, in spite of significant differences in the details of the way specific cell-cell adhesion is mediated, similar principles are involved in the mechanisms employed by members of disparate phyla. Universal requirements are likely to include (a) rapidly reversible intermolecular interactions; (b) low-affinity intermolecular interactions with fast on-off rates; (c) the compounding of multiple intermolecular interactions; (d) associated regulatory signalling systems. The apparent widespread employment of molecular mechanisms involving cadherin-like cell adhesion molecules suggests the fundamental importance of cadherin function during development, particularly in epithelial morphogenesis, cell sorting, and segregation of cells.

  7. Molecular checkpoints controlling natural killer cell activation and their modulation for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Hun Sik

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have gained considerable attention as promising therapeutic tools for cancer therapy due to their innate selectivity against cancer cells over normal healthy cells. With an array of receptors evolved to sense cellular alterations, NK cells provide early protection against cancer cells by producing cytokines and chemokines and exerting direct cytolytic activity. These effector functions are governed by signals transmitted through multiple receptor–ligand interactions but are not achieved by engaging a single activating receptor on resting NK cells. Rather, they require the co-engagement of different activating receptors that use distinct signaling modules, due to a cell-intrinsic inhibition mechanism. The redundancy of synergizing receptors and the inhibition of NK cell function by a single class of inhibitory receptor suggest the presence of common checkpoints to control NK cell activation through different receptors. These molecular checkpoints would be therapeutically targeted to harness the power of NK cells against diverse cancer cells that express heterogeneous ligands for NK cell receptors. Recent advances in understanding the activation of NK cells have revealed promising candidates in this category. Targeting such molecular checkpoints will facilitate NK cell activation by lowering activation thresholds, thereby providing therapeutic strategies that optimize NK cell reactivity against cancer. PMID:28360428

  8. Photodynamic Efficiency: From Molecular Photochemistry to Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Bacellar, Isabel O. L.; Tsubone, Tayana M.; Pavani, Christiane; Baptista, Mauricio S.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinical modality used to treat cancer and infectious diseases. The main agent is the photosensitizer (PS), which is excited by light and converted to a triplet excited state. This latter species leads to the formation of singlet oxygen and radicals that oxidize biomolecules. The main motivation for this review is to suggest alternatives for achieving high-efficiency PDT protocols, by taking advantage of knowledge on the chemical and biological processes taking place during and after photosensitization. We defend that in order to obtain specific mechanisms of cell death and maximize PDT efficiency, PSes should oxidize specific molecular targets. We consider the role of subcellular localization, how PS photochemistry and photophysics can change according to its nanoenvironment, and how can all these trigger specific cell death mechanisms. We propose that in order to develop PSes that will cause a breakthrough enhancement in the efficiency of PDT, researchers should first consider tissue and intracellular localization, instead of trying to maximize singlet oxygen quantum yields in in vitro tests. In addition to this, we also indicate many open questions and challenges remaining in this field, hoping to encourage future research. PMID:26334268

  9. Photodynamic Efficiency: From Molecular Photochemistry to Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Bacellar, Isabel O L; Tsubone, Tayana M; Pavani, Christiane; Baptista, Mauricio S

    2015-08-31

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinical modality used to treat cancer and infectious diseases. The main agent is the photosensitizer (PS), which is excited by light and converted to a triplet excited state. This latter species leads to the formation of singlet oxygen and radicals that oxidize biomolecules. The main motivation for this review is to suggest alternatives for achieving high-efficiency PDT protocols, by taking advantage of knowledge on the chemical and biological processes taking place during and after photosensitization. We defend that in order to obtain specific mechanisms of cell death and maximize PDT efficiency, PSes should oxidize specific molecular targets. We consider the role of subcellular localization, how PS photochemistry and photophysics can change according to its nanoenvironment, and how can all these trigger specific cell death mechanisms. We propose that in order to develop PSes that will cause a breakthrough enhancement in the efficiency of PDT, researchers should first consider tissue and intracellular localization, instead of trying to maximize singlet oxygen quantum yields in in vitro tests. In addition to this, we also indicate many open questions and challenges remaining in this field, hoping to encourage future research.

  10. Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Corey; Fardad, Shima; Sincore, Alex; Vangheluwe, Marie; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Optical trapping of single biological cells has become an established technique for controlling and studying fundamental behavior of single cells with their environment without having "many-body" interference. The development of such an instrument for optical diagnostics (including Raman and fluorescence for molecular diagnostics) via laser spectroscopy with either the "trapping" beam or secondary beams is still in progress. This paper shows the development of modular multi-spectral imaging optical tweezers combining Raman and Fluorescence diagnostics of biological cells.

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Dating Suggest That Hemidactylus anamallensis Is Not a Member of the Hemidactylus Radiation and Has an Ancient Late Cretaceous Origin

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Rohini; Karanth, K. Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Background of the Work The phylogenetic position and evolution of Hemidactylus anamallensis (family Gekkonidae) has been much debated in recent times. In the past it has been variously assigned to genus Hoplodactylus (Diplodactylidae) as well as a monotypic genus ‘Dravidogecko’ (Gekkonidae). Since 1995, this species has been assigned to Hemidactylus, but there is much disagreement between authors regarding its phylogenetic position within this genus. In a recent molecular study H. anamallensis was sister to Hemidactylus but appeared distinct from it in both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. However, this study did not include genera closely allied to Hemidactylus, thus a robust evaluation of this hypothesis was not undertaken. Methods The objective of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic position of H. anamallensis within the gekkonid radiation. To this end, several nuclear and mitochondrial markers were sequenced from H. anamallensis, selected members of the Hemidactylus radiation and genera closely allied to Hemidactylus. These sequences in conjunction with published sequences were subjected to multiple phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore the nuclear dataset was also subjected to molecular dating analysis to ascertain the divergence between H. anamallensis and related genera. Results and Conclusion Results showed that H. anamallensis lineage was indeed sister to Hemidactylus group but was separated from the rest of the Hemidactylus by a long branch. The divergence estimates supported a scenario wherein H. anamallensis dispersed across a marine barrier to the drifting peninsular Indian plate in the late Cretaceous whereas Hemidactylus arrived on the peninsular India after the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate. Based on these molecular evidence and biogeographical scenario we suggest that the genus Dravidogecko should be resurrected. PMID:23696785

  12. Characterization of V beta-bearing cells in athymic (nu/nu) mice suggests an extrathymic pathway for T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rocha, B

    1990-04-01

    In the present article, the expression of the T cell receptor (TcR) beta chain and other T cell molecules was evaluated in surface immunoglobulin-negative spleen cell populations of young and old BALB/c and C57BL/6 nude mice, using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The results obtained show that in young nude mice, most Thy-1high cells do not express other T cell markers. These mice have, however, a sizable population of Thy-1low cells with the same phenotype of alpha/beta+, CD4-CD8- thymocytes or MRL/lpr peripheral T cells, expressing predominantly genes of the V beta 8 family. The evolution of alpha/beta+ cells in aging nudes is strongly suggestive of an extrathymic pathway of differentiation of these cells since (a) the acquisition of high density TcR and CD3, as well as Thy-1 or CD4CD8 antigens at the cell surface of nude V beta+ T cells is not simultaneous; (b) alpha/beta+ cells in nude mice co-express other T cell markers at random and, even in old mice, they never completely resemble to the predominant high Thy-1+ CD3+ TcR alpha/beta+, CD4+CD8+ cells of euthymic controls; and (c) BALB/c nude T cells express V beta 11 genes, that are deleted in euthymic BALB/c mice. This latter finding may also indicate differences in the mechanisms of selection of T cells specificities in the thymus vs. the peripheral pools.

  13. Cell and molecular biology for diagnostic and therapeutic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Our body contains 100 trillion cells. However, each cell has certain function and structure. For maintaining their integrity, cells will be collaborating with each other and with extracellular matrix surround them to form a tissue. These interactions effect internally on many networks or pathway such as signalling pathway, metabolic pathway and transport network in the cell. These networks interact with each other to maintain cell survival, cell structure and function and moreover the tissue as well as the organ which the cells built. Therefore, as part of a tissue, genetic and epigenetic abnormality of a cell can also alter these networks, and moreover disturb the function of the tissue itself. Hence, condition of genetic and epigenetic of the cell may affect other conditions in omics level such as transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics characteristics which can be differentiated by a particular unique molecular profile from each level, which can be used for diagnostic as well as for targeted therapy.

  14. Molecular diagnosis and phylogeographic analysis of Trypanosoma evansi in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) suggest an epidemiological importance of this species in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Dueñez, Jeiczon; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Valencia-Hernández, Andrés; Sánchez-Arévalo, Diana; Poche-Ceballos, Alba; Ortíz-Álvarez, José; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M

    2017-04-01

    Surra disease is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi, a salivary trypanosome, originally from Africa, which affects a wide range of mammalian worldwide. Dogs are highly susceptible to T. evansi infection and they often exhibit strong clinical signs than can lead to death, even within weeks in untreated acute cases. The present survey is the first report through clinical, parasitological and molecular approaches, of two fatal cases of T. evansi in Colombian dogs. After analysing two presumptive cases of infection with Trypanosoma spp., in dogs by parasitological methods, we confirmed by molecular techniques the presence of T. evansi, finding clinical signs such as anaemia, thrombocytopenia and hepatosplenomegaly, with fatal outcomes within a week even after the treatment. A phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis of both isolates from T. evansi, suggest a complex evolutionary relationship with species of Trypanozoon subgenus. Moreover, the haplotype H2 was observed for the first time in Colombia, in common areas where human cases of T. evansi infection has been reported. These findings imply a relevant problem for animal health in the country, and highlight the importance of this infection in domestic animals and the possibility of human cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular and serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) suggests potential transmission risk in areas of recent acute Chagas disease outbreaks in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Dueñez, Jeiczon; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Cantillo-Barraza, Omar; Hernández, Carolina; Ramírez, Juan David; Góngora-Orjuela, Agustín

    2017-06-01

    Chagas disease is a zoonotic infection widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of America, including more than 50% of the Colombian territory. In the last years, an increase of outbreaks of acute Chagas disease has been observed in the east of the country due to environmental changes and mammal movements toward human settlements. Given the importance of dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) as reservoir hosts and sentinels of Trypanosoma cruzi infection across different regions of America, in this study we reported a serological and molecular detection of T. cruzi infection in 242 dogs from an endemic area of Meta department (East of Colombia), with recent emergence of acute Chagas disease outbreaks. The distribution of T. cruzi infection in dogs was not homogeneous, ranging from 0-41.4% and 0-5.1% in different sampling sectors, through serological (ELISA/IFAT) and molecular methods (conventional and real time PCR), respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that dog infection was associated with specific sampling sectors. Our results show a moderate seroprevalence of infection and active circulation of T. cruzi in dogs from this zone, which suggest areas with potential risk of infection to human that must be taken into consideration when Chagas disease control programs need to be implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of male germ cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hecht, N B

    1998-07-01

    During spermatogenesis, diploid stem cells differentiate, undergo meiosis, and transform into haploid spermatozoa. As this precisely timed series of events proceeds, chromosomal ploidy is reduced and the nucleosomes of the chromatin are replaced by a transcriptionally quiescent protamine-containing nucleus. The premature termination of transcription during the haploid phase of spermatogenesis necessitates an especially prominent role for posttranscriptional regulation in the temporal and spatial expression of many testis-specific proteins and isozymes. In this review article, discussion will focus on novel mechanisms regulating gene expression in mammalian male germ cells from genome to protein.

  17. Cell Engineering and Molecular Pharming for Biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, M.A; Rahmah, Anisa ur; Sinskey, A.J; Rha, C.K

    2008-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are often produced by recombinant E. coli or mammalian cell lines. This is usually achieved by the introduction of a gene or cDNA coding for the protein of interest into a well-characterized strain of producer cells. Naturally, each recombinant production system has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. This paper examines the current practices, developments, and future trends in the production of biopharmaceuticals. Platform technologies for rapid screening and analyses of biosystems are reviewed. Strategies to improve productivity via metabolic and integrated engineering are also highlighted. PMID:19662143

  18. Innate recognition of apoptotic cells: novel apoptotic cell-associated molecular patterns revealed by crossreactivity of anti-LPS antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tennant, I; Pound, J D; Marr, L A; Willems, J J L P; Petrova, S; Ford, C A; Paterson, M; Devitt, A; Gregory, C D

    2013-05-01

    Cells dying by apoptosis are normally cleared by phagocytes through mechanisms that can suppress inflammation and immunity. Molecules of the innate immune system, the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are able to interact not only with conserved structures on microbes (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs) but also with ligands displayed by apoptotic cells. We reasoned that PRRs might therefore interact with structures on apoptotic cells - apoptotic cell-associated molecular patterns (ACAMPs) - that are analogous to PAMPs. Here we show that certain monoclonal antibodies raised against the prototypic PAMP, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can crossreact with apoptotic cells. We demonstrate that one such antibody interacts with a constitutively expressed intracellular protein, laminin-binding protein, which translocates to the cell surface during apoptosis and can interact with cells expressing the prototypic PRR, mCD14 as well as with CD14-negative cells. Anti-LPS cross reactive epitopes on apoptotic cells colocalised with annexin V- and C1q-binding sites on vesicular regions of apoptotic cell surfaces and were released associated with apoptotic cell-derived microvesicles (MVs). These results confirm that apoptotic cells and microbes can interact with the immune system through common elements and suggest that anti-PAMP antibodies could be used strategically to characterise novel ACAMPs associated not only with apoptotic cells but also with derived MVs.

  19. Equivocal p16 immunostaining in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: staining patterns are suggestive of HPV status.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongchuan Will; Weinreb, Ilan; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Perez-Ordoñez, Bayardo

    2012-12-01

    p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is commonly used as a surrogate marker for human papillomavirus (HPV) detection in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). However, the HPV status of tumors not staining strongly for p16 is difficult to interpret and may require the use of PCR, not available in all laboratories, as a final arbiter. We aim to determine if staining pattern in equivocal p16 staining and correlation to the percentage of positively stained tumor cells is predictive of HPV status. A retrospective review was performed on all SCCHN that underwent p16 IHC and PCR in our institution from 2007 to 2010. Descriptors of staining pattern in the original IHC report were retrieved. All available IHC slides were reviewed and reclassified using consensus staining pattern descriptors. Original and reclassified descriptors were compared to the final PCR HPV status for statistical significance using the χ(2) test. An estimate of the percentage of tumor cells that showed any form of staining was performed. Thirty-two SCCHN cases that underwent PCR HPV testing had equivocal p16 IHC results. Twenty-six cases available for review were reclassified into four staining patterns. Comparing age, sex, tumor site and diagnosis to HPV PCR status showed no statistically significant findings. However, comparing original descriptors to HPV status was statistically significant with isolated staining associated with negative HPV status (p = 0.0002). Analysis using reclassified descriptors showed strong association of membranous/cytoplasmic staining of isolated cells with negative HPV status and faint, diffuse nuclear and cytoplasmic staining with positive HPV status (p = 0.00006). HPV-negative cases with the former pattern had no more than 30 % positively-stained tumor cells and HPV-positive cases with the latter pattern had 50-90 % positively-stained cells. Our results suggest that pattern of staining in p16 IHC is associated with HPV status. For instance, a diffuse

  20. Phosphoproteomics profiling suggests a role for nuclear βΙPKC in transcription processes of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Costa-Junior, Helio Miranda; Garavello, Nicole Milaré; Duarte, Mariana Lemos; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Glaser, Talita; de Andrade, Alexander; Labate, Carlos A; Ferreira, André Teixeira da Silva; Perales, Jonas Enrique Aguilar; Xavier-Neto, José; Krieger, José Eduardo; Schechtman, Deborah

    2010-12-03

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key role in embryonic stem cell (ESC) proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation. However, the function of specific PKC isoenzymes have yet to be determined. Of the PKCs expressed in undifferentiated ESCs, βIPKC was the only isoenzyme abundantly expressed in the nuclei. To investigate the role of βΙPKC in these cells, we employed a phosphoproteomics strategy and used two classical (cPKC) peptide modulators and one βIPKC-specific inhibitor peptide. We identified 13 nuclear proteins that are direct or indirect βΙPKC substrates in undifferentiated ESCs. These proteins are known to be involved in regulating transcription, splicing, and chromatin remodeling during proliferation and differentiation. Inhibiting βΙPKC had no effect on DNA synthesis in undifferentiated ESCs. However, upon differentiation, many cells seized to express βΙPKC and βΙPKC was frequently found in the cytoplasm. Taken together, our results suggest that βIPKC takes part in the processes that maintain ESCs in their undifferentiated state.

  1. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Truong, David M; Hewitt, F Curtis; Hanson, Joseph H; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2015-08-01

    Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a "ribozyme") and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed "retrohoming". Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have impacted the

  2. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Truong, David M.; Hewitt, F. Curtis; Hanson, Joseph H.; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a “ribozyme”) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed “retrohoming”. Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have impacted the

  3. Anticorrelation between Local Photoluminescence and Photocurrent Suggests Variability in Contact to Active Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Giles E; Moerman, David; Ginger, David S

    2016-11-22

    We use high-resolution, spatially resolved, laser beam induced current, confocal photoluminescence, and photoconductive atomic force microscopy (pcAFM) measurements to correlate local solar cell performance with spatially heterogeneous local material properties in methylammonium lead triiodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite solar cells. We find that, for this material and device architecture, the photocurrent heterogeneity measured via pcAFM on devices missing a top selective contact with traditional Au-coated tips is significantly larger than the photocurrent heterogeneity observed in full devices with both electron- and hole-selective extraction layers, indicating that extraction barriers at the Au/perovskite interface are ameliorated by deposition of the organic charge extraction layer. Nevertheless, in completed, efficient device structures (PCE ≈ 16%) with state-of-the-art nickel oxide and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid (PCBM) methyl ester contacts, we observe that the local photoluminescence (PL) is weakly anticorrelated with local photocurrent at both short-circuit and open-circuit conditions. We determine that the contact materials are fairly homogeneous; thus the heterogeneity stems from the perovskite itself. We suggest a cause for the anticorrelation as being related to local carrier extraction heterogeneity. However, we find that the contacts are still the dominating source of losses in these devices, which minimizes the impact of the material heterogeneity on device performance at present. These results suggest that further steps to prevent recombination losses at the interfaces are needed to help perovskite-based cells approach theoretical efficiency limits; only at this point will material heterogeneity become crucial.

  4. Engineered Aptamers to Probe Molecular Interactions on the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Batool, Sana; Bhandari, Sanam; George, Shanell; Okeoma, Precious; Van, Nabeela; Zümrüt, Hazan E; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika

    2017-08-29

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of molecular interactions on the cell membrane. To decipher such interactions, molecular scaffolds can be engineered as a tool to modulate these events as they occur on the cell membrane. To guarantee reliability, scaffolds that function as modulators of cell membrane events must be coupled to a targeting moiety with superior chemical versatility. In this regard, nucleic acid aptamers are a suitable class of targeting moieties. Aptamers are inherently chemical in nature, allowing extensive site-specific chemical modification to engineer sensing molecules. Aptamers can be easily selected using a simple laboratory-based in vitro evolution method enabling the design and development of aptamer-based functional molecular scaffolds against wide range of cell surface molecules. This article reviews the application of aptamers as monitors and modulators of molecular interactions on the mammalian cell surface with the aim of increasing our understanding of cell-surface receptor response to external stimuli. The information gained from these types of studies could eventually prove useful in engineering improved medical diagnostics and therapeutics.

  5. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27909729

  6. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. Surprisingly, we report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair-cell stereocilia and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS/LHFPL5, TMIE and TMC1/2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distribution. PMID:27893727

  7. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS). It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI)) gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI. PMID:24701583

  8. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zizhen; Grillet, Nicolas; Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. We report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair cell stereocilia, and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS, TMIE, TMC1 and TMC2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and that it contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distributions.

  9. Embryonic stem cell biology: insights from molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Karim; Wu, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have therapeutic potential in disorders of cellular loss such as myocardial infarction, type I diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. ES cell biology in living subjects was largely poorly understood until incorporation of molecular imaging into the field. Reporter gene imaging works by integrating a reporter gene into ES cells and using a reporter probe to induce a signal detectable by normal imaging modalities. Reporter gene imaging allows for longitudinal tracking of ES cells within the same host for a prolonged period of time. This has advantages over postmortem immunohistochemistry and traditional imaging modalities. The advantages include expression of reporter gene is limited to viable cells, expression is conserved between generations of dividing cells, and expression can be linked to a specific population of cells. These advantages were especially useful in studying a dynamic cell population such as ES cells and proved useful in elucidating the biology of ES cells. Reporter gene imaging identified poor integration of differentiated ES cells transplanted into host tissue as well as delayed donor cell death as reasons for poor long-term survival in vivo. This imaging technology also confirmed that ES cells indeed have immunogenic properties that factor into cell survival and differentiation. Finally, reporter gene imaging improved our understanding of the neoplastic risk of undifferentiated ES cells in forming teratomas. Despite such advances, much remains to be understood about ES cell biology to translate this technology to the bedside, and reporter gene imaging will certainly play a key role in formulating this understanding.

  10. High Molecular Weight Isoforms of Growth Hormone In Cells of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Weigent, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of research exists to support the idea that cells of the immune system produce growth hormone (GH). However, the structure and mechanism of action of lymphocyte-derived GH continues to remain largely unknown. Here we present the results of Western analysis of whole cell extracts showing that different molecular weight isoforms of GH of approximately 100 kDa, 65 kDa, and 48 kDa can be detected in primary mouse cells of the immune system and in the mouse EL4 cell line. The identity of the 65 kDa and 48 kDa isoforms of GH were confirmed by mass spectrometry. The various isoforms were detected in both enriched T and B spleen cell populations. The large molecular weight isoform appears to reside primarily in the cytoplasm whereas the lower molecular weight 65 kDa and 48 kDa isoforms were detected primarily in the nucleus. These results also suggest that GH isoforms are induced by oxidative stress. In EL4 cells overexpressing GH, the expression of luciferase controlled by a promoter containing the antioxidant response element is increased almost three-fold above control. The data suggest that the induction of isoforms of the GH molecule in cells of the immune system may be an important mechanism of adaptation and/or protection of lymphoid cells under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:21741628

  11. Colorectal cancer cell lines lack the molecular heterogeneity of clinical colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Auman, James Todd; McLeod, Howard L

    2010-01-01

    Histologically similar colorectal cancers (CRCs) exhibit a wide range of outcomes, suggesting that knowledge of the molecular differences might provide insight into this heterogeneity. Cancer cell lines have been used in preclinical studies to identify gene expression alterations that influence response to chemotherapeutic agents. However, it is not clear to what extent available CRC cell lines reflect the molecular heterogeneity observed in clinical colorectal tumors. We compared genome-wide gene expression data from 22 CRC cell lines and 276 clinical colorectal tumors to determine whether the cell lines were able to represent the variability in expression profiles seen in the clinical tissues. Following mean centered data normalization, hierarchical clustering was performed on the samples using literature-derived biologic and pharmacogenomic gene sets. In general, the majority of cell lines tended to cluster together in a single group, as a subcluster within the clinical tissues, although a few cell lines showed distinct expression profiles from the majority of cell lines. The gene expression data comparison suggests that CRC cell lines do not adequately reflect the molecular heterogeneity of clinical colorectal tumors.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Théry, Clotilde; Regnault, Armelle; Garin, Jérôme; Wolfers, Joseph; Zitvogel, Laurence; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Raposo, Graça; Amigorena, Sebastian

    1999-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles secreted by hematopoietic cells upon fusion of late multivesicular endosomes with the plasma membrane. Dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes induce potent antitumor immune responses in mice, resulting in the regression of established tumors (Zitvogel, L., A. Regnault, A. Lozier, J. Wolfers, C. Flament, D. Tenza, P. Ricciardi-Castagnoli, G. Raposo, and S. Amigorena. 1998. Nat. Med. 4:594–600). To unravel the molecular basis of exosome-induced immune stimulation, we now analyze the regulation of their production during DC maturation and characterize extensively their protein composition by peptide mass mapping. Exosomes contain several cytosolic proteins (including annexin II, heat shock cognate protein hsc73, and heteromeric G protein Gi2α), as well as different integral or peripherally associated membrane proteins (major histocompatiblity complex class II, Mac-1 integrin, CD9, milk fat globule-EGF-factor VIII [MFG-E8]). MFG-E8, the major exosomal component, binds integrins expressed by DCs and macrophages, suggesting that it may be involved in exosome targeting to these professional antigen-presenting cells. Another exosome component is hsc73, a cytosolic heat shock protein (hsp) also present in DC endocytic compartments. hsc73 was shown to induce antitumor immune responses in vivo, and therefore could be involved in the exosome's potent antitumor effects. Finally, exosome production is downregulated upon DC maturation, indicating that in vivo, exosomes are produced by immature DCs in peripheral tissues. Thus, DC-derived exosomes accumulate a defined subset of cellular proteins reflecting their endosomal biogenesis and accounting for their biological function. PMID:10545503

  13. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  14. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  15. A decade of molecular cell biology: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Asifa; Fuchs, Elaine; Mitchison, Tim; Shaw, Reuben J; St Johnston, Daniel; Strasser, Andreas; Taylor, Susan; Walczak, Claire; Zerial, Marino

    2011-09-23

    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology celebrated its 10-year anniversary during this past year with a series of specially commissioned articles. To complement this, here we have asked researchers from across the field for their insights into how molecular cell biology research has evolved during this past decade, the key concepts that have emerged and the most promising interfaces that have developed. Their comments highlight the broad impact that particular advances have had, some of the basic understanding that we still require, and the collaborative approaches that will be essential for driving the field forward.

  16. Protein kinase CK2 governs the molecular decision between encephalitogenic TH17 cell and Treg cell development

    PubMed Central

    Ulges, Alexander; Witsch, Esther J.; Pramanik, Gautam; Klein, Matthias; Birkner, Katharina; Bühler, Ulrike; Wasser, Beatrice; Luessi, Felix; Stergiou, Natascha; Dietzen, Sarah; Brühl, Till-Julius; Bohn, Toszka; Bündgen, Georg; Kunz, Horst; Waisman, Ari; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Zipp, Frauke; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T helper 17 (TH17) cells represent a discrete TH cell subset instrumental in the immune response to extracellular bacteria and fungi. However, TH17 cells are considered to be detrimentally involved in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast to TH17 cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to be pivotal in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Thus, the balance between Treg cells and TH17 cells determines the severity of a TH17 cell-driven disease and therefore is a promising target for treating autoimmune diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this balance are still unclear. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibition as well as genetic ablation of the protein kinase CK2 (CK2) ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity and relapse incidence. Furthermore, CK2 inhibition or genetic ablation prevents TH17 cell development and promotes the generation of Treg cells. Molecularly, inhibition of CK2 leads to reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and strongly attenuated expression of the IL-23 receptor, IL-17, and GM-CSF. Thus, these results identify CK2 as a nodal point in TH17 cell development and suggest this kinase as a potential therapeutic target to treat TH17 cell-driven autoimmune responses. PMID:27555590

  17. Isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, So-ichiro; Ma, Yuran; Ohtani, Takuji; Watanabe, Yoko; Murakami, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has great regenerative capacity which is dependent on muscle stem cells, also known as satellite cells. A loss of satellite cells and/or their function impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and leads to a loss of skeletal muscle power; therefore, the molecular mechanisms for maintaining satellite cells in a quiescent and undifferentiated state are of great interest in skeletal muscle biology. Many studies have demonstrated proteins expressed by satellite cells, including Pax7, M-cadherin, Cxcr4, syndecan3/4, and c-met. To further characterize satellite cells, we established a method to directly isolate satellite cells using a monoclonal antibody, SM/C-2.6. Using SM/C-2.6 and microarrays, we measured the genes expressed in quiescent satellite cells and demonstrated that Hesr3 may complement Hesr1 in generating quiescent satellite cells. Although Hesr1- or Hesr3-single knockout mice show a normal skeletal muscle phenotype, including satellite cells, Hesr1/Hesr3-double knockout mice show a gradual decrease in the number of satellite cells and increase in regenerative defects dependent on satellite cell numbers. We also observed that a mouse's genetic background affects the regenerative capacity of its skeletal muscle and have established a line of DBA/2-background mdx mice that has a much more severe phenotype than the frequently used C57BL/10-mdx mice. The phenotype of DBA/2-mdx mice also seems to depend on the function of satellite cells. In this review, we summarize the methodology of direct isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of satellite cells based on our results. The relationship between the regenerative capacity of satellite cells and progression of muscular disorders is also summarized. In the last part, we discuss application of the accumulating scientific information on satellite cells to treatment of patients with muscular disorders. PMID:24273513

  18. The evolutionary history of seahorses (Syngnathidae: Hippocampus): molecular data suggest a West Pacific origin and two invasions of the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Teske, Peter R; Cherry, Michael I; Matthee, Conrad A

    2004-02-01

    Sequence data derived from four markers (the nuclear RP1 and Aldolase and the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and cytochrome b genes) were used to determine the phylogenetic relationships among 32 species belonging to the genus Hippocampus. There were marked differences in the rate of evolution among these gene fragments, with Aldolase evolving the slowest and the mtDNA cytochrome b gene the fastest. The RP1 gene recovered the highest number of nodes supported by >70% bootstrap values from parsimony analysis and >95% posterior probabilities from Bayesian inference. The combined analysis based on 2317 nucleotides resulted in the most robust phylogeny. A distinct phylogenetic split was identified between the pygmy seahorse, Hippocampus bargibanti, and a clade including all other species. Three species from the western Pacific Ocean included in our study, namely H. bargibanti, H. breviceps, and H. abdominalis occupy basal positions in the phylogeny. This and the high species richness in the region suggests that the genus evolved somewhere in the West Pacific. There is also fairly strong molecular support for the remaining species being subdivided into three main evolutionary lineages: two West Pacific clades and a clade of species present in both the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean. The phylogeny obtained herein suggests at least two independent colonization events of the Atlantic Ocean, once before the closure of the Tethyan seaway, and once afterwards.

  19. Low-molecular-weight heparins inhibit CCL21-induced T cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Kent W; Campbell, James J; Travers, Jeffrey B; Hromas, Robert A

    2002-07-01

    The chemokine CCL21, also known as Exodus-2/6-Ckine/secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine/T cell activator protein-4, is the most potent stimulator of T cell migration and adhesion yet described. Endothelial heparin-like glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are thought to present chemokines at sites of inflammation, maintaining a local concentration gradient to which leukocytes can respond. In contrast, this study found that GAGs markedly inhibit the ability of CCL21 to stimulate T cell adhesion and chemotaxis. Enzymes, such as heparinase, that split GAGs into component-sulfated saccharides abrogate this inhibition, suggesting a mechanism for local tissue regulation of CCL21 function. Low-molecular-weight heparins also strongly inhibit CCL21 adhesion and chemotaxis. Therefore, low-molecular-weight heparins may be effective therapeutic agents in decreasing the pathology of T cell-infiltrative autoimmune diseases by targeting the CCL21 regulation of T cell infiltration.

  20. Largescale Transcriptomics Analysis Suggests Over-Expression of BGH3, MMP9 and PDIA3 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Shao, Fangyang; Pi, Weidong; Shi, Cong; Chen, Yujia; Gong, Diping; Wang, Bingjie; Cao, Zhiwei; Tang, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been reported as the most prevalent cancer of the head and neck region, while early diagnosis remains challenging. Here we took a comprehensive bioinformatics study on microarray data of 326 OSCC clinical samples with control of 165 normal tissues. The cell interaction pathways of ECM-receptor interaction and focal adhesion were found to be significantly regulated in OSCC samples. Further analysis of the topological properties and expression consistency identified that three hub genes in the gene interaction network, MMP9, PDIA3 and BGH3, were consistently up-expressed in OSCC samples. When being validated on additional microarray datasets of 41 OSCC samples, the validation rate of over-expressed BGH3, MMP9, and PDIA3 reached 90%, 90% and 84% respectively. At last, immuno-histochemical assays were done to test the protein expression of the three genes on newly collected clinical samples of 35 OSCC, 20 samples of pre-OSCC stage, and 12 normal oral mucosa specimens. Their protein expression levels were also found to progressively increase from normal mucosa to pre-OSCC stage and further to OSCC (ANOVA p = 0.000), suggesting their key roles in OSCC pathogenesis. Based on above solid validation, we propose BGH3, MMP9 and PDIA3 might be further explored as potential biomarkers to aid OSCC diagnosis. PMID:26745629

  1. Transcriptome from circulating cells suggests dysregulated pathways associated with long-term recurrent events following first-time myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Rahul; Li, Xing; Chiriac, Anca; Goel, Kashish; Terzic, Andre; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Nelson, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Whole-genome gene expression analysis has been successfully utilized to diagnose, prognosticate, and identify potential therapeutic targets for high-risk cardiovascular diseases. However, the feasibility of this approach to identify outcome-related genes and dysregulated pathways following first-time myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unknown and may offer a novel strategy to detect affected expressome networks that predict long-term outcome. Methods and Results Whole-genome expression microarray on blood samples from normal cardiac function controls (n=21) and first-time AMI patients (n=31) within 48-hours post-MI revealed expected differential gene expression profiles enriched for inflammation and immune-response pathways. To determine molecular signatures at the time of AMI associated with long-term outcomes, transcriptional profiles from sub-groups of AMI patients with (n=5) or without (n=22) any recurrent events over an 18-month follow-up were compared. This analysis identified 559 differentially-expressed genes. Bioinformatic analysis of this differential gene-set for associated pathways revealed 1) increasing disease severity in AMI patients is associated with a decreased expression of genes involved in the developmental epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathway, and 2) modulation of cholesterol transport genes that include ABCA1, CETP, APOA1, and LDLR is associated with clinical outcome. Conclusion Differentially regulated genes and modulated pathways were identified that were associated with recurrent cardiovascular outcomes in first-time AMI patients. This cell-based approach for risk stratification in AMI could represent a novel, non-invasive platform to anticipate modifiable pathways and therapeutic targets to optimize long-term outcome for AMI patients and warrants further study to determine the role of metabolic remodeling and regenerative processes required for optimal outcomes. PMID:24801707

  2. The TUNEL assay suggests mandibular regression by programmed cell death during presoldier differentiation in the nasute termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toga, Kouhei; Yoda, Shinichi; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2011-09-01

    Termite soldiers are the most specialized caste of social insects in terms of their morphology and function. Soldier development requires increased juvenile hormone (JH) titer and the two molts via a presoldier stage. These molts are accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, including the exaggeration and regression of certain organs. Soldiers of the most apical termitid subfamily Nasutitermitinae possess not only a horn-like frontal tube, called the nasus, for the projection of defensive chemicals from the frontal gland reservoir but also regressed mandibles. Although candidate genes regulating soldier mandibular growth were reported in a relatively basal termite species, the regulatory mechanisms of mandibular regression remain unknown. To clarify these mechanisms, we performed morphological and histological examinations of the mandibles during soldier differentiation in Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Mandibular size reduced dramatically during soldier differentiation, and mandibular regression occurred just prior to the presoldier molt. Spotted TUNEL signals were observed in regressing mandibles of presoldiers, suggesting that the regression involved programmed cell death. Because soldiers of N. takasagoensis possess exaggerated organs (nasus and frontal gland), the present results suggest that JH-dependent regressive mechanisms exist in the mandibles without interfering with the formation of the exaggerated organs.

  3. The TUNEL assay suggests mandibular regression by programmed cell death during presoldier differentiation in the nasute termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis.

    PubMed

    Toga, Kouhei; Yoda, Shinichi; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2011-09-01

    Termite soldiers are the most specialized caste of social insects in terms of their morphology and function. Soldier development requires increased juvenile hormone (JH) titer and the two molts via a presoldier stage. These molts are accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, including the exaggeration and regression of certain organs. Soldiers of the most apical termitid subfamily Nasutitermitinae possess not only a horn-like frontal tube, called the nasus, for the projection of defensive chemicals from the frontal gland reservoir but also regressed mandibles. Although candidate genes regulating soldier mandibular growth were reported in a relatively basal termite species, the regulatory mechanisms of mandibular regression remain unknown. To clarify these mechanisms, we performed morphological and histological examinations of the mandibles during soldier differentiation in Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Mandibular size reduced dramatically during soldier differentiation, and mandibular regression occurred just prior to the presoldier molt. Spotted TUNEL signals were observed in regressing mandibles of presoldiers, suggesting that the regression involved programmed cell death. Because soldiers of N. takasagoensis possess exaggerated organs (nasus and frontal gland), the present results suggest that JH-dependent regressive mechanisms exist in the mandibles without interfering with the formation of the exaggerated organs.

  4. Molecular and cell biology aspects of plague

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guy R.

    2000-01-01

    A 70-kb virulence plasmid (sometimes called pYV) enables Yersinia spp. to survive and multiply in the lymphoid tissues of their host. It encodes the Yop virulon, a system consisting of secreted proteins called Yops and their dedicated type III secretion apparatus called Ysc. The Ysc apparatus forms a channel composed of 29 proteins. Of these, 10 have counterparts in almost every type III system. Secretion of some Yops requires the assistance, in the bacterial cytosol, of small individual chaperones called the Syc proteins. These chaperones act as bodyguards or secretion pilots for their partner Yop. Yop proteins fall into two categories. Some are intracellular effectors, whereas the others are “translocators” needed to deliver the effectors across the eukaryotic plasma membrane, into eukaryotic cells. The translocators (YopB, YopD, LcrV) form a pore of 16–23 Å in the eukaryotic cell plasma membrane. The effector Yops are YopE, YopH, YpkA/YopO, YopP/YopJ, YopM, and YopT. YopH is a powerful phosphotyrosine phosphatase playing an antiphagocytic role by dephosphorylating several focal adhesion proteins. YopE and YopT contribute to antiphagocytic effects by inactivating GTPases controlling cytoskeleton dynamics. YopP/YopJ plays an anti-inflammatory role by preventing the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. It also induces rapid apoptosis of macrophages. Less is known about the role of the phosphoserine kinase YopO/YpkA and YopM. PMID:10922034

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of a nanoscopic nematic twist cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirantsev, Leonid V.; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2007-08-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of a nanoscopic nematic twist cell confined within two bounding substrates with conflicting anchoring conditions. The results of our simulations show that the torque transmitted through the cell drops significantly below a certain critical cell’s thickness, thus confirming the predictions of the continuum Landau theory extrapolated down to the nanoscopic scale [F. Bisi, E. G. Virga, and G. E. Durand, Phys. Rev. E 70, 042701 (2004)].

  6. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Apetoh, Lionel; Baert, Thais; Birge, Raymond B.; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Breckpot, Karine; Brough, David; Chaurio, Ricardo; Cirone, Mara; Coosemans, An; Coulie, Pierre G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dini, Luciana; de Witte, Peter; Dudek-Peric, Aleksandra M.; Faggioni, Alberto; Fucikova, Jitka; Gaipl, Udo S.; Golab, Jakub; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hemminki, Akseli; Herrmann, Martin; Hodge, James W.; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Land, Walter G.; Madeo, Frank; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Mattarollo, Stephen R.; Maueroder, Christian; Merendino, Nicolò; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pabst, Thomas; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Riganti, Chiara; Romano, Erminia; Rufo, Nicole; Smyth, Mark J.; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Spisek, Radek; Stagg, John; Vacchelli, Erika; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vandenberk, Lien; Van den Eynde, Benoit J.; Van Gool, Stefaan; Velotti, Francesca; Zitvogel, Laurence; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens, including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of the so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs). The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD) favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical, and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation. PMID:26635802

  7. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease.

  8. Advances in simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Guo, Wenge; Li, Ming; Ma, Wentao; Meng, Sen

    2015-02-01

    Recently, more focuses have been put on organic semiconductors because of its advantages, such as its flexibility, ease of fabrication and potential low cost, etc. The reasons we pay highlight on small molecular photovoltaic material are its ease of purification, easy to adjust and determine structure, easy to assemble range units and get high carrier mobility, etc. Simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells before the experiment can help the researchers find relationship between the efficiency and structure parameters, properties of material, estimate the performance of the device, bring the optimization of guidance. Also, the applicability of the model used in simulation can be discussed by comparison with experimental data. This paper summaries principle, structure, progress of numerical simulation on organic small molecular solar cells.

  9. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jarsch, Iris K; Daste, Frederic; Gallop, Jennifer L

    2016-08-15

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists.

  10. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Daste, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists. PMID:27528656

  11. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  12. Cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in histopathology specimens.

    PubMed

    Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Lassoued, Wiem; Grama, Kedar; Nath, Sumit K; Zhu, Jianliang; Oueslati, Ridha; Feldman, Michael; Lee, William M F; Roysam, Badrinath

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the use of a computer-assisted technology for objective, cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in specified cell types in histopathology specimens, with the aim of advancing current visual estimation and pixel-level (rather than cell-based) quantification methods. Tissue specimens were multiplex-immunostained to reveal cell structures, cell type markers, and analytes, and imaged with multispectral microscopy. The image data were processed with novel software that automatically delineates and types each cell in the field, measures morphological features, and quantifies analytes in different subcellular compartments of specified cells.The methodology was validated with the use of cell blocks composed of differentially labelled cultured cells mixed in known proportions, and evaluated on human breast carcinoma specimens for quantifying human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Ki67, phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase, and phospho-S6. Automated cell-level analyses closely matched human assessments, but, predictably, differed from pixel-level analyses of the same images. Our method reveals the type, distribution, morphology and biomarker state of each cell in the field, and allows multiple biomarkers to be quantified over specified cell types, regardless of their abundance. It is ideal for studying specimens from patients in clinical trials of targeted therapeutic agents, for investigating minority stromal cell subpopulations, and for phenotypic characterization to personalize therapy and prognosis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  13. Cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in histopathology specimens

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Lassoued, Wiem; Grama, Kedar; Nath, Sumit K; Zhu, Jianliang; Oueslati, Ridha; Feldman, Michael; Lee, William M F; Roysam, Badrinath

    2011-01-01

    Aims To investigate the use of a computer-assisted technology for objective, cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in specified cell types in histopathology specimens, with the aim of advancing current visual estimation or pixel-level (rather than cell-based) quantification methods. Methods and results Tissue specimens were multiplex-immunostained to reveal cell structures, cell type markers, and analytes, and imaged with multispectral microscopy. The image data were processed with novel software that automatically delineates and types each cell in the field, measures morphological features, and quantifies analytes in different subcellular compartments of specified cells. The methodology was validated with the use of cell blocks composed of differentially labelled cultured cells mixed in known proportions, and evaluated on human breast carcinoma specimens for quantifying human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Ki67, phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase, and phospho-S6. Automated cell-level analyses closely matched human assessments, but, predictably, differed from pixel-level analyses of the same images. Conclusions Our method reveals the type, distribution, morphology and biomarker state of each cell in the field, and allows multiple biomarkers to be quantified over specified cell types, regardless of abundance. It is ideal for studying specimens from patients in clinical trials of targeted therapeutic agents, for investigating minority stromal cell subpopulations, and for phenotypic characterization to personalize therapy and prognosis. PMID:21771025

  14. Delineation of molecular pathway activities of the chronic antidepressant treatment response suggests important roles for glutamatergic and ubiquitin–proteasome systems

    PubMed Central

    Park, D I; Dournes, C; Sillaber, I; Ising, M; Asara, J M; Webhofer, C; Filiou, M D; Müller, M B; Turck, C W

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify molecular pathways related to antidepressant response. We administered paroxetine to the DBA/2J mice for 28 days. Following the treatment, the mice were grouped into responders or non-responders depending on the time they spent immobile in the forced swim test. Hippocampal metabolomics and proteomics analyses revealed that chronic paroxetine treatment affects glutamate-related metabolite and protein levels differentially in the two groups. We found significant differences in the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and neuronal nitric oxide synthase proteins between the two groups, without any significant alterations in the respective transcript levels. In addition, we found that chronic paroxetine treatment altered the levels of proteins associated with the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS). The soluble guanylate cyclase-β1, proteasome subunit α type-2 and ubiquitination levels were also affected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from antidepressant responder and non-responder patients suffering from major depressive disorder. We submit that the glutamatergic system and UPS have a crucial role in the antidepressant treatment response in both mice and humans. PMID:28375208

  15. Teaching Introductory Cell & Molecular Biology: A Historical and Empirical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Herbert B.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the reorganized introductory cell and molecular biology lecture course at the State University of New York at Binghamton that was designed to address the issues of lack of active student participation and the stress put on memorization rather than analytical skills. Emphasizes teaching the subject historically and empirically…

  16. Molecular evolution of the vertebrate mechanosensory cell and ear

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Beisel, Kirk W.; Pauley, Sarah; Soukup, Garrett

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of mechanosensation, mechanosensory cell development and mechanosensory organ development is reviewed with an emphasis on its evolution. In contrast to eye evolution and development, which apparently modified a genetic program through intercalation of genes between the master control genes on the top (Pax6, Eya1, Six1) of the hierarchy and the structural genes (rhodopsin) at the bottom, the as yet molecularly unknown mechanosensory channel precludes such a firm conclusion for mechanosensors. However, recent years have seen the identification of several structural genes which are involved in mechanosensory tethering and several transcription factors controlling mechanosensory cell and organ development; these warrant the interpretation of available data in very much the same fashion as for eye evolution: molecular homology combined with potential morphological parallelism. This assertion of molecular homology is strongly supported by recent findings of a highly conserved set of microRNAs that appear to be associated with mechanosensory cell development across phyla. The conservation of transcription factors and their regulators fits very well to the known or presumed mechanosensory specializations which can be mostly grouped as variations of a common cellular theme. Given the widespread distribution of the molecular ability to form mechanosensory cells, it comes as no surprise that structurally different mechanosensory organs evolved in different phyla, presenting a variation of a common theme specified by a conserved set of transcription factors in their cellular development. Within vertebrates and arthropods, some mechanosensory organs evolved into auditory organs, greatly increasing sensitivity to sound through modifications of accessory structures to direct sound to the specific sensory epithelia. However, while great attention has been paid to the evolution of these accessory structures in vertebrate fossils, comparatively less attention has

  17. THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL SIGNATURES OF CELLS FROM THE HUMAN PEYRONIE'S DISEASE PLAQUE AND THE ABILITY OF THESE CELLS TO GENERATE A PLAQUE IN A RAT MODEL SUGGEST POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, R; Vernet, D; Kovanecz, I; Rajfer, J; Gonzalez-Cadavid, NF

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The success of medical therapies for Peyronie's disease (PD) has not been optimal, possibly because many of them went directly to clinical application without sufficient preclinical scientific research. Previous studies revealed cellular and molecular pathways involved in the formation of the PD plaque, and in particular the role of the myofibroblast. Aims The current work aimed to determine under normal and fibrotic conditions what differentiates PD cells from tunica albuginea (TA) and corpora cavernosa (CC) cells, by defining their global transcriptional signatures and testing in vivo whether PD cells can generate a PD like plaque Main Outcomes Measures Fibroproliferative features of PD cells and identification of related key genes as novel targets to reduce plaque size Methods Human TA, PD, and CC cells were grown with TGFβ1 (TA+, PD+, CC+) or without it (TA−, PD−, CC−) and assayed by: a) immunofluorescence, western blot and RT/PCR for myofibroblast, smooth muscle cell and stem cell markers; b) collagen content; and c) DNA microarray analysis. The ability of PD+ cells to induce a PD like plaque in an immuno-suppressed rat model was assessed by Masson trichrome and Picrosirius Red. Results Upon TGFβ1stimulation, collagen levels were increased by myofibroblasts in the PD+ but not in the CC+ cells. The transcriptional signature of the PD− cells identified fibroproliferative, myogenic (myofibroblasts), inflammatory, and collagen turnover genes, that differentiate them from TA− or CC− cells, and respond to TGFβ1 with a PD+ fibrotic phenotype, by upregulation of IGF1, ACTG2, MYF5, ACTC1, PSTN, COL III, MMP3, and others. The PD+ cells injected into the TA of the rat induce a PD like plaque. Conclusions This suggests a novel combination therapy to eliminate a PD plaque, by targeting the identified genes to: a) improve collagenase action by stimulating endogenous MMPs specific to key collagen types, and b) counteract fibromatosis by inhibiting

  18. Frequent mutations of p53 gene in oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas with and without human papillomavirus (HPV) involvement suggest the dominant role of environmental carcinogens in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F.; Syrjänen, S.; Tervahauta, A.; Kurvinen, K.; Wang, L.; Syrjänen, K.

    1994-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that alcohol intake, use of tobacco, ingestion of mycotoxins and nitrosamines and nutritional deficiencies are high-risk factors for the development of oesophageal cancer. Similarly, viral infections have been postulated to play a role in some tumours. However, the molecular events underlying the development of oesophageal carcinoma are poorly understood as yet. Loss of p53 tumour-suppressor gene function has been found in different human malignancies, and it can occur in a variety of ways, including gene mutation and interaction with the E6 protein of oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Because the oesophageal mucosa is potentially exposed to mutagens and HPVs, we studied DNA samples derived from nine HPV-positive squamous cell carcinomas and 12 HPV-negative tumours. Exons 5-9 of the p53 gene containing phylogenetically conserved domains were examined using the polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique. HPV detection was done using DNA in situ hybridisation with biotin-labelled HPV DNA probes. Mutations were detected in eight (38%) out of the 21 cases. Three mutations were found in exons 5/6, three in exon 7 and two in exon 8/9. Six (50%) of the 12 HPV-negative carcinomas showed p53 mutations. Two (22.2%) of the nine HPV-positive carcinomas were found to contain p53 mutations as well; one contained HPV 16 DNA sequences and showed p53 mutation in exon 8/9, and the other was HPV 6/11 positive with the mutation in exon 5/6. Although mutations were more common in HPV-negative tumours (50.0% vs 22.2%), the difference in p53 mutations in HPV-positive and -negative tumours did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.1946). These data indicate that inactivation of the p53 gene is a frequent event in oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas and such an inactivation might be an important molecular pathway for the development of oesophageal cancer. The findings of p53 mutations in HPV

  19. Molecular interplay between cdk4 and p21 dictates G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gulappa, Thippeswamy; Reddy, Ramadevi Subramani; Suman, Suman; Nyakeriga, Alice M.; Damodaran, Chendil

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 3, 9-dihydroxy-2-prenylcoumestan (pso), a furanocoumarin, on PC-3 and C4-2B castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Pso caused significant G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell growth. Molecular analysis of cyclin (D1, D2, D3, and E), cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) (cdks 2, 4, and 6), and cdk inhibitor (p21 and p27) expression suggested transcriptional regulation of the cdk inhibitors and more significant downregulation of cdk4 than of cyclins or other cdks. Overexpression of cdk4, or silencing of p21 or p27, overcame pso-induced G0/G1 arrest, suggesting that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest is a potential mechanism of growth inhibition in CRPC cells. PMID:23684928

  20. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  1. Molecular interaction fields and 3D-QSAR studies of p53-MDM2 inhibitors suggest additional features of ligand-target interaction.

    PubMed

    Dezi, Cristina; Carotti, Andrea; Magnani, Matteo; Baroni, Massimo; Padova, Alessandro; Cruciani, Gabriele; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2010-08-23

    The design and optimization of small molecule inhibitors of the murine double minute clone 2-p53 (p53-MDM2) interaction has attracted a great deal of interest as a way to novel anticancer therapies. Herein we report 3D-QSAR studies of 41 small molecule inhibitors based on the use of molecular interaction fields and docking experiments as part of an approach to generating predictive models of MDM2 affinity and shedding further light on the structural elements of the ligand-target interaction. These studies have yielded predictive models explaining much of the variance of the 41 compound training set and satisfactorily predicting with 75% success an external test set of 36 compounds. Not surprisingly, and in full agreement with previous data, inspection of the 3D-QSAR coefficients reveals that the major driving force for potent inhibition is given by the hydrophobic interaction between the inhibitors and the p53 binding cleft of MDM2. More surprisingly, and challenging previous suggestions, the projection of the 3D-QSAR coefficients back onto the experimental structures of MDM2 provides an intriguing hypothesis concerning an active role played by the N-terminal region of MDM2 in ligand binding.

  2. Molecular markers of cell adhesion in ameloblastomas. An update

    PubMed Central

    González-González, Rogelio; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Damian-Matsumura, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin, and though it is of a benign nature, it frequently infiltrates the bone, has a high rate of recurrence and could potentially become malignant. Cellular adhesion potentially plays an important role in the manifestation of these characteristics and in the tumor biology of ameloblastomas. Losses of cell-cell and extracellular matrix adhesion and cohesion are among the first events that occur in the invasion and growth of tumors of epithelial origin. The present review includes a description of the molecules that are involved in cell adhesion as reported for various types of ameloblastomas and discusses the possible roles of these molecules in the biological behaviors of this odontogenic tumor. Knowledge of the complex mechanisms in which these molecules play a role is critical for the research and discovery of future therapeutic targets. Key words:Ameloblastoma, cellular adhesion, molecular markers, cell-cell adhesion, extracellular matrix-cell adhesion. PMID:23986011

  3. FAMA: A Molecular Link between Stomata and Myrosin Cells.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Makoto; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-10-01

    Plants use sophisticated defense strategies against herbivores, including the myrosinase-glucosinolate system in Brassicales plants. This system sequesters myrosinase in myrosin cells, which are idioblasts in inner leaf tissues, and produces a toxic compound when cells are damaged by herbivores. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying myrosin cell development are largely unknown, recent studies have revealed that two key components, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor (FAMA) and vesicle trafficking factors (such as SYNTAXIN OF PLANTS 22), regulate the differentiation and fate determination of myrosin cells. FAMA also functions as a master regulator of guard cell (GC) differentiation. In this review, we discuss how FAMA operates two distinct genetic programs: the generation of myrosin cells in inner plant tissue and GCs in the epidermis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.

    2007-07-01

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the hemispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides significantly faster binding kinetics and ensures more spatially homogeneous distribution of local (from a pixel) signals over a cell in the transient regime. The advantage of using thin slabs with small volume of analyte solution may be hampered by the much longer binding kinetics needing the auxiliary mixing devices. Our analysis proves that the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment should be included to the list of essential factors at biochip designing.

  5. Molecular pathways regulating mitotic spindle orientation in animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Michelle S.; Johnston, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Orientation of the cell division axis is essential for the correct development and maintenance of tissue morphology, both for symmetric cell divisions and for the asymmetric distribution of fate determinants during, for example, stem cell divisions. Oriented cell division depends on the positioning of the mitotic spindle relative to an axis of polarity. Recent studies have illuminated an expanding list of spindle orientation regulators, and a molecular model for how cells couple cortical polarity with spindle positioning has begun to emerge. Here, we review both the well-established spindle orientation pathways and recently identified regulators, focusing on how communication between the cell cortex and the spindle is achieved, to provide a contemporary view of how positioning of the mitotic spindle occurs. PMID:23571210

  6. Depletion of high molecular weight dextran from the red cell surface measured by particle electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Rad, Samar; Gao, Jie; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K; Neu, Björn

    2009-02-01

    The reversible aggregation of human red blood cells (RBC) by proteins or polymers continues to be of biological and biophysical interest, yet the mechanistic details governing the process are still being explored. A depletion model has been proposed for aggregation by the neutral polyglucose dextran and its applicability at high molecular weights has been recently documented. In the present study the depletion of high molecular weight dextrans on the red cell surface was measured as a function of polymer molecular mass (40 kDa-28 MDa), ionic strength (5 and 15 mM NaCl) and polymer concentration (< or =0.9 g/dL). The experimental data clearly indicate an increasing depletion effect with increasing molecular weight: the effects of medium viscosity on RBC mobility were markedly overestimated by the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski relation, with the difference increasing with dextran molecular mass. These results agree with the concept of polymer depletion near the RBC surface and lend strong support to a "depletion model" mechanism for dextran-mediated RBC aggregation. Our findings provide important new insight into polymer-RBC interactions and suggest the usefulness of this model for fundamental studies of cell-cell affinity and for the development of new agents to stabilize or destabilize specific bio-fluids.

  7. Coevolution of paired receptors in Xenopus carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule families suggests appropriation as pathogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Kammerer, Robert

    2016-11-16

    In mammals, CEACAM1 and closely related members represent paired receptors with similar extracellular ligand-binding regions and cytoplasmic domains with opposing functions. Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM3 which have inhibitory ITIM/ITSM and activating ITAM-like motifs, respectively, in their cytoplasmic regions are such paired receptors. Various bacterial pathogens bind to CEACAM1 on epithelial and immune cells facilitating both entry into the host and down-regulation of the immune response whereas interaction with granulocyte-specific CEACAM3 leads to their uptake and destruction. It is unclear whether paired CEACAM receptors also exist in other vertebrate clades. We identified more than 80 ceacam genes in Xenopus tropicalis and X. laevis. They consist of two subgroups containing one or two putative paired receptor pairs each. Analysis of genomic sequences of paired receptors provide evidence that their highly similar ligand binding domains were adjusted by recent gene conversion events. In contrast, selection for diversification is observed among inhibitory receptor orthologs of the two frogs which split some 60 million years ago. The allotetraploid X. laevis arose later by hybridization of two closely related species. Interestingly, despite the conservation of the genomic landscape surrounding the homeologous ceacam loci only one locus resembles the one found in X. tropicalis. From the second X. laevis locus more than 80 % of the ceacam genes were lost including 5 of the 6 paired receptor genes. This suggests that once the gene for one of the paired receptors is lost the remaining gene cluster degrades rapidly probably due to lack of selection pressure exerted by pathogens. The presence of paired receptors and selection for diversification suggests that also in amphibians CEACAM1-related inhibitory proteins are or were used as pathogen receptors.

  8. Probing (macro)molecular transport through cell walls.

    PubMed

    Kilcher, Giona; Delneri, Daniela; Duckham, Craig; Tirelli, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    We here report a study on the passive permeability of hydrophobic probes through the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study we have prepared a series of fluorescent probes with similar chemical composition and molecular weight ranging from a few hundreds to a few thousands of g mol(-1). Their permeation into the cell body exhibits a clear MW cut-off and the underlying mechanism is governed by the permeation of individual molecules rather than aggregates. We also show that it is possible to reversibly alter the cell wall permeation properties without compromising the essence of its structure, by modifying the polarity/dielectric constant of the wall through solvent exchange.

  9. Advances in Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging for Tracking Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    The high mortality rate associated with cardiovascular disease is partially due to the lack of proliferative cells in the heart. Without adequate repair following myocardial infarction, progressive dilation can lead to heart failure. Stem cell therapies present one promising option for treating cardiovascular disease, though the specific mechanisms by which they benefit the heart remain unclear. Before stem cell therapies can be used safely in human populations, their biology must be investigated using innovative technologies such as multi-modality molecular imaging. The present review will discuss the basic principles, labeling techniques, clinical applications, and drawbacks associated with four major modalities: radionuclide imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and fluorescence imaging. PMID:20458434

  10. Molecular aspects of renal cell carcinoma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Hari; Huh, Jung-Sik; Rove, Kyle O; Crompton, Luiza; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Kim, Fernando J

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tubules of the kidney. RCC, the incidence of which is increasing annually, represents five percent of adult epithelial cancers. Clear cell carcinoma represents the most frequent histological subtype. RCC is characterized by a lack of early warning signs, diverse clinical manifestations. Incidentally detected tumors in asymptomatic individuals have been steadily increasing owing to the increased usage of various imaging technologies. Currently there are no recommendations for screening to detect and make an early diagnosis of renal cancer. But in recent years, the discovery of new molecular and cytogenetic markers has led to the recognition and classification of several novel subtypes of RCC, and the introduction of molecular-targeted therapy for advanced-stage RCC. We performed a literature review using PubMed and discuss current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, treatment, and future research directions of RCC. PMID:21969126

  11. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  12. Familial renal cell carcinoma: clinical and molecular genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, E.R.; Yates, J.R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% of all human cancer, but familial cases are infrequent. Riches (1963) and Griffin et al. (1984) in a population-based case-control study found a family history of renal cell carcinoma in 2.4% of affected patients compared to 1.4% of controls. Nevertheless the importance of inherited tumours in clinical practice and medical research is disproportionate to their frequency. In clinical practice recognition of familial RCC can provide opportunities to prevent morbidity and mortality by appropriate screening. In medical research recent advances in molecular genetics offer the prospect of isolating the genes involved in the pathogenesis of familial RCC and of the more common sporadic cases. In this article we review the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited renal cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma). PMID:1997093

  13. miR-223-3p regulates cell growth and apoptosis via FBXW7 suggesting an oncogenic role in human testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jikai; Shi, Hao; Li, Xidan; Chen, Gang; Larsson, Catharina; Lui, Weng-Onn

    2017-01-01

    miR-223-3p is deregulated in several tumor types and plays an important role in tumorigenesis and progression. However, its role in the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) remains uncharacterized. We previously demonstrated that miR-223-3p expression was increased in TGCTs compared with normal testes (NT), suggesting that miR-223-3p may have an oncogenic role in TGCT. Using published dataset and The Cancer Genome Atlas database, we validated higher miR-223-3p expression in TGCTs than NT, and found a negative correlation between miR-223-3p and FBXW7 mRNA expression levels. Using both gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we show that miR-223-3p regulates FBXW7 protein expression, cell growth and apoptosis in TGCT cell lines. Additionally, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of the full-length coding sequence of FBXW7 could rescue the cell growth and apoptotic effects mediated by miR-223-3p. Our findings suggest an oncogenic role for miR-223-3p in TGCT, which promotes cell growth and inhibits apoptosis through repression of FBXW7. PMID:28000896

  14. How to Train a Cell - Cutting-Edge Molecular Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapiński, Jakub; Kiełbus, Michał; Kałafut, Joanna; Kos, Michał; Stepulak, Andrzej; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2017-03-01

    In biological systems, the formation of molecular complexes is the currency for all cellular processes. Traditionally, functional experimentation was targeted to single molecular players in order to understand its effects in a cell or animal phenotype. In the last few years, we have been experiencing rapid progress in the development of ground-breaking molecular biology tools that affect the metabolic, structural, morphological, and (epi)genetic instructions of cells by chemical, optical (optogenetic) and mechanical inputs. Such precise dissection of cellular processes is not only essential for a better understanding of biological systems, but will also allow us to better diagnose and fix common dysfunctions. Here, we present several of these emerging and innovative techniques by providing the reader with elegant examples on how these tools have been implemented in cells, and, in some cases, organisms, to unravel molecular processes in minute detail. We also discuss their advantages and disadvantages with particular focus on their translation to multicellular organisms for in vivo spatiotemporal regulation. We envision that further developments of these tools will not only help solve the processes of life, but will give rise to novel clinical and industrial applications.

  15. The Eukaryotic Cell Originated in the Integration and Redistribution of Hyperstructures from Communities of Prokaryotic Cells Based on Molecular Complementarity

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Vic; Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In the “ecosystems-first” approach to the origins of life, networks of non-covalent assemblies of molecules (composomes), rather than individual protocells, evolved under the constraints of molecular complementarity. Composomes evolved into the hyperstructures of modern bacteria. We extend the ecosystems-first approach to explain the origin of eukaryotic cells through the integration of mixed populations of bacteria. We suggest that mutualism and symbiosis resulted in cellular mergers entailing the loss of redundant hyperstructures, the uncoupling of transcription and translation, and the emergence of introns and multiple chromosomes. Molecular complementarity also facilitated integration of bacterial hyperstructures to perform cytoskeletal and movement functions. PMID:19582221

  16. The eukaryotic cell originated in the integration and redistribution of hyperstructures from communities of prokaryotic cells based on molecular complementarity.

    PubMed

    Norris, Vic; Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2009-06-04

    In the "ecosystems-first" approach to the origins of life, networks of non-covalent assemblies of molecules (composomes), rather than individual protocells, evolved under the constraints of molecular complementarity. Composomes evolved into the hyperstructures of modern bacteria. We extend the ecosystems-first approach to explain the origin of eukaryotic cells through the integration of mixed populations of bacteria. We suggest that mutualism and symbiosis resulted in cellular mergers entailing the loss of redundant hyperstructures, the uncoupling of transcription and translation, and the emergence of introns and multiple chromosomes. Molecular complementarity also facilitated integration of bacterial hyperstructures to perform cytoskeletal and movement functions.

  17. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, W. Marston; Spellman, Paul T.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Creighton, Chad J.; Fei, Suzanne S.; Davis, Caleb; Wheeler, David A.; Murray, Bradley A.; Schmidt, Laura; Vocke, Cathy D.; Peto, Myron; Al Mamun, Abu Amar M.; Shinbrot, Eve; Sethi, Anurag; Brooks, Samira; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brooks, Angela N.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Bowlby, Reanne; Sadeghi, Sara; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Haake, Scott; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Leiserson, Mark D.M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Anur, Pavana; Bottaro, Donald; Albiges, Laurence; Barnabas, Nandita; Choueiri, Toni K.; Czerniak, Bogdan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Ho, Thai; Hsieh, James; Ittmann, Michael; Kim, William Y.; Krishnan, Bhavani; Merino, Maria J.; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Reuter, Victor E.; Reznik, Ed; Shelley, Carl Simon; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Tickoo, Satish; Burnett, Kenneth; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph D.; Penny, Robert J.; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, W. Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Avedon, Melissa T.; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Santos, Tracie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buhay, Christian; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L.; Chao, Hsu; Chuah, Eric; Clarke, Amanda; Covington, Kyle R.; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Dewal, Ninad; Dhalla, Noreen; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Drummond, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Guin, Ranabir; Hale, Walker; Hawes, Alicia; Hayes, D. Neil; Holt, Robert A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie; Lewis, Lora; Li, Jie; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Moore, Richard A.; Morton, Donna; Mose, Lisle E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Muzny, Donna; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Sougnez, Carrie; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Thiessen, Nina; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Wang, Min; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Zhou, Jane; Bedford, Jason; Chen, Fengju; Fu, Yao; Gerstein, Mark; Haussler, David; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lai, Phillip; Ling, Shiyun; Radenbaugh, Amie; Van Den Berg, David; Weinstein, John N.; Zhu, Jingchun; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Auman, J. Todd; Bartlett, John; Bastacky, Sheldon; Bergsten, Julie; Blute, Michael L.; Boice, Lori; Bollag, Roni J.; Boyd, Jeff; Castle, Erik; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cheville, John C.; Curley, Erin; Davies, Benjamin; DeVolk, April; Dhir, Rajiv; Dike, Laura; Eckman, John; Engel, Jay; Harr, Jodi; Hrebinko, Ronald; Huang, Mei; Huelsenbeck-Dill, Lori; Iacocca, Mary; Jacobs, Bruce; Lobis, Michael; Maranchie, Jodi K.; McMeekin, Scott; Myers, Jerome; Nelson, Joel; Parfitt, Jeremy; Parwani, Anil; Petrelli, Nicholas; Rabeno, Brenda; Roy, Somak; Salner, Andrew L.; Slaton, Joel; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Thorne, Leigh; Tucker, Kelinda; Weinberger, Paul M.; Winemiller, Cythnia; Zach, Leigh Anne; Zuna, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillary renal cell carcinoma, accounting for 15% of renal cell carcinoma, is a heterogeneous disease consisting of different types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal cell carcinoma; no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist. Methods We performed comprehensive molecular characterization utilizing whole-exome sequencing, copy number, mRNA, microRNA, methylation and proteomic analyses of 161 primary papillary renal cell carcinomas. Results Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas were found to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with Type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups based on molecular differences that influenced patient survival. MET alterations were associated with Type 1 tumors, whereas Type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-ARE pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was found in a distinct subset of Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma characterized by poor survival and mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Conclusions Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas are clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway are associated with Type 1 and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway with Type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in Type 2 convey a poor prognosis. Furthermore, Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma consists of at least 3 subtypes based upon molecular and phenotypic features. PMID:26536169

  18. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal-Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Linehan, W Marston; Spellman, Paul T; Ricketts, Christopher J; Creighton, Chad J; Fei, Suzanne S; Davis, Caleb; Wheeler, David A; Murray, Bradley A; Schmidt, Laura; Vocke, Cathy D; Peto, Myron; Al Mamun, Abu Amar M; Shinbrot, Eve; Sethi, Anurag; Brooks, Samira; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Brooks, Angela N; Hoadley, Katherine A; Robertson, A Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Bowlby, Reanne; Sadeghi, Sara; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Bootwalla, Moiz; Baylin, Stephen B; Laird, Peter W; Cherniack, Andrew D; Saksena, Gordon; Haake, Scott; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Akbani, Rehan; Leiserson, Mark D M; Raphael, Benjamin J; Anur, Pavana; Bottaro, Donald; Albiges, Laurence; Barnabas, Nandita; Choueiri, Toni K; Czerniak, Bogdan; Godwin, Andrew K; Hakimi, A Ari; Ho, Thai H; Hsieh, James; Ittmann, Michael; Kim, William Y; Krishnan, Bhavani; Merino, Maria J; Mills Shaw, Kenna R; Reuter, Victor E; Reznik, Ed; Shelley, Carl S; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Tickoo, Satish; Burnett, Kenneth; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph D; Penny, Robert J; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, W Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Avedon, Melissa T; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Ramirez, Nilsa C; Santos, Tracie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Demchok, John A; Felau, Ina; Hutter, Carolyn M; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C; Zhang, Jiashan; Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buhay, Christian; Butterfield, Yaron S N; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L; Chao, Hsu; Chuah, Eric; Clarke, Amanda; Covington, Kyle R; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Dewal, Ninad; Dhalla, Noreen; Doddapaneni, Harsha V; Drummond, Jennifer A; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gibbs, Richard A; Guin, Ranabir; Hale, Walker; Hawes, Alicia; Hayes, D Neil; Holt, Robert A; Hoyle, Alan P; Jefferys, Stuart R; Jones, Steven J M; Jones, Corbin D; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie; Lewis, Lora; Li, Jie; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Moore, Richard A; Morton, Donna; Mose, Lisle E; Mungall, Andrew J; Muzny, Donna; Parker, Joel S; Perou, Charles M; Roach, Jeffrey; Schein, Jacqueline E; Schumacher, Steven E; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V; Sipahimalani, Payal; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G; Sougnez, Carrie; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Thiessen, Nina; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Wang, Min; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Zhou, Jane; Bedford, Jason; Chen, Fengju; Fu, Yao; Gerstein, Mark; Haussler, David; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lai, Phillip; Ling, Shiyun; Radenbaugh, Amie; Van Den Berg, David; Weinstein, John N; Zhu, Jingchun; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Auman, J Todd; Bartlett, John; Bastacky, Sheldon; Bergsten, Julie; Blute, Michael L; Boice, Lori; Bollag, Roni J; Boyd, Jeff; Castle, Erik; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cheville, John C; Curley, Erin; Davies, Benjamin; DeVolk, April; Dhir, Rajiv; Dike, Laura; Eckman, John; Engel, Jay; Harr, Jodi; Hrebinko, Ronald; Huang, Mei; Huelsenbeck-Dill, Lori; Iacocca, Mary; Jacobs, Bruce; Lobis, Michael; Maranchie, Jodi K; McMeekin, Scott; Myers, Jerome; Nelson, Joel; Parfitt, Jeremy; Parwani, Anil; Petrelli, Nicholas; Rabeno, Brenda; Roy, Somak; Salner, Andrew L; Slaton, Joel; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R Houston; Thorne, Leigh; Tucker, Kelinda; Weinberger, Paul M; Winemiller, Cynthia; Zach, Leigh Anne; Zuna, Rosemary

    2016-01-14

    Papillary renal-cell carcinoma, which accounts for 15 to 20% of renal-cell carcinomas, is a heterogeneous disease that consists of various types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal-cell carcinoma, and no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist. We performed comprehensive molecular characterization of 161 primary papillary renal-cell carcinomas, using whole-exome sequencing, copy-number analysis, messenger RNA and microRNA sequencing, DNA-methylation analysis, and proteomic analysis. Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups on the basis of molecular differences associated with patient survival. Type 1 tumors were associated with MET alterations, whereas type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was observed in a distinct subgroup of type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas that was characterized by poor survival and mutation of the gene encoding fumarate hydratase (FH). Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway were associated with type 1, and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway was associated with type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in type 2 conveyed a poor prognosis. Furthermore, type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinoma consisted of at least three subtypes based on molecular and phenotypic features. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

  19. The RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway as a molecular switch for anchorage dependent cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seungwon; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2012-04-01

    The proliferation of anchorage-dependent cells of mesenchymal origin requires the attachment of the cells to substrates. Thus, cells that are poorly attached to substrates exhibit retarded cell cycle progression or apoptotic death. A major disadvantage of most polymers used in tissue engineering is their hydrophobicity; hydrophobic surfaces do not allow cells to attach firmly and, therefore, do not allow normal proliferation rates. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the reduced proliferation rate of cells that are poorly attached to substrates. There was an inverse relationship between the activity of the small GTPase RhoA (RhoA) and the cell proliferation rate. RhoA activity correlated inversely with the strength of cell adhesion to the substrates. The high RhoA activity in the cells poorly attached to substrates caused an increase in the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), a well-known effector of RhoA that upregulated the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The resulting activated PTEN downregulated Akt activity, which is essential for cell proliferation. Thus, the cells that were poorly attached to substrates showed low levels of cell proliferation because the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway was hyperactive. In addition, RhoA activity seemed to be related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Weak FAK activity in these poorly attached cells failed to downregulate the high RhoA activity that restrained cell proliferation. Interestingly, reducing the expression of any component of the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway rescued the proliferation rate without physico-chemical surface modifications. Based on these results, we suggest that the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway acts as a molecular switch to control cell proliferation and determine anchorage dependence. In cells that are poorly attached to substrates, its inhibition is sufficient to restore cell proliferation without the need for physico-chemical modification of the material

  20. Microglial cell migration stimulated by ATP and C5a involve distinct molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron M.; Stella, Nephi

    2009-01-01

    Microglial cells, the macrophages of the brain, play an essential role in the propagation of neuroinflammation. Increased microglial cell migration in response to specific chemoattractants has been documented, but less is known about the differences between these stimuli and the signal transduction pathways that mediate their effects. Current methods to measure cell migration are often labor-intensive and rely on the manual counting of cell number, so more efficient and objective methods are needed. Here we present an improved and higher-throughput Boyden Chamber technique that measures microglial cell migration by using DRAQ5, a nuclear dye that emits in the near-infrared. Out of a panel of chemoattractants tested, we found that ATP and C5a potently stimulate the migration of mouse primary microglial cells. The stimulatory effects of ATP and C5a displayed significant additivity, suggesting that each chemoattractant stimulated migration through independent molecular mechanisms. Accordingly, we found key differences in these responses: ATP stimulated a combination of both chemokinesis and chemotaxis, and this response was mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway; whereas C5a stimulated only chemotaxis and this response was mediated by the Rac1 signaling pathway. Finally, we found that functional PI3-kinase is only required for random basal microglial cell migration. Thus, our results show that distinct non-overlapping signal transduction pathways control different modes of microglial cell migration and suggest that the targeting of these distinct molecular mechanisms should modulate different aspects of neuroinflammation propagation. PMID:19053059

  1. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  2. Porosome: the universal molecular machinery for cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2008-12-31

    Porosomes are supramolecular, lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. The mouth of the porosome opening to the outside, range in size from 150 nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas, to 12 nm in neurons, which dilates during cell secretion, returning to its resting size following completion of the process. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. In this mini review, the discovery of the porosome, its structure, function, isolation, chemistry, and reconstitution into lipid membrane, the molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling and fusion at the base of porosomes, and how this new information provides a paradigm shift in our understanding of cell secretion, is discussed.

  3. Rates of Molecular Evolution Suggest Natural History of Life History Traits and a Post-K-Pg Nocturnal Bottleneck of Placentals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaqi; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Kishino, Hirohisa

    2017-10-09

    Life history and behavioral traits are often difficult to discern from the fossil record, but evolutionary rates of genes and their changes over time can be inferred from extant genomic data. Under the neutral theory, molecular evolutionary rate is a product of mutation rate and the proportion of neutral mutations [1, 2]. Mutation rates may be shared across the genome, whereas proportions of neutral mutations vary among genes because functional constraints vary. By analyzing evolutionary rates of 1,185 genes in a phylogeny of 89 mammals, we extracted historical profiles of functional constraints on these rates in the form of gene-branch interactions. By applying a novel statistical approach to these profiles, we reconstructed the history of ten discrete traits related to activity, diet, and social behaviors. Our results indicate that the ancestor of placental mammals was solitary, seasonally breeding, insectivorous, and likely nocturnal. The results suggest placental diversification began 10-20 million years before the K-Pg boundary (66 million years ago), with some ancestors of extant placental mammals becoming diurnal and adapted to different diets. However, from the Paleocene to the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT, 33.9 mya), we detect a post-K-Pg nocturnal bottleneck where all ancestral lineages of extant placentals were nocturnal. Although diurnal placentals may have existed during the elevated global temperatures of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum [3], we hypothesize that diurnal placentals were selectively extirpated during or after the global cooling of the EOT, whereas some nocturnal lineages survived due to preadaptations to cold environments [4]. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Coxiella burnetii in French livestock reveals the existence of three main genotype clusters and suggests species-specific associations as well as regional stability.

    PubMed

    Joulié, Aurelien; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; Bailly, Xavier; Gasqui, Patrick; Barry, Séverine; Jaffrelo, Lydia; Poncet, Charles; Abrial, David; Yang, Elise; Leblond, Agnès; Rousset, Elodie; Jourdain, Elsa

    2017-03-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. In domestic ruminants, Q fever main clinical manifestations are abortions. Although the clinical signs may differ between ruminant species, C. burnetii's genetic diversity remains understudied in enzootic areas. Here, we focused on France, where Q fever is enzootic, with the aims to (a) identify potential associations between C. burnetii genotypes and ruminant host species; (b) assess the distribution of C. burnetii genotypes both within French farms and across France's major livestock-farming regions; and (c) suggest a subset of markers for future genotypic studies. We used DNA samples collected between 2006 and 2015 from 301 females (160 cows, 76 ewes, 65 goats) aborted of Q fever within 7 different farming regions. C. burnetii diversity was determined using a multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) considering 17 markers. Using a phylogenetic approach, we identified 3 main genotypic clusters divided into 12 sub-clusters. These clusters were significantly associated with ruminant species: almost all the cattle genotypes were found in a "cattle-specific" cluster whereas small ruminants genotypes essentially grouped into the two other clusters. The clusters also proved stable over space and time, some genotypes being more specifically observed in certain farming regions. We also observed some within-farm diversity but this diversity was restricted to a same genotypic cluster. Finally, we identified 6 MLVA markers that maximized the representativeness of the diversity described. Overall, we highlighted that molecular epidemiology is a relevant approach to assess C. burnetii's genetic diversity and to reveal the existence of species-specific associations and regional stability. These results will be valuable in the field to trace genotype circulation among ruminants and from ruminants to humans. Ultimately, the potential links between genotypes and virulence traits need

  5. Stem cells and molecular strategies to restore hearing

    PubMed Central

    PAULEY, S.; KOPECKY, B.; BEISEL, K.; SOUKUP, G.; FRITZSCH, B.

    2008-01-01

    Hearing loss is a costly and growing problem for the elderly population worldwide with millions of people being affected. There are currently two prosthetic devices available to minimize problems associated with the two forms of hearing loss: hearing aids that amplify sound to overcome middle ear based conductive hearing loss and cochlear implants that restore some hearing after neurosensory hearing loss. The current presentation provides information on the treatment of neurosensory hearing loss. Although the cochlear implant solution for neurosensory hearing loss is technologically advanced; it still provides only moderate hearing capacity in neurosensory deaf individuals. Inducible stem cells and molecular therapies are appealing alternatives to the cochlear implant and may provide more than a new form of treatment as they hold the promise for a cure. To this end, current insights into inducible stem cells that may provide cells for seeding the cochlea with the hope of new hair cell formation are being reviewed. Alternatively, similar to induction of stem cells, cells of the flat epithelium that remains after hair cell loss could be induced to proliferate and differentiate into hair cells. In either of these strategies, hair cell specific genes known to be essential for hair cell differentiation or maintenance such as ATOH1, POU4F3, GFI1, and miRNA-183 will be utilized with the hope of completely restoring hearing to all patients with hearing loss. PMID:18427387

  6. Molecular Cell Biology of Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Christopher P; Green, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Cell death is a major mechanism to eliminate cells in which DNA is damaged, organelles are stressed, or oncogenes are overexpressed, all events that would otherwise predispose cells to oncogenic transformation. The pathways that initiate and execute cell death are complex, genetically encoded, and subject to significant regulation. Consequently, while these pathways are often mutated in malignancy, there is considerable interest in inducing cell death in tumor cells as therapy. This chapter addresses our current understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to two cell death pathways, apoptotic cell death and necroptosis, a regulated form of necrotic cell death. Apoptosis can be induced by a wide variety of signals, leading to protease activation that dismantles the cell. We discuss the physiological importance of each apoptosis pathway and summarize their known roles in cancer suppression and the current efforts at targeting each pathway therapeutically. The intricate mechanistic link between death receptor-mediated apoptosis and necroptosis is described, as well as the potential opportunities for utilizing necroptosis in the treatment of malignancy.

  7. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  8. Cell death by mitotic catastrophe: a molecular definition.

    PubMed

    Castedo, Maria; Perfettini, Jean-Luc; Roumier, Thomas; Andreau, Karine; Medema, Rene; Kroemer, Guido

    2004-04-12

    The current literature is devoid of a clearcut definition of mitotic catastrophe, a type of cell death that occurs during mitosis. Here, we propose that mitotic catastrophe results from a combination of deficient cell-cycle checkpoints (in particular the DNA structure checkpoints and the spindle assembly checkpoint) and cellular damage. Failure to arrest the cell cycle before or at mitosis triggers an attempt of aberrant chromosome segregation, which culminates in the activation of the apoptotic default pathway and cellular demise. Cell death occurring during the metaphase/anaphase transition is characterized by the activation of caspase-2 (which can be activated in response to DNA damage) and/or mitochondrial membrane permeabilization with the release of cell death effectors such as apoptosis-inducing factor and the caspase-9 and-3 activator cytochrome c. Although the morphological aspect of apoptosis may be incomplete, these alterations constitute the biochemical hallmarks of apoptosis. Cells that fail to execute an apoptotic program in response to mitotic failure are likely to divide asymmetrically in the next round of cell division, with the consequent generation of aneuploid cells. This implies that disabling of the apoptotic program may actually favor chromosomal instability, through the suppression of mitotic catastrophe. Mitotic catastrophe thus may be conceived as a molecular device that prevents aneuploidization, which may participate in oncogenesis. Mitotic catastrophe is controlled by numerous molecular players, in particular, cell-cycle-specific kinases (such as the cyclin B1-dependent kinase Cdk1, polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases), cell-cycle checkpoint proteins, survivin, p53, caspases and members of the Bcl-2 family.

  9. Aptamers Selected by Cell-SELEX for Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Zheng, Jing; Li, Chunmei; Qiu, Liping; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Conventional diagnostics for cancer rely primarily on anatomical techniques. However, these techniques cannot monitor the changes at the molecular level in normal cells, which possibly signal the onset of cancer at its very earliest stages. For accurate prediction of the carcinogenesis at the molecular level, targeting ligands have been used in combination with imaging probes to monitor this biological process. Among these targeting ligands, aptamers have high binding affinity to various targets ranging from small molecules to whole organisms, and, hence, exceptional recognition ability. Many recent studies have been reported on aptamer-based molecular imaging, clearly indicating its clinical and diagnostic utility. In this review, we will discuss some key results of these studies.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Spontaneous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Daniel; Garcia, Silvia; Paz, Maria F.; De la Cueva, Teresa; Lopez-Fernandez, Luis A.; Lloyd, Alison C.; Garcia-Castro, Javier; Bernad, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Background We previously reported the in vitro spontaneous transformation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) generating a population with tumorigenic potential, that we termed transformed mesenchymal cells (TMC). Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have characterized the molecular changes associated with TMC generation. Using microarrays techniques we identified a set of altered pathways and a greater number of downregulated than upregulated genes during MSC transformation, in part due to the expression of many untranslated RNAs in MSC. Microarray results were validated by qRT-PCR and protein detection. Conclusions/Significance In our model, the transformation process takes place through two sequential steps; first MSC bypass senescence by upregulating c-myc and repressing p16 levels. The cells then bypass cell crisis with acquisition of telomerase activity, Ink4a/Arf locus deletion and Rb hyperphosphorylation. Other transformation-associated changes include modulation of mitochondrial metabolism, DNA damage-repair proteins and cell cycle regulators. In this work we have characterized the molecular mechanisms implicated in TMC generation and we propose a two-stage model by which a human MSC becomes a tumor cell. PMID:18167557

  11. Molecular biology of normal melanocytes and melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bandarchi, Bizhan; Jabbari, Cyrus Aleksandre; Vedadi, Ali; Navab, Roya

    2013-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans and is responsible for 60-80% of deaths from skin cancers. The 5-year survival of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma is about 14%. Its incidence has been increasing in the white population over the past two decades. The mechanisms leading to malignant transformation of melanocytes and melanocytic lesions are poorly understood. In developing malignant melanoma, there is a complex interaction of environmental and endogenous (genetic) factors, including: dysregulation of cell proliferation, programmed cell death (apoptosis) and cell-to-cell interactions. The understanding of genetic alterations in signalling pathways of primary and metastatic malignant melanoma and their interactions may lead to therapeutics modalities, including targeted therapies, particularly in advanced melanomas that have high mortality rates and are often resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Our knowledge regarding the molecular biology of malignant melanoma has been expanding. Even though several genes involved in melanocyte development may also be associated with melanoma cell development, it is still unclear how a normal melanocyte becomes a melanoma cell. This article reviews the molecular events and recent findings associated with malignant melanoma.

  12. Localizing transcripts to single cells suggests an important role of uncultured deltaproteobacteria in the termite gut hydrogen economy.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Adam Z; Zhang, Xinning; Lucey, Kaitlyn S; Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Trivedi, Vikas; Choi, Harry M T; Pierce, Niles A; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2013-10-01

    Identifying microbes responsible for particular environmental functions is challenging, given that most environments contain an uncultivated microbial diversity. Here we combined approaches to identify bacteria expressing genes relevant to catabolite flow and to locate these genes within their environment, in this case the gut of a "lower," wood-feeding termite. First, environmental transcriptomics revealed that 2 of the 23 formate dehydrogenase (FDH) genes known in the system accounted for slightly more than one-half of environmental transcripts. FDH is an essential enzyme of H2 metabolism that is ultimately important for the assimilation of lignocellulose-derived energy by the insect. Second, single-cell PCR analysis revealed that two different bacterial types expressed these two transcripts. The most commonly transcribed FDH in situ is encoded by a previously unappreciated deltaproteobacterium, whereas the other FDH is spirochetal. Third, PCR analysis of fractionated gut contents demonstrated that these bacteria reside in different spatial niches; the spirochete is free-swimming, whereas the deltaproteobacterium associates with particulates. Fourth, the deltaproteobacteria expressing FDH were localized to protozoa via hybridization chain reaction-FISH, an approach for multiplexed, spatial mapping of mRNA and rRNA targets. These results underscore the importance of making direct vs. inference-based gene-species associations, and have implications in higher termites, the most successful termite lineage, in which protozoa have been lost from the gut community. Contrary to expectations, in higher termites, FDH genes related to those from the protozoan symbiont dominate, whereas most others were absent, suggesting that a successful gene variant can persist and flourish after a gut perturbation alters a major environmental niche.

  13. Biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas are molecularly similar to each other, but distinct from, non-sarcomatoid renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Kanishka; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Wani, Khalida; Patel, Lalit R; Voicu, Horatiu; Torres-Garcia, Wandaliz; Verhaak, Roel G W; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2015-10-01

    Sarcomatoid transformation, wherein an epithelioid carcinomatous tumour component coexists with a sarcomatoid histology, is a predictor of poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Our understanding of sarcomatoid change has been hindered by the lack of molecular examination. Thus, we sought to characterize molecularly the biphasic epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and compare them to non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We examined the transcriptome of the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of advanced stage sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=43) and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) from independent discovery and validation cohorts using the cDNA microarray and RNA-seq platforms. We analyzed DNA copy number profiles, generated using SNP arrays, from patients with sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=10) and advanced non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=155). The epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma had similar gene expression and DNA copy number signatures that were, however, distinct from those of high-grade, high-stage non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Prognostic clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression profiles were shared by the biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and the sarcomatoid component showed a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signature. Our genome-scale microarray-based transcript data were validated in an independent set of sarcomatoid and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas using RNA-seq. Sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is molecularly distinct from non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with its genetic programming largely shared by its biphasic morphological components. These data explain why a low percentage of sarcomatoid histology augurs a poor prognosis; suggest the

  14. Biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas are molecularly similar to each other, but distinct from, non‐sarcomatoid renal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Kanishka; Yoo, Suk‐Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Wani, Khalida; Patel, Lalit R.; Voicu, Horatiu; Torres‐Garcia, Wandaliz; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A.; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sarcomatoid transformation, wherein an epithelioid carcinomatous tumour component coexists with a sarcomatoid histology, is a predictor of poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Our understanding of sarcomatoid change has been hindered by the lack of molecular examination. Thus, we sought to characterize molecularly the biphasic epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and compare them to non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We examined the transcriptome of the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of advanced stage sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=43) and non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) from independent discovery and validation cohorts using the cDNA microarray and RNA‐seq platforms. We analyzed DNA copy number profiles, generated using SNP arrays, from patients with sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=10) and advanced non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=155). The epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma had similar gene expression and DNA copy number signatures that were, however, distinct from those of high‐grade, high‐stage non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Prognostic clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression profiles were shared by the biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and the sarcomatoid component showed a partial epithelial‐to‐mesenchymal transition signature. Our genome‐scale microarray‐based transcript data were validated in an independent set of sarcomatoid and non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas using RNA‐seq. Sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is molecularly distinct from non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with its genetic programming largely shared by its biphasic morphological components. These data explain why a low percentage of sarcomatoid histology

  15. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca2+ and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings. PMID:27200056

  16. Gold nanoshell bioconjugates for molecular imaging in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Christopher; Hirsch, Leon; Lee, Min-Ho; Chang, Emmanuel; West, Jennifer; Halas, Naomi; Drezek, Rebekah

    2005-05-01

    Advances in scattering-based optical imaging technologies offer a new approach to noninvasive point-of-care detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of cancer. Emerging photonics technologies provide a cost-effective means to image tissue in vivo with high resolution in real time. Advancing the clinical potential of these imaging strategies requires the development of optical contrast agents targeted to specific molecular signatures of disease. We describe the use of a novel class of contrast agents based on nanoshell bioconjugates for molecular imaging in living cells. Nanoshells offer significant advantages over conventional imaging probes including continuous and broad wavelength tunability, far greater scattering and absorption coefficients, increased chemical stability, and improved biocompatibility. We show that nanoshell bioconjugates can be used to effectively target and image human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a clinically relevant biomarker, in live human breast carcinoma cells.

  17. Photochemical energy conversion: from molecular dyads to solar cells.

    PubMed

    Durrant, James R; Haque, Saif A; Palomares, Emilio

    2006-08-21

    Photochemical approaches to solar energy conversion are currently making rapid progress, increasing not only academic but also commercial interest in molecular-based photovoltaic solar cells. This progress has been achieved not only by increased understanding of the physics and physical chemistry of device function but also through advances in chemical and materials synthesis and processing, which now allows the design and fabrication of increasingly sophisticated device structures organised on the nanometer length scale. In this feature article, we review some progress in this field, focusing in particular upon the electron-transfer dynamics which underlie the function of dye-sensitised, nanocrystalline solar cells. The article starts by building upon the parallels between the function of such devices and the function of simple donor/acceptor molecular systems in solution. We then go on to discuss the optimisation of device function, and in particular the use of self-assembly-based strategies to control interfacial electron-transfer kinetics.

  18. Effect of molecular electrical doping on polyfuran based photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuwen; Opitz, Andreas; Salzmann, Ingo; Frisch, Johannes; Cohen, Erez; Bendikov, Michael; Koch, Norbert

    2015-05-18

    The electronic, optical, and morphological properties of molecularly p-doped polyfuran (PF) films were investigated over a wide range of doping ratio in order to explore the impact of doping in photovoltaic applications. We find evidence for integer-charge transfer between PF and the prototypical molecular p-dopant tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) and employed the doped polymer in bilayer organic solar cells using fullerene as acceptor. The conductivity increase in the PF films at dopant loadings ≤2% significantly enhances the short-circuit current of photovoltaic devices. For higher doping ratios, however, F4TCNQ is found to precipitate at the heterojunction between the doped donor polymer and the fullerene acceptor. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that its presence acts beneficial to the energy-level alignment by doubling the open-circuit voltage of solar cells from 0.2 V to ca. 0.4 V, as compared to pristine PF.

  19. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings.

  20. Molecular Pathways in the Induction of Interleukin-27-Driven Regulatory Type 1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pot, Caroline; Apetoh, Lionel; Awasthi, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells have emerged as key players in the prevention of autoimmunity. They produce high levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and confer protection against a wide panel of autoimmune diseases. However, the molecular pathways leading to their generation have long remained elusive. We have recently identified IL-27, a member of the IL-12 cytokine family, as a novel cytokine that induces Tr1 cells. Further analysis of IL-27-driven Tr1 cells have identified a critical role of the transcription factor avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma v-maf and of IL-21 in the generation of IL-27-induced Tr1 cells. Importantly, IL-27 also induces Tr1 cells in humans, suggesting that IL-27 administration may dampen tissue inflammation in humans as well. Here, we review the role of IL-27 in the generation of Tr1 cells and discuss its potential to alleviate autoimmune diseases. PMID:20540648

  1. In focus: molecular and cell biology research in China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuebiao; Li, Dangsheng; Pei, Gang

    2013-09-01

    An interactive, intellectual environment with good funding opportunities is essential for the development and success of basic research. The fast-growing economy and investment in science, together with a visionary plan, have attracted foreign scholars to work in China, motivated world-class Chinese scientists to return and strengthened the country's international collaborations. As a result, molecular and cell biology research in China has evolved rapidly over the past decade.

  2. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/Host Cell Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Colombo, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex bi-ological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or non-phagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the up-regulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells. PMID:22454195

  3. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/host cell interplay.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex biological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or nonphagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the upregulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Passivation Using Molecular Halides Increases Quantum Dot Solar Cell Performance.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xinzheng; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Kiani, Amirreza; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Abbas, Abdullah Saud; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Liu, Mengxia; Yang, Zhenyu; Walters, Grant; Xu, Jixian; Yuan, Mingjian; Ning, Zhijun; Fan, Fengjia; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Kramer, Illan; Zhitomirsky, David; Lee, Philip; Perelgut, Alexander; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-01-13

    A solution-based passivation scheme is developed featuring the use of molecular iodine and PbS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). The improved passivation translates into a longer carrier diffusion length in the solid film. This allows thicker solar-cell devices to be built while preserving efficient charge collection, leading to a certified power conversion efficiency of 9.9%, which is a new record in CQD solar cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cytosolic and Nuclear Co-localization of Betalain Biosynthetic Enzymes in Tobacco Suggests that Betalains Are Synthesized in the Cytoplasm and/or Nucleus of Betalainic Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ning; Yu, Zhi-Hai; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Betalains replace anthocyanins as color pigments in most families of Caryophyllales. Unlike anthocyanins, betalains are derived from tyrosine via three enzymatic steps: hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA; step 1), and conversion of L-DOPA to betalamic acid (step 2), and to cyclo-DOPA (cDOPA; step 3). The principal enzymes responsible for these reactions have been elucidated at the molecular level, but their subcellular localizations have not been explored; hence, the intracellular compartments wherein betalains are biosynthesized remain unknown. Here, we report on the subcellular localization of these principal enzymes. Bioinformatic predictors and N- and C-terminal GFP tagging in transgenic tobacco, showed that Beta vulgaris CYP76AD1 which mediates both steps 1 and 3, DODA1 that catalyzes step 2, and CYP76AD6 which also mediates step 1, were similarly localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus (although the P450s were also weakly present in the endoplasmic reticulum). These two compartments were also the principal locations of Mirabilis jalapa cDOPA5GT. The cytoplasmic and nuclear co-localization of these key enzymes in tobacco suggests that betalains are biosynthesized in the cytoplasm and/or nucleus of betalain-containing plant cells. Elucidation of the subcellular compartmentation of betalain biosynthesis will facilitate the bioengineering of the betalain biosynthetic pathway in non-betalain-containing plants. PMID:28572813

  6. Molecular Imaging in Tracking Tumor Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Jiang, Han; Li, Chenrui; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cancer remains a major public health problem in many countries. It was found to contain a subset of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are capable of proliferation and self-renewal, and differentiation into various types of cancer cells. CSCs often display characteristics of chemotherapy resistance and radiotherapy resistance. Numerous putative biomarkers of CSCs are currently identified including CD133, CD44, CD24, ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase), and ABCG2. Interestingly, no single marker is exclusively expressed by CSCs. Thus, the various combinations of different biomarkers will be possible to identify CSCs, and considerable work is being done to recognize new ones. In order to demonstrate the mechanisms of resistance and response to therapy and predict the outcome as well as prognosis, the ways to track and identify CSCs will be extremely important. The technologies of molecular imaging will reveal mechanisms of cancer progression and provide visual targets for novel therapeutics. Limited studies were investigated on the detection of various types of CSCs by molecular imaging. Although the tracking of circulating CSCs is still hampered by technological challenges, personalized diagnosis and therapies of cancers are expected to be established based on increased understanding of molecular imaging of cancer stem-like cells biomarkers. PMID:22570529

  7. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Contreras, Ricardo; Vaca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore) at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area. PMID:21876785

  8. Molecular mechanisms of host cell traversal by malaria sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Annie S P; Boddey, Justin A

    2017-02-01

    Malaria is a pernicious infectious disease caused by apicomplexan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Each year, malaria afflicts over 200million people, causing considerable morbidity, loss to gross domestic product of endemic countries, and more than 420,000 deaths. A central feature of the virulence of malaria parasites is the ability of sporozoite forms injected by a mosquito to navigate from the inoculation site in the skin through host tissues to infect the liver. The ability for sporozoites to traverse through different host cell types is very important for the successful development of parasites within the mammalian host. Over the past decade, our understanding of the role of host cell traversal has become clearer through important studies with rodent models of malaria. However, we still do not understand the stepwise process of host cell entry and exit or know the molecular mechanisms governing each step. We know even less about cell traversal by malaria parasite species that infect humans. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the role and molecular mechanisms of sporozoite cell traversal and highlight recent advances that prompt new ways of thinking about this important process. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular modeling and computational analyses suggests that the Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic regulator protein ExoR adopts a superhelical fold and is controlled by a unique mechanism of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Wiech, Eliza M; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-03-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic ExoR protein and the ExoS/ChvI two-component system form a regulatory mechanism that directly controls the transformation of free-living to host-invading cells. In the absence of crystal structures, understanding the molecular mechanism of interaction between ExoR and the ExoS sensor, which is believed to drive the key regulatory step in the invasion process, remains a major challenge. In this study, we present a theoretical structural model of the active form of ExoR protein, ExoRm , generated using computational methods. Our model suggests that ExoR possesses a super-helical fold comprising 12 α-helices forming six Sel1-like repeats, including two that were unidentified in previous studies. This fold is highly conducive to mediating protein-protein interactions and this is corroborated by the identification of putative protein binding sites on the surface of the ExoRm protein. Our studies reveal two novel insights: (a) an extended conformation of the third Sel1-like repeat that might be important for ExoR regulatory function and (b) a buried proteolytic site that implies a unique proteolytic mechanism. This study provides new and interesting insights into the structure of S. meliloti ExoR, lays the groundwork for elaborating the molecular mechanism of ExoRm cleavage, ExoRm -ExoS interactions, and studies of ExoR homologs in other bacterial host interactions.

  10. Human neural crest cells display molecular and phenotypic hallmarks of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sophie; Thomas, Marie; Wincker, Patrick; Babarit, Candice; Xu, Puting; Speer, Marcy C.; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Etchevers, Heather C.

    2008-01-01

    The fields of both developmental and stem cell biology explore how functionally distinct cell types arise from a self-renewing founder population. Multipotent, proliferative human neural crest cells (hNCC) develop toward the end of the first month of pregnancy. It is assumed that most differentiate after migrating throughout the organism, although in animal models neural crest stem cells reportedly persist in postnatal tissues. Molecular pathways leading over time from an invasive mesenchyme to differentiated progeny such as the dorsal root ganglion, the maxillary bone or the adrenal medulla are altered in many congenital diseases. To identify additional components of such pathways, we derived and maintained self-renewing hNCC lines from pharyngulas. We show that, unlike their animal counterparts, hNCC are able to self-renew ex vivo under feeder-free conditions. While cross species comparisons showed extensive overlap between human, mouse and avian NCC transcriptomes, some molecular cascades are only active in the human cells, correlating with phenotypic differences. Furthermore, we found that the global hNCC molecular profile is highly similar to that of pluripotent embryonic stem cells when compared with other stem cell populations or hNCC derivatives. The pluripotency markers NANOG, POU5F1 and SOX2 are also expressed by hNCC, and a small subset of transcripts can unambiguously identify hNCC among other cell types. The hNCC molecular profile is thus both unique and globally characteristic of uncommitted stem cells. PMID:18689800

  11. Genomic Assessment of Blitz Nevi Suggests Classification as a Subset of Blue Nevus Rather Than Spitz Nevus: Clinical, Histopathologic, and Molecular Analysis of 18 Cases.

    PubMed

    Isales, Maria C; Haugh, Alexandra M; Bubley, Jeffrey; Verzì, Anna E; Zhang, Bin; Kudalkar, Emily; Lee, Christina Y; Yazdan, Pedram; Guitart, Joan; Gerami, Pedram

    2017-04-27

    Blitz nevi/tumors are a distinct subset of melanocytic neoplasia which show mixed morphologic features of Spitz and blue nevus. Genomically, most blue nevi have GNAQ or GNA11 mutations while most Spitzoid neoplasms have either an HRAS mutation or translocations involving MET, ROS, BRAF, ALK1, NTRK1, and RET. The criteria used for the assessment of malignancy in blue and Spitzoid lesions are different, and these lesions have different prognostic markers. In this study, we assess the clinical, morphological, and genomic changes in 18 cases of Blitz nevi/tumors to better characterize this subset of neoplasms and determine their optimal genomic classification. Most lesions occurred on the extremities followed by the head and neck region typical of blue nevi. Histology showed most cases having a prominent plexiform growth pattern with cells aggregating around the adnexal structures and neurovascular bundles also typical of blue nevi. Using next generation sequencing, we detected the presence of somatic mutations in GNAQ or GNA11 in 4 of 7 cases (57%) of Blitz nevi with sufficient DNA available for sequencing. Normal skin samples in these 4 cases were sequenced to confirm that the GNAQ or GNA11 mutations were somatic mutations. All 4 cases were negative for immunohistochemical assessment for wild-type BRAF, RET, ALK, and NTRK1 and mutational analysis of HRAS was also negative in all cases. Hence, our study suggests that Blitz nevi/tumors are a distinct subset which genomically are best classified as a subset of blue nevi.

  12. Oral keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells: specific markers, molecular signaling pathways and potential uses.

    PubMed

    Calenic, Bogdan; Greabu, Maria; Caruntu, Constantin; Tanase, Cristiana; Battino, Maurizio

    2015-10-01

    Oral keratinocyte stem cells reside in the basal layers of the oral epithelium, representing a minor population of cells with a great potential to self-renew and proliferate over the course of their lifetime. As a result of the potential uses of oral keratinocyte stem cells in regenerative medicine and the key roles they play in tissue homeostasis, inflammatory conditions, wound healing and tumor initiation and progression, intense scientific efforts are currently being undertaken to identify, separate and reprogram these cells. Although currently there is no specific marker that can characterize and isolate oral keratinocyte stem cells, several suggestions have been made. Thus, different stem/progenitor-cell subpopulations have been categorized based on combinations of positive and/or negative membrane-surface markers, which include integrins, clusters of differentiation and cytokeratins. Important advances have also been made in understanding the molecular pathways that govern processes such as self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation, wound healing and programmed cell death. A thorough understanding of stem-cell biology and the molecular players that govern cellular fate is paramount in the quest for using stem-cell-derived therapies in the treatment of various oral pathologies. The current review focuses on recent advances in understanding the molecular signaling pathways coordinating the behavior of these cells and in identifying suitable markers used for their isolation and characterization. Special emphasis will also be placed on the roles played by oral keratinocyte stem and progenitor cells in normal and diseased oral tissues and on their potential uses in the fields of general medicine and dentistry.

  13. Different sucrose-isomaltase response of Caco-2 cells to glucose and maltose suggests dietary maltose sensing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using the small intestine enterocyte Caco-2 cell model, sucrase-isomaltase (SI, the mucosal alpha-glucosidase complex) expression and modification were examined relative to exposure to different mono- and disaccharide glycemic carbohydrates. Caco-2/TC7 cells were grown on porous supports to post-con...

  14. Investigation of six testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility genes suggests a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Robert; Andreassen, Kristine E; Kristiansen, Wenche; Aschim, Elin L; Bremnes, Roy M; Dahl, Olav; Fosså, Sophie D; Klepp, Olbjørn; Langberg, Carl W; Solberg, Arne; Tretli, Steinar; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Haugen, Trine B; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik

    2013-08-15

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) risk in the genes ATF7IP, BAK1, DMRT1, KITLG, SPRY4 and TERT. In the present study, we validate these associations in a Scandinavian population, and explore effect modification by parental sex and differences in associations between the major histological subtypes seminoma and non-seminoma. A total of 118 SNPs in the six genes were genotyped in a population-based Swedish-Norwegian sample comprising 831 TGCT case-parent triads, 474 dyads, 712 singletons and 3919 population controls. Seven hundred and thirty-four additional SNPs were imputed using reference haplotypes from the 1000 genomes project. SNP-TGCT association was investigated using a likelihood-based association test for nuclear families and unrelated subjects implemented in the software package UNPHASED. Forward stepwise regression within each gene was applied to determine independent association signals. Effect modifications by parent-of-origin and effect differences between histological subtypes were explored. We observed strong association between SNPs in all six genes and TGCT (lowest P-value per gene: ATF7IP 6.2 × 10(-6); BAK1 2.1 × 10(-10); DMRT1 6.7 × 10(-25); KITLG 2.1 × 10(-48); SPRY4 1.4 × 10(-29); TERT 1.8 × 10(-18)). Stepwise regression indicated three independent signals for BAK1 and TERT, two for SPRY4 and one each for DMRT1, ATF7IP and KITLG. A significant parent-of-origin effect was observed for rs10463352 in SPRY4 (maternal odds ratio = 1.72, paternal odds ratio = 0.99, interaction P = 0.0013). No significant effect differences between seminomas and non-seminomas were found. In summary, we validated previously reported genetic associations with TGCT in a Scandinavian population, and observed suggestive evidence of a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4.

  15. Molecular Sieving by the Bacillus megaterium Cell Wall and Protoplast

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Rene; Gerhardt, Philipp

    1971-01-01

    Passive permeabilities of the cell wall and protoplast of Bacillus megaterium strain KM were characterized by use of 50 hydrophilic probing molecules (tritiated water, sugars, dextrans, glycols, and polyglycols) which varied widely in size. Weight per cent uptake values (Rw) were measured at diffusional equilibrium under conditions that negated the influences of adsorption or active transport. Plots of Rw for intact cells as a function of number-average molecular weight (¯Mn) or Einstein-Stokes hydrodynamic radius (¯rES) of the solutes showed three phases: a protoplast uptake phase with a polydisperse exclusion threshold of ¯Mn = 0.6 × 103 to 1.1 × 103, ¯rES = 0.6 to 1.1 nm; a cell wall uptake phase with a polydisperse exclusion threshold of ¯Mn = 0.7 × 105 to 1.2 × 105, ¯rES ≅ 8.3 nm; and a total exclusion phase. Isolated cell walls showed only the latter two phases. However, it became evident that the cell wall selectively passed only the smallest molecules in a heterodisperse polymer sample. When the molecular-weight distributions of polyglycol samples (¯Mn = 1,000, 1,450, and 3,350) were determined by analytical gel chromatography before and after uptake by intact cells or isolated cell walls, a quasi-monodisperse exclusion threshold was obtained corresponding to Mn = 1,200, rES = 1.1 nm. The permeability of isolated protoplasts was assessed by the relative ability of solutes to effect osmotic stabilization. An indefinite exclusion threshold, evident even with monodisperse sugars, was attributed to lengthwise orientation of the penetrating rod-shaped molecules. Altogether, the best estimate of the limiting equivalent porosity of the protoplast was 0.4 to 0.6 nm in radius and of the cell wall, 1.1 nm. PMID:4999413

  16. Single cell analysis exposes intratumor heterogeneity and suggests that FLT3-ITD is a late event in leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shouval, Roni; Shlush, Liran I; Yehudai-Resheff, Shlomit; Ali, Shahnaz; Pery, Neta; Shapiro, Ehud; Tzukerman, Maty; Rowe, Jacob M; Zuckerman, Tsila

    2014-06-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) commonly occurs in acute myeloid leukemia and is considered rare in acute lymphocytic leukemia. Acute leukemia has poor prognosis, mainly due to relapse. Standard FLT3-ITD diagnostic techniques are based on genomic polymerase chain reaction and have recently incorporated GeneScan (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) to identify variations of the FLT3 gene. As this is an average-based assay utilized in a heterogeneous leukemic cell population, we hypothesized that cells of acute leukemia, considered FLT3-ITD-negative by standard methods, could possess a fraction of FLT3-ITD-positive cells. The present study employed single cell mutation analysis to evaluate the FLT3-ITD status in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (n = 3) patients. A total of 541 single leukemic cells and 36 mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers were analyzed. Seven patients, considered FLT3-ITD-negative according to bulk DNA analysis, appeared to possess a small fraction of FLT3-ITD-positive cells based on single cell analysis. Moreover, this approach revealed the heterogeneity of the tumor as evident by different FLT3-ITD mutations present in the same patient. The presence of a minor clone carrying FLT3-ITD in almost all patients tested provides evidence that this lesion is a common late event in leukemogenesis. Additionally, 3 relapsed patients demonstrated loss of heterozygosity of the normal allele, affecting 25%-100% of the cells found to be FLT3-ITD-positive. Though further clinical testing is warranted, these findings may have implications on the prognostic significance of FLT3-ITD and the use of targeted therapy. Copyright © 2014 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-cell approaches for molecular classification of endocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, James; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sosa, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review In this review, we summarize recent developments in single-cell technologies that can be employed for the functional and molecular classification of endocrine cells in normal and neoplastic tissue. Recent findings The emergence of new platforms for the isolation, analysis, and dynamic assessment of individual cell identity and reactive behavior enables experimental deconstruction of intratumoral heterogeneity and other contexts, where variability in cell signaling and biochemical responsiveness inform biological function and clinical presentation. These tools are particularly appropriate for examining and classifying endocrine neoplasias, as the clinical sequelae of these tumors are often driven by disrupted hormonal responsiveness secondary to compromised cell signaling. Single-cell methods allow for multidimensional experimental designs incorporating both spatial and temporal parameters with the capacity to probe dynamic cell signaling behaviors and kinetic response patterns dependent upon sequential agonist challenge. Summary Intratumoral heterogeneity in the provenance, composition, and biological activity of different forms of endocrine neoplasia presents a significant challenge for prognostic assessment. Single-cell technologies provide an array of powerful new approaches uniquely well suited for dissecting complex endocrine tumors. Studies examining the relationship between clinical behavior and tumor compositional variations in cellular activity are now possible, providing new opportunities to deconstruct the underlying mechanisms of endocrine neoplasia. PMID:26632769

  18. Molecular basis for premature senescence induced by surfactants in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, Yoshimi; Miki, Kensuke; Yonekura, Ryuzo; Kudo, Ikuru; Fujii, Michihiko; Ayusawa, Dai

    2014-01-01

    Sublethal doses of surfactants as exemplified by NP-40 clearly induce premature senescence in normal human cells. To understand molecular basis for this phenomenon, we tried to suppress it with use of various inhibitors. An inhibitor of p38 of the MAPK family almost completely suppressed growth arrest and morphological changes induced by surfactants; however, other inhibitors tested had no effect. Oleic acid, a weak inducer of premature senescence, was found to suppress the effect of NP-40. Fluorescein-labeled oleic acid rapidly bound to the cell surface, and this binding was clearly blocked by pre-treatment with surfactants, suggesting that surfactants and oleic acid compete for binding to the cell surface. Moderate concentrations of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, also suppressed the senescent features induced by NP-40. These results suggest that surfactants activate p38 signaling pathway by binding to the cell surface, and induce cellular senescence.

  19. Aberrant upregulation of MUC4 mucin expression in cutaneous condyloma acuminatum and squamous cell carcinoma suggests a potential role in the diagnosis and therapy of skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankar; Swanson, Benjamin J; Bonthu, Neelima; Batra, Surinder K

    2010-01-01

    Aim Mucins comprise a family of high-molecular-weight glycoproteins. MUC4, a large transmembrane mucin, has recently emerged as a novel marker for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy in several malignancies. However, its role in skin pathologies remains unknown. The aim of this study was to analyse the expression of MUC4 in cutaneous pathologies by immunohistochemistry for potential diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Methods A total of 330 tissue spots representing the normal skin, and benign and malignant cutaneous diseases, were analysed after staining with the monoclonal antibody to human MUC4 (clone 8G7). Results While the normal epidermis showed a negative to weak-positive expression of MUC4, its expression was significantly upregulated in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) where the intensity of staining correlated negatively with tumour grade and positively with age. A moderately strong MUC4 expression was also noted in 2/20 cancer adjacent normal skin and 2/21 chronically inflamed skin tissues, while 10/19 cases of vulval condyloma acuminate, 3/12 of vulval hyperplasia and 2 cases of verruca vulgaris also showed strong MUC4 positivity. Malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous cysts were negative. Conclusion The results indicate that MUC4 expression is aberrantly upregulated in cutaneous SCCs, vulval condylomas and verruca vulgaris. Further, it appears that MUC4 expression in the skin may be modulated by chronic inflammation and the presence of an adjacent cutaneous malignancy in certain cases. These observations suggest a novel role for MUC4 mucin in the pathogenesis of cutaneous SCC and a possible application as a diagnostic and/or prognostic marker in cutaneous pathologies. PMID:20591909

  20. CD44 distribution in sweat gland tumors suggests it has different functional roles in the various cell types.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Figueras, M T; Puig, L; Ariza, A; Calatrava, A; Fuente, M J; Ferrándiz, C

    1996-10-01

    CD44 is a polymorphic group of membrane glycoproteins with multiple functions that include cell adhesion. Since on normal sweat glands CD44 is expressed only in eccrine coil secretory cells, it has been considered as a possible marker of this type of differentiation. We have immunohistochemically investigated the distribution of CD44 in paraffin-embedded samples of 41 benign and malignant sweat gland tumors by using a monoclonal antibody directed against the standard isoform of CD44. CD44 was strongly expressed in epithelial cells at the peripheral row of syringomas and in cuticular areas of eccrine poromas. Apocrine tumors such as apocrine hidrocystoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, or hidradenoma papilliferum showed intense CD44 positivity in the portion of cells in contact with the neighboring stroma and focally on the luminal side of cells with apocrine secretion. Cylindromas and spiradenomas presented focal CD44 positivity, virtually limited to clear cells. Malignant neoplasms exhibited irregular CD44 staining, which was more intense in the less differentiated zones and tumors. Our results indicate that CD44 is not a useful marker for a specific form of sweat gland differentiation. Nevertheless, its characteristic patterns of distribution might reflect the variety of functional roles assumed by the different CD44 isoforms in each epithelial cell.

  1. A molecular mechanism for TNF-α-mediated down-regulation of B cell responses1

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Romero, Maria; Diaz, Alain; Alter-Wolf, Sarah; Ratliff, Michelle; Landin, Ana Marie; Riley, Richard L; Blomberg, Bonnie B.

    2011-01-01

    B cell function with age is decreased in class switch recombination (CSR), activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and stability of E47 mRNA. The latter is regulated at least in part by tristetraprolin (TTP) which is increased in aged B cells and also negatively regulates TNF-α. Here, we investigate whether B cells produce TNF-α, whether this changes with age, and how this affects their function upon stimulation. Our hypothesis is that in aging there is a feedback mechanism of autocrine inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α) that lowers the expression of AID and CSR. Our results show that unstimulated B cells from old BALB/c mice make significantly more TNF-α mRNA and protein than B cells from young mice, but after stimulation the old make less than young, thus they are refractory to stimulation. The increase in TNF-α made by old B cells is primarily due to follicular, but not minor subsets of B cells. Pre-incubation of B cells with TNF-α before LPS stimulation decreases both young and old B cell responses. Importantly, B cell function was restored by adding anti-TNF-α antibody in cultured B cells. To address a molecular mechanism, we found that pre-incubation of B cells with TNF-α, before LPS stimulation, induces tristetraprolin, a physiological regulator of mRNA stability of the transcription factor E47, crucial for CSR. Finally, anti-TNF-α given in vivo was able to increase follicular B cell function in old but not in young follicular B cells. These results suggest new molecular mechanisms which contribute to reduced antibody responses in aging. PMID:22116831

  2. Studies with glycolysis-deficient cells suggest that production of lactic acid is not the only cause of tumor acidity.

    PubMed Central

    Newell, K; Franchi, A; Pouysségur, J; Tannock, I

    1993-01-01

    Solid tumors have been observed to develop an acidic extracellular environment, which is believed to occur as a result of lactic acid accumulation produced during aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis. Experiments using glycolysis-deficient ras-transfected Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts have been performed to test the hypothesis that lactic acid production within solid tumors is responsible for the development of tumor acidity. The variant cells have defects in glucose transport and in the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase with 1% activity compared to parental cells. Consequently, the in vitro rate of lactic acid production by variant cells was < 4% compared to parental cells. An in vitro correlation between lactic acid production and acidification of exposure medium was observed for parental and variant cells. Implantation of both cell lines into nude mice led to tumors with minimal difference in growth rate. As expected, variant cells died when exposed to hypoxic conditions in culture, and parental tumors were observed to have a larger fraction of cells resistant to radiation due to hypoxia (27%) than variant tumors (2%). Using pH microelectrodes, parental (n = 12) and variant (n = 12) tumors were observed to have extracellular pH (pHe) values of 6.65 +/- 0.07 and 6.78 +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, P = 0.13), respectively, whereas normal muscle had a pHe of 7.29 +/- 0.06 (P < 0.0001 for both cell lines). The lactic acid content of variant tumors was found to be similar to that in serum, whereas parental tumors had lactic acid content that was higher than in serum (P < 0.0001). We conclude that there was no correlation between lactic acid content and acidosis for these tumors derived from ras-transfected fibroblasts. These results provide evidence that the production of lactic acid via glycolysis is not the only mechanism responsible for the development of an acidic environment within solid tumors. PMID:8430084

  3. The reciprocal coordination and mechanics of molecular motors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Laib, Jeneva A; Marin, John A; Bloodgood, Robert A; Guilford, William H

    2009-03-03

    Molecular motors in living cells are involved in whole-cell locomotion, contractility, developmental shape changes, and organelle movement and positioning. Whether motors of different directionality are functionally coordinated in cells or operate in a semirandom "tug of war" is unclear. We show here that anterograde and retrograde microtubule-based motors in the flagella of Chlamydomonas are regulated such that only motors of a common directionality are engaged at any single time. A laser trap was used to position microspheres on the plasma membrane of immobilized paralyzed Chlamydomonas flagella. The anterograde and retrograde movements of the microsphere were measured with nanometer resolution as microtubule-based motors engaged the transmembrane protein FMG-1. An average of 10 motors acted to move the microsphere in either direction. Reversal of direction during a transport event was uncommon, and quiescent periods separated every transport event, suggesting the coordinated and exclusive action of only a single motor type. After a jump to 32 degrees C, temperature-sensitive mutants of kinesin-2 (fla10) showed exclusively retrograde transport events, driven by 7 motors on average. These data suggest that molecular motors in living cells can be reciprocally coordinated to engage simultaneously in large numbers and for exclusive transport in a single direction, even when a mixed population of motors is present. This offers a unique model for studying the mechanics, regulation, and directional coordination of molecular motors in a living intracellular environment.

  4. Asymmetric Aneuploidy in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Detected by In Situ Karyotyping and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Suggestions for Reference Values for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Young; Im, Kyongok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Jiseok; Kim, Jung-Ah; Choi, Qute; Hwang, Sang Mee; Han, Sung-Hee; Kwon, Sunghoon; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic testing is important to ensure patient safety before therapeutic application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). However, the standardized methods and criteria for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities of MSCs have not yet been determined. We investigated the frequency of cytogenetic aberrations in MSCs using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and suggest reference values for aneuploidy in MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 consecutive cultures from 68 MSCs (25 adipose-origin, 20 bone marrow-origin, 18 cord blood-origin, and 5 neural stem cells; 8 from adipose tissue of patients with breast cancer and 60 from healthy donors). We compared the MSC aneuploidy patterns with those of hematological malignancies and benign hematological diseases. Interphase FISH showed variable aneuploid clone proportions (1%–20%) in 68 MSCs. The aneuploidy patterns were asymmetric, and aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X occurred most frequently. Clones with polysomy were significantly more abundant than those with monosomy. The cutoff value of maximum polysomy rates (upper 95th percentile value) was 13.0%. By G-banding, 5 of the 61 MSCs presented clonal chromosomal aberrations. Aneuploidy was asymmetric in the malignant hematological diseases, while it was symmetric in the benign hematological diseases. We suggest an aneuploidy cutoff value of 13%, and FISH for aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X would be informative to evaluate the genetic stability of MSCs. Although it is unclear whether the aneuploid clones might represent the senescent cell population or transformed cells, more attention should be focused on the safety of MSCs, and G-banding combined with FISH should be performed. PMID:25019198

  5. Asymmetric aneuploidy in mesenchymal stromal cells detected by in situ karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization: suggestions for reference values for stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Young; Im, Kyongok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Jiseok; Kim, Jung-Ah; Choi, Qute; Hwang, Sang Mee; Han, Sung-Hee; Kwon, Sunghoon; Oh, Il-Hoan; Lee, Dong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic testing is important to ensure patient safety before therapeutic application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). However, the standardized methods and criteria for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities of MSCs have not yet been determined. We investigated the frequency of cytogenetic aberrations in MSCs using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and suggest reference values for aneuploidy in MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 consecutive cultures from 68 MSCs (25 adipose-origin, 20 bone marrow-origin, 18 cord blood-origin, and 5 neural stem cells; 8 from adipose tissue of patients with breast cancer and 60 from healthy donors). We compared the MSC aneuploidy patterns with those of hematological malignancies and benign hematological diseases. Interphase FISH showed variable aneuploid clone proportions (1%-20%) in 68 MSCs. The aneuploidy patterns were asymmetric, and aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X occurred most frequently. Clones with polysomy were significantly more abundant than those with monosomy. The cutoff value of maximum polysomy rates (upper 95th percentile value) was 13.0%. By G-banding, 5 of the 61 MSCs presented clonal chromosomal aberrations. Aneuploidy was asymmetric in the malignant hematological diseases, while it was symmetric in the benign hematological diseases. We suggest an aneuploidy cutoff value of 13%, and FISH for aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X would be informative to evaluate the genetic stability of MSCs. Although it is unclear whether the aneuploid clones might represent the senescent cell population or transformed cells, more attention should be focused on the safety of MSCs, and G-banding combined with FISH should be performed.

  6. High molecular weight insulating polymers can improve the performance of molecular solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ye; Wen, Wen; Kramer, Edward; Bazan, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    Solution-processed molecular semiconductors for the fabrication of solar cells have emerged as a competitive alternative to their conjugated polymer counterparts, primarily because such materials systems exhibit no batch-to-batch variability, can be purified to a greater extent and offer precisely defined chemical structures. Highest power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) have been achieved through a combination of molecular design and the application of processing methods that optimize the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) morphology. However, one finds that the methods used for controlling structural order, for example the use of high boiling point solvent additives, have been inspired by examination of the conjugated polymer literature. It stands to reason that a different class of morphology modifiers should be sought that address challenges unique to molecular films, including difficulties in obtaining thicker films and avoiding the dewetting of active photovoltaic layers. Here we show that the addition of small quantities of high molecular weight polystyrene (PS) is a very simple to use and economically viable additive that improves PCE. Remarkably, the PS spontaneously accumulates away from the electrodes as separate domains that do not interfere with charge extraction and collection or with the arrangement of the donor and acceptor domains in the BHJ blend.

  7. Circulating tumor cells: clinically relevant molecular access based on a novel CTC flow cell.

    PubMed

    Winer-Jones, Jessamine P; Vahidi, Behrad; Arquilevich, Norma; Fang, Cong; Ferguson, Samuel; Harkins, Darren; Hill, Cory; Klem, Erich; Pagano, Paul C; Peasley, Chrissy; Romero, Juan; Shartle, Robert; Vasko, Robert C; Strauss, William M; Dempsey, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC) require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error) and a precision (CV<25%) down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens the way for clinically relevant genetic profiling of CTCs.

  8. Circulating Tumor Cells: Clinically Relevant Molecular Access Based on a Novel CTC Flow Cell

    PubMed Central

    Winer-Jones, Jessamine P.; Vahidi, Behrad; Arquilevich, Norma; Fang, Cong; Ferguson, Samuel; Harkins, Darren; Hill, Cory; Klem, Erich; Pagano, Paul C.; Peasley, Chrissy; Romero, Juan; Shartle, Robert; Vasko, Robert C.; Strauss, William M.; Dempsey, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC) require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. Methodology/Principal Findings Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error) and a precision (CV<25%) down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. Conclusions/Significance The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens the way for

  9. Signet ring cell carcinoma of the testis: clinicopathologic and molecular evidence for germ cell tumor origin--a case report.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Shah, Shilpa R; Einhorn, Lawrence H; Eble, John N; Cheng, Liang; Ulbright, Thomas M; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2012-02-01

    Development of a somatic-type malignancy from a mixed germ cell tumor is a rare but recognized event and typically represented by sarcoma or, less commonly, by carcinoma. This phenomenon is generally believed to result from progression of a teratomatous component. In many cases, because of intermingling of other germ cell tumor components, the diagnosis is apparent; however, in rare cases, metastatic carcinoma to the testis or a novel primary tumor may be a diagnostic consideration. In this study, we report the clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of a 53-year-old man, whose testicular tumor was composed entirely of signet ring cells, mimicking metastatic carcinoma. Subsequent retroperitoneal lymph node dissection revealed metastatic deposits composed of teratoma and yolk sac tumor, in addition to signet ring cell carcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for abnormalities of chromosome 12p revealed the presence of i(12p) in both the teratoma and signet ring cell carcinoma in the metastasis and in signet ring cells in the testis, supporting a common germ cell origin. Our report indicates that signet ring carcinoma cells in an orchiectomy specimen, although usually strongly suggestive of metastatic adenocarcinoma from a primary tumor in another organ, may be a primary testicular neoplasm of germ cell tumor origin. This is the first report of testicular signet ring cell carcinoma of germ cell tumor derivation.

  10. An 80-Year Experience with Optic Nerve Glioma Cases at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology: Evolution from Museum to Molecular Evaluation Suggests Possibe Interventions in the Cellular Senescence and Microglial Pathways (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J. Douglas; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Rushing, Elisabeth; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Eberhart, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether p16, a molecular marker of cellular senescence, and CD68, a microglial marker, are detectible in optic nerve glioma tissue stored for decades, thus providing potential targets for pharmacologic intervention. Methods: Cases were retrieved from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Registry of Ophthalmic Pathology. Clinical information was tabulated. In specimens with sufficient tissue, a tissue microarray was constructed to conduct molecular studies. Results: Ninety-two cases were included: gender distribution was in a ratio of one male to 1.6 females, and age range was 2 months to 50 years (average age, 10.8 years). Neurofibromatosis type 1 was identified in 10 cases (10.8%). The majority presented with decreased vision and exophthalmos. Forty-eight cases were studied by a tissue microarray construction. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, a control for immunoreactivity, was positive in 46 cases (96%). Immunoreactivity for p16 protein was seen in 36 cases (75%) and CD68-positive cells in 34 (71%). Limitations include referral bias, limited clinical information, limited amount of tissue, and extended period of tissue preservation. Conclusions: Optic nerve glioma is a tumor of the visual axis in young individuals, which is generally indolent but with a variable clinical course. Traditional histopathologic techniques have not been reliably predictive of clinical course. This microarray contains tumors with representative demographic, clinical, and histologic characteristics for optic nerve glioma. Immunoreactivity for p16 protein and CD68 is positive in the majority. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the variable clinical course and identify therapeutic targets in the cell senescence and microglial pathways. PMID:25411512

  11. Computational Modeling of Cell Electroporation and Molecular Delivery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Li, Jianbo

    2007-11-01

    Electroporation is an elegant means to gain access to the cytoplasm, and to deliver molecules into the cell while simultaneously maintaining viability and functionality. In this technique, an applied electric pulse transiently permeabilizes the cell membrane, through which biologically active agents such as DNA, RNA, and amino acids can enter the cell, and to perform tasks such as gene and cancer therapy. Current electroporation technologies fall short of desired efficiency and reliability, in part due to the lack of a good understanding in the pertinent fundamental processes. In this work, we use computational modeling to investigate electroporation-mediated molecular delivery, with a focus on the transport mechanisms long ignored in previous studies. By coupling the Smoluchowski equation governing membrane permeabilization with an electrohydrodynamic model, major aspects including electrophoresis, diffusion, and membrane deformation are investigated. Specifically, the effect of electrical parameters such as field strength, duration, and intra-/extra-cellular electrical conductivity on transport efficacy will be quantified. The eventual objective of this study is to optimize molecular delivery via simultaneously increasing transport and minimizing cell damage due to field exposure.

  12. Molecular mechanism of extrinsic factors affecting anti-aging of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Chen, Ying-Hui; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei

    2015-03-26

    Scientific evidence suggests that stem cells possess the anti-aging ability to self-renew and maintain differentiation potentials, and quiescent state. The objective of this review is to discuss the micro-environment where stem cells reside in vivo, the secreted factors to which stem cells are exposed, the hypoxic environment, and intracellular factors including genome stability, mitochondria integrity, epigenetic regulators, calorie restrictions, nutrients, and vitamin D. Secreted tumor growth factor-β and fibroblast growth factor-2 are reported to play a role in stem cell quiescence. Extracellular matrices may interact with caveolin-1, the lipid raft on cell membrane to regulate quiescence. N-cadherin, the adhesive protein on niche cells provides support for stem cells. The hypoxic micro-environment turns on hypoxia-inducible factor-1 to prevent mesenchymal stem cells aging through p16 and p21 down-regulation. Mitochondria express glucosephosphate isomerase to undergo glycolysis and prevent cellular aging. Epigenetic regulators such as p300, protein inhibitors of activated Stats and H19 help maintain stem cell quiescence. In addition, calorie restriction may lead to secretion of paracrines cyclic ADP-ribose by intestinal niche cells, which help maintain intestinal stem cells. In conclusion, it is crucial to understand the anti-aging phenomena of stem cells at the molecular level so that the key to solving the aging mystery may be unlocked.

  13. Molecular mechanism of extrinsic factors affecting anti-aging of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Chen, Ying-Hui; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that stem cells possess the anti-aging ability to self-renew and maintain differentiation potentials, and quiescent state. The objective of this review is to discuss the micro-environment where stem cells reside in vivo, the secreted factors to which stem cells are exposed, the hypoxic environment, and intracellular factors including genome stability, mitochondria integrity, epigenetic regulators, calorie restrictions, nutrients, and vitamin D. Secreted tumor growth factor-β and fibroblast growth factor-2 are reported to play a role in stem cell quiescence. Extracellular matrices may interact with caveolin-1, the lipid raft on cell membrane to regulate quiescence. N-cadherin, the adhesive protein on niche cells provides support for stem cells. The hypoxic micro-environment turns on hypoxia-inducible factor-1 to prevent mesenchymal stem cells aging through p16 and p21 down-regulation. Mitochondria express glucosephosphate isomerase to undergo glycolysis and prevent cellular aging. Epigenetic regulators such as p300, protein inhibitors of activated Stats and H19 help maintain stem cell quiescence. In addition, calorie restriction may lead to secretion of paracrines cyclic ADP-ribose by intestinal niche cells, which help maintain intestinal stem cells. In conclusion, it is crucial to understand the anti-aging phenomena of stem cells at the molecular level so that the key to solving the aging mystery may be unlocked. PMID:25815136

  14. Molecular mechanisms underlying nutrient detection by incretin-secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted postprandially from intestinal K- and L-cells, respectively. As incretins, these hormones stimulate insulin secretion from the pancreatic β-cell, and have independently been implicated in the control of food intake and lipid metabolism. Whilst the enteroendocrine cells producing GIP and GLP-1 are therefore attractive targets for the treatment of diabetes and obesity, our understanding of their physiology is fairly limited. The mechanisms employed to sense the arrival of carbohydrate, fat and protein in the gut lumen have been investigated using organ perfusion techniques, primary epithelial cultures and cell line models. The recent development of mice with fluorescently labeled GIP or GLP-1-expressing cells is now enabling the use of single cell techniques to investigate stimulus-secretion coupling mechanisms. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the molecular machinery underlying nutrient sensing within K- and L-cells. PMID:20204054

  15. Dedifferentiated liposarcoma with "homologous" lipoblastic (pleomorphic liposarcoma-like) differentiation: clinicopathologic and molecular analysis of a series suggesting revised diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Mariño-Enríquez, Adrián; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Dal Cin, Paola; Hornick, Jason L

    2010-08-01

    Dedifferentiated liposarcoma (LPS) is a malignant adipocytic neoplasm defined as the transition from well-differentiated LPS to a nonlipogenic sarcoma. Heterologous differentiation is seen in 5% to 10% of dedifferentiated LPS, usually with myogenic or osteo/chondrosarcomatous elements. Adipocytic differentiation in the dedifferentiated component is incompatible with the current definition of dedifferentiated LPS. Pleomorphic LPS is a high-grade sarcoma containing lipoblasts. At least in areas, pleomorphic LPS can be indistinguishable from dedifferentiated LPS, except for the presence of lipoblasts in pleomorphic LPS and well-differentiated LPS areas in dedifferentiated LPS. We evaluated 12 unusual liposarcomas: 11 cases with pleomorphic LPS-like morphology affecting patients with concomitant or previous well-differentiated/dedifferentiated LPS, and 1 case resembling inflammatory "MFH" with scattered lipoblasts. Clinical and histologic features were reviewed. Immunohistochemistry for MDM2 and CDK4 was carried out. Amplification of 12q13 to q15 was studied by FISH analysis of the HMGA2 locus. The tumors arose in the retroperitoneum (7), proximal lower extremity (3), chest wall (1), and neck (1) of 9 males and 3 females (median age 66 y; range 49 to 76). Size ranged from 9 to 32 cm (median 23 cm). In 3 cases, there was an abrupt transition between well-differentiated LPS and sheets of pleomorphic lipoblasts, indistinguishable from pleomorphic LPS. Four cases consisted of otherwise typical dedifferentiated LPS (with adjacent well-differentiated LPS), except for the presence of lipoblasts in the high-grade component. One case contained both nonlipogenic spindle cell areas and an inflammatory "MFH"-like component with numerous admixed lipoblasts. Four cases were composed exclusively of pleomorphic LPS-like areas developing in 1 of the recurrences or metastases of a prior typical dedifferentiated LPS. Two cases also showed heterologous smooth muscle differentiation. MDM2

  16. Screening disrupted molecular functions and pathways associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma using Gibbs sampling.

    PubMed

    Nan, Ning; Chen, Qi; Wang, Yu; Zhai, Xu; Yang, Chuan-Ce; Cao, Bin; Chong, Tie

    2017-10-01

    To explore the disturbed molecular functions and pathways in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) using Gibbs sampling. Gene expression data of ccRCC samples and adjacent non-tumor renal tissues were recruited from public available database. Then, molecular functions of expression changed genes in ccRCC were classed to Gene Ontology (GO) project, and these molecular functions were converted into Markov chains. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm was implemented to perform posterior inference and identify probability distributions of molecular functions in Gibbs sampling. Differentially expressed molecular functions were selected under posterior value more than 0.95, and genes with the appeared times in differentially expressed molecular functions ≥5 were defined as pivotal genes. Functional analysis was employed to explore the pathways of pivotal genes and their strongly co-regulated genes. In this work, we obtained 396 molecular functions, and 13 of them were differentially expressed. Oxidoreductase activity showed the highest posterior value. Gene composition analysis identified 79 pivotal genes, and survival analysis indicated that these pivotal genes could be used as a strong independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with ccRCC. Pathway analysis identified one pivotal pathway - oxidative phosphorylation. We identified the differentially expressed molecular functions and pivotal pathway in ccRCC using Gibbs sampling. The results could be considered as potential signatures for early detection and therapy of ccRCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. VDR regulation of microRNA differs across prostate cell models suggesting extremely flexible control of transcription.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant K; Long, Mark D; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Campbell, Moray J

    2015-01-01

    The Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and is of therapeutic interest in cancer and other settings. Regulation of microRNA (miRNA) by the VDR appears to be important to mediate its actions, for example, to control cell growth. To identify if and to what extent VDR-regulated miRNA patterns change in prostate cancer progression, we undertook miRNA microarray analyses in 7 cell models representing non-malignant and malignant prostate cells (RWPE-1, RWPE-2, HPr1, HPr1AR, LNCaP, LNCaP-C4-2, and PC-3). To focus on primary VDR regulatory events, we undertook expression analyses after 30 minutes treatment with 1α,25(OH)2D3. Across all models, 111 miRNAs were significantly modulated by 1α,25(OH)2D3 treatment. Of these, only 5 miRNAs were modulated in more than one cell model, and of these, only 3 miRNAs were modulated in the same direction. The patterns of miRNA regulation, and the networks they targeted, significantly distinguished the different cell types. Integration of 1α,25(OH)2D3-regulated miRNAs with published VDR ChIP-seq data showed significant enrichment of VDR peaks in flanking regions of miRNAs. Furthermore, mRNA and miRNA expression analyses in non-malignant RWPE-1 cells revealed patterns of miRNA and mRNA co-regulation; specifically, 13 significant reciprocal patterns were identified and these patterns were also observed in TCGA prostate cancer data. Lastly, motif search analysis revealed differential motif enrichment within VDR peaks flanking mRNA compared to miRNA genes. Together, this study revealed that miRNAs are rapidly regulated in a highly cell-type specific manner, and are significantly co-integrated with mRNA regulation.

  18. Molecular classification of urothelial carcinoma: global mRNA classification versus tumour-cell phenotype classification.

    PubMed

    Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Eriksson, Pontus; Liedberg, Fredrik; Höglund, Mattias

    2017-05-01

    Global mRNA expression analysis is efficient for phenotypic profiling of tumours, and has been used to define molecular subtypes for almost every major tumour type. A key limitation is that most tumours are communities of both tumour and non-tumour cells. This problem is particularly pertinent for analysis of advanced invasive tumours, which are known to induce major changes and responses in both the tumour and the surrounding tissue. To identify bladder cancer tumour-cell phenotypes and compare classification by tumour-cell phenotype with classification by global gene expression analysis, we analysed 307 advanced bladder cancers (cystectomized) both by genome gene expression analysis and by immunohistochemistry with antibodies for 28 proteins. According to systematic analysis of gene and protein expression data, focusing on key molecular processes, we describe five tumour-cell phenotypes of advanced urothelial carcinoma: urothelial-like, genomically unstable, basal/SCC-like, mesenchymal-like, and small-cell/neuroendocrine-like. We provide molecular pathological definitions for each subtype. Tumours expressing urothelial differentiation factors show inconsistent and abnormal protein expression of terminal differentiation markers, suggesting pseudo-differentiation. Cancers with different tumour-cell phenotypes may co-cluster (converge), and cases with identical tumour-cell phenotypes may cluster apart (diverge), in global mRNA analyses. This divergence/convergence suggests that broad global commonalities related to the invasive process may exist between muscle-invasive tumours regardless of specific tumour-cell phenotype. Hence, there is a systematic disagreement in subtype classification determined by global mRNA profiling and by immunohistochemical profiling at the tumour-cell level. We suggest that a combination of molecular pathology (tumour-cell phenotype) and global mRNA profiling (context) is required for adequate subtype classification of muscle

  19. Multi-locus molecular phylogeny and allelic variation in a transcription factor gene suggest the multiple independent origins of kabuli chickpea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To examine the patterns of molecular diversity in wild crop relatives and the cultivated gene pool of chickpea we genotyped a set of 98 wild annual and 224 cultivated accessions with a 768 feature assay that monitored SNPs in low-copy orthologous loci. Analyses of the resulting multi-locus genotypin...

  20. Serological & molecular diagnostic surveys combined with examining hematological profiles suggest increased levels of infection & hematological response of cattle to babesiosis infections compared to native buffaloes in Egypt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Babesiosis threatens the development of the cattle and buffaloes industries in Egypt and improved control is needed. The main objectives of this study are surveying the presence of bovine babesiosis in distinct selected bovine and buffalo populations in Egypt using novel molecular and pr...

  1. Molecular Mechanism of Isocupressic Acid Supresses MA-10 Cell Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Wu, Leang-Shin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of ponderosa pine needles causes late-term abortions in cattle and is a serious poisonous plant problem in foothill and mountain rangelands. Isocupressic acid (IA) is the component of pine needles responsible for the abortifacient effect, its abortifacient effect may be due to inhibition of steroidogenesis. To investigate the more detail molecular mechanism, we used MA-10 cell, which is wild used to investigate molecular mechanism of steroidogenesis, to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of IA in more detail. In this report, we focus on the function of IA on important steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD). We found that IA does not affect enzyme activities of these genes but inhibits transcription of P450scc and translation of StAR and P450scc through attenuating cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, steroid productions of cells were suppressed. PMID:22666287

  2. Molecular Mechanism of Isocupressic Acid Supresses MA-10 Cell Steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Wu, Leang-Shin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of ponderosa pine needles causes late-term abortions in cattle and is a serious poisonous plant problem in foothill and mountain rangelands. Isocupressic acid (IA) is the component of pine needles responsible for the abortifacient effect, its abortifacient effect may be due to inhibition of steroidogenesis. To investigate the more detail molecular mechanism, we used MA-10 cell, which is wild used to investigate molecular mechanism of steroidogenesis, to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of IA in more detail. In this report, we focus on the function of IA on important steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD). We found that IA does not affect enzyme activities of these genes but inhibits transcription of P450scc and translation of StAR and P450scc through attenuating cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, steroid productions of cells were suppressed.

  3. Reverse engineering the mechanical and molecular pathways in stem cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai; Gordon, Richard; Cao, Tong

    2015-03-01

    The formation of relevant biological structures poses a challenge for regenerative medicine. During embryogenesis, embryonic cells differentiate into somatic tissues and undergo morphogenesis to produce three-dimensional organs. Using stem cells, we can recapitulate this process and create biological constructs for therapeutic transplantation. However, imperfect imitation of nature sometimes results in in vitro artifacts that fail to recapitulate the function of native organs. It has been hypothesized that developing cells may self-organize into tissue-specific structures given a correct in vitro environment. This proposition is supported by the generation of neo-organoids from stem cells. We suggest that morphogenesis may be reverse engineered to uncover its interacting mechanical pathway and molecular circuitry. By harnessing the latent architecture of stem cells, novel tissue-engineering strategies may be conceptualized for generating self-organizing transplants. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Spatial distribution of cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions regulates force balance while main-taining E-cadherin molecular tension in cell pairs.

    PubMed

    Sim, Joo Yong; Moeller, Jens; Hart, Kevin C; Ramallo, Diego; Vogel, Viola; Dunn, Alex R; Nelson, W James; Pruitt, Beth L

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical linkage between cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions regulates cell shape changes during embryonic development and tissue homoeostasis. We examined how the force balance between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions changes with cell spread area and aspect ratio in pairs of MDCK cells. We used ECM micropatterning to drive different cytoskeleton strain energy states and cell-generated traction forces and used a Förster resonance energy transfer tension biosensor to ask whether changes in forces across cell-cell junctions correlated with E-cadherin molecular tension. We found that continuous peripheral ECM adhesions resulted in increased cell-cell and cell-ECM forces with increasing spread area. In contrast, confining ECM adhesions to the distal ends of cell-cell pairs resulted in shorter junction lengths and constant cell-cell forces. Of interest, each cell within a cell pair generated higher strain energies than isolated single cells of the same spread area. Surprisingly, E-cadherin molecular tension remained constant regardless of changes in cell-cell forces and was evenly distributed along cell-cell junctions independent of cell spread area and total traction forces. Taken together, our results showed that cell pairs maintained constant E-cadherin molecular tension and regulated total forces relative to cell spread area and shape but independently of total focal adhesion area.

  5. Tumor-driven Molecular Changes in Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Toro, Lenka; Skolekova, Svetlana; Demkova, Lucia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) exert either tumor-stimulatory or tumor-inhibitory effect. The outcome of the tumor-MSC interaction is dictated by the tumor-specific activating signals. We analyzed the alterations in MSC phenotype in response to stimulation by tumor-secreted paracrine factors. Paracrine factors from human melanoma A375 and glioblastoma 8MGBA cells were used for prolonged culture of MSC to produce derived cells designated DIFF(A)-MSC or DIFF(G)-MSC, respectively. Derived cells were analyzed for the specific surface markers, the expression pattern of MSC markers and fibroblast-specific proteins. Changes in the cell phenotype were evaluated using scratch wound assay and tube formation in vitro; and xenotransplant growth in vivo. Our data show induced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor 2, CD146, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin and endosialin in DIFF(A)-MSC cells. This indicates their differentiation towards the cells with features of tumor-associated fibroblasts upon stimulation with melanoma-secreted cytokines. Paracrine stimulation in DIFF(G)-MSC led to up-regulation of the genes involved in the MSC differentiation. MSC-specific surface marker characteristics were preserved in derived DIFF(A)-MSC and DIFF(G)-MSC cells. However, we observed increased proportion of CD146 and GD2 (neural ganglioside) positive cells and decreased expression of marker NG2 in the MSC exposed to tumor-conditioned medium. Melanoma-CM increased MSC migration, glioblastoma-CM compromised angiogenic capacity of MSC in vitro and the protumorigenic effect in vivo. Our data directly compare the pleiotropic effects mediated by the malignant cells on the MSC. Secreted paracrine factors from melanoma or glioblastoma differently changed molecular traits in MSC, which explains the dual role of MSC in tumor growth.

  6. Fluorescent molecular rotor for the study of membrane fluidity in endothelial cells under fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidekker, Mark A.; Frangos, John A.

    2000-04-01

    Molecular rotors are fluorescent probes that change quantum yield with the viscosity of their environment. When integrated into the cell membrane, they can be used to probe viscosity changes of the membrane. Fluid shear stress is hypothesized to increase membrane fluidity in the membrane of endothelial cells, a change that leads to the activation of heterotrimetric G proteins, thus activating a signal transduction cascade. This hypothesis was examined using a molecular rotor, 9-dicyanovinyl-julolidine (DCVJ) as membrane probe. The principal response, a decease of fluorescence intensity caused by increased membrane fluidity, was obtained by adding a fluidity-increasing agent to the cells. In a parallel-plate flow chamber, a confluent layer of DCVJ-labeled human umbilical cord venous endothelial cells were exposed to different levels of fluid shear stress. With increased shear, a reduced fluorescence intensity was observed, indicating an increase of membrane fluidity. Step changes of fluid shear stress caused an approximately linear drop of fluorescence within 5 seconds, showing fast and almost full recovery after shear stopped. A linear relationship between shear stress and membrane fluidity changes was also observed. This study not only shows the suitability of the molecular rotor DCVJ as a membrane fluidity probe, but also provides evidence for the direct link between fluid shear stress and membrane fluidity, and suggests that the membrane is the primary flow mechanosensor of the cell.

  7. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making. PMID:24198613

  8. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  9. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-05

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

  10. Cell and molecular biology of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, Brian P; Peterson, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most intensely studied cell surface receptors due to its well-established roles in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer biology. The EGFR has been critical for creating paradigms for numerous aspects of cell biology, such as ligand binding, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Despite this history of discovery, there is a continual stream of evidence that only the surface has been scratched. New ways of receptor regulation continue to be identified, each of which is a potential molecular target for manipulating EGFR signaling and the resultant changes in cell and tissue biology. This chapter is an update on EGFR-mediated signaling, and describes some recent developments in the regulation of receptor biology.

  11. Critical Limb Ischemia: Cell and Molecular Therapies for Limb Salvage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing new limb salvage therapies for patients with severe peripheral artery disease who have no alternative to amputation. Cell and gene therapy studies are showing promise in controlling pain and minor ulceration in patients with significant critical limb ischemia. Among cardiovascular cell and molecular therapy programs, The Methodist Hospital is one of the leading centers in both gene and cell therapy for critical limb ischemia. Randomized controlled trials continue to be performed, and these experimental therapies will move from research to pharmacy within the decade. In conjunction with aggressive medical and surgical management, these emergent therapies may help patients with critical limb ischemia avoid a major amputation and are one of the foundations of any advanced limb salvage program. PMID:23342184

  12. Molecular signaling in live cells studied by FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2011-11-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. We have used FRET to assess temporal and spatial characteristics for signaling molecules, including tyrosine kinases Src and FAK, small GTPase Rac, calcium, and a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Activations of Src and Rac by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) led to distinct subcellular patterns during cell migration on micropatterned surface, and these two enzymes interact with each other to form a feedback loop with differential regulations at different subcellular locations. We have developed FRET biosensors to monitor FAK activities at rafts vs. non-raft regions of plasma membrane in live cells. In response to cell adhesion on matrix proteins or stimulation by PDGF, the raft-targeting FAK biosensor showed a stronger FRET response than that at non-rafts. The FAK activation at rafts induced by PDGF is mediated by Src. In contrast, the FAK activation at rafts induced by adhesion is independent of Src activity, but rather is essential for Src activation. Thus, Src is upstream to FAK in response to chemical stimulation (PDGF), but FAK is upstream to Src in response to mechanical stimulation (adhesion). A novel biosensor has been developed to dynamically visualize the activity of membrane type-1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which proteolytically remodels the extracellular matrix. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed active MT1-MMP to the leading edge of migrating live cancer cells with local accumulation of EGF receptor via a process dependent on an intact cytoskeletal network. In summary, FRET-based biosensors enable the elucidation of molecular processes and hierarchies underlying spatiotemporal regulation of biological and pathological processes, thus advancing our knowledge on how cells perceive mechanical/chemical cues in space and time to coordinate

  13. Molecular signaling in live cells studied by FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2012-03-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. We have used FRET to assess temporal and spatial characteristics for signaling molecules, including tyrosine kinases Src and FAK, small GTPase Rac, calcium, and a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Activations of Src and Rac by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) led to distinct subcellular patterns during cell migration on micropatterned surface, and these two enzymes interact with each other to form a feedback loop with differential regulations at different subcellular locations. We have developed FRET biosensors to monitor FAK activities at rafts vs. non-raft regions of plasma membrane in live cells. In response to cell adhesion on matrix proteins or stimulation by PDGF, the raft-targeting FAK biosensor showed a stronger FRET response than that at non-rafts. The FAK activation at rafts induced by PDGF is mediated by Src. In contrast, the FAK activation at rafts induced by adhesion is independent of Src activity, but rather is essential for Src activation. Thus, Src is upstream to FAK in response to chemical stimulation (PDGF), but FAK is upstream to Src in response to mechanical stimulation (adhesion). A novel biosensor has been developed to dynamically visualize the activity of membrane type-1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which proteolytically remodels the extracellular matrix. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed active MT1-MMP to the leading edge of migrating live cancer cells with local accumulation of EGF receptor via a process dependent on an intact cytoskeletal network. In summary, FRET-based biosensors enable the elucidation of molecular processes and hierarchies underlying spatiotemporal regulation of biological and pathological processes, thus advancing our knowledge on how cells perceive mechanical/chemical cues in space and time to coordinate

  14. Epigenetic and molecular profiles of erythroid cells after hydroxyurea treatment in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Aisha L; Steward, Shirley; Howard, Thad A; Mortier, Nicole; Smeltzer, Matthew; Wang, Yong-Dong; Ware, Russell E

    2011-11-17

    Hydroxyurea has been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of sickle cell anemia (SCA), primarily through the induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). However, the exact mechanisms by which hydroxyurea can induce HbF remain incompletely defined, although direct transcriptional effects and altered cell cycle kinetics have been proposed. In this study, we investigated potential epigenetic and alternative molecular mechanisms of hydroxyurea-mediated HbF induction by examining methylation patterns within the (G)γ-globin promoter and miRNA expression within primary CD71(+) erythrocytes of patients with SCA, both at baseline before beginning hydroxyurea therapy and after reaching maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Using both cross-sectional analysis and paired-sample analysis, we found that the highly methylated (G)γ-globin promoter was inversely correlated to baseline HbF levels, but only slightly altered by hydroxyurea treatment. Conversely, expression of several specific miRNAs was significantly increased after hydroxyurea treatment, and expression of miR-26b and miR-151-3p were both associated with HbF levels at MTD. The significant associations identified in these studies suggest that methylation may be important for regulation of baseline HbF, but not after hydroxyurea treatment, whereas changes in miRNA expression may be associated with hydroxyurea-mediated HbF induction. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00305175).

  15. Early-Onset Severe Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage after Bortezomib Administration Suggestive of Pulmonary Involvement of Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasumasa; Ohwada, Chikako; Nagao, Yuhei; Kawajiri, Chika; Shimizu, Ryoh; Togasaki, Emi; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Muto, Tomoya; Sakai, Shio; Takeda, Yusuke; Mimura, Naoya; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Sakaida, Emiko; Iseki, Tohru; Yokote, Koutaro; Nakaseko, Chiaki

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute lung injury is a rare but life-threatening complication associated with bortezomib. We report a patient with multiple myeloma who developed a severe diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) immediately after the first bortezomib administration. The patient was suspected to have pulmonary involvement of myeloma, which caused DAH after rapidly eradicating myeloma cells in the lungs with bortezomib. Rechallenge with bortezomib was performed without recurrent DAH. In patients with multiple myeloma who manifest abnormal pulmonary shadow, we should be aware of early-onset severe DAH after bortezomib administration, which might be due to pulmonary involvement of myeloma cells.

  16. Molecular characterization of HCMV-specific immune responses: Parallels between CD8(+) T cells, CD4(+) T cells, and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira Braga, Felipe A; Hertoghs, Kirsten M L; van Lier, René A W; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M

    2015-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells are important for immunity against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response is characterized by the accumulation of terminally differentiated effector cells that have downregulated the costimulatory molecules CD27 and CD28. These HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells maintain high levels of cytotoxic molecules such as granzyme B and rapidly produce the inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ upon activation. Remarkably, HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells are able to persist long term as fully functional effector cells, suggesting a unique differentiation pathway that is distinct from the formation of memory CD8(+) T cells after infection with acute viruses. In this review, we aim to highlight the most recent developments in HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell differentiation, maintenance, tissue distribution, metabolism and function. HCMV also induces the differentiation of effector CD4(+) T cells and NK cells, which share characteristics with HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. We propose that the overlap in differentiation of NK cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after HCMV infection may be regulated by a shared transcriptional machinery. A better understanding of the molecular framework of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses may benefit vaccine design, as these cells uniquely combine the capacity to rapidly respond to infection with long-term survival. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Considerations of red blood cell molecular testing in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Annika M; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    The field of transfusion medicine is on the threshold of a paradigm shift, as the technology for genotyping of red blood cell antigens, including US FDA-approved arrays, is now moving into standard practice. Access to cost-efficient, high-resolution genotyping has the potential to increase the quality of care by decreasing the risk for alloimmunization and incompatible transfusions in individuals on long-term blood transfusion protocols, including patient groups with hemoglobinopathies and other chronic diseases. Current and future applications of molecular methods in transfusion medicine and blood banking are discussed, with emphasis on indications for genotyping in various clinical scenarios. Furthermore, limitations of the current gold standard methodology and serology, as well as of contemporary molecular methodology, are examined.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; Levitt, James A; Chung, Pei-Hua; Kuimova, Marina K; Yahioglu, Gokhan

    2012-02-09

    Diffusion is often an important rate-determining step in chemical reactions or biological processes and plays a role in a wide range of intracellular events. Viscosity is one of the key parameters affecting the diffusion of molecules and proteins, and changes in viscosity have been linked to disease and malfunction at the cellular level. While methods to measure the bulk viscosity are well developed, imaging microviscosity remains a challenge. Viscosity maps of microscopic objects, such as single cells, have until recently been hard to obtain. Mapping viscosity with fluorescence techniques is advantageous because, similar to other optical techniques, it is minimally invasive, non-destructive and can be applied to living cells and tissues. Fluorescent molecular rotors exhibit fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields which are a function of the viscosity of their microenvironment. Intramolecular twisting or rotation leads to non-radiative decay from the excited state back to the ground state. A viscous environment slows this rotation or twisting, restricting access to this non-radiative decay pathway. This leads to an increase in the fluorescence quantum yield and the fluorescence lifetime. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) of modified hydrophobic BODIPY dyes that act as fluorescent molecular rotors show that the fluorescence lifetime of these probes is a function of the microviscosity of their environment. A logarithmic plot of the fluorescence lifetime versus the solvent viscosity yields a straight line that obeys the Förster Hoffman equation. This plot also serves as a calibration graph to convert fluorescence lifetime into viscosity. Following incubation of living cells with the modified BODIPY fluorescent molecular rotor, a punctate dye distribution is observed in the fluorescence images. The viscosity value obtained in the puncta in live cells is around 100 times higher than that of water and of cellular cytoplasm. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy

  19. Molecular bulk heterojunctions: an emerging approach to organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Jean

    2009-11-17

    The predicted exhaustion of fossil energy resources and the pressure of environmental constraints are stimulating an intensification of research on renewable energy sources, in particular, on the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. In this context, organic solar cells are attracting increasing interest that is motivated by the possibility of fabricating large-area, lightweight, and flexible devices using simple techniques with low environmental impact. Organic solar cells are based on a heterojunction resulting from the contact of a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) material. Absorption of solar photons creates excitons, Coulombically bound electron-hole pairs, which diffuse to the D/A interface, where they are dissociated into free holes and electrons by the electric field. D/A heterojunctions can be created with two types of architectures, namely, bilayer heterojunction and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. BHJ cells combine the advantages of easier fabrication and higher conversion efficiency due to the considerably extended D/A interface. Until now, the development of BHJ solar cells has been essentially based on the use of soluble pi-conjugated polymers as donor material. Intensive interdisciplinary research carried out in the past 10 years has led to an increase in the conversion efficiency of BHJ cells from 0.10 to more than 5.0%. These investigations have progressively established regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the standard donor material for BHJ solar cells, owing to a useful combination of optical and charge-transport properties. However, besides the limit imposed to the maximum conversion efficiency by its intrinsic electronic properties, P3HT and more generally polymers pose several problems related to the control of their structure, molecular weight, polydispersity, and purification. In this context, recent years have seen the emergence of an alternative approach based on the replacement of polydisperse polymers by soluble

  20. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhao, Jun; Zeng, Jin; Wu, Kai-jie; Chen, Yu-le; Wang, Xin-yang; Chang, Luke S; He, Da-lin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detect bladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively. The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair. Methods: Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed, which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family. Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637, 253J and T24, as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined. Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope. For assays using dual FRET MBs, the excitation wavelength was 488 nm, and the emission detection wavelengths were 520±20 nm and 560±20 nm, respectively. Results: The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals. In contrast, no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs. Conclusion: The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer. PMID:22019956

  1. Persulphate challenge in female hairdressers with nasal hyperreactivity suggests immune cell, but no IgE reaction.

    PubMed

    Diab, Kerstin Kronholm; Truedsson, Lennart; Albin, Maria; Nielsen, Jørn

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of persulphate on the nasal mucosa and on the immune cells in hairdressers suffering from bleaching powder associated rhinitis (BAR) versus subjects with rhinitis not previously exposed to bleaching powder. Fifteen hairdressers (S) with BAR, 14 without symptoms (WS) and 12 atopics (A) with rhinitis but without exposure to bleaching powder were studied. Each performed a nasal challenge with persulphates. Effect parameters were symptom score, acoustic rhinometry, albumin in nasal lavage, subpopulations of lymphocytes in blood and specific serum antibodies. The S group had a post-challenge increase in nasal symptoms and nasal lavage albumin. The A group reacted to a lesser intent. The S and A groups showed an increase in Th1 cells. An HLA class II cell expression was noticed in both groups of hairdressers. No evidence of a type 1 reaction (immediate type) to persulphate was noticed. Persulphate challenge affects hairdressers with BAR, but also atopics. The reaction may be driven by a Th1 cell activation.

  2. iTRAQ analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines suggests Drebrin (DBN1) is overexpressed during liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qifeng; Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Khoo, Avery; Lim, Kiat Hon; Chung, Maxey C M

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third in cancer incidence worldwide and the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. Mortality in colorectal cancer is often ascribed to liver metastasis. In an effort to elucidate the proteins involved in colorectal cancer liver metastasis, we compared the proteome profiles of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 with its metastatic derivative E1, using the iTRAQ labelling technology, coupled to 2D-LC and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. A total of 547 proteins were identified, of which 31 of them were differentially expressed in the E1 cell line. Among these proteins, the differential expressions of translationally controlled tumour protein 1, A-kinase anchor protein 12 and Drebrin (DBN1) were validated using Western blot. In particular, DBN1, a protein not previously known to be involved in colorectal cancer metastasis, was found to be overexpressed in E1 as compared to HCT-116 cells. The overexpression of DBN1 was further validated using immunohistochemistry on colorectal cancer tissue sections with matched lymph node and liver metastasis tissues. DBN1 is currently believed to be involved in actin cytoskeleton reorganisation and suppresses actin filament cross-linking and bundling. Since actin reorganisation is an important process for tumour cell migration and invasion, DBN1 may have an important role during colorectal cancer metastasis.

  3. Identification of molecular pathways facilitating glioma cell invasion in situ.

    PubMed

    Nevo, Ido; Woolard, Kevin; Cam, Maggie; Li, Aiguo; Webster, Joshua D; Kotliarov, Yuri; Kim, Hong Sug; Ahn, Susie; Walling, Jennifer; Kotliarova, Svetlana; Belova, Galina; Song, Hua; Bailey, Rolanda; Zhang, Wei; Fine, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are mostly incurable secondary to their diffuse infiltrative nature. Thus, specific therapeutic targeting of invasive glioma cells is an attractive concept. As cells exit the tumor mass and infiltrate brain parenchyma, they closely interact with a changing micro-environmental landscape that sustains tumor cell invasion. In this study, we used a unique microarray profiling approach on a human glioma stem cell (GSC) xenograft model to explore gene expression changes in situ in Invading Glioma Cells (IGCs) compared to tumor core, as well as changes in host cells residing within the infiltrated microenvironment relative to the unaffected cortex. IGCs were found to have reduced expression of genes within the extracellular matrix compartment, and genes involved in cell adhesion, cell polarity and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes. The infiltrated microenvironment showed activation of wound repair and tissue remodeling networks. We confirmed by protein analysis the downregulation of EMT and polarity related genes such as CD44 and PARD3 in IGCs, and EFNB3, a tissue-remodeling agent enriched at the infiltrated microenvironment. OLIG2, a proliferation regulator and glioma progenitor cell marker upregulated in IGCs was found to function in enhancing migration and stemness of GSCs. Overall, our results unveiled a more comprehensive picture of the complex and dynamic cell autonomous and tumor-host interactive pathways of glioma invasion than has been previously demonstrated. This suggests targeting of multiple pathways at the junction of invading tumor and microenvironment as a viable option for glioma therapy.

  4. Transforming benzophenoxazine laser dyes into chromophores for dye-sensitized solar cells: a molecular engineering approach

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Florian A. Y. N.; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.; McKechnie, Scott

    2015-05-06

    The re-functionalization of a series of four well-known industrial laser dyes, based on benzophenoxazine, is explored with the prospect of molecularly engineering new chromophores for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) applications. Such engineering is important since a lack of suitable dyes is stifling the progress of DSC technology. The conceptual idea involves making laser dyes DSC-active by chemical modification, while maintaining their key property attributes that are attractive to DSC applications. This molecular engineering follows a step-wise approach. Firstly, molecular structures and optical absorption properties are determined for the parent laser dyes: Cresyl Violet (1); Oxazine 170 (2); Nile Blue A (3), Oxazine 750 (4). These reveal structure-property relationships which define the prerequisites for computational molecular design of DSC dyes; the nature of their molecular architecture (D-π-A) and intramolecular charge transfer. Secondly, new DSC dyes are computationally designed by the in silico addition of a carboxylic acid anchor at various chemical substitution points in the parent laser dyes. A comparison of the resulting frontier molecular orbital energy levels with the conduction band edge of a TiO2 DSC photoanode and the redox potential of two electrolyte options I-/I3- and Co(II/III)tris(bipyridyl) suggests promise for these computationally designed dyes as co-sensitizers for DSC applications.

  5. Molecular ties between the cell cycle and differentiation in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Victor C.; Kirschner, Marc W.

    2014-01-01

    Attainment of the differentiated state during the final stages of somatic cell differentiation is closely tied to cell cycle progression. Much less is known about the role of the cell cycle at very early stages of embryonic development. Here, we show that molecular pathways involving the cell cycle can be engineered to strongly affect embryonic stem cell differentiation at early stages in vitro. Strategies based on perturbing these pathways can shorten the rate and simplify the lineage path of ES differentiation. These results make it likely that pathways involving cell proliferation intersect at various points with pathways that regulate cell lineages in embryos and demonstrate that this knowledge can be used profitably to guide the path and effectiveness of cell differentiation of pluripotent cells. PMID:24979803

  6. Molecular ties between the cell cycle and differentiation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Victor C; Kirschner, Marc W

    2014-07-01

    Attainment of the differentiated state during the final stages of somatic cell differentiation is closely tied to cell cycle progression. Much less is known about the role of the cell cycle at very early stages of embryonic development. Here, we show that molecular pathways involving the cell cycle can be engineered to strongly affect embryonic stem cell differentiation at early stages in vitro. Strategies based on perturbing these pathways can shorten the rate and simplify the lineage path of ES differentiation. These results make it likely that pathways involving cell proliferation intersect at various points with pathways that regulate cell lineages in embryos and demonstrate that this knowledge can be used profitably to guide the path and effectiveness of cell differentiation of pluripotent cells.

  7. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  8. Combined gene expression and proteomic analysis of EGF induced apoptosis in A431 cells suggests multiple pathways trigger apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Ibrahim; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Hoffmann, Peter; Adelson, David L

    2013-11-01

    A431 cells, derived from epidermoid carcinoma, overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and when treated with a high dose of EGF will undergo apoptosis. We exploited microarray and proteomics techniques and network prediction to study the regulatory mechanisms of EGF-induced apoptosis in A431 cells. We observed significant changes in gene expression in 162 genes, approximately evenly split between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes and identified 30 proteins from the proteomic data that had either pro or anti-apoptotic annotation. Our correlation analysis of gene expression and proteome modeled a number of distinct sub-networks that are associated with the onset of apoptosis, allowing us to identify specific pathways and components. These include components of the interferon signalling pathway, and down stream components, including cytokines and suppressors of cytokine signalling. A central component of almost all gene expression sub-networks identified was TP53, which is mutated in A431 cells, and was down regulated. This down regulation of TP53 appeared to be correlated with proteomic sub-networks of cytoskeletal or cell adhesion components that might induce apoptosis by triggering cytochrome C release. Of the only three genes also differentially expressed as proteins, only serpinb1 had a known association with apoptosis. We confirmed that up regulation and cleavage of serpinb1 into L-DNAaseII was correlated with the induction of apoptosis. It is unlikely that a single pathway, but more likely a combination of pathways is needed to trigger EGF induced apoptosis in A431cells.

  9. Molecular analysis of LEFTY-expressing cells in early human embryoid bodies.

    PubMed

    Dvash, Tamar; Sharon, Nadav; Yanuka, Ofra; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2007-02-01

    Human ESCs (HESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cell lines that are derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos. These cells can produce terminally differentiated cells representing the three embryonic germ layers. We thus hypothesized that during the course of in vitro differentiation of HESCs, progenitor-like cells are transiently formed. We demonstrated that LEFTY proteins, which are known to play a major role during mouse gastrulation, are transiently expressed during HESC differentiation. Moreover, LEFTY proteins seemed to be exclusively expressed by a certain population of cells in the early human embryoid bodies that does not overlap with the population expressing the ESC marker OCT4. We also showed that LEFTY expression is regulated at the cellular transcription level by molecular labeling of LEFTY-positive cells. A DNA microarray analysis of LEFTY-overexpressing cells revealed a signature of cell surface markers such as CADHERIN 2 and 11. Expression of LEFTY controlled by NODAL appears to have a substantial role in mesodermal origin cell population establishment, since inhibition of NODAL activity downregulated expression not only of LEFTY A and LEFTY B but also of BRACHYURY, an early mesodermal marker. In addition, other mesodermal lineage-related genes were downregulated, and this was accompanied by an upregulation in ectoderm-related genes. We propose that during the initial step of HESC differentiation, mesoderm progenitor-like cells appear via activation of the NODAL pathway. Our analysis suggests that in vitro differentiation of HESCs can model early events in human development.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma cell inhibition by medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Leelawat, Surang; Leelawat, Kawin

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is one of the most common causes of cancer-associated mortality in Thailand. Certain phytochemicals have been demonstrated to modulate apoptotic signaling pathways, which may be targeted for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of specific medicinal plants on the inhibition of CCA cell proliferation, and to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this. A WST-1 cell proliferation assay was performed using an RMCCA1 cell line, and apoptotic signaling pathways were also investigated using a PathScan Stress and Apoptosis Signaling Antibody Array Kit. The cell proliferation assay indicated that extracts from the Phyllanthus emblica fruit pulp (PEf), Phyllanthus emblica seed (PEs), Terminalia chebula fruit pulp (TCf), Terminalia chebula seed (TCs), Areca catechu seed (ACs), Curcuma longa (CL) and Moringa oleifera seed (MOs) exerted anti-proliferative activity in RMCCA1 cells. In addition, the PathScan assay revealed that certain pro-apoptotic molecules, including caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, checkpoint kinase 2 and tumor protein 53, exhibited increased activity in RMCCA1 cells treated with the aforementioned selected plant extracts, with the exception of PEf. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (including ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK) expression level was significantly increased in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of PEs, TCf, CL and MOs. The activation of protein kinase B (Akt) was significantly demonstrated in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of TCf, ACs and MOs. In summary, the present study demonstrated that extracts of PEs, TCf, TCs, ACs, CL and MOs exhibited anti-proliferative effects in CCA cells by inducing pro-apoptotic signals and modulating signal transduction molecules. Further studies in vivo are required to demonstrate the potential applications of specific plant extracts for the treatment of human cancer. PMID:28356985

  11. VNAR single-domain antibodies specific for BAFF inhibit B cell development by molecular mimicry.

    PubMed

    Häsler, Julien; Flajnik, Martin F; Williams, Gareth; Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, J Lynn

    2016-07-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) plays a dominant role in the B cell homeostasis. However, excessive BAFF promotes the development of autoreactive B-cells and several antibodies have been developed to block its activity. Bispecific antibodies with added functionality represent the next wave of biologics that may be more effective in the treatment of complex autoimmune disease. The single variable domain from the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (VNAR) is one of the smallest antibody recognition units that could be combined with monospecific antibodies to develop bispecific agents. We isolated a panel of BAFF-binding VNARs with low nM potency from a semi-synthetic phage display library and examined their functional activity. The anti-BAFF VNARs blocked the binding of BAFF to all three of its receptors (BR3, TACI and BCMA) and the presence of the conserved DXL receptor motif found in the CDR3 regions suggests molecular mimicry as the mechanism of antagonism. One clone was formatted as an Fc fusion for functional testing and it was found to inhibit both mouse and human BAFF with equal potency ex vivo in a splenocyte proliferation assay. In mice, subchronic administration reduced the number of immature and transitional intermediates B cells and mature B cell subsets. These results indicate that VNAR single domain antibodies function as selective B-cell inhibitors and offer an alternative molecular format for targeting B-cell disorders.

  12. Molecular features of a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with spontaneous metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, F A; Betts, D R; Niggli, F K; Schäfer, B W

    2000-01-01

    A novel human cell line was established from a primary botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction investigations of this cell line, called RUCH-2, demonstrated expression of the regulatory factors PAX3, Myf3 and Myf5. After 3.5 months in culture, cells underwent a crisis after which Myf3 and Myf5 could no longer be detected, whereas PAX3 expression remained constant over the entire period. Karyotype analysis revealed breakpoints in regions similar to previously described alterations in primary rhabdomyosarcoma tumour samples. Interestingly, cells progressed to a metastatic phenotype, as observed by enhanced invasiveness in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice in vivo. On the molecular level, microarray analysis before and after progression identified extensive changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix. As expected, down-regulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases were observed. Extensive down-regulation of several death receptors of the tumour necrosis factor family suggests that these cells might have an altered response to appropriate apoptotic stimuli. The RUCH-2 cell line represents a cellular model to study multistep tumorigenesis in human rhabdomyosarcoma, allowing molecular comparison of tumorigenic versus metastatic cancer cells. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10735512

  13. Radiation-associated small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the thyroid: a case report with molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Mussazhanova, Zhanna; Miura, Shiro; Stanojevic, Boban; Rougounovitch, Tatiana; Saenko, Vladimir; Shiraishi, Toshio; Kurashige, Tomomi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Kaneko, Kenichi; Takahashi, Haruo; Ito, Masahiro; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the thyroid other than medullary carcinoma is extremely rare. We describe here a case of calcitonin-negative small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNEC), which occurred in a thyroid gland that had previously been irradiated at high dose (60 Gy) for pharyngeal cancer, with molecular analyses for follicular cell origin. The tumor cells were small with fine chromatin, inconspicuous nucleoli, and inapparent cytoplasm, and showed neuroendocrine architectures such as palisading, rosettes, and trabeculae. Mitotic figures were numerous exceeding 10 mitoses per 10 high-power fields. The tumor cells invaded into several vessels and metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were strongly positive for neuroendocrine markers and thyroglobulin (Tg), a marker of thyroid follicular cells but negative for calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Expression of Tg and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Ki-67 labeling index was more than 70% in the tumor cells. Taken together, the tumor was diagnosed as SCNEC of the thyroid. Genetic analyses also revealed microsatellite abnormalities of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene, suggesting that functional loss of PTEN contributes to carcinogenesis. This is the first report describing a SCNEC of the thyroid with molecular analyses that provide evidence for a follicular epithelial origin.

  14. Feasibility of a workflow for the molecular characterization of single cells by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Rotunno, Giada; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Pestrin, Marta; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Di Leo, Angelo; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the feasibility of a protocol for the isolation and molecular characterization of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patients using a single-cell next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. To reach this goal we used as a model an artificial sample obtained by spiking a breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) into the blood of a healthy donor. Tumor cells were enriched and enumerated by CellSearch® and subsequently isolated by DEPArray™ to obtain single or pooled pure samples to be submitted to the analysis of the mutational status of multiple genes involved in cancer. Upon whole genome amplification, samples were analysed by NGS on the Ion Torrent PGM™ system (Life Technologies) using the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (Life Technologies), designed to investigate genomic “hot spot” regions of 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We successfully sequenced five single cells, a pool of 5 cells and DNA from a cellular pellet of the same cell line with a mean depth of the sequencing reaction ranging from 1581 to 3479 reads. We found 27 sequence variants in 18 genes, 15 of which already reported in the COSMIC or dbSNP databases. We confirmed the presence of two somatic mutations, in the BRAF and TP53 gene, which had been already reported for this cells line, but also found new mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Three variants were common to all the analysed samples, while 18 were present only in a single cell suggesting a high heterogeneity within the same cell line. This paper presents an optimized workflow for the molecular characterization of multiple genes in single cells by NGS. The described pipeline can be easily transferred to the study of single CTCs from oncologic patients. PMID:27077040

  15. Molecular profiling of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gatalica, Zoran; Knezetic, Joseph; Reddy, Sandeep; Nathan, Cherie‐Ann; Javadi, Nader; Teknos, Theodoros

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits high rates of recurrence, and with few approved targeted agents, novel treatments are needed. We analyzed a molecular profiling database for the distribution of biomarkers predictive of chemotherapies and targeted agents. Methods Seven hundred thirty‐five patients with advanced HNSCC (88 with known human papillomavirus [HPV] status), were profiled using multiple platforms (gene sequencing, gene copy number, and protein expression). Results Among the entire patient population studied, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was the protein most often overexpressed (90%), TP53 gene most often mutated (41%), and phosphatidylinositol 3‐kinase (PIK3CA) most often amplified (40%; n = 5). With the exception of TP53 mutation, other biomarker frequencies were not significantly different among HPV‐positive or HPV‐negative patients. PIK3CA mutations and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss are frequent events, independent of HPV status. The immune response‐modulating programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) axis was active across sites, stages, and HPV status. Conclusion Molecular profiling utilizing multiple platforms provides a range of therapy options beyond standard of care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1625–E1638, 2016 PMID:26614708

  16. Enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulation captures experimentally suggested intermediate and unfolded states in the folding pathway of Trp-cage miniprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2012-09-01

    The ability of molecular dynamics simulation to capturing the transient states within the folding pathway of protein is important to the understanding of protein folding mechanism. In the present study, the integrated-tempering-sampling molecular dynamics (ITS-MD) simulation was performed to investigate the transient states including intermediate and unfolded ones in the folding pathway of a miniprotein, Trp-cage. Three force fields (FF03, FF99SB, and FF96) were tested, and both intermediate and unfolded states with their characteristics in good agreement with experiments were observed during the simulations, which supports the hypothesis that observable intermediates might present in the folding pathway of small polypeptides. In addition, it was demonstrated that FF03 force field as combined with ITS-MD is in overall a more proper force field than the others in reproducing experimentally recorded properties in UVRS, ECD, and NMR, Photo-CIDNP NMR, and IR T-jump experiments, and the folding/unfolding thermodynamics parameters, such as ΔGU, ΔCp, and ΔHU (Tm). In summary, the present study showed that using suitable force field and energy sampling method, molecular dynamics simulation could capture the transient states within the folding pathway of protein which are consistent with the experimental measurements, and thus provide information of protein folding mechanism and thermodynamics.

  17. Molecular biology of mycoplasmas: from the minimum cell concept to the artificial cell.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Caio M M; Hoeltgebaum, Daniela L; Machado, Laís D P N; Santos, Larissa Dos

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are a large group of bacteria, sorted into different genera in the Mollicutes class, whose main characteristic in common, besides the small genome, is the absence of cell wall. They are considered cellular and molecular biology study models. We present an updated review of the molecular biology of these model microorganisms and the development of replicative vectors for the transformation of mycoplasmas. Synthetic biology studies inspired by these pioneering works became possible and won the attention of the mainstream media. For the first time, an artificial genome was synthesized (a minimal genome produced from consensus sequences obtained from mycoplasmas). For the first time, a functional artificial cell has been constructed by introducing a genome completely synthesized within a cell envelope of a mycoplasma obtained by transformation techniques. Therefore, this article offers an updated insight to the state of the art of these peculiar organisms' molecular biology.

  18. Molecular Pathways of Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Joshua; Gridley, Thomas; Liaw, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Notch signaling in the cardiovascular system is important during embryonic development, vascular repair of injury, and vascular pathology in humans. The vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) expresses multiple Notch receptors throughout its life cycle, and responds to Notch ligands as a regulatory mechanism of differentiation, recruitment to growing vessels, and maturation. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of the molecular basis for Notch regulation of VSMC phenotype. Further, we will explore Notch interaction with other signaling pathways important in VSMC. PMID:22509166

  19. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ke; Ward, William; Farnum, Byron H.; Taheri, Atefeh; Johansson, Patrik; Meyer, Gerald John

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  20. Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2015-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, e.g., plants including green algae, use a sophisticated light-sensing system, composed of primary photoreceptors and additional downstream signaling components, to monitor changes in the ambient light environment towards adjust their growth and development. Although a variety of cellular processes, e.g., initiation of cleavage division and final cellular differentiation, have been shown to be light-regulated in the green alga Volvox carteri, little is known about the underlying light perception and signaling pathways. This multicellular alga possesses at least 12 photoreceptors, i.e., one phototropin (VcPhot), four cryptochromes (VcCRYa, VcCRYp, VcCRYd1, and VcCRYd2), and seven members of rhodopsin-like photoreceptors (VR1, VChR1, VChR2, VcHKR1, VcHKR2, VcHKR3, and VcHKR4), which display distinct light-dependent chemical processes based on their protein architectures and associated chromophores. Gene expression analyses could show that the transcript levels of some of the photoreceptor genes (e.g., VChR1 and VcHKR1) accumulate during division cleavages, while others (e.g., VcCRYa, VcCRYp, and VcPhot) accumulate during final cellular differentiation. However, the pattern of transcript accumulation changes when the alga switches to the sexual development. Eight photoreceptor genes, e.g., VcPhot, VcCRYp, and VcHKR1, are highly expressed in the somatic cells, while only the animal-type rhodopsin VR1 was found to be highly expressed in the reproductive cells/embryos during both asexual and sexual life cycles. Moreover, accumulation of VChR1 and VcCRYa transcripts is more sensitive to light and changes in response to more than one light quality. Obviously, different regulatory mechanisms underlying gene expression control transcript accumulation of photoreceptors not only during development, but also in a cell-type specific way and in response to various external signals such as light quality. The transcriptional patterns described in this study

  1. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation - Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative data were collected on dose-response curves of cultured mouse-embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) irradiated with heavy ions of various charges and energies. Results suggests that two breaks formed on DNA within 80 A may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 A may be lethal. From results of experiments with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, it was found that DNA double strand breaks are important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double-strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship for high-LET radiation is similar to that for HGPRT locus mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, indicating that common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects.

  2. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation - Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative data were collected on dose-response curves of cultured mouse-embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) irradiated with heavy ions of various charges and energies. Results suggests that two breaks formed on DNA within 80 A may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 A may be lethal. From results of experiments with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, it was found that DNA double strand breaks are important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double-strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship for high-LET radiation is similar to that for HGPRT locus mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, indicating that common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects.

  3. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1–infected T cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor–NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7. Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1–infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated. PMID:28115366

  4. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiki

    2017-03-02

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor-NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7 Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated.

  5. Identifying molecular phenotype of nucleus pulposus cells in human intervertebral disc with aging and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinyan; Jing, Liufang; Richardson, William J; Isaacs, Robert E; Fitch, Robert D; Brown, Christopher R; Erickson, Melissa M; Setton, Lori A; Chen, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Previous study claimed that disc degeneration may be preceded by structure and matrix changes in the intervertebral disc (IVD) which coincide with the loss of distinct notochordally derived nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. However, the fate of notochordal cells and their molecular phenotype change during aging and degeneration in human are still unknown. In this study, a set of novel molecular phenotype markers of notochordal NP cells during aging and degeneration in human IVD tissue were revealed with immunostaining and flow cytometry. Furthermore, the potential of phenotype juvenilization and matrix regeneration of IVD cells in a laminin-rich pseudo-3D culture system were evaluated at day 28 by immunostaining, Safranin O, and type II collagen staining. Immunostaining and flow cytometry demonstrated that transcriptional factor Brachyury T, neuronal-related proteins (brain abundant membrane attached signal protein 1, Basp1; Neurochondrin, Ncdn; Neuropilin, Nrp-1), CD24, and CD221 were expressed only in juvenile human NP tissue, which suggested that these proteins may be served as the notochordal NP cell markers. However, the increased expression of CD54 and CD166 with aging indicated that they might be referenced as the potential biomarker for disc degeneration. In addition, 3D culture maintained most of markers in juvenile NP, and rescued the expression of Basp1, Ncdn, and Nrp 1 that disappeared in adult NP native tissue. These findings provided new insight into molecular profile that may be used to characterize the existence of a unique notochordal NP cells during aging and degeneration in human IVD cells, which will facilitate cell-based therapy for IVD regeneration. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1316-1326, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Molecular signature of erythroblast enucleation in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rouzbeh, Shaghayegh; Kobari, Ladan; Cambot, Marie; Mazurier, Christelle; Hebert, Nicolas; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Durand, Charles; Douay, Luc; Lapillonne, Hélène

    2015-08-01

    While enucleation is a critical step in the terminal differentiation of human red blood cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying this unique process remain unclear. To investigate erythroblast enucleation, we studied the erythroid differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which provide a unique model for deeper understanding of the development and differentiation of multiple cell types. First, using a two-step protocol, we demonstrated that terminal erythroid differentiation from hESCs is directly dependent on the age of the embryoid bodies. Second, by choosing hESCs in two extreme conditions of erythroid culture, we obtained an original differentiation model which allows one to study the mechanisms underlying the enucleation of erythroid cells by analyzing the gene and miRNA (miR) expression profiles of cells from these two culture conditions. Third, using an integrated analysis of mRNA and miR expression profiles, we identified five miRs potentially involved in erythroblast enucleation. Finally, by selective knockdown of these five miRs we found miR-30a to be a regulator of erythroblast enucleation in hESCs.

  7. Optogenetic control of molecular motors and organelle distributions in cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liting; Che, Daphne; Zhang, Kai; Ong, Qunxiang; Guo, Shunling; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-05-21

    Intracellular transport and distribution of organelles play important roles in diverse cellular functions, including cell polarization, intracellular signaling, cell survival, and apoptosis. Here, we report an optogenetic strategy to control the transport and distribution of organelles by light. This is achieved by optically recruiting molecular motors onto organelles through the heterodimerization of Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) and its interacting partner CIB1. CRY2 and CIB1 dimerize within subseconds upon exposure to blue light, which requires no exogenous ligands and low intensity of light. We demonstrate that mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes can be driven toward the cell periphery upon light-induced recruitment of kinesin, or toward the cell nucleus upon recruitment of dynein. Light-induced motor recruitment and organelle movements are repeatable, reversible, and can be achieved at subcellular regions. This light-controlled organelle redistribution provides a new strategy for studying the causal roles of organelle transport and distribution in cellular functions in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of Ebola virus pathogenesis: focus on cell death

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, L; Agrati, C; Petrosillo, N; Di Caro, A; Capobianchi, M R; Ippolito, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) belongs to the Filoviridae family and is responsible for a severe disease characterized by the sudden onset of fever and malaise accompanied by other non-specific signs and symptoms; in 30–50% of cases hemorrhagic symptoms are present. Multiorgan dysfunction occurs in severe forms with a mortality up to 90%. The EBOV first attacks macrophages and dendritic immune cells. The innate immune reaction is characterized by a cytokine storm, with secretion of numerous pro-inflammatory cytokines, which induces a huge number of contradictory signals and hurts the immune cells, as well as other tissues. Other highly pathogenic viruses also trigger cytokine storms, but Filoviruses are thought to be particularly lethal because they affect a wide array of tissues. In addition to the immune system, EBOV attacks the spleen and kidneys, where it kills cells that help the body to regulate its fluid and chemical balance and that make proteins that help the blood to clot. In addition, EBOV causes liver, lungs and kidneys to shut down their functions and the blood vessels to leak fluid into surrounding tissues. In this review, we analyze the molecular mechanisms at the basis of Ebola pathogenesis with a particular focus on the cell death pathways induced by the virus. We also discuss how the treatment of the infection can benefit from the recent experience of blocking/modulating cell death in human degenerative diseases. PMID:26024394

  9. Molecular analyses of unrelated Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease patients suggest a high frequency of the CMT1A duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, C.A.; Davis, S.N.; Heju, Z.; Pentao, L.; Patel, P.I.; Lupski, J.R. ); Garcia, C.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. One form of CMT, CMT type 1A, is characterized by uniformly decreased nerve conduction velocities, usually shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and is associated with a large submicroscopic duplication of the p11.2-p12 region of chromosome 17. A cohort of 75 unrelated patients diagnosed clinically with CMT and evaluated by electrophysiological methods were analyzed molecularly for the presence of the CMT1A DNA duplication. Three methodologies were used to assess the duplication: Measurement of dosage differences between RFLP alleles, analysis of polymorphic (GT)[sub n] repeats, and detection of a junction fragment by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The CMT1A duplication was found in 68% of the 63 unrelated CMT patients with electrophysiological studies consistent with CMT type 1 (CMT1). The CMT1A duplication was detected as a de novo event in two CMT1 families. Twelve CMT patients who did not have decreased nerve conduction velocities consistent with a diagnosis of CMT type 2 (CMT2) were found not to have the CMT1A duplication. The most informative molecular method was the detection of the CMT1A duplication-specific junction fragment. Given the high frequency of the CMT1A duplication in CMT patients and the high frequency of new mutations, the authors conclude that a molecular test for the CMT1A DNA duplication is very useful in the differential diagnosis of patients with peripheral neuropathies. 61 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Are we ready to stratify treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using molecular hallmarks?

    PubMed

    Barton, Sarah; Hawkes, Eliza A; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Cunningham, David

    2012-01-01

    The division of the heterogeneous entity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into the ontogenic phenotypes of germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B-cell-like (ABC) is optimally determined by gene expression profiling (GEP), although simpler immunohistochemistry (IHC) algorithms are alternatively being used. The cell-of-origin (COO) classification assists in prognostication and may be predictive of response to therapy. Mounting data suggests that IHC methods of classifying COO may be inaccurate. GEP categorization of COO is superior in defining prognostically and biologically distinct DLBCL subtypes, but current barriers to its widescale use include inaccessibility, cost, and lack of methodological standardization and prospective validation. The poorer prognosis of ABC-DLBCL is frequently associated with constitutive activity in the NF-κB pathway and aberrations in upstream or downstream regulators of this pathway. The molecular mechanisms underlying lymphomagenesis in GCB-DLBCL are arguably less well defined, but C-REL amplification and mutations in BCL-2 and EZH2 are common. New technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, are rapidly revealing novel pathogenic genetic aberrations, and DLBCL treatment strategies are increasingly being designed focusing on distinctive pathogenic drivers within ontogenic phenotypes. This review examines emerging molecular targets and novel therapeutic agents in DLBCL, and discusses whether stratifying therapy for DLBCL using molecular features is merited by current preclinical and clinical evidence.

  11. Tuning Open-Circuit Voltage in Organic Solar Cells with Molecular Orientation.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Brent; Awartani, Omar; Kline, R Joseph; McAfee, Terry; Ade, Harald; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2015-06-24

    The role of molecular orientation of a polar conjugated polymer in polymer-fullerene organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is investigated. A planar heterojunction (PHJ) OPV cell composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is used as a model system to isolate the effect of the interfacial orientation on the photovoltaic properties. The molecular orientation of the aggregate P3HT relative to the PCBM layer is varied from highly edge-on (conjugated ring plane perpendicular to the interface plane) to appreciably face-on (ring plane parallel to the interface). It is found that as the P3HT stacking becomes more face-on there is a positive correlation to the OPV open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), attributed to a shift in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level of P3HT. In addition, the PHJ OPV cell with a broad P3HT stacking orientation distribution has a V(OC) comparable to an archetypal bulk heterojunction (BHJ) device. These results suggest that, in the BHJ OPV cell, the hole energy level in the charge transfer state is defined in part by the orientation distribution of the P3HT at the interface with PCBM. Finally, the photoresponses of the devices are also shown to have a dependence on P3HT stacking orientation.

  12. Cells from icons to symbols: molecularizing cell biology in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Serpente, Norberto

    2011-12-01

    Over centuries cells have been the target of optical and electronic microscopes as well as others technologies, with distinctive types of visual output. Whilst optical technologies produce images 'evident to the eye', the electronic and especially the molecular create images that are more elusive to conceptualization and assessment. My study applies the semiotic approach to the production of images in cell biology to capture the shift from microscopic images to non-traditional visual technologies around 1980. Here I argue that the visual shift that coincides with the growing dominance of molecular biology involves a change from iconic to symbolic forms.

  13. The versatile low-molecular-weight thiols: Beyond cell protection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhao, Qunfei; Liu, Wen

    2015-12-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols are extensively involved in the maintenance of cellular redox potentials and the protection of cells from a variety of reactive chemical and electrophilic species. However, we recently found that the metabolic coupling of two LMW thiols - mycothiol (MSH) and ergothioneine (EGT) - programs the biosynthesis of the anti-infective agent lincomycin A. Remarkably, such a constructive role of the thiols in the biosynthesis of natural products has so far received relatively little attention. We speculate that the unusual thiol EGT might function as a chiral thiolation carrier (for modification) and a novel activator (for glycosylation) of sugar. Additionally, we examine recent evidence for LMW thiols (MSH and others) as sulfur donors of sulfur-containing natural products. Clearly, the LMW thiols have more diverse activities beyond cell protection, and more attention should be paid to the correlation of their functions with thiol-dependent enzymes.

  14. A Drosophila XPD model links cell cycle coordination with neuro-development and suggests links to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stettler, Karin; Li, Xiaoming; Sandrock, Björn; Braga-Lagache, Sophie; Heller, Manfred; Dümbgen, Lutz; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    XPD functions in transcription, DNA repair and in cell cycle control. Mutations in human XPD (also known as ERCC2) mainly cause three clinical phenotypes: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), and only XP patients have a high predisposition to developing cancer. Hence, we developed a fly model to obtain novel insights into the defects caused by individual hypomorphic alleles identified in human XP-D patients. This model revealed that the mutations that displayed the greatest in vivo UV sensitivity in Drosophila did not correlate with those that led to tumor formation in humans. Immunoprecipitations followed by targeted quantitative MS/MS analysis showed how different xpd mutations affected the formation or stability of different transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) subcomplexes. The XP mutants most clearly linked to high cancer risk, Xpd R683W and R601L, showed a reduced interaction with the core TFIIH and also an abnormal interaction with the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex. Interestingly, these two XP alleles additionally displayed high levels of chromatin loss and free centrosomes during the rapid nuclear division phase of the Drosophila embryo. Finally, the xpd mutations showing defects in the coordination of cell cycle timing during the Drosophila embryonic divisions correlated with those human mutations that cause the neurodevelopmental abnormalities and developmental growth defects observed in XP/CS and TTD patients. PMID:25431422

  15. Molecular mechanism of action of fluoride on bone cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, K H; Baylink, D J

    1998-11-01

    Fluoride is an effective anabolic agent to increase spinal bone density by increasing bone formation, and at therapeutically relevant (i.e., micromolar) concentrations, it stimulates bone cell proliferation and activities in vitro and in vivo. However, the fluoride therapy of osteoporosis has been controversial, in large part because of a lack of consistent antifracture efficacy. However, information regarding the molecular mechanism of action of fluoride may improve its optimum and correct usage and may disclose potential targets for the development of new second generation drugs that might have a better efficacy and safety profile. Accordingly, this review will address the molecular mechanisms of the osteogenic action of fluoride. In this regard, we and other workers have proposed two competing models, both of which involve the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) mitogenic signal transduction pathway. Our model involves a fluoride inhibition of a unique fluoride-sensitive phosphotyrosine phosphatase (PTP) in osteoblasts, which results in a sustained increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation level of the key signaling proteins of the MAPK mitogenic transduction pathway, leading to the potentiation of the bone cell proliferation initiated by growth factors. The competing model proposes that fluoride acts in coordination with aluminum to form fluoroaluminate, which activates a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein on bone cell membrane, leading to an activation of cellular protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), which in turn leads to increases in the tyrosine phosphorylation of signaling proteins of the MAPK mitogenic signal transduction pathway, ultimately leading to a stimulation of cell proliferation. A benefit of our model, but not the other model, is that it accounts for all the unique properties of the osteogenic action of fluoride. These include the low effective fluoride dose, the skeletal tissue specificity, the requirement of PTK-activating growth factors

  16. Molecular organization of Drosophila neuroendocrine cells by Dimmed.

    PubMed

    Park, Dongkook; Hadžić, Tarik; Yin, Ping; Rusch, Jannette; Abruzzi, Katharine; Rosbash, Michael; Skeath, James B; Panda, Satchidananda; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Taghert, Paul H

    2011-09-27

    In Drosophila, the basic-helix-loop-helix protein DIMM coordinates the molecular and cellular properties of all major neuroendocrine cells, irrespective of the secretory peptides they produce. When expressed by nonneuroendocrine neurons, DIMM confers the major properties of the regulated secretory pathway and converts such cells away from fast neurotransmission and toward a neuroendocrine state. We first identified 134 transcripts upregulated by DIMM in embryos and then evaluated them systematically using diverse assays (including embryo in situ hybridization, in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation, and cell-based transactivation assays). We conclude that of eleven strong candidates, six are strongly and directly controlled by DIMM in vivo. The six targets include several large dense-core vesicle (LDCV) proteins, but also proteins in non-LDCV compartments such as the RNA-associated protein Maelstrom. In addition, a functional in vivo assay, combining transgenic RNA interference with MS-based peptidomics, revealed that three DIMM targets are especially critical for its action. These include two well-established LDCV proteins, the amidation enzyme PHM and the ascorbate-regenerating electron transporter cytochrome b(561-1). The third key DIMM target, CAT-4 (CG13248), has not previously been associated with peptide neurosecretion-it encodes a putative cationic amino acid transporter, closely related to the Slimfast arginine transporter. Finally, we compared transcripts upregulated by DIMM with those normally enriched in DIMM neurons of the adult brain and found an intersection of 18 DIMM-regulated genes, which included all six direct DIMM targets. The results provide a rigorous molecular framework with which to describe the fundamental regulatory organization of diverse neuroendocrine cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MOLECULAR ORGANIZATION OF DROSOPHILA NEUROENDOCRINE CELLS BY DIMMED

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dongkook; Hadžić, Tarik; Yin, Ping; Rusch, Jannette; Abruzzi, Katharine; Rosbash, Michael; Skeath, James B.; Panda, Satchidananda; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Taghert, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In Drosophila the bHLH protein DIMM coordinates the molecular and cellular properties of all major neuroendocrine cells, irrespective of the secretory peptides they produce. When expressed by non-neuroendocrine neurons, DIMM confers the major properties of the Regulated Secretory Pathway and converts such cells away from fast neurotransmission and towards a neuroendocrine state. Results We first identified 134 transcripts upregulated by DIMM in embryos, then evaluated them systematically using diverse assays (including embryo in situ hybridization, in vivo ChIP, and cell-based transactivation assays). We conclude that of 11 strong candidates, six are strongly and directly controlled by DIMM in vivo. The six targets include several large dense-core vesicle (LDCV) proteins, but also proteins in non-LDCV compartments such as the RNA-associated protein MAELSTROM. In addition, a functional in vivo assay, combining transgenic RNAi with MS-based peptidomics, revealed that three DIMM targets are especially critical for its action: These include two well-established LDCV proteins, the amidation enzyme PHM and the ascorbate-regenerating electron transporter Cytochrome-b561-1. The third key DIMM target, CAT-4 (CG13248), has not previously been associated with peptide neurosecretion – it encodes a putative cationic amino acid transporter, closely related to the SLIMFAST Arginine transporter. Finally, we compared transcripts upregulated by DIMM with those normally enriched in DIMM neurons of the adult brain and found an intersection of 18 DIMM-regulated genes, which included all six direct DIMM targets. Conclusions The results provide a rigorous molecular framework with which to describe the fundamental regulatory organization of diverse neuroendocrine cells. PMID:21885285

  18. DNA Duplex-Based Photodynamic Molecular Beacon for Targeted Killing of Retinoblastoma Cell.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanchun; Lu, Cuixia; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2016-11-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of infancy. An alternative RB treatment protocol is proposed and tested. It is based on a photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a designed molecular beacon that specifically targets the murine double minute x (MDMX) high-expressed RB cells. A MDMX mRNA triggered photodynamic molecular beacon is designed by binding a photosensitizer molecule (pyropheophorbide-a, or PPa) and a black hole quencher-3 (BHQ3) through a complementary oligonucleotide sequence. Cells with and without MDMX high-expression are incubated with the beacon and then irradiated with a laser. The fluorescence and reactive oxygen species are detected in solution to verify the specific activation of PPa by the perfectly matched DNA targets. The cell viabilities are evaluated with CCK-8 and flow cytometry assay. The fluorescence and photo-cytoxicity of PPa is recovered and significantly higher in the MDMX high-expressed Y79 and WERI-Rb1 cells, compared to that with the MDMX low-expressed cells. The synthesized beacon exhibits high PDT efficiency toward MDMX high-expressed RB cells. The data suggest that the designed beacon may provide a potential alternative for RB therapy and secures the ground for future investigation.

  19. Determining the fate of fluorescent quantum dots on surface of engineered budding S. cerevisiae cell molecular landscape.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Raghuraj S; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we surface engineered living S. cerevisiae cells by decorating quantum dots (QDs) and traced the fate of QDs on molecular landscape of single mother cell through several generation times (progeny cells). The fate of QDs on cell-surface was tracked through the cellular division events using confocal microscopy and fluorescence emission profiles. The extent of cell-surface QDs distribution among the offspring was determined as the mother cell divides into daughter cells. Fluorescence emission from QDs on progeny cells was persistent through the second-generation time (~240min) until all of the progeny cells lost their cell-bound QDs during the third generation time (~360min). The surface engineered yeast cells were unaffected by the QDs present on their molecular landscapes and retained their normal cellular growth, architecture and metabolic activities as confirmed by their viability, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations and cytotoxicity tests, respectively. Our results demonstrated that QDs on mother cell landscape tend to distribute among its progeny cells that accompanied with concomitant reduction in QDs' fluorescence, which can be quantified. We suggest that surface engineered cells with QDs will enable investigating the cellular behavior and monitoring cell growth patterns as nanobiosensors for screening of drugs/chemicals at single cell level with fewer side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A molecular switch for initiating cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Maite; Sauer, Michael; Muñoz, Alfonso; Zouhar, Jan; Ordóñez, Angel; van de Ven, Wilhelmina T G; Caro, Elena; de la Paz Sánchez, María; Raikhel, Natasha V; Gutiérrez, Crisanto; Sánchez-Serrano, José J; Rojo, Enrique

    2011-06-21

    The onset of differentiation entails modifying the gene expression state of cells, to allow activation of developmental programs that are maintained repressed in the undifferentiated precursor cells [1, 2]. This requires a mechanism to change gene expression on a genome-scale. Recent evidence suggests that in mammalian stem cells, derepression of developmental regulators during differentiation involves a shift from stalled to productive elongation of their transcripts [3-5], but factors mediating this shift have not been identified and the evidence remains correlative. We report the identification of the MINIYO (IYO) gene, a positive regulator of transcriptional elongation that is essential for cells to initiate differentiation in Arabidopsis. IYO interacts with RNA polymerase II and the Elongator complex and is required to sustain global levels of transcriptional elongation activity, specifically in differentiating tissues. Accordingly, IYO is expressed in embryos, meristems, and organ primordia and not in mature tissues. Moreover, differential subcellular protein distribution further refines the domain of IYO function by directing nuclear accumulation, and thus its transcriptional activity, to cells initiating differentiation. Importantly, IYO overexpression induces premature cell differentiation and leads to meristem termination phenotypes. These findings identify IYO as a necessary and sufficient factor for initiating differentiation in Arabidopsis and suggest that the targeted nuclear accumulation of IYO functions as a transcriptional switch for this fate transition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen production and solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Weiwei

    The global energy crisis presents two major challenges for scientists around the world: Producing cleaner energy which is sustainable for the environment; And improving the efficiency of energy production as well as consumption. It is crucial and yet elusive to understand the atomistic mechanisms and electronic properties, which are needed in order to tackle those challenges. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations and nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics are two of the dominant methods used to address the atomistic and electronic properties in various energy studies. This dissertation is an ensemble of three studies in energy research: (1) Hydrogen production from the reaction of aluminum clusters with water to provide a renewable energy cycle; (2) The photo-excited charge transfer and recombination at a quaterthiophene/zinc oxide interface to improve the power conversion efficiency of hybrid poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) /ZnO solar cells; and (3) the charge transfer at a rubrene/C60 interface to understand why phenyl groups in rubrene improve the performance of rubrene/C60 solar cells.

  2. Molecular interactions between amantadine and model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Gen; Yang, Pei; Zhang, Chi; Li, Bolin; Han, Xiaofeng; Song, Minghu; Chen, Zhan

    2014-07-22

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was applied to study molecular interactions between amantadine and substrate supported lipid bilayers serving as model cell membranes. Both isotopically asymmetric and symmetric lipid bilayers were used in the research. SFG results elucidated how the water-soluble drug, amantadine, influenced the packing state of each leaflet of a lipid bilayer and how the drugs affected the lipid flip-flop process. It is difficult to achieve such detailed molecular-level information using other analytical techniques. Especially, from the flip-flop rate change of isotopically asymmetric lipid bilayer induced by amantadine, important information on the drug-membrane interaction mechanism can be derived. The results show that amantadine can be associated with zwitterionic PC bilayers but has a negligible influence on the flip-flop behavior of PC molecules unless at high concentrations. Different effects of amantadine on the lipid bilayer were observed for the negatively charged DPPG bilayer; low concentration amantadine (e.g., 0.20 mM) in the subphase could immediately disturb the outer lipid leaflet and then the lipid associated amantadine molecules gradually reorganize to cause the outer leaflet to return to the original orderly packed state. Higher concentration amantadine (e.g., 5.0 mM) immediately disordered the packing state of the outer lipid leaflet. For both the high and low concentration cases, amantadine molecules only bind to the outer PG leaflet and cannot translocate to the inner layer. The presence of amantadine within the negatively charged lipid layers has certain implications for using liposomes as drug delivery carriers for amantadine. Besides, by using PC or PG bilayers with both leaflets deuterated, we were able to examine how amantadine is distributed and/or oriented within the lipid bilayer. The present work demonstrates that SFG results can provide an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms of

  3. Teaching cell and molecular biology for gender equity.

    PubMed

    Sible, Jill C; Wilhelm, Dayna E; Lederman, Muriel

    2006-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, including cell biology, are characterized by the "leaky pipeline" syndrome in which, over time, women leave the discipline. The pipeline itself and the pond into which it empties may not be neutral. Explicating invisible norms, attitudes, and practices by integrating social studies of science into science education may be the necessary first step in helping female students persist in STEM disciplines. In 2003 and 2004, a sophomore Cell and Molecular Biology course at Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA) was taught integrating social studies of science with standard material. The course was successfully implemented, teaching students factual content while increasing awareness of the cultures of science and their self-confidence in engaging with the subject. Course evaluation data indicated that females in particular perceived greater gains in logical thinking and problem-solving abilities than females in a traditional cell biology course. Consistent with K-12 studies, males in this class were likely to view scientists as male only, whereas females viewed scientists as male and female. This pilot project demonstrates that social studies can be integrated successfully in a cell biology course. Longitudinal studies of this cohort of students will indicate whether this approach contributes to the retention of women in the field.

  4. Molecular biology of breast cancer stem cells: potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam P; Almeida, Fabio S; Chi, Alex; Nguyen, Ly M; Cohen, Deirdre; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated recently as responsible for failure of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to review breast CSCs molecular biology with respect to their mechanism of resistance to conventional therapy, and to develop treatment strategies that may improve survival of breast cancer patients. A literature search has identified in vitro and in vivo studies of breast CSCs. Breast CSCs overexpress breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) which allows cancer cells to transport actively chemotherapy agents out of the cells. Radioresistance is modulated through activation of Wnt signaling pathway and overexpression of genes coding for glutathione. Lapatinib can selectively target HER-2 positive breast CSCs and improves disease-free survival in these patients. Metformin may target basal type breast CSCs. Parthenolide and oncolytic viruses are promising targeting agents for breast CSCs. Future clinical trials for breast cancer should include anti-cancer stem cells targeting agents in addition to conventional chemotherapy. Hypofractionation radiotherapy may be indicated for residual disease post chemotherapy.

  5. Teaching Cell and Molecular Biology for Gender Equity

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Dayna E.; Lederman, Muriel

    2006-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, including cell biology, are characterized by the “leaky pipeline” syndrome in which, over time, women leave the discipline. The pipeline itself and the pond into which it empties may not be neutral. Explicating invisible norms, attitudes, and practices by integrating social studies of science into science education may be the necessary first step in helping female students persist in STEM disciplines. In 2003 and 2004, a sophomore Cell and Molecular Biology course at Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA) was taught integrating social studies of science with standard material. The course was successfully implemented, teaching students factual content while increasing awareness of the cultures of science and their self-confidence in engaging with the subject. Course evaluation data indicated that females in particular perceived greater gains in logical thinking and problem-solving abilities than females in a traditional cell biology course. Consistent with K–12 studies, males in this class were likely to view scientists as male only, whereas females viewed scientists as male and female. This pilot project demonstrates that social studies can be integrated successfully in a cell biology course. Longitudinal studies of this cohort of students will indicate whether this approach contributes to the retention of women in the field. PMID:17012214

  6. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridization followed by mutational analysis, gene expression and miRNA microarray profiling were performed on 123 paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from patients with NSCLC. Results At DNA, mRNA and miRNA levels we could identify molecular markers that discriminated significantly between the various histopathological entities of NSCLC. We identified 34 genomic clusters using aCGH data; several genes exhibited a different profile of aberrations between AC and SCC, including PIK3CA, SOX2, THPO, TP63, PDGFB genes. Gene expression profiling analysis identified SPP1, CTHRC1and GREM1 as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of the cancer, and SPINK1 and BMP7 to distinguish between AC and SCC in small biopsies or in blood samples. Using integrated genomics approach we found in recurrently altered regions a list of three potential driver genes, MRPS22, NDRG1 and RNF7, which were consistently over-expressed in amplified regions, had wide-spread correlation with an average of ~800 genes throughout the genome and highly associated with histological types. Using a network enrichment analysis, the targets of these potential drivers were seen to be involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, mismatch repair, p53 signalling pathway and other lung cancer related signalling pathways, and many immunological pathways. Furthermore, we also identified one potential driver miRNA hsa-miR-944. Conclusions Integrated molecular characterization of AC and SCC helped identify clinically relevant markers

  7. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Vladimir; Suo, Chen; Orear, Cedric; van den Oord, Joost; Balogh, Zsofia; Guegan, Justine; Job, Bastien; Meurice, Guillaume; Ripoche, Hugues; Calza, Stefano; Hasmats, Johanna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lacroix, Ludovic; Vielh, Philippe; Dufour, Fabienne; Lehtiö, Janne; Napieralski, Rudolf; Eggermont, Alexander; Schmitt, Manfred; Cadranel, Jacques; Besse, Benjamin; Girard, Philippe; Blackhall, Fiona; Validire, Pierre; Soria, Jean-Charles; Dessen, Philippe; Hansson, Johan; Pawitan, Yudi

    2013-12-03

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Comparative genomic hybridization followed by mutational analysis, gene expression and miRNA microarray profiling were performed on 123 paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from patients with NSCLC. At DNA, mRNA and miRNA levels we could identify molecular markers that discriminated significantly between the various histopathological entities of NSCLC. We identified 34 genomic clusters using aCGH data; several genes exhibited a different profile of aberrations between AC and SCC, including PIK3CA, SOX2, THPO, TP63, PDGFB genes. Gene expression profiling analysis identified SPP1, CTHRC1 and GREM1 as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of the cancer, and SPINK1 and BMP7 to distinguish between AC and SCC in small biopsies or in blood samples. Using integrated genomics approach we found in recurrently altered regions a list of three potential driver genes, MRPS22, NDRG1 and RNF7, which were consistently over-expressed in amplified regions, had wide-spread correlation with an average of ~800 genes throughout the genome and highly associated with histological types. Using a network enrichment analysis, the targets of these potential drivers were seen to be involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, mismatch repair, p53 signalling pathway and other lung cancer related signalling pathways, and many immunological pathways. Furthermore, we also identified one potential driver miRNA hsa-miR-944. Integrated molecular characterization of AC and SCC helped identify clinically relevant markers and potential drivers, which are

  8. Molecular classification of basal cell carcinoma of skin by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Jee, Byul A; Lim, Hyoseob; Kwon, So Mee; Jo, Yuna; Park, Myong Chul; Lee, Il Jae; Woo, Hyun Goo

    2015-12-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are more common kinds of skin cancer. Although these tumors share common pathological and clinical features, their similarity and heterogeneity at molecular levels are not fully elaborated yet. Here, by performing comparative analysis of gene expression profiling of BCC, SCC, and normal skin tissues, we could classify the BCC into three subtypes of classical, SCC-like, and normal-like BCCs. Functional enrichment and pathway analyses revealed the molecular characteristics of each subtype. The classical BCC showed the enriched expression and transcription signature with the activation of Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, which were well known key features of BCC. By contrast, the SCC-like BCC was enriched with immune-response genes and oxidative stress-related genes. Network analysis revealed the PLAU/PLAUR as a key regulator of SCC-like BCC. The normal-like BCC showed prominent activation of metabolic processes particularly the fatty acid metabolism. The existence of these molecular subtypes could be validated in an independent dataset, which demonstrated the three subgroups of BCC with distinct functional enrichment. In conclusion, we suggest a novel molecular classification of BCC providing insights on the heterogeneous progression of BCC.

  9. Automated mitotic spindle tracking suggests a link between spindle dynamics, spindle orientation, and anaphase onset in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Matthew E.; Bement, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning at anaphase onset is essential for normal tissue organization and function. Here we develop automated spindle-tracking software and apply it to characterize mitotic spindle dynamics in the Xenopus laevis embryonic epithelium. We find that metaphase spindles first undergo a sustained rotation that brings them on-axis with their final orientation. This sustained rotation is followed by a set of striking stereotyped rotational oscillations that bring the spindle into near contact with the cortex and then move it rapidly away from the cortex. These oscillations begin to subside soon before anaphase onset. Metrics extracted from the automatically tracked spindles indicate that final spindle position is determined largely by cell morphology and that spindles consistently center themselves in the XY-plane before anaphase onset. Finally, analysis of the relationship between spindle oscillations and spindle position relative to the cortex reveals an association between cortical contact and anaphase onset. We conclude that metaphase spindles in epithelia engage in a stereotyped “dance,” that this dance culminates in proper spindle positioning and orientation, and that completion of the dance is linked to anaphase onset. PMID:28100633

  10. Electron cryotomography of ESCRT assemblies and dividing Sulfolobus cells suggests that spiraling filaments are involved in membrane scission.

    PubMed

    Dobro, Megan J; Samson, Rachel Y; Yu, Zhiheng; McCullough, John; Ding, H Jane; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Bell, Stephen D; Jensen, Grant J

    2013-08-01

    The endosomal-sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is evolutionarily conserved from Archaea to eukaryotes. The complex drives membrane scission events in a range of processes, including cytokinesis in Metazoa and some Archaea. CdvA is the protein in Archaea that recruits ESCRT-III to the membrane. Using electron cryotomography (ECT), we find that CdvA polymerizes into helical filaments wrapped around liposomes. ESCRT-III proteins are responsible for the cinching of membranes and have been shown to assemble into helical tubes in vitro, but here we show that they also can form nested tubes and nested cones, which reveal surprisingly numerous and versatile contacts. To observe the ESCRT-CdvA complex in a physiological context, we used ECT to image the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and observed a distinct protein belt at the leading edge of constriction furrows in dividing cells. The known dimensions of ESCRT-III proteins constrain their possible orientations within each of these structures and point to the involvement of spiraling filaments in membrane scission.

  11. Electron cryotomography of ESCRT assemblies and dividing Sulfolobus cells suggests that spiraling filaments are involved in membrane scission

    PubMed Central

    Dobro, Megan J.; Samson, Rachel Y.; Yu, Zhiheng; McCullough, John; Ding, H. Jane; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Bell, Stephen D.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    The endosomal-sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is evolutionarily conserved from Archaea to eukaryotes. The complex drives membrane scission events in a range of processes, including cytokinesis in Metazoa and some Archaea. CdvA is the protein in Archaea that recruits ESCRT-III to the membrane. Using electron cryotomography (ECT), we find that CdvA polymerizes into helical filaments wrapped around liposomes. ESCRT-III proteins are responsible for the cinching of membranes and have been shown to assemble into helical tubes in vitro, but here we show that they also can form nested tubes and nested cones, which reveal surprisingly numerous and versatile contacts. To observe the ESCRT–CdvA complex in a physiological context, we used ECT to image the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and observed a distinct protein belt at the leading edge of constriction furrows in dividing cells. The known dimensions of ESCRT-III proteins constrain their possible orientations within each of these structures and point to the involvement of spiraling filaments in membrane scission. PMID:23761076

  12. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Stromal Cells-Induced Neural Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ramila; Buchanan, James Carlton; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Morris, Nathan; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Deriving specific neural cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a promising approach for cell replacement therapies of neurodegenerative diseases. When co-cultured with certain stromal cells, mouse ESCs (mESCs) differentiate efficiently to neural cells. In this study, a comprehensive gene and protein expression analysis of differentiating mESCs is performed over a two-week culture period to track temporal progression of cells from a pluripotent state to specific terminally-differentiated neural cells such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Expression levels of 26 genes consisting of marker genes for pluripotency, neural progenitors, and specific neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendrocytic cells are tracked using real time q-PCR. The time-course gene expression analysis of differentiating mESCs is combined with the hierarchal clustering and functional principal component analysis (FPCA) to elucidate the evolution of specific neural cells from mESCs at a molecular level. These statistical analyses identify three major gene clusters representing distinct phases of transition of stem cells from a pluripotent state to a terminally-differentiated neuronal or glial state. Temporal protein expression studies using immunohistochemistry demonstrate the generation of neural stem/progenitor cells and specific neural lineages and show a close agreement with the gene expression profiles of selected markers. Importantly, parallel gene and protein expression analysis elucidates long-term stability of certain proteins compared to those with a quick turnover. Describing the molecular regulation of neural cells commitment of mESCs due to stromal signaling will help identify major promoters of differentiation into specific cell types for use in cell replacement therapy applications.