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Sample records for cells suggests molecular

  1. Molecular and biochemical analysis of rainbow trout LCK suggests a conserved mechanism for T-cell signaling in gnathostomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Dutton, S.; Hansen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Two genes were identified in rainbow trout that display high sequence identity to vertebrate Lck. Both of the trout Lck transcripts are associated with lymphoid tissues and were found to be highly expressed in IgM-negative lymphocytes. In vitro analysis of trout lymphocytes indicates that trout Lck mRNA is up-regulated by T-cell mitogens, supporting an evolutionarily conserved function for Lck in the signaling pathways of T-lymphocytes. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a specific monoclonal antibody raised against the N-terminal domains of recombinant trout Lck that can recognize Lck protein(s) from trout thymocyte lysates that are similar in size (???57 kDa) to mammalian Lck. This antibody also reacted with permeabilized lymphocytes during FACS analysis, indicating its potential usage for cellular analyses of trout lymphocytes, thus representing an important tool for investigations of salmonid T-cell function.

  2. Molecular spectroscopic study for suggested mechanism of chrome tanned leather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashy, Elshahat H. A.; Osman, Osama; Mahmoud, Abdel Aziz; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-03-01

    Collagen represents the structural protein of the extracellular matrix, which gives strength of hides and/or skin under tanning process. Chrome tan is the most important tanning agent all over the world. The methods for production of leather evolved over several centuries as art and engineering with little understanding of the underlying science. The present work is devoted to suggest the most probable mechanistic action of chrome tan on hide proteins. First the affect of Cr upon hide protein is indicated by the studied mechanical properties. Then the spectroscopic characterization of the hide protein as well as chrome tanned leather was carried out with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflection (HATR) FT-IR. The obtained results indicate how the chromium can attached with the active sites of collagen. Molecular modeling confirms that chromium can react with amino as well as carboxylate groups. Four schemes were obtained to describe the possible interactions of chrome tan with hide proteins.

  3. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues ("dentome"). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the "dentome" and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  4. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues (“dentome”). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the “dentome” and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  5. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane. PMID:27774041

  6. PSF/SFPQ is a very common gene fusion partner in TFE3 rearrangement-associated perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) and melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular characteristics suggesting classification as a distinct entity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qiu; Shen, Qin; Xia, Qiu-yuan; Wang, Zi-yu; Liu, Biao; Shi, Shan-shan; Shi, Qun-li; Yin, Hong-lin; Wu, Bo; Ye, Sheng-bing; Li, Li; Chen, Jie-Yu; Pan, Min-hong; Li, Qing; Li, Rui; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Ru-song; Yu, Bo; Ma, Heng-hui; Lu, Zhen-feng; Zhou, Xiao-jun

    2015-09-01

    An increasing number of TFE3 rearrangement-associated tumors, such as TFE3 rearrangement-associated perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas), melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers, and melanotic Xp11 neoplasms, have recently been reported. We examined 12 such cases, including 5 TFE3 rearrangement-associated PEComas located in the pancreas, cervix, or pelvis and 7 melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers, using clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular analyses. All the tumors shared a similar morphology, including a purely nested or sheet-like architecture separated by a delicate vascular network, purely epithelioid cells displaying a clear or granular eosinophilic cytoplasm, a lack of papillary structures and spindle cell or fat components, uniform round or oval nuclei containing small visible nucleoli, and, in most cases (11/12), melanin pigmentation. The levels of mitotic activity and necrosis varied. All 12 cases displayed moderately (2+) or strongly (3+) positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 and cathepsin K. One case labeled focally for HMB45 and Melan-A, whereas the others typically labeled moderately (2+) or strongly (3+) for 1 of these markers. None of the cases were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, desmin, CKpan, S100, or PAX8. PSF-TFE3 fusion genes were confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in cases (7/7) in which a novel PSF-TFE3 fusion point was identified. All of the cases displayed TFE3 rearrangement associated with Xp11 translocation. Furthermore, we developed a PSF-TFE3 fusion fluorescence in situ hybridization assay for the detection of the PSF-TFE3 fusion gene and detected it in all 12 cases. Clinical follow-up data were available for 7 patients. Three patients died, and 2 patients (cases 1 and 3) remained alive with no evidence of disease after initial resection. Case 2 experienced recurrence and remained alive with disease. Case 5, a recent case, remained alive with extensive abdominal cavity

  7. Apical groove type and molecular phylogeny suggests reclassification of Cochlodinium geminatum as Polykrikos geminatum.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dajun; Huang, Liangmin; Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally Cocholodinium and Gymnodinium sensu lato clade are distinguished based on the cingulum turn number, which has been increasingly recognized to be inadequate for Gymnodiniales genus classification. This has been improved by the combination of the apical groove characteristics and molecular phylogeny, which has led to the erection of several new genera (Takayama, Akashiwo, Karenia, and Karlodinium). Taking the apical groove characteristics and molecular phylogeny combined approach, we reexamined the historically taxonomically uncertain species Cochlodinium geminatum that formed massive blooms in Pearl River Estuary, China, in recent years. Samples were collected from a bloom in 2011 for morphological, characteristic pigment, and molecular analyses. We found that the cingulum in this species wraps around the cell body about 1.2 turns on average but can appear under the light microscopy to be >1.5 turns after the cells have been preserved. The shape of its apical groove, however, was stably an open-ended anticlockwise loop of kidney bean shape, similar to that of Polykrikos. Furthermore, the molecular phylogenetic analysis using 18S rRNA-ITS-28S rRNA gene cistron we obtained in this study also consistently placed this species closest to Polykrikos within the Gymnodinium sensu stricto clade and set it far separated from the clade of Cochlodinium. These results suggest that this species should be transferred to Polykrikos as Polykrikos geminatum. Our results reiterate the need to use the combination of apical groove morphology and molecular phylogeny for the classification of species within the genus of Cochlodinium and other Gymnodiniales lineages.

  8. Molecular Force Spectroscopy on Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to study how mechanics regulates biology, especially the mechanical regulation of molecular interactions and its impact on cellular functions. This force-driven methodology has uncovered a wealth of new information of the physical chemistry of molecular bonds for various biological systems. The new concepts, qualitative and quantitative measures describing bond behavior under force, and structural bases underlying these phenomena have substantially advanced our fundamental understanding of the inner workings of biological systems from the nanoscale (molecule) to the microscale (cell), elucidated basic molecular mechanisms of a wide range of important biological processes, and provided opportunities for engineering applications. Here, we review major force spectroscopic assays, conceptual developments of mechanically regulated kinetics of molecular interactions, and their biological relevance. We also present current challenges and highlight future directions.

  9. Use of multivariate analysis to suggest a new molecular classification of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Enric; Ramamoorthy, Rajarajan; Oukrif, Dahmane; Rosmarin, Daniel; Presz, Michal; Wang, Haitao; Pulker, Hannah; Lockstone, Helen; Hveem, Tarjei; Cranston, Treena; Danielsen, Havard; Novelli, Marco; Davidson, Brian; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Molloy, Peter; Johnstone, Elaine; Holmes, Christopher; Midgley, Rachel; Kerr, David; Sieber, Oliver; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Molecular classification of colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently based on microsatellite instability (MSI), KRAS or BRAF mutation and, occasionally, chromosomal instability (CIN). Whilst useful, these categories may not fully represent the underlying molecular subgroups. We screened 906 stage II/III CRCs from the VICTOR clinical trial for somatic mutations. Multivariate analyses (logistic regression, clustering, Bayesian networks) identified the primary molecular associations. Positive associations occurred between: CIN and TP53 mutation; MSI and BRAF mutation; and KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Negative associations occurred between: MSI and CIN; MSI and NRAS mutation; and KRAS mutation, and each of NRAS, TP53 and BRAF mutations. Some complex relationships were elucidated: KRAS and TP53 mutations had both a direct negative association and a weaker, confounding, positive association via TP53–CIN–MSI–BRAF–KRAS. Our results suggested a new molecular classification of CRCs: (1) MSI+ and/or BRAF-mutant; (2) CIN+ and/or TP53– mutant, with wild-type KRAS and PIK3CA; (3) KRAS- and/or PIK3CA-mutant, CIN+, TP53-wild-type; (4) KRAS– and/or PIK3CA-mutant, CIN–, TP53-wild-type; (5) NRAS-mutant; (6) no mutations; (7) others. As expected, group 1 cancers were mostly proximal and poorly differentiated, usually occurring in women. Unexpectedly, two different types of CIN+ CRC were found: group 2 cancers were usually distal and occurred in men, whereas group 3 showed neither of these associations but were of higher stage. CIN+ cancers have conventionally been associated with all three of these variables, because they have been tested en masse. Our classification also showed potentially improved prognostic capabilities, with group 3, and possibly group 1, independently predicting disease-free survival. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23165447

  10. Characterization of cell death inducing Phytophthora capsici CRN effectors suggests diverse activities in the host nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Remco; Howden, Andrew J. M.; Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; M. M. Amaro, Tiago M.; Motion, Graham B.; Pham, Jasmine; Huitema, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Plant-Microbe interactions are complex associations that feature recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns by the plant immune system and dampening of subsequent responses by pathogen encoded secreted effectors. With large effector repertoires now identified in a range of sequenced microbial genomes, much attention centers on understanding their roles in immunity or disease. These studies not only allow identification of pathogen virulence factors and strategies, they also provide an important molecular toolset suited for studying immunity in plants. The Phytophthora intracellular effector repertoire encodes a large class of proteins that translocate into host cells and exclusively target the host nucleus. Recent functional studies have implicated the CRN protein family as an important class of diverse effectors that target distinct subnuclear compartments and modify host cell signaling. Here, we characterized three necrosis inducing CRNs and show that there are differences in the levels of cell death. We show that only expression of CRN20_624 has an additive effect on PAMP induced cell death but not AVR3a induced ETI. Given their distinctive phenotypes, we assessed localization of each CRN with a set of nuclear markers and found clear differences in CRN subnuclear distribution patterns. These assays also revealed that expression of CRN83_152 leads to a distinct change in nuclear chromatin organization, suggesting a distinct series of events that leads to cell death upon over-expression. Taken together, our results suggest diverse functions carried by CRN C-termini, which can be exploited to identify novel processes that take place in the host nucleus and are required for immunity or susceptibility. PMID:24155749

  11. Molecular modeling studies suggest that zinc ions inhibit HIV-1 protease by binding at catalytic aspartates.

    PubMed Central

    York, D M; Darden, T A; Pedersen, L G; Anderson, M W

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease is inhibited in vitro by zinc ions at neutral pH. The binding site of these ions is not known; however, experimental data suggest that binding may occur in the active site. To examine the possibility of zinc binding in the active site, molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of zinc have been carried out to 200 psec. The results are compared with the 2.8-A crystallographic structures of a synthetic HIV-1 protease, and a zinc binding site at the catalytic aspartate residues (Asp-25, Asp-25') is proposed. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the zinc ion remains stably bound in this region, coordinating the carboxylate side chains of both aspartate residues. Interaction with zinc does not disrupt the dimeric structure of the protein or significantly alter the structure of the active site. These data are consistent with experimental studies of HIV-1 protease inhibition by zinc and give strong evidence that this is the binding site that leads to inactivation. Images p246-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8404763

  12. Molecular evidence to suggest the origin of a colonization: Drosophila subobscura in America.

    PubMed

    Araúz, Pedro A; Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Latorre, Amparo; Serra, Luís; Mestres, Francesc

    2011-12-01

    The recent colonization of America by Drosophila subobscura represents a great opportunity for evolutionary biology studies. Knowledge of the populations from which the colonization started would provide an understanding of how genetic composition changed during adaptation to the new environment. Thus, a 793 nucleotide fragment of the Odh (Octanol dehydrogenase) gene was sequenced in 66 chromosomal lines from Barcelona (western Mediterranean) and in 66 from Mt. Parnes (Greece, eastern Mediterranean). No sequence of Odh fragment in Barcelona or Mt. Parnes was identical to any of those previously detected in America. However, an Odh sequence from Barcelona differed in only one nucleotide from another found in American populations. In both cases, the chromosomal lines presented the same inversion: O(7), and the Odh gene was located within this inversion. This evidence suggests a possible western Mediterranean origin for the colonization. Finally, the molecular and inversion data indicate that the colonization was not characterized by multiple reintroductions.

  13. Molecular phenotypes in triple negative breast cancer from African American patients suggest targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Sullivan, Catherine; Offor, Onyinye; Lezon-Geyda, Kimberly; Halligan, Kyle; Fischbach, Neal; Shah, Mansi; Bossuyt, Veerle; Schulz, Vincent; Tuck, David P; Harris, Lyndsay N

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by high proliferation, poor differentiation and a poor prognosis due to high rates of recurrence. Despite lower overall incidence African American (AA) patients suffer from higher breast cancer mortality in part due to the higher proportion of TNBC cases among AA patients compared to European Americans (EA). It was recently shown that the clinical heterogeneity of TNBC is reflected by distinct transcriptional programs with distinct drug response profiles in preclinical models. In this study, gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry were used to elucidate potential differences between TNBC tumors of EA and AA patients on a molecular level. In a retrospective cohort of 136 TNBC patients, a major transcriptional signature of proliferation was found to be significantly upregulated in samples of AA ethnicity. Furthermore, transcriptional profiles of AA tumors showed differential activation of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and a signature of BRCA1 deficiency in this cohort. Using signatures derived from the meta-analysis of TNBC gene expression carried out by Lehmann et al., tumors from AA patients were more likely of basal-like subtypes whereas transcriptional features of many EA samples corresponded to mesenchymal-like or luminal androgen receptor driven subtypes. These results were validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas mRNA and protein expression data, again showing enrichment of a basal-like phenotype in AA tumors and mesenchymal subtypes in EA tumors. In addition, increased expression of VEGF-activated genes together with elevated microvessel area determined by the AQUA method suggest that AA patients exhibit higher tumor vascularization. This study confirms the existence of distinct transcriptional programs in triple negative breast cancer in two separate cohorts and that these programs differ by racial group. Differences in TNBC subtypes and levels of tumor angiogenesis in AA versus EA patients

  14. Extensive Molecular Analysis Suggested the Strong Genetic Heterogeneity of Idiopathic Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sofia, Valentina Maria; Da Sacco, Letizia; Surace, Cecilia; Tomaiuolo, Anna Cristina; Genovese, Silvia; Grotta, Simona; Gnazzo, Maria; Petrocchi, Stefano; Ciocca, Laura; Alghisi, Federico; Montemitro, Enza; Martemucci, Luigi; Elce, Ausilia; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Angioni, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Genetic features of chronic pancreatitis (CP) have been investigated extensively, mainly by testing genes associated to the trypsinogen activation pathway. However, different molecular pathways involving other genes may be implicated in CP pathogenesis. A total of 80 patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) were investigated using a Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach with a panel of 70 genes related to six different pancreatic pathways: premature activation of trypsinogen, modifier genes of cystic fibrosis phenotype, pancreatic secretion and ion homeostasis, calcium signaling and zymogen granules (ZG) exocytosis, autophagy and autoimmune pancreatitis-related genes. We detected mutations in 34 out of 70 genes examined; of the 80 patients, 64 (80.0%) were positive for mutations in one or more genes and 16 (20.0%) had no mutations. Mutations in CFTR were detected in 32 of the 80 patients (40.0%) and 22 of them exhibited at least one mutation in genes of other pancreatic pathways. Of the remaining 48 patients, 13/80 (16.3%) had mutations in genes involved in premature activation of trypsinogen and 19/80 (23.8%) had mutations only in genes of the other pathways: 38 (59.3%) of the 64 patients positive for mutations showed variants in two or more genes. Our data, although to be extended with functional analysis of novel mutations, suggest a high rate of genetic heterogeneity in CP and that trans-heterozygosity may predispose to the ICP phenotype. PMID:27264265

  15. Atomistic Molecular Simulations Suggest a Kinetic Model for Membrane Translocation by Arginine-Rich Peptides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Delin; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E

    2015-11-12

    Arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (ARCPPs) are known to quickly permeate cell membranes through a non-endocytotic pathway. Potential clinical applications of this facility have prompted enormous effort, both experimental and theoretical, to better understand how ARCPPs manage to overcome the prodigious thermodynamic cost of lipid bilayer permeation by these highly charged peptides. In this work we report the results of all-atom simulations, which suggest that a kinetic (rather than thermodynamic) mechanism may explain how ARCPPs are able to achieve this. Our simulations reveal that octaarginine significantly hinders the closing of membrane pores, either individually or via aggregation in the membrane pore, while octalysine (not an ARCPP) lacks this ability. Our proposed mechanism is an alternative to current attempts to explain pore-mediated translocation of ARCPPs. It asserts that ARCPPs need not lower the equilibrium thermodynamic cost of pore formation. Instead, they can achieve rapid bilayer translocation by instead slowing down the kinetics of naturally occurring thermal pores. Linking the pore lifetime to the characteristic time for peptide diffusion out of the pore, ARCPPs are able to cooperatively permeate the membrane pore. PMID:26485313

  16. Mixed Signals? Morphological and Molecular Evidence Suggest a Color Polymorphism in Some Neotropical Polythore Damselflies

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kathleen M.; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N.; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L.; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these “wingforms” do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular evidence suggest multiple origins and geographical parthenogenesis in Nothoscordum gracile (Alliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Crosa, Orfeo; Speranza, Pablo; Guerra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nothoscordum gracile is an apomitic tetraploid widely distributed throughout the Americas and naturalized in many temperate regions of other continents. It has been suggested to form a species complex with sexual and apomictic N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon. Tetraploids of these species also share a structurally heterozygous chromosome complement 2n = 19 (13M + 6A). In this work, the origin of N. gracile and its relationships with its related species was investigated based on cytological and molecular data. Methods Cytogenetic analyses were based on meiotic behaviour, CMA bands, localization of 5S and 45S rDNA sites, and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Nuclear ITS and plastidial trnL-trnF sequences were also obtained for most individuals. Key Results Proximal CMA bands were observed in the long arms of all acrocentrics of 2x and 4x N. macrostemon but not in diploid and some tetraploid cytotypes of N. nudicaule. Samples of N. gracile showed a variable number of CMA bands in the long arms of acrocentrics. Analysis of ITS sequences, dot-blot, GISH, and 5S and 45S rDNA sites, revealed no differentiation among the three species. The trnL-trnF cpDNA fragment showed variation with a trend to geographical structuring irrespective of morphospecies and fully congruent with karyotype variation. Conclusions The 2n = 19 karyotype was probably formed by a centric fusion event occurring in N. nudicaule and later transmitted to tetraploid cytotypes of N. macrostemon. Diploids of N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon appeared as consistent recently diverged species, whereas tetraploid apomicts seem to constitute an assemblage of polyploid hybrids originating from multiple independent hybridization events between them, part of which are morphologically recognizable as N. gracile. PMID:22362660

  18. Mixed signals? Morphological and molecular evidence suggest a color polymorphism in some neotropical polythore damselflies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Herrera, Melissa; Kuhn, William R; Lorenzo-Carballa, Maria Olalla; Harding, Kathleen M; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Beatty, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these "wingforms" do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and the

  19. Graphical Modeling of Gene Expression in Monocytes Suggests Molecular Mechanisms Explaining Increased Atherosclerosis in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Verdugo, Ricardo A.; Zeller, Tanja; Rotival, Maxime; Wild, Philipp S.; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J.; Weidmann, Henri; Ninio, Ewa; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Cambien, François; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tiret, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for atherosclerosis with reported widespread effects on gene expression in circulating blood cells. We hypothesized that a molecular signature mediating the relation between smoking and atherosclerosis may be found in the transcriptome of circulating monocytes. Genome-wide expression profiles and counts of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries were collected in 248 smokers and 688 non-smokers from the general population. Patterns of co-expressed genes were identified by Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and network structure of the pattern-specific gene modules was inferred by the PC-algorithm. A likelihood-based causality test was implemented to select patterns that fit models containing a path “smoking→gene expression→plaques”. Robustness of the causal inference was assessed by bootstrapping. At a FDR ≤0.10, 3,368 genes were associated to smoking or plaques, of which 93% were associated to smoking only. SASH1 showed the strongest association to smoking and PPARG the strongest association to plaques. Twenty-nine gene patterns were identified by ICA. Modules containing SASH1 and PPARG did not show evidence for the “smoking→gene expression→plaques” causality model. Conversely, three modules had good support for causal effects and exhibited a network topology consistent with gene expression mediating the relation between smoking and plaques. The network with the strongest support for causal effects was connected to plaques through SLC39A8, a gene with known association to HDL-cholesterol and cellular uptake of cadmium from tobacco, while smoking was directly connected to GAS6, a gene reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis and to be up-regulated in the placenta of women smoking during pregnancy. Our analysis of the transcriptome of monocytes recovered genes relevant for association to smoking and atherosclerosis, and connected genes that before, were only studied in separate contexts

  20. Heterogeneous estrogen receptor expression in circulating tumor cells suggests diverse mechanisms of fulvestrant resistance.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Larios, Jose M; Muñiz, Maria C; Aung, Kimberly; Cannell, Emily M; Darga, Elizabeth P; Kidwell, Kelley M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Tokudome, Nahomi; Brown, Martha E; Connelly, Mark C; Chianese, David A; Schott, Anne F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    Fulvestrant is a dose dependent selective estrogen receptor (ER) down-regulator (SERD) used in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Nearly all patients develop resistance. We performed molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTC) to gain insight into fulvestrant resistance. Preclinical studies were performed with cultured breast cancer cells spiked into human blood and analyzed on the CellSearch(®) system. Clinical data are limited to a subset of patients with ER-positive MBC from a previously reported pilot trial whose disease was progressing on fulvestrant (N = 7) or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (N = 10). CTCs were enumerated and phenotyped for ER and B-cell lymphoma (BCL2) using the CellSearch(®) CXC kit. In preclinical modeling, tamoxifen and AIs resulted in stabilized ER expression, whereas fulvestrant eliminated it. Five of seven patients progressing on fulvestrant had ≥5CTC/7.5 ml WB. Two of these five, treated with 500 mg/month fulvestrant, had no detectable CTC-expression of ER and BCL2 (an ER regulated gene). Three patients had heterogeneous CTC-ER and BCL2 expression indicating incomplete degradation of the ER target by fulvestrant. Two of these patients received 250 mg/month whereas the third patient received 500 mg/month fulvestrant. Her cancer harbored a mutation (Y537S) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1). All seven ER positive patients progressing on AIs had heterogeneous CTC-ER expression. These results suggest heterogeneous mechanisms of resistance to fulvestrant, including insufficient dosage, ESR1 mutation, or conversion to dependence on non-ER pathways. CTC enumeration, phenotyping, and genotyping might identify patients who would benefit from fulvestrant dose escalation versus switching to alternative therapies. PMID:27178224

  1. Coumarins as Potential Antioxidant Agents Complemented with Suggested Mechanisms and Approved by Molecular Modeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Al-Majedy, Yasameen K; Al-Duhaidahawi, Dunya L; Al-Azawi, Khalida F; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    Syntheses of coumarins, which are a structurally interesting antioxidant activity, was done in this article. The modification of 7-hydroxycoumarin by different reaction steps was done to yield target compounds. Molecular structures were characterized by different spectroscopical techniques (Fourier transformation infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance). Antioxidant activities were performed by using various in vitro spectrophometric assays against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). All compounds exhibited high efficiency as antioxidants compared to ascorbic acid. The highest efficiency scavenging activity was found for compound 3 (91.0 ± 5.0), followed by compounds 2 and 4 (88.0 ± 2.00; and 87.0 ± 3.00). Ascorbic acid C was used as a standard drug with a percentage inhibition of 91.00 ± 1.5. The mechanism of the synthesized compounds as antioxidants was also studied. Hartree-Fock-based quantum chemical studies have been carried out with the basis set to 3-21G, in order to obtain information about the three-dimensional (3D) geometries, electronic structure, molecular modeling, and electronic levels, namely HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital), to understand the antioxidant activity for the synthesized compounds. PMID:26805811

  2. Deceptive desmas: molecular phylogenetics suggests a new classification and uncovers convergent evolution of lithistid demosponges.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Astrid; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Pisera, Andrzej; Hooper, John; Bryce, Monika; Fromont, Jane; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Reconciling the fossil record with molecular phylogenies to enhance the understanding of animal evolution is a challenging task, especially for taxa with a mostly poor fossil record, such as sponges (Porifera). 'Lithistida', a polyphyletic group of recent and fossil sponges, are an exception as they provide the richest fossil record among demosponges. Lithistids, currently encompassing 13 families, 41 genera and >300 recent species, are defined by the common possession of peculiar siliceous spicules (desmas) that characteristically form rigid articulated skeletons. Their phylogenetic relationships are to a large extent unresolved and there has been no (taxonomically) comprehensive analysis to formally reallocate lithistid taxa to their closest relatives. This study, based on the most comprehensive molecular and morphological investigation of 'lithistid' demosponges to date, corroborates some previous weakly-supported hypotheses, and provides novel insights into the evolutionary relationships of the previous 'order Lithistida'. Based on molecular data (partial mtDNA CO1 and 28S rDNA sequences), we show that 8 out of 13 'Lithistida' families belong to the order Astrophorida, whereas Scleritodermidae and Siphonidiidae form a separate monophyletic clade within Tetractinellida. Most lithistid astrophorids are dispersed between different clades of the Astrophorida and we propose to formally reallocate them, respectively. Corallistidae, Theonellidae and Phymatellidae are monophyletic, whereas the families Pleromidae and Scleritodermidae are polyphyletic. Family Desmanthidae is polyphyletic and groups within Halichondriidae--we formally propose a reallocation. The sister group relationship of the family Vetulinidae to Spongillida is confirmed and we propose here for the first time to include Vetulina into a new Order Sphaerocladina. Megascleres and microscleres possibly evolved and/or were lost several times independently in different 'lithistid' taxa, and microscleres

  3. Deceptive Desmas: Molecular Phylogenetics Suggests a New Classification and Uncovers Convergent Evolution of Lithistid Demosponges

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Astrid; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Pisera, Andrzej; Hooper, John; Bryce, Monika; Fromont, Jane; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Reconciling the fossil record with molecular phylogenies to enhance the understanding of animal evolution is a challenging task, especially for taxa with a mostly poor fossil record, such as sponges (Porifera). ‘Lithistida’, a polyphyletic group of recent and fossil sponges, are an exception as they provide the richest fossil record among demosponges. Lithistids, currently encompassing 13 families, 41 genera and >300 recent species, are defined by the common possession of peculiar siliceous spicules (desmas) that characteristically form rigid articulated skeletons. Their phylogenetic relationships are to a large extent unresolved and there has been no (taxonomically) comprehensive analysis to formally reallocate lithistid taxa to their closest relatives. This study, based on the most comprehensive molecular and morphological investigation of ‘lithistid’ demosponges to date, corroborates some previous weakly-supported hypotheses, and provides novel insights into the evolutionary relationships of the previous ‘order Lithistida’. Based on molecular data (partial mtDNA CO1 and 28S rDNA sequences), we show that 8 out of 13 ‘Lithistida’ families belong to the order Astrophorida, whereas Scleritodermidae and Siphonidiidae form a separate monophyletic clade within Tetractinellida. Most lithistid astrophorids are dispersed between different clades of the Astrophorida and we propose to formally reallocate them, respectively. Corallistidae, Theonellidae and Phymatellidae are monophyletic, whereas the families Pleromidae and Scleritodermidae are polyphyletic. Family Desmanthidae is polyphyletic and groups within Halichondriidae – we formally propose a reallocation. The sister group relationship of the family Vetulinidae to Spongillida is confirmed and we propose here for the first time to include Vetulina into a new Order Sphaerocladina. Megascleres and microscleres possibly evolved and/or were lost several times independently in different

  4. Molecular characterization of a family 5 glycoside hydrolase suggests an induced-fit enzymatic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liberato, Marcelo V.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Prates, Érica T.; de Araujo, Evandro A.; Pellegrini, Vanessa O. A.; Camilo, Cesar M.; Kadowaki, Marco A.; Neto, Mario de O.; Popov, Alexander; Skaf, Munir S.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) play fundamental roles in the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomaterials. Here, we report the full-length structure of a cellulase from Bacillus licheniformis (BlCel5B), a member of the GH5 subfamily 4 that is entirely dependent on its two ancillary modules (Ig-like module and CBM46) for catalytic activity. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that the C-terminal CBM46 caps the distal N-terminal catalytic domain (CD) to establish a fully functional active site via a combination of large-scale multidomain conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. The Ig-like module is pivoting the packing and unpacking motions of CBM46 relative to CD in the assembly of the binding subsite. This is the first example of a multidomain GH relying on large amplitude motions of the CBM46 for assembly of the catalytically competent form of the enzyme. PMID:27032335

  5. Molecular characterization of a family 5 glycoside hydrolase suggests an induced-fit enzymatic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberato, Marcelo V.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Prates, Érica T.; de Araujo, Evandro A.; Pellegrini, Vanessa O. A.; Camilo, Cesar M.; Kadowaki, Marco A.; Neto, Mario De O.; Popov, Alexander; Skaf, Munir S.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) play fundamental roles in the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomaterials. Here, we report the full-length structure of a cellulase from Bacillus licheniformis (BlCel5B), a member of the GH5 subfamily 4 that is entirely dependent on its two ancillary modules (Ig-like module and CBM46) for catalytic activity. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that the C-terminal CBM46 caps the distal N-terminal catalytic domain (CD) to establish a fully functional active site via a combination of large-scale multidomain conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. The Ig-like module is pivoting the packing and unpacking motions of CBM46 relative to CD in the assembly of the binding subsite. This is the first example of a multidomain GH relying on large amplitude motions of the CBM46 for assembly of the catalytically competent form of the enzyme.

  6. Structures of aminoarabinose transferase ArnT suggest a molecular basis for lipid A glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Vasileios I; Herrera, Carmen M; Schultz, Kathryn M; Clarke, Oliver B; Vendome, Jérémie; Tomasek, David; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Belcher Dufrisne, Meagan; Kloss, Brian; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Klug, Candice S; Trent, M Stephen; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    Polymyxins are antibiotics used in the last line of defense to combat multidrug-resistant infections by Gram-negative bacteria. Polymyxin resistance arises through charge modification of the bacterial outer membrane with the attachment of the cationic sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose to lipid A, a reaction catalyzed by the integral membrane lipid-to-lipid glycosyltransferase 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose transferase (ArnT). Here, we report crystal structures of ArnT from Cupriavidus metallidurans, alone and in complex with the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate, at 2.8 and 3.2 angstrom resolution, respectively. The structures show cavities for both lipidic substrates, which converge at the active site. A structural rearrangement occurs on undecaprenyl phosphate binding, which stabilizes the active site and likely allows lipid A binding. Functional mutagenesis experiments based on these structures suggest a mechanistic model for ArnT family enzymes.

  7. Molecular evolution of bovine Toll-like receptor 2 suggests substitutions of functional relevance

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that polymorphism in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes might be associated with disease resistance or susceptibility traits in livestock. Polymorphic sites affecting TLR function should exhibit signatures of positive selection, identified as a high ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions (ω). Phylogeny based models of codon substitution based on estimates of ω for each amino acid position can therefore offer a valuable tool to predict sites of functional relevance. We have used this approach to identify such polymorphic sites within the bovine TLR2 genes from ten Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle breeds. By analysing TLR2 gene phylogeny in a set of mammalian species and a subset of ruminant species we have estimated the selective pressure on individual sites and domains and identified polymorphisms at sites of putative functional importance. Results The ω were highest in the mammalian TLR2 domains thought to be responsible for ligand binding and lowest in regions responsible for heterodimerisation with other TLR-related molecules. Several positively-selected sites were detected in or around ligand-binding domains. However a comparison of the ruminant subset of TLR2 sequences with the whole mammalian set of sequences revealed that there has been less selective pressure among ruminants than in mammals as a whole. This suggests that there have been functional changes during ruminant evolution. Twenty newly-discovered non-synonymous polymorphic sites were identified in cattle. Three of them were localised at positions shaped by positive selection in the ruminant dataset (Leu227Phe, His305Pro, His326Gln) and in domains involved in the recognition of ligands. His326Gln is of particular interest as it consists of an exchange of differentially-charged amino acids at a position which has previously been shown to be crucial for ligand binding in human TLR2. Conclusion Within bovine TLR2, polymorphisms at amino

  8. Immunocalization of telomerase in cells of lizard tail after amputation suggests cell activation for tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2016-02-01

    Tail amputation (autotomy) in most lizards elicits a remarkable regenerative response leading to a new although simplified tail. No information on the trigger mechanism following wounding is known but cells from the stump initiate to proliferate and form a regenerative blastema. The present study shows that telomerases are mainly activated in the nuclei of various connective and muscle satellite cells of the stump, and in other tissues, probably responding to the wound signals. Western blotting detection also indicates that telomerase positive bands increases in the regenerating blastema in comparison to the normal tail. Light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry localization of telomerase shows that 4-14 days post-amputation in lizards immunopositive nuclei of sparse cells located among the wounded tissues are accumulating into the forming blastema. These cells mainly include fibroblasts and fat cells of the connective tissue and satellite cells of muscles. Also some immature basophilic and polychromatophilic erytroblasts, lymphoblasts and myelocytes present within the Bone Marrow of the vertebrae show telomerase localization in their nuclei, but their contribution to the formation of the regenerative blastema remains undetermined. The study proposes that one of the initial mechanisms triggering cell proliferation for the formation of the blastema in lizards involve gene activation for the production of telomerase that stimulates the following signaling pathways for cell division and migration.

  9. PDGF beta targeting in cervical cancer cells suggest a fine-tuning of compensatory signalling pathways to sustain tumourigenic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tudoran, Oana Mihaela; Soritau, Olga; Balacescu, Loredana; Pop, Laura; Meurice, Guillaume; Visan, Simona; Lindberg, Staffan; Eniu, Alexandru; Langel, Ulo; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signalling pathway has been reported to play an important role in human cancers by modulating autocrine and paracrine processes such as tumour growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Several clinical trials document the benefits of targeting this pathway; however, in cervical cancer the role of PDGF signalling in still unclear. In this study, we used siRNA against PDGF beta (PDGFBB) to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of PDGFBB signalling in Ca Ski and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Our results show that PDGFBB inhibition in Ca Ski cells led to rapid alterations of the transcriptional pattern of 579 genes, genes that are known to have antagonistic roles in regulating tumour progression. Concomitantly, with the lack of significant effects on cervical cancer cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration or invasion, these findings suggests that cervical cancer cells shift between compensatory signalling pathways to maintain their behaviour. The observed autocrine effects were limited to cervical cancer cells ability to adhere to an endothelial cell (EC) monolayer. However, by inhibiting PDGFBB on cervical cells, we achieved reduced proliferation of ECs in co-culture settings and cellular aggregation in conditioned media. Because of lack of PDGF receptor expression on ECs, we believe that these effects are a result of indirect PDGFBB paracrine signalling mechanisms. Our results shed some light into the understanding of PDGFBB signalling mechanism in cervical cancer cells, which could be further exploited for the development of synergistic anti-tumour and anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies. PMID:25311137

  10. Molecular mobility of scaffolds' biopolymers influences cell growth.

    PubMed

    Podlipec, Rok; Gorgieva, Selestina; Jurašin, Darija; Urbančič, Iztok; Kokol, Vanja; Strancar, Janez

    2014-09-24

    Understanding biocompatibility of materials and scaffolds is one of the main challenges in the field of tissue engineering and regeneration. The complex nature of cell-biomaterial interaction requires extensive preclinical functionality testing by studying specific cell responses to different biomaterial properties, from morphology and mechanics to surface characteristics at the molecular level. Despite constant improvements, a more general picture of biocompatibility is still lacking and tailormade scaffolds are not yet available. The scope of our study was thus the investigation of the correlation of fibroblast cell growth on different gelatin scaffolds with their morphological, mechanical as well as surface molecular properties. The latter were thoroughly investigated via polymer molecular mobility studied by site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) for the first time. Anisotropy of the rotational motion of the gelatin side chain mobility was identified as the most correlated quantity with cell growth in the first days after adhesion, while weaker correlations were found with scaffold viscoelasticity and no correlations with scaffold morphology. Namely, the scaffolds with highly mobile or unrestricted polymers identified with the cell growth being five times less efficient (N(cells) = 60 ± 25 mm(-2)) as compared to cell growth on the scaffolds with considerable part of polymers with the restricted rotational motion (N(cells) = 290 ± 25 mm(-2)). This suggests that molecular mobility of scaffold components could play an important role in cell response to medical devices, reflecting a new aspect of the biocompatibility concept.

  11. The Molecular Control of Blood Cell Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Leo

    1987-12-01

    The establishment of a cell culture system for the clonal development of blood cells has made it possible to identify the proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of different blood cell lineages and to discover the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cell development in blood forming tissues. A model system with myeloid blood cells has shown that (i) normal blood cells require different proteins to induce cell multiplication (growth inducers) and cell differentiation (differentiation inducers), (ii) there is a hierarchy of growth inducers as cells become more restricted in their developmental program, and (iii) a cascade of interactions between proteins determines the correct balance between immature and mature cells in normal blood cell development. Gene cloning has shown that there is a family of different genes for these proteins. Normal protein regulators of blood cell development can control the abnormal growth of certain types of leukemic cells and suppress malignancy by incuding differentiation to mature nondividing cells. Chromosome abnormalities that give rise to malignancy in these leukemic cells can be bypassed and their effects nullified by inducing differentiation, which stops cells from multiplying. These blood cell regulatory proteins are active in culture and in the body, and they can be used clinically to correct defects in blood cell development.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation. PMID:27005656

  13. Molecular multiproxy analysis of ancient root systems suggests strong alteration of deep subsoil organic matter by rhizomicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocke, Martina; Huguet, Arnaud; Derenne, Sylvie; Kolb, Steffen; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.

    2013-04-01

    Roots have a high potential capacity to store large amounts of CO2 in the subsoil. However, associated with rooting, microorganisms enter the subsoil and might contribute to priming effects of carbon mineralisation in the microbial hotspot rhizosphere. Although these processes are well known for recent surface soils, it remains questionable, if and how microorganisms contribute to priming effects in the subsoil and if these effects can be traced after the roots' lifetime. The current study implies several state-of-the-art techniques like DNA and lipid molecular proxies to trace remains of microbial biomass in ancient root systems. These can provide valuable information if parts of the root and rhizomicrobial biomass are preserved, e.g. by encrustation with secondary carbonate during the root's lifespan or shortly thereafter. At the Late Pleistocene loess-paleosol sequence near Nussloch (SW Germany), rhizoliths (calcified roots) occur highly abundant in the deep subsoil from 1 to 9 m depth and below. They were formed by Holocene woody vegetation. Their size can account for up to several cm in diameter and up to > 1 m length. Rhizoliths and surrounding sediment with increasing distances of up to 10 cm, as well as reference loess without visible root remains were collected at several depth intervals. Samples were analysed for n-fatty acids (FAs) and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs; membrane lipids from Archaea and some Bacteria), as well as structural diversity based on the RNA gene of the prokaryotic ribosome subunit 16S (16S rRNA). GDGT represent organic remains from microbial biomass, whereas FA comprise both microbial remains and degradation products. 16S rRNA indicates the presence of both living cells and/or cell fragments. Despite the general low RNA contents in the sample set, results pointed to a much higher abundance of bacterial compared to archaeal RNA. The latter occured in notable amounts only in some rhizoliths. This was in part enforced by

  14. Plasma proteomic profiles from disease-discordant monozygotic twins suggest that molecular pathways are shared in multiple systemic autoimmune diseases*

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Although systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID) share many clinical and laboratory features, whether they also share some common features of pathogenesis remains unclear. We assessed plasma proteomic profiles among different SAID for evidence of common molecular pathways that could provide insights into pathogenic mechanisms shared by these diseases. Methods Differential quantitative proteomic analyses (one-dimensional reverse-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) were performed to assess patterns of plasma protein expression. Monozygotic twins (four pairs discordant for systemic lupus erythematosus, four pairs discordant for juvenile idiopathic arthritis and two pairs discordant for juvenile dermatomyositis) were studied to minimize polymorphic gene effects. Comparisons were also made to 10 unrelated, matched controls. Results Multiple plasma proteins, including acute phase reactants, structural proteins, immune response proteins, coagulation and transcriptional factors, were differentially expressed similarly among the different SAID studied. Multivariate Random Forest modeling identified seven proteins whose combined altered expression levels effectively segregated affected vs. unaffected twins. Among these seven proteins, four were also identified in univariate analyses of proteomic data (syntaxin 17, α-glucosidase, paraoxonase 1, and the sixth component of complement). Molecular pathway modeling indicated that these factors may be integrated through interactions with a candidate plasma biomarker, PON1 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Conclusions Together, these data suggest that different SAID may share common alterations of plasma protein expression and molecular pathways. An understanding of the mechanisms leading to the altered plasma proteomes common among these SAID may provide useful insights into their pathogeneses. PMID:22044644

  15. Grid cells correlation structure suggests organized feedforward projections into superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tocker, Gilad; Barak, Omri; Derdikman, Dori

    2015-12-01

    Navigation requires integration of external and internal inputs to form a representation of location. Part of this integration is considered to be carried out by the grid cells network in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). However, the structure of this neural network is unknown. To shed light on this structure, we measured noise correlations between 508 pairs of simultaneous previously recorded grid cells. We differentiated between pure grid and conjunctive cells (pure grid in Layers II, III, and VI vs. conjunctive in Layers III and V--only Layer III was bi-modal), and devised a new method to classify cell pairs as belonging/not-belonging to the same module. We found that pairs from the same module show significantly more correlations than pairs from different modules. The correlations between pure grid cells decreased in strength as their relative spatial phase increased. However, correlations were mostly at 0 time-lag, suggesting that the source of correlations was not only synaptic, but rather resulted mostly from common input. Given our measured correlations, the two functional groups of grid cells (pure vs. conjunctive), and the known disorganized recurrent connections within Layer II, we propose the following model: conjunctive cells in deep layers form an attractor network whose activity is governed by velocity-controlled signals. A second manifold in Layer II receives organized feedforward projections from the deep layers, giving rise to pure grid cells. Numerical simulations indicate that organized projections induce such correlations as we measure in superficial layers. Our results provide new evidence for the functional anatomy of the entorhinal circuit-suggesting that strong phase-organized feedforward projections support grid fields in the superficial layers.

  16. Zika Virus Targets Different Primary Human Placental Cells, Suggesting Two Routes for Vertical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Michlmayr, Daniela; Wang, Chunling; Fang-Hoover, June; Harris, Eva; Pereira, Lenore

    2016-08-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy is linked to severe birth defects, but mother-to-fetus transmission routes are unknown. We infected different primary cell types from mid- and late-gestation placentas and explants from first-trimester chorionic villi with the prototype Ugandan and a recently isolated Nicaraguan ZIKV strain. ZIKV infects primary human placental cells and explants-cytotrophoblasts, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and Hofbauer cells in chorionic villi and amniotic epithelial cells and trophoblast progenitors in amniochorionic membranes-that express Axl, Tyro3, and/or TIM1 viral entry cofactors. ZIKV produced NS3 and E proteins and generated higher viral titers in amniotic epithelial cells from mid-gestation compared to late-gestation placentas. Duramycin, a peptide that binds phosphatidylethanolamine in enveloped virions and precludes TIM1 binding, reduced ZIKV infection in placental cells and explants. Our results suggest that ZIKV spreads from basal and parietal decidua to chorionic villi and amniochorionic membranes and that targeting TIM1 could suppress infection at the uterine-placental interface. PMID:27443522

  17. Zika Virus Targets Different Primary Human Placental Cells, Suggesting Two Routes for Vertical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Michlmayr, Daniela; Wang, Chunling; Fang-Hoover, June; Harris, Eva; Pereira, Lenore

    2016-08-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy is linked to severe birth defects, but mother-to-fetus transmission routes are unknown. We infected different primary cell types from mid- and late-gestation placentas and explants from first-trimester chorionic villi with the prototype Ugandan and a recently isolated Nicaraguan ZIKV strain. ZIKV infects primary human placental cells and explants-cytotrophoblasts, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and Hofbauer cells in chorionic villi and amniotic epithelial cells and trophoblast progenitors in amniochorionic membranes-that express Axl, Tyro3, and/or TIM1 viral entry cofactors. ZIKV produced NS3 and E proteins and generated higher viral titers in amniotic epithelial cells from mid-gestation compared to late-gestation placentas. Duramycin, a peptide that binds phosphatidylethanolamine in enveloped virions and precludes TIM1 binding, reduced ZIKV infection in placental cells and explants. Our results suggest that ZIKV spreads from basal and parietal decidua to chorionic villi and amniochorionic membranes and that targeting TIM1 could suppress infection at the uterine-placental interface.

  18. Novel HLA-B27-restricted epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis generated upon endogenous processing of bacterial proteins suggest a role of molecular mimicry in reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J; Dos Santos, Helena G; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A

    2013-09-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na(+)-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27(+) cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330-338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211-223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211-223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA.

  19. Novel HLA-B27-restricted Epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis Generated upon Endogenous Processing of Bacterial Proteins Suggest a Role of Molecular Mimicry in Reactive Arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J.; Dos Santos, Helena G.; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na+-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27+ cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330–338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211–223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211–223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA. PMID:23867464

  20. Molecular mechanisms of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Chiba, Shigeru

    2016-08-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has gradually been clarified in terms of genomic abnormalities. Insights into these genomic abnormalities have provided clues to understanding the pathogenesis of PTCL. Furthermore, the origins of lymphoma cells have been clarified by investigating the distribution of genomic abnormalities in tumor cells and non-tumor blood cells. Multistep tumorigenesis has been suggested to be a fundamental mechanism underlying the development of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), a distinct subtype of PTCL: premalignant cells evolve from hematopoietic progenitors via mutations in epigenetic regulators. These cells then further differentiate into tumor cells via the addition of tumor-specific G17V RHOA mutations. Meanwhile, AITL are composed of various infiltrating cells as well as tumor cells. Most notably, AITL tissues are characterized by massive infiltration of B cells partially infected by Epstein-Barr virus, follicular dendritic cells, and high endothelial venules. Infiltration of these cell types has been thought to be a reactive process, promoted by cytokines and chemokines released from tumor cells. Considering the multistep mechanisms of AITL allows us to analyze whether these infiltrating cells are also derived from premalignant cells. Indeed, the mechanisms underlying massive infiltration of bystander cells might be more complicated than previously imagined. PMID:27599421

  1. Molecular biology of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Zhou, H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells are the output neurons that encode and transmit information from the eye to the brain. Their diverse physiologic and anatomic properties have been intensively studied and appear to account well for a number of psychophysical phenomena such as lateral inhibition and chromatic opponency. In this paper, we summarize our current view of retinal ganglion cell properties and pose a number of questions regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. As an example of one approach to understanding molecular mechanisms, we describe recent work on several POU domain transcription factors that are expressed in subsets of retinal ganglion cells and that appear to be involved in ganglion cell development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570601

  2. Molecular mechanisms that control endothelial cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Vestweber, D

    2000-02-01

    Endothelial cell contacts control the permeability of the blood vessel wall. This allows the endothelium to form a barrier for solutes, macromolecules, and leukocytes between the vessel lumen and the interstitial space. Loss of this barrier function in pathophysiological situations can lead to extracellular oedema. The ability of leukocytes to enter tissue at sites of inflammation is dependent on molecular mechanisms that allow leukocytes to adhere to the endothelium and to migrate through the endothelial cell layer and the underlying basal lamina. It is a commonly accepted working hypothesis that inter-endothelial cell contacts are actively opened and closed during this process. Angiogenesis is another important process that requires well-controlled regulation of inter-endothelial cell contacts. The formation of new blood vessels by sprouting from pre-existing vessels depends on the loosening of established endothelial cell contacts and the migration of endothelial cells that form the outgrowing sprouts. This review focuses on the molecular composition of endothelial cell surface proteins and proteins of the cytoskeletal undercoat of the plasma membrane at sites of inter-endothelial cell contacts and discusses the current knowledge about the potential role of such molecules in the regulation of endothelial cell contacts. PMID:10685062

  3. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply. PMID:21619650

  4. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of nuclear genes suggests a Cenozoic over-water dispersal origin for the Cuban solenodon.

    PubMed

    Sato, Jun J; Ohdachi, Satoshi D; Echenique-Diaz, Lazaro M; Borroto-Páez, Rafael; Begué-Quiala, Gerardo; Delgado-Labañino, Jorge L; Gámez-Díez, Jorgelino; Alvarez-Lemus, José; Nguyen, Son Truong; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Kita, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The Cuban solenodon (Solenodon cubanus) is one of the most enigmatic mammals and is an extremely rare species with a distribution limited to a small part of the island of Cuba. Despite its rarity, in 2012 seven individuals of S. cubanus were captured and sampled successfully for DNA analysis, providing new insights into the evolutionary origin of this species and into the origins of the Caribbean fauna, which remain controversial. We conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear genes (Apob, Atp7a, Bdnf, Brca1 and Rag1; total, 4,602 bp) from 35 species of the mammalian order Eulipotyphla. Based on Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses, the family Solenodontidae diverged from other eulipotyphlan in the Paleocene, after the bolide impact on the Yucatan Peninsula, and S. cubanus diverged from the Hispaniolan solenodon (S. paradoxus) in the Early Pliocene. The strikingly recent divergence time estimates suggest that S. cubanus and its ancestral lineage originated via over-water dispersal rather than vicariance events, as had previously been hypothesised. PMID:27498968

  5. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of nuclear genes suggests a Cenozoic over-water dispersal origin for the Cuban solenodon.

    PubMed

    Sato, Jun J; Ohdachi, Satoshi D; Echenique-Diaz, Lazaro M; Borroto-Páez, Rafael; Begué-Quiala, Gerardo; Delgado-Labañino, Jorge L; Gámez-Díez, Jorgelino; Alvarez-Lemus, José; Nguyen, Son Truong; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Kita, Masaki

    2016-08-08

    The Cuban solenodon (Solenodon cubanus) is one of the most enigmatic mammals and is an extremely rare species with a distribution limited to a small part of the island of Cuba. Despite its rarity, in 2012 seven individuals of S. cubanus were captured and sampled successfully for DNA analysis, providing new insights into the evolutionary origin of this species and into the origins of the Caribbean fauna, which remain controversial. We conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear genes (Apob, Atp7a, Bdnf, Brca1 and Rag1; total, 4,602 bp) from 35 species of the mammalian order Eulipotyphla. Based on Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses, the family Solenodontidae diverged from other eulipotyphlan in the Paleocene, after the bolide impact on the Yucatan Peninsula, and S. cubanus diverged from the Hispaniolan solenodon (S. paradoxus) in the Early Pliocene. The strikingly recent divergence time estimates suggest that S. cubanus and its ancestral lineage originated via over-water dispersal rather than vicariance events, as had previously been hypothesised.

  6. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of nuclear genes suggests a Cenozoic over-water dispersal origin for the Cuban solenodon

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Jun J.; Ohdachi, Satoshi D.; Echenique-Diaz, Lazaro M.; Borroto-Páez, Rafael; Begué-Quiala, Gerardo; Delgado-Labañino, Jorge L.; Gámez-Díez, Jorgelino; Alvarez-Lemus, José; Nguyen, Son Truong; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Kita, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The Cuban solenodon (Solenodon cubanus) is one of the most enigmatic mammals and is an extremely rare species with a distribution limited to a small part of the island of Cuba. Despite its rarity, in 2012 seven individuals of S. cubanus were captured and sampled successfully for DNA analysis, providing new insights into the evolutionary origin of this species and into the origins of the Caribbean fauna, which remain controversial. We conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear genes (Apob, Atp7a, Bdnf, Brca1 and Rag1; total, 4,602 bp) from 35 species of the mammalian order Eulipotyphla. Based on Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses, the family Solenodontidae diverged from other eulipotyphlan in the Paleocene, after the bolide impact on the Yucatan Peninsula, and S. cubanus diverged from the Hispaniolan solenodon (S. paradoxus) in the Early Pliocene. The strikingly recent divergence time estimates suggest that S. cubanus and its ancestral lineage originated via over-water dispersal rather than vicariance events, as had previously been hypothesised. PMID:27498968

  7. Genomewide scans of red cell indices suggest linkage on chromosome 6q23

    PubMed Central

    Iliadou, A; Evans, D M; Zhu, G; Duffy, D L; Frazer, I H; Montgomery, G W; Martin, N G

    2007-01-01

    Background The red cell indices quantify the size, number and oxygen‐carrying ability of erythrocytes. Although the genetic basis of many monogenic forms of anaemia is well understood, comparatively little is known about the genes responsible for variation in the red cell indices among healthy participants. Objective To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for normal variation in the red cell indices of 391 pairs of dizygotic twins who were measured longitudinally at 12, 14 and 16 years of age. Results Evidence suggesting linkage of red cell indices to haemoglobin concentration (LOD  = 3.03) and haematocrit (LOD  = 2.95) on chromosome 6q23, a region previously identified as possibly harbouring a QTL for haematocrit, was found. Evidence for linkage to several other regions of the genome, including chromosome 4q32 for red cell count and 7q for mean cell volume, was also found. In contrast, there was little evidence of linkage to the chromosomal regions containing the genes for erythropoietin (7q21) and its receptor (19p13.2), nor to the regions containing the genes for the haemoglobin α (16p13.3) and β chains (11p15.5). Conclusion Findings provide additional evidence for a QTL affecting haemoglobin and haematocrit on chromosome 6q23. In contrast, polymorphisms in the genes coding for erythropoietin, its receptor and the haemoglobin α and β chains do not appear to contribute substantially to variation in the red cell indices between healthy persons. PMID:16950815

  8. Molecular underpinning of B-cell anergy

    PubMed Central

    Yarkoni, Yuval; Getahun, Andrew; Cambier, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A byproduct of the largely stochastic generation of a diverse B-cell specificity repertoire is production of cells that recognize autoantigens. Indeed, recent studies indicate that more than half of the primary repertoire consists of autoreactive B cells that must be silenced to prevent autoimmunity. While this silencing can occur by multiple mechanisms, it appears that most autoreactive B cells are silenced by anergy, wherein they populate peripheral lymphoid organs and continue to express unoccupied antigen receptors yet are unresponsive to antigen stimulation. Here we review molecular mechanisms that appear operative in maintaining the antigen unresponsiveness of anergic B cells. In addition, we present new data indicating that the failure of anergic B cells to mobilize calcium in response to antigen stimulation is not mediated by inactivation of stromal interacting molecule 1, a critical intermediary in intracellular store depletion-induced calcium influx. PMID:20727040

  9. Molecular cell biology and molecular genetics of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, Atanas; Keath, Elizabeth J

    2002-10-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a dimorphic ascomycete which is capable of producing a broad spectrum of disease ranging from mild asymptomatic, pulmonary illness to severe, life-threatening systemic mycosis. Regulatory mechanisms that use temperature and other environmental cues are paramount to the successful adaptation of the organism as an effective intracellular pathogenic yeast. Although the biochemistry and phenomenology of reversible morphogenesis have been well examined in Histoplasma, the identification and functional characterization of genes and their products that are required for early establishment or maintenance of the parasitic yeast phase in intracellular host compartments have only recently been fruitful. Advances in the molecular biology of Histoplasma, including approaches to introduce telomeric plasmids, reporter fusion constructs, and gene disruption cassettes into the fungus are poised to solidify the pre-eminence of this fungus as a model system which can be applied to other dimorphic fungal pathogens that exhibit similar cellular and immunological complexities. This review centers on recent developments in the molecular cell biology and molecular genetics of Histoplasma capsulatum that provide important new avenues for examining the mold-to-yeast phase transition beyond the historical, binary view of dimorphism and the implications that these successful approaches may have on seminal issues in fungal pathogenesis. PMID:12452281

  10. Mutational spectrum of Barrett's stem cells suggests paths to initiation of a precancerous lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wang, Xia; Bertrand, Denis; Kern, Florian; Zhang, Ting; Duleba, Marcin; Srivastava, Supriya; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hu, Yuanyu; Wilson, Lane H.; Blaszyk, Hagen; Rolshud, Daniil; Teh, Ming; Liu, Jianjun; Howitt, Brooke E.; Vincent, Matthew; Crum, Christopher P.; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Ho, Khek Yu; McKeon, Frank; Xian, Wa

    2016-01-01

    The precancerous lesion known as Barrett's oesophagus can evolve to oesophageal adenocarcinoma in decades-long processes of regenerative growth. Here we report the isolation and propagation of distinct, patient-matched stem cells of Barrett's, gastric and oesophageal epithelia that yield divergent tumour types following in vitro transformation and xenografting. Genomic analyses reveal a broad mutational spectrum unique to Barrett's stem cells that likely reflects their risk for oncogenesis. Remarkably, 25% of cases show no cancer-related genomic changes, suggesting that Barrett's initiates without driver mutations. Most cases, however, sustain patterns of deletions almost identical to adenocarcinoma though tumour-associated gene amplifications were absent. Notably, those suspected of low-grade dysplasia have p53 mutations or undergo amplifications of proto-oncogenes and receptor tyrosine kinases, implicating these events in lethal transitions. Our findings suggest paths for the initiation and progression of Barrett's and define a discrete stem cell underlying its regenerative growth whose eradication could prevent oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26783136

  11. Molecular machinery and mechanism of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-05-01

    Secretion occurs in all living cells and involves the delivery of intracellular products to the cell exterior. Secretory products are packaged and stored in membranous sacs or vesicles within the cell. When the cell needs to secrete these products, the secretory vesicles containing them dock and fuse at plasma membrane-associated supramolecular structures, called porosomes, to release their contents. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion, or hormone release use a highly regulated secretory process. Similar to other fundamental cellular processes, cell secretion is precisely regulated. During secretion, swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of intravesicular pressure, allowing expulsion of vesicular contents. The extent of vesicle swelling dictates the amount of vesicular contents expelled. The discovery of the porosome as the universal secretory machinery, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nanometer resolution and in real time, and its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling and the fusion of opposing bilayers, that is, the fusion of secretory vesicle membrane at the base of the porosome membrane, have also been resolved. These findings reveal, for the first time, the universal molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells.

  12. A Common Molecular Motif Characterizes Extracellular Allosteric Enhancers of GPCR Aminergic Receptors and Suggests Enhancer Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Robert Root; Dillon, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Several classes of compounds that have no intrinsic activity on aminergic systems nonetheless enhance the potency of aminergic receptor ligands three-fold or more while significantly increasing their duration of activity, preventing tachyphylaxis and reversing fade. Enhancer compounds include ascorbic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, cortico-steroids, opioid peptides, opiates and opiate antagonists. This paper provides the first review of aminergic enhancement, demonstrating that all enhancers have a common, inobvious molecular motif and work through a common mechanism that is manifested by three common characteristics. First, aminergic enhancers bind directly to the amines they enhance, suggesting that the common structural motif is reflected in common binding targets. Second, one common target is the first extracellular loop of aminergic receptors. Third, at least some enhancers are antiphosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that aminergic enhancers act on the extracellular surface of aminergic receptors to keep the receptor in its high affinity state, trapping the ligand inside the receptor. Enhancer binding produces allosteric modifications of the receptor structure that interfere with phosphorylation of the receptor, thereby inhibiting down-regulation of the receptor. The mechanism explains how enhancers potentiate aminergic activity and increase duration of activity and makes testable predictions about additional compounds that should act as aminergic enhancers. PMID:25174918

  13. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  14. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  15. T Cell Allorecognition via Molecular Mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Whitney A.; Chen, Zhenjun; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Clements, Craig S.; Bharadwaj, Mandvi; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Saunders, Philippa M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Crawford, Fran; Stadinsky, Brian; Jackson, David; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Kappler, John W.; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James

    2010-08-16

    T cells often alloreact with foreign human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Here we showed the LC13 T cell receptor (TCR), selected for recognition on self-HLA-B*0801 bound to a viral peptide, alloreacts with B44 allotypes (HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4405) bound to two different allopeptides. Despite extensive polymorphism between HLA-B*0801, HLA-B*4402, and HLA-B*4405 and the disparate sequences of the viral and allopeptides, the LC13 TCR engaged these peptide-HLA (pHLA) complexes identically, accommodating mimicry of the viral peptide by the allopeptide. The viral and allopeptides adopted similar conformations only after TCR ligation, revealing an induced-fit mechanism of molecular mimicry. The LC13 T cells did not alloreact against HLA-B*4403, and the single residue polymorphism between HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4403 affected the plasticity of the allopeptide, revealing that molecular mimicry was associated with TCR specificity. Accordingly, molecular mimicry that is HLA and peptide dependent is a mechanism for human T cell alloreactivity between disparate cognate and allogeneic pHLA complexes.

  16. Immunohistochemical Expression and Clinical Significance of Suggested Stem Cell Markers in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jong Jin; Noh, Sang Jae; Bae, Jun Sang; Park, Ho Sung; Jang, Kyu Yun; Chung, Myoung Ja; Moon, Woo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing evidence has shown that tumor initiation and growth are nourished by a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor mass. CSCs are posited to be responsible for tumor maintenance, growth, distant metastasis, and relapse after curative operation. We examined the expression of CSC markers in paraffin-embedded tissue sections of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and correlated the results with clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for the markers believed to be expressed in the CSCs, including epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), keratin 19 (K19), CD133, and CD56, was performed in 82 HCC specimens. Results: EpCAM expression was observed in 56% of the HCCs (46/82) and K19 in 6% (5/82). EpCAM expression in HCC significantly correlated with elevated α-fetoprotein level, microvessel invasion of tumor cells, and high histologic grade. In addition, EpCAM expression significantly correlated with K19 expression. The overall survival and relapsefree survival rates in patients with EpCAM-expressing HCC were relatively lower than those in patients with EpCAM-negative HCC. All but two of the 82 HCCs were negative for CD133 and CD56, respectively. Conclusions: Our results suggest that HCCs expressing EpCAM are associated with unfavorable prognostic factors and have a more aggressive clinical course than those not expressing EpCAM. Further, the expression of either CD133 or CD56 in paraffin-embedded HCC tissues appears to be rare. PMID:26581206

  17. Molecular genetic analysis of cucumber mosaic virus populations infecting pepper suggests unique patterns of evolution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeong-Jin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Studying genetic structure and diversity of viruses is important to understand the evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain variations in viral populations. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is endemic in most pepper fields in Korea. Currently, no effective methods for control of CMV are available due to many environmental and biological factors such as the extensive evolutionary capacity of CMV. Thus, analyzing the genetic structure of CMV populations may facilitate the development of strategies for the control of CMV. In this study, 252 pepper (Capsicum annuum) samples showing virus symptoms were collected by field surveys performed throughout Korea in 2007. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that, in total, 165 collected samples were infected with CMV. Forty-five CMV isolates were randomly selected within each regional subpopulation and analyzed by full-genome sequencing. Analyses of genetic diversity showed that the 2b gene of CMV is under weaker purifying selection than the other genes. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of RNA1, the CMV isolates from pepper were divided into three clusters in subgroup I. Our full-genome sequence-based molecular analyses of the CMV Korean population suggest that the subpopulations of CMV have been geographically localized in pepper fields in Korea.

  18. Genomic, RNAseq, and molecular modeling evidence suggests that the major allergen domain in insects evolved from a homodimeric origin.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas A; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E; Mueller, Geoffrey A

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects.

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of cucumber mosaic virus populations infecting pepper suggests unique patterns of evolution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeong-Jin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Studying genetic structure and diversity of viruses is important to understand the evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain variations in viral populations. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is endemic in most pepper fields in Korea. Currently, no effective methods for control of CMV are available due to many environmental and biological factors such as the extensive evolutionary capacity of CMV. Thus, analyzing the genetic structure of CMV populations may facilitate the development of strategies for the control of CMV. In this study, 252 pepper (Capsicum annuum) samples showing virus symptoms were collected by field surveys performed throughout Korea in 2007. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that, in total, 165 collected samples were infected with CMV. Forty-five CMV isolates were randomly selected within each regional subpopulation and analyzed by full-genome sequencing. Analyses of genetic diversity showed that the 2b gene of CMV is under weaker purifying selection than the other genes. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of RNA1, the CMV isolates from pepper were divided into three clusters in subgroup I. Our full-genome sequence-based molecular analyses of the CMV Korean population suggest that the subpopulations of CMV have been geographically localized in pepper fields in Korea. PMID:25116642

  20. How Environment Supports a State: Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Two States in Bacteriorhodopsin Suggest Lipid and Water Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Crozier, Paul S.; Stevens, Mark J.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2004-01-01

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a transmembrane protein that uses large conformational changes for proton transfer from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular regions. Crystal structures, due to their solvent conditions, do not resolve the effect of lipid molecules on these protein conformational changes. To begin to understand the molecular details behind such large conformational changes, we simulated two conformations of wild-type bacteriorhodopsin, one of the dark-adapted state and the second of an intermediate (MO) state, each within an explicit dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer. The simulations included all-hydrogen and all-atom representations of protein, lipid, and water and were performed for 20 ns. We investigate the equilibrium properties and the dynamic motions of the two conformations in the lipid setting. We note that the conformational state of the MO intermediate bR remains markedly different from the dark-adapted bR state in that the MO intermediate shows rearrangement of the cytoplasmic portions of helices C, F, and G, and nearby loops. This difference in the states remained throughout the simulations, and the results are stable on the molecular dynamics timescale and provide an illustration of the changes in both lipid and water that help to stabilize a particular state. Our analysis focuses on how the environment adjusts to these two states and on how the dynamics of the helices, loops, and water molecules can be related to the pump mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin. For example, water generally behaves in the same manner on the extracellular sides of both simulations but is decreased in the cytoplasmic region of the MO intermediate. We suspect that the different water behavior is closely related to the fluctuations of microcavities volume in the protein interior, which is strongly coupled to the collective motion of the protein. Our simulation result suggests that experimental observation can be useful to

  1. Lack of IDH1 mutation in astroblastomas suggests putative origin from ependymoglial cells?

    PubMed

    Asha, Unchagi; Mahadevan, Anita; Sathiyabama, Dhinakaran; Ravindra, Thakkar; Sagar, B K Chandrashekar; Bhat, Dhananjaya Ishwar; Aravinda, Hanumantapura Ramalingaiah; Pandey, Paritosh; Vilanilam, George C

    2015-08-01

    Astroblastomas are extremely rare neuroepithelial tumors of uncertain histogenesis, affecting children and young adults, and constitute a new addition to the WHO 2000 classification of CNS tumors. We report the largest series of nine cases diagnosed in a single institute over the last 13 years and review published literature. Mean age at presentation was 12.8 years (range: 22 months to 27years). Seven out of nine cases were supratentorial (frontal/frontoparietal - three, parieto-occipital - three, parafalcine - one), one was intraventricular and another was optochaismatic/suprasellar. Five cases were high grade (anaplastic) astroblastomas with Ki-67 labeling index of 8-10%. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural evidence suggesting origin from cells intermediate between ependymocytes and astrocytes is presented. The histogenetic origin of these tumors remains speculative. But the lack of Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation as detected by immunohistochemistry in this study, which is similar to ependymomas supports putative origin from ependymoglial cells. Out of the nine cases, recurrence was noted in one case, 12 months after gross total resection with progression to high grade in the recurrent tumor. There is no recommended treatment protocol due to the rarity of this entity and prognostic factors are yet to be established.

  2. NMR solution structure and backbone dynamics of domain III of the E protein of tick-borne Langat flavivirus suggests a potential site for molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Munia; Dutta, Kaushik; White, Mark A; Cowburn, David; Fox, Robert O

    2006-06-01

    Flaviviruses cause many human diseases, including dengue fever, yellow fever, West Nile viral encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fevers, and are transmitted to their vertebrate hosts by infected mosquitoes and ticks. Domain III of the envelope protein (E-D3) is considered to be the primary viral determinant involved in the virus-host-cell receptor interaction, and thus represents an excellent target for antiviral drug development. Langat (LGT) virus is a naturally attenuated BSL-2 TBE virus and is a model for the pathogenic BSL-3 and BSL-4 viruses in the serogroup. We have determined the solution structure of LGT-E-D3 using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The backbone dynamics of LGT-E-D3 have been investigated using 15N relaxation measurements. A detailed analysis of the solution structure and dynamics of LGT-E-D3 suggests potential residues that could form a surface for molecular recognition, and thereby represent a target site for antiviral therapeutics design.

  3. Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests a Strategy of Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitro and exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1α, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result in altered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters that were exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite. PMID:23429540

  4. Early events following experimental infection with Peste-Des-Petits ruminants virus suggest immune cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Pope, Robert A; Parida, Satya; Bailey, Dalan; Brownlie, Joe; Barrett, Thomas; Banyard, Ashley C

    2013-01-01

    Peste-des-petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is a viral pathogen that causes a devastating plague of small ruminants. PPRV is an economically significant disease that continues to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world. The current understanding of PPRV pathogenesis has been heavily assumed from the closely related rinderpest virus (RPV) and other morbillivirus infections alongside data derived from field outbreaks. There have been few studies reported that have focused on the pathogenesis of PPRV and very little is known about the processes underlying the early stages of infection. In the present study, 15 goats were challenged by the intranasal route with a virulent PPRV isolate, Côte d'Ivoire '89 (CI/89) and sacrificed at strategically defined time-points post infection to enable pre- and post-mortem sampling. This approach enabled precise monitoring of the progress and distribution of virus throughout the infection from the time of challenge, through peak viraemia and into a period of convalescence. Observations were then related to findings of previous field studies and experimental models of PPRV to develop a clinical scoring system for PPRV. Importantly, histopathological investigations demonstrated that the initial site for virus replication is not within the epithelial cells of the respiratory mucosa, as has been previously reported, but is within the tonsillar tissue and lymph nodes draining the site of inoculation. We propose that virus is taken up by immune cells within the respiratory mucosa which then transport virus to lymphoid tissues where primary virus replication occurs, and from where virus enters circulation. Based on these findings we propose a novel clinical scoring methodology for PPRV pathogenesis and suggest a fundamental shift away from the conventional model of PPRV pathogenesis.

  5. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  6. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, D J

    1998-05-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized. PMID:11540640

  7. Molecular crowding limits translation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Stefan; Scott, Matthew; Pedersen, Steen; Hwa, Terence

    2013-10-15

    Bacterial growth is crucially dependent on protein synthesis and thus on the cellular abundance of ribosomes and related proteins. Here, we show that the slow diffusion of the bulky tRNA complexes in the crowded cytoplasm imposes a physical limit on the speed of translation, which ultimately limits the rate of cell growth. To study the required allocation of ancillary translational proteins to alleviate the effect of molecular crowding, we develop a model for cell growth based on a coarse-grained partitioning of the proteome. We find that coregulation of ribosome- and tRNA-affiliated proteins is consistent with measured growth-rate dependencies and results in near-optimal allocation over a broad range of growth rates. The analysis further resolves a long-standing controversy in bacterial growth physiology concerning the growth-rate dependence of translation speed and serves as a caution against premature identification of phenomenological parameters with mechanistic processes.

  8. Molecular Classification of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Konda, Paremala; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Makarla, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is the commonest tumour in the oro-facial region with increasing incidence in the recent years. The disease is challenging as it still depicts a high morbidity and mortality rate. Clinico-pathological data, tumour site, pathologic site tumor, lymphnode, metastasis (TNM) staging, histological grade, invasion, perineural invasion and metastasis have been evaluated to a great depth in relation to OSCC. Co-morbidity factors like use of tobacco, alcohol consumption and various other factors including genetic predisposition have been looked at for finding a suitable treatment protocol. The crux of the matter in understanding the complexity of oral cancer lies in the biological heterogeneity of the tumour. Similar heterogeneity is seen in clinical presentation, histopathology and molecular changes at the cellular level. In spite of the disease being diagnosed, a prediction of the same related to behaviour has remained elusive. Hence, it is time to look beyond at the genetic and epigenetic events leading to molecular and cytogenetic changes that elucidate the pathogenesis and help in design and implementation of targeted drug therapy. A molecular classification of OSCC needs to be put in place much before a clinician can design the treatment protocol of the same and predict the prognosis. PMID:27790599

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  10. Molecular Culprits Generating Brain Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    Despite current advances in multimodality therapies, such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the outcome for patients with high-grade glioma remains fatal. Understanding how glioma cells resist various therapies may provide opportunities for developing new therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that the main obstacle for successfully treating high-grade glioma is the existence of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), which share a number of cellular properties with adult stem cells, such as self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capabilities. Owing to their resistance to standard therapy coupled with their infiltrative nature, BTSCs are a primary cause of tumor recurrence post-therapy. Therefore, BTSCs are thought to be the main glioma cells representing a novel therapeutic target and should be eliminated to obtain successful treatment outcomes. PMID:24904883

  11. Mechano-logical model of C. elegans germ line suggests feedback on the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Atwell, Kathryn; Qin, Zhao; Gavaghan, David; Kugler, Hillel; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Osborne, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans germ line is an outstanding model system in which to study the control of cell division and differentiation. Although many of the molecules that regulate germ cell proliferation and fate decisions have been identified, how these signals interact with cellular dynamics and physical forces within the gonad remains poorly understood. We therefore developed a dynamic, 3D in silico model of the C. elegans germ line, incorporating both the mechanical interactions between cells and the decision-making processes within cells. Our model successfully reproduces key features of the germ line during development and adulthood, including a reasonable ovulation rate, correct sperm count, and appropriate organization of the germ line into stably maintained zones. The model highlights a previously overlooked way in which germ cell pressure may influence gonadogenesis, and also predicts that adult germ cells might be subject to mechanical feedback on the cell cycle akin to contact inhibition. We provide experimental data consistent with the latter hypothesis. Finally, we present cell trajectories and ancestry recorded over the course of a simulation. The novel approaches and software described here link mechanics and cellular decision-making, and are applicable to modeling other developmental and stem cell systems. PMID:26428008

  12. Paired octamer rings of retinoschisin suggest a junctional model for cell-cell adhesion in the retina.

    PubMed

    Tolun, Gökhan; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Huang, Rick; Zeng, Yong; Li, Yan; Steven, Alasdair C; Sieving, Paul A; Heymann, J Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Retinoschisin (RS1) is involved in cell-cell junctions in the retina, but is unique among known cell-adhesion proteins in that it is a soluble secreted protein. Loss-of-function mutations in RS1 lead to early vision impairment in young males, called X-linked retinoschisis. The disease is characterized by separation of inner retinal layers and disruption of synaptic signaling. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we report the structure at 4.1 Å, revealing double octamer rings not observed before. Each subunit is composed of a discoidin domain and a small N-terminal (RS1) domain. The RS1 domains occupy the centers of the rings, but are not required for ring formation and are less clearly defined, suggesting mobility. We determined the structure of the discoidin rings, consistent with known intramolecular and intermolecular disulfides. The interfaces internal to and between rings feature residues implicated in X-linked retinoschisis, indicating the importance of correct assembly. Based on this structure, we propose that RS1 couples neighboring membranes together through octamer-octamer contacts, perhaps modulated by interactions with other membrane components. PMID:27114531

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  14. A diagnostic assessment for introductory molecular and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia; Wood, William B; Martin, Jennifer M; Guild, Nancy A; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed for use as a pre- and posttest to measure student learning gains. To develop the assessment, we first worked with faculty to create a set of learning goals that targeted important concepts in the field and seemed likely to be emphasized by most instructors teaching these subjects. We interviewed students using open-ended questions to identify commonly held misconceptions, formulated multiple-choice questions that included these ideas as distracters, and reinterviewed students to establish validity of the instrument. The assessment was then evaluated by 25 biology experts and modified based on their suggestions. The complete revised assessment was administered to more than 1300 students at three institutions. Analysis of statistical parameters including item difficulty, item discrimination, and reliability provides evidence that the IMCA is a valid and reliable instrument with several potential uses in gauging student learning of key concepts in molecular and cell biology.

  15. Molecular Profiling of Clear Cell Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Michael L.; Russell, Kenneth; Millis, Sherri; Gatalica, Zoran; Bender, Ryan; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced stage/recurrent clear cell ovarian cancers (CCOCs) are characterized by a low response to chemotherapy and a poor prognosis. There is growing interest in investigating novel/molecular targeted therapies in patients with CCOC in histotype-specific trials. However, CCOCs are not a uniform entity and comprise a number of molecular subtypes and it is unlikely that a single approach to treatment will be appropriate for all patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of a multiplatform profiling panel in CCOCs to identify potential therapeutic targets. Patients and Methods Tumor profiling was performed on 521 CCOCs. They were grouped into pure (n = 422) and mixed (n = 99) CCOC for analysis. Testing included a combination of DNA sequencing (including next-generation sequencing) using a 46-gene panel, immunohistochemistry, fluorescent or chromogenic in situ hybridization, and RNA fragment analysis. Results The most common findings were in the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway, with 61% of all CCOCs showing a molecular alteration in one of these pathway components. Next-generation sequencing revealed PIK3CA mutations in 50% of pure CCOCs. Significant differences were observed between pure and mixed CCOCs with respect to hormone receptor expression (9% vs 34.7% for ER, 13.45 vs 26.4% for PR), cMET (24.1% vs 11.6%), PD-1 tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (48.1% vs 100%), expression of PD-L1 (7.4% vs 25%), and TOPO1 (41% vs 27.1%) on immunohistochemistry, whereas next-generation sequencing revealed significant differences in mutation frequency in PIK3CA (50% vs 18.5%), TP53 (18.1% vs 57.7%), KRAS (12.4% vs 3.7%), and cMET (1.9% vs 11.1%). Conclusions This large study confirms that the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway is commonly altered in CCOCs, and highlights the significant differences between pure and mixed CCOCs. Clear cell ovarian cancers are molecularly heterogeneous and there are a number of potential therapeutic targets which could be tested in clinical

  16. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data. PMID:15012964

  17. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data.

  18. Molecular characterization of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P; Cesarman, E; Chadburn, A; Liu, Y F; Knowles, D M

    1996-06-01

    Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL) postulated to arise from noncirculating thymic B lymphocytes. Because of its distinctive clinical and morphological features and putative unique cellular origin, PMBL is generally considered a distinct clinicopathological entity. Little is known, however, about the molecular characteristics of PMBL. Therefore, we analyzed 16 PMBLs for molecular alterations involving the bcl-1, bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, H-ras, K-ras, N-ras, and p53 genes and for Epstein-Barr virus infection, which are commonly involved in lymphoid neoplasia. Employing a combination of Southern blotting and/or polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism assays, we detected genetic alterations in 7 of the 16 (44%) PMBLs. Whereas the bcl-6 gene is rearranged in up to 45% of DLCLs, rearrangement of the bcl-6 gene was detected in only 1 of these 16 (6%) PMBLS. Point mutations of the 5' noncoding region of the c-myc gene were demonstrated in 3 other cases (19%), although c-myc gene rearrangements were not seen by Southern blotting. Missense point mutations of the p53 gene were identified in 3 additional PMBLs (19%). Alterations of the bcl-1, bcl-2, or ras genes and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection were not observed. In conclusion, a variety of molecular lesions occur in PMBLs and may be involved in their pathogenesis. This molecular genetic pattern bears little resemblance to that known for other B cell malignancies, including DLCL. In particular, the infrequent occurrence of bcl-6 gene rearrangement in PMBLs distinguishes them from other DLCLs of B cell origin, suggesting that PMBLs do not represent a distinct subtype of DLCL. PMID:8669486

  19. Molecular characterization of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P.; Cesarman, E.; Chadburn, A.; Liu, Y. F.; Knowles, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL) postulated to arise from noncirculating thymic B lymphocytes. Because of its distinctive clinical and morphological features and putative unique cellular origin, PMBL is generally considered a distinct clinicopathological entity. Little is known, however, about the molecular characteristics of PMBL. Therefore, we analyzed 16 PMBLs for molecular alterations involving the bcl-1, bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, H-ras, K-ras, N-ras, and p53 genes and for Epstein-Barr virus infection, which are commonly involved in lymphoid neoplasia. Employing a combination of Southern blotting and/or polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism assays, we detected genetic alterations in 7 of the 16 (44%) PMBLs. Whereas the bcl-6 gene is rearranged in up to 45% of DLCLs, rearrangement of the bcl-6 gene was detected in only 1 of these 16 (6%) PMBLS. Point mutations of the 5' noncoding region of the c-myc gene were demonstrated in 3 other cases (19%), although c-myc gene rearrangements were not seen by Southern blotting. Missense point mutations of the p53 gene were identified in 3 additional PMBLs (19%). Alterations of the bcl-1, bcl-2, or ras genes and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection were not observed. In conclusion, a variety of molecular lesions occur in PMBLs and may be involved in their pathogenesis. This molecular genetic pattern bears little resemblance to that known for other B cell malignancies, including DLCL. In particular, the infrequent occurrence of bcl-6 gene rearrangement in PMBLs distinguishes them from other DLCLs of B cell origin, suggesting that PMBLs do not represent a distinct subtype of DLCL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8669486

  20. Structure of anthrax lethal toxin prepore complex suggests a pathway for efficient cell entry.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Lucien; Santelli, Eugenio; Mountassif, Driss; Donoghue, Annemarie; Biswas, Aviroop; Blunck, Rikard; Hanein, Dorit; Volkmann, Niels; Liddington, Robert; Rouiller, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    Anthrax toxin comprises three soluble proteins: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). PA must be cleaved by host proteases before it oligomerizes and forms a prepore, to which LF and EF bind. After endocytosis of this tripartite complex, the prepore transforms into a narrow transmembrane pore that delivers unfolded LF and EF into the host cytosol. Here, we find that translocation of multiple 90-kD LF molecules is rapid and efficient. To probe the molecular basis of this translocation, we calculated a three-dimensional map of the fully loaded (PA63)7-(LF)3 prepore complex by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). The map shows three LFs bound in a similar way to one another, via their N-terminal domains, to the surface of the PA heptamer. The model also reveals contacts between the N- and C-terminal domains of adjacent LF molecules. We propose that this molecular arrangement plays an important role in the maintenance of translocation efficiency through the narrow PA pore. PMID:27670897

  1. Molecular response of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Matthias; Topuz, Fuat; Tag, Carmen Gabriele; Sauer-Lehnen, Sibille; Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Trautwein, Christian; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Tacke, Frank

    2015-06-01

    There is a high demand for the isolation of primary endothelial cells for biomaterial endotheliazation studies, tissue engineering, and artificial organ development. Further, biomarkers for monitoring the response of endothelial cells in biomaterials science are required. We systematically compared two strategies for isolating liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) from mouse liver. We demonstrate that fluorescence-activated cell sorting results in a considerably higher purity (~97%) compared to magnetic-assisted cell sorting (~80%), but is associated with a lower yield and recovery rate. Cell repellent polyethylene glycol (PEG) substrates affected the morphology of primary LSEC in culture and significantly downregulated the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and upregulated the vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM). This molecular response could partially be reverted by further modification with arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD). Thus, usage of PEGylated materials may reduce, while applying RGD may support endotheliazation of materials, and we could relate LSEC attachment to their expression of ICAM and VCAM mRNA, suggesting their usage as biomarkers for endothelialization.

  2. Whole cell cryo-electron tomography suggests mitochondria divide by budding.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Bin

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotes rely on mitochondrial division to guarantee that each new generation of cells acquires an adequate number of mitochondria. Mitochondrial division has long been thought to occur by binary fission and, more recently, evidence has supported the idea that binary fission is mediated by dynamin-related protein (Drp1) and the endoplasmic reticulum. However, studies to date have depended on fluorescence microscopy and conventional electron microscopy. Here, we utilize whole cell cryo-electron tomography to visualize mitochondrial division in frozen hydrated intact HeLa cells. We observe a large number of relatively small mitochondria protruding from and connected to large mitochondria or mitochondrial networks. Therefore, this study provides evidence that mitochondria divide by budding. PMID:24870811

  3. Acid stress suggests different determinants for polystyrene and HeLa cell adhesion in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Haddaji, N; Khouadja, S; Fdhila, K; Krifi, B; Ben Ismail, M; Lagha, R; Bakir, K; Bakhrouf, A

    2015-07-01

    Adhesion has been regarded as one of the basic features of probiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of acid stress on the functional properties, such as hydrophobicity, adhesion to HeLa cells, and composition of membrane fatty acids, of Lactobacillus probiotics strains. Two strains of Lactobacillus casei were used. Adhesion on polystyrene, hydrophobicity, epithelial cells adhesion, and fatty acids analysis were evaluated. Our results showed that the membrane properties such as hydrophobicity and fatty acid composition of stressed strains were significantly changed with different pH values. However, we found that acid stress caused a change in the proportions of unsaturated and saturated fatty acid. The ratio of saturated fatty acid to unsaturated fatty acids observed in acid-stressed Lactobacillus casei cells was significantly higher than the ration in control cells. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in the adhesion ability of these strains to HeLa cells and to a polystyrene surface at low pH. The present finding could first add new insight about the acid stress adaptation and, thus, enable new strategies to be developed aimed at improving the industrial performance of this species under acid stress. Second, no relationship was observed between changes in membrane composition and fluidity induced by acid treatment and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces. In fact, the decrease of cell surface hydrophobicity and the adhesion ability to abiotic surface and the increase of the capacity of adhesion to biotic surface demonstrate that adhesive characteristics will have little relevance in probiotic strain-screening procedures.

  4. Altered gene expression in dry age-related macular degeneration suggests early loss of choroidal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S. Scott; Braun, Terry A.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Haas, Christine M.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Stone, Edwin M.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in developed countries. The molecular pathogenesis of early events in AMD is poorly understood. We investigated differential gene expression in samples of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid from early AMD and control maculas with exon-based arrays. Methods Gene expression levels in nine human donor eyes with early AMD and nine control human donor eyes were assessed using Affymetrix Human Exon ST 1.0 arrays. Two controls did not pass quality control and were removed. Differentially expressed genes were annotated using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID), and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed on RPE-specific and endothelium-associated gene sets. The complement factor H (CFH) genotype was also assessed, and differential expression was analyzed regarding high AMD risk (YH/HH) and low AMD risk (YY) genotypes. Results Seventy-five genes were identified as differentially expressed (raw p value <0.01; ≥50% fold change, mean log2 expression level in AMD or control ≥ median of all average gene expression values); however, no genes were significant (adj. p value <0.01) after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Of 52 genes with decreased expression in AMD (fold change <0.5; raw p value <0.01), 18 genes were identified by DAVID analysis as associated with vision or neurologic processes. The GSEA of the RPE-associated and endothelium-associated genes revealed a significant decrease in genes typically expressed by endothelial cells in the early AMD group compared to controls, consistent with previous histologic and proteomic studies. Analysis of the CFH genotype indicated decreased expression of ADAMTS9 in eyes with high-risk genotypes (fold change = –2.61; raw p value=0.0008). Conclusions GSEA results suggest that RPE transcripts are preserved or elevated in early AMD, concomitant with loss of endothelial cell marker

  5. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Influenza Neuraminidase Suggest a Mechanism for the Increased Virulence of Stalk-Deletion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Deletions in the stalk of the influenza neuraminidase (NA) surface protein are associated with increased virulence, but the mechanisms responsible for this enhanced virulence are unclear. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of stalk deletion on enzymatic activity, contrasting NA proteins from the A/swine/Shandong/N1/2009 strain both with and without a stalk deletion. By modeling and simulating neuraminidase apo glycoproteins embedded in complex-mixture lipid bilayers, we show that the geometry and dynamics of the neuraminidase enzymatic pocket may differ depending on stalk length, with possible repercussions on the binding of the endogenous sialylated-oligosaccharide receptors. We also use these simulations to predict previously unrecognized druggable “hotspots” on the neuraminidase surface that may prove useful for future efforts aimed at structure-based drug design. PMID:27141956

  6. The Structure of a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) Ruler Protein Suggests a Molecular Mechanism for Needle Length Sensing.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Julien R C; Fernández, Lucia; Wasney, Gregory A; Vuckovic, Marija; Reffuveille, Fany; Hancock, Robert E W; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2016-01-22

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and the bacterial flagellum are related pathogenicity-associated appendages found at the surface of many disease-causing bacteria. These appendages consist of long tubular structures that protrude away from the bacterial surface to interact with the host cell and/or promote motility. A proposed "ruler" protein tightly regulates the length of both the T3SS and the flagellum, but the molecular basis for this length control has remained poorly characterized and controversial. Using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa T3SS as a model system, we report the first structure of a T3SS ruler protein, revealing a "ball-and-chain" architecture, with a globular C-terminal domain (the ball) preceded by a long intrinsically disordered N-terminal polypeptide chain. The dimensions and stability of the globular domain do not support its potential passage through the inner lumen of the T3SS needle. We further demonstrate that a conserved motif at the N terminus of the ruler protein interacts with the T3SS autoprotease in the cytosolic side. Collectively, these data suggest a potential mechanism for needle length sensing by ruler proteins, whereby upon T3SS needle assembly, the ruler protein's N-terminal end is anchored on the cytosolic side, with the globular domain located on the extracellular end of the growing needle. Sequence analysis of T3SS and flagellar ruler proteins shows that this mechanism is probably conserved across systems. PMID:26589798

  7. New Molecular Targets in Mantle Cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Samir; Weniger, Marc A.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a malignancy of mature B cells characterized by aberrant expression of cyclin D1 due to the translocation t(11;14). Epigenomic and genomic lesions in pathways regulating B-cell activation, cell cycle progression, protein homeostasis, DNA damage response, cell proliferation and apoptosis contribute to its pathogenesis. While patients typically respond to first-line chemotherapy, relapse is the rule resulting in a median survival of 5–7 years. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR appears as a key pathway in the pathogenesis and can be targeted with small molecules. Most experience is with mTOR inhibitors of the rapamycin class. Second-generation mTOR inhibitors and the PI3K inhibitor CAL-101 are novel options to more effectively target this pathway. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibition by PCI-32765 has promising activity and indicates immunoreceptor signaling as a novel therapeutic target. Up to 50% of relapsed patients respond to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib suggesting that MCL may be particularly sensitive to disruption of protein homeostasis and/or induction of oxidative stress. Recent work has focused on elucidating the mechanism of bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and the development of second-generation proteasome inhibitors. DNA hypomethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors effect epigenetic de-repression of aberrantly silenced genes. These epigenetic pharmaceuticals and HSP90 inhibitors can synergize with proteasome inhibitors. Finally, BH3 mimetics are emerging as tools to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy. Participation in clinical trials offers patients a chance to benefit from these advances and is essential to maintain the momentum of progress. Innovative trial designs may be needed to expedite the clinical development of these targeted agents. PMID:21945517

  8. Molecular Targeted Approaches in Mantle Cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Weniger, Marc A.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a malignancy of mature B cells characterized by the translocation t(11;14) that leads to aberrant expression of cyclin D1. Response to first-line chemotherapy is good but most patients relapse resulting in a median survival of 5-7 years. The important PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can be targeted with small molecules. mTOR inhibitors have clinical activity and temsirolimus has been approved in Europe. Second generation mTOR inhibitors and the PI3K inhibitor CAL-101 offer additional means to target the pathway. Promising results with the BTK inhibitor PCI-32765 suggest that B-cell receptor signaling could play a role. For unknown reasons, MCL appears to be particularly sensitive to disruption of protein homeostasis. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib achieves responses in up to 50% of relapsed patients. Much work has been done in elucidating the mechanism of its cytotoxicity, its incorporation into combination therapies, and the development of second generation proteasome inhibitors. Deacetylase and HSP90 inhibitors are also promising classes of drugs that can synergize with proteasome inhibitors. Finally, BH3 mimetics are emerging as tools to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy. Participation in clinical trials offers patients an immediate chance to benefit from these advances and is essential to maintain the momentum of progress. PMID:21782064

  9. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae proteins into infected cells suggests an active role of microsporidia in the control of host programs and metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Senderskiy, Igor V; Timofeev, Sergey A; Seliverstova, Elena V; Pavlova, Olga A; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs. PMID:24705470

  10. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae Proteins into Infected Cells Suggests an Active Role of Microsporidia in the Control of Host Programs and Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Senderskiy, Igor V.; Timofeev, Sergey A.; Seliverstova, Elena V.; Pavlova, Olga A.; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs. PMID:24705470

  11. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  12. Molecular signatures in response to Isoliquiritigenin in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Nam, Hye-Young; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified the inhibitory effect of ISL on cell proliferation of LCLs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ISL-induced genes and miRNAs through microarray approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs associated with ISL effect. -- Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of various cancer cells. However, genetic factors regulating ISL effects remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular signatures involved in ISL-induced cell death of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) using microarray analyses. For gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) microarray experiments, each of 12 LCL strains was independently treated with ISL or DMSO as a vehicle control for a day prior to total RNA extraction. ISL treatment inhibited cell proliferation of LCLs in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis showed that ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway, having a potential as regulators in LCL survival and sensitivity to ISL-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, 36 miRNAs including five miRNAs with unknown functions were differentially expressed in ISL-treated LCLs. The integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs. Among them, miR-1207-5p and miR-575 were negatively correlated with p53 pathway- and cell cycle-associated genes, respectively. In conclusion, our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in ISL-induced cytotoxicity in LCLs by targeting signaling pathways including p53 pathway and cell cycle.

  13. Molecular dissection of AKT activation in lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Du, Jinyan; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    AKT is a critical signaling node downstream of PI3K, which is often activated in cancer. We analyzed the state of activation of AKT in 80 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines under serum starvation conditions. We identified 13 lines which showed persistent AKT activation in the absence of serum. In 12 of the 13 lines, AKT activation could be attributed to loss of PTEN, activating mutation in EGFR or PIK3CA, or amplification of ERBB2. HCC2429 was the only cell line that had no alterations in those genes, but had high phospho-AKT(Ser473) levels under serum starvation conditions. However, the activation of AKT in HCC2429 was PI3K- and mTORC2-dependent based upon use of specific inhibitors. Kinome tyrosine phosphorylation profiling showed that both Notch and SRC were highly activated in this cell line. Despite the activation of Notch, AKT activation and cell survival were not affected by Notch inhibitors DAPT or Compound E. In contrast, SRC inhibitors PP2 and dasatinib both significantly decreased pAKT(Ser473) levels and reduced cell survival by inducing apoptosis. Further, a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibition synergistically blocked activation of AKT and induced apoptosis. Over-expression of SRC has been identified previously in human lung cancers, and these results suggest that a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibitors may have unique therapeutic benefit for a subset of lung cancers with these molecular features. PMID:23319332

  14. Difficulty distinguishing benign notochordal cell tumor from chordoma further suggests a link between them

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Much discussion about benign notochordal cell tissue in vertebrae has centered on the nature of its relationship, if any, to chordoma. Often referred to as benign notochordal cell tumors (BNCTs), these lesions have unique morphological features, however, differentiating between notochordal cells in discs, BNCT, and chordoma can be difficult. They are described as radiologically distinct from chordoma, with lysis, contrast enhancement, and a soft tissue mass indicating chordoma. Methods All chordomas diagnosed at our institution, the Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli (Bologna, Italy), prior to 2008 were reviewed, yielding 174 cases. Five were limited to bone; one was a recurrent chordoma without original data available. The remaining four were re-evaluated in detail. Results There were three women and one man, aged 33–57 years (mean, 48 years). Two were BNCTs and two were mixed lesions containing BNCT and chordoma. On computed tomography, all were radiopaque with areas of lysis. One BNCT was heterogeneous on magnetic resonance imaging, enhancing after contrast. Microscopically, one BNCT had a well-defined cystic area with a sclerotic border. The other had a minute atypical area; it recurred as chordoma. The mixed lesions had areas of definitive BNCT, definitive chordoma, and atypical areas that did not meet the criteria for either. The atypical areas in all three cases ‘blended’ with areas of chordoma or BNCT. Conclusion These cases illustrate the ongoing challenges in differentiating between BNCT and chordoma. All had unique imaging features; three had atypical microscopic areas blending with BNCT or chordoma, strengthening the argument for a relationship between the two entities and supporting the idea that some BNCTs may progress to chordoma. Our study dispels the notion that any single radiologic criterion used to distinguish between chordoma and BNCT is reliable, opening the discussion as to whether or how to monitor BNCTs. PMID:25609192

  15. In vitro analysis suggests that difference in cell movement during direct interaction can generate various pigment patterns in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kondo, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Pigment patterns of organisms have invoked strong interest from not only biologists but also, scientists in many other fields. Zebrafish is a useful model animal for studying the mechanism of pigment pattern formation. The zebrafish stripe pattern is primarily two types of pigment cells: melanophores and xanthophores. Previous studies have reported that interactions among these pigment cells are important for pattern formation. In the recent report, we found that the direct contact by xanthophores induces the membrane depolarization of melanophores. From analysis of jaguar mutants, it is suggested that the depolarization affects the movements of melanophores. To analyze the cell movement in detail, we established a unique in vitro system. It allowed us to find that WT xanthophores induced repulsive movement of melanophores through direct contact. The xanthophores also chased the melanophores. As a result, they showed run-and-chase movements. We also analyzed the cell movement of pigment cells from jaguar and leopard mutants, which have fuzzy stripes and spot patterns, respectively. jaguar cells showed inhibited run-and-chase movements, and leopard melanophores scarcely showed repulsive response. Furthermore, we paired mutant and WT cells and showed which of the melanophores and xanthophores have responsibility for the altered cell movements. These results suggested that there is a correspondence relationship between the cell movements and pigment patterns. The correspondence relationship highlighted the importance of the cell movements in the pattern formation and showed that our system is a quite useful system for future study in this field.

  16. A Diagnostic Assessment for Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jia; Wood, William B.; Martin, Jennifer M.; Guild, Nancy A.; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed…

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that RNA three-way junctions can act as flexible RNA structural elements in the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Beššeová, Ivana; Réblová, Kamila; Leontis, Neocles B.; Šponer, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    We present extensive explicit solvent molecular dynamics analysis of three RNA three-way junctions (3WJs) from the large ribosomal subunit: the 3WJ formed by Helices 90–92 (H90–H92) of 23S rRNA; the 3WJ formed by H42–H44 organizing the GTPase associated center (GAC) of 23S rRNA; and the 3WJ of 5S rRNA. H92 near the peptidyl transferase center binds the 3′-CCA end of amino-acylated tRNA. The GAC binds protein factors and stimulates GTP hydrolysis driving protein synthesis. The 5S rRNA binds the central protuberance and A-site finger (ASF) involved in bridges with the 30S subunit. The simulations reveal that all three 3WJs possess significant anisotropic hinge-like flexibility between their stacked stems and dynamics within the compact regions of their adjacent stems. The A-site 3WJ dynamics may facilitate accommodation of tRNA, while the 5S 3WJ flexibility appears to be essential for coordinated movements of ASF and 5S rRNA. The GAC 3WJ may support large-scale dynamics of the L7/L12-stalk region. The simulations reveal that H42–H44 rRNA segments are not fully relaxed and in the X-ray structures they are bent towards the large subunit. The bending may be related to L10 binding and is distributed between the 3WJ and the H42–H97 contact. PMID:20507916

  18. Physiological and molecular responses to heavy metal stresses suggest different detoxification mechanism of Populus deltoides and P. x canadensis.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Dániel; Horváth, Edit; Németh, Edit; Leviczky, Tünde; Takács, Kinga; Lehotai, Nóra; Feigl, Gábor; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Ördög, Attila; Gallé, Róbert; Csiszár, Jolán; Szabados, László; Erdei, László; Gallé, Ágnes

    2016-08-20

    Plants have divergent defense mechanisms against the harmful effects of heavy metals present in excess in soils and groundwaters. Poplars (Populus spp.) are widely cultivated because of their rapid growth and high biomass production, and members of the genus are increasingly used as experimental model organisms of trees and for phytoremediation purposes. Our aim was to investigate the copper and zinc stress responses of three outstanding biomass producer bred poplar lines to identify such transcripts of genes involved in the detoxification mechanisms, which can play an important role in the protection against heavy metals. Poplar cuttings were grown hydroponically and subjected to short-term (one week) mild and sublethal copper and zinc stresses. We evaluated the effects of the applied heavy metals and the responses of plants by detecting the changes of multiple physiological and biochemical parameters. The most severe cellular oxidative damage was caused by 30μM copper treatment, while zinc was less harmful. Analysis of stress-related transcripts revealed genotype-specific differences that are likely related to alterations in heavy metal tolerance. P. deltoides clones B-229 and PE 19/66 clones were clearly more effective at inducing the expression of various genes implicated in the detoxification process, such as the glutathione transferases, metallothioneins, ABC transporters, (namely PtGSTU51, PxMT1, PdABCC2,3), while the P. canadensis line M-1 accumulated more metal, resulting in greater cellular oxidative damage. Our results show that all three poplar clones are efficient in stress acclimatization, but with different molecular bases. PMID:27448721

  19. Comparative modeling and molecular dynamics suggest high carboxylase activity of the Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 RbcL protein.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; de Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez, João Lídio; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-03-01

    Rubisco catalyzes the first step reaction in the carbon fixation pathway, bonding atmospheric CO2/O2 to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate; it is therefore considered one of the most important enzymes in the biosphere. Genetic modifications to increase the carboxylase activity of rubisco are a subject of great interest to agronomy and biotechnology, since this could increase the productivity of biomass in plants, algae and cyanobacteria and give better yields in crops and biofuel production. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize in silico the catalytic domain of the rubisco large subunit (rbcL gene) of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14, and identify target sites to improve enzyme affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. A three-dimensional model was built using MODELLER 9.14, molecular dynamics was used to generate a 100 ns trajectory by AMBER12, and the binding free energy was calculated using MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA and SIE methods with alanine scanning. The model obtained showed characteristics of form-I rubisco, with 15 beta sheets and 19 alpha helices, and maintained the highly conserved catalytic site encompassing residues Lys175, Lys177, Lys201, Asp203, and Glu204. The binding free energy of the enzyme-substrate complexation of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 showed values around -10 kcal mol(-1) using the SIE method. The most important residues for the interaction with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were Arg295 followed by Lys334. The generated model was successfully validated, remaining stable during the whole simulation, and demonstrated characteristics of enzymes with high carboxylase activity. The binding analysis revealed candidates for directed mutagenesis sites to improve rubisco's affinity.

  20. BROADBAND TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ 1214b SUGGESTS A LOW MEAN MOLECULAR WEIGHT ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Croll, Bryce; Jayawardhana, Ray; Albert, Loic; Kempton, Eliza Miller-Ricci; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Murray, Norman; Neilson, Hilding

    2011-08-01

    We use the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to observe four transits of the super-Earth planet GJ 1214b in the near-infrared. For each transit, we observe GJ 1214 in two bands nearly simultaneously by rapidly switching the WIRCam filter wheel back and forth for the duration of the observations. By combining all our J-band ({approx}1.25 {mu}m) observations we find a transit depth, analogous to the planet-to-star radius ratio squared, in this band of (R{sub PJ} /R{sub *}){sup 2} = (1.338 {+-} 0.013)%-a value consistent with the optical transit depth reported by Charbonneau and collaborators. However, our best-fit combined K{sub s}-band ({approx}2.15 {mu}m) transit depth is deeper: (R{sub PKs} /R{sub *}){sup 2} = (1.438 {+-} 0.019)%. Formally, our K{sub s}-band transits are deeper than the J-band transits observed simultaneously by a factor of (R{sub PKs} /R{sub PJ}){sup 2} = 1.072 {+-} 0.018-a 4{sigma} discrepancy. The most straightforward explanation for our deeper K{sub s}-band transit depth is a spectral absorption feature from the limb of the atmosphere of the planet; for the spectral absorption feature to be this prominent, the atmosphere of GJ 1214b must have a large-scale height and a low mean molecular weight. That is, its atmosphere would have to be hydrogen/helium dominated and this planet would be better described as a mini-Neptune. However, recently published observations from 0.78 to 1.0 {mu}m, by Bean and collaborators, show a lack of spectral features and transit depths consistent with those obtained by Charbonneau and collaborators. The most likely atmospheric composition for GJ 1214b that arises from combining all these observations is less clear; if the atmosphere of GJ 1214b is hydrogen/helium dominated, then it must have either a haze layer that is obscuring transit-depth differences at shorter wavelengths or significantly different spectral features from what current models predict. Our observations

  1. Propranolol treatment of infantile hemangioma endothelial cells: A molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Jessica; Amaya, Clarissa; Pham, Robert; Rowntree, Rebecca K; Lacaze, Mary; Mulne, Arlynn; Bischoff, Joyce; Kokta, Victor; Boucheron, Laura E; Mitchell, Dianne C; Bryan, Brad A

    2012-10-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are non-malignant, largely cutaneous vascular tumors affecting approximately 5-10% of children to varying degrees. During the first year of life, these tumors are strongly proliferative, reaching an average size ranging from 2 to 20 cm. These lesions subsequently stabilize, undergo a spontaneous slow involution and are fully regressed by 5 to 10 years of age. Systemic treatment of infants with the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, propranolol, has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in reducing the size and appearance of IHs. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of β blocker treatment in IHs. Our data reveal that propranolol treatment of IH endothelial cells, as well as a panel of normal primary endothelial cells, blocks endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and formation of the actin cytoskeleton coincident with alterations in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), p38 and cofilin signaling. Moreover, propranolol induces major alterations in the protein levels of key cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, and modulates global gene expression patterns with a particular affect on genes involved in lipid/sterol metabolism, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis and ubiquitination. Interestingly, the effects of propranolol were endothelial cell-type independent, affecting the properties of IH endothelial cells at similar levels to that observed in neonatal dermal microvascular and coronary artery endothelial cells. This data suggests that while propranolol markedly inhibits hemangioma and normal endothelial cell function, its lack of endothelial cell specificity hints that the efficacy of this drug in the treatment of IHs may be more complex than simply blockage of endothelial function as previously believed.

  2. Hsp10 nuclear localization and changes in lung cells response to cigarette smoke suggest novel roles for this chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Corrao, Simona; Anzalone, Rita; Lo Iacono, Melania; Corsello, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Antonino; D'Anna, Silvestro Ennio; Balbi, Bruno; Carone, Mauro; Sala, Anna; Corona, Davide; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Farina, Felicia; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J. L.; Cappello, Francesco; La Rocca, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Heat-shock protein (Hsp)10 is the co-chaperone for Hsp60 inside mitochondria, but it also resides outside the organelle. Variations in its levels and intracellular distribution have been documented in pathological conditions, e.g. cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Here, we show that Hsp10 in COPD undergoes changes at the molecular and subcellular levels in bronchial cells from human specimens and derived cell lines, intact or subjected to stress induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Noteworthy findings are: (i) Hsp10 occurred in nuclei of epithelial and lamina propria cells of bronchial mucosa from non-smokers and smokers; (ii) human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) and lung fibroblast (HFL-1) cells, in vitro, showed Hsp10 in the nucleus, before and after CSE exposure; (iii) CSE stimulation did not increase the levels of Hsp10 but did elicit qualitative changes as indicated by molecular weight and isoelectric point shifts; and (iv) Hsp10 nuclear levels increased after CSE stimulation in HFL-1, indicating cytosol to nucleus migration, and although Hsp10 did not bind DNA, it bound a DNA-associated protein. PMID:25355063

  3. HLA class I molecular variation and peptide-binding properties suggest a model of joint divergent asymmetric selection.

    PubMed

    Buhler, Stéphane; Nunes, José Manuel; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    The main function of HLA class I molecules is to present pathogen-derived peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This function is assumed to drive the maintenance of an extraordinary amount of polymorphism at each HLA locus, providing an immune advantage to heterozygote individuals capable to present larger repertories of peptides than homozygotes. This seems contradictory, however, with a reduced diversity at individual HLA loci exhibited by some isolated populations. This study shows that the level of functional diversity predicted for the two HLA-A and HLA-B genes considered simultaneously is similar (almost invariant) between 46 human populations, even when a reduced diversity exists at each locus. We thus propose that HLA-A and HLA-B evolved through a model of joint divergent asymmetric selection conferring all populations an equivalent immune potential. The distinct pattern observed for HLA-C is explained by its functional evolution towards killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) activity regulation rather than peptide presentation. PMID:27233953

  4. Molecular Diversity of Anthracnose Pathogen Populations Associated with UK Strawberry Production Suggests Multiple Introductions of Three Different Colletotrichum Species.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Zapparata, Antonio; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Sukno, Serenella A; Lane, Charles R; Thon, Michael R; Vannacci, Giovanni; Holub, Eric; Sreenivasaprasad, Surapareddy

    2015-01-01

    Fragaria × ananassa (common name: strawberry) is a globally cultivated hybrid species belonging to Rosaceae family. Colletotrichum acutatum sensu lato (s.l.) is considered to be the second most economically important pathogen worldwide affecting strawberries. A collection of 148 Colletotrichum spp. isolates including 67 C. acutatum s.l. isolates associated with the phytosanitary history of UK strawberry production were used to characterize multi-locus genetic variation of this pathogen in the UK, relative to additional reference isolates that represent a worldwide sampling of the diversity of the fungus. The evidence indicates that three different species C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae are associated with strawberry production in the UK, which correspond to previously designated genetic groups A2, A4 and A3, respectively. Among these species, 12 distinct haplotypes were identified suggesting multiple introductions into the country. A subset of isolates was also used to compare aggressiveness in causing disease on strawberry plants and fruits. Isolates belonging to C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae representative of the UK anthracnose pathogen populations showed variation in their aggressiveness. Among the three species, C. nymphaeae and C. fioriniae appeared to be more aggressive compared to C. godetiae. This study highlights the genetic and pathogenic heterogeneity of the C. acutatum s.l. populations introduced into the UK linked to strawberry production. PMID:26086351

  5. Molecular Diversity of Anthracnose Pathogen Populations Associated with UK Strawberry Production Suggests Multiple Introductions of Three Different Colletotrichum Species

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Zapparata, Antonio; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Sukno, Serenella A.; Lane, Charles R.; Thon, Michael R.; Vannacci, Giovanni; Holub, Eric; Sreenivasaprasad, Surapareddy

    2015-01-01

    Fragaria × ananassa (common name: strawberry) is a globally cultivated hybrid species belonging to Rosaceae family. Colletotrichum acutatum sensu lato (s.l.) is considered to be the second most economically important pathogen worldwide affecting strawberries. A collection of 148 Colletotrichum spp. isolates including 67 C. acutatum s.l. isolates associated with the phytosanitary history of UK strawberry production were used to characterize multi-locus genetic variation of this pathogen in the UK, relative to additional reference isolates that represent a worldwide sampling of the diversity of the fungus. The evidence indicates that three different species C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae are associated with strawberry production in the UK, which correspond to previously designated genetic groups A2, A4 and A3, respectively. Among these species, 12 distinct haplotypes were identified suggesting multiple introductions into the country. A subset of isolates was also used to compare aggressiveness in causing disease on strawberry plants and fruits. Isolates belonging to C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae representative of the UK anthracnose pathogen populations showed variation in their aggressiveness. Among the three species, C. nymphaeae and C. fioriniae appeared to be more aggressive compared to C. godetiae. This study highlights the genetic and pathogenic heterogeneity of the C. acutatum s.l. populations introduced into the UK linked to strawberry production. PMID:26086351

  6. Conformational Changes in the GM-CSF Receptor Suggest a Molecular Mechanism for Affinity Conversion and Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Dhagat, Urmi; Taing, Houng; Gorman, Michael A; King-Scott, Jack; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    The GM-CSF, IL-3, and IL-5 receptors constitute the βc family, playing important roles in inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Typical of heterodimeric type I cytokine receptors, signaling requires recruitment of the shared subunit to the initial cytokine:α subunit binary complex through an affinity conversion mechanism. This critical process is poorly understood due to the paucity of crystal structures of both binary and ternary receptor complexes for the same cytokine. We have now solved the structure of the binary GM-CSF:GMRα complex at 2.8-Å resolution and compared it with the structure of the ternary complex, revealing distinct conformational changes. Guided by these differences we performed mutational and functional studies that, importantly, show GMRα interactions playing a major role in receptor signaling while βc interactions control high-affinity binding. These results support the notion that conformational changes underlie the mechanism of GM-CSF receptor activation and also suggest how related type I cytokine receptors signal. PMID:27396825

  7. Molecular Diversity of Anthracnose Pathogen Populations Associated with UK Strawberry Production Suggests Multiple Introductions of Three Different Colletotrichum Species.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Zapparata, Antonio; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Sukno, Serenella A; Lane, Charles R; Thon, Michael R; Vannacci, Giovanni; Holub, Eric; Sreenivasaprasad, Surapareddy

    2015-01-01

    Fragaria × ananassa (common name: strawberry) is a globally cultivated hybrid species belonging to Rosaceae family. Colletotrichum acutatum sensu lato (s.l.) is considered to be the second most economically important pathogen worldwide affecting strawberries. A collection of 148 Colletotrichum spp. isolates including 67 C. acutatum s.l. isolates associated with the phytosanitary history of UK strawberry production were used to characterize multi-locus genetic variation of this pathogen in the UK, relative to additional reference isolates that represent a worldwide sampling of the diversity of the fungus. The evidence indicates that three different species C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae are associated with strawberry production in the UK, which correspond to previously designated genetic groups A2, A4 and A3, respectively. Among these species, 12 distinct haplotypes were identified suggesting multiple introductions into the country. A subset of isolates was also used to compare aggressiveness in causing disease on strawberry plants and fruits. Isolates belonging to C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae representative of the UK anthracnose pathogen populations showed variation in their aggressiveness. Among the three species, C. nymphaeae and C. fioriniae appeared to be more aggressive compared to C. godetiae. This study highlights the genetic and pathogenic heterogeneity of the C. acutatum s.l. populations introduced into the UK linked to strawberry production.

  8. Molecular inferences suggest multiple host shifts of rabies viruses from bats to mesocarnivores in Arizona during 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Ivan V; Shi, Mang; Orciari, Lillian A; Yager, Pamela A; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Kuzmina, Natalia A; Streicker, Daniel G; Bergman, David L; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In nature, rabies virus (RABV; genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae) represents an assemblage of phylogenetic lineages, associated with specific mammalian host species. Although it is generally accepted that RABV evolved originally in bats and further shifted to carnivores, mechanisms of such host shifts are poorly understood, and examples are rarely present in surveillance data. Outbreaks in carnivores caused by a RABV variant, associated with big brown bats, occurred repeatedly during 2001-2009 in the Flagstaff area of Arizona. After each outbreak, extensive control campaigns were undertaken, with no reports of further rabies cases in carnivores for the next several years. However, questions remained whether all outbreaks were caused by a single introduction and further perpetuation of bat RABV in carnivore populations, or each outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of a bat virus. Another question of concern was related to adaptive changes in the RABV genome associated with host shifts. To address these questions, we sequenced and analyzed 66 complete and 20 nearly complete RABV genomes, including those from the Flagstaff area and other similar outbreaks in carnivores, caused by bat RABVs, and representatives of the major RABV lineages circulating in North America and worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that each Flagstaff outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of bat RABV into populations of carnivores. Positive selection analysis confirmed the absence of post-shift changes in RABV genes. In contrast, convergent evolution analysis demonstrated several amino acids in the N, P, G and L proteins, which might be significant for pre-adaptation of bat viruses to cause effective infection in carnivores. The substitution S/T₂₄₂ in the viral glycoprotein is of particular merit, as a similar substitution was suggested for pathogenicity of Nishigahara RABV strain. Roles of the amino acid changes, detected in our study, require

  9. Molecular Inferences Suggest Multiple Host Shifts of Rabies Viruses from Bats to Mesocarnivores in Arizona during 2001–2009

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Shi, Mang; Orciari, Lillian A.; Yager, Pamela A.; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Kuzmina, Natalia A.; Streicker, Daniel G.; Bergman, David L.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, rabies virus (RABV; genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae) represents an assemblage of phylogenetic lineages, associated with specific mammalian host species. Although it is generally accepted that RABV evolved originally in bats and further shifted to carnivores, mechanisms of such host shifts are poorly understood, and examples are rarely present in surveillance data. Outbreaks in carnivores caused by a RABV variant, associated with big brown bats, occurred repeatedly during 2001–2009 in the Flagstaff area of Arizona. After each outbreak, extensive control campaigns were undertaken, with no reports of further rabies cases in carnivores for the next several years. However, questions remained whether all outbreaks were caused by a single introduction and further perpetuation of bat RABV in carnivore populations, or each outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of a bat virus. Another question of concern was related to adaptive changes in the RABV genome associated with host shifts. To address these questions, we sequenced and analyzed 66 complete and 20 nearly complete RABV genomes, including those from the Flagstaff area and other similar outbreaks in carnivores, caused by bat RABVs, and representatives of the major RABV lineages circulating in North America and worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that each Flagstaff outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of bat RABV into populations of carnivores. Positive selection analysis confirmed the absence of post-shift changes in RABV genes. In contrast, convergent evolution analysis demonstrated several amino acids in the N, P, G and L proteins, which might be significant for pre-adaptation of bat viruses to cause effective infection in carnivores. The substitution S/T242 in the viral glycoprotein is of particular merit, as a similar substitution was suggested for pathogenicity of Nishigahara RABV strain. Roles of the amino acid changes, detected in our study, require

  10. A molecular beacon defines bacterial cell asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Melanie L; Brun, Yves V

    2006-03-10

    Many cells divide asymmetrically by generating two different cell ends or poles prior to cell division, but the mechanisms by which cells distinguish one pole from the other is poorly understood. In this issue of Cell, Huitema et al. (2006) and Lam et al. (2006) describe a protein that defines one specific pole of a bacterial cell by localizing to the site of cell division to be inherited by both progeny at the resulting new poles.

  11. Quantum dot imaging platform for single-cell molecular profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-03-01

    Study of normal cell physiology and disease pathogenesis heavily relies on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. To achieve this goal, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of microenvironment is required. Here we report the development of a multicolour multicycle in situ imaging technology capable of creating detailed quantitative molecular profiles for individual cells at the resolution of optical imaging. A library of stoichiometric fluorescent probes is prepared by linking target-specific antibodies to a universal quantum dot-based platform via protein A in a quick and simple procedure. Surprisingly, despite the potential for multivalent binding between protein A and antibody and the intermediate affinity of this non-covalent bond, fully assembled probes do not aggregate or exchange antibodies, facilitating highly multiplexed parallel staining. This single-cell molecular profiling technology is expected to open new opportunities in systems biology, gene expression studies, signalling pathway analysis and molecular diagnostics.

  12. Disc cell senescence in intervertebral disc degeneration: Causes and molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chencheng; Liu, Huan; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accumulation of senescent disc cells in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) suggests the detrimental roles of cell senescence in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Disc cell senescence decreased the number of functional cells in IVD. Moreover, the senescent disc cells were supposed to accelerate the process of IDD via their aberrant paracrine effects by which senescent cells cause the senescence of neighboring cells and enhance the matrix catabolism and inflammation in IVD. Thus, anti-senescence has been proposed as a novel therapeutic target for IDD. However, the development of anti-senescence therapy is based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence. In this review, we focused on the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence, including the causes and various molecular pathways. We found that, during the process of IDD, age-related damages together with degenerative external stimuli activated both p53-p21-Rb and p16-Rb pathways to induce disc cell senescence. Meanwhile, disc cell senescence was regulated by multiple signaling pathways, suggesting the complex regulating network of disc cell senescence. To understand the mechanism of disc cell senescence better contributes to developing the anti-senescence-based therapies for IDD. PMID:27192096

  13. The pattern of xylan acetylation suggests xylan may interact with cellulose microfibrils as a twofold helical screw in the secondary plant cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Gomes, Thiago C F; Tryfona, Theodora; Nikolovski, Nino; Stott, Katherine; Grantham, Nicholas J; Bolam, David N; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between xylan and cellulose microfibrils is important for secondary cell wall properties in vascular plants; however, the molecular arrangement of xylan in the cell wall and the nature of the molecular bonding between the polysaccharides are unknown. In dicots, the xylan backbone of β-(1,4)-linked xylosyl residues is decorated by occasional glucuronic acid, and approximately one-half of the xylosyl residues are O-acetylated at C-2 or C-3. We recently proposed that the even, periodic spacing of GlcA residues in the major domain of dicot xylan might allow the xylan backbone to fold as a twofold helical screw to facilitate alignment along, and stable interaction with, cellulose fibrils; however, such an interaction might be adversely impacted by random acetylation of the xylan backbone. Here, we investigated the arrangement of acetyl residues in Arabidopsis xylan using mass spectrometry and NMR. Alternate xylosyl residues along the backbone are acetylated. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we found that a twofold helical screw conformation of xylan is stable in interactions with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose faces. Tight docking of xylan on the hydrophilic faces is feasible only for xylan decorated on alternate residues and folded as a twofold helical screw. The findings suggest an explanation for the importance of acetylation for xylan–cellulose interactions, and also have implications for our understanding of cell wall molecular architecture and properties, and biological degradation by pathogens and fungi. They will also impact strategies to improve lignocellulose processing for biorefining and bioenergy. PMID:24889696

  14. Molecular imaging of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with stem cells holds tremendous therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Over the last decade, molecular imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted cells and assessing the therapeutic efficacy. This current review summarizes the role and capabilities of different molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging, nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. We discuss current challenges and perspectives of these techniques and encompass updated information such as theranostic imaging and optogenetics in stem cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Posterior elongation in the annelid Platynereis dumerilii involves stem cells molecularly related to primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Gazave, Eve; Béhague, Julien; Laplane, Lucie; Guillou, Aurélien; Préau, Laetitia; Demilly, Adrien; Balavoine, Guillaume; Vervoort, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Like most bilaterian animals, the annelid Platynereis dumerilii generates the majority of its body axis in an anterior to posterior temporal progression with new segments added sequentially. This process relies on a posterior subterminal proliferative body region, known as the "segment addition zone" (SAZ). We explored some of the molecular and cellular aspects of posterior elongation in Platynereis, in particular to test the hypothesis that the SAZ contains a specific set of stem cells dedicated to posterior elongation. We cloned and characterized the developmental expression patterns of orthologs of 17 genes known to be involved in the formation, behavior, or maintenance of stem cells in other metazoan models. These genes encode RNA-binding proteins (e.g., tudor, musashi, pumilio) or transcription factors (e.g., myc, id, runx) widely conserved in eumetazoans. Most of these genes are expressed both in the migrating primordial germ cells and in overlapping ring-like patterns in the SAZ, similar to some previously analyzed genes (piwi, vasa). The SAZ patterns are coincident with the expression of proliferation markers cyclin B and PCNA. EdU pulse and chase experiments suggest that new segments are produced through many rounds of divisions from small populations of teloblast-like posterior stem cells. The shared molecular signature between primordial germ cells and posterior stem cells in Platynereis thus corresponds to an ancestral "stemness" program. PMID:23891818

  16. Molecular imaging of cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based cancer immunotherapy represents a new and powerful weapon in the arsenal of anticancer treatments. Non-invasive monitoring of the disposition, migration and destination of therapeutic cells will facilitate the development of cell based therapy. The therapeutic cells can be modified intrinsically by a reporter gene or labeled extrinsically by introducing imaging probes into the cells or on the cell surface before transplant. Various advanced non-invasive molecular imaging techniques are playing important roles in optimizing cellular therapy by tracking cells and monitoring the therapeutic effects of transplanted cells in vivo. This review will summarize the application of multiple molecular imaging modalities in cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21308113

  17. Human molecular cytogenetics: From cells to nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Mariluce

    2014-03-01

    The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  18. Molecular genetics of calcium sensing in bone cells.

    PubMed

    Purroy, Jesús; Spurr, Nigel K

    2002-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating bone remodelling are only partially understood. One of the controversial issues discussed during the past few years is the role that calcium signalling plays in this process and, in particular, in the functioning of the osteoclast. Calcium is involved in the recruitment and activation of osteoclasts and their subsequent detachment from bone. Parathyroid hormone and vitamin D are part of a systemic mechanism regulating calcium availability, storage and disposal. But there are conflicting results suggesting the presence of a local calcium-sensing mechanism in osteoclasts, in osteoblasts or in both. If this system could be characterized, it would be of therapeutic relevance for diseases such as postmenopausal osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Genetic data, animal models and cell-based assays have not yet been used to their full extent in this area. Here we review the available data and outline possible future strategies. PMID:12351573

  19. Nano-guided cell networks as conveyors of molecular communication

    PubMed Central

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Barber, Nathan B.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided unprecedented physical means to sample molecular space. Living cells provide additional capability in that they identify molecules within complex environments and actuate function. We have merged cells with nanotechnology for an integrated molecular processing network. Here we show that an engineered cell consortium autonomously generates feedback to chemical cues. Moreover, abiotic components are readily assembled onto cells, enabling amplified and ‘binned' responses. Specifically, engineered cell populations are triggered by a quorum sensing (QS) signal molecule, autoinducer-2, to express surface-displayed fusions consisting of a fluorescent marker and an affinity peptide. The latter provides means for attaching magnetic nanoparticles to fluorescently activated subpopulations for coalescence into colour-indexed output. The resultant nano-guided cell network assesses QS activity and conveys molecular information as a ‘bio-litmus' in a manner read by simple optical means. PMID:26455828

  20. Nano-guided cell networks as conveyors of molecular communication.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Jessica L; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Barber, Nathan B; Servinsky, Matthew D; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided unprecedented physical means to sample molecular space. Living cells provide additional capability in that they identify molecules within complex environments and actuate function. We have merged cells with nanotechnology for an integrated molecular processing network. Here we show that an engineered cell consortium autonomously generates feedback to chemical cues. Moreover, abiotic components are readily assembled onto cells, enabling amplified and 'binned' responses. Specifically, engineered cell populations are triggered by a quorum sensing (QS) signal molecule, autoinducer-2, to express surface-displayed fusions consisting of a fluorescent marker and an affinity peptide. The latter provides means for attaching magnetic nanoparticles to fluorescently activated subpopulations for coalescence into colour-indexed output. The resultant nano-guided cell network assesses QS activity and conveys molecular information as a 'bio-litmus' in a manner read by simple optical means.

  1. Autonomous molecular cascades for evaluation of cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P., Jr.; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2013-08-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs. Previously studied nucleic acid-based automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata) and finite-state automata for the analysis of nucleic acids, with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement cascades directed by antibodies that can analyse cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a molecular automaton that successfully completes its analysis is the presence of a unique molecular tag on the cell surface of a specific subpopulation of lymphocytes within human blood cells.

  2. The molecular biology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Frick, Mareike; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most common type of malignant lymphoma. In the last few years, significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this entity. Gene expression profiling has identified three molecular DLBCL subtypes, termed germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the biology of these DLBCL subtypes with a special emphasis on novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23556103

  3. Comprehensive molecular characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (for example, VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (for example, PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumours using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI(3)K/AKT pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving downregulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 (also known as MIR21) and GRB10. Remodelling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumour stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment.

  4. COMPREHENSIVE MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF CLEAR CELL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (e.g. VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (e.g. PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumors using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI3K/Akt pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving down-regulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, up-regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 and GRB10. Remodeling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumor stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment. PMID:23792563

  5. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  6. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the “molecular clutch” description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of Major Sperm Protein (MSP), which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. PMID:25383039

  7. The structure of FtsZ filaments in vivo suggests a force-generating role in cell division

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Trimble, Michael J; Brun, Yves V; Jensen, Grant J

    2007-01-01

    In prokaryotes, FtsZ (the filamentous temperature sensitive protein Z) is a nearly ubiquitous GTPase that localizes in a ring at the leading edge of constricting plasma membranes during cell division. Here we report electron cryotomographic reconstructions of dividing Caulobacter crescentus cells wherein individual arc-like filaments were resolved just underneath the inner membrane at constriction sites. The filaments' position, orientation, time of appearance, and resistance to A22 all suggested that they were FtsZ. Predictable changes in the number, length, and distribution of filaments in cells where the expression levels and stability of FtsZ were altered supported that conclusion. In contrast to the thick, closed-ring-like structure suggested by fluorescence light microscopy, throughout the constriction process the Z-ring was seen here to consist of just a few short (∼100 nm) filaments spaced erratically near the division site. Additional densities connecting filaments to the cell wall, occasional straight segments, and abrupt kinks were also seen. An ‘iterative pinching' model is proposed wherein FtsZ itself generates the force that constricts the membrane in a GTP-hydrolysis-driven cycle of polymerization, membrane attachment, conformational change, depolymerization, and nucleotide exchange. PMID:17948052

  8. Molecular beacons: fluorogenic probes for living cell study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaohong; Mi, Yanming; Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Beck, Terry; Schuster, Sheldon; Tan, Weihong

    2002-01-01

    Molecular beacons are a new class of fluorescent probes that can report the presence of specific nucleic acids with high sensitivity and excellent specificity. In addition to their current wide applications in monitoring the progress of polymerase chain reactions, their unique properties make them promising probes for the detection and visualization of target biomolecules in living cells. This article is focused on our recent research in exploring the potential of using molecular beacon for living-cell studies in three important areas: the monitoring of mRNA in living cells, the development of ultrasmall DNA/RNA biosensors, and the novel approach of combining molecular beacon's signal transduction mechanism with aptamer's specificity for real-time protein detection. These applications demonstrate molecular beacon's unique properties in bioanalysis and bioassay development.

  9. The cell as the smallest DNA-based molecular computer.

    PubMed

    Ji, S

    1999-10-01

    The pioneering work of Adleman (1994) demonstrated that DNA molecules in test tubes can be manipulated to perform a certain type of mathematical computation. This has stimulated a theoretical interest in the possibility of constructing DNA-based molecular computers. To gauge the practicality of realizing such microscopic computers, it was thought necessary to learn as much as possible from the biology of the living cell--presently the only known DNA-based molecular computer in existence. Here the recently developed theoretical model of the living cell (the Bhopalator) and its associated theories (e.g. cell language), principles, laws and concepts (e.g. conformons, IDS's) are briefly reviewed and summarized in the form of a set of five laws of 'molecular semiotics' (synonyms include 'microsemiotics', 'cellular semiotics', or 'cytosemiotics') the study of signs mediating measurement, computation, and communication on the cellular and molecular levels. Hopefully, these laws will find practical applications in designing DNA-based computing systems.

  10. Molecular basis of hair cell loss.

    PubMed

    Furness, David N

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms that lead to the death of hair cells are reviewed. Exposure to noise, the use of ototoxic drugs that damage the cochlea and old age are accompanied by hair cell death. Outer hair cells are often more susceptible than inner hair cells, partly because of an intrinsically greater susceptibility; high frequency cells are also more vulnerable. A common factor in hair cell loss following age-related changes and exposure to ototoxic drugs or high noise levels is the generation of reactive oxygen species, which can trigger intrinsic apoptosis (the mitochondrial pathway). However, hair cell death is sometimes produced via an extracellular signal pathway triggering extrinsic apoptosis. Necrosis and necroptosis also play a role and, in various situations in which cochlear damage occurs, a balance exists between these possible routes of cell death, with no one mechanism being exclusively activated. Finally, the numerous studies on these mechanisms of hair cell death have led to the identification of many potential therapeutic agents, some of which have been used to attempt to treat people exposed to damaging events, although clinical trials are not yet conclusive. Continued work in this area is likely to lead to clinical treatments that could be used to prevent or ameliorate hearing loss.

  11. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke. PMID:24222920

  12. Form and pattern of MUC1 expression on T cells activated in vivo or in vitro suggests a function in T-cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Isabel; Plunkett, Tim; Vlad, Anda; Mungul, Arron; Candelora-Kettel, Jessica; Burchell, Joy M; Taylor–papadimitriou, Joyce; Finn, Olivera J

    2003-01-01

    MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin that is expressed on ductal epithelial cells and epithelial malignancies and has been proposed as a target antigen for immunotherapy. The expression of MUC1 has recently been reported on T and B cells. In this study we demonstrate that following activation in vivo or activation by different stimuli in vitro, human T cells expressed MUC1 at the cell surface. However, the level of expression in activated human T cells was significantly lower than that seen on normal epithelial cells or on breast cancer cells. In contrast, resting T cells did not bind MUC1-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), nor was MUC1 mRNA detectable by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) or Northern blot analysis in these cells. The profile of activated T-cell reactivity with different MUC1-specific antibodies suggested that the glycoform of MUC1 expressed by the activated T cells carried core 2-based O-glycans, as opposed to the core 1 structures that dominate in the cancer-associated mucin. Confocal microscopy revealed that MUC1 was uniformly distributed on the surface of activated T cells. However, when the cells were polarized in response to a migratory chemokine, MUC1 was found on the leading edge rather than on the uropod, where other large mucin-like molecules on T cells are trafficked. The concentration of MUC1 at the leading edge of polarized activated human T cells suggests that MUC1 could be involved in early interactions between T cells and endothelial cells at inflammatory sites. PMID:12519300

  13. Spatial expression of CLAVATA3 in the shoot apical meristem suggests it is not a stem cell marker in soybean.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chui E; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2013-12-01

    CLAVATA3 (CLV3), a stem cell marker in Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes a secreted peptide that maintains the stem cell population within the shoot apical meristem. This work investigated the CLV3 orthologue in a major legume crop, soybean (GmCLV3). Instead of being expressed in the three outermost layers of the meristem as in Arabidopsis, GmCLV3 was expressed deeper in the central zone beneath the fourth layer (L4) of the meristem, overlapping with the expression of soybean WUSCHEL. Subsequent investigation using an alternative stem cell marker (GmLOG1) revealed its expression within layers L2-L4, indicating that GmCLV3 is not a stem cell marker. Overexpression studies of GmCLV3 in Arabidopsis and complementation of clv3-2 mutant suggest similar functional capacity to that of Arabidopsis CLV3. The expression of soybean CLV1, which encodes a receptor for CLV3 in Arabidopsis, was not detectable in the central zone of the meristem via reverse-transcription PCR analysis of amplified RNA from laser-microdissected samples or in situ, implicating a diverged pathway in soybean. This study also reports the novel expression of GmLOG1 in initials of axillary meristem in the boundary region between the SAM and developing leaf primordia, before the expression of GmWUS or GmCLV3, indicating cytokinin as one of the earliest signals in initiating and specifying the stem cell population.

  14. Spatial expression of CLAVATA3 in the shoot apical meristem suggests it is not a stem cell marker in soybean.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chui E; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2013-12-01

    CLAVATA3 (CLV3), a stem cell marker in Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes a secreted peptide that maintains the stem cell population within the shoot apical meristem. This work investigated the CLV3 orthologue in a major legume crop, soybean (GmCLV3). Instead of being expressed in the three outermost layers of the meristem as in Arabidopsis, GmCLV3 was expressed deeper in the central zone beneath the fourth layer (L4) of the meristem, overlapping with the expression of soybean WUSCHEL. Subsequent investigation using an alternative stem cell marker (GmLOG1) revealed its expression within layers L2-L4, indicating that GmCLV3 is not a stem cell marker. Overexpression studies of GmCLV3 in Arabidopsis and complementation of clv3-2 mutant suggest similar functional capacity to that of Arabidopsis CLV3. The expression of soybean CLV1, which encodes a receptor for CLV3 in Arabidopsis, was not detectable in the central zone of the meristem via reverse-transcription PCR analysis of amplified RNA from laser-microdissected samples or in situ, implicating a diverged pathway in soybean. This study also reports the novel expression of GmLOG1 in initials of axillary meristem in the boundary region between the SAM and developing leaf primordia, before the expression of GmWUS or GmCLV3, indicating cytokinin as one of the earliest signals in initiating and specifying the stem cell population. PMID:24179098

  15. Molecular profiling of endometrial carcinoma precursor, primary and metastatic lesions suggests different targets for treatment in obese compared to non-obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Anna; Hoivik, Erling A.; Mjøs, Siv; Holst, Frederik; Werner, Henrica M. J.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Gibson, William J.; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Wik, Elisabeth; Trovik, Jone; Halle, Mari K.; Øyan, Anne M.; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Stefansson, Ingunn; Mills, Gordon B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Salvesen, Helga B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is linked to increased incidence of endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) and complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). We here explore pattern and sequence of molecular alterations characterizing endometrial carcinogenesis in general and related to body mass index (BMI), to improve diagnostic stratification and treatment strategies. We performed molecular characterization of 729 prospectively collected EEC and CAH. Candidate biomarkers were identified in frozen samples by whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, oligonucleotide gene expression and Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (investigation cohort) and further explored in formalin fixed tissues by immunohistochemistry and Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization (validation cohort). We here demonstrate that PIK3CA mutations, PTEN loss, PI3K and KRAS activation are early events in endometrial carcinogenesis. Molecular changes related to KRAS activation and inflammation are more common in obese CAH patients, suggesting different prevention and systemic treatment strategies in obese and non-obese patients. We also found that oncoprotein Stathmin might improve preoperative diagnostic distinction between premalignant and malignant endometrial lesions. PMID:25415225

  16. Effect of morphine on PC12 cells with molecular radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Yu, Xiaoli; Lu, Jiuyi; Zhang, Chunyang; Jin, Lei; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Dacheng; Chen, Die Yan

    2000-10-01

    Molecular Radar (MR) is a new method to detect biological processes in living cells at the level of molecular, it is also the newest means to get intracellular information. In this paper we study the effect of morphine on PC12 cells using MR. The results show that the effect of morphine on PC12 cells is time- and concentration-dependent. Morphine treating for short time induces the increase and fluctuation of intracellular (CA2+), while morphine treating for long time induces chromatin condensation, loss of mitochondria membrane potential apoptosis.

  17. Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest Mechanisms Involving Early B-Cell Development in Canine IgA Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Frankowiack, Marcel; Kierczak, Marcin; Bergvall, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik; Tintle, Linda; Marti, Eliane; Roosje, Petra; Leeb, Tosso; Hedhammar, Åke; Hammarström, Lennart; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immune deficiency disorder in both humans and dogs, characterized by recurrent mucosal tract infections and a predisposition for allergic and other immune mediated diseases. In several dog breeds, low IgA levels have been observed at a high frequency and with a clinical resemblance to human IgAD. In this study, we used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genomic regions associated with low IgA levels in dogs as a comparative model for human IgAD. We used a novel percentile groups-approach to establish breed-specific cut-offs and to perform analyses in a close to continuous manner. GWAS performed in four breeds prone to low IgA levels (German shepherd, Golden retriever, Labrador retriever and Shar-Pei) identified 35 genomic loci suggestively associated (p <0.0005) to IgA levels. In German shepherd, three genomic regions (candidate genes include KIRREL3 and SERPINA9) were genome-wide significantly associated (p <0.0002) with IgA levels. A ~20kb long haplotype on CFA28, significantly associated (p = 0.0005) to IgA levels in Shar-Pei, was positioned within the first intron of the gene SLIT1. Both KIRREL3 and SLIT1 are highly expressed in the central nervous system and in bone marrow and are potentially important during B-cell development. SERPINA9 expression is restricted to B-cells and peaks at the time-point when B-cells proliferate into antibody-producing plasma cells. The suggestively associated regions were enriched for genes in Gene Ontology gene sets involving inflammation and early immune cell development. PMID:26225558

  18. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol’s effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  19. Gene expression in bryozoan larvae suggest a fundamental importance of pre-patterned blastemic cells in the bryozoan life-cycle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bryozoa is a clade of aquatic protostomes. The bryozoan life cycle typically comprises a larval stage, which metamorphoses into a sessile adult that proliferates by asexual budding to form colonies. The homology of bryozoan larvae with other protostome larvae is enigmatic. Bryozoan larvae exhibit blastemic tissues that contribute to build the adult during morphogenesis. However, it remains unclear if the cells of these tissues are pre-determined according to their future fate or if the cells are undifferentiated, pluripotent stem cells. Gene expression studies can help to identify molecular patterning of larval and adult tissues and enlighten the evolution of bryozoan life cycle stages. Results We investigated the spatial expression of 13 developmental genes in the larval stage of the gymnolaemate bryozoan Bugula neritina. We found most genes expressed in discrete regions in larval blastemic tissues that form definitive components of the adult body plan. Only two of the 13 genes, BnTropomyosin and BnFoxAB, were exclusively expressed in larval tissues that are discarded during metamorphosis. Conclusions Our results suggest that the larval blastemas in Bugula are pre-patterned according to their future fate in the adult. The gene expression patterns indicate that some of the bryozoan blastemas can be interpreted to correspond to homologous adult tissues of other animals. This study challenges an earlier proposed view that metazoan larvae share homologous undifferentiated "set-aside cells", and instead points to an independent origin of the bryozoan larval stage with respect to other lophotrochozoans. PMID:21645327

  20. Physiological and proteomic changes suggest an important role of cell walls in the high tolerance to metals of Elodea nuttallii.

    PubMed

    Larras, Floriane; Regier, Nicole; Planchon, Sébastien; Poté, John; Renaut, Jenny; Cosio, Claudia

    2013-12-15

    Macrophytes bioaccumulate metals, the suggestion being made that they be considered for phytoremediation. However, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of metal tolerance in these plants is necessary to allow full optimization of this approach. The present study was undertaken to gain insight into Hg and Cd accumulation and their effects in a representative macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii. Exposure to methyl-Hg (23 ng dm(-3)) had no significant effect while inorganic Hg (70 ng dm(-3)) and Cd (281 μg dm(-3)) affected root growth but did not affect shoots growth, photosynthesis, or antioxidant enzymes. Phytochelatins were confirmed as having a role in Cd tolerance in this plant while Hg tolerance seems to rely on different mechanisms. Histology and subcellular distribution revealed a localized increase in lignification, and an increased proportion of metal accumulation in cell wall over time. Proteomics further suggested that E. nuttallii was able to efficiently adapt its energy sources and the structure of its cells during Hg and Cd exposure. Storage in cell walls to protect cellular machinery is certainly predominant at environmental concentrations of metals in this plant resulting in a high tolerance highlighted by the absence of toxicity symptoms in shoots despite the significant accumulation of metals.

  1. Where's the glass? Biomarkers, molecular clocks, and microRNAs suggest a 200-Myr missing Precambrian fossil record of siliceous sponge spicules.

    PubMed

    Sperling, E A; Robinson, J M; Pisani, D; Peterson, K J

    2010-01-01

    The earliest evidence for animal life comes from the fossil record of 24-isopropylcholestane, a sterane found in Cryogenian deposits, and whose precursors are found in modern demosponges, but not choanoflagellates, calcareans, hexactinellids, or eumetazoans. However, many modern demosponges are also characterized by the presence of siliceous spicules, and there are no convincing demosponge spicules in strata older than the Cambrian. This temporal disparity highlights a problem with our understanding of the Precambrian fossil record--either these supposed demosponge-specific biomarkers were derived from the sterols of some other organism and are simply retained in modern demosponges, or spicules do not primitively characterize crown-group demosponges. Resolving this issue requires resolving the phylogenetic placement of another group of sponges, the hexactinellids, which not only make a spicule thought to be homologous to the spicules of demosponges, but also make their first appearance near the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. Using two independent analytical approaches and data sets--traditional molecular phylogenetic analyses and the presence or absence of specific microRNA genes--we show that demosponges are monophyletic, and that hexactinellids are their sister group (together forming the Silicea). Thus, spicules must have evolved before the last common ancestor of all living siliceans, suggesting the presence of a significant gap in the silicean spicule fossil record. Molecular divergence estimates date the origin of this last common ancestor well within the Cryogenian, consistent with the biomarker record, and strongly suggests that siliceous spicules were present during the Precambrian but were not preserved.

  2. Central European parasitic flatworms of the family Renicolidae Dollfus, 1939 (Trematoda: Plagiorchiida): molecular and comparative morphological analysis rejects the synonymization of Renicola pinguis complex suggested by Odening.

    PubMed

    Heneberg, Petr; Sitko, Jiljí; Bizos, Jiří; Horne, Elizabeth C

    2016-10-01

    The Renicolidae are digenean parasites of piscivorous and molluscivorous birds. Although they exhibit few morphological autapomorphies and are highly variable, the numerous suggested re-classifications within the family have never been supported by any molecular analyses. We address the possible synonymization of species within the Renicola pinguis complex suggested previously by Odening. We provide and analyse sequences of two nuclear (ITS2, 28S rDNA) and two mitochondrial (CO1, ND1) DNA loci of central European species of the Renicolidae, namely Renicola lari, Renicola pinguis and Renicola sternae sp. n., and we also provide first sequences of Renicola sloanei. The combined molecular and comparative morphological analysis confirms the previously questioned validity of the three Renicola spp. of highly similar morphology, which display strict niche separation in terms of host specificity and selectivity. We identify two previously unreported clades within the genus Renicola; however, only one of them is supported by the analysis of adult worms. We also provide comparative measurements of the three examined closely related central European renicolids, and describe the newly proposed tern-specialized species Renicola sternae sp. n., which was previously repeatedly misidentified as Renicola paraquinta. Based on the extensive dataset collected in 1962-2015, we update the host spectrum of Renicolidae parasitizing central European birds (Renicola bretensis, R. lari, Renicola mediovitellata, R. pinguis, Renicola secunda and R. sternae sp. n.) and discuss their host-specific prevalence and intensity of infections. PMID:27356772

  3. Cell and molecular biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This document contains only the abstracts of 92 presentations on the biology of Chlamydomonas. Topics include gene transformations, gene regulation, biosynthetic pathways, cell surfaces, circadian clocks, and the development and structure of the flagellar apparatus. (TEM)

  4. The Molecular Basis of Communication between Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical messengers mediate long-range hormonal communication and short-range neural communication between cells. Background information on peptides, steroids, neuropeptides, and specialized enzymes is given. Investigations reveal that the two systems have many common intercellular messenger molecules. (DH)

  5. Photodynamic Efficiency: From Molecular Photochemistry to Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Bacellar, Isabel O L; Tsubone, Tayana M; Pavani, Christiane; Baptista, Mauricio S

    2015-08-31

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinical modality used to treat cancer and infectious diseases. The main agent is the photosensitizer (PS), which is excited by light and converted to a triplet excited state. This latter species leads to the formation of singlet oxygen and radicals that oxidize biomolecules. The main motivation for this review is to suggest alternatives for achieving high-efficiency PDT protocols, by taking advantage of knowledge on the chemical and biological processes taking place during and after photosensitization. We defend that in order to obtain specific mechanisms of cell death and maximize PDT efficiency, PSes should oxidize specific molecular targets. We consider the role of subcellular localization, how PS photochemistry and photophysics can change according to its nanoenvironment, and how can all these trigger specific cell death mechanisms. We propose that in order to develop PSes that will cause a breakthrough enhancement in the efficiency of PDT, researchers should first consider tissue and intracellular localization, instead of trying to maximize singlet oxygen quantum yields in in vitro tests. In addition to this, we also indicate many open questions and challenges remaining in this field, hoping to encourage future research.

  6. Photodynamic Efficiency: From Molecular Photochemistry to Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Bacellar, Isabel O. L.; Tsubone, Tayana M.; Pavani, Christiane; Baptista, Mauricio S.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinical modality used to treat cancer and infectious diseases. The main agent is the photosensitizer (PS), which is excited by light and converted to a triplet excited state. This latter species leads to the formation of singlet oxygen and radicals that oxidize biomolecules. The main motivation for this review is to suggest alternatives for achieving high-efficiency PDT protocols, by taking advantage of knowledge on the chemical and biological processes taking place during and after photosensitization. We defend that in order to obtain specific mechanisms of cell death and maximize PDT efficiency, PSes should oxidize specific molecular targets. We consider the role of subcellular localization, how PS photochemistry and photophysics can change according to its nanoenvironment, and how can all these trigger specific cell death mechanisms. We propose that in order to develop PSes that will cause a breakthrough enhancement in the efficiency of PDT, researchers should first consider tissue and intracellular localization, instead of trying to maximize singlet oxygen quantum yields in in vitro tests. In addition to this, we also indicate many open questions and challenges remaining in this field, hoping to encourage future research. PMID:26334268

  7. Regulatory T Cells: Molecular Actions on Effector Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Arce-Sillas, Asiel; Álvarez-Luquín, Diana Denisse; Tamaya-Domínguez, Beatriz; Gomez-Fuentes, Sandra; Trejo-García, Abel; Melo-Salas, Marlene; Cárdenas, Graciela; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Juan; Adalid-Peralta, Laura

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory cells play a key role in the control of the immune response, both in health and during illness. While the mechanisms through which T regulatory cells exert their function have been extensively described, their molecular effects on effector cells have received little attention. Thus, this revision is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge on those regulation mechanisms on the target cells from a molecular perspective. PMID:27298831

  8. The effects of opioid receptor antagonists suggest that testicular opiates regulate Sertoli and Leydig cell function in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Gerendai, I; Shaha, C; Gunsalus, G L; Bardin, C W

    1986-05-01

    beta-Endorphin and other peptides derived from proopiomelanocortin are synthesized in testicular Leydig cells. To better understand the possible function of these and other endogenous opioid peptides in the testis, the opioid antagonists naloxone and nalmefene were administered intratesticularly to hemicastrated 5-day-old rats. Both naloxone and nalmefene potentiated testicular hypertrophy induced by unilateral orchidectomy at 11 days of age. Unexpectedly, at least a 100-fold lower dose of nalmefene was required to produce maximal hypertrophy than that previously reported for naloxone. Leydig and Sertoli cell functions were evaluated, respectively, by measurement of basal testosterone production in vitro and rat androgen-binding protein (rABP) in serum. The optimal dose of naloxone for hypertrophy (1 microgram/testis) suppressed testosterone production and had a nonuniform effect on rABP secretion (either had no effect or produced a slight increase). By contrast, the optimal dose of nalmefene for hypertrophy (0.01 microgram/testis) not only suppressed basal testosterone secretion, but also uniformly increased rABP levels in serum. Larger doses of this opioid antagonist, up to 1 microgram/testis, were not as effective on the three parameters measured (hypertrophy, testosterone secretion, and rABP levels). These results suggest that this agent has both antagonistic and agonistic activities in the testis. At the doses that produced optimal effects on hypertrophy, systemic administration of these antagonists produced no effects. The results of these studies suggest that intratesticular opiates exert a suppressive effect on Sertoli cell growth and rABP secretion. In addition, these peptides may modulate testosterone secretion by Leydig cells. PMID:3698906

  9. Cell and molecular biology for diagnostic and therapeutic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Our body contains 100 trillion cells. However, each cell has certain function and structure. For maintaining their integrity, cells will be collaborating with each other and with extracellular matrix surround them to form a tissue. These interactions effect internally on many networks or pathway such as signalling pathway, metabolic pathway and transport network in the cell. These networks interact with each other to maintain cell survival, cell structure and function and moreover the tissue as well as the organ which the cells built. Therefore, as part of a tissue, genetic and epigenetic abnormality of a cell can also alter these networks, and moreover disturb the function of the tissue itself. Hence, condition of genetic and epigenetic of the cell may affect other conditions in omics level such as transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics characteristics which can be differentiated by a particular unique molecular profile from each level, which can be used for diagnostic as well as for targeted therapy.

  10. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqin; Delgado, Stefanie; Champanhac, Carole; Cansiz, Sena; Wu, Cuichen; Shan, Hong; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers. PMID:25938802

  11. Cell engineering and molecular pharming for biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, M A; Rahmah, Anisa Ur; Sinskey, A J; Rha, C K

    2008-05-14

    Biopharmaceuticals are often produced by recombinant E. coli or mammalian cell lines. This is usually achieved by the introduction of a gene or cDNA coding for the protein of interest into a well-characterized strain of producer cells. Naturally, each recombinant production system has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. This paper examines the current practices, developments, and future trends in the production of biopharmaceuticals. Platform technologies for rapid screening and analyses of biosystems are reviewed. Strategies to improve productivity via metabolic and integrated engineering are also highlighted.

  12. Cell engineering and molecular pharming for biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, M A; Rahmah, Anisa Ur; Sinskey, A J; Rha, C K

    2008-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are often produced by recombinant E. coli or mammalian cell lines. This is usually achieved by the introduction of a gene or cDNA coding for the protein of interest into a well-characterized strain of producer cells. Naturally, each recombinant production system has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. This paper examines the current practices, developments, and future trends in the production of biopharmaceuticals. Platform technologies for rapid screening and analyses of biosystems are reviewed. Strategies to improve productivity via metabolic and integrated engineering are also highlighted. PMID:19662143

  13. Cell Engineering and Molecular Pharming for Biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, M.A; Rahmah, Anisa ur; Sinskey, A.J; Rha, C.K

    2008-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are often produced by recombinant E. coli or mammalian cell lines. This is usually achieved by the introduction of a gene or cDNA coding for the protein of interest into a well-characterized strain of producer cells. Naturally, each recombinant production system has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. This paper examines the current practices, developments, and future trends in the production of biopharmaceuticals. Platform technologies for rapid screening and analyses of biosystems are reviewed. Strategies to improve productivity via metabolic and integrated engineering are also highlighted. PMID:19662143

  14. Oral Vaccine Development by Molecular Display Methods Using Microbial Cells.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oral vaccines are easier to administer than injectable vaccines. To induce an adequate immune response using vaccines, antigenic proteins are usually combined with adjuvant materials. This chapter presents methodologies for the design of oral vaccines using molecular display technology. In molecular display technology, antigenic proteins are displayed on a microbial cell surface with adjuvant ability. This technology would provide a quite convenient process to produce oral vaccines when the DNA sequence of an efficient antigenic protein is available. As an example, oral vaccines against candidiasis were introduced using two different molecular display systems with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus casei. PMID:27076318

  15. Cell mechanics and stress: from molecular details to the 'universal cell reaction' and hormesis.

    PubMed

    Agutter, Paul S

    2007-04-01

    The 'universal cell reaction' (UCR), a coordinated biphasic response to external (noxious and other) stimuli observed in all living cells, was described by Nasonov and his colleagues in the mid-20th century. This work has received no attention from cell biologists in the West, but the UCR merits serious consideration. Although it is non-specific, it is likely to be underpinned by precise mechanisms and, if these mechanisms were characterized and their relationship to the UCR elucidated, then our understanding of the integration of cellular function could be improved. As a step towards identifying such mechanisms, I review some recent advances in understanding cell mechanics and the stress response and I suggest potentially testable hypotheses. There is a particular need for time-course studies of cellular responses to different stimulus doses or intensities. I also suggest a correspondence with hormesis; re-investigation of the UCR using modern biophysical and molecular-biological techniques might throw light on this much-discussed phenomenon.

  16. Molecular/cell engineering approach to autocrine ligand control of cell function.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, D A; Forsten, K E; Will, B; Wiley, H S

    1995-01-01

    Tissue engineering, along with other modern cell- and tissue-based health care technologies, depends on successful regulation of cell function by molecular means, including pharmacological agents, materials, and genetics. This regulation is generally mediated by cell receptor/ligand interactions providing primary targets for molecular intervention. While regulatory ligands may often be exogenous in nature, in the categories of endocrine and paracrine hormone systems, they are being increasingly appreciated as crucial in local control of cell and tissue function. Improvements in design of health care technologies involving autocrine ligand interactions with cell receptors should benefit from increased qualitative and quantitative understanding of the kinetic and transport processes governing these interactions. In this symposium paper we offer a concise overview of our recent efforts combining molecular cell biology and engineering approaches to increase the understanding of how molecular and cellular parameters may be manipulated for improved control of cell and tissue function regulated by autocrine ligands.

  17. Protein kinase CK2 governs the molecular decision between encephalitogenic TH17 cell and Treg cell development.

    PubMed

    Ulges, Alexander; Witsch, Esther J; Pramanik, Gautam; Klein, Matthias; Birkner, Katharina; Bühler, Ulrike; Wasser, Beatrice; Luessi, Felix; Stergiou, Natascha; Dietzen, Sarah; Brühl, Till-Julius; Bohn, Toszka; Bündgen, Georg; Kunz, Horst; Waisman, Ari; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Zipp, Frauke; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    T helper 17 (TH17) cells represent a discrete TH cell subset instrumental in the immune response to extracellular bacteria and fungi. However, TH17 cells are considered to be detrimentally involved in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast to TH17 cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to be pivotal in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Thus, the balance between Treg cells and TH17 cells determines the severity of a TH17 cell-driven disease and therefore is a promising target for treating autoimmune diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this balance are still unclear. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibition as well as genetic ablation of the protein kinase CK2 (CK2) ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity and relapse incidence. Furthermore, CK2 inhibition or genetic ablation prevents TH17 cell development and promotes the generation of Treg cells. Molecularly, inhibition of CK2 leads to reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and strongly attenuated expression of the IL-23 receptor, IL-17, and GM-CSF. Thus, these results identify CK2 as a nodal point in TH17 cell development and suggest this kinase as a potential therapeutic target to treat TH17 cell-driven autoimmune responses. PMID:27555590

  18. Protein kinase CK2 governs the molecular decision between encephalitogenic TH17 cell and Treg cell development.

    PubMed

    Ulges, Alexander; Witsch, Esther J; Pramanik, Gautam; Klein, Matthias; Birkner, Katharina; Bühler, Ulrike; Wasser, Beatrice; Luessi, Felix; Stergiou, Natascha; Dietzen, Sarah; Brühl, Till-Julius; Bohn, Toszka; Bündgen, Georg; Kunz, Horst; Waisman, Ari; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Zipp, Frauke; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    T helper 17 (TH17) cells represent a discrete TH cell subset instrumental in the immune response to extracellular bacteria and fungi. However, TH17 cells are considered to be detrimentally involved in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast to TH17 cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to be pivotal in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Thus, the balance between Treg cells and TH17 cells determines the severity of a TH17 cell-driven disease and therefore is a promising target for treating autoimmune diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this balance are still unclear. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibition as well as genetic ablation of the protein kinase CK2 (CK2) ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity and relapse incidence. Furthermore, CK2 inhibition or genetic ablation prevents TH17 cell development and promotes the generation of Treg cells. Molecularly, inhibition of CK2 leads to reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and strongly attenuated expression of the IL-23 receptor, IL-17, and GM-CSF. Thus, these results identify CK2 as a nodal point in TH17 cell development and suggest this kinase as a potential therapeutic target to treat TH17 cell-driven autoimmune responses.

  19. S(mu) mutation patterns suggest different progression pathways in follicular lymphoma: early direct or late from FL progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ruminy, Philippe; Jardin, Fabrice; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Parmentier, Françoise; Contentin, Nathalie; Buchonnet, Gérard; Tison, Sandrine; Rainville, Vinciane; Tilly, Hervé; Bastard, Christian

    2008-09-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by the t(14;18) translocation. Although sensitive to treatment, the disease remains incurable and the reason why tumor cells invariably evade treatment, leading to clinical relapse, is still unknown. Here, we tracked the clonal history of tumor cells by studying mutations introduced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase on the switch mu region of the der(14)t(14;18) during the early phase of the class-switch recombination (CSR) process. We observed frequent intraclonal variations, suggesting that CSR often remains active after the acquisition of the fully transformed phenotype. However, mutations only rarely accumulated over time, but instead showed complex evolutionary scenarios and 2 different progression pathways. The first pathway was a direct and rapid evolution from the dominant clone. The second was indirect, arising from earlier subclones usually after years of remission. A better understanding of these mechanisms might influence the future choice of treatment strategies. PMID:18515657

  20. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Truong, David M; Hewitt, F Curtis; Hanson, Joseph H; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2015-08-01

    Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a "ribozyme") and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed "retrohoming". Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have impacted the

  1. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Truong, David M.; Hewitt, F. Curtis; Hanson, Joseph H.; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a “ribozyme”) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed “retrohoming”. Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have impacted the

  2. 454 Transcriptome Sequencing Suggests a Role for Two-Component Signalling in Cellularization and Differentiation of Barley Endosperm Transfer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Johannes; Hollmann, Julien; Rutten, Twan; Weber, Hans; Scholz, Uwe; Weschke, Winfriede

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell specification and differentiation in the endosperm of cereals starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the endosperm transfer cells (ETCs). Besides the importance in assimilate transfer, ETCs are proposed to play an essential role in the regulation of endosperm differentiation by affecting development of proximate endosperm tissues. We attempted to identify signalling elements involved in early endosperm differentiation by using a combination of laser-assisted microdissection and 454 transcriptome sequencing. Principal Findings 454 sequencing of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial state until functionality in transfer processes captured a high proportion of novel transcripts which are not available in existing barley EST databases. Intriguingly, the ETC-transcriptome showed a high abundance of elements of the two-component signalling (TCS) system suggesting an outstanding role in ETC differentiation. All components and subfamilies of the TCS, including distinct kinds of membrane-bound receptors, have been identified to be expressed in ETCs. The TCS system represents an ancient signal transduction system firstly discovered in bacteria and has previously been shown to be co-opted by eukaryotes, like fungi and plants, whereas in animals and humans this signalling route does not exist. Transcript profiling of TCS elements by qRT-PCR suggested pivotal roles for specific phosphorelays activated in a coordinated time flow during ETC cellularization and differentiation. ETC-specificity of transcriptionally activated TCS phosphorelays was assessed for early differentiation and cellularization contrasting to an extension of expression to other grain tissues at the beginning of ETC maturation. Features of candidate genes of distinct phosphorelays and transcriptional activation of genes putatively implicated in hormone signalling pathways hint at a crosstalk of hormonal influences, putatively ABA and ethylene, and TCS signalling

  3. A decade of molecular cell biology: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Asifa; Fuchs, Elaine; Mitchison, Tim; Shaw, Reuben J; St Johnston, Daniel; Strasser, Andreas; Taylor, Susan; Walczak, Claire; Zerial, Marino

    2011-09-23

    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology celebrated its 10-year anniversary during this past year with a series of specially commissioned articles. To complement this, here we have asked researchers from across the field for their insights into how molecular cell biology research has evolved during this past decade, the key concepts that have emerged and the most promising interfaces that have developed. Their comments highlight the broad impact that particular advances have had, some of the basic understanding that we still require, and the collaborative approaches that will be essential for driving the field forward.

  4. Where's the glass? Biomarkers, molecular clocks, and microRNAs suggest a 200-Myr missing Precambrian fossil record of siliceous sponge spicules.

    PubMed

    Sperling, E A; Robinson, J M; Pisani, D; Peterson, K J

    2010-01-01

    The earliest evidence for animal life comes from the fossil record of 24-isopropylcholestane, a sterane found in Cryogenian deposits, and whose precursors are found in modern demosponges, but not choanoflagellates, calcareans, hexactinellids, or eumetazoans. However, many modern demosponges are also characterized by the presence of siliceous spicules, and there are no convincing demosponge spicules in strata older than the Cambrian. This temporal disparity highlights a problem with our understanding of the Precambrian fossil record--either these supposed demosponge-specific biomarkers were derived from the sterols of some other organism and are simply retained in modern demosponges, or spicules do not primitively characterize crown-group demosponges. Resolving this issue requires resolving the phylogenetic placement of another group of sponges, the hexactinellids, which not only make a spicule thought to be homologous to the spicules of demosponges, but also make their first appearance near the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. Using two independent analytical approaches and data sets--traditional molecular phylogenetic analyses and the presence or absence of specific microRNA genes--we show that demosponges are monophyletic, and that hexactinellids are their sister group (together forming the Silicea). Thus, spicules must have evolved before the last common ancestor of all living siliceans, suggesting the presence of a significant gap in the silicean spicule fossil record. Molecular divergence estimates date the origin of this last common ancestor well within the Cryogenian, consistent with the biomarker record, and strongly suggests that siliceous spicules were present during the Precambrian but were not preserved. PMID:19929965

  5. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Apetoh, Lionel; Baert, Thais; Birge, Raymond B.; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Breckpot, Karine; Brough, David; Chaurio, Ricardo; Cirone, Mara; Coosemans, An; Coulie, Pierre G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dini, Luciana; de Witte, Peter; Dudek-Peric, Aleksandra M.; Faggioni, Alberto; Fucikova, Jitka; Gaipl, Udo S.; Golab, Jakub; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hemminki, Akseli; Herrmann, Martin; Hodge, James W.; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Land, Walter G.; Madeo, Frank; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Mattarollo, Stephen R.; Maueroder, Christian; Merendino, Nicolò; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pabst, Thomas; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Riganti, Chiara; Romano, Erminia; Rufo, Nicole; Smyth, Mark J.; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Spisek, Radek; Stagg, John; Vacchelli, Erika; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vandenberk, Lien; Van den Eynde, Benoit J.; Van Gool, Stefaan; Velotti, Francesca; Zitvogel, Laurence; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens, including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of the so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs). The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD) favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical, and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation. PMID:26635802

  6. Paired octamer rings of retinoschisin suggest a junctional model for cell–cell adhesion in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Tolun, Gökhan; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Huang, Rick; Zeng, Yong; Li, Yan; Steven, Alasdair C.; Sieving, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Retinoschisin (RS1) is involved in cell–cell junctions in the retina, but is unique among known cell-adhesion proteins in that it is a soluble secreted protein. Loss-of-function mutations in RS1 lead to early vision impairment in young males, called X-linked retinoschisis. The disease is characterized by separation of inner retinal layers and disruption of synaptic signaling. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we report the structure at 4.1 Å, revealing double octamer rings not observed before. Each subunit is composed of a discoidin domain and a small N-terminal (RS1) domain. The RS1 domains occupy the centers of the rings, but are not required for ring formation and are less clearly defined, suggesting mobility. We determined the structure of the discoidin rings, consistent with known intramolecular and intermolecular disulfides. The interfaces internal to and between rings feature residues implicated in X-linked retinoschisis, indicating the importance of correct assembly. Based on this structure, we propose that RS1 couples neighboring membranes together through octamer–octamer contacts, perhaps modulated by interactions with other membrane components. PMID:27114531

  7. Largescale Transcriptomics Analysis Suggests Over-Expression of BGH3, MMP9 and PDIA3 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Shao, Fangyang; Pi, Weidong; Shi, Cong; Chen, Yujia; Gong, Diping; Wang, Bingjie; Cao, Zhiwei; Tang, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been reported as the most prevalent cancer of the head and neck region, while early diagnosis remains challenging. Here we took a comprehensive bioinformatics study on microarray data of 326 OSCC clinical samples with control of 165 normal tissues. The cell interaction pathways of ECM-receptor interaction and focal adhesion were found to be significantly regulated in OSCC samples. Further analysis of the topological properties and expression consistency identified that three hub genes in the gene interaction network, MMP9, PDIA3 and BGH3, were consistently up-expressed in OSCC samples. When being validated on additional microarray datasets of 41 OSCC samples, the validation rate of over-expressed BGH3, MMP9, and PDIA3 reached 90%, 90% and 84% respectively. At last, immuno-histochemical assays were done to test the protein expression of the three genes on newly collected clinical samples of 35 OSCC, 20 samples of pre-OSCC stage, and 12 normal oral mucosa specimens. Their protein expression levels were also found to progressively increase from normal mucosa to pre-OSCC stage and further to OSCC (ANOVA p = 0.000), suggesting their key roles in OSCC pathogenesis. Based on above solid validation, we propose BGH3, MMP9 and PDIA3 might be further explored as potential biomarkers to aid OSCC diagnosis.

  8. Quantum Dot Platform for Single-Cell Molecular Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel S.

    In-depth understanding of the nature of cell physiology and ability to diagnose and control the progression of pathological processes heavily rely on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. Therefore, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of their natural tissue or cell culture microenvironment is essential. In principle, this goal can be achieved by tagging each molecular target with a unique reporter probe and detecting its localization with high sensitivity at sub-cellular resolution, primarily via microscopy-based imaging. Yet, neither widely used conventional methods nor more advanced nanoparticle-based techniques have been able to address this task up to date. High multiplexing potential of fluorescent probes is heavily restrained by the inability to uniquely match probes with corresponding molecular targets. This issue is especially relevant for quantum dot probes---while simultaneous spectral imaging of up to 10 different probes is possible, only few can be used concurrently for staining with existing methods. To fully utilize multiplexing potential of quantum dots, it is necessary to design a new staining platform featuring unique assignment of each target to a corresponding quantum dot probe. This dissertation presents two complementary versatile approaches towards achieving comprehensive single-cell molecular profiling and describes engineering of quantum dot probes specifically tailored for each staining method. Analysis of expanded molecular profiles is achieved through augmenting parallel multiplexing capacity with performing several staining cycles on the same specimen in sequential manner. In contrast to other methods utilizing quantum dots or other nanoparticles, which often involve sophisticated probe synthesis, the platform technology presented here takes advantage of simple covalent bioconjugation and non-covalent self-assembly mechanisms for straightforward probe

  9. Cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in histopathology specimens

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Lassoued, Wiem; Grama, Kedar; Nath, Sumit K; Zhu, Jianliang; Oueslati, Ridha; Feldman, Michael; Lee, William M F; Roysam, Badrinath

    2011-01-01

    Aims To investigate the use of a computer-assisted technology for objective, cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in specified cell types in histopathology specimens, with the aim of advancing current visual estimation or pixel-level (rather than cell-based) quantification methods. Methods and results Tissue specimens were multiplex-immunostained to reveal cell structures, cell type markers, and analytes, and imaged with multispectral microscopy. The image data were processed with novel software that automatically delineates and types each cell in the field, measures morphological features, and quantifies analytes in different subcellular compartments of specified cells. The methodology was validated with the use of cell blocks composed of differentially labelled cultured cells mixed in known proportions, and evaluated on human breast carcinoma specimens for quantifying human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Ki67, phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase, and phospho-S6. Automated cell-level analyses closely matched human assessments, but, predictably, differed from pixel-level analyses of the same images. Conclusions Our method reveals the type, distribution, morphology and biomarker state of each cell in the field, and allows multiple biomarkers to be quantified over specified cell types, regardless of abundance. It is ideal for studying specimens from patients in clinical trials of targeted therapeutic agents, for investigating minority stromal cell subpopulations, and for phenotypic characterization to personalize therapy and prognosis. PMID:21771025

  10. Time-resolved molecular transport across living cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather M; Dounce, Susan M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that the nonlinear optical phenomenon known as second-harmonic generation can be used for label-free, time-resolved study of the transport of molecules through living cell membranes. The adsorption and transport of a 300-Da molecular-mass hydrophobic ion at the Escherichia coli membrane is observed. Remarkably, at low ion concentrations, the second-harmonic generation technique clearly exposes a multistep molecular transport process: Transport of the molecular ion across the outer and cytoplasmic membranes of the Gram-negative bacteria is recorded, in sequence, in time. Fitting of the data to a multiprocess kinematic model reveals that the transport of this hydrophobic ion through the outer membrane is much faster than through the cytoplasmic membrane, likely reflecting the effectiveness of ion transport porins. The observations illustrate an experimental means for studying the interactions of small molecules with cell membranes.

  11. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jarsch, Iris K; Daste, Frederic; Gallop, Jennifer L

    2016-08-15

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists.

  12. Advances in simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Guo, Wenge; Li, Ming; Ma, Wentao; Meng, Sen

    2015-02-01

    Recently, more focuses have been put on organic semiconductors because of its advantages, such as its flexibility, ease of fabrication and potential low cost, etc. The reasons we pay highlight on small molecular photovoltaic material are its ease of purification, easy to adjust and determine structure, easy to assemble range units and get high carrier mobility, etc. Simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells before the experiment can help the researchers find relationship between the efficiency and structure parameters, properties of material, estimate the performance of the device, bring the optimization of guidance. Also, the applicability of the model used in simulation can be discussed by comparison with experimental data. This paper summaries principle, structure, progress of numerical simulation on organic small molecular solar cells.

  13. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jarsch, Iris K; Daste, Frederic; Gallop, Jennifer L

    2016-08-15

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists. PMID:27528656

  14. Roles of cell volume in molecular and cellular biology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Marc; Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Extracellular tonicity and volume regulation control a great number of molecular and cellular functions including: cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, hormone and neuromediator release, gene expression, ion channel and transporter activity and metabolism. The aim of this review is to describe these effects and to determine if they are direct or are secondarily the result of the activity of second messengers. PMID:22192789

  15. The TUNEL assay suggests mandibular regression by programmed cell death during presoldier differentiation in the nasute termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toga, Kouhei; Yoda, Shinichi; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2011-09-01

    Termite soldiers are the most specialized caste of social insects in terms of their morphology and function. Soldier development requires increased juvenile hormone (JH) titer and the two molts via a presoldier stage. These molts are accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, including the exaggeration and regression of certain organs. Soldiers of the most apical termitid subfamily Nasutitermitinae possess not only a horn-like frontal tube, called the nasus, for the projection of defensive chemicals from the frontal gland reservoir but also regressed mandibles. Although candidate genes regulating soldier mandibular growth were reported in a relatively basal termite species, the regulatory mechanisms of mandibular regression remain unknown. To clarify these mechanisms, we performed morphological and histological examinations of the mandibles during soldier differentiation in Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Mandibular size reduced dramatically during soldier differentiation, and mandibular regression occurred just prior to the presoldier molt. Spotted TUNEL signals were observed in regressing mandibles of presoldiers, suggesting that the regression involved programmed cell death. Because soldiers of N. takasagoensis possess exaggerated organs (nasus and frontal gland), the present results suggest that JH-dependent regressive mechanisms exist in the mandibles without interfering with the formation of the exaggerated organs.

  16. Molecular evolution of the vertebrate mechanosensory cell and ear

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Beisel, Kirk W.; Pauley, Sarah; Soukup, Garrett

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of mechanosensation, mechanosensory cell development and mechanosensory organ development is reviewed with an emphasis on its evolution. In contrast to eye evolution and development, which apparently modified a genetic program through intercalation of genes between the master control genes on the top (Pax6, Eya1, Six1) of the hierarchy and the structural genes (rhodopsin) at the bottom, the as yet molecularly unknown mechanosensory channel precludes such a firm conclusion for mechanosensors. However, recent years have seen the identification of several structural genes which are involved in mechanosensory tethering and several transcription factors controlling mechanosensory cell and organ development; these warrant the interpretation of available data in very much the same fashion as for eye evolution: molecular homology combined with potential morphological parallelism. This assertion of molecular homology is strongly supported by recent findings of a highly conserved set of microRNAs that appear to be associated with mechanosensory cell development across phyla. The conservation of transcription factors and their regulators fits very well to the known or presumed mechanosensory specializations which can be mostly grouped as variations of a common cellular theme. Given the widespread distribution of the molecular ability to form mechanosensory cells, it comes as no surprise that structurally different mechanosensory organs evolved in different phyla, presenting a variation of a common theme specified by a conserved set of transcription factors in their cellular development. Within vertebrates and arthropods, some mechanosensory organs evolved into auditory organs, greatly increasing sensitivity to sound through modifications of accessory structures to direct sound to the specific sensory epithelia. However, while great attention has been paid to the evolution of these accessory structures in vertebrate fossils, comparatively less attention has

  17. Molecular biology of major components of chloride cells.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Shigehisa; Kaneko, Toyoji; Naito, Nobuko; Takei, Yoshio

    2003-12-01

    Current understanding of chloride cells (CCs) is briefly reviewed with emphasis on molecular aspects of their channels, transporters and regulators. Seawater-type and freshwater-type CCs have been identified based on their shape, location and response to different ionic conditions. Among the freshwater-type CCs, subpopulations are emerging that are implicated in the uptake of Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+), respectively, and can be distinguished by their shape of apical crypt and affinity for lectins. The major function of the seawater CC is transcellular secretion of Cl(-), which is accomplished by four major channels and transporters: (1). CFTR Cl(-) channel, (2). Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, (3). Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter and (4). a K(+) channel. The first three components have been cloned and characterized, but concerning the K(+) channel that is essential for the continued generation of the driving force by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, only one candidate is identified. Although controversial, freshwater CCs seem to perform the uptake of Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+) in a manner analogous to but slightly different from that seen in the absorptive epithelia of mammalian kidney and intestine since freshwater CCs face larger concentration gradients than ordinary epithelial cells. The components involved in these processes are beginning to be cloned, but their CC localization remains to be established definitively. The most important yet controversial issue is the mechanism of Na(+) uptake. Two models have been postulated: (i). the original one involves amiloride-sensitive electroneutral Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) with the driving force generated by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase (CA) and (ii). the current model suggests that Na(+) uptake occurs through an amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) electrogenically coupled to H(+)-ATPase. While fish ENaC remains to be identified by molecular cloning and database mining, fish NHE has been cloned and shown to be highly

  18. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure.

  19. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure. PMID:26014942

  20. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L.; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T.; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D.; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure. PMID:26014942

  1. Molecular analysis of selected cell cycle regulatory proteins during aerobic and hypoxic maintenance of human ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Krtolica, A; Krucher, N A; Ludlow, J W

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported on the development of an in vitro model system for studying the effect of hypoxia on ovarian carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion (Krtolica and Ludlow, 1996). These data indicate that the cell division cycle is reversibly arrested during the G1 phase. Here, we have continued this study to include the proliferation properties of both aerobic and hypoxic human ovarian carcinoma cells at the molecular level. The growth suppressor product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRB, appears to be functional in these cells as determined by SV40 T-antigen binding studies. Additional G1-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclins D and E, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) 4 and 2, and cdk inhibitors p27 and p18, also appear to be intact based on their apparent molecular weights and cell cycle stage-specific abundance. During hypoxia, there is a decrease in abundance of cyclins D and E, with an increase in p27 abundance. cdk4 activity towards pRB and cdk2 activity towards histone H1 are also decreased. Co-precipitation studies revealed an increased amount of p27 complexing with cyclin E-cdk2 during hypoxia than during aerobic cell growth. In addition, pRB-directed phosphatase activity was found to be greater in hypoxic than aerobic cells. Taken together, a model is suggested to explain hypoxia-induced cell cycle arrest in SKA human ovarian carcinoma cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471034

  2. Molecular analysis of selected cell cycle regulatory proteins during aerobic and hypoxic maintenance of human ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Krtolica, A; Krucher, N A; Ludlow, J W

    1999-08-01

    We have previously reported on the development of an in vitro model system for studying the effect of hypoxia on ovarian carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion (Krtolica and Ludlow, 1996). These data indicate that the cell division cycle is reversibly arrested during the G1 phase. Here, we have continued this study to include the proliferation properties of both aerobic and hypoxic human ovarian carcinoma cells at the molecular level. The growth suppressor product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRB, appears to be functional in these cells as determined by SV40 T-antigen binding studies. Additional G1-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclins D and E, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) 4 and 2, and cdk inhibitors p27 and p18, also appear to be intact based on their apparent molecular weights and cell cycle stage-specific abundance. During hypoxia, there is a decrease in abundance of cyclins D and E, with an increase in p27 abundance. cdk4 activity towards pRB and cdk2 activity towards histone H1 are also decreased. Co-precipitation studies revealed an increased amount of p27 complexing with cyclin E-cdk2 during hypoxia than during aerobic cell growth. In addition, pRB-directed phosphatase activity was found to be greater in hypoxic than aerobic cells. Taken together, a model is suggested to explain hypoxia-induced cell cycle arrest in SKA human ovarian carcinoma cells. PMID:10471034

  3. Combination of Mechanical and Molecular Filtration for Enhanced Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Anne; Hernández-Castro, Javier Alejandro; Turner, Kate; Li, Kebin; Veres, Teodor; Juncker, David

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been linked to cancer progression but are difficult to isolate, as they are very rare and heterogeneous, covering a range of sizes and expressing different molecular receptors. Filtration has emerged as a simple and powerful method to enrich CTCs but only captures cells above a certain size regardless of molecular characteristics. Here, we introduce antibody-functionalized microfilters to isolate CTCs based on both size and surface receptor expression. We present a 3D printed filtration cartridge with microfabricated polymer filters with 8, 10, 12, 15, or 20 μm-diameter pores. Pristine filters were used to optimize sample dilution, rinsing protocol, flow rate, and pore size, leading to >80% for the recovery of spiked cancer cells with very low white blood cell contamination (<1000). Then, filters were functionalized with antibodies against either epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the cartridges were used to enrich breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and renal (786-O, A-498) cancer cells expressing various levels of EpCAM and EGFR. Cancer cells were spiked into human blood, and when using filters with antibodies specific to a molecular receptor expressed on a cell, efficiency was increased to >96%. These results suggest that filtration can be optimized to target specific CTC characteristics such as size and receptor expression and that a diverse range of CTCs may be captured using particular combinations of pore size, filtration parameters, and antibody functionalization. PMID:27442305

  4. Limited T-cell receptor beta-chain heterogeneity among interleukin 2 receptor-positive synovial T cells suggests a role for superantigen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Diveley, J P; Lundeen, K A; Esty, A; Winters, S T; Carlo, D J; Brostoff, S W

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease affecting the synovial membranes of articulating joints that is thought to result from T-cell-mediated autoimmune phenomena. T cells responsible for the pathogenesis of RA are likely present in that fraction of synovial T cells that expresses the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), one marker of T-cell activation. We report herein an analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) beta-chain gene expression by IL-2R-positive synovial T cells. These T cells were isolated from uncultured synovial tissue specimens by using IL-2R-specific monoclonal antibodies and magnetic beads, and TCR beta-chain transcription was analyzed by PCR-catalyzed amplification using a panel of primers specific for the human TCR beta-chain variable region (V beta). Multiple V beta gene families were found to be transcribed in these patients samples; however, three gene families, V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17, were found in a majority of the five synovial samples analyzed, suggesting that T cells bearing these V beta s had been selectively retained in the synovial microenvironment. In many instances, the V beta 3, V beta 14, or V beta 17 repertoires amplified from an individual patient were dominated by a single rearrangement, indicative of clonal expansion in the synovium and supportive of a role for these T cells in RA. Of note is a high sequence similarity between V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17 polypeptides, particularly in the fourth complementarity-determining region (CDR). Given that binding sites for superantigens have been mapped to the CDR4s of TCR beta chains, the synovial localization of T cells bearing V beta s with significant CDR4 homology indicates that V beta-specific T-cell activation by superantigen may play a role in RA. PMID:1660155

  5. Bitter melon juice targets molecular mechanisms underlying gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Somasagara, Ranganatha R; Deep, Gagan; Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PanC) is one of the most lethal malignancies, and resistance towards gemcitabine, the front-line chemotherapy, is the main cause for dismal rate of survival in PanC patients; overcoming this resistance remains a major challenge to treat this deadly malignancy. Whereas several molecular mechanisms are known for gemcitabine resistance in PanC cells, altered metabolism and bioenergetics are not yet studied. Here, we compared metabolic and bioenergetic functions between gemcitabine-resistant (GR) and gemcitabine-sensitive (GS) PanC cells and underlying molecular mechanisms, together with efficacy of a natural agent bitter melon juice (BMJ). GR PanC cells showed distinct morphological features including spindle-shaped morphology and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. GR cells also showed higher ATP production with an increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR). Molecular studies showed higher expression of glucose transporters (GLUT1 and 4) suggesting an increase in glucose uptake by GR cells. Importantly, GR cells showed a significant increase in Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and their inhibition decreased cell viability, suggesting their role in survival and drug resistance of these cells. Recently, we reported strong efficacy of BMJ against a panel of GS cells in culture and nude mice, which we expanded here and found that BMJ was also effective in decreasing both Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and viability of GR PanC cells. Overall, we have identified novel mechanisms of gemcitabine resistance in PanC cells which are targeted by BMJ. Considering the short survival in PanC patients, our findings could have high translational potential in controlling this deadly malignancy. PMID:25672620

  6. CAM and cell fate targeting: molecular and energetic insights into cell growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Carlo

    2005-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence-based CAM.

  7. Using Molecular Biology to Develop Drugs for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cowey, C. Lance; Rathmell, W. Kimryn

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma is a disease marked by a unique biology which has governed it’s long history of poor response to conventional cancer treatments. The discovery of the signaling pathway activated as a result of inappropriate constitutive activation of the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF), transcription factors physiologically and transiently stabilized in response to low oxygen, has provided a primary opportunity to devise treatment strategies to target this oncogenic pathway. Objective A review of the molecular pathogenesis of renal cell cancer as well as molecularly targeted therapies, both those currently available and those in development, will be provided. In addition, trials involving combination or sequential targeted therapy are discussed. Methods A detailed review of the literature describing the molecular biology of renal cell cancer and novel therapies was performed and summarized. Results/Conclusion Therapeutics targeting angiogenesis have provided the first class of agents which provide clinical benefit in a large majority of patients and heralded renal cell carcinoma as a solid tumor paradigm for the development of novel therapeutics. Multiple strategies targeting this pathway and now other identified pathways in renal cell carcinoma provide numerous potential opportunities to make major improvements in treating this historically devastating cancer. PMID:20648240

  8. The eukaryotic cell originated in the integration and redistribution of hyperstructures from communities of prokaryotic cells based on molecular complementarity.

    PubMed

    Norris, Vic; Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2009-06-04

    In the "ecosystems-first" approach to the origins of life, networks of non-covalent assemblies of molecules (composomes), rather than individual protocells, evolved under the constraints of molecular complementarity. Composomes evolved into the hyperstructures of modern bacteria. We extend the ecosystems-first approach to explain the origin of eukaryotic cells through the integration of mixed populations of bacteria. We suggest that mutualism and symbiosis resulted in cellular mergers entailing the loss of redundant hyperstructures, the uncoupling of transcription and translation, and the emergence of introns and multiple chromosomes. Molecular complementarity also facilitated integration of bacterial hyperstructures to perform cytoskeletal and movement functions.

  9. The RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway as a molecular switch for anchorage dependent cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seungwon; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2012-04-01

    The proliferation of anchorage-dependent cells of mesenchymal origin requires the attachment of the cells to substrates. Thus, cells that are poorly attached to substrates exhibit retarded cell cycle progression or apoptotic death. A major disadvantage of most polymers used in tissue engineering is their hydrophobicity; hydrophobic surfaces do not allow cells to attach firmly and, therefore, do not allow normal proliferation rates. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the reduced proliferation rate of cells that are poorly attached to substrates. There was an inverse relationship between the activity of the small GTPase RhoA (RhoA) and the cell proliferation rate. RhoA activity correlated inversely with the strength of cell adhesion to the substrates. The high RhoA activity in the cells poorly attached to substrates caused an increase in the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), a well-known effector of RhoA that upregulated the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The resulting activated PTEN downregulated Akt activity, which is essential for cell proliferation. Thus, the cells that were poorly attached to substrates showed low levels of cell proliferation because the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway was hyperactive. In addition, RhoA activity seemed to be related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Weak FAK activity in these poorly attached cells failed to downregulate the high RhoA activity that restrained cell proliferation. Interestingly, reducing the expression of any component of the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway rescued the proliferation rate without physico-chemical surface modifications. Based on these results, we suggest that the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway acts as a molecular switch to control cell proliferation and determine anchorage dependence. In cells that are poorly attached to substrates, its inhibition is sufficient to restore cell proliferation without the need for physico-chemical modification of the material

  10. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, W. Marston; Spellman, Paul T.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Creighton, Chad J.; Fei, Suzanne S.; Davis, Caleb; Wheeler, David A.; Murray, Bradley A.; Schmidt, Laura; Vocke, Cathy D.; Peto, Myron; Al Mamun, Abu Amar M.; Shinbrot, Eve; Sethi, Anurag; Brooks, Samira; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brooks, Angela N.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Bowlby, Reanne; Sadeghi, Sara; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Haake, Scott; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Leiserson, Mark D.M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Anur, Pavana; Bottaro, Donald; Albiges, Laurence; Barnabas, Nandita; Choueiri, Toni K.; Czerniak, Bogdan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Ho, Thai; Hsieh, James; Ittmann, Michael; Kim, William Y.; Krishnan, Bhavani; Merino, Maria J.; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Reuter, Victor E.; Reznik, Ed; Shelley, Carl Simon; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Tickoo, Satish; Burnett, Kenneth; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph D.; Penny, Robert J.; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, W. Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Avedon, Melissa T.; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Santos, Tracie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buhay, Christian; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L.; Chao, Hsu; Chuah, Eric; Clarke, Amanda; Covington, Kyle R.; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Dewal, Ninad; Dhalla, Noreen; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Drummond, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Guin, Ranabir; Hale, Walker; Hawes, Alicia; Hayes, D. Neil; Holt, Robert A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie; Lewis, Lora; Li, Jie; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Moore, Richard A.; Morton, Donna; Mose, Lisle E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Muzny, Donna; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Sougnez, Carrie; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Thiessen, Nina; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Wang, Min; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Zhou, Jane; Bedford, Jason; Chen, Fengju; Fu, Yao; Gerstein, Mark; Haussler, David; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lai, Phillip; Ling, Shiyun; Radenbaugh, Amie; Van Den Berg, David; Weinstein, John N.; Zhu, Jingchun; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Auman, J. Todd; Bartlett, John; Bastacky, Sheldon; Bergsten, Julie; Blute, Michael L.; Boice, Lori; Bollag, Roni J.; Boyd, Jeff; Castle, Erik; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cheville, John C.; Curley, Erin; Davies, Benjamin; DeVolk, April; Dhir, Rajiv; Dike, Laura; Eckman, John; Engel, Jay; Harr, Jodi; Hrebinko, Ronald; Huang, Mei; Huelsenbeck-Dill, Lori; Iacocca, Mary; Jacobs, Bruce; Lobis, Michael; Maranchie, Jodi K.; McMeekin, Scott; Myers, Jerome; Nelson, Joel; Parfitt, Jeremy; Parwani, Anil; Petrelli, Nicholas; Rabeno, Brenda; Roy, Somak; Salner, Andrew L.; Slaton, Joel; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Thorne, Leigh; Tucker, Kelinda; Weinberger, Paul M.; Winemiller, Cythnia; Zach, Leigh Anne; Zuna, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillary renal cell carcinoma, accounting for 15% of renal cell carcinoma, is a heterogeneous disease consisting of different types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal cell carcinoma; no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist. Methods We performed comprehensive molecular characterization utilizing whole-exome sequencing, copy number, mRNA, microRNA, methylation and proteomic analyses of 161 primary papillary renal cell carcinomas. Results Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas were found to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with Type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups based on molecular differences that influenced patient survival. MET alterations were associated with Type 1 tumors, whereas Type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-ARE pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was found in a distinct subset of Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma characterized by poor survival and mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Conclusions Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas are clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway are associated with Type 1 and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway with Type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in Type 2 convey a poor prognosis. Furthermore, Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma consists of at least 3 subtypes based upon molecular and phenotypic features. PMID:26536169

  11. Molecular profiling reveals primary mesothelioma cell lines recapitulate human disease.

    PubMed

    Chernova, T; Sun, X M; Powley, I R; Galavotti, S; Grosso, S; Murphy, F A; Miles, G J; Cresswell, L; Antonov, A V; Bennett, J; Nakas, A; Dinsdale, D; Cain, K; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; MacFarlane, M

    2016-07-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive, fatal tumor strongly associated with asbestos exposure. There is an urgent need to improve MM patient outcomes and this requires functionally validated pre-clinical models. Mesothelioma-derived cell lines provide an essential and relatively robust tool and remain among the most widely used systems for candidate drug evaluation. Although a number of cell lines are commercially available, a detailed comparison of these commercial lines with freshly derived primary tumor cells to validate their suitability as pre-clinical models is lacking. To address this, patient-derived primary mesothelioma cell lines were established and characterized using complementary multidisciplinary approaches and bioinformatic analysis. Clinical markers of mesothelioma, transcriptional and metabolic profiles, as well as the status of p53 and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and NF2, were examined in primary cell lines and in two widely used commercial lines. Expression of MM-associated markers, as well as the status of CDKN2A, NF2, the 'gatekeeper' in MM development, and their products demonstrated that primary cell lines are more representative of the tumor close to its native state and show a degree of molecular diversity, thus capturing the disease heterogeneity in a patient cohort. Molecular profiling revealed a significantly different transcriptome and marked metabolic shift towards a greater glycolytic phenotype in commercial compared with primary cell lines. Our results highlight that multiple, appropriately characterised, patient-derived tumor cell lines are required to enable concurrent evaluation of molecular profiles versus drug response. Furthermore, application of this approach to other difficult-to-treat tumors would generate improved cellular models for pre-clinical evaluation of novel targeted therapies.

  12. Molecular profiling reveals primary mesothelioma cell lines recapitulate human disease

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, T; Sun, X M; Powley, I R; Galavotti, S; Grosso, S; Murphy, F A; Miles, G J; Cresswell, L; Antonov, A V; Bennett, J; Nakas, A; Dinsdale, D; Cain, K; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; MacFarlane, M

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive, fatal tumor strongly associated with asbestos exposure. There is an urgent need to improve MM patient outcomes and this requires functionally validated pre-clinical models. Mesothelioma-derived cell lines provide an essential and relatively robust tool and remain among the most widely used systems for candidate drug evaluation. Although a number of cell lines are commercially available, a detailed comparison of these commercial lines with freshly derived primary tumor cells to validate their suitability as pre-clinical models is lacking. To address this, patient-derived primary mesothelioma cell lines were established and characterized using complementary multidisciplinary approaches and bioinformatic analysis. Clinical markers of mesothelioma, transcriptional and metabolic profiles, as well as the status of p53 and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and NF2, were examined in primary cell lines and in two widely used commercial lines. Expression of MM-associated markers, as well as the status of CDKN2A, NF2, the ‘gatekeeper' in MM development, and their products demonstrated that primary cell lines are more representative of the tumor close to its native state and show a degree of molecular diversity, thus capturing the disease heterogeneity in a patient cohort. Molecular profiling revealed a significantly different transcriptome and marked metabolic shift towards a greater glycolytic phenotype in commercial compared with primary cell lines. Our results highlight that multiple, appropriately characterised, patient-derived tumor cell lines are required to enable concurrent evaluation of molecular profiles versus drug response. Furthermore, application of this approach to other difficult-to-treat tumors would generate improved cellular models for pre-clinical evaluation of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26891694

  13. Gene Mapping of a Mutant Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Using New Molecular Markers Suggests a Gene Encoding a YUC4-like Protein Regulates the Chasmogamous Flower Trait

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingbin; Somta, Prakit; Chen, Xin; Cui, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xingxing; Srinives, Peerasak

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) is a cleistogamous plant in which flowers are pollinated before they open, which prevents yield improvements through heterosis. We previously generated a chasmogamous mutant (CM) mungbean in which open flowers are pollinated. In this study, we developed insertion/deletion (indel) markers based on the transcriptome differences between CM and Sulu-1 (i.e., normal flowering) plants. An F2 population derived from a cross between CM and Sulu-1 was used for gene mapping. Segregation analyses revealed that a single recessive gene regulates the production of chasmogamous flowers. Using newly developed indel and simple sequence repeat markers, the cha gene responsible for the chasmogamous flower trait was mapped to a 277.1-kb segment on chromosome 6. Twelve candidate genes were detected in this segment, including Vradi06g12650, which encodes a YUCCA family protein associated with floral development. A single base pair deletion producing a frame-shift mutation and a premature stop codon in Vradi06g12650 was detected only in CM plants. This suggested that Vradi06g12650 is a cha candidate gene. Our results provide important information for the molecular breeding of chasmogamous mungbean lines, which may serve as new genetic resources for hybrid cultivar development. PMID:27375671

  14. [Bone and Stem Cells. Molecular mechanisms of the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts derived from hematopoietic cells].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikihito; Nakashima, Tomoki

    2014-04-01

    Mononuclear myeloid lineage cells, which are attracted to bone surfaces by chemokines and other factors, differentiate into multinucleated bone resorbing osteoclasts by cell fusion. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) , which is expressed in mesenchymal cells, including osteocytes and hypertrophic chondrocytes, is essential for osteoclast differentiation and function. Osteoclasts have the capacity to resorb bone and impaired osteoclast differentiation and/or function leads to osteopetrosis, a rare disease in which mineralized bone cannot be removed. In contrast, excessive osteoclastogenesis causes diseases such as osteoporosis. Recent findings suggest that osteoclasts can also function as positive and negative regulators of osteoblastic bone formation. Thus, understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate osteoclastogenesis is important to develop therapeutic approaches to prevent bone diseases. This paper reviews recent findings of the molecular mechanisms regulating osteoclast differentiation and function.

  15. Expression of zebrafish GATA 3 (gta3) during gastrulation and neurulation suggests a role in the specification of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Neave, B; Rodaway, A; Wilson, S W; Patient, R; Holder, N

    1995-06-01

    In order to understand the role of the transcription factor GATA 3 in vertebrate development, we have examined its expression and some aspects of its regulation during gastrulation and neurulation in the zebrafish. The complete coding sequence of the cDNA encoding the zebrafish GATA 3 homologue, termed gta3, is described. Analysis of expression patterns by in situ hybridisation shows the gene to be expressed during gastrulation in the ventral region of the embryo which includes tissue fated to form the non-neural ectoderm. By the end of gastrulation, there is a clear border to the gta3 expression domain that is close to the edge of the neural plate. Subsequently, gta3 expresses in the pronephric duct and in defined regions of the central nervous system which include specific cells in each segment of the spinal cord and nuclei in the brain. Double labelling embryos with a probe for gta3 and antibodies which identify differentiated neurons suggest that gta3 is dynamically expressed during the early differentiation phase of a subset of neurons but not in the terminal phase. Analysis of gta3 expression in dorsalised embryos and in cyc and spt mutant embryos indicates that the neural expression of the gene is subject to control by signals from the mesoderm, including both the notochord and the somites, which influence the segmental organisation of expression in the spinal cord.

  16. Porosome: the universal molecular machinery for cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2008-12-31

    Porosomes are supramolecular, lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. The mouth of the porosome opening to the outside, range in size from 150 nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas, to 12 nm in neurons, which dilates during cell secretion, returning to its resting size following completion of the process. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. In this mini review, the discovery of the porosome, its structure, function, isolation, chemistry, and reconstitution into lipid membrane, the molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling and fusion at the base of porosomes, and how this new information provides a paradigm shift in our understanding of cell secretion, is discussed.

  17. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  18. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  19. Biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas are molecularly similar to each other, but distinct from, non-sarcomatoid renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Kanishka; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Wani, Khalida; Patel, Lalit R; Voicu, Horatiu; Torres-Garcia, Wandaliz; Verhaak, Roel G W; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2015-10-01

    Sarcomatoid transformation, wherein an epithelioid carcinomatous tumour component coexists with a sarcomatoid histology, is a predictor of poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Our understanding of sarcomatoid change has been hindered by the lack of molecular examination. Thus, we sought to characterize molecularly the biphasic epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and compare them to non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We examined the transcriptome of the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of advanced stage sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=43) and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) from independent discovery and validation cohorts using the cDNA microarray and RNA-seq platforms. We analyzed DNA copy number profiles, generated using SNP arrays, from patients with sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=10) and advanced non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=155). The epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma had similar gene expression and DNA copy number signatures that were, however, distinct from those of high-grade, high-stage non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Prognostic clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression profiles were shared by the biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and the sarcomatoid component showed a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signature. Our genome-scale microarray-based transcript data were validated in an independent set of sarcomatoid and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas using RNA-seq. Sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is molecularly distinct from non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with its genetic programming largely shared by its biphasic morphological components. These data explain why a low percentage of sarcomatoid histology augurs a poor prognosis; suggest the

  20. [Basal cell carcinoma. Molecular genetics and unusual clinical features].

    PubMed

    Reifenberger, J

    2007-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common human cancer. Its incidence is steadily increasing. The development of basal cell carcinoma is linked to genetic factors, including the individual skin phototype, as well as the cumulative exposure to UVB. The vast majority of basal cell carcinomas are sporadic tumors, while familial cases associated with certain hereditary syndromes are less common. At the molecular level, basal cell carcinomas are characterized by aberrant activation of sonic hedgehog signaling, usually due to mutations either in the ptch or smoh genes. In addition, about half of the cases carry mutations in the tp53 tumor suppressor gene, which are often UVB-associated C-->T transition mutations. Clinically, basal cell carcinomas may show a high degree of phenotypical variability. In particular, tumors occurring in atypical locations, showing an unusual clinical appearance, or imitating other skin diseases may cause diagnostic problems. This review article summarizes the current state of the art concerning the etiology, predisposition and molecular genetics of basal cell carcinoma. In addition, examples of unusual clinical manifestations are illustrated. PMID:17440702

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/host cell interplay.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex biological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or nonphagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the upregulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells.

  2. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/Host Cell Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Colombo, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex bi-ological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or non-phagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the up-regulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells. PMID:22454195

  3. A Novel Small Molecular STAT3 Inhibitor, LY5, Inhibits Cell Viability, Cell Migration, and Angiogenesis in Medulloblastoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Jou, David; Wu, Xiaojuan; Yu, Wenying; Li, Chenglong; Houghton, Peter J.; Lin, Jiayuh

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling is persistently activated and could contribute to tumorigenesis of medulloblastoma. Numerous studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the persistent STAT3 signaling pathway results in decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis in human cancer cells, indicating that STAT3 is a viable molecular target for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated a novel non-peptide, cell-permeable small molecule, named LY5, to target STAT3 in medulloblastoma cells. LY5 inhibited persistent STAT3 phosphorylation and induced apoptosis in human medulloblastoma cell lines expressing constitutive STAT3 phosphorylation. The inhibition of STAT3 signaling by LY5 was confirmed by down-regulating the expression of the downstream targets of STAT3, including cyclin D1, bcl-XL, survivin, and micro-RNA-21. LY5 also inhibited the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF-2, and leukemia inhibitory factor in medulloblastoma cells, but did not inhibit STAT1 and STAT5 phosphorylation stimulated by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and EGF, respectively. In addition, LY5 blocked the STAT3 nuclear localization induced by IL-6, but did not block STAT1 and STAT5 nuclear translocation mediated by IFN-γ and EGF, respectively. A combination of LY5 with cisplatin or x-ray radiation also showed more potent effects than single treatment alone in the inhibition of cell viability in human medulloblastoma cells. Furthermore, LY5 demonstrated a potent inhibitory activity on cell migration and angiogenesis. Taken together, these findings indicate LY5 inhibits persistent and inducible STAT3 phosphorylation and suggest that LY5 is a promising therapeutic drug candidate for medulloblastoma by inhibiting persistent STAT3 signaling. PMID:25313399

  4. Molecular Insights for Optimizing T Cell Receptor Specificity Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hebeisen, Michael; Oberle, Susanne G.; Presotto, Danilo; Speiser, Daniel E.; Zehn, Dietmar; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8 T cells mediate immunity to pathogens and they are able to eliminate malignant cells. Immunity to viruses and bacteria primarily involves CD8 T cells bearing high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs), which are specific to pathogen-derived (non-self) antigens. Given the thorough elimination of high affinity self/tumor-antigen reactive T cells by central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms, anti-cancer immunity mostly depends on TCRs with intermediate-to-low affinity for self-antigens. Because of this, a promising novel therapeutic approach to increase the efficacy of tumor-reactive T cells is to engineer their TCRs, with the aim to enhance their binding kinetics to pMHC complexes, or to directly manipulate the TCR-signaling cascades. Such manipulations require a detailed knowledge on how pMHC-TCR and co-receptors binding kinetics impact the T cell response. In this review, we present the current knowledge in this field. We discuss future challenges in identifying and targeting the molecular mechanisms to enhance the function of natural or TCR-affinity optimized T cells, and we provide perspectives for the development of protective anti-tumor T cell responses. PMID:23801991

  5. Effect of molecular electrical doping on polyfuran based photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuwen; Opitz, Andreas; Salzmann, Ingo; Frisch, Johannes; Cohen, Erez; Bendikov, Michael; Koch, Norbert

    2015-05-18

    The electronic, optical, and morphological properties of molecularly p-doped polyfuran (PF) films were investigated over a wide range of doping ratio in order to explore the impact of doping in photovoltaic applications. We find evidence for integer-charge transfer between PF and the prototypical molecular p-dopant tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) and employed the doped polymer in bilayer organic solar cells using fullerene as acceptor. The conductivity increase in the PF films at dopant loadings ≤2% significantly enhances the short-circuit current of photovoltaic devices. For higher doping ratios, however, F4TCNQ is found to precipitate at the heterojunction between the doped donor polymer and the fullerene acceptor. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that its presence acts beneficial to the energy-level alignment by doubling the open-circuit voltage of solar cells from 0.2 V to ca. 0.4 V, as compared to pristine PF.

  6. Effect of molecular electrical doping on polyfuran based photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuwen; Frisch, Johannes; Opitz, Andreas; Cohen, Erez; Bendikov, Michael; Koch, Norbert; Salzmann, Ingo

    2015-05-01

    The electronic, optical, and morphological properties of molecularly p-doped polyfuran (PF) films were investigated over a wide range of doping ratio in order to explore the impact of doping in photovoltaic applications. We find evidence for integer-charge transfer between PF and the prototypical molecular p-dopant tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) and employed the doped polymer in bilayer organic solar cells using fullerene as acceptor. The conductivity increase in the PF films at dopant loadings ≤2% significantly enhances the short-circuit current of photovoltaic devices. For higher doping ratios, however, F4TCNQ is found to precipitate at the heterojunction between the doped donor polymer and the fullerene acceptor. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that its presence acts beneficial to the energy-level alignment by doubling the open-circuit voltage of solar cells from 0.2 V to ca. 0.4 V, as compared to pristine PF.

  7. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings.

  8. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca2+ and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings. PMID:27200056

  9. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings. PMID:27200056

  10. Localizing transcripts to single cells suggests an important role of uncultured deltaproteobacteria in the termite gut hydrogen economy.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Adam Z; Zhang, Xinning; Lucey, Kaitlyn S; Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Trivedi, Vikas; Choi, Harry M T; Pierce, Niles A; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2013-10-01

    Identifying microbes responsible for particular environmental functions is challenging, given that most environments contain an uncultivated microbial diversity. Here we combined approaches to identify bacteria expressing genes relevant to catabolite flow and to locate these genes within their environment, in this case the gut of a "lower," wood-feeding termite. First, environmental transcriptomics revealed that 2 of the 23 formate dehydrogenase (FDH) genes known in the system accounted for slightly more than one-half of environmental transcripts. FDH is an essential enzyme of H2 metabolism that is ultimately important for the assimilation of lignocellulose-derived energy by the insect. Second, single-cell PCR analysis revealed that two different bacterial types expressed these two transcripts. The most commonly transcribed FDH in situ is encoded by a previously unappreciated deltaproteobacterium, whereas the other FDH is spirochetal. Third, PCR analysis of fractionated gut contents demonstrated that these bacteria reside in different spatial niches; the spirochete is free-swimming, whereas the deltaproteobacterium associates with particulates. Fourth, the deltaproteobacteria expressing FDH were localized to protozoa via hybridization chain reaction-FISH, an approach for multiplexed, spatial mapping of mRNA and rRNA targets. These results underscore the importance of making direct vs. inference-based gene-species associations, and have implications in higher termites, the most successful termite lineage, in which protozoa have been lost from the gut community. Contrary to expectations, in higher termites, FDH genes related to those from the protozoan symbiont dominate, whereas most others were absent, suggesting that a successful gene variant can persist and flourish after a gut perturbation alters a major environmental niche.

  11. In focus: molecular and cell biology research in China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuebiao; Li, Dangsheng; Pei, Gang

    2013-09-01

    An interactive, intellectual environment with good funding opportunities is essential for the development and success of basic research. The fast-growing economy and investment in science, together with a visionary plan, have attracted foreign scholars to work in China, motivated world-class Chinese scientists to return and strengthened the country's international collaborations. As a result, molecular and cell biology research in China has evolved rapidly over the past decade.

  12. Heterogeneous abnormalities of CCND1 and RB1 in primary cutaneous T-Cell lymphomas suggesting impaired cell cycle control in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin; Orchard, Guy; Vonderheid, Eric C; Nowell, Peter C; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Russell-Jones, Robin; Young, Bryan D; Whittaker, Sean J

    2006-06-01

    Upregulation of cyclin D1/B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (CCND1/BCL1) is present in most mantle cell lymphomas with the t(11;14)(q13;q32) translocation. However, little is known about the abnormalities of CCND1 and its regulator RB1 in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). We analyzed CCND and RB status in CTCL using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and Affymetrix expression microarray. FISH revealed loss of CCND1/BCL1 in five of nine Sézary syndrome (SS) cases but gain in two cases, and RB1 loss in four of seven SS cases. IHC showed absent CCND1/BCL1 expression in 18 of 30 SS, 10 of 23 mycosis fungoides (MF), and three of 10 primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (C-ALCL). Increased CCND1/BCL1 expression was seen in nine MF, seven C-ALCL, and six SS cases. Absent RB1 expression was detected in 8 of 12 MF and 7 of 9 SS cases, and raised RB1 expression in 7 of 8 C-ALCL. Affymetrix revealed increased gene expression of CCND2 in four of eight CTCL cases, CCND3 in three cases, and CDKN2C in two cases with a normal expression of CCND1 and RB1. These findings suggest heterogeneous abnormalities of CCND and RB in CTCL, in which dysregulated CCND and RB1 may lead to impaired cell cycle control.

  13. Inhibition of cell adhesion by high molecular weight kininogen

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    An anti-cell adhesion globulin was purified from human plasma by heparin-affinity chromatography. The purified globulin inhibited spreading of osteosarcoma and melanoma cells on vitronectin, and of endothelial cells, platelets, and mononuclear blood cells on vitronectin or fibrinogen. It did not inhibit cell spreading on fibronectin. The protein had the strongest antiadhesive effect when preadsorbed onto the otherwise adhesive surfaces. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the globulin is cleaved (kinin-free) high molecular weight kininogen (HKa). Globulin fractions from normal plasma immunodepleted of high molecular weight kininogen (HK) or from an individual deficient of HK lacked adhesive activity. Uncleaved single- chain HK preadsorbed at neutral pH, HKa preadsorbed at pH greater than 8.0, and HKa degraded further to release its histidine-rich domain had little anti-adhesive activity. These results indicate that the cationic histidine-rich domain is critical for anti-adhesive activity and is somehow mobilized upon cleavage. Vitronectin was not displaced from the surface by HKa. Thus, cleavage of HK by kallikrein results in both release of bradykinin, a potent vasoactive and growth-promoting peptide, and formation of a potent anti-adhesive protein. PMID:1370494

  14. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Contreras, Ricardo; Vaca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore) at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area. PMID:21876785

  15. Molecular Characterization of Circulating Plasma Cells in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lugar, Patricia L.; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P1, suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:23028528

  16. Molecular characterization of circulating plasma cells in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lugar, Patricia L; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C; Dave, Sandeep S; Lipsky, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P(1), suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype.

  17. Single-cell approaches for molecular classification of endocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, James; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sosa, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review In this review, we summarize recent developments in single-cell technologies that can be employed for the functional and molecular classification of endocrine cells in normal and neoplastic tissue. Recent findings The emergence of new platforms for the isolation, analysis, and dynamic assessment of individual cell identity and reactive behavior enables experimental deconstruction of intratumoral heterogeneity and other contexts, where variability in cell signaling and biochemical responsiveness inform biological function and clinical presentation. These tools are particularly appropriate for examining and classifying endocrine neoplasias, as the clinical sequelae of these tumors are often driven by disrupted hormonal responsiveness secondary to compromised cell signaling. Single-cell methods allow for multidimensional experimental designs incorporating both spatial and temporal parameters with the capacity to probe dynamic cell signaling behaviors and kinetic response patterns dependent upon sequential agonist challenge. Summary Intratumoral heterogeneity in the provenance, composition, and biological activity of different forms of endocrine neoplasia presents a significant challenge for prognostic assessment. Single-cell technologies provide an array of powerful new approaches uniquely well suited for dissecting complex endocrine tumors. Studies examining the relationship between clinical behavior and tumor compositional variations in cellular activity are now possible, providing new opportunities to deconstruct the underlying mechanisms of endocrine neoplasia. PMID:26632769

  18. Molecular modeling and computational analyses suggests that the Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic regulator protein ExoR adopts a superhelical fold and is controlled by a unique mechanism of proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wiech, Eliza M; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic ExoR protein and the ExoS/ChvI two-component system form a regulatory mechanism that directly controls the transformation of free-living to host-invading cells. In the absence of crystal structures, understanding the molecular mechanism of interaction between ExoR and the ExoS sensor, which is believed to drive the key regulatory step in the invasion process, remains a major challenge. In this study, we present a theoretical structural model of the active form of ExoR protein, ExoRm, generated using computational methods. Our model suggests that ExoR possesses a super-helical fold comprising 12 α-helices forming six Sel1-like repeats, including two that were unidentified in previous studies. This fold is highly conducive to mediating protein–protein interactions and this is corroborated by the identification of putative protein binding sites on the surface of the ExoRm protein. Our studies reveal two novel insights: (a) an extended conformation of the third Sel1-like repeat that might be important for ExoR regulatory function and (b) a buried proteolytic site that implies a unique proteolytic mechanism. This study provides new and interesting insights into the structure of S. meliloti ExoR, lays the groundwork for elaborating the molecular mechanism of ExoRm cleavage, ExoRm–ExoS interactions, and studies of ExoR homologs in other bacterial host interactions. PMID:25492513

  19. Proteomic analysis of the molecular response of Raji cells to maslinic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Yap, W H; Khoo, K S; Lim, S H; Yeo, C C; Lim, Y M

    2012-01-15

    Maslinic acid, a natural pentacyclic triterpene has been shown to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in some tumour cell lines. We studied the molecular response of Raji cells towards maslinic acid treatment. A proteomics approach was employed to identify the target proteins. Seventeen differentially expressed proteins including those involved in DNA replication, microtubule filament assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking, cell signaling, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal organization were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS. The down-regulation of stathmin, Ran GTPase activating protein-1 (RanBP1), and microtubule associated protein RP/EB family member 1 (EB1) were confirmed by Western blotting. The study of the effect of maslinic acid on Raji cell cycle regulation showed that it induced a G1 cell cycle arrest. The differential proteomic changes in maslinic acid-treated Raji cells demonstrated that it also inhibited expression of dUTPase and stathmin which are known to induce early S and G2 cell cycle arrests. The mechanism of maslinic acid-induced cell cycle arrest may be mediated by inhibiting cyclin D1 expression and enhancing the levels of cell cycle-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 protein. Maslinic acid suppressed nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity which is known to stimulate expression of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory gene products. These results suggest that maslinic acid affects multiple signaling molecules and inhibits fundamental pathways regulating cell growth and survival in Raji cells. PMID:21893403

  20. Molecular mechanism of extrinsic factors affecting anti-aging of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Chen, Ying-Hui; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that stem cells possess the anti-aging ability to self-renew and maintain differentiation potentials, and quiescent state. The objective of this review is to discuss the micro-environment where stem cells reside in vivo, the secreted factors to which stem cells are exposed, the hypoxic environment, and intracellular factors including genome stability, mitochondria integrity, epigenetic regulators, calorie restrictions, nutrients, and vitamin D. Secreted tumor growth factor-β and fibroblast growth factor-2 are reported to play a role in stem cell quiescence. Extracellular matrices may interact with caveolin-1, the lipid raft on cell membrane to regulate quiescence. N-cadherin, the adhesive protein on niche cells provides support for stem cells. The hypoxic micro-environment turns on hypoxia-inducible factor-1 to prevent mesenchymal stem cells aging through p16 and p21 down-regulation. Mitochondria express glucosephosphate isomerase to undergo glycolysis and prevent cellular aging. Epigenetic regulators such as p300, protein inhibitors of activated Stats and H19 help maintain stem cell quiescence. In addition, calorie restriction may lead to secretion of paracrines cyclic ADP-ribose by intestinal niche cells, which help maintain intestinal stem cells. In conclusion, it is crucial to understand the anti-aging phenomena of stem cells at the molecular level so that the key to solving the aging mystery may be unlocked. PMID:25815136

  1. Molecular mechanism of extrinsic factors affecting anti-aging of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Chen, Ying-Hui; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei

    2015-03-26

    Scientific evidence suggests that stem cells possess the anti-aging ability to self-renew and maintain differentiation potentials, and quiescent state. The objective of this review is to discuss the micro-environment where stem cells reside in vivo, the secreted factors to which stem cells are exposed, the hypoxic environment, and intracellular factors including genome stability, mitochondria integrity, epigenetic regulators, calorie restrictions, nutrients, and vitamin D. Secreted tumor growth factor-β and fibroblast growth factor-2 are reported to play a role in stem cell quiescence. Extracellular matrices may interact with caveolin-1, the lipid raft on cell membrane to regulate quiescence. N-cadherin, the adhesive protein on niche cells provides support for stem cells. The hypoxic micro-environment turns on hypoxia-inducible factor-1 to prevent mesenchymal stem cells aging through p16 and p21 down-regulation. Mitochondria express glucosephosphate isomerase to undergo glycolysis and prevent cellular aging. Epigenetic regulators such as p300, protein inhibitors of activated Stats and H19 help maintain stem cell quiescence. In addition, calorie restriction may lead to secretion of paracrines cyclic ADP-ribose by intestinal niche cells, which help maintain intestinal stem cells. In conclusion, it is crucial to understand the anti-aging phenomena of stem cells at the molecular level so that the key to solving the aging mystery may be unlocked.

  2. Investigation of six testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility genes suggests a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Robert; Andreassen, Kristine E; Kristiansen, Wenche; Aschim, Elin L; Bremnes, Roy M; Dahl, Olav; Fosså, Sophie D; Klepp, Olbjørn; Langberg, Carl W; Solberg, Arne; Tretli, Steinar; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Haugen, Trine B; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik

    2013-08-15

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) risk in the genes ATF7IP, BAK1, DMRT1, KITLG, SPRY4 and TERT. In the present study, we validate these associations in a Scandinavian population, and explore effect modification by parental sex and differences in associations between the major histological subtypes seminoma and non-seminoma. A total of 118 SNPs in the six genes were genotyped in a population-based Swedish-Norwegian sample comprising 831 TGCT case-parent triads, 474 dyads, 712 singletons and 3919 population controls. Seven hundred and thirty-four additional SNPs were imputed using reference haplotypes from the 1000 genomes project. SNP-TGCT association was investigated using a likelihood-based association test for nuclear families and unrelated subjects implemented in the software package UNPHASED. Forward stepwise regression within each gene was applied to determine independent association signals. Effect modifications by parent-of-origin and effect differences between histological subtypes were explored. We observed strong association between SNPs in all six genes and TGCT (lowest P-value per gene: ATF7IP 6.2 × 10(-6); BAK1 2.1 × 10(-10); DMRT1 6.7 × 10(-25); KITLG 2.1 × 10(-48); SPRY4 1.4 × 10(-29); TERT 1.8 × 10(-18)). Stepwise regression indicated three independent signals for BAK1 and TERT, two for SPRY4 and one each for DMRT1, ATF7IP and KITLG. A significant parent-of-origin effect was observed for rs10463352 in SPRY4 (maternal odds ratio = 1.72, paternal odds ratio = 0.99, interaction P = 0.0013). No significant effect differences between seminomas and non-seminomas were found. In summary, we validated previously reported genetic associations with TGCT in a Scandinavian population, and observed suggestive evidence of a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4. PMID:23640991

  3. Different sucrose-isomaltase response of Caco-2 cells to glucose and maltose suggests dietary maltose sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using the small intestine enterocyte Caco-2 cell model, sucrase-isomaltase (SI, the mucosal alpha-glucosidase complex) expression and modification were examined relative to exposure to different mono- and disaccharide glycemic carbohydrates. Caco-2/TC7 cells were grown on porous supports to post-con...

  4. Reverse engineering the mechanical and molecular pathways in stem cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai; Gordon, Richard; Cao, Tong

    2015-03-01

    The formation of relevant biological structures poses a challenge for regenerative medicine. During embryogenesis, embryonic cells differentiate into somatic tissues and undergo morphogenesis to produce three-dimensional organs. Using stem cells, we can recapitulate this process and create biological constructs for therapeutic transplantation. However, imperfect imitation of nature sometimes results in in vitro artifacts that fail to recapitulate the function of native organs. It has been hypothesized that developing cells may self-organize into tissue-specific structures given a correct in vitro environment. This proposition is supported by the generation of neo-organoids from stem cells. We suggest that morphogenesis may be reverse engineered to uncover its interacting mechanical pathway and molecular circuitry. By harnessing the latent architecture of stem cells, novel tissue-engineering strategies may be conceptualized for generating self-organizing transplants.

  5. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION: VISUALIZATION OF MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS IN LIVING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kerppola, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of experimental methods have been developed for the analysis of protein interactions. The majority of these methods either require disruption of the cells to detect molecular interactions or rely on indirect detection of the protein interaction. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay provides a direct approach for the visualization of molecular interactions in living cells and organisms. The BiFC approach is based on the facilitated association between two fragments of a fluorescent protein when the fragments are brought together by an interaction between proteins fused to the fragments. The BiFC approach has been used for visualization of interactions among a variety of structurally divers interaction partners in many different cell types and. It enables detection of transient complexes as well as complexes formed by a subpopulation of the interaction partners. It is essential to include negative controls in each experiment in which the interface between the interaction partners has been mutated or deleted. The BiFC assay has been adapted for simultaneous visualization of multiple protein complexes in the same cell and the competition for shared interaction partners. A ubiquitin-mediated fluorescence complementation (UbFC) assay has also been developed for visualization of the covalent modification of proteins by ubiquitin family peptides. These fluorescence complementation assays have a great potential to illuminate a variety of biological interactions in the future. PMID:18155474

  6. [Cell therapy in cartilage repair: cellular and molecular bases].

    PubMed

    Corvol, Marie-Thérèse; Tahiri, Khadija; Montembault, Alexandra; Daumard, Alain; Savouret, Jean-François; Rannou, François

    2008-01-01

    The destruction of articular cartilage represents the outcome of most inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases and leads to severe disability. Articular cartilage being unable to repair spontaneously, alterations of the joint surface often results in end-stage osteoarthritis, requiring surgical intervention and total joint replacement. This makes damaged tissues repair a major challenge in our aging society. Cartilage harbors only one cell type, the chondrocyte, which synthesizes and secretes specific matrix proteins such as type II collagen and high molecular weight proteoglycans. Matrix proteins are responsible for the conservation of the chondrocyte phenotype and the maintenance of the mechanical functions of cartilage. Development of therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair should thus comprise not only the replacement of lost cartilage cells but also that of extracellular matrix with cartilage-like properties. Different protocols are under investigation. The most commonly employed materials include transplantation of autologous osteochondral tissue. More recently, cell-based therapies using autologous mature chondrocytes or pre-chondrogenic stem cells have drawn particular attention. Tissue-engineering procedures represent the actual trend in cartilage repair. This approach combines biodegradable polymeric three-dimensional matrixes and isolated prechondrogenic stem cells. The cells are seeded within the biocompatible matrix and then implanted into the joint. Numerous non-degradable and degradable polymers, which efficiently "mimic" the natural surroundings of cartilage cells, are currently under investigation.

  7. Integrated molecular analysis of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kitanaka, Akira; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shimamura, Teppei; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Totoki, Yasushi; Chiba, Kenichi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Nagae, Genta; Ishii, Ryohei; Muto, Satsuki; Kotani, Shinichi; Watatani, Yosaku; Takeda, June; Sanada, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Sato, Yusuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Makishima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Ma, Guangyong; Nosaka, Kisato; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Itonaga, Hidehiro; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Munakata, Wataru; Ogasawara, Hideaki; Sato, Toshitaka; Sasai, Ken; Muramoto, Kenzo; Penova, Marina; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Shide, Kotaro; Kubuki, Yoko; Hidaka, Tomonori; Kameda, Takuro; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Ishiyama, Ken; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Tobinai, Kensei; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nureki, Osamu; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Matsuoka, Masao; Miyano, Satoru; Shimoda, Kazuya; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-11-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a peripheral T cell neoplasm of largely unknown genetic basis, associated with human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here we describe an integrated molecular study in which we performed whole-genome, exome, transcriptome and targeted resequencing, as well as array-based copy number and methylation analyses, in a total of 426 ATL cases. The identified alterations overlap significantly with the HTLV-1 Tax interactome and are highly enriched for T cell receptor-NF-κB signaling, T cell trafficking and other T cell-related pathways as well as immunosurveillance. Other notable features include a predominance of activating mutations (in PLCG1, PRKCB, CARD11, VAV1, IRF4, FYN, CCR4 and CCR7) and gene fusions (CTLA4-CD28 and ICOS-CD28). We also discovered frequent intragenic deletions involving IKZF2, CARD11 and TP73 and mutations in GATA3, HNRNPA2B1, GPR183, CSNK2A1, CSNK2B and CSNK1A1. Our findings not only provide unique insights into key molecules in T cell signaling but will also guide the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics in this intractable tumor. PMID:26437031

  8. Metabolite profiling of CHO cells: Molecular reflections of bioprocessing effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Sellick, Christopher A; Croxford, Alexandra S; Maqsood, Arfa R; Stephens, Gill M; Westerhoff, Hans V; Goodacre, Royston; Dickson, Alan J

    2015-09-01

    Whilst development of medium and feeds has provided major advances in recombinant protein production in CHO cells, the fundamental understanding is limited. We have applied metabolite profiling with established robust (GC-MS) analytics to define the molecular loci by which two yield-enhancing feeds improve recombinant antibody yields from a model GS-CHO cell line. With data across core metabolic pathways, that report on metabolism within several cellular compartments, these data identify key metabolites and events associated with increased cell survival and specific productivity of cells. Of particular importance, increased process efficiency was linked to the functional activity of the mitochondria, with the amount and time course of use/production of intermediates of the citric acid cycle, for uses such as lipid biosynthesis, precursor generation and energy production, providing direct indicators of cellular status with respect to productivity. The data provide clear association between specific cellular metabolic indicators and cell process efficiency, extending from prior indications of the relevance of lactate metabolic balance to other redox sinks (glycerol, sorbitol and threitol). The information, and its interpretation, identifies targets for engineering cell culture efficiency, either from genetic or environmental perspectives, and greater understanding of the significance of specific medium components towards overall CHO cell bioprocessing.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of a Molecular Model of the Budding Yeast Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Katherine C.; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Gyorffy, Bela; Val, John; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J.

    2000-01-01

    The molecular machinery of cell cycle control is known in more detail for budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, than for any other eukaryotic organism. In recent years, many elegant experiments on budding yeast have dissected the roles of cyclin molecules (Cln1–3 and Clb1–6) in coordinating the events of DNA synthesis, bud emergence, spindle formation, nuclear division, and cell separation. These experimental clues suggest a mechanism for the principal molecular interactions controlling cyclin synthesis and degradation. Using standard techniques of biochemical kinetics, we convert the mechanism into a set of differential equations, which describe the time courses of three major classes of cyclin-dependent kinase activities. Model in hand, we examine the molecular events controlling “Start” (the commitment step to a new round of chromosome replication, bud formation, and mitosis) and “Finish” (the transition from metaphase to anaphase, when sister chromatids are pulled apart and the bud separates from the mother cell) in wild-type cells and 50 mutants. The model accounts for many details of the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of cell cycle control in budding yeast. PMID:10637314

  10. Tracking neuronal marker expression inside living differentiating cells using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Della Vedova, Paolo; Hansen, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2013-12-19

    Monitoring gene expression is an important tool for elucidating mechanisms of cellular function. In order to monitor gene expression during nerve cell development, molecular beacon (MB) probes targeting markers representing different stages of neuronal differentiation were designed and synthesized as 2'-O-methyl RNA backbone oligonucleotides. MBs were transfected into human mesencephalic cells (LUHMES) using streptolysin-O-based membrane permeabilization. Mathematical modeling, simulations and experiments indicated that MB concentration was equal to the MB in the transfection medium after 10 min transfection. The cells will then each contain about 60,000 MBs. Gene expression was detected at different time points using fluorescence microscopy. Nestin and NeuN mRNA were expressed in approximately 35% of the LUHMES cells grown in growth medium, and in 80-90% of cells after differentiation. MAP2 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNAs were expressed 2 and 3 days post induction of differentiation, respectively. Oct 4 was not detected with MB in these cells and signal was not increased over time suggesting that MB are generally stable inside the cells. The gene expression changes measured using MBs were confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results suggest that MBs are simple to use sensors inside living cell, and particularly useful for studying dynamic gene expression in heterogeneous cell populations.

  11. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  12. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

  13. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Phair, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist–electrical engineer–systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build—and subject to exhaustive experimental tests—models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set. PMID:25368428

  14. An 80-Year Experience with Optic Nerve Glioma Cases at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology: Evolution from Museum to Molecular Evaluation Suggests Possibe Interventions in the Cellular Senescence and Microglial Pathways (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J. Douglas; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Rushing, Elisabeth; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Eberhart, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether p16, a molecular marker of cellular senescence, and CD68, a microglial marker, are detectible in optic nerve glioma tissue stored for decades, thus providing potential targets for pharmacologic intervention. Methods: Cases were retrieved from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Registry of Ophthalmic Pathology. Clinical information was tabulated. In specimens with sufficient tissue, a tissue microarray was constructed to conduct molecular studies. Results: Ninety-two cases were included: gender distribution was in a ratio of one male to 1.6 females, and age range was 2 months to 50 years (average age, 10.8 years). Neurofibromatosis type 1 was identified in 10 cases (10.8%). The majority presented with decreased vision and exophthalmos. Forty-eight cases were studied by a tissue microarray construction. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, a control for immunoreactivity, was positive in 46 cases (96%). Immunoreactivity for p16 protein was seen in 36 cases (75%) and CD68-positive cells in 34 (71%). Limitations include referral bias, limited clinical information, limited amount of tissue, and extended period of tissue preservation. Conclusions: Optic nerve glioma is a tumor of the visual axis in young individuals, which is generally indolent but with a variable clinical course. Traditional histopathologic techniques have not been reliably predictive of clinical course. This microarray contains tumors with representative demographic, clinical, and histologic characteristics for optic nerve glioma. Immunoreactivity for p16 protein and CD68 is positive in the majority. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the variable clinical course and identify therapeutic targets in the cell senescence and microglial pathways. PMID:25411512

  15. Molecular signaling in live cells studied by FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2012-03-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. We have used FRET to assess temporal and spatial characteristics for signaling molecules, including tyrosine kinases Src and FAK, small GTPase Rac, calcium, and a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Activations of Src and Rac by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) led to distinct subcellular patterns during cell migration on micropatterned surface, and these two enzymes interact with each other to form a feedback loop with differential regulations at different subcellular locations. We have developed FRET biosensors to monitor FAK activities at rafts vs. non-raft regions of plasma membrane in live cells. In response to cell adhesion on matrix proteins or stimulation by PDGF, the raft-targeting FAK biosensor showed a stronger FRET response than that at non-rafts. The FAK activation at rafts induced by PDGF is mediated by Src. In contrast, the FAK activation at rafts induced by adhesion is independent of Src activity, but rather is essential for Src activation. Thus, Src is upstream to FAK in response to chemical stimulation (PDGF), but FAK is upstream to Src in response to mechanical stimulation (adhesion). A novel biosensor has been developed to dynamically visualize the activity of membrane type-1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which proteolytically remodels the extracellular matrix. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed active MT1-MMP to the leading edge of migrating live cancer cells with local accumulation of EGF receptor via a process dependent on an intact cytoskeletal network. In summary, FRET-based biosensors enable the elucidation of molecular processes and hierarchies underlying spatiotemporal regulation of biological and pathological processes, thus advancing our knowledge on how cells perceive mechanical/chemical cues in space and time to coordinate

  16. Molecular signaling in live cells studied by FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2011-11-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. We have used FRET to assess temporal and spatial characteristics for signaling molecules, including tyrosine kinases Src and FAK, small GTPase Rac, calcium, and a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Activations of Src and Rac by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) led to distinct subcellular patterns during cell migration on micropatterned surface, and these two enzymes interact with each other to form a feedback loop with differential regulations at different subcellular locations. We have developed FRET biosensors to monitor FAK activities at rafts vs. non-raft regions of plasma membrane in live cells. In response to cell adhesion on matrix proteins or stimulation by PDGF, the raft-targeting FAK biosensor showed a stronger FRET response than that at non-rafts. The FAK activation at rafts induced by PDGF is mediated by Src. In contrast, the FAK activation at rafts induced by adhesion is independent of Src activity, but rather is essential for Src activation. Thus, Src is upstream to FAK in response to chemical stimulation (PDGF), but FAK is upstream to Src in response to mechanical stimulation (adhesion). A novel biosensor has been developed to dynamically visualize the activity of membrane type-1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which proteolytically remodels the extracellular matrix. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed active MT1-MMP to the leading edge of migrating live cancer cells with local accumulation of EGF receptor via a process dependent on an intact cytoskeletal network. In summary, FRET-based biosensors enable the elucidation of molecular processes and hierarchies underlying spatiotemporal regulation of biological and pathological processes, thus advancing our knowledge on how cells perceive mechanical/chemical cues in space and time to coordinate

  17. Molecular features of a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with spontaneous metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, F A; Betts, D R; Niggli, F K; Schäfer, B W

    2000-01-01

    A novel human cell line was established from a primary botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction investigations of this cell line, called RUCH-2, demonstrated expression of the regulatory factors PAX3, Myf3 and Myf5. After 3.5 months in culture, cells underwent a crisis after which Myf3 and Myf5 could no longer be detected, whereas PAX3 expression remained constant over the entire period. Karyotype analysis revealed breakpoints in regions similar to previously described alterations in primary rhabdomyosarcoma tumour samples. Interestingly, cells progressed to a metastatic phenotype, as observed by enhanced invasiveness in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice in vivo. On the molecular level, microarray analysis before and after progression identified extensive changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix. As expected, down-regulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases were observed. Extensive down-regulation of several death receptors of the tumour necrosis factor family suggests that these cells might have an altered response to appropriate apoptotic stimuli. The RUCH-2 cell line represents a cellular model to study multistep tumorigenesis in human rhabdomyosarcoma, allowing molecular comparison of tumorigenic versus metastatic cancer cells. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10735512

  18. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  19. Feasibility of a workflow for the molecular characterization of single cells by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salvianti, Francesca; Rotunno, Giada; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Pestrin, Marta; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Di Leo, Angelo; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the feasibility of a protocol for the isolation and molecular characterization of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patients using a single-cell next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. To reach this goal we used as a model an artificial sample obtained by spiking a breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) into the blood of a healthy donor. Tumor cells were enriched and enumerated by CellSearch(®) and subsequently isolated by DEPArray™ to obtain single or pooled pure samples to be submitted to the analysis of the mutational status of multiple genes involved in cancer. Upon whole genome amplification, samples were analysed by NGS on the Ion Torrent PGM™ system (Life Technologies) using the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (Life Technologies), designed to investigate genomic "hot spot" regions of 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We successfully sequenced five single cells, a pool of 5 cells and DNA from a cellular pellet of the same cell line with a mean depth of the sequencing reaction ranging from 1581 to 3479 reads. We found 27 sequence variants in 18 genes, 15 of which already reported in the COSMIC or dbSNP databases. We confirmed the presence of two somatic mutations, in the BRAF and TP53 gene, which had been already reported for this cells line, but also found new mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Three variants were common to all the analysed samples, while 18 were present only in a single cell suggesting a high heterogeneity within the same cell line. This paper presents an optimized workflow for the molecular characterization of multiple genes in single cells by NGS. The described pipeline can be easily transferred to the study of single CTCs from oncologic patients. PMID:27077040

  20. Feasibility of a workflow for the molecular characterization of single cells by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Rotunno, Giada; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Pestrin, Marta; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Di Leo, Angelo; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the feasibility of a protocol for the isolation and molecular characterization of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patients using a single-cell next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. To reach this goal we used as a model an artificial sample obtained by spiking a breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) into the blood of a healthy donor. Tumor cells were enriched and enumerated by CellSearch® and subsequently isolated by DEPArray™ to obtain single or pooled pure samples to be submitted to the analysis of the mutational status of multiple genes involved in cancer. Upon whole genome amplification, samples were analysed by NGS on the Ion Torrent PGM™ system (Life Technologies) using the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (Life Technologies), designed to investigate genomic “hot spot” regions of 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We successfully sequenced five single cells, a pool of 5 cells and DNA from a cellular pellet of the same cell line with a mean depth of the sequencing reaction ranging from 1581 to 3479 reads. We found 27 sequence variants in 18 genes, 15 of which already reported in the COSMIC or dbSNP databases. We confirmed the presence of two somatic mutations, in the BRAF and TP53 gene, which had been already reported for this cells line, but also found new mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Three variants were common to all the analysed samples, while 18 were present only in a single cell suggesting a high heterogeneity within the same cell line. This paper presents an optimized workflow for the molecular characterization of multiple genes in single cells by NGS. The described pipeline can be easily transferred to the study of single CTCs from oncologic patients. PMID:27077040

  1. Molecular bulk heterojunctions: an emerging approach to organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Jean

    2009-11-17

    The predicted exhaustion of fossil energy resources and the pressure of environmental constraints are stimulating an intensification of research on renewable energy sources, in particular, on the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. In this context, organic solar cells are attracting increasing interest that is motivated by the possibility of fabricating large-area, lightweight, and flexible devices using simple techniques with low environmental impact. Organic solar cells are based on a heterojunction resulting from the contact of a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) material. Absorption of solar photons creates excitons, Coulombically bound electron-hole pairs, which diffuse to the D/A interface, where they are dissociated into free holes and electrons by the electric field. D/A heterojunctions can be created with two types of architectures, namely, bilayer heterojunction and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. BHJ cells combine the advantages of easier fabrication and higher conversion efficiency due to the considerably extended D/A interface. Until now, the development of BHJ solar cells has been essentially based on the use of soluble pi-conjugated polymers as donor material. Intensive interdisciplinary research carried out in the past 10 years has led to an increase in the conversion efficiency of BHJ cells from 0.10 to more than 5.0%. These investigations have progressively established regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the standard donor material for BHJ solar cells, owing to a useful combination of optical and charge-transport properties. However, besides the limit imposed to the maximum conversion efficiency by its intrinsic electronic properties, P3HT and more generally polymers pose several problems related to the control of their structure, molecular weight, polydispersity, and purification. In this context, recent years have seen the emergence of an alternative approach based on the replacement of polydisperse polymers by soluble

  2. Molecular bulk heterojunctions: an emerging approach to organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Jean

    2009-11-17

    The predicted exhaustion of fossil energy resources and the pressure of environmental constraints are stimulating an intensification of research on renewable energy sources, in particular, on the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. In this context, organic solar cells are attracting increasing interest that is motivated by the possibility of fabricating large-area, lightweight, and flexible devices using simple techniques with low environmental impact. Organic solar cells are based on a heterojunction resulting from the contact of a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) material. Absorption of solar photons creates excitons, Coulombically bound electron-hole pairs, which diffuse to the D/A interface, where they are dissociated into free holes and electrons by the electric field. D/A heterojunctions can be created with two types of architectures, namely, bilayer heterojunction and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. BHJ cells combine the advantages of easier fabrication and higher conversion efficiency due to the considerably extended D/A interface. Until now, the development of BHJ solar cells has been essentially based on the use of soluble pi-conjugated polymers as donor material. Intensive interdisciplinary research carried out in the past 10 years has led to an increase in the conversion efficiency of BHJ cells from 0.10 to more than 5.0%. These investigations have progressively established regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the standard donor material for BHJ solar cells, owing to a useful combination of optical and charge-transport properties. However, besides the limit imposed to the maximum conversion efficiency by its intrinsic electronic properties, P3HT and more generally polymers pose several problems related to the control of their structure, molecular weight, polydispersity, and purification. In this context, recent years have seen the emergence of an alternative approach based on the replacement of polydisperse polymers by soluble

  3. Molecular analysis of circulating tumour cells-biology and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Matthew G; Metcalf, Robert L; Carter, Louise; Brady, Ged; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2014-03-01

    Growing evidence for intratumour heterogeneity informs us that single-site biopsies fall short of revealing the complete genomic landscape of a tumour. With an expanding repertoire of targeted agents entering the clinic, screening tumours for genomic aberrations is increasingly important, as is interrogating the tumours for resistance mechanisms upon disease progression. Multiple biopsies separated spatially and temporally are impractical, uncomfortable for the patient and not without risk. Here, we describe how circulating tumour cells (CTCs), captured from a minimally invasive blood test-and readily amenable to serial sampling-have the potential to inform intratumour heterogeneity and tumour evolution, although it remains to be determined how useful this will be in the clinic. Technologies for detecting and isolating CTCs include the validated CellSearch(®) system, but other technologies are gaining prominence. We also discuss how recent CTC discoveries map to mechanisms of haematological spread, previously described in preclinical models, including evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, collective cell migration and cells with tumour-initiating capacity within the circulation. Advances in single-cell molecular analysis are enhancing our ability to explore mechanisms of metastasis, and the combination of CTC and cell-free DNA assays are anticipated to provide invaluable blood-borne biomarkers for real-time patient monitoring and treatment stratification.

  4. Molecular profiling of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gatalica, Zoran; Knezetic, Joseph; Reddy, Sandeep; Nathan, Cherie‐Ann; Javadi, Nader; Teknos, Theodoros

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits high rates of recurrence, and with few approved targeted agents, novel treatments are needed. We analyzed a molecular profiling database for the distribution of biomarkers predictive of chemotherapies and targeted agents. Methods Seven hundred thirty‐five patients with advanced HNSCC (88 with known human papillomavirus [HPV] status), were profiled using multiple platforms (gene sequencing, gene copy number, and protein expression). Results Among the entire patient population studied, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was the protein most often overexpressed (90%), TP53 gene most often mutated (41%), and phosphatidylinositol 3‐kinase (PIK3CA) most often amplified (40%; n = 5). With the exception of TP53 mutation, other biomarker frequencies were not significantly different among HPV‐positive or HPV‐negative patients. PIK3CA mutations and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss are frequent events, independent of HPV status. The immune response‐modulating programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) axis was active across sites, stages, and HPV status. Conclusion Molecular profiling utilizing multiple platforms provides a range of therapy options beyond standard of care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1625–E1638, 2016 PMID:26614708

  5. Serological & molecular diagnostic surveys combined with examining hematological profiles suggest increased levels of infection & hematological response of cattle to babesiosis infections compared to native buffaloes in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Babesiosis threatens the development of the cattle and buffaloes industries in Egypt and improved control is needed. The main objectives of this study are surveying the presence of bovine babesiosis in distinct selected bovine and buffalo populations in Egypt using novel molecular and pr...

  6. The molecular basis of the memory T cell response: differential gene expression and its epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Nan-ping; Araki, Yasuto; Subedi, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    How the immune system remembers a previous encounter with a pathogen and responds more efficiently to a subsequent encounter has been one of the central enigmas for immunologists for over a century. The identification of pathogen-specific memory lymphocytes that arise after an infection provided a cellular basis for immunological memory. But the molecular mechanisms of immunological memory remain only partially understood. The emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes have a key role in controlling the distinct transcriptional profiles of memory lymphocytes and thus in shaping their function. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress that has been made in assessing the differential gene expression and chromatin modifications in memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and we present our current understanding of the molecular basis of memory T cell function. PMID:22421787

  7. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation - Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative data were collected on dose-response curves of cultured mouse-embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) irradiated with heavy ions of various charges and energies. Results suggests that two breaks formed on DNA within 80 A may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 A may be lethal. From results of experiments with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, it was found that DNA double strand breaks are important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double-strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship for high-LET radiation is similar to that for HGPRT locus mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, indicating that common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects.

  8. Molecular biology of mycoplasmas: from the minimum cell concept to the artificial cell.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Caio M M; Hoeltgebaum, Daniela L; Machado, Laís D P N; Santos, Larissa Dos

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are a large group of bacteria, sorted into different genera in the Mollicutes class, whose main characteristic in common, besides the small genome, is the absence of cell wall. They are considered cellular and molecular biology study models. We present an updated review of the molecular biology of these model microorganisms and the development of replicative vectors for the transformation of mycoplasmas. Synthetic biology studies inspired by these pioneering works became possible and won the attention of the mainstream media. For the first time, an artificial genome was synthesized (a minimal genome produced from consensus sequences obtained from mycoplasmas). For the first time, a functional artificial cell has been constructed by introducing a genome completely synthesized within a cell envelope of a mycoplasma obtained by transformation techniques. Therefore, this article offers an updated insight to the state of the art of these peculiar organisms' molecular biology.

  9. Molecular biology of mycoplasmas: from the minimum cell concept to the artificial cell.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Caio M M; Hoeltgebaum, Daniela L; Machado, Laís D P N; Santos, Larissa Dos

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are a large group of bacteria, sorted into different genera in the Mollicutes class, whose main characteristic in common, besides the small genome, is the absence of cell wall. They are considered cellular and molecular biology study models. We present an updated review of the molecular biology of these model microorganisms and the development of replicative vectors for the transformation of mycoplasmas. Synthetic biology studies inspired by these pioneering works became possible and won the attention of the mainstream media. For the first time, an artificial genome was synthesized (a minimal genome produced from consensus sequences obtained from mycoplasmas). For the first time, a functional artificial cell has been constructed by introducing a genome completely synthesized within a cell envelope of a mycoplasma obtained by transformation techniques. Therefore, this article offers an updated insight to the state of the art of these peculiar organisms' molecular biology. PMID:27142538

  10. iTRAQ analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines suggests Drebrin (DBN1) is overexpressed during liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qifeng; Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Khoo, Avery; Lim, Kiat Hon; Chung, Maxey C M

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third in cancer incidence worldwide and the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. Mortality in colorectal cancer is often ascribed to liver metastasis. In an effort to elucidate the proteins involved in colorectal cancer liver metastasis, we compared the proteome profiles of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 with its metastatic derivative E1, using the iTRAQ labelling technology, coupled to 2D-LC and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. A total of 547 proteins were identified, of which 31 of them were differentially expressed in the E1 cell line. Among these proteins, the differential expressions of translationally controlled tumour protein 1, A-kinase anchor protein 12 and Drebrin (DBN1) were validated using Western blot. In particular, DBN1, a protein not previously known to be involved in colorectal cancer metastasis, was found to be overexpressed in E1 as compared to HCT-116 cells. The overexpression of DBN1 was further validated using immunohistochemistry on colorectal cancer tissue sections with matched lymph node and liver metastasis tissues. DBN1 is currently believed to be involved in actin cytoskeleton reorganisation and suppresses actin filament cross-linking and bundling. Since actin reorganisation is an important process for tumour cell migration and invasion, DBN1 may have an important role during colorectal cancer metastasis.

  11. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ke; Ward, William; Farnum, Byron H.; Taheri, Atefeh; Johansson, Patrik; Meyer, Gerald John

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  12. How Cells Feel: Stochastic Model for a Molecular Mechanosensor

    PubMed Central

    Escudé, Matteo; Rigozzi, Michelle K.; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mechanosensitivity (i.e., how cells sense the stiffness of their environment) is very important, yet there is a fundamental difficulty in understanding its mechanism: to measure an elastic modulus one requires two points of application of force—a measuring and a reference point. The cell in contact with substrate has only one (adhesion) point to work with, and thus a new method of measurement needs to be invented. The aim of this theoretical work is to develop a self-consistent physical model for mechanosensitivity, a process by which a cell detects the mechanical stiffness of its environment (e.g., a substrate it is attached to via adhesion points) and generates an appropriate chemical signaling to remodel itself in response to this environment. The model uses the molecular mechanosensing complex of latent TGF-β attached to the adhesion point as the biomarker. We show that the underlying Brownian motion in the substrate is the reference element in the measuring process. The model produces a closed expression for the rate of release of active TGF-β, which depends on the substrate stiffness and the pulling force coming from the cell in a subtle and nontrivial way. It is consistent with basic experimental data showing an increase in signal for stiffer substrates and higher pulling forces. In addition, we find that for each cell there is a range of stiffness where a homeostatic configuration of the cell can be achieved, outside of which the cell either relaxes its cytoskeletal forces and detaches from the very weak substrate, or generates an increasingly strong pulling force through stress fibers with a positive feedback loop on very stiff substrates. In this way, the theory offers the underlying mechanism for the myofibroblast conversion in wound healing and smooth muscle cell dysfunction in cardiac disease. PMID:24411244

  13. Tuning Open-Circuit Voltage in Organic Solar Cells with Molecular Orientation.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Brent; Awartani, Omar; Kline, R Joseph; McAfee, Terry; Ade, Harald; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2015-06-24

    The role of molecular orientation of a polar conjugated polymer in polymer-fullerene organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is investigated. A planar heterojunction (PHJ) OPV cell composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is used as a model system to isolate the effect of the interfacial orientation on the photovoltaic properties. The molecular orientation of the aggregate P3HT relative to the PCBM layer is varied from highly edge-on (conjugated ring plane perpendicular to the interface plane) to appreciably face-on (ring plane parallel to the interface). It is found that as the P3HT stacking becomes more face-on there is a positive correlation to the OPV open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), attributed to a shift in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level of P3HT. In addition, the PHJ OPV cell with a broad P3HT stacking orientation distribution has a V(OC) comparable to an archetypal bulk heterojunction (BHJ) device. These results suggest that, in the BHJ OPV cell, the hole energy level in the charge transfer state is defined in part by the orientation distribution of the P3HT at the interface with PCBM. Finally, the photoresponses of the devices are also shown to have a dependence on P3HT stacking orientation.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of Ebola virus pathogenesis: focus on cell death

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, L; Agrati, C; Petrosillo, N; Di Caro, A; Capobianchi, M R; Ippolito, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) belongs to the Filoviridae family and is responsible for a severe disease characterized by the sudden onset of fever and malaise accompanied by other non-specific signs and symptoms; in 30–50% of cases hemorrhagic symptoms are present. Multiorgan dysfunction occurs in severe forms with a mortality up to 90%. The EBOV first attacks macrophages and dendritic immune cells. The innate immune reaction is characterized by a cytokine storm, with secretion of numerous pro-inflammatory cytokines, which induces a huge number of contradictory signals and hurts the immune cells, as well as other tissues. Other highly pathogenic viruses also trigger cytokine storms, but Filoviruses are thought to be particularly lethal because they affect a wide array of tissues. In addition to the immune system, EBOV attacks the spleen and kidneys, where it kills cells that help the body to regulate its fluid and chemical balance and that make proteins that help the blood to clot. In addition, EBOV causes liver, lungs and kidneys to shut down their functions and the blood vessels to leak fluid into surrounding tissues. In this review, we analyze the molecular mechanisms at the basis of Ebola pathogenesis with a particular focus on the cell death pathways induced by the virus. We also discuss how the treatment of the infection can benefit from the recent experience of blocking/modulating cell death in human degenerative diseases. PMID:26024394

  15. Molecular packing and solar cell performance in blends of polymers with a bisadduct fullerene.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nichole Cates; Sweetnam, Sean; Hoke, Eric T; Gysel, Roman; Miller, Chad E; Bartelt, Jonathan A; Xie, Xinxin; Toney, Michael F; McGehee, Michael D

    2012-03-14

    We compare the solar cell performance of several polymers with the conventional electron acceptor phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) to fullerenes with one to three indene adducts. We find that the multiadduct fullerenes with lower electron affinity improve the efficiency of the solar cells only when they do not intercalate between the polymer side chains. When they intercalate between the side chains, the multiadduct fullerenes substantially reduce solar cell photocurrent. We use X-ray diffraction to determine how the fullerenes are arranged within crystals of poly-(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT) and suggest that poor electron transport in the molecularly mixed domains may account for the reduced solar cell performance of blends with fullerene intercalation.

  16. Hypoxia-resistant profile implies vulnerability of cancer stem cells to physiological agents, which suggests new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Ilaria; Santini, Roberta; Fredducci, David; Vinci, Maria Cristina; D’Amico, Massimo; Rovida, Elisabetta; Stivarou, Theodora; Torre, Eugenio; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Stecca, Barbara; Olivotto, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that peculiar metabolic features of cell adaptation and survival in hypoxia imply growth restriction points that are typical of embryonic stem cells and disappear with differentiation. Here we provide evidence that such restrictions can be exploited as specific antiblastic targets by physiological factors such as pyruvate, tetrahydrofolate, and glutamine. These metabolites act as powerful cytotoxic agents on cancer stem cells (CSCs) when supplied at doses that perturb the biochemical network, sustaining the resumption of aerobic growth after the hypoxic dormant state. Experiments were performed in vivo and in vitro using CSCs obtained from various anaplastic tumors: human melanoma, leukemia, and rat hepatoma cells. Pretreatment of melanoma CSCs with pyruvate significantly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. The metabolic network underlying the cytotoxic effect of the physiological factors was thoroughly defined, principally using AH130 hepatoma, a tumor spontaneously reprogrammed to the embryonic stem stage. This network, based on a tight integration of aerobic glycolysis, cellular redox state, and folate metabolism, is centered on the cellular NADP/NADPH ratio that controls the redox pathway of folate utilization in purine synthesis. On the whole, this study indicates that pyruvate, FH4, and glutamine display anticancer activity, because CSCs are committed to survive and maintain their stemness in hypoxia. When CSC need to differentiate and proliferate, they shift from anaerobic to aerobic status, and the few mitochondria available makes them susceptible to the injury of the above physiological factors. This vulnerability might be exploited for novel therapeutic treatments. PMID:24200964

  17. The versatile low-molecular-weight thiols: Beyond cell protection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhao, Qunfei; Liu, Wen

    2015-12-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols are extensively involved in the maintenance of cellular redox potentials and the protection of cells from a variety of reactive chemical and electrophilic species. However, we recently found that the metabolic coupling of two LMW thiols - mycothiol (MSH) and ergothioneine (EGT) - programs the biosynthesis of the anti-infective agent lincomycin A. Remarkably, such a constructive role of the thiols in the biosynthesis of natural products has so far received relatively little attention. We speculate that the unusual thiol EGT might function as a chiral thiolation carrier (for modification) and a novel activator (for glycosylation) of sugar. Additionally, we examine recent evidence for LMW thiols (MSH and others) as sulfur donors of sulfur-containing natural products. Clearly, the LMW thiols have more diverse activities beyond cell protection, and more attention should be paid to the correlation of their functions with thiol-dependent enzymes.

  18. A molecular pathway for CO₂ response in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wang; Hou, Congcong; Ren, Zhijie; Pan, Yajun; Jia, Jinjin; Zhang, Haiwen; Bai, Fenglin; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Huifen; He, Yikun; Luo, Shenglian; Li, Legong; Luan, Sheng

    2015-01-20

    Increasing carbon dioxide (CO₂) levels in the atmosphere have caused global metabolic changes in diverse plant species. CO₂ is not only a carbon donor for photosynthesis but also an environmental signal that regulates stomatal movements and thereby controls plant-water relationships and carbon metabolism. However, the mechanism underlying CO₂ sensing in stomatal guard cells remains unclear. Here we report characterization of Arabidopsis RESISTANT TO HIGH CO₂ (RHC1), a MATE-type transporter that links elevated CO₂ concentration to repression of HT1, a protein kinase that negatively regulates CO₂-induced stomatal closing. We also show that HT1 phosphorylates and inactivates OST1, a kinase which is essential for the activation of the SLAC1 anion channel and stomatal closing. Combining genetic, biochemical and electrophysiological evidence, we reconstituted the molecular relay from CO₂ to SLAC1 activation, thus establishing a core pathway for CO₂ signalling in plant guard cells.

  19. Quantifying molecular colocalization in live cell fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Humpert, Fabian; Yahiatène, Idir; Lummer, Martina; Sauer, Markus; Huser, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    One of the most challenging tasks in microscopy is the quantitative identification and characterization of molecular interactions. In living cells this task is typically performed by fluorescent labeling of the interaction partners with spectrally distinct fluorophores and imaging in different color channels. Current methods for determining colocalization of molecules result in outcomes that can vary greatly depending on signal-to-noise ratios, threshold and background levels, or differences in intensity between channels. Here, we present a novel and quantitative method for determining the degree of colocalization in live-cell fluorescence microscopy images for two and more data channels. Moreover, our method enables the construction of images that directly classify areas of high colocalization.

  20. Molecular comparison of single cell MDA products derived from different cell types.

    PubMed

    Glentis, Stavros; SenGupta, Sioban; Thornhill, Alan; Wang, Rubin; Craft, Ian; Harper, Joyce Catherine

    2009-07-01

    The quality of DNA obtained from single cells for molecular analysis is primarily dependent on cell type and cell lysis. Multiple displacement amplification (MDA) amplifies the DNA isothermally with the use of Phi29 polymerase and random hexamer primers. The efficiency and accuracy of MDA was assessed on different cell types (buccal cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts) using two multiplex PCR reactions that have been applied in clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis cases (DM triplex-DM1, APOC2, Dl9S112 and CF triplex-DF508del, IVS8CA, IVS17TA). These results were compared using the DM triplex with MDA products from single blastomeres. Cells were lysed using a modified protocol excluding dithiothreitol in the alkaline lysis buffer. The MDA amplification efficiency for buccal cells was 82.0% (41/50) compared with 96.0% (48/50) for lymphocytes and 100% (20/20) for fibroblasts. The average allele dropout (ADO) rates were 31.0% for buccal cells, 20.8% for lymphocytes and 20.0% for fibroblasts with high inter-locus variation across all cell types (5.0-45.5%). Overall, MDA on single lymphocytes and fibroblasts lysed using the modified protocol produced DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for subsequent molecular analysis by PCR and gave results comparable with MDA products from blastomeres, in contrast to buccal cells. PMID:19573296

  1. Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2015-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, e.g., plants including green algae, use a sophisticated light-sensing system, composed of primary photoreceptors and additional downstream signaling components, to monitor changes in the ambient light environment towards adjust their growth and development. Although a variety of cellular processes, e.g., initiation of cleavage division and final cellular differentiation, have been shown to be light-regulated in the green alga Volvox carteri, little is known about the underlying light perception and signaling pathways. This multicellular alga possesses at least 12 photoreceptors, i.e., one phototropin (VcPhot), four cryptochromes (VcCRYa, VcCRYp, VcCRYd1, and VcCRYd2), and seven members of rhodopsin-like photoreceptors (VR1, VChR1, VChR2, VcHKR1, VcHKR2, VcHKR3, and VcHKR4), which display distinct light-dependent chemical processes based on their protein architectures and associated chromophores. Gene expression analyses could show that the transcript levels of some of the photoreceptor genes (e.g., VChR1 and VcHKR1) accumulate during division cleavages, while others (e.g., VcCRYa, VcCRYp, and VcPhot) accumulate during final cellular differentiation. However, the pattern of transcript accumulation changes when the alga switches to the sexual development. Eight photoreceptor genes, e.g., VcPhot, VcCRYp, and VcHKR1, are highly expressed in the somatic cells, while only the animal-type rhodopsin VR1 was found to be highly expressed in the reproductive cells/embryos during both asexual and sexual life cycles. Moreover, accumulation of VChR1 and VcCRYa transcripts is more sensitive to light and changes in response to more than one light quality. Obviously, different regulatory mechanisms underlying gene expression control transcript accumulation of photoreceptors not only during development, but also in a cell-type specific way and in response to various external signals such as light quality. The transcriptional patterns described in this study

  2. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    PubMed

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  3. BRAF mutation is associated with a specific cell-type with features suggestive of senescence in ovarian serous borderline (atypical proliferative) tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zeppernick, Felix; Ardighieri, Laura; Hannibal, Charlotte G.; Vang, Russell; Junge, Jette; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Zhang, Rugang; Kurman, Robert J.; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Serous borderline tumor (SBT) also known as atypical proliferative serous tumor (APST) is the precursor of ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC). In this study, we correlated the morphologic and immunohistochemical phenotypes of 71 APSTs and 18 LGSCs with the mutational status of KRAS and BRAF, the most common molecular genetic changes in these neoplasms. A subset of cells characterized by abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm (EC), discrete cell borders and bland nuclei was identified in all (100%) 25 BRAF mutated APSTs but in only 5 (10%) of 46 APSTs without BRAF mutations (p<0.0001). Among the 18 LGSCs, EC cells were found in only 2 and both contained BRAF mutations. The EC cells were present admixed with cuboidal and columnar cells lining the papillae and appeared to be budding from the surface, resulting in individual cells and clusters of detached cells “floating” above the papillae. Immunohistochemistry showed that the EC cells always expressed p16, a senescence-associated marker, and had a significantly lower Ki-67 labeling index than adjacent cuboidal and columnar cells (p=0.02). In vitro studies supported the interpretation that these cells were undergoing senescence as the same morphologic features could be reproduced in cultured epithelial cells by ectopic expression of BRAFV600E. Senescence was further established by markers such as SA-β-gal staining, expression of p16 and p21, and reduction in DNA synthesis. In conclusion, this study sheds light on the pathogenesis of this unique group of ovarian tumors by showing that BRAF mutation is associated with cellular senescence and the presence of a specific cell type characterized by abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. This “oncogene-induced senescence” phenotype may represent a mechanism that prevents impedes progression of APSTs to LGSC. PMID:25188864

  4. A Drosophila XPD model links cell cycle coordination with neuro-development and suggests links to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stettler, Karin; Li, Xiaoming; Sandrock, Björn; Braga-Lagache, Sophie; Heller, Manfred; Dümbgen, Lutz; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    XPD functions in transcription, DNA repair and in cell cycle control. Mutations in human XPD (also known as ERCC2) mainly cause three clinical phenotypes: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), and only XP patients have a high predisposition to developing cancer. Hence, we developed a fly model to obtain novel insights into the defects caused by individual hypomorphic alleles identified in human XP-D patients. This model revealed that the mutations that displayed the greatest in vivo UV sensitivity in Drosophila did not correlate with those that led to tumor formation in humans. Immunoprecipitations followed by targeted quantitative MS/MS analysis showed how different xpd mutations affected the formation or stability of different transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) subcomplexes. The XP mutants most clearly linked to high cancer risk, Xpd R683W and R601L, showed a reduced interaction with the core TFIIH and also an abnormal interaction with the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex. Interestingly, these two XP alleles additionally displayed high levels of chromatin loss and free centrosomes during the rapid nuclear division phase of the Drosophila embryo. Finally, the xpd mutations showing defects in the coordination of cell cycle timing during the Drosophila embryonic divisions correlated with those human mutations that cause the neurodevelopmental abnormalities and developmental growth defects observed in XP/CS and TTD patients. PMID:25431422

  5. High viral burden and rapid CD4+ cell depletion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected SCID-hu mice suggest direct viral killing of thymocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, B D; Uittenbogaart, C H; Schmid, I; Zack, J A

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of CD4+ cell loss in lymphoid organs is unknown. In this study, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of human fetal thymus/liver implants in severe combined immunodeficient mice was used to investigate the mechanism of HIV-induced depletion of CD4-bearing cells in vivo. The implants were assessed for depletion of CD4+ thymocytes, apoptosis, and viral burden. We detected two phases of CD4 cell depletion, an initial rapid phase and a more gradual later phase. Compared to mock-infected implants, HIV-infected implants did not demonstrate detectable increases in the levels of apoptosis while severe depletion of CD4-bearing cells was ongoing. During peak loss of CD4+ cells, high viral burden was observed, suggesting that loss of CD4+ cells in this in vivo system is due to direct killing of infected thymocytes. Increased levels of apoptosis were observed during the later phase of thymocyte depletion; however, these apoptotic cells lacked CD4. This finding suggests that a second indirect mechanism may be responsible for the destruction of CD4- CD8+ thymocytes in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that CD4+ and CD4- cells may die by different mechanism(s). PMID:9343176

  6. Molecular Basis of 9G4 B Cell Autoreactivity in Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Christopher; Chida, Asiya Seema; Adlowitz, Diana; Silver, Lin; Fox, Erin; Jenks, Scott A.; Palmer, Elise; Wang, Youliang; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Li, Quan-Zhen; Mohan, Chandra; Cummings, Richard; Tipton, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    9G4+ IgG Abs expand in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a disease-specific fashion and react with different lupus Ags including B cell Ags and apoptotic cells. Their shared use of VH4-34 represents a unique system to understand the molecular basis of lupus autoreactivity. In this study, a large panel of recombinant 9G4+ mAbs from single naive and memory cells was generated and tested against B cells, apoptotic cells, and other Ags. Mutagenesis eliminated the framework-1 hydrophobic patch (HP) responsible for the 9G4 idiotype. The expression of the HP in unselected VH4-34 cells was assessed by deep sequencing. We found that 9G4 Abs recognize several Ags following two distinct structural patterns. B cell binding is dependent on the HP, whereas anti-nuclear Abs, apoptotic cells, and dsDNA binding are HP independent and correlate with positively charged H chain third CDR. The majority of mutated VH4-34 memory cells retain the HP, thereby suggesting selection by Ags that require this germline structure. Our findings show that the germline-encoded HP is compulsory for the anti–B cell reactivity largely associated with 9G4 Abs in SLE but is not required for reactivity against apoptotic cells, dsDNA, chromatin, anti-nuclear Abs, or cardiolipin. Given that the lupus memory compartment contains a majority of HP+ VH4-34 cells but decreased B cell reactivity, additional HP-dependent Ags must participate in the selection of this compartment. This study represents the first analysis, to our knowledge, of VH-restricted autoreactive B cells specifically expanded in SLE and provides the foundation to understand the antigenic forces at play in this disease. PMID:24108696

  7. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridization followed by mutational analysis, gene expression and miRNA microarray profiling were performed on 123 paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from patients with NSCLC. Results At DNA, mRNA and miRNA levels we could identify molecular markers that discriminated significantly between the various histopathological entities of NSCLC. We identified 34 genomic clusters using aCGH data; several genes exhibited a different profile of aberrations between AC and SCC, including PIK3CA, SOX2, THPO, TP63, PDGFB genes. Gene expression profiling analysis identified SPP1, CTHRC1and GREM1 as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of the cancer, and SPINK1 and BMP7 to distinguish between AC and SCC in small biopsies or in blood samples. Using integrated genomics approach we found in recurrently altered regions a list of three potential driver genes, MRPS22, NDRG1 and RNF7, which were consistently over-expressed in amplified regions, had wide-spread correlation with an average of ~800 genes throughout the genome and highly associated with histological types. Using a network enrichment analysis, the targets of these potential drivers were seen to be involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, mismatch repair, p53 signalling pathway and other lung cancer related signalling pathways, and many immunological pathways. Furthermore, we also identified one potential driver miRNA hsa-miR-944. Conclusions Integrated molecular characterization of AC and SCC helped identify clinically relevant markers

  8. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions.

  9. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  10. Temperature modulates the cell wall mechanical properties of rice coleoptiles by altering the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism inducing the difference in the cell wall extensibility of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) coleoptiles grown under various temperature (10-50 degrees C) conditions. The growth rate and the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles exhibited the maximum value at 30-40 degrees C, and became smaller as the growth temperature rose or dropped from this temperature range. The amounts of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile increased in coleoptiles grown at 40 degrees C, but not at other temperature conditions. On the other hand, the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides was small at temperatures where the cell wall extensibility was high (30-40 degrees C). The autolytic activities of cell walls obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30 and 40 degrees C were substantially higher than those grown at 10, 20 and 50 degrees C. Furthermore, the activities of (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucanases extracted from coleoptile cell walls showed a similar tendency. When oat (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucans with high molecular mass were incubated with the cell wall enzyme preparations from coleoptiles grown at various temperature conditions, the extensive molecular mass downshifts were brought about only by the cell wall enzymes obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30-40 degrees C. There were close correlations between the cell wall extensibility and the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides or the activity of beta -glucanases. These results suggest that the environmental temperature regulates the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles by modifying mainly the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides. Modulation of the activity of beta-glucanases under various temperature conditions may be involved in the alteration of the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides.

  11. Steroid control of steroidogenesis in isolated adrenocortical cells: molecular and species specificity.

    PubMed

    Carsia, R V; Macdonald, G J; Malamed, S

    1983-06-01

    The molecular and species specificity of glucocorticoid suppression of corticosteroidogenesis was investigated in isolated adrenocortical cells. Trypsin-isolated cells from male rat, domestic fowl and bovine adrenal glands were incubated with or without steroidogenic agents and with or without steroids. Glucocorticoids were measured by radioimmunoassay or fluorometric assay after 1-2 h incubation. Glucocorticoids suppressed ACTH-induced steroidogenesis of isolated rat cells with the following relative potencies: corticosterone greater than cortisol = cortisone greater than dexamethasone. The mineralocorticoid, aldosterone did not affect steroidogenesis. Suppression by glucocorticoids was acute (within 1-2 h), and varied directly with the glucocorticoid concentration. Testosterone also suppressed ACTH-induced steroidogenesis. Glucocorticoid-type steroids have equivalent suppressive potencies, thus suggesting that these steroids may induce suppression at least partly by a common mechanism. Although corticosterone caused the greatest suppression, testosterone was more potent. The steroid specificity of suppression of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced and ACTH-induced steroidogenesis were similar, suggesting that suppression is not solely the result of interference with ACTH receptor function or the induction of adenylate cyclase activity. Exogenous glucocorticoids also suppressed ACTH-induced steroidogenesis of cells isolated from domestic fowl and beef adrenal glands, thus suggesting that this observed suppression may be a general mechanism of adrenocortical cell autoregulation.

  12. Molecular Characteristics of Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors and Comparison With Testicular Counterparts: Implications for Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kraggerud, Sigrid Marie; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E.; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Abeler, Vera M.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the molecular characteristics and development of rare malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (mOGCTs). We provide an overview of the genomic aberrations assessed by ploidy, cytogenetic banding, and comparative genomic hybridization. We summarize and discuss the transcriptome profiles of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), and biomarkers (DNA methylation, gene mutation, individual protein expression) for each mOGCT histological subtype. Parallels between the origin of mOGCT and their male counterpart testicular GCT (TGCT) are discussed from the perspective of germ cell development, endocrinological influences, and pathogenesis, as is the GCT origin in patients with disorders of sex development. Integrated molecular profiles of the 3 main histological subtypes, dysgerminoma (DG), yolk sac tumor (YST), and immature teratoma (IT), are presented. DGs show genomic aberrations comparable to TGCT. In contrast, the genome profiles of YST and IT are different both from each other and from DG/TGCT. Differences between DG and YST are underlined by their miRNA/mRNA expression patterns, suggesting preferential involvement of the WNT/β-catenin and TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways among YSTs. Characteristic protein expression patterns are observed in DG, YST and IT. We propose that mOGCT develop through different developmental pathways, including one that is likely shared with TGCT and involves insufficient sexual differentiation of the germ cell niche. The molecular features of the mOGCTs underline their similarity to pluripotent precursor cells (primordial germ cells, PGCs) and other stem cells. This similarity combined with the process of ovary development, explain why mOGCTs present so early in life, and with greater histological complexity, than most somatic solid tumors. PMID:23575763

  13. Molecular characteristics of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors and comparison with testicular counterparts: implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kraggerud, Sigrid Marie; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Skotheim, Rolf I; Abeler, Vera M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2013-06-01

    This review focuses on the molecular characteristics and development of rare malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (mOGCTs). We provide an overview of the genomic aberrations assessed by ploidy, cytogenetic banding, and comparative genomic hybridization. We summarize and discuss the transcriptome profiles of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), and biomarkers (DNA methylation, gene mutation, individual protein expression) for each mOGCT histological subtype. Parallels between the origin of mOGCT and their male counterpart testicular GCT (TGCT) are discussed from the perspective of germ cell development, endocrinological influences, and pathogenesis, as is the GCT origin in patients with disorders of sex development. Integrated molecular profiles of the 3 main histological subtypes, dysgerminoma (DG), yolk sac tumor (YST), and immature teratoma (IT), are presented. DGs show genomic aberrations comparable to TGCT. In contrast, the genome profiles of YST and IT are different both from each other and from DG/TGCT. Differences between DG and YST are underlined by their miRNA/mRNA expression patterns, suggesting preferential involvement of the WNT/β-catenin and TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways among YSTs. Characteristic protein expression patterns are observed in DG, YST and IT. We propose that mOGCT develop through different developmental pathways, including one that is likely shared with TGCT and involves insufficient sexual differentiation of the germ cell niche. The molecular features of the mOGCTs underline their similarity to pluripotent precursor cells (primordial germ cells, PGCs) and other stem cells. This similarity combined with the process of ovary development, explain why mOGCTs present so early in life, and with greater histological complexity, than most somatic solid tumors. PMID:23575763

  14. Clinical and molecular prognostic and predictive biomarkers in clear cell renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Kukwa, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Lian, Fei; Szczylik, Cezary

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of clear cell renal cell cancer is highly unpredictable with various progressors and with populations where small renal masses may be accompanied by metastatic disease. Currently, there is a critical need to determine patient risk and optimize treatment regimes. For these patients, molecular markers may offer significant information in terms of prognostic and predictive values, as well as determination of valid therapeutic targets. Until now, only a few of the many identified clear cell renal cell cancer biomarkers have been clinically validated in large cohorts. And only several biomarkers are integrated in predictive or prognostic models. Therefore, a large cohesive effort is required to advance the field of clear cell renal cell cancer prognostic biomarkers through systematic discovery, verification, validation and clinical implementation.

  15. The molecular nature of very small embryonic-like stem cells in adult tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, YongHwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Kang, Hyunsook; Lim, Jisun; Heo, Jinbeom; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2014-11-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been considered as the most important cells in regenerative medicine as they are able to differentiate into all types of cells in the human body. PSCs have been established from several sources of embryo tissue or by reprogramming of terminally differentiated adult tissue by transduction of so-called Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc). Interestingly, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the residence of PSCs in adult tissue and with the ability to differentiate into multiple types of tissue-committed stem cells (TCSCs). We also recently demonstrated that a population of pluripotent Oct4(+) SSEA-1(+)Sca-1(+)Lin(-)CD45(-) very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) resides in the adult murine bone marrow (BM) and in other murine tissue. These very small (∼3-6 μm) cells express pluripotent markers such as Oct4, Nanog, and SSEA-1. VSELs could be specified into several tissue-residing TCSCs in response to tissue/organ injury, and thus suggesting that these cells have a physiological role in the rejuvenation of a pool of TCSCs under steady-state conditions. In this review article, we discuss the molecular nature of the rare population of VSELs which have a crucial role in regulating the pluripotency, proliferation, differentiation, and aging of these cells. PMID:25473442

  16. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola

    2010-05-01

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  17. International Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Stephen Miller

    2010-06-10

    The 2010 Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas was held June 6-10 near Boston, MA, and attracted a record 273 participants, 146 from US labs, 10 from Canada, and the remainder from 18 other countries. The single-celled algal protist Chlamydomonas is a key research organism for many investigators, including those who study photosynthesis, cell motility, adaptation to environmental stresses, the evolution of multicellularity, and the production of biofuels. Chlamydomonas researchers gather every two years at a research conference to exchange methods, develop collaborative efforts, disseminate recent findings, and plan large-scale studies to improve the usefulness of this unique research organism. This conference provides the only opportunity for Chlamydomonas scientists who work on different research problems to meet face to face, and greatly speeds progress in their respective fields. An important function of these Chlamydomonas conferences is to promote and showcase the work of younger scientists, and to attract new investigators into the Chlamydomonas community. DOE award SC0004085 was used to offset the travel and registration costs for 18 young investigators, 9 of whom were women, including one African American. Most of these scientists would not have been able to attend the conference without DOE support. A total of 208 research presentations were made at the meeting, 80 talks (63 presented by students, postdocs, and pre-tenured faculty) and 128 posters. Cell motility and biofuels/metabolism were the best-represented research areas, with a total of 77 presentations. This fact underscores the growing importance of Chlamydomonas as a research and production tool in the rapidly expanding world of biofuels research. A total of 28 talks and posters were presented on the topics of photosynthesis and stress responses, which were among the next best-represented research areas. As at several recent Chlamydomonas meetings, important advances were

  18. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge. PMID:21470128

  19. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge.

  20. Oxidation of Monolignols by Members of the Berberine Bridge Enzyme Family Suggests a Role in Plant Cell Wall Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Bastian; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Steiner, Barbara; Dordic, Andela; Gutmann, Alexander; Nidetzky, Bernd; Sensen, Christoph W; van der Graaff, Eric; Wallner, Silvia; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2015-07-24

    Plant genomes contain a large number of genes encoding for berberine bridge enzyme (BBE)-like enzymes. Despite the widespread occurrence and abundance of this protein family in the plant kingdom, the biochemical function remains largely unexplored. In this study, we have expressed two members of the BBE-like enzyme family from Arabidopsis thaliana in the host organism Komagataella pastoris. The two proteins, termed AtBBE-like 13 and AtBBE-like 15, were purified, and their catalytic properties were determined. In addition, AtBBE-like 15 was crystallized and structurally characterized by x-ray crystallography. Here, we show that the enzymes catalyze the oxidation of aromatic allylic alcohols, such as coumaryl, sinapyl, and coniferyl alcohol, to the corresponding aldehydes and that AtBBE-like 15 adopts the same fold as vanillyl alcohol oxidase as reported previously for berberine bridge enzyme and other FAD-dependent oxidoreductases. Further analysis of the substrate range identified coniferin, the glycosylated storage form of coniferyl alcohol, as a substrate of the enzymes, whereas other glycosylated monolignols were rather poor substrates. A detailed analysis of the motifs present in the active sites of the BBE-like enzymes in A. thaliana suggested that 14 out of 28 members of the family might catalyze similar reactions. Based on these findings, we propose a novel role of BBE-like enzymes in monolignol metabolism that was previously not recognized for this enzyme family.

  1. Oxidation of Monolignols by Members of the Berberine Bridge Enzyme Family Suggests a Role in Plant Cell Wall Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bastian; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Steiner, Barbara; Dordic, Andela; Gutmann, Alexander; Nidetzky, Bernd; Sensen, Christoph W.; van der Graaff, Eric; Wallner, Silvia; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a large number of genes encoding for berberine bridge enzyme (BBE)-like enzymes. Despite the widespread occurrence and abundance of this protein family in the plant kingdom, the biochemical function remains largely unexplored. In this study, we have expressed two members of the BBE-like enzyme family from Arabidopsis thaliana in the host organism Komagataella pastoris. The two proteins, termed AtBBE-like 13 and AtBBE-like 15, were purified, and their catalytic properties were determined. In addition, AtBBE-like 15 was crystallized and structurally characterized by x-ray crystallography. Here, we show that the enzymes catalyze the oxidation of aromatic allylic alcohols, such as coumaryl, sinapyl, and coniferyl alcohol, to the corresponding aldehydes and that AtBBE-like 15 adopts the same fold as vanillyl alcohol oxidase as reported previously for berberine bridge enzyme and other FAD-dependent oxidoreductases. Further analysis of the substrate range identified coniferin, the glycosylated storage form of coniferyl alcohol, as a substrate of the enzymes, whereas other glycosylated monolignols were rather poor substrates. A detailed analysis of the motifs present in the active sites of the BBE-like enzymes in A. thaliana suggested that 14 out of 28 members of the family might catalyze similar reactions. Based on these findings, we propose a novel role of BBE-like enzymes in monolignol metabolism that was previously not recognized for this enzyme family. PMID:26037923

  2. Decreasing Global Transcript Levels over Time Suggest that Phytoplasma Cells Enter Stationary Phase during Plant and Insect Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, D.; Galetto, L.; Rashidi, M.; Abbà, S.; Palmano, S.; Firrao, G.; Bosco, D.

    2015-01-01

    To highlight different transcriptional behaviors of the phytoplasma in the plant and animal host, expression of 14 genes of “Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris,” chrysanthemum yellows strain, was investigated at different times following the infection of a plant host (Arabidopsis thaliana) and two insect vector species (Macrosteles quadripunctulatus and Euscelidius variegatus). Target genes were selected among those encoding antigenic membrane proteins, membrane transporters, secreted proteins, and general enzymes. Transcripts were detected for all analyzed genes in the three hosts; in particular, those encoding the antigenic membrane protein Amp, elements of the mechanosensitive channel, and two of the four secreted proteins (SAP54 and TENGU) were highly accumulated, suggesting that they play important roles in phytoplasma physiology during the infection cycle. Most transcripts were present at higher abundance in the plant host than in the insect hosts. Generally, transcript levels of the selected genes decreased significantly during infection of A. thaliana and M. quadripunctulatus but were more constant in E. variegatus. Such decreases may be explained by the fact that only a fraction of the phytoplasma population was transcribing, while the remaining part was aging to a stationary phase. This strategy might improve long-term survival, thereby increasing the likelihood that the pathogen may be acquired by a vector and/or inoculated to a healthy plant. PMID:25636844

  3. Viewing individual cells and ambient microvasculature using two molecular contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Wei, Xunbin; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    To view the individual cells and ambient microvasculature simultaneously will be helpful to study tumor angiogenesis and microenvironments. To achieve this, two molecular contrast mechanisms were exploited simultaneously by integrating two imaging modalities, confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). These share the same scanning optical path and laser source. The induced photoacoustic (PA) signal was detected by a highly sensitive needle hydrophone; while the back-traveling fluorescent photons emitted from the same sample were collected by an avalanche photodetector. Experiments on ex vivo rat bladders were conducted. The CFM image depicted the shape and size of the individual cells successfully. Besides large polygonal umbrella cells, some intracellular components can also be discerned. With the CFM image presenting morphologic cellular information in the bladder wall, the PAM image provides the complementary information, based on the endogenous optical absorption contrast, of the microvascular distribution inside the bladder wall, from large vessels to capillaries. Such multimodal imaging provides the opportunity to realize both histological assay and characterization of microvasculature using one imaging setup. This approach offers the possibility of comprehensive diagnosis of cancer in vivo.

  4. Cell biology, molecular embryology, Lamarckian and Darwinian selection as evolvability.

    PubMed

    Hoenigsberg, H

    2003-01-01

    immune system and life as we know it now. We offer the hypothesis that metazoan evolution solved this ancient conflict by evolving an immunogenetic mechanism that responds with rapid Lamarckian efficiency by retaining the ancient reverse transcriptase enzyme (RNACopyright DNA copying discovered by Temin in 1959 (see Temin, 1989) and found in 1970 in RNA tumor viruses by Temin and Baltimore), which can produce cDNA from the genome of an RNA virus that infects the cells. It seems that molecular Lamarckism can survive (Lewin, 1993). PMID:12917798

  5. Rectified Brownian movement in molecular and cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ronald F.

    1998-02-01

    A unified model is presented for rectified Brownian movement as the mechanism for a variety of putatively chemomechanical energy conversions in molecular and cell biology. The model is established by a detailed analysis of ubiquinone transport in electron transport chains and of allosteric conformation changes in proteins. It is applied to P-type ATPase ion transporters and to a variety of rotary arm enzyme complexes. It provides a basis for the dynamics of actin-myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers. In this model, metabolic free energy does no work directly, but instead biases boundary conditions for thermal diffusion. All work is done by thermal energy, which is harnessed at the expense of metabolic free energy through the establishment of the asymmetric boundary conditions.

  6. Enzymology and molecular biology of cell wall biosynthesis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.M.

    1993-03-20

    In order to be able to explore the control of cell wall polysaccharide synthesis at the molecular level, which inter alia might eventually lead to means for useful modification of plant biomass polysaccharide production, the immediate goals of this project are to identify polypeptides responsible for wall polysaccharide synthase activities and to obtain clones of the genes that encode them. We are concentrating on plasma membraneassociated (1,3)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-II or GS-II) and Golgi-associated (1,4)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-I or GS-I), of growing pea stem tissue. Our progress has been much more rapid with respect to GS-II than regarding GS-I.

  7. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1.

    PubMed

    Sola-Campoy, Pedro J; Robles, Francisca; Schwarzacher, Trude; Ruiz Rejón, Carmelo; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.). The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176-178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs) of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30) could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II) with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree.

  8. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1.

    PubMed

    Sola-Campoy, Pedro J; Robles, Francisca; Schwarzacher, Trude; Ruiz Rejón, Carmelo; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.). The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176-178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs) of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30) could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II) with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree. PMID:26633808

  9. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1

    PubMed Central

    Sola-Campoy, Pedro J.; Robles, Francisca; Schwarzacher, Trude; Ruiz Rejón, Carmelo; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.). The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176–178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs) of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30) could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II) with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree. PMID:26633808

  10. Molecular Changes in Endometriosis-Associated Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Michael J.; Liu, Shubai; Hua, Yuanyuan; Kwok, Jamie Sui-Lam; Samuel, Anicka; Hou, Lei; Shoni, Melina; Lu, Shi; Sandberg, Evelien M.; Keryan, Anna; Wu, Di; Ng, Shu-Kay; Kuo, Winston P.; Parra-Herran, Carlos E.; Tsui, Stephen KW; Welch, William; Crum, Christopher; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endometriosis is frequently associated with and thought of having propensity to develop into ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC), although the molecular transformation mechanism is not completely understood. METHODS We employed immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for marker expression along the potential progression continuum. Expression profiling of microdissected endometriotic and OCCC cells from patient-matched formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples was performed to explore the carcinogenic pathways. Function of novel biomarkers was confirmed by knockdown experiments. RESULTS PTEN was significantly lost in both endometriosis and invasive tumor tissues, while estrogen receptor (ER) expression was lost in OCCC relative to endometriosis. XRCC5, PTCH2, eEF1A2, and PPP1R14B were significantly overexpressed in OCCC and associated endometriosis, but not in benign endometriosis (p≤0.004). Knockdown experiments with XRCC5 and PTCH2 in a clear cell cancer cell line resulted in significant growth inhibition. There was also significant silencing of a panel of target genes with histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a signature of polycomb chromatin-remodeling complex in OCCC. IHC confirmed the loss of expression of one such polycomb target gene, the serous ovarian cancer lineage marker WT1 in OCCC, while endometriotic tissues showed significant co-expression of WT1 and ER. CONCLUSIONS Loss of PTEN expression is proposed as an early and permissive event in endometriosis development, while the loss of ER and polycomb-mediated transcriptional reprogramming for pluripotency may play an important role in the ultimate transformation process. Our study provides new evidence to redefine the pathogenic program for lineage-specific transformation of endometriosis to OCCC. PMID:26059197

  11. The Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture Resource: Validated Cell Models Representing All Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuan; Bergström, Tobias; Jiang, Yiwen; Johansson, Patrik; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Lindberg, Nanna; Segerman, Anna; Wicher, Grzegorz; Niklasson, Mia; Baskaran, Sathishkumar; Sreedharan, Smitha; Everlien, Isabelle; Kastemar, Marianne; Hermansson, Annika; Elfineh, Lioudmila; Libard, Sylwia; Holland, Eric Charles; Hesselager, Göran; Alafuzoff, Irina; Westermark, Bengt; Nelander, Sven; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Uhrbom, Lene

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and malignant form of primary brain tumor. GBM is essentially incurable and its resistance to therapy is attributed to a subpopulation of cells called glioma stem cells (GSCs). To meet the present shortage of relevant GBM cell (GC) lines we developed a library of annotated and validated cell lines derived from surgical samples of GBM patients, maintained under conditions to preserve GSC characteristics. This collection, which we call the Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture (HGCC) resource, consists of a biobank of 48 GC lines and an associated database containing high-resolution molecular data. We demonstrate that the HGCC lines are tumorigenic, harbor genomic lesions characteristic of GBMs, and represent all four transcriptional subtypes. The HGCC panel provides an open resource for in vitro and in vivo modeling of a large part of GBM diversity useful to both basic and translational GBM research. PMID:26629530

  12. Communicating the molecular basis of cancer cell-by-cell: an interview with Tatsushi Igaki.

    PubMed

    Igaki, Tatsushi

    2015-12-01

    Tatsushi Igaki is currently based at the Kyoto University Graduate School of Biostudies, where he leads a research group dedicated to using Drosophila genetics to build a picture of the cell-cell communications underlying the establishment and maintenance of multicellular systems. His work has provided insight into the molecular bases of cell competition in the context of development and tumorigenesis, including the landmark discovery that oncogenic cells communicate with normal cells in the tumor microenvironment to induce tumor progression in a non-autonomous fashion. In this interview, he describes his career path, highlighting the shift in his research focus from the basic principles of apoptosis to clonal evolution in cancer, and also explains why Drosophila provides a powerful model system for studying cancer biology. PMID:26637532

  13. Dexamethasone-induced cell death is restricted to specific molecular subgroups of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kervoëlen, Charlotte; Ménoret, Emmanuelle; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Bataille, Régis; Godon, Catherine; Marionneau-Lambot, Séverine; Moreau, Philippe; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Amiot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Due to its cytotoxic effect in lymphoid cells, dexamethasone is widely used in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). However, only a subset of myeloma patients responds to high-dose dexamethasone. Despite the undeniable anti-myeloma benefits of dexamethasone, significant adverse effects have been reported. We re-evaluate the anti-tumor effect of dexamethasone according to the molecular heterogeneity of MM. We demonstrated that the pro-death effect of dexamethasone is related to the genetic heterogeneity of MM because sensitive cell lines were restricted to MAF and MMSET signature subgroups, whereas all CCND1 cell lines (n = 10) were resistant to dexamethasone. We demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor expression was an important limiting factor for dexamethasone-induced cell death and we found a correlation between glucocorticoid receptor levels and the induction of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) under dexamethasone treatment. By silencing GILZ, we next demonstrated that GILZ is necessary for Dex induced apoptosis while triggering an imbalance between anti- and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Finally, the heterogeneity of the dexamethasone response was further confirmed in vivo using myeloma xenograft models. Our findings suggested that the effect of dexamethasone should be re-evaluated within molecular subgroups of myeloma patients to improve its efficacy and reduce its adverse effects. PMID:26323097

  14. Molecular Recognition by a Polymorphic Cell Surface Receptor Governs Cooperative Behaviors in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Arup; Wall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is a fundamental process that allows cells to coordinate multicellular behaviors. Some microbes, such as myxobacteria, build multicellular fruiting bodies from free-living cells. However, how bacterial cells recognize each other by contact is poorly understood. Here we show that myxobacteria engage in recognition through interactions between TraA cell surface receptors, which leads to the fusion and exchange of outer membrane (OM) components. OM exchange is shown to be selective among 17 environmental isolates, as exchange partners parsed into five major recognition groups. TraA is the determinant of molecular specificity because: (i) exchange partners correlated with sequence conservation within its polymorphic PA14-like domain and (ii) traA allele replacements predictably changed partner specificity. Swapping traA alleles also reprogrammed social interactions among strains, including the regulation of motility and conferred immunity from inter-strain killing. We suggest that TraA helps guide the transition of single cells into a coherent bacterial community, by a proposed mechanism that is analogous to mitochondrial fusion and fission cycling that mixes contents to establish a homogenous population. In evolutionary terms, traA functions as a rare greenbeard gene that recognizes others that bear the same allele to confer beneficial treatment. PMID:24244178

  15. Regulatory T cells and dendritic cells in transplantation tolerance: molecular markers and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Nolan, Kathleen F; Graca, Luis; Castejon, Raquel; Le Moine, Alain; Frewin, Mark; Humm, Susan; Adams, Elizabeth; Thompson, Sara; Zelenika, Diana; Paterson, Alison; Yates, Stephen; Fairchild, Paul J; Waldmann, Herman

    2003-12-01

    Transplantation tolerance can be induced in adult rodents using monoclonal antibodies against coreceptor or costimulation molecules on the surface of T cells. There are currently two well-characterized populations of T cells, demonstrating regulatory capacity: the "natural" CD4+CD25+ T cells and the interleukin (IL)-10-producing Tr1 cells. Although both types of regulatory T cells can induce transplantation tolerance under appropriate conditions, it is not clear whether either one plays any role in drug-induced dominant tolerance, primarily due to a lack of clear-cut molecular or functional markers. Similarly, although dendritic cells (DCs) can be pharmacologically manipulated to promote tolerance, the phenotype of such populations remains poorly defined. We have used serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) with 29 different T-cell and antigen-presenting cell libraries to identify gene-expression signatures associated with immune regulation. We found that independently derived, regulatory Tr1-like clones were highly concordant in their patterns of gene expression but were quite distinct from CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells from the spleen. DCs that were treated with the tolerance-enhancing agents IL-10 or vitamin D3 expressed a gene signature reflecting a functional specification in common with the most immature DCs derived from embryonic stem cells. PMID:14617201

  16. Structural Models of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT Domains Suggest Differential ATP Binding Orientations: Insights from Computational Modeling, Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved ‘Lysine’ at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. ‘Proline’ of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  17. A few minor suggestions.

    PubMed

    Michael, J; Clark, J W

    2001-05-01

    We agree with almost all of the analysis in this excellent presentation of the molecular view of avoidance behavior. A few suggestions are made as follows: Referring to response-generated stimuli as ''readily observable" seems not quite right for the kinesthetic components of such stimuli, although their scientific legitimacy is not questioned. Interpreting response-generated stimuli as a form of positive reinforcement is contested, and an alternative interpretation is offered. A possibly simpler interpretation of the Sidman (1962) two-lever experiment is suggested. We question Dinsmoor's (2001) explanation for warning stimuli not being avoided, except for the reference to the weakness of third-order conditioning effects. A final question is raised regarding the nature of the variables that are responsible for the momentary evocation of the avoidance response.

  18. Molecular analysis of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) subtypes reveals two distinct cell populations with different identities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The term endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is currently used to refer to cell populations which are quite dissimilar in terms of biological properties. This study provides a detailed molecular fingerprint for two EPC subtypes: early EPCs (eEPCs) and outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs). Methods Human blood-derived eEPCs and OECs were characterised by using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, 2D protein electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. Comparative analysis at the transcript and protein level included monocytes and mature endothelial cells as reference cell types. Results Our data show that eEPCs and OECs have strikingly different gene expression signatures. Many highly expressed transcripts in eEPCs are haematopoietic specific (RUNX1, WAS, LYN) with links to immunity and inflammation (TLRs, CD14, HLAs), whereas many transcripts involved in vascular development and angiogenesis-related signalling pathways (Tie2, eNOS, Ephrins) are highly expressed in OECs. Comparative analysis with monocytes and mature endothelial cells clusters eEPCs with monocytes, while OECs segment with endothelial cells. Similarly, proteomic analysis revealed that 90% of spots identified by 2-D gel analysis are common between OECs and endothelial cells while eEPCs share 77% with monocytes. In line with the expression pattern of caveolins and cadherins identified by microarray analysis, ultrastructural evaluation highlighted the presence of caveolae and adherens junctions only in OECs. Conclusions This study provides evidence that eEPCs are haematopoietic cells with a molecular phenotype linked to monocytes; whereas OECs exhibit commitment to the endothelial lineage. These findings indicate that OECs might be an attractive cell candidate for inducing therapeutic angiogenesis, while eEPC should be used with caution because of their monocytic nature. PMID:20465783

  19. Low molecular weight heparin tinzaparin antagonizes cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pfankuchen, Daniel Bastian; Stölting, Daniel Philipp; Schlesinger, Martin; Royer, Hans-Dieter; Bendas, Gerd

    2015-09-15

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used for antithrombotic treatment of cancer patients. Preclinical- and clinical data suggest that LMWH has beneficial effects for cancer patients beyond the prevention of thrombosis, i.e. by inhibiting metastasis. It is, however, unclear whether heparin has an impact on the efficiency of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Here we show that a therapeutic dosage of LMWH tinzaparin reverses cisplatin resistance of A2780cis human ovarian cancer cells to the level of sensitive cells. This novel activity of tinzaparin is associated with intense transcriptional reprogramming. Our gene expression profiling experiments revealed that 3776 genes responded to tinzaparin treatment. For this reason tinzaparin has a complex impact on diverse biological processes. We discovered that tinzaparin inhibits the expression of genes that mediate cisplatin resistance of A2780cis cells. In contrast tinzaparin induced the expression of genes that antagonize drug resistance. This activity of tinzaparin is mediated by cell surface proteoglycans, since enzymatic cleavage of heparan sulfates prevented the reversal of cisplatin resistance. These data indicate that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play an important role for chemotherapy resistance. The results of this study shed a new light on LMWH application in cancer therapy and suggest tinzaparin as promising treatment option of ovarian cancer patients in combination with anticancer drugs. Future clinical trials are needed to validate these findings. PMID:26239805

  20. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Zapien, Gustavo Jesus; Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo; Rojas-Lopez, Marlon

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells.

  1. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells. PMID:27651798

  2. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells.

  3. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Zapien, Gustavo Jesus; Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo; Rojas-Lopez, Marlon

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells. PMID:27651798

  4. Molecular carcinogenesis of squamous cell carcinomas of the skin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshiaki; Murao, Kazutoshi; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Arase, Seiji

    2002-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin were suggested to develop through a multistep process that involves activation of proto-oncogenes and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in the human skin keratinocytes. Exposure to ultra-violet (UV), especially UV-B, radiation is the most common cause for these genetic abnormalities in cells. We review causation of SCCs and genetic abnormalities in human SCCs with the current work. To elucidate the multistep process, we developed a method for examining the combinatorial function in vivo of plural genes in human keratinocytes. Using high efficiency retroviral transductions, we could express plural genes serially in normal human primary keratinocytes and use these cells to regenerate human skin on SCID mice. A combinatorial transduction of H-RasV12 and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) produced human epidermal neoplasia resembling SCC. These findings were consistent with our previous results of mutation analysis in SCCs, one of which had both mutations of H-Ras gene and the INK4a locus. Therefore, it is suggested that a combination of these genetic abnormalities might be crucial to the carcinogenesis at least in a subset of SCCs. PMID:12322999

  5. Iron affects the structure of cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Martínez, F; Cárdenas, H; Grzyb, J; Strzałka, K

    2005-03-01

    The effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on molecular models of biomembranes were investigated. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), classes of phospholipids located in the outer and inner moieties of cell membranes, respectively. X-ray studies showed that very low concentrations of Fe(3+) affected DMPC organization and 10(-3)M induced a total loss of its multilamellar periodic stacking. Experiments carried out with Fe(2+) on DMPC showed weaker effects than those induced by Fe(3+) ions. Similar experiments were performed on DMPE bilayers. Fe(3+) from 10(-7)M up to 10(-4)M had practically no effect on DMPE structure. However, 10(-3)M Fe(3+) induced a deep perturbation of the multilamellar structure of DMPE. However, 10(-3)M Fe(2+) had no effect on DMPE organization practically. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements also revealed different effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on the phase transition and other thermal properties of the examined lipids. In conclusion, the results obtained indicate that iron ions interact with phospholipid bilayers perturbing their structures. These findings are consistent with the observation that iron ions change cell membrane fluidity and, therefore, affect its functions. PMID:15752465

  6. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70–90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an “oncometabolite,” inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo. PMID:27014635

  7. The Molecular Ecophysiology of Programmed Cell Death in Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidle, Kay D.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  8. Cellular and molecular biology of aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Morgan, R Garrett; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage has been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway and result in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current state

  9. Anti-CD antibody microarray for human leukocyte morphology examination allows analyzing rare cell populations and suggesting preliminary diagnosis in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khvastunova, Alina N; Kuznetsova, Sofya A; Al-Radi, Liubov S; Vylegzhanina, Alexandra V; Zakirova, Anna O; Fedyanina, Olga S; Filatov, Alexander V; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly

    2015-07-27

    We describe a method for leukocyte sorting by a microarray of anti-cluster-of-differentiation (anti-CD) antibodies and for preparation of the bound cells for morphological or cytochemical examination. The procedure results in a "sorted" smear with cells positive for certain surface antigens localised in predefined areas. The morphology and cytochemistry of the microarray-captured normal and neoplastic peripheral blood mononuclear cells are identical to the same characteristics in a smear. The microarray permits to determine the proportions of cells positive for the CD antigens on the microarray panel with high correlation with flow cytometry. Using the anti-CD microarray we show that normal granular lymphocytes and lymphocytes with radial segmentation of the nuclei are positive for CD3, CD8, CD16 or CD56 but not for CD4 or CD19. We also show that the described technique permits to obtain a pure leukemic cell population or to separate two leukemic cell populations on different antibody spots and to study their morphology or cytochemistry directly on the microarray. In cases of leukemias/lymphomas when circulating neoplastic cells are morphologically distinct, preliminary diagnosis can be suggested from full analysis of cell morphology, cytochemistry and their binding pattern on the microarray.

  10. Molecular mechanisms promoting the pathogenesis of Schwann cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Steven L

    2012-03-01

    Neurofibromas, schwannomas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) all arise from the Schwann cell lineage. Despite their common origin, these tumor types have distinct pathologies and clinical behaviors; a growing body of evidence indicates that they also arise via distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Identification of the genes that are mutated in genetic diseases characterized by the development of either neurofibromas and MPNSTs [neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)] or schwannomas [neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), schwannomatosis and Carney complex type 1] has greatly advanced our understanding of these mechanisms. The development of genetically engineered mice with ablation of NF1, NF2, SMARCB1/INI1 or PRKAR1A has confirmed the key role these genes play in peripheral nerve sheath tumorigenesis. Establishing the functions of the NF1, NF2, SMARCB1/INI1 and PRKAR1A gene products has led to the identification of key cytoplasmic signaling pathways promoting Schwann cell neoplasia and identified new therapeutic targets. Analyses of human neoplasms and genetically engineered mouse models have established that interactions with other tumor suppressors such as TP53 and CDKN2A promote neurofibroma-MPNST progression and indicate that intratumoral interactions between neoplastic and non-neoplastic cell types play an essential role in peripheral nerve sheath tumorigenesis. Recent advances have also provided new insights into the identity of the neural crest-derived populations that give rise to different types of peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Based on these findings, we now have an initial outline of the molecular mechanisms driving the pathogenesis of neurofibromas, MPNSTs and schwannomas. However, this improved understanding in turn raises a host of intriguing new questions. PMID:22160322

  11. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium resistance in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.L.; Moyzis, R.K.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy metal induction of the synthesis of metallothioneins (MTs) provides an ideal model system for basic mechanistic studies of gene expression. Cell lines varying in their resistance to heavy metals have been isolated through a regime of exposure to serially increasing levels of Cd followed by clonal isolation. These cell lines have been used to examine the role of methylation and amplification in the Cd-resistant (Cd/sup r/) phenotype. It is suggested that regulation of expression of the MT genes in Cd/sup r/ Chinese hamster cells is modulated at both the transcriptional and translational levels. An analysis of the MT2 gene sequence has uncovered a potential alternative splice site in the first intron. Usage of this site would insert 3 or 12 additional amino acids between amino acids 9 and 10. Analysis of the splicing pattern of the MT2 gene transcript in cultured cells has indicated that the second intron is preferentially removed prior to first intron excision. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbing

    -based techniques and is partially attributed to the ease in controlling composition and CZTS phase through this technique. Based on this platform, comprehensive characterization on CZTS devices is carried out including solar cells and transistors. Especially defects properties are exploited in Chapter 4 targeting to identify the limiting factors for further improvement on CZTS solar cells efficiency. Finally, molecular structures and precursor solution stability have been explored, potentially to provide a universal approach to process multinary compounds.

  13. Integrative Modeling of eQTLs and Cis-Regulatory Elements Suggests Mechanisms Underlying Cell Type Specificity of eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher D.; Mangravite, Lara M.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variants in cis-regulatory elements or trans-acting regulators frequently influence the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of gene transcription. Recent interest in expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping has paralleled the adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for the analysis of complex traits and disease in humans. Under the hypothesis that many GWAS associations tag non-coding SNPs with small effects, and that these SNPs exert phenotypic control by modifying gene expression, it has become common to interpret GWAS associations using eQTL data. To fully exploit the mechanistic interpretability of eQTL-GWAS comparisons, an improved understanding of the genetic architecture and causal mechanisms of cell type specificity of eQTLs is required. We address this need by performing an eQTL analysis in three parts: first we identified eQTLs from eleven studies on seven cell types; then we integrated eQTL data with cis-regulatory element (CRE) data from the ENCODE project; finally we built a set of classifiers to predict the cell type specificity of eQTLs. The cell type specificity of eQTLs is associated with eQTL SNP overlap with hundreds of cell type specific CRE classes, including enhancer, promoter, and repressive chromatin marks, regions of open chromatin, and many classes of DNA binding proteins. These associations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms generating the cell type specificity of eQTLs and the mode of regulation of corresponding eQTLs. Using a random forest classifier with cell specific CRE-SNP overlap as features, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting the cell type specificity of eQTLs. We then demonstrate that CREs from a trait-associated cell type can be used to annotate GWAS associations in the absence of eQTL data for that cell type. We anticipate that such integrative, predictive modeling of cell specificity will improve our ability to understand the mechanistic basis of human complex phenotypic

  14. Molecular mechanisms of asbestos-induced lung epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Beri, Rohinee; Mueller, Amanda; Kamp, David W

    2010-11-01

    Asbestos causes pulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis) and malignancies (bronchogenic lung cancer and mesothelioma) by mechanisms that are not fully elucidated. Accumulating evidence show that alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis is a crucial initiating and perpetuating event in the development of pulmonary fibrosis following exposure to a wide variety of noxious stimuli, including asbestos. We review the important molecular mechanisms underlying asbestos-induced AEC apoptosis. Specifically, we focus on the role of asbestos in augmenting AEC apoptosis by the mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways that result from the production of iron-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. We summarize emerging evidence implicating the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in AEC apoptosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a disease with similarities to asbestosis. Finally, we discuss a recent finding that a mitochondrial oxidative DNA repair enzyme (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase; Ogg1) acts as a mitochondrial aconitase chaperone protein to prevent oxidant (asbestos and H(2)O(2))-induced AEC mitochondrial dysfunction and intrinsic apoptosis. The coupling of mitochondrial Ogg1 to mitochondrial aconitase is a novel mechanism linking metabolism to mitochondrial DNA that may be important in the pathophysiologic events resulting in oxidant-induced toxicity as seen in tumors, aging, and respiratory disorders (e.g. asbestosis, IPF). Collectively, these studies are illuminating the molecular basis of AEC apoptosis following asbestos exposure that may prove useful for developing novel therapeutic strategies. Importantly, the asbestos paradigm is elucidating pathophysiologic insights into other more common pulmonary diseases, such as IPF and lung cancer, for which better therapy is required. PMID:20380827

  15. Genome wide survey and molecular modeling of hypothetical proteins containing 2Fe-2S and FMN binding domains suggests Rieske Dioxygenase Activity highlighting their potential roles in bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Nagendra, Holenarsipur Gundurao

    2014-01-01

    'Conserved hypothetical' proteins pose a challenge not just for functional genomics, but also to biology in general. As long as there are hundreds of conserved proteins with unknown function in model organisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, any discussion towards a 'complete' understanding of these biological systems will remain a wishful thinking. Insilico approaches exhibit great promise towards attempts that enable appreciating the plausible roles of these hypothetical proteins. Among the majority of genomic proteins, two-thirds in unicellular organisms and more than 80% in metazoa, are multi-domain proteins, created as a result of gene duplication events. Aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, also called Rieske dioxygenases (RDOs), are class of multi-domain proteins that catalyze the initial step in microbial aerobic degradation of many aromatic compounds. Investigations here address the computational characterization of hypothetical proteins containing Ferredoxin and Flavodoxin signatures. Consensus sequence of each class of oxidoreductase was obtained by a phylogenetic analysis, involving clustering methods based on evolutionary relationship. A synthetic sequence was developed by combining the consensus, which was used as the basis to search for their homologs via BLAST. The exercise yielded 129 multidomain hypothetical proteins containing both 2Fe-2S (Ferredoxin) and FNR (Flavodoxin) domains. In the current study, 17 proteins with N-terminus FNR domain and C-terminus 2Fe-2S domain are characterized, through homology modelling and docking exercises which suggest dioxygenase activity indicate their plausible roles in degradation of aromatic moieties. PMID:24616557

  16. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C.; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis. PMID:27009448

  17. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis. PMID:27009448

  18. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bo Yon; Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  19. Protein Profiling of Human Breast Tumor Cells Identifies Novel Biomarkers Associated with Molecular Subtypes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Anthony; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Bertucci, François; Audebert, Stéphane; Toiron, Yves; Esterni, Benjamin; Monville, Florence; Tarpin, Carole; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Chabannon, Christian; Extra, Jean-Marc; Viens, Patrice; Borg, Jean-Paul; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Molecular subtypes of breast cancer with relevant biological and clinical features have been defined recently, notably ERBB2-overexpressing, basal-like, and luminal-like subtypes. To investigate the ability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies to analyze the molecular complexity of human breast cancer, we performed a SELDI-TOF MS-based protein profiling of human breast cell lines (BCLs). Triton-soluble proteins from 27 BCLs were incubated with ProteinChip arrays and subjected to SELDI analysis. Unsupervised global hierarchical clustering spontaneously discriminated two groups of BCLs corresponding to “luminal-like” cell lines and to “basal-like” cell lines, respectively. These groups of BCLs were also different in terms of estrogen receptor status as well as expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and other basal markers. Supervised analysis revealed various protein biomarkers with differential expression in basal-like versus luminal-like cell lines. We identified two of them as a carboxyl terminus-truncated form of ubiquitin and S100A9. In a small series of frozen human breast tumors, we confirmed that carboxyl terminus-truncated ubiquitin is observed in primary breast samples, and our results suggest its higher expression in luminal-like tumors. S100A9 up-regulation was found as part of the transcriptionally defined basal-like cluster in DNA microarrays analysis of human tumors. S100A9 association with basal subtypes as well as its poor prognosis value was demonstrated on a series of 547 tumor samples from early breast cancer deposited in a tissue microarray. Our study shows the potential of integrated genomics and proteomics profiling to improve molecular knowledge of complex tumor phenotypes and identify biomarkers with valuable diagnostic or prognostic values. PMID:18426791

  20. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Yon; Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo

    2011-11-18

    In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  1. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of strains of Shigella sonnei isolated over 31 years suggests the circulation of two prevalent subtypes in São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Seribelli, Amanda Ap; Frazão, Miliane R; Medeiros, Marta I Cazentini; Falcão, Juliana P

    2016-07-01

    Shigella sonnei is an important causative agent of bacillary dysentery worldwide that has recently emerged in developing countries. However, there are few studies that have characterized strains ofS. sonnei isolated in Brazil. The aims of this study were to assess the presence of 12 virulence genes, the antimicrobial resistance profile against 16 drugs and the genotypic diversity of strains of S. sonnei isolated in this country. Seventy-two strains of S. sonnei isolated from human diarrhoeic faeces in São Paulo State, Brazil from 1983-2014 were studied. All of the strains contained the ipaH, iuc and sigA genes. The ipaBCD gene was detected in 19 % of the strains, the ial and virF genes in 18 % and the sen gene in 10 % of the strains. The set1A, set1B, pic,sepA and sat genes were not detected. A total of 42 (58.3 %) strains were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Thirty (41.6 %) strains were resistant to tetracycline. The S. sonnei strains were grouped in two clusters called A and B by PFGE and ERIC-PCR, and the majority of the strains comprised in each cluster presented ≥80 % similarity. In conclusion, the pathogenic potential of the strains studied was highlighted by the presence of important virulence genes. The high rates of resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline are alarming once those drugs can be used in the treatment of shigellosis. The PFGE and ERIC-PCR results suggest that there are two prevalent subtypes in the studied strains of S. sonnei that differed little over 31 years and have been contaminating humans and causing diseases in São Paulo State, Brazil. PMID:27267912

  2. Differences Between Colon Cancer Primaries and Metastases Using a Molecular Assay for Tumor Radiation Sensitivity Suggest Implications for Potential Oligometastatic SBRT Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Fulp, William J.; Berglund, Anders E.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shridhar, Ravi; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: We previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiation sensitivity index (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple independent cohorts (breast, rectal, esophageal, and head and neck patients). The purpose of this study was to assess differences between RSI scores in primary colon cancer and metastases. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified from our institutional review board–approved prospective observational protocol. A total of 704 metastatic and 1362 primary lesions were obtained from a de-identified metadata pool. RSI was calculated using the previously published rank-based algorithm. An independent cohort of 29 lung or liver colon metastases treated with 60 Gy in 5 fractions stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used for validation. Results: The most common sites of metastases included liver (n=374; 53%), lung (n=116; 17%), and lymph nodes (n=40; 6%). Sixty percent of metastatic tumors, compared with 54% of primaries, were in the RSI radiation-resistant peak, suggesting metastatic tumors may be slightly more radiation resistant than primaries (P=.01). In contrast, when we analyzed metastases based on anatomical site, we uncovered large differences in RSI. The median RSIs for metastases in descending order of radiation resistance were ovary (0.48), abdomen (0.47), liver (0.43), brain (0.42), lung (0.32), and lymph nodes (0.31) (P<.0001). These findings were confirmed when the analysis was restricted to lesions from the same patient (n=139). In our independent cohort of treated lung and liver metastases, lung metastases had an improved local control rate compared to that in patients with liver metastases (2-year local control rate of 100% vs 73.0%, respectively; P=.026). Conclusions: Assessment of radiation sensitivity between primary and metastatic tissues of colon cancer histology revealed significant differences based on anatomical location of metastases. These initial results warrant validation in a larger

  3. Differences between colon cancer primaries and metastases utilizing a molecular assay for tumor radiosensitivity suggest implications for potential oligometastatic SBRT patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Fulp, William J.; Berglund, Anders E.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shridhar, Ravi; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives We have previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple independent cohorts (breast, rectal, esophageal, and head and neck). The purpose of this study was to assess differences in RSI scores between primary colon cancer and metastases. Methods and Materials Patients were identified from our institutional IRB approved prospective observational protocol. A total of 704 metastatic and 1,362 primary lesions were obtained from a de-identified meta-data pool. RSI was calculated using the previously published ranked based algorithm. An independent cohort of 29 lung or liver colon metastases treated with 60 Gy in 5 fractions stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) was used for validation. Results The most common sites of metastases included liver (n=374; 53%), lung (n=116; 17%), and lymph nodes (n=40; 6%). Sixty percent of metastatic tumors compared with 54% of primaries were in the RSI-radioresistant (RSI-RR) peak, suggesting that, metastatic tumors may be slightly more radioresistant than primaries (p=0.01). In contrast, when we analyzed metastases based on anatomical site, we uncovered large differences in RSI. The median RSIs for metastases in descending order of radioresistance were ovary (0.48), abdomen (0.47), liver (0.43), brain (0.42), lung (0.32), and lymph nodes (0.31), p<0.0001. These findings were confirmed when the analysis was restricted to lesions from the same patient (n=139). In our independent cohort of treated lung and liver metastases, lung metastases had an improved local control (LC) rate over patients with liver metastases (2 yr LC 100% vs. 73.0%, p=0.026). Conclusions Assessment of radiosensitivity between primary and metastatic tissues of colon cancer histology, reveals significant differences based on anatomical location of metastases. These initial results warrant validation in a larger clinical cohort. PMID:25838188

  4. Genetically-defined novel oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines for the development of molecular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Fadlullah, Muhammad Zaki Hidayatullah; Chiang, Ivy Kim-Ni; Dionne, Kalen R.; Yee, Pei San; Gan, Chai Phei; Sam, Kin Kit; Tiong, Kai Hung; Ng, Adrian Kwok Wen; Martin, Daniel; Lim, Kue Peng; Kallarakkal, Thomas George; Mustafa, Wan Mahadzir Wan; Lau, Shin Hin; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Molinolo, Alfredo; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Tan, Aik Choon; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2016-01-01

    Emerging biological and translational insights from large sequencing efforts underscore the need for genetically-relevant cell lines to study the relationships between genomic alterations of tumors, and therapeutic dependencies. Here, we report a detailed characterization of a novel panel of clinically annotated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines, derived from patients with diverse ethnicity and risk habits. Molecular analysis by RNAseq and copy number alterations (CNA) identified that the cell lines harbour CNA that have been previously reported in OSCC, for example focal amplications in 3q, 7p, 8q, 11q, 20q and deletions in 3p, 5q, 8p, 18q. Similarly, our analysis identified the same cohort of frequently mutated genes previously reported in OSCC including TP53, CDKN2A, EPHA2, FAT1, NOTCH1, CASP8 and PIK3CA. Notably, we identified mutations (MLL4, USP9X, ARID2) in cell lines derived from betel quid users that may be associated with this specific risk factor. Gene expression profiles of the ORL lines also aligned with those reported for OSCC. By focusing on those gene expression signatures that are predictive of chemotherapeutic response, we observed that the ORL lines broadly clustered into three groups (cell cycle, xenobiotic metabolism, others). The ORL lines noted to be enriched in cell cycle genes responded preferentially to the CDK1 inhibitor RO3306, by MTT cell viability assay. Overall, our in-depth characterization of clinically annotated ORL lines provides new insight into the molecular alterations synonymous with OSCC, which can facilitate in the identification of biomarkers that can be used to guide diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of OSCC. PMID:27050151

  5. Ex vivo priming for long-term maintenance of antileukemia human cytotoxic T cells suggests a general procedure for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Montagna, D; Maccario, R; Locatelli, F; Rosti, V; Yang, Y; Farness, P; Moretta, A; Comoli, P; Montini, E; Vitiello, A

    2001-12-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy has proven to be a successful approach in preventing and curing cytomegalovirus infection and Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphomas after bone marrow transplantation. Translation of this approach for preventing leukemia relapse after bone marrow transplantation might require ex vivo priming and long-term maintenance of leukemia blast-specific T cells. To accomplish this goal, procedures were optimized for the in vitro priming of naive CD8 using dendritic cells activated by CD40 ligation, interleukin-12 (IL-12), and IL-7. Using T lymphocytes and dendritic cells obtained from HLA-matched allogeneic bone marrow transplantation donors and leukemia blasts as a source of tumor antigens, anti-acute myeloid leukemia cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were induced. In these experiments, it was found that though it is possible to induce CTLs using immature dendritic cells, IL-12, and IL-7, obtaining long-term CTLs requires the presence of CD4 T cells in the priming phase. Using this approach, long-term antileukemia CTL lines could be generated from 4 of 4 bone marrow donors. Because this procedure does not require definition of the target antigen and because it selects responding cells from a virgin T-cell repertoire, its general application is suggested in adoptive immunotherapy and in the definition of tumor rejection antigens. PMID:11719375

  6. Molecular changes induced by the curcumin analogue D6 in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In a previous report, we described the in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity of a hydroxylated biphenyl (D6), a structural analogue of curcumin, on malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma tumours. In this paper, we investigated the molecular changes induced by such a compound, underlying cell growth arrest and apoptosis in melanoma cells. Results To shed light on the mechanisms of action of D6, we firstly demonstrated its quick cellular uptake and subsequent block of cell cycle in G2/M phase transition. A gene expression profile analysis of D6-treated melanoma cells and fibroblasts was then carried out on high density microarrays, to assess gene expression changes induced by this compound. The expression profile study evidenced both an induction of stress response pathways and a modulation of cell growth regulation mechanisms. In particular, our data suggest that the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of D6 in melanoma could be partially driven by up-regulation of the p53 signalling pathways as well as by down-regulation of the PI3K/Akt and NF-kB pathways. Modulation of gene expression due to D6 treatment was verified by western blot analysis for single proteins of interest, confirming the results from the gene expression profile analysis. Conclusions Our findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of D6, through a comprehensive description of the molecular changes induced by this compound at the gene expression level, in agreement with the previously reported anti-tumour effects on melanoma cells. PMID:23642048

  7. Morphological and molecular analysis calls for a reappraisal of the red rain cells of Kerala.

    PubMed

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Burchell, Mark J; Hogg, Stuart I

    2014-02-01

    Early studies on the coloured particles that fell as red rain over southern India identified them as unicellular eukaryotes such as members of the red algae or fungi; however, the results of the present investigation are not consistent with this designation. Using transmission electron microscopy, we have demonstrated significant differences in the ultrastructure when compared with representative species from these other groups. Most notably, the red rain cells show no evidence of typical eukaryotic internal structures such as mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, comparisons based on elemental composition using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, as well as Raman spectral signatures demonstrate significant dissimilarities in their molecular composition. The identity and origins of the red rain cells remain an enigma; however, our findings are more consistent with an unidentified prokaryote, and thus suggest that previous attempts at their identification should be reappraised.

  8. The Molecular Karyotype of 25 Clinical-Grade Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Canham, Maurice A.; Van Deusen, Amy; Brison, Daniel R.; De Sousa, Paul A.; Downie, Janet; Devito, Liani; Hewitt, Zoe A.; Ilic, Dusko; Kimber, Susan J.; Moore, Harry D.; Murray, Helen; Kunath, Tilo

    2015-01-01

    The application of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives to regenerative medicine is now becoming a reality. Although the vast majority of hESC lines have been derived for research purposes only, about 50 lines have been established under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) conditions. Cell types differentiated from these designated lines may be used as a cell therapy to treat macular degeneration, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, diabetes, osteoarthritis and other degenerative conditions. It is essential to know the genetic stability of the hESC lines before progressing to clinical trials. We evaluated the molecular karyotype of 25 clinical-grade hESC lines by whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis. A total of 15 unique copy number variations (CNVs) greater than 100 kb were detected, most of which were found to be naturally occurring in the human population and none were associated with culture adaptation. In addition, three copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) regions greater than 1 Mb were observed and all were relatively small and interstitial suggesting they did not arise in culture. The large number of available clinical-grade hESC lines with defined molecular karyotypes provides a substantial starting platform from which the development of pre-clinical and clinical trials in regenerative medicine can be realised. PMID:26607962

  9. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins. PMID:14514663

  10. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins.

  11. Molecular Factors in Dendritic Cell Responses to Adsorbed Glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, Nathan A.; Cummings, Richard D.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Babensee, Julia E.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates and glycoconjugates have been shown to exert pro-inflammatory effects on the dendritic cell (DC), supporting pathogen-induced innate immunity and antigen processing, as well as immunosuppressive effects in the tolerance to self-proteins. Additionally, the innate inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials has been hypothesized to be mediated by inflammatory cells interacting with adsorbed proteins, many of which are glycosylated. However, the molecular factors relevant for surface displayed glycoconjugate modulation of DC phenotype are unknown. Thus, in this study, a model system was developed to establish the role of glycan composition, density, and carrier cationization state on DC response. Thiol modified glycans were covalently bound to a model protein carrier, maleimide functionalized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the number of glycans per BSA modulated. Additionally, the carrier isoelectric point was scaled from a pI of ~4.0 to ~10.0 using ethylenediamine (EDA). The DC response to the neoglycoconjugates adsorbed to wells of a 384 well plate was determined via a high throughput assay. The underlying trends in DC phenotype in relation to conjugate properties were elucidated via multivariate general linear models. It was found that glycoconjugates with more than 20 glycans per carrier had the greatest impact on the pro-inflammatory response from DCs, followed by conjugates having an isoelectric point above 9.5. Surfaces displaying terminal α1–2 linked mannose structures were able to increase the inflammatory DC response to a greater extent than did any other terminal glycan structure. The results herein can be applied to inform the design of the next generation of combination products and biomaterials for use in future vaccines and implanted materials. PMID:24746228

  12. Raman probing of molecular interactions of alginate biopolymers with cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourpa, Igor; Carpentier, Philippe; Maingault, Philippe; Fetissoff, Franck; Dubois, Pierre

    2000-05-01

    The biological polymers extracted from brown algae, alginates, are novel materials in biotechnology and biomedicine. Their ability to form viscous gels is used to immobilize or encapsulate yeast, enzymes, living cells and drugs. Calcium-alginate fibers are extensively used in wound dressings since exhibit antihaemostatic and healing properties. The problem with alginate-made dressings in surgery is their slow biodegradability: if entrapped within tissues, they can induce a local cellular recruitment with an inflammatory response contemporaneous to the resorption phase. In part, this problem is a consequence of poor solubility of the calcium alginates in water. Although calcium alginate fibers can exchange calcium ions with sodium ions from the wound exudate to create a calcium/sodium alginate fibers, the residual alginates are thought to be not totally degradable in vivo. Rapid and non- destructive characterization of series of the crude alginates and calcium alginate fibers has been performed using Raman spectroscopy with near IR excitation. Study of structural organization of the polymeric chains within calcium alginate fibers have been previously reported as made by confocal Raman multispectral imaging (CRMSI) in visible. Here, the Raman approach has been used to monitor the ion exchange reactions for different types of alginates and their salts in vitro. For in vivo evaluation, histological sections of alginate-treated rat tissue have been analyzed by light microscopy and CRMSI. The in vitro Raman modeling and the histochemical mapping were a necessary precursor for application of the Raman microprobe to follow in a non-invasive way the alginate-cell molecular interactions in rat tissue.

  13. Plutonium Uptake and Distribution in Mammalian Cells: Molecular vs Polymeric Plutonium

    PubMed Central

    ARYAL, BAIKUNTHA P.; GORMAN-LEWIS, DREW; PAUNESKU, TATJANA; WILSON, RICHARD E.; LAI, BARRY; VOGT, STEFAN; WOLOSCHAK, GAYLE E.; JENSEN, MARK P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the cellular responses to molecular and polymeric forms of plutonium using PC12 cells derived from rat adrenal glands. Materials and methods Serum starved PC12 cells were exposed to polymeric and molecular forms of plutonium for three hours. Cells were washed with 10 mM EGTA, 100 mM NaCl at pH 7.4 to remove surface sorbed plutonium. Localization of plutonium in individual cell was quantitatively analyzed by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy. Results Molecular plutonium complexes introduced to cell growth media in the form of NTA, citrate, or transferrin complexes were taken up by PC12 cells, and mostly co-localized with iron within the cells. Polymeric plutonium prepared separately was not internalized by PC12 cells but it was always found on the cell surface as big agglomerates; however polymeric plutonium formed in situ was mostly found within the cells as agglomerates. Conclusions PC12 cells can differentiate molecular and polymeric forms of plutonium. Molecular plutonium is taken up by PC12 cells and mostly co-localized with iron but aged polymeric plutonium is not internalized by the cells. PMID:21770702

  14. Ultrastructural localization of desmoglein and plakophilin in the human hair suggests that the cell membrane complex is a long desmosomal remnant.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Watanabe, Shunichi; Nöcker, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Unlike the superficial part of the corneous layer of the epidermis (Stratum corneum) where desmosomes are degraded and corneocytes flake away, the trichocytes in the hair remain attached to each other after cornification. The permanence and fine localization of cell junctions, in particular of desmosomal proteins in the cornifying and mature human hair, is not known. The present electron microscope immunolocalization study indicates that two protein markers for desmosomes such as desmoglein 4 and plakophilins 1 and 3 are still present in mature cortical and cuticle cells. These proteins remain mainly localized in the cornified cytoplasmic side of desmosomal remnants of cortical cells, but also in the delta layer of the extracellular region of the membrane complex. This suggests that the delta layer represents an extensive desmosomal remnant formed between mature cortical cells and in cuticle cells. The endocuticle appears to be the site of accumulation of desmosomal proteins and degraded nuclear material. The cornification of desmosomal junctions in both cortical and cuticle cells likely contributes to stabilize the integrity of the hair shaft.

  15. Molecular characterization of a 17q11.2 translocation in a malignant schwannoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J E; Fletcher, J A; Lytle, C H; Nie, L; Morton, C C; Diehl, S R

    1992-12-01

    Malignant schwannomas are soft-tissue neoplasms that occur at increased frequency with germline alterations of the neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) gene at 17q11.2. We report molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a malignant schwannoma cell line established from an individual affected with NF1. This cell line has a complex hyperdiploid karyotype with two cytogenetically identical der(13)t(13;17)(p11,q11.2) chromosomes. Using somatic cell hybrids, we mapped twelve chromosome-17 probes to either the der(13)t(13;17) chromosome or a small der(17) chromosome. Two chromosome-17p loci, including the p53 tumor suppressor gene, were present in the schwannoma cell line, but did not map to either of these chromosomes. Loss of heterozygosity studies indicated that the two der(13)t(13;17) chromosomes arose by duplication, presumably after the translocation event. The 17q11.2 translocation break-point maps distal to the NF1 gene, and may not disrupt its functioning. Although NF1 mRNA was detected in this cell line by polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot analysis revealed very little or none of the 13-kb mature NF1 transcript. This suggests that the single remaining allele of the NF1 gene contains a mutation that results in either greatly reduced transcription or message instability.

  16. Molecular regulation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 trafficking to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Dong, Su; Xiao, Shuqi; Zhao, Yutong

    2014-11-01

    The lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1), a G-protein coupled receptor, regulates cell proliferation, migration, and cytokine release. Here, we investigate the molecular signature of LPA1 trafficking to the cell surface. The overexpressed LPA1 with a C-terminal V5 tag (LPA1-V5) is majorly expressed on the cell surface, while two deletion mutants (C320 and ∆84-87) failed to be trafficked to the cell surface. Further, site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the LPA1 revealed that Ile325, Tyr85, and Leu87 within these two fragments regulate LPA1 maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. Over-expression of Sar1, a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), enhances glycosylation of LPA1 wild type, but not these mutants. The mutants of LPA1 are majorly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and exhibit a higher binding affinity to heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), when compared to the LPA1 wild type. Further, we found that all these mutants failed to increase phosphorylation of Erk, and the cytokine release in response to LPA treatment. These results suggest that Ile325, Tyr85, and Leu87 within LPA1 are essential for LPA1 protein properly folding in the ER.

  17. Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Mechanism of Cryopreservation by Polyampholytes: Cell Membrane Interactions and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Robin; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Nagashima, Toshio; Matsumura, Kazuaki

    2016-05-01

    Cryopreservation enables long-term preservation of cells at ultralow temperatures. Current cryoprotective agents (CPAs) have several limitations, making it imperative to develop CPAs with advanced properties. Previously, we developed a novel synthetic polyampholyte-based CPA, copolymer of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and methacrylic acid(MAA) (poly(MAA-DMAEMA)), which showed excellent efficiency and biocompatibility. Introduction of hydrophobicity increased its efficiency significantly. Herein, we investigated the activity of other polyampholytes. We prepared two zwitterionic polymers, poly(sulfobetaine) (SPB) and poly(carboxymethyl betaine) (CMB), and compared their efficiency with poly(MAA-DMAEMA). Poly-SPB showed only intermediate property and poly-CMB showed no cryoprotective property. These data suggested that the polymer structure strongly influences cryoprotection, providing an impetus to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cryopreservation. We investigated the mechanism by studying the interaction of polymers with cell membrane, which allowed us to identify the interactions responsible for imparting different properties. Results unambiguously demonstrated that polyampholytes cryopreserve cells by strongly interacting with cell membrane, with hydrophobicity increasing the affinity for membrane interaction, which enables it to protect the membrane from various freezing-induced damages. Additionally, cryoprotective polymers, especially their hydrophobic derivatives, inhibit the recrystallization of ice, thus averting cell death. Hence, our results provide an important insight into the complex mechanism of cryopreservation, which might facilitate the rational design of polymeric CPAs with improved efficiency. PMID:27077533

  18. Y-chromosome status identification suggests a recipient origin of posttransplant non-small cell lung carcinomas: chromogenic in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Brodsky, Sergey V; Zhao, Weiqiang; Otterson, Gregory A; Villalona-Calero, Miguel; Satoskar, Anjali A; Hasan, Ayesha; Pelletier, Ronald; Ivanov, Iouri; Ross, Patrick; Nadasdy, Tibor; Shilo, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Owing to the need of lifelong immunosuppression, solid-organ transplant recipients are known to have an increased risk of posttransplant malignancies including lung cancer. Posttransplant neoplastic transformation of donor-derived cells giving rise to hematopoietic malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, and basal cell carcinoma in nongraft tissues has been reported. The goal of this study was to assess the cell origin (donor versus recipient derived) of posttransplant non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) in kidney and heart transplant recipients. An institutional database search identified 2557 kidney and heart transplant recipients in 8 consecutive years. Among this cohort, 20 (0.8%) renal and 18 (0.7%) heart transplant recipients developed NSCLC. The study cohort comprised 6 of 38 NSCLCs arising in donor-recipient sex-mismatched transplant patients. The tumor cell origin was evaluated by chromogenic in situ hybridization with Y-chromosome probe on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Y-chromosome was identified in 97% ± 1% (range from 92% to 99%) of all types of nucleated cells in male control tissues. In all 5 NSCLCs from male recipients of female donor organ, Y-chromosome was identified in 97% ± 2% (range from 92% to 100%) of tumor cells, statistically equivalent to normal control (P < .001). No Y-chromosome was identified in NSCLC cells from a female recipient of male kidney. These findings suggest a recipient derivation of NSCLC arising in kidney and heart transplant recipients. A combination of histologic evaluation and chromogenic in situ hybridization with Y-chromosome analysis allows reliable determination of tissue origin in sex-mismatched solid-organ transplant recipients and may aid in management of posttransplant malignancy in such cases.

  19. Incomplete complementation of the DNA repair defect in cockayne syndrome cells by the denV gene from bacteriophage T4 suggests a deficiency in base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Francis, M A; Bagga, P S; Athwal, R S; Rainbow, A J

    1997-10-01

    Endonuclease V (denV) from bacteriophage T4 has been examined for its ability to complement the repair defect in Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of complementation groups A and B. CS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and a defect in the preferential repair of UV-induced lesions in transcriptionally active DNA by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The denV gene was introduced into non-transformed normal and CS fibroblasts transiently via a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vector and into SV40-transformed normal and CS cells via a retroviral vector. Expression of denV in CS-A cells resulted in partial correction of the UV-sensitive phenotype in assays of gene-specific repair and cell viability, while correction of CS-B cells by expression of denV in the same assays was minimal or non-existent. In contrast, denV expression led to enhanced host cell reactivation (HCR) of viral DNA synthesis in both CS complementation groups to near normal levels. DenV is a glycosylase which is specific for cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) but does not recognize other UV-induced lesions. Previous work has indicated that CS cells can efficiently repair all non-CPD UV-induced transcription blocking lesions (S.F. Barrett et al.. Mutation Res. 255 (1991) 281-291 [1]) and that denV incised lesions are believed to be processed via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The inability of denV to complement the NER defect in CS cells to normal levels implies an impaired ability to process denV incised lesions by the BER pathway, and suggests a role for the CS genes, particularly the CS-B gene, in BER. PMID:9372849

  20. Single-Cell RNA-Seq with Waterfall Reveals Molecular Cascades underlying Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaehoon; Berg, Daniel A; Zhu, Yunhua; Shin, Joseph Y; Song, Juan; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Enikolopov, Grigori; Nauen, David W; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-09-01

    Somatic stem cells contribute to tissue ontogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration through sequential processes. Systematic molecular analysis of stem cell behavior is challenging because classic approaches cannot resolve cellular heterogeneity or capture developmental dynamics. Here we provide a comprehensive resource of single-cell transcriptomes of adult hippocampal quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) and their immediate progeny. We further developed Waterfall, a bioinformatic pipeline, to statistically quantify singe-cell gene expression along a de novo reconstructed continuous developmental trajectory. Our study reveals molecular signatures of adult qNSCs, characterized by active niche signaling integration and low protein translation capacity. Our analyses further delineate molecular cascades underlying qNSC activation and neurogenesis initiation, exemplified by decreased extrinsic signaling capacity, primed translational machinery, and regulatory switches in transcription factors, metabolism, and energy sources. Our study reveals the molecular continuum underlying adult neurogenesis and illustrates how Waterfall can be used for single-cell omics analyses of various continuous biological processes.

  1. Gene expression profiling suggests a pathological role of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in aging-related skeletal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Tseng, Kuo-Yun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Wang, Ming Jen; Chang, I-Shou; Lin, Jiunn-Liang; Lin, Shankung

    2011-07-01

    Aging is associated with bone loss and degenerative joint diseases, in which the aging of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (bmMSC)[1] may play an important role. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of bmMSC from 14 donors between 36 and 74 years old, and obtained age-associated genes (in the background of osteoarthritis) and osteoarthritis-associated genes (in the background of old age). Pathway analysis of these genes suggests that alterations in glycobiology might play an important role in the aging of human bmMSC. On the other hand, antigen presentation and signaling of immune cells were the top pathways enriched by osteoarthritis-associated genes, suggesting that alteration in immunology of bmMSC might be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Most intriguingly, we found significant age-associated differential expression of HEXA, HEXB, CTSK, SULF1, ADAMTS5, SPP1, COL8A2, GPNMB, TNFAIP6, and RPL29; those genes have been implicated in the bone loss and the pathology of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis in aging. Collectively, our results suggest a pathological role of bmMSC in aging-related skeletal diseases, and suggest the possibility that alteration in the immunology of bmMSC might also play an important role in the etiology of adult-onset osteoarthritis.

  2. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  3. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen.

    PubMed

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  4. Protein farnesyltransferase in plants: molecular characterization and involvement in cell cycle control.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, D; Zhou, D; Ju, R; Cramer, C L; Yang, Z

    1996-01-01

    Farnesylation is required for membrane targeting, protein-protein interactions, and the biological activity of key regulatory proteins, such as Ras small GTPases and protein kinases in a wide range of eukaryotes. In this report, we describe the molecular identification of a plant protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) and evidence for its role in the control of the cell cycle in plants. A pea gene encoding a homolog of the FTase beta subunit was previously cloned using a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy. A similar approach was used to clone a pea gene encoding a homolog of the FTase alpha subunit. The biochemical function of the pea FTase homologs was demonstrated by the reconstitution of FTase enzyme activity using FTase fusion proteins coexpressed in Escherichia coll. RNA gel blot analyses showed that levels of FTase mRNAs are generally higher in tissues, such as those of nodules, that are active in cell division. The relationship of FTase to cell division was further analyzed during the growth of suspension-cultured tobacco BY-2 cells. A biphasic fluctuation of FTase enzyme activity preceded corresponding changes in mitotic activity at the early log phase of cell growth. Moreover, manumycin, a specific inhibitor of FTase, was effective in inhibiting mitosis and growth in these cells. Using synchronized BY-2 cells, manumycin completely blocked mitosis when added at the early S phase but not when added at the G2 phase. These data suggest that FTase is required for the plant cell cycle, perhaps by modulating the progression through the S phase and the transition from G1 to the S phase. PMID:8989889

  5. A molecular roadmap of reprogramming somatic cells into iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Polo, Jose M; Anderssen, Endre; Walsh, Ryan M; Schwarz, Benjamin A; Nefzger, Christian M; Lim, Sue Mei; Borkent, Marti; Apostolou, Effie; Alaei, Sara; Cloutier, Jennifer; Bar-Nur, Ori; Cheloufi, Sihem; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; Robinton, Daisy; Natesan, Sridaran; Melnick, Ari; Zhu, Jinfang; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2012-12-21

    Factor-induced reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is inefficient, complicating mechanistic studies. Here, we examined defined intermediate cell populations poised to becoming iPSCs by genome-wide analyses. We show that induced pluripotency elicits two transcriptional waves, which are driven by c-Myc/Klf4 (first wave) and Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (second wave). Cells that become refractory to reprogramming activate the first but fail to initiate the second transcriptional wave and can be rescued by elevated expression of all four factors. The establishment of bivalent domains occurs gradually after the first wave, whereas changes in DNA methylation take place after the second wave when cells acquire stable pluripotency. This integrative analysis allowed us to identify genes that act as roadblocks during reprogramming and surface markers that further enrich for cells prone to forming iPSCs. Collectively, our data offer new mechanistic insights into the nature and sequence of molecular events inherent to cellular reprogramming. PMID:23260147

  6. Molecular Evolution of Drosophila Germline Stem Cell and Neural Stem Cell Regulating Genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Aquadro, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we study the molecular evolution of a near complete set of genes that had functional evidence in the regulation of the Drosophila germline and neural stem cell. Some of these genes have previously been shown to be rapidly evolving by positive selection raising the possibility that stem cell genes as a group have elevated signatures of positive selection. Using recent Drosophila comparative genome sequences and population genomic sequences of Drosophila melanogaster, we have investigated both long- and short-term evolution occurring across these two different stem cell systems, and compared them with a carefully chosen random set of genes to represent the background rate of evolution. Our results showed an excess of genes with evidence of a recent selective sweep in both germline and neural stem cells in D. melanogaster. However compared with their control genes, both stem cell systems had no significant excess of genes with long-term recurrent positive selection in D. melanogaster, or across orthologous sequences from the melanogaster group. The evidence of long-term positive selection was limited to a subset of genes with specific functions in both the germline and neural stem cell system. PMID:26507797

  7. Elevated Gene Expression in Chalcone Synthase Enzyme Suggests an Increased Production of Flavonoids in Skin and Synchronized Red Cell Cultures of North American Native Grape Berries

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gina; Ananga, Anthony; Krastanova, Stoyanka; Sutton, Safira; Ochieng, Joel W.; Leong, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Anthocyanins are antioxidants and are among the natural products synthesized via the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. Anthocyanins have been recommended for dietary intake in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and age-related conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or dementia. With an increasingly aging population in many parts of the world, strategies for the commercial production of in vitro synchronized red cell cultures as natural antioxidants will be a significant contribution to human medicine. Red pigmented fruits such as grapes (Vitis sp.) are a major source of bioavailable anthocyanins and other polyphenols. Since the level of antioxidants varies among cultivars, this study is the first one that phytochemically and genetically characterizes native grape cultivars of North America to determine the optimal cultivar and berry cells for the production of anthocyanins as antioxidants. Using real-time PCR and bioinformatics approaches, we tested for the transcript expression of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene, an enzyme involved in the flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, in different parts of physiologically mature grape berries and in vitro synchronized red cells. A low level of expression was recorded in berry flesh, compared with an elevated expression in berry skins and in vitro synchronized red cells, suggesting increased production of flavonoids in skin and cell cultures. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of functional genomics in natural products research as well as in systematic studies of North American native grapes, specifically in muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia). PMID:22364203

  8. UV-enhanced reactivation of a UV-damaged reporter gene suggests transcription-coupled repair is UV-inducible in human cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, M A; Rainbow, A J

    1999-01-01

    The genetic disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) exhibit deficiencies in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. CS fibroblasts retain proficient nucleotide excision repair (NER) of inactive (or bulk) DNA, but are deficient in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of active genes. In contrast, XP complementation group C (XP-C) fibroblasts retain proficient TCR, but are deficient in bulk DNA repair. The remaining NER-deficient XP groups exhibit deficiencies in both repair pathways. Ad5HCMVsp1lacZ is a recombinant adenovirus vector that is unable to replicate in human fibroblasts, but can efficiently infect and express the beta-galactosidase reporter gene in these cells. We have examined the host cell reactivation (HCR) of beta-galactosidase activity for UV-irradiated Ad5HCMVsp1lacZ in non-irradiated and UV-irradiated normal, XP-B, XP-C, XP-D, XP-F, XP-G, CS-A and CS-B fibroblasts. HCR of beta-galactosidase activity for UV-irradiated Ad5HCMVsp1lacZ was reduced in non-irradiated cells from each of the repair-deficient groups examined (including XP-C) relative to that in non-irradiated normal cells. Prior irradiation of cells with low UV fluences resulted in an enhancement of HCR for normal and XP-C strains, but not for the remaining XP and CS strains. HCR of the UV-damaged reporter gene in UV-irradiated XP and CS strains was similar to measurements of TCR reported previously for these cells. These results suggest that UV treatment results in an induced repair of UV-damaged DNA in the transcribed strand of an active gene in XP-C and normal cells through an enhancement of TCR or a mechanism which involves the TCR pathway. PMID:9934845

  9. Transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches to investigate the molecular responses of human cell lines exposed to the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkang; Williams, Timothy D; Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Harrad, Stuart; Chipman, James K; Viant, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The potential for human exposure to the brominated flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has given rise to health concerns, yet there is relatively limited knowledge about its possible toxic effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms that may mediate any impacts on health. In this study, unbiased transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches were employed to investigate the potential molecular changes that could lead to the toxicity of HBCD under concentrations relevant to human exposure conditions using in vitro models. A concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of HBCD to A549 and HepG2/C3A cells was observed based on MTT assays or CCK-8 assays with EC50 values of 27.4 μM and 63.0 μM, respectively. Microarray-based transcriptomics and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics revealed few molecular changes in A549 cells or HepG2/C3A cells following a 24-hour exposure to several sub-lethal concentrations (2 to 4000 nM) of HBCD. Quantification of the level of HBCD in the HepG2/C3A exposed cells suggested that the flame retardant was present at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those reported to occur in human tissues. We conclude that at the concentrations known to be achievable following exposure in humans, HBCD exhibits no detectable acute toxicity in A549 cells, representative of the lung, or in HepG2/C3A cells, that are hepatocytes with some xenobiotic metabolic capacity.

  10. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of a transforming gene detected by transfection of chicken B-cell lymphoma DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubin, Gerard; Goldman, Debra S.; Luce, Judith; Neiman, Paul E.; Cooper, Geoffrey M.

    1983-03-01

    A transforming gene detected by transfection of chicken B-cell lymphoma DNA has been isolated by molecular cloning. It is homologous to a conserved family of sequences present in normal chicken and human DNAs but is not related to transforming genes of acutely transforming retroviruses. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned transforming gene suggests that it encodes a protein that is partially homologous to the amino terminus of transferrin and related proteins although only about one tenth the size of transferrin.

  11. Differential expression of id genes and their potential regulator znf238 in zebrafish adult neural progenitor cells and neurons suggests distinct functions in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Diotel, Nicolas; Beil, Tanja; Strähle, Uwe; Rastegar, Sepand

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish display a remarkable ability to generate new neurons and to repair brain lesions during adulthood. They are, therefore, a very popular model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of constitutive and induced neurogenesis in adult vertebrates. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of inhibitor of DNA binding (id) genes and of their potential transcriptional repressor, znf238, in the whole brain of adult zebrafish. We show that while id1 is exclusively expressed in ventricular cells in the whole brain, id2a, id3 and id4 genes are expressed in broader areas. Interestingly, znf238 was also detected in these regions, its expression overlapping with id2a, id3 and id4 expression. Further detailed characterization of the id-expressing cells demonstrated that (a) id1 is expressed in type 1 and type 2 neural progenitors as previously published, (b) id2a in type 1, 2 and 3 neural progenitors, (c) id3 in type 3 neural progenitors and (d) id4 in postmitotic neurons. Our data provide a detailed map of id and znf238 expression in the brain of adult zebrafish, supplying a framework for studies of id genes function during adult neurogenesis and brain regeneration in the zebrafish.

  12. Molecular Requirements for Transformation of Fallopian Tube Epithelial Cells into Serous Carcinoma12

    PubMed Central

    Jazaeri, Amir A; Bryant, Jennifer L; Park, Hong; Li, Hui; Dahiya, Neetu; Stoler, Mark H; Ferriss, James Stuart; Dutta, Anindya

    2011-01-01

    Although controversial, recent studies suggest that serous ovarian carcinomas may arise from fallopian tube fimbria rather than ovarian surface epithelium. We developed an in vitro model for serous carcinogenesis in which primary human fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTECs) were exposed to potentially oncogenic molecular alterations delivered by retroviral vectors. To more closely mirror in vivo conditions, transformation of FTECs was driven by the positive selection of growth-promoting alterations rather antibiotic selection. Injection of the transformed FTEC lines in SCID mice resulted in xenografts with histologic and immunohistochemical features indistinguishable from poorly differentiated serous carcinomas. Transcriptional profiling revealed high similarity among the transformed and control FTEC lines and patient-derived serous ovarian carcinoma cells and was used to define a malignancy-related transcriptional signature. Oncogene-treated FTEC lines were serially analyzed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis to identify oncogenes whose expression was subject to positive selection. The combination of p53 and Rb inactivation (mediated by SV40 T antigen), hTERT expression, and oncogenic C-MYC and HRAS accumulation showed positive selection during transformation. Knockdown of each of these selected components resulted in significant growth inhibition of the transformed cell lines that correlated with p27 accumulation. The combination of SV40 T antigen and hTERT expression resulted in immortalized cells that were nontumorigenic in mice, whereas forced expression of a dominant-negative p53 isoform (p53DD) and hTERT resulted in senescence. Thus, our investigation supports the tubal origin of serous carcinoma and provides a dynamic model for studying early molecular alterations in serous carcinogenesis. PMID:22028616

  13. Regulating the Rate of Molecular Self-Assembly for Targeting Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Xu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Besides tight and specific ligand-receptor interactions, the rate regulation of the formation of molecular assemblies is one of fundamental features of cells. But the latter receives little exploration for developing anticancer therapeutics. Here we show that a simple molecular design of the substrates of phosphatases-tailoring the number of phosphates on peptidic substrates-is able to regulate the rate of molecular self-assembly of the enzyme reaction product. Such a rate regulation allows selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cells over hepatocytes, which promises to target cancer cells in a specific organ. Moreover, our result reveals that the direct measurement of the rate of the self-assembly in a cell-based assay provides precise assessment of the cell targeting capability of self-assembly. This work, as the first report establishing rate regulation of a multiple-step process to inhibit cells selectively, illustrates a fundamentally new approach for controlling the fate of cells.

  14. Chromosomal Instability and Molecular Defects in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Halevy, Tomer; Akov, Shira; Bohndorf, Martina; Mlody, Barbara; Adjaye, James; Benvenisty, Nissim; Goldberg, Michal

    2016-08-30

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) results from the absence of the NBS1 protein, responsible for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS is characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition. Here, we show successful reprogramming of NBS fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (NBS-iPSCs). Our data suggest a strong selection for karyotypically normal fibroblasts to go through the reprogramming process. NBS-iPSCs then acquire numerous chromosomal aberrations and show a delayed response to DSB induction. Furthermore, NBS-iPSCs display slower growth, mitotic inhibition, a reduced apoptotic response to stress, and abnormal cell-cycle-related gene expression. Importantly, NBS neural progenitor cells (NBS-NPCs) show downregulation of neural developmental genes, which seems to be mediated by P53. Our results demonstrate the importance of NBS1 in early human development, shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this severe syndrome, and further expand our knowledge of the genomic stress cells experience during the reprogramming process. PMID:27545893

  15. Investigating the Molecular Mechanism of TSO1 Function in Arabidopsis cell division and meristem development

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongchi Liu

    2004-10-01

    Unlike animals, plants are constantly exposed to environmental mutagens including ultraviolet light and reactive oxygen species. Further, plant cells are totipotent with highly plastic developmental programs. An understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of plants to monitor and repair its DNA and to eliminate damaged cells are of great importance. Previously we have identified two genes, TSO1 and TSO2, from a flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations in these two genes cause callus-like flowers, fasciated shoot apical meristems, and abnormal cell division, indicating that TSO1 and TSO2 may encode important cell cycle regulators. Previous funding from DOE led to the molecular cloning of TSO1, which was shown to encode a novel nuclear protein with two CXC domains suspected to bind DNA. This DOE grant has allowed us to characterize and isolate TSO2 that encodes the small subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR comprises two large subunits (R1) an d two small subunits (R2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA replication and repair. Previous studies in yeast and mammals indicated that defective RNR often led to cell cycle arrest, growth retardation and p53-dependent apoptosis while abnormally elevated RNR activities led to higher mutation rates. Subsequently, we identified two additional R2 genes, R2A and R2B in the Arabidopsis genome. Using reverse genetics, mutations in R2A and R2B were isolated, and double and triple mutants among the three R2 genes (TSO2, R2A and R2B) were constructed and analyzed. We showed that Arabidopsis tso2 mutants, with reduced dNTP levels, were more sensitive to UV-C. While r2a or r2b single mutants did not exhibit any phenotypes, tso2 r2b double mutants were embryonic lethal and tso2 r2a double mutants were seedling lethal indicating redundant functions among the three R2 genes. Furthermore, tso2 r2a double mutants exhibited increased DNA dam age

  16. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (1): angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified and anaplastic large cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T/NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of the histological subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. It will be published in two parts : the first is focused on the three more frequent entities, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second (which will appear in the november issue) will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. T or NK cell lymphoproliferative disorders with leukemic presentation, primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and very rare subtypes of PTCL whose prevalence is less than 5% (hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma) will not be discussed herein. PMID:26481023

  17. Traffic of Human α-Mannosidase in Plant Cells Suggests the Presence of a New Endoplasmic Reticulum-to-Vacuole Pathway without Involving the Golgi Complex1[W

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole requires sorting signals as well as specific transport mechanisms. This work is focused on the transport in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants of a human α-mannosidase, MAN2B1, which is a lysosomal enzyme involved in the turnover of N-linked glycoproteins and can be used in enzyme replacement therapy. Although ubiquitously expressed, α-mannosidases are targeted to lysosomes or vacuoles through different mechanisms according to the organisms in which these proteins are produced. In tobacco cells, MAN2B1 reaches the vacuole even in the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors, which are responsible for its transport in animal cells. We report that MAN2B1 is targeted to the vacuole without passing through the Golgi complex. In addition, a vacuolar targeting signal that is recognized in plant cells is located in the MAN2B1 amino-terminal region. Indeed, when this amino-terminal domain is removed, the protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, when this domain is added to a plant-secreted protein, the resulting fusion protein is partially redirected to the vacuole. These results strongly suggest the existence in plants of a new type of vacuolar traffic that can be used by leaf cells to transport vacuolar proteins. PMID:23449646

  18. Traffic of human α-mannosidase in plant cells suggests the presence of a new endoplasmic reticulum-to-vacuole pathway without involving the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole requires sorting signals as well as specific transport mechanisms. This work is focused on the transport in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants of a human α-mannosidase, MAN2B1, which is a lysosomal enzyme involved in the turnover of N-linked glycoproteins and can be used in enzyme replacement therapy. Although ubiquitously expressed, α-mannosidases are targeted to lysosomes or vacuoles through different mechanisms according to the organisms in which these proteins are produced. In tobacco cells, MAN2B1 reaches the vacuole even in the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors, which are responsible for its transport in animal cells. We report that MAN2B1 is targeted to the vacuole without passing through the Golgi complex. In addition, a vacuolar targeting signal that is recognized in plant cells is located in the MAN2B1 amino-terminal region. Indeed, when this amino-terminal domain is removed, the protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, when this domain is added to a plant-secreted protein, the resulting fusion protein is partially redirected to the vacuole. These results strongly suggest the existence in plants of a new type of vacuolar traffic that can be used by leaf cells to transport vacuolar proteins.

  19. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  20. Molecular Characterization of Antigen-Peptide Pulsed Dendritic Cells: Immature Dendritic Cells Develop a Distinct Molecular Profile when Pulsed with Antigen Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yufei; Catalano, Jennifer; Puri, Raj K.; Khleif, Samir N.

    2014-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC), immature DC (iDC), and mature DC (mDC) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20), a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC). When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA), pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN), anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA), DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1), and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61) in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE) induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host. PMID:24475103

  1. Single-agent lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma: results from a UK phase II study suggest activity and possible gender differences.

    PubMed

    Eve, Heather E; Carey, Sean; Richardson, Sarah J; Heise, Carla C; Mamidipudi, Vidya; Shi, Tao; Radford, John A; Auer, Rebecca L; Bullard, Sheila H; Rule, Simon A J

    2012-10-01

    We present data from a phase II study investigating a novel treatment strategy for relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Twenty-six patients received lenalidomide 25 mg/d (days 1-21 of a 28-d cycle) for up to 6 cycles followed by low-dose maintenance lenalidomide (15 mg) in responding patients. Eight patients achieved complete or partial response to give an overall response rate of 31% with median response duration of 22·2 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·0-53·6] and median progression-free survival (PFS) of 3·9 months (95% CI 0·0-11·1). An additional six patients (23%) achieved stable disease. Eleven patients received maintenance with median PFS of 14·6 months (95% CI 7·3-21·9). Correlative studies showed that peripheral T and Natural Killer (NK) cells increased in responding patients by 40-60% over the first 6 cycles with an initial dip in NK cells suggestive of tumour infiltration. Peripheral regulatory T cells were increased in MCL patients (P = 0·001) and expanded further following lenalidomide. Sequential plasma analysis showed increased IL12 p40 and IL7 alongside decreased MMP9, IL10, and adiponectin. Finally, a significant correlation (P = 0·02) between gender and response suggested that female MCL patients were more sensitive to lenalidomide than males. In summary, we confirm the activity, safety and immunomodulatory properties of lenalidomide in MCL and highlight its potential as a low-dose maintenance agent.

  2. A specific role for PRND in goat foetal Leydig cells is suggested by prion family gene expression during gonad development in goats and mice.

    PubMed

    Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Castille, Johan; Pannetier, Maëlle; Passet, Bruno; Elzaïat, Maëva; André, Marjolaine; Montazer-Torbati, Fatemeh; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katayoun; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Pailhoux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Three genes of the prion protein gene family are expressed in gonads. Comparative analyses of their expression patterns in mice and goats revealed constant expression of PRNP and SPRN in both species and in both male and female gonads, but with a weaker expression of SPRN. By contrast, expression of PRND was found to be sex-dimorphic, in agreement with its role in spermatogenesis. More importantly, our study revealed that PRND seems to be a key marker of foetal Leydig cells specifically in goats, suggesting a yet unknown role for its encoded protein Doppel during gonadal differentiation in nonrodent mammals.

  3. The function and molecular identity of inward rectifier channels in vestibular hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michaela E; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2012-07-01

    Inner ear hair cells respond to mechanical stimuli with graded receptor potentials. These graded responses are modulated by a host of voltage-dependent currents that flow across the basolateral membrane. Here, we examine the molecular identity and the function of a class of voltage-dependent ion channels that carries the potassium-selective inward rectifier current known as I(K1). I(K1) has been identified in vestibular hair cells of various species, but its molecular composition and functional contributions remain obscure. We used quantitative RT-PCR to show that the inward rectifier gene, Kir2.1, is highly expressed in mouse utricle between embryonic day 15 and adulthood. We confirmed Kir2.1 protein expression in hair cells by immunolocalization. To examine the molecular composition of I(K1), we recorded voltage-dependent currents from type II hair cells in response to 50-ms steps from -124 to -54 in 10-mV increments. Wild-type cells had rapidly activating inward currents with reversal potentials close to the K(+) equilibrium potential and a whole-cell conductance of 4.8 ± 1.5 nS (n = 46). In utricle hair cells from Kir2.1-deficient (Kir2.1(-/-)) mice, I(K1) was absent at all stages examined. To identify the functional contribution of Kir2.1, we recorded membrane responses in current-clamp mode. Hair cells from Kir2.1(-/-) mice had significantly (P < 0.001) more depolarized resting potentials and larger, slower membrane responses than those of wild-type cells. These data suggest that Kir2.1 is required for I(K1) in type II utricle hair cells and contributes to hyperpolarized resting potentials and fast, small amplitude receptor potentials in response to current inputs, such as those evoked by hair bundle deflections.

  4. The molecular basis of neurosensory cell formation in ear development: a blueprint for hair cell and sensory neuron regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Beisel, Kirk W.; Hansen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Summary The inner ear of mammals uses neurosensory cells derived from the embryonic ear for mechanoelectric transduction of vestibular and auditory stimuli (the hair cells) and conducts this information to the brain via sensory neurons. As with most other neurons of mammals, lost hair cells and sensory neurons are not spontaneously replaced and result instead in age-dependent progressive hearing loss. We review the molecular basis of neurosensory development in the mouse ear to provide a blueprint for possible enhancement of therapeutically useful transformation of stem cells into lost neurosensory cells. We identify several readily available adult sources of stem cells that express, like the ectoderm-derived ear, genes known to be essential for ear development. Use of these stem cells combined with molecular insights into neurosensory cell specification and proliferation regulation of the ear, might allow for neurosensory regeneration of mammalian ears in the near future. PMID:17120192

  5. From Uniplex to Multiplex Molecular Profiling in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ileana, Ecaterina E; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Izzo, Julie G

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Understanding the molecular biology of survival and proliferation of cancer cells led to a new molecular classification of lung cancer and the development of targeted therapies with promising results. With the advances of image-guided biopsy techniques, tumor samples are becoming smaller, and the molecular testing techniques have to overcome the challenge of integrating the characterization of a panel of abnormalities including gene mutations, copy-number changes, and fusions in a reduced number of assays using only a small amount of genetic material. This article reviews the current knowledge about the most frequent actionable molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung carcinoma, the new approaches of molecular analysis, and the implications of these findings in the context of clinical practice.

  6. Stool-fermented Plantago ovata husk induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells independently of molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vanessa R; Giros, Anna; Xicola, Rosa M; Fluvià, Lourdes; Grzybowski, Mike; Anguera, Anna; Llor, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have suggested that the partially fermentable fibre Plantago ovata husk (PO) may have a protective effect on colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the potentially pro-apoptotic effect of PO and the implicated mechanisms in CRC cells with different molecular phenotypes (Caco-2, HCT116, LoVo, HT-29, SW480) after PO anaerobic fermentation with colonic bacteria as it occurs in the human colon. The fermentation products of PO induced apoptosis in all primary tumour and metastatic cell lines, independent of p53, adenomatous polyposis coli, β-catenin or cyclo-oxygenase-2 status. Apoptosis was caspase-dependent and both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were implicated. The intrinsic pathway was activated through a shift in the balance towards a pro-apoptotic environment with an up-regulation of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 homologous antagonist killer (BAK) and a down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) seen in HCT116 and LoVo cells. This resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, increased expression of caspase activators second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac)/Diablo, death effector apoptosis-inducing factor, apoptosome member apoptotic protease activating factor 1 and down-regulation of inhibitors of apoptosis Survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in most cells. The extrinsic pathway was activated presumably through the up-regulation of death receptor (DR5). Some important differences were seen between primary tumour and metastatic CRC cells. Thus, metastatic PO-treated LoVo cells had a remarkable up-regulation of TNF-α ligand along with death-inducing signalling complex components receptor interacting protein and TNF-α receptor 1-associated death domain protein. The extrinsic pathway modulator FCICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), an inhibitor of both spontaneous death ligand-independent and death receptor-mediated apoptosis, was significantly down-regulated after PO treatment in all primary tumour cells, but not

  7. Following the nanostructural molecular orientation guidelines for sulfur versus thiophene units in small molecule photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-03-01

    In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not. The improved performance of the DR3TBDTT-based devices, particularly in the photocurrent and the fill factor, was attributed to the large population of donor compound crystallites with a favorable face-on orientation along the perpendicular direction. This orientation resulted in efficient charge transport and a reduction in charge recombination. These findings underscore the great potential of small-molecule solar cells and suggest that even higher efficiencies can be achieved through materials development and molecular orientation control.In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not

  8. Decipher the Molecular Response of Plant Single Cell Types to Environmental Stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh-Rey, Mehrnoush; Libault, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the molecular response of entire plants or organs to environmental stresses suffers from the cellular complexity of the samples used. Specifically, this cellular complexity masks cell-specific responses to environmental stresses and logically leads to the dilution of the molecular changes occurring in each cell type composing the tissue/organ/plant in response to the stress. Therefore, to generate a more accurate picture of these responses, scientists are focusing on plant single cell type approaches. Several cell types are now considered as models such as the pollen, the trichomes, the cotton fiber, various root cell types including the root hair cell, and the guard cell of stomata. Among them, several have been used to characterize plant response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Lastly, in this review, we are describing the various -omic studies performed on these different plant single cell type models to better understand plant cell response to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  9. Decipher the Molecular Response of Plant Single Cell Types to Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the molecular response of entire plants or organs to environmental stresses suffers from the cellular complexity of the samples used. Specifically, this cellular complexity masks cell-specific responses to environmental stresses and logically leads to the dilution of the molecular changes occurring in each cell type composing the tissue/organ/plant in response to the stress. Therefore, to generate a more accurate picture of these responses, scientists are focusing on plant single cell type approaches. Several cell types are now considered as models such as the pollen, the trichomes, the cotton fiber, various root cell types including the root hair cell, and the guard cell of stomata. Among them, several have been used to characterize plant response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this review, we are describing the various -omic studies performed on these different plant single cell type models to better understand plant cell response to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:27088086

  10. Decipher the Molecular Response of Plant Single Cell Types to Environmental Stresses.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh-Rey, Mehrnoush; Libault, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the molecular response of entire plants or organs to environmental stresses suffers from the cellular complexity of the samples used. Specifically, this cellular complexity masks cell-specific responses to environmental stresses and logically leads to the dilution of the molecular changes occurring in each cell type composing the tissue/organ/plant in response to the stress. Therefore, to generate a more accurate picture of these responses, scientists are focusing on plant single cell type approaches. Several cell types are now considered as models such as the pollen, the trichomes, the cotton fiber, various root cell types including the root hair cell, and the guard cell of stomata. Among them, several have been used to characterize plant response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this review, we are describing the various -omic studies performed on these different plant single cell type models to better understand plant cell response to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:27088086

  11. [The toxic aggregation of proteins: a kind of "molecular delinquency" actively fought in the cell by molecular chaperones and proteases].

    PubMed

    Hinault, M P; Goloubinoff, P

    2006-04-01

    Under various stresses, mutation-sensitised proteins may spontaneously convert into inactive, aggregation-prone structures, which may be cytotoxic and infectious. In the cell, this new kind of "molecular criminality" is actively fought against by a network of molecular chaperones that can specifically identify, isolate and unfold damaged (delinquent) proteins and favour their subsequent native refolding. Irreversibly damaged molecules unable to natively refold are preferentially "executed" and recycled by proteases. Failing that, they are "imprisoned" within compact amyloids, or "evicted" from the cell. Thus, striking parallels, although of questionable ethical value, exist between protein and human criminality, and between the cellular and social responses to these different types of criminality. Fundamental differences also exist. Whereas programmed death (apoptosis) is the preferred solution chosen by aged and aggregation-stressed cells, collective suicide is seldom an option chosen by lawless human societies. More significantly, there is no clear cellular equivalent for the role of the family and the education system, which are so essential to the proper shaping of functional individuals in the society, and give rise to humanism, that favours crime prevention, reeducation and reinsertion programs over capital punishment. To the cardiologist and transplantation surgeon, the interest of molecular chaperones, in particular of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp27, lays in their ability to inhibit the signalling pathway of programmed cell death. Their induction before and during ischemia, by various treatments and drugs could significantly reduce damages from the post ischemic reperfusion of organs.

  12. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  13. Molecular basis of cellular localization of poly C binding protein 1 in neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Andrea M.; Flock, Kelly E.; Loh, Horace H.; Ko, Jane L. . E-mail: kojane@shu.edu

    2006-11-03

    Poly C binding protein 1 (PCBP) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of neuronal mu-opioid receptor gene. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of PCBP cellular/nuclear localization in neuronal cells using EGFP fusion protein. PCBP, containing three KH domains and a variable domain, distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus with a preferential nuclear expression. Domain-deletional analyses suggested the requirement of variable and KH3 domains for strong PCBP nuclear expression. Within the nucleus, a low nucleolar PCBP expression was observed, and PCBP variable domain contributed to this restricted nucleolar expression. Furthermore, the punctate nuclear pattern of PCBP was correlated to its single-stranded (ss) DNA binding ability, with both requiring cooperativity of at least three sequential domains. Collectively, certain PCBP domains thus govern its nuclear distribution and transcriptional regulatory activity in the nucleus of neurons, whereas the low nucleolar expression implicates the disengagement of PCBP in the ribosomal RNA synthesis.

  14. Human cells and cell membrane molecular models are affected in vitro by chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P; Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    This study presents evidence that chlorpromazine (CPZ) affects human cells and cell membrane molecular models. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells incubated with 0.1 mM CPZ suffered a decrease of cell viability. On the other hand, phase contrast microscopy observations of human erythrocytes indicated that they underwent a morphological alteration as 1 microM CPZ changed their discoid normal shape to stomatocytes, and to hemolysis with 1 mM CPZ. X-ray diffraction experiments performed on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers, classes of the major phospholipids present in the outer and inner sides of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively showed that CPZ disordered the polar head and acyl chain regions of both DMPC and DMPE, where these interactions were stronger with DMPC bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV at 18 degrees C confirmed these results. In fact, the assays showed that CPZ induced a significant reduction of their generalized polarization (GP) and anisotropy (r) values, indicative of enhanced disorder at the polar head and acyl chain regions of the DMPC lipid bilayer. PMID:18372093

  15. Glucocorticoids entrain molecular clock components in human peripheral cells.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Marc; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2015-04-01

    In humans, shift work induces a desynchronization between the circadian system and the outside world, which contributes to shift work-associated medical disorders. Using a simulated night shift experiment, we previously showed that 3 d of bright light at night fully synchronize the central clock to the inverted sleep schedule, whereas the peripheral clocks located in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) took longer to reset. This underlines the need for testing the effects of synchronizers on both the central and peripheral clocks. Glucocorticoids display circadian rhythms controlled by the central clock and are thought to act as synchronizers of rodent peripheral clocks. In the present study, we tested whether the human central and peripheral clocks were sensitive to exogenous glucocorticoids (Cortef) administered in the late afternoon. We showed that 20 mg Cortef taken orally acutely increased PER1 expression in PBMC peripheral clocks. After 6 d of Cortef administration, the phases of central markers were not affected, whereas those of PER2-3 and BMAL1 expression in PBMCs were shifted by ∼ 9.5-11.5 h. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that human peripheral clocks are entrained by glucocorticoids. Importantly, they suggest innovative interventions for shift workers and jet-lag travelers, combining synchronizing agents for the central and peripheral clocks.

  16. Analysis of mutational signatures in exomes from B-cell lymphoma cell lines suggest APOBEC3 family members to be involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wagener, R.; Alexandrov, L. B.; Montesinos-Rongen, M.; Schlesner, M.; Haake, A.; Drexler, H. G.; Richter, J.; Bignell, G. R.; McDermott, U.; Siebert, R.

    2015-02-04

    Here, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare large B-cell neoplasm particularly affecting immunodeficient hosts with an increased incidence in young or middle-aged males infected with the HIV.1 The clinical outcome of patients with PEL is unfavorable with a median survival of <6 months.1 PEL has been closely associated with human herpes virus 8 (HHV8, previously called Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus) infection.1 In some cases a coinfection of HHV8 with the Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) has been described.1 HHV8 encodes various genes homologous to cellular genes that have proliferative and anti-apoptotic functions.2 Although HHV8 is supposed to be a major driver of PEL, it alone is not sufficient for a full-blown lymphomagenesis.2 PEL usually shows complex karyotypes with many chromosomal aberrations.3 This chromosomal complexity might be driven by the viral infection and lead to genetic alterations cooperating with HHV8 in PEL lymphomagenesis.4

  17. Analysis of mutational signatures in exomes from B-cell lymphoma cell lines suggest APOBEC3 family members to be involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma

    DOE PAGES

    Wagener, R.; Alexandrov, L. B.; Montesinos-Rongen, M.; Schlesner, M.; Haake, A.; Drexler, H. G.; Richter, J.; Bignell, G. R.; McDermott, U.; Siebert, R.

    2015-02-04

    Here, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare large B-cell neoplasm particularly affecting immunodeficient hosts with an increased incidence in young or middle-aged males infected with the HIV.1 The clinical outcome of patients with PEL is unfavorable with a median survival of <6 months.1 PEL has been closely associated with human herpes virus 8 (HHV8, previously called Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus) infection.1 In some cases a coinfection of HHV8 with the Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) has been described.1 HHV8 encodes various genes homologous to cellular genes that have proliferative and anti-apoptotic functions.2 Although HHV8 is supposed to be a major driver ofmore » PEL, it alone is not sufficient for a full-blown lymphomagenesis.2 PEL usually shows complex karyotypes with many chromosomal aberrations.3 This chromosomal complexity might be driven by the viral infection and lead to genetic alterations cooperating with HHV8 in PEL lymphomagenesis.4« less

  18. Genetic engineered molecular imaging probes for applications in cell therapy: emphasis on MRI approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In K; Wang, Silun; Mao, Hui; Chan, Anthony WS

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell-based regenerative medicine, cell replacement therapy, and genome editing technologies (i.e. CRISPR-Cas 9) have sparked great interest in in vivo cell monitoring. Molecular imaging promises a unique approach to noninvasively monitor cellular and molecular phenomena, including cell survival, migration, proliferation, and even differentiation at the whole organismal level. Several imaging modalities and strategies have been explored for monitoring cell grafts in vivo. We begin this review with an introduction describing the progress in stem cell technology, with a perspective toward cell replacement therapy. The importance of molecular imaging in reporting and assessing the status of cell grafts and their relation to the local microenvironment is highlighted since the current knowledge gap is one of the major obstacles in clinical translation of stem cell therapy. Based on currently available imaging techniques, we provide a brief discussion on the pros and cons of each imaging modality used for monitoring cell grafts with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the reporter gene approach. Finally, we conclude with a comprehensive discussion of future directions of applying molecular imaging in regenerative medicine to emphasize further the importance of correlating cell graft conditions and clinical outcomes to advance regenerative medicine. PMID:27766183

  19. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kerry M; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (via trans interactions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (via cis interactions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition between cis and trans interactions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19058.001 PMID:27644106

  20. Translational applications of molecular imaging in cardiovascular disease and stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Tao, Hongyan; Zhao, Shihua; He, Zuo-Xiang; Li, Zongjin

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Molecular imaging techniques provide valuable information at cellular and molecular level, as opposed to anatomical and structural layers acquired from traditional imaging modalities. More specifically, molecular imaging employs imaging probes which interact with specific molecular targets and therefore makes it possible to visualize biological processes in vivo. Molecular imaging technology is now progressing towards preclinical and clinical application that gives an integral and comprehensive guidance for the investigation of cardiovascular disease. In addition, cardiac stem cell therapy holds great promise for clinical translation. Undoubtedly, combining stem cell therapy with molecular imaging technology will bring a broad prospect for the study and treatment of cardiac disease. This review will focus on the progresses of molecular imaging strategies in cardiovascular disease and cardiac stem cell therapy. Furthermore, the perspective on the future role of molecular imaging in clinical translation and potential strategies in defining safety and efficacy of cardiac stem cell therapies will be discussed.

  1. PCR amplification of 16S rDNA from lyophilized cell cultures facilitates studies in molecular systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The sequence of the major portion of a Bacillus cycloheptanicus strain SCH(T) 16S rRNA gene is reported. This sequence suggests that B. cycloheptanicus is genetically quite distinct from traditional Bacillus strains (e.g., B. subtilis) and may be properly regarded as belonging to a different genus. The sequence was determined from DNA that was produced by direct amplification of ribosomal DNA from a lyophilized cell pellet with straightforward polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures. By obviating the need to revive cell cultures from the lyophile pellet, this approach facilitates rapid 16S rDNA sequencing and thereby advances studies in molecular systematics.

  2. A Demonstration of the Molecular Basis of Sickle-Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration that permits the separation of different hemoglobin molecules within two to three hours. Introduces students to the powerful technique of gel electrophoresis and illustrates the molecular basis of sickle-cell anemia. (JRH)

  3. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  4. Epitope Mapping of Antibodies Suggests the Novel Membrane Topology of B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31 on the Cell Surface of Embryonic Stem Cells: The Novel Membrane Topology of BAP31.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Tae; Choi, Hong Seo; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Jung, Han-Sung; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2015-01-01

    When located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31) is involved in the export of secreted proteins from the ER to the plasma membrane. In a previous study, we generated two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 297-D4 and 144-A8, that bound to surface molecules on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but not to surface molecules on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Subsequent studies revealed that the mAbs recognized BAP31 on the surface of hESCs. To investigate the membrane topology of BAP31 on the cell surface, we first examined the epitope specificity of 297-D4 and 144-A8, as well as a polyclonal anti-BAP31 antibody (α-BAP31). We generated a series of GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins in which BAP31 was serially deleted at the C- terminus. GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins were then screened to identify the epitopes targeted by the antibodies. Both 297-D4 and 144-A8 recognized C-terminal residues 208-217, while α-BAP31 recognized C-terminal residues 165-246, of BAP31 on hESCs, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is exposed on the cell surface. The polyclonal antibody α-BAP31 bound to mESCs, which confirmed that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is also exposed on the surface of these cells. Our results show for the first time the novel membrane topology of cell surface-expressed BAP31 as the extracellular exposure of the BAP31 C-terminal domain was not predicted from previous studies. PMID:26102500

  5. Genome-wide analysis of HIF-2α chromatin binding sites under normoxia in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) suggests its diverse functions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Chang; Huang, Hsin-Ju; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsieh-Chou; Hsieh, Shen-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Siou; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chiang, Chiao-Hsi; Lai, Ching-Huang; Shiau, Chia-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive functional HIF-2α was recently identified in cancer and stem cell lines under normoxia. In this study, BEAS-2B, a bronchial epithelial cell line, was shown to constitutively express active HIF-2α under normoxia and exhibit markers of pluripotency including Oct-4, Nanog, and sphere formation. Oct-4 expression was reduced after knockdown of HIF-2α under normoxia. Global enrichment analysis of HIF-2α demonstrated the diverse functions of HIF-2α under normoxia. Bioinformatics analysis of the enriched loci revealed an enhancer role of HIF-2α binding sites, involvement of HIF-2α interacting proteins, and enriched de novo motifs which suggest the diverse role of HIF-2α in pseudohypoxia. The low ratio of the discovered loci overlapping with those revealed in cancer cell lines 786-O (16.1%) and MCF-7 (15.9%) under hypoxia indicated a prevailing non-canonical mechanism. Hypoxia had positive, marginal or adverse effects on the enrichment of the selected loci in ChIP-PCR assays. Deletion of the N-terminal activation domain (N-TAD) of HIF-2α disrupted the reporting activity of two of the loci annotated to ELN and ANKRD31. Hypoxia incurring abundance variation of HIF-2α may misrepresent the N-TAD functions as canonical hypoxia inducible features via C-TAD activation. Elucidation of the pseudohypoxia functions of constitutive HIF-2α is useful for resolving its role in malignancy and pluripotency. PMID:27373565

  6. Genome-wide analysis of HIF-2α chromatin binding sites under normoxia in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) suggests its diverse functions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Chang; Huang, Hsin-Ju; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsieh-Chou; Hsieh, Shen-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Siou; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chiang, Chiao-Hsi; Lai, Ching-Huang; Shiau, Chia-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive functional HIF-2α was recently identified in cancer and stem cell lines under normoxia. In this study, BEAS-2B, a bronchial epithelial cell line, was shown to constitutively express active HIF-2α under normoxia and exhibit markers of pluripotency including Oct-4, Nanog, and sphere formation. Oct-4 expression was reduced after knockdown of HIF-2α under normoxia. Global enrichment analysis of HIF-2α demonstrated the diverse functions of HIF-2α under normoxia. Bioinformatics analysis of the enriched loci revealed an enhancer role of HIF-2α binding sites, involvement of HIF-2α interacting proteins, and enriched de novo motifs which suggest the diverse role of HIF-2α in pseudohypoxia. The low ratio of the discovered loci overlapping with those revealed in cancer cell lines 786-O (16.1%) and MCF-7 (15.9%) under hypoxia indicated a prevailing non-canonical mechanism. Hypoxia had positive, marginal or adverse effects on the enrichment of the selected loci in ChIP-PCR assays. Deletion of the N-terminal activation domain (N-TAD) of HIF-2α disrupted the reporting activity of two of the loci annotated to ELN and ANKRD31. Hypoxia incurring abundance variation of HIF-2α may misrepresent the N-TAD functions as canonical hypoxia inducible features via C-TAD activation. Elucidation of the pseudohypoxia functions of constitutive HIF-2α is useful for resolving its role in malignancy and pluripotency.

  7. Modifications in the glycerophospholipid composition between the Coxiella burnetii phase I and phase II cells suggest an association with phase variation of the bacterium.

    PubMed

    Frimmelová, M; Toman, R; Pompach, P; Škultéty, L

    2016-03-01

    Glycerophospholipids (GP) extracted from the Coxiella burnetii strain Nine Mile in virulent phase I (NM I) and low virulent phase II (NM II) were analyzed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) that gave a superior mass resolution and mass accuracy allowing unambiguous peak recognition and precise assignment of ions. We showed that GP present in the pathogen's outer membrane underwent considerable modifications during the phase variation that might be related to impact of various environmental factors. It was found that GP from phase I cells were much more complex than those from phase II cells. While glycerophosphoethanolamines (PE), glycerophosphocholines (PC) and glycerophosphoglycerols (PG) were present in both phases of C. burnetii, major differences were observed in the presence of glycerophosphates (PA) and glycerophosphoserines (PS). Thus, PA but no PS were detected in NM I variant in contrast with NM II cells where PS but no PA were identified. It is suggested that enzymes for PA head group modifications to form PS, PE, and PG become active during the phase variation of the bacterium. PMID:26982464

  8. The Xist RNA-PRC2 complex at 20-nm resolution reveals a low Xist stoichiometry and suggests a hit-and-run mechanism in mouse cells

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Hongjae; Wu, John Y.; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2015-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is initiated by the long noncoding RNA Xist, which coats the inactive X (Xi) and targets Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in cis. Epigenomic analyses have provided significant insight into Xist binding patterns and chromatin organization of the Xi. However, such epigenomic analyses are limited by averaging of population-wide dynamics and do not inform behavior of single cells. Here we view Xist RNA and the Xi at 20-nm resolution using STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) in mouse cells. We observe dynamics at the single-cell level not predicted by epigenomic analysis. Only ∼50 hubs of Xist RNA occur on the Xi in the maintenance phase, corresponding to 50–100 Xist molecules per Xi and contrasting with the chromosome-wide “coat” observed by deep sequencing and conventional microscopy. Likewise, only ∼50 hubs PRC2 are observed. PRC2 and Xist foci are not randomly distributed but showed statistically significant spatial association. Knock-off experiments enable visualization of the dynamics of dissociation and relocalization onto the Xi and support a functional tethering of Xist and PRC2. Our analysis reveals that Xist-PRC2 complexes are less numerous than expected and suggests methylation of nucleosomes in a hit-and-run model. PMID:26195790

  9. The co-occurrence of an ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with a thyroid carcinoma is highly suggestive of a DICER1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Durieux, Emeline; Descotes, Françoise; Mauduit, Claire; Decaussin, Myriam; Guyetant, Serge; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan

    2016-05-01

    The DICER1 gene encodes an endoribonuclease involved in the production of mature microRNAs which regulates gene expression through several mechanisms. Carriers of germline DICER1 mutations are predisposed to a rare cancer syndrome, the DICER1 syndrome. Pleuropulmonary blastoma is the most frequent lesion seen in this syndrome. Thyroid abnormalities are also a common finding, essentially concerning multinodular goiter. However, differentiated thyroid carcinoma is infrequently seen in such pedigrees. In addition to germline DICER1 mutations, specific somatic mutations have been identified in the DICER1 RNase IIIb catalytic domain in several tumor types, including ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. We report two cases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma associated with ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor and with a heterozygous DICER1 gene mutation, occurring in two unrelated young girls without pleuropulmonary blastoma. Both thyroid carcinomas showed an E1813 mutation in exon 25 while the ovarian tumors harboured a somatic mutation in E1705 in exon 24 and a D1709 mutation in exon 25. Our observations confirm that the occurrence of an ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor with a thyroid carcinoma is highly suggestive of a DICER1 syndrome. We contend that the possibility of a relationship between sporadic thyroid carcinoma in young patients and somatic DICER1 gene mutation needs further investigation. PMID:26983701

  10. Molecular and cellular effects of a novel hydroxamate-based HDAC inhibitor - belinostat - in glioblastoma cell lines: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kusaczuk, Magdalena; Krętowski, Rafał; Stypułkowska, Anna; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna

    2016-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are now intensively investigated as potential cytostatic agents in many malignancies. Here, we provide novel information concerning the influence of belinostat (Bel), a hydroxamate-based pan-HDAC inhibitor, on glioblastoma LN-229 and LN-18 cells. We found that LN-229 cells stimulated with 2 μmol/L of Bel for 48 h resulted in 70 % apoptosis, while equivalent treatment of LN-18 cells resulted in only 28 % apoptosis. In LN-229 cells this effect was followed by up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes including Puma, Bim, Chop and p21. In treated LN-18 cells only p21 was markedly overexpressed. Simultaneously, LN-229 cells treated with 2 μmol/L of Bel for 48 h exhibited down-regulation of molecular chaperones GRP78 and GRP94 at the protein level. In contrast, in LN-18 cells Western blot analysis did not show any marked changes in GRP78 nor GRP94 expression. Despite noticeable overexpression of p21, there were no signs of evident G1 nor G2/M cell cycle arrest, however, the reduction in number of the S phase cells was observed in both cell lines. These results collectively suggest that Bel can be considered as potential anti-glioblastoma agent. To our knowledge this is the first report presenting the effects of belinostat treatment in glioblastoma cell lines. PMID:27468826

  11. Fiber-optic Raman sensing of cell proliferation probes and molecular vibrations: Brain-imaging perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-09-01

    Optical fibers are employed to sense fingerprint molecular vibrations in ex vivo experiments on the whole brain and detect cell proliferation probes in a model study on a quantitatively controlled solution. A specifically adapted spectral filtering procedure is shown to allow the Raman signal from molecular vibrations of interest to be discriminated against the background from the fiber, allowing a highly sensitive Raman detection of the recently demonstrated EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) labels of DNA synthesis in cells.

  12. Molecular characterization of a Leydig cell tumor presenting as congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Solish, S B; Goldsmith, M A; Voutilainen, R; Miller, W L

    1989-12-01

    We present an unusual patient with a Leydig cell tumor to show that greatly elevated serum concentrations of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) may not be diagnostic of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). A 3.5-yr-old boy had a small testicular mass and plasma 17OHP concentrations of 147-333 nmol/L (4,850-11,000 ng/dL), suggesting CAH with adrenal rests. However, normal plasma cortisol values and the unresponsiveness of the 17OHP concentration to dexamethasone suppression or ACTH stimulation suggested a diagnosis of Leydig cell tumor. A 4-fold elevation in plasma 21-deoxycortisol compared with a 200-fold elevation in 17OHP suggested that the elevated 17OHP derived from the normal pathway of testosterone synthesis in the testis. This was proven by normalization of all hormonal values after tumor resection. Compared to the abundance of mRNA for P450c17, the tumor contained unusually large amounts of mRNA for P450scc, the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, which is the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone synthesis. Increased P450scc activity, which increased the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone, apparently permitted the 17,20-lyase activity of P450c17 to become rate limiting, thus accounting for the increased secretion of 17OHP. Thus, Leydig cell tumors can produce quantities of 17OHP previously reported only in CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The molecular characterization of steroidogenic mRNAs in this tumor indicates an unusual ratio in the expression of the genes for the steroidogenic enzymes, probably accounting for the unusual pattern of serum steroids.

  13. A Self-Organized Model for Cell-Differentiation Based on Variations of Molecular Decay Rates

    PubMed Central

    Hanel, Rudolf; Pöchacker, Manfred; Schölling, Manuel; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Systemic properties of living cells are the result of molecular dynamics governed by so-called genetic regulatory networks (GRN). These networks capture all possible features of cells and are responsible for the immense levels of adaptation characteristic to living systems. At any point in time only small subsets of these networks are active. Any active subset of the GRN leads to the expression of particular sets of molecules (expression modes). The subsets of active networks change over time, leading to the observed complex dynamics of expression patterns. Understanding of these dynamics becomes increasingly important in systems biology and medicine. While the importance of transcription rates and catalytic interactions has been widely recognized in modeling genetic regulatory systems, the understanding of the role of degradation of biochemical agents (mRNA, protein) in regulatory dynamics remains limited. Recent experimental data suggests that there exists a functional relation between mRNA and protein decay rates and expression modes. In this paper we propose a model for the dynamics of successions of sequences of active subnetworks of the GRN. The model is able to reproduce key characteristics of molecular dynamics, including homeostasis, multi-stability, periodic dynamics, alternating activity, differentiability, and self-organized critical dynamics. Moreover the model allows to naturally understand the mechanism behind the relation between decay rates and expression modes. The model explains recent experimental observations that decay-rates (or turnovers) vary between differentiated tissue-classes at a general systemic level and highlights the role of intracellular decay rate control mechanisms in cell differentiation. PMID:22693554

  14. In vivo mutations in human blood cells: biomarkers for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, R J; Nicklas, J A; Fuscoe, J C; Skopek, T R; Branda, R F; O'Neill, J P

    1993-01-01

    Mutations arising in vivo in recorder genes of human blood cells provide biomarkers for molecular epidemiology by serving as surrogates for cancer-causing genetic changes. Current markers include mutations of the glycophorin-A (GPA) or hemoglobin (Hb) genes, measured in red blood cells, or mutations of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) or HLA genes, measured in T-lymphocytes. Mean mutant frequencies (variant frequencies) for normal young adults are approximately: Hb (4 x 10(-8)) < hprt (5 x 10(-6)) = GPA (10 x 10(-6)) < HLA (30 x 10(-6)). Mutagen-exposed individuals show decided elevations. Molecular mutational spectra are also being defined. For the hprt marker system, about 15% of background mutations are gross structural alterations of the hprt gene (e.g., deletions); the remainder are point mutations (e.g., base substitutions or frameshifts). Ionizing radiations result in dose-related increases in total gene deletions. Large deletions may encompass several megabases as shown by co-deletions of linked markers. Possible hprt spectra for defining radiation and chemical exposures are being sought. In addition to their responsiveness to environmental mutagens/carcinogens, three additional findings suggest that the in vivo recorder mutations are relevant in vivo surrogates for cancer mutations. First, a large fraction of GPA and HLA mutations show exchanges due to homologous recombination, an important mutational event in cancer. Second, hprt mutations arise preferentially in dividing T-cells, which can accumulate additional mutations in the same clone, reminiscent of the multiple hits required in the evolution of malignancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8319611

  15. Molecular Characterization of Clear Cell Lesions of Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anshi; Shetty, Devi Charan; Juneja, Saurabh; Narwal, Nidhi

    2016-05-01

    The salivary glands, oral mucosa and jaws constitute a group of lesions which are heterogeneous in nature and are odontogenic, salivary or metastatic in origin. This group of tumours is termed as Clear Cell Tumours. Fixation artifacts are one of the most important reasons for the cell to appear clear but clearing of cells may also result from cytoplasmic accumulation of water, presence of glycogen within the cell, intermediate filaments, immature zymogen granules, or a paucity of cellular organelles. Clear cell Odontogenic neoplasms predominantly include odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Clear cell tumours of salivary gland origin are almost invariably malignant in nature but they do include two benign lesions. Very frequently, surgical pathologist encounters clear cells in many malignant neoplasms, the nature and sources of which are undetermined on the basis of conventional histopathology. This review will selectively discuss the clinicopathological features of neoplasms which at times may pose a diagnostic challenge and dilemma due to clear cell changes.

  16. Molecular analysis of stem cells and their descendents during cell turnover and regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhoffer, George T.; Kang, Hara; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    In adult planarians the replacement of cells lost to physiological turnover or injury is sustained by the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells known as neoblasts. Neoblast lineage relationships and the molecular changes that take place during differentiation into the appropriate cell types are poorly understood. Here we report the identification and characterization of a cohort of genes specifically expressed in neoblasts and their descendents. We find that genes with severely downregulated expression after irradiation molecularly define at least three discrete subpopulations of cells. Simultaneous BrdU labeling and in situ hybridization experiments in intact and regenerating animals indicate that these cell subpopulations are related by lineage. Our data demonstrate not only the ability to measure and study the in vivo population dynamics of adult stem cells during tissue homeostasis and regeneration, but also the utility of studies in planarians to broadly inform stem cell biology in adult organisms. PMID:18786419

  17. Molecular heterogeneity in adjacent cells in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huebschman, Michael L; Lane, Nancy L; Liu, Huaying; Sarode, Venetia R; Devlin, Judith L; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study interrogates the molecular status of individual cells in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and explores the molecular identification and characterization of these tumors to consider the exploitation of a potential-targeted therapeutic approach. Patients and methods Hyperspectral immunologic cell by cell analysis was applied to touch imprint smears obtained from fresh tumors of breast cancer patients. Results Cell by cell analysis confirms significant intratumoral molecular heterogeneity in cancer markers with differences from polymerase chain reaction marker reporting. The individual cell heterogeneity was recognized in adjacent cells examined with panels of ten molecular markers in each single cell and included some markers that are considered to express “stem-cell” character. In addition, heterogeneity did not relate either to the size or stage of the primary tumor or to the site from within the cancer. Conclusion There is a very significant molecular heterogeneity when “adjacent cells” are examined in triple-negative breast cancer, thereby making a successful targeted approach unlikely. In addition, it is not reasonable to consider that these changes will provide an answer to tumor dormancy. PMID:26316815

  18. A specific molecular beacon probe for the detection of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Lin; McGoldrick, Christopher A; Yin, Deling; Zhao, Jing; Patel, Vini; Brannon, Marianne F; Lightner, Janet W; Krishnan, Koyamangalath; Stone, William L

    2012-06-01

    The small-molecule, water-soluble molecular beacon probe 1 is hydrolyzed by the lysate and living cells of human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP), resulting in strong green fluorescence. In contrast, probe 1 does not undergo significant hydrolysis in either the lysate or living cells of human nontumorigenic prostate cells (RWPE-1). These results, corroborated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and fluorescent microscopy, reveal that probe 1 is a sensitive and specific fluorogenic and chromogenic sensor for the detection of human prostate cancer cells among nontumorigenic prostate cells and that carboxylesterase activity is a specific biomarker for human prostate cancer cells.

  19. Retrograde axonal transport of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the adult nigrostriatal system suggests a trophic role in the adult.

    PubMed Central

    Tomac, A; Widenfalk, J; Lin, L F; Kohno, T; Ebendal, T; Hoffer, B J; Olson, L

    1995-01-01

    The recently cloned, distant member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), has potent trophic actions on fetal mesencephalic dopamine neurons. GDNF also has protective and restorative activity on adult mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and potently protects motoneurons from axotomy-induced cell death. However, evidence for a role for endogenous GDNF as a target-derived trophic factor in adult midbrain dopaminergic circuits requires documentation of specific transport from the sites of synthesis in the target areas to the nerve cell bodies themselves. Here, we demonstrate that GDNF is retrogradely transported by mesencephalic dopamine neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. The pattern of retrograde transport following intrastriatal injections indicates that there may be subpopulations of neurons that are GDNF responsive. Retrograde axonal transport of biologically active 125I-labeled GDNF was inhibited by an excess of unlabeled GDNF but not by an excess of cytochrome c. Specificity was further documented by demonstrating that another TGF-beta family member, TGF-beta 1, did not appear to affect retrograde transport. Retrograde transport was also demonstrated by immunohistochemistry by using intrastriatal injections of unlabeled GDNF. GDNF immunoreactivity was found specifically in dopamine nerve cell bodies of the substantia nigra pars compacta distributed in granules in the soma and proximal dendrites. Our data implicate a specific receptor-mediated uptake mechanism operating in the adult. Taken together, the present findings suggest that GDNF acts endogenously as a target-derived physiological survival/maintenance factor for dopaminergic neurons. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7667281

  20. Host response during Yersinia pestis infection of human bronchial epithelial cells involves negative regulation of autophagy and suggests a modulation of survival-related and cellular growth pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alem, Farhang; Yao, Kuan; Lane, Douglas; Calvert, Valerie; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Kramer, Liana; Hale, Martha L.; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G.; Hakami, Ramin M.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis (Yp) causes the re-emerging disease plague, and is classified by the CDC and NIAID as a highest priority (Category A) pathogen. Currently, there is no approved human vaccine available and advances in early diagnostics and effective therapeutics are urgently needed. A deep understanding of the mechanisms of host response to Yp infection can significantly advance these three areas. We employed the Reverse Phase Protein Microarray (RPMA) technology to reveal the dynamic states of either protein level changes or phosphorylation changes associated with kinase-driven signaling pathways during host cell response to Yp infection. RPMA allowed quantitative profiling of changes in the intracellular communication network of human lung epithelial cells at different times post infection and in response to different treatment conditions, which included infection with the virulent Yp strain CO92, infection with a derivative avirulent strain CO92 (Pgm-, Pst-), treatment with heat inactivated CO92, and treatment with LPS. Responses to a total of 111 validated antibodies were profiled, leading to discovery of 12 novel protein hits. The RPMA analysis also identified several protein hits previously reported in the context of Yp infection. Furthermore, the results validated several proteins previously reported in the context of infection with other Yersinia species or implicated for potential relevance through recombinant protein and cell transfection studies. The RPMA results point to strong modulation of survival/apoptosis and cell growth pathways during early host response and also suggest a model of negative regulation of the autophagy pathway. We find significant cytoplasmic localization of p53 and reduced LC3-I to LC3-II conversion in response to Yp infection, consistent with negative regulation of autophagy. These studies allow for a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis mechanisms and the discovery of innovative approaches for prevention, early diagnosis, and

  1. Using tRNA-linked molecular beacons to image cytoplasmic mRNAs in live cells.

    PubMed

    Mhlanga, Musa M; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    Imaging products of gene expression in live cells will provide unique insights into the biology of cells. Molecular beacons make attractive probes for imaging mRNA in live cells as they can report the presence of an RNA target by turning on the fluorescence of a quenched fluorophore. However, when oligonucleotide probes are introduced into cells, they are rapidly sequestered in the nucleus, making the detection of cytoplasmic mRNAs difficult. We have shown that if a molecular beacon is linked to a tRNA, it stays in the cytoplasm and permits detection of cytoplasmic mRNAs. Here we describe two methods of linking molecular beacons to tRNA and show how the joint molecules can be used for imaging an mRNA that is normally present in the cytoplasm in live cultured cells. This protocol should take a total of 4 d to complete.

  2. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot-based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan-cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF-7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot-based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology. PMID:27572664

  3. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  4. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology. PMID:27572664

  5. Following the nanostructural molecular orientation guidelines for sulfur versus thiophene units in small molecule photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-04-14

    In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not. The improved performance of the DR3TBDTT-based devices, particularly in the photocurrent and the fill factor, was attributed to the large population of donor compound crystallites with a favorable face-on orientation along the perpendicular direction. This orientation resulted in efficient charge transport and a reduction in charge recombination. These findings underscore the great potential of small-molecule solar cells and suggest that even higher efficiencies can be achieved through materials development and molecular orientation control.

  6. Differential efficacy of bortezomib plus chemotherapy within molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavy, Kieron; Pittaluga, Stefania; Czuczman, Myron S.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Wright, George; Grant, Nicole; Shovlin, Margaret; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Janik, John E.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has revealed distinct molecular subtypes that include germinal center B cell–like (GCB) and activated B cell–like (ABC) DLBCL. ABC DLBCL has a worse survival after upfront chemotherapy and is characterized by constitutive activation of the antiapoptotic nuclear factor–kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, which can inhibit chemotherapy. We hypothesized that inhibition of NF-κB might sensitize ABC but not GCB DLBCL to chemotherapy and improve outcome. As the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib can inhibit NF-κB through blocking IκBα degradation, we investigated bortezomib alone followed by bortezomib and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in recurrent DLBCL. Tumor tissue was analyzed by gene expression profiling and/or immunohistochemistry to identify molecular DLBCL subtypes. As a control, we showed that relapsed/refractory ABC and GCB DLBCL have equally poor survivals after upfront chemotherapy. Bortezomib alone had no activity in DLBCL, but when combined with chemotherapy, it demonstrated a significantly higher response (83% vs 13%; P < .001) and median overall survival (10.8 vs 3.4 months; P = .003) in ABC compared with GCB DLBCL, respectively. These results suggest bortezomib enhances the activity of chemotherapy in ABC but not GCB DLBCL, and provide a rational therapeutic approach based on genetically distinct DLBCL subtypes. This trial is registered with http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT00057902. PMID:19380866

  7. Planar Microdevices Enhance Transport of Large Molecular Weight Molecules Across Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Jennifer S.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2014-01-01

    Large molecular weight drug delivery to the posterior eye is challenging due to cellular barriers that hinder drug transport. Understanding how to enhance transport across the retinal barrier is important for the design of new drug delivery systems. A novel mechanism to enhance drug transport is the use of geometric properties, which has not been extensively explored in the retina. Planar SU-8/ Poly(ethyleneglycol)dimethacrylate microdevices were constructed using photolithography to deliver FITC dextran across an in vitro retinal model. The model consists of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown to confluence on transwell inserts, which provides an environment to investigate the influence of geometry on paracellular and transcellular delivery of encapsulated large molecules. Planar microdevices enhanced transport of large molecular weight dextrans across different models of RPE in a size dependent fashion. Increased drug permeation across the RPE was observed with the addition of microdevices as compared to a traditional bolus of FITC dextran. This phenomena was initiated by a non-toxic interaction between the microdevices and the retinal tight junction proteins. Suggesting that increased drug transport occurs via a paracellular pathway. These experiments provide evidence to support the future use of planar unidirectional microdevices for delivery of biologics in ocular applications. PMID:24789225

  8. A molecular level prototype for mechanoelectrical transducer in mammalian hair cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinkyoung; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-10-01

    The mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) is a crucial component of mammalian auditory system. The gating mechanism of the MET channel remains a puzzling issue, though there are many speculations, due to the lack of essential molecular building blocks. To understand the working principle of mammalian MET, we propose a molecular level prototype which constitutes a charged blocker, a realistic ion channel and its surrounding membrane. To validate the proposed prototype, we make use of a well-established ion channel theory, the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, for three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations. A wide variety of model parameters, including bulk ion concentration, applied external voltage, blocker charge and blocker displacement, are explored to understand the basic function of the proposed MET prototype. We show that our prototype prediction of channel open probability in response to blocker relative displacement is in remarkable accordance with experimental observation of rat cochlea outer hair cells. Our results appear to suggest that tip links which connect hair bundles gate MET channels.

  9. Molecular species analysis of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol (DG) in rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kennerly, D.A.

    1987-05-01

    The metabolism of DG, PA and PI were studied in purified rat mast cells to determine whether generally accepted pathways of PI metabolism could explain the pattern of fatty acids seen in these intermediates. A method was developed to separate and quantitate by mass (for DG) or endogenous labeling (for PA and PI) the different molecular species of each lipid that are defined by their component fatty acids. The resultant molecular species fingerprint for each lipid was examined to see if it was similar to other intermediates in the PI cycle. For each class of compounds the percent in a given subclass was recorded. Stimulation caused a reduction of more saturated subclasses and/or an increase in AA containing compounds in PA, PI and DG. The relative similarity of subclasses of /sup 32/P-PA and /sup 32/P-PI supports the view that they are metabolically related. The relative absence of AA-containing species of DG suggests that most of the stimulated increase of DG was not produced by PI hydrolysis.

  10. microRNA expression profiling identifies molecular signatures associated with anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiling; Iqbal, Javeed; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Shen, Yulei; Dabrowska, Magdalena Julia; Dybkaer, Karen; Lim, Megan S.; Piva, Roberto; Barreca, Antonella; Pellegrino, Elisa; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Kucuk, Can; Jiang, Chun-Sun; Hu, Xiaozhou; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Greiner, Timothy C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Aoun, Patricia; Perkins, Sherrie L.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) encompass at least 2 systemic diseases distinguished by the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) profiling on 33 ALK-positive (ALK[+]) ALCLs, 25 ALK-negative (ALK[−]) ALCLs, 9 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas, 11 peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified (PTCLNOS), and normal T cells, and demonstrated that ALCLs express many of the miRNAs that are highly expressed in normal T cells with the prominent exception of miR-146a. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated distinct clustering of ALCL, PTCL-NOS, and the AITL subtype of PTCL. Cases of ALK(+) ALCL and ALK(–) ALCL were interspersed in unsupervised analysis, suggesting a close relationship at the molecular level. We identified an miRNA signature of 7 miRNAs (5 upregulated: miR-512-3p, miR-886-5p, miR-886-3p, miR-708, miR-135b; 2 downregulated: miR-146a, miR-155) significantly associated with ALK(+) ALCL cases. In addition, we derived an 11-miRNA signature (4 upregulated: miR-210, miR-197, miR-191, miR-512-3p; 7 downregulated: miR-451, miR-146a, miR-22, miR-455-3p, miR-455-5p, miR-143, miR-494) that differentiates ALK(–) ALCL from other PTCLs. Our in vitro studies identified a set of 32 miRNAs associated with ALK expression. Of these, the miR-17∼92 cluster and its paralogues were also highly expressed in ALK(+) ALCL and may represent important downstream effectors of the ALK oncogenic pathway. PMID:23801630

  11. Large Molecular Weight Polymer Solar Cells with Strong Chain Alignment Created by Nanoimprint Lithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Mielczarek, Kamil; Zakhidov, Anvar; Hu, Walter

    2016-03-23

    In this work, strong chain alignment in large molecular weight polymer solar cells is for the first time demonstrated by nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The polymer crystallizations in nonimprinted thin films and imprinted nanogratings with different molecular weight poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) are compared. We first observe that the chain alignment is favored by medium molecular weight (Mn = 25 kDa) P3HT for nonimprinted thin films. However, NIL allows large molecular weight P3HT (>40 kDa) to organize more strongly, which has been desired for efficient charge transport but is difficult to achieve through any other technique. Consequently P3HT/[6,6]-penyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (PCBM) solar cells with large molecular weight P3HT nanogratings show a high power conversion efficiency of 4.4%, which is among the best reported P3HT/PCBM photovoltaics devices.

  12. Gene Concepts in Higher Education Cell and Molecular Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albuquerque, Pitombo Maiana; de Almeida, Ana Maria Rocha; El-Hani, Nino Charbel

    2008-01-01

    Despite being a landmark of 20th century biology, the "classical molecular gene concept," according to which a gene is a stretch of DNA encoding a functional product, which may be a single polypeptide or RNA molecule, has been recently challenged by a series of findings (e.g., split genes, alternative splicing, overlapping and nested genes, mRNA…

  13. Polygenic Molecular Architecture Underlying Non-Sexual Cell Aggregation in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiarui; Wang, Lin; Wu, Xiaoping; Fang, Ou; Wang, Luwen; Lu, Chenqi; Yang, Shengjie; Hu, Xiaohua; Luo, Zewei

    2013-01-01

    Cell aggregation in unicellular organisms, induced by either cell non-sexual adhesion to yield flocs and biofilm, or pheromone-driving sexual conjugation is of great significance in cellular stress response, medicine, and brewing industries. Most current literatures have focused on one form of cell aggregation termed flocculation and its major molecular determinants, the flocculation (FLO) family genes. Here, we implemented a map-based approach for dissecting the molecular basis of non-sexual cell aggregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome-wide mapping has identified four major quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying nature variation in the cell aggregation phenotype. High-resolution mapping following up with knockout and allele replacement experiments resolved the QTL into the underlying genes (AMN1, RGA1, FLO1, and FLO8) or even into the causative nucleotide. Genetic variation in the QTL genes can explain up to 46% of phenotypic variation of this trait. Of these genes, AMN1 plays the leading role, differing from the FLO family members, in regulating expression of cell clumping phenotype through inducing cell segregation defect. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of how cell aggregation is regulated in budding yeast, and the data will be directly implicated to understand the molecular basis and evolutionary implications of cell aggregation in other fungus species. PMID:23284084

  14. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid increases the differentiation potential of the murine chondrocytic ATDC5 cell line.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eiichi; Ando, Takashi; Ichikawa, Jiro; Okita, Genki; Sato, Nobutaka; Wako, Masanori; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ochiai, Satoshi; Hagino, Tetsuo; Jacobson, Richard; Haro, Hirotaka

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a group of common, chronic, and painful inflammatory joint diseases. One important finding in OA patients is a remarkable decrease in the molecular weight of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial fluid of affected joints. Therapeutic HA is available to patients in most parts of the world as a viscosupplementation product for the treatment of OA. Previous clinical reports show that high molecular weight HA (HMWHA) more effectively relieves pain than low molecular weight HA (LMWHA). However, the mechanism behind this finding remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether a LMWHA (Low-0.9 MDa) and two types of HMWHA (High-1.9 MDa and 6 MDa) differentially affected chondroregulatory action. We tested this using ATDC5 cell, a murine chondrocytic cell line widely used in culture systems to study chondrogenic differentiation. We found that HMWHA, especially hylan G-F 20 (High-6 MDa), significantly induced aggrecan and proteoglycan accumulation, nodule formation, and mRNA expression of chondrogenic differentiation markers in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, we showed that HMWHA prevented TNF-α induced inhibition of chondrogenic differentiation, with no effect on cell proliferation or viability. These results reveal that HMWHA significantly promotes chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells in vitro, and suggest that HMWHA plays a significant chondroregulatory role in vivo.

  15. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T cell lymphoma (2): extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T /NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of histologic subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. The first part published in the October issue was focused on the three more frequent entities, i.e. angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second part presented herein will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26576610

  16. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  17. The circadian molecular clock creates epidermal stem cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Janich, Peggy; Pascual, Gloria; Merlos-Suárez, Anna; Batlle, Eduard; Ripperger, Jürgen; Albrecht, Urs; Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Obrietan, Karl; Di Croce, Luciano; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2011-11-09

    Murine epidermal stem cells undergo alternate cycles of dormancy and activation, fuelling tissue renewal. However, only a subset of stem cells becomes active during each round of morphogenesis, indicating that stem cells coexist in heterogeneous responsive states. Using a circadian-clock reporter-mouse model, here we show that the dormant hair-follicle stem cell niche contains coexisting populations of cells at opposite phases of the clock, which are differentially predisposed to respond to homeostatic cues. The core clock protein Bmal1 modulates the expression of stem cell regulatory genes in an oscillatory manner, to create populations that are either predisposed, or less prone, to activation. Disrupting this clock equilibrium, through deletion of Bmal1 (also known as Arntl) or Per1/2, resulted in a progressive accumulation or depletion of dormant stem cells, respectively. Stem cell arrhythmia also led to premature epidermal ageing, and a reduction in the development of squamous tumours. Our results indicate that the circadian clock fine-tunes the temporal behaviour of epidermal stem cells, and that its perturbation affects homeostasis and the predisposition to tumorigenesis.

  18. An HLA-A2-restricted tyrosinase antigen on melanoma cells results from posttranslational modification and suggests a novel pathway for processing of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes recognize antigens consisting of peptides presented by class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. The peptides identified so far have been predictable from the amino acid sequences of proteins. We have identified the natural peptide target of a CTL clone that recognizes the tyrosinase gene product on melanoma cells. The peptide results from posttranslational conversion of asparagine to aspartic acid. This change is of central importance for peptide recognition by melanoma-specific T cells, but has no impact on peptide binding to the MHC molecule. This posttranslational modification has not been previously described for any MHC-associated peptide and represents the first demonstration of posttranslational modification of a naturally processed class I-associated peptide. This observation is relevant to the identification and prediction of potential peptide antigens. The most likely mechanism for production of this peptide leads to the suggestion that antigenic peptides can be derived from proteins that are translated into the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8627164

  19. Impact of low molecular weight phthalates in inducing reproductive malfunctions in male mice: Special emphasis on Sertoli cell functions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narender; Srivastava, Swati; Roy, Partha

    2015-05-01

    Phthalates are commonly used as plasticizers in a variety of products. Since they have been identified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), effect of phthalates on human health is a major concern. In this study, we evaluated individual as well as combined mixture effects of three low molecular weight phthalates on the reproductive system of male mice, specifically on the Sertoli cell structure and function. In order to analyze the blood testes barrier (BTB) dynamics, primary culture of Sertoli cells from 3-weeks old male mice was used for mimicking typical tight junction structures. Male mice were exposed to long-term (45 days) and combined mixture of three phthalates, diethyl phthalate (DEP), diphenyl phthalate (DPP), and dimethyl isophthalate (DMIP) between pre-pubertal to adult stage. Our data showed significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the rates of transcription of certain prominent Sertoli cell specific genes like transferrin, testin and occludin. Moreover, we also observed significant decreases in the expression of proteins like 3β-HSD, connexin-43 and occludin in testicular lysates of treated animals (p < 0.05). The transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that the test compounds significantly altered the structural integrity of Sertoli cells. The significant changes of Sertoli cell tight junction structure by test compounds were associated with phosphorylation of ERK. Taken together, our study suggests that low molecular weight phthalates may affect male fertility by altering both structural and functional integrity of Sertoli cells in testes.

  20. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of a hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma: report of a novel chromosomal aberration.

    PubMed

    Mandava, Swarna; Sonar, Reshma; Ahmad, Firoz; Yadav, Anil K; Chheda, Pratiksha; Ramani, Manisha; Gupta, Amar D; Das, Bibhu R

    2011-02-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphomas (HSTCL) are rare cancers and comprise 5% of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. These well-characterized extranodal lymphomas have a disguised onset, secondary to intrasinusoidal infiltration of the spleen, liver, and bone marrow, with a rapidly progressive course that is poorly responsive to chemotherapy and often ensues in the setting of immune system suppression. We describe the clinical, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and molecular analyses for T cell receptor gene rearrangement in a 21-year-old man diagnosed with HSTCL. Immunophenotypic analysis revealed negativity for CD5 as well as double negativity for CD4/CD8 mature T-cell immunophenotype, which suggested the diagnosis of hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma. Molecular analysis confirmed a TCR gene rearrangement, thereby verifying the common T-cell origin of the present HSTCL case. Furthermore, cytogenetic analysis revealed a novel chromosomal rearrangement, t(7;15)(p22;q21). Metaphase fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed the translocation of a chromosomal segment from 15q21 to 7p22.

  1. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  2. Molecular mechanism of action of opioids in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, V.C.K.

    1987-01-01

    A series of human neuroblastoma cell lines was screened for the presence of opioid receptor sites. Of these cell lines, SK-N-SH was found to express approximately 50,000 ..mu.. and 10,000 delta opioid receptor sites/cell. In vitro characterization revealed that the binding properties of these receptor sites closely resembled those of human and rodent brain. Phosphatidylinositol turnover as a potential second messenger system for the ..mu.. receptor was examined in SK-N-SH cells. Neurotransmitter receptor systems were determined in the three sub-clones of SK-N-SH cells. Cells of the SH-SY5Y line, a phenotypically stable subclone of SK-N-SH cells, were induced to differentiate by treatment with various inducing agents, and changes of several neurotransmitter receptor systems were determined. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and retinoic acid (RA) up-regulated, while dBcAMP down-regulated opioid receptor sites. (/sup 3/H)Dopamine uptake was slightly enhanced only in RA-treated cells. Strikingly, the efficacy of PGE/sub 1/-stimulated accumulation of cAMP was enhanced by 15- to 30-fold upon RA treatment.

  3. The Molecular Basis of Communication within the Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Only a few substances serve as signals within cells; this indicates that internal signal pathways are remarkably universal. The variety of physiological and biochemical processes regulated by known messengers is discussed along with chemical structures, pathways, inositol-lipid cycles, and cell growth regulation. (DH)

  4. Molecular Characterization of Clear Cell Lesions of Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi Charan; Juneja, Saurabh; Narwal, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    The salivary glands, oral mucosa and jaws constitute a group of lesions which are heterogeneous in nature and are odontogenic, salivary or metastatic in origin. This group of tumours is termed as Clear Cell Tumours. Fixation artifacts are one of the most important reasons for the cell to appear clear but clearing of cells may also result from cytoplasmic accumulation of water, presence of glycogen within the cell, intermediate filaments, immature zymogen granules, or a paucity of cellular organelles. Clear cell Odontogenic neoplasms predominantly include odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Clear cell tumours of salivary gland origin are almost invariably malignant in nature but they do include two benign lesions. Very frequently, surgical pathologist encounters clear cells in many malignant neoplasms, the nature and sources of which are undetermined on the basis of conventional histopathology. This review will selectively discuss the clinicopathological features of neoplasms which at times may pose a diagnostic challenge and dilemma due to clear cell changes. PMID:27437379

  5. Molecular Characterization of Clear Cell Lesions of Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anshi; Shetty, Devi Charan; Juneja, Saurabh; Narwal, Nidhi

    2016-05-01

    The salivary glands, oral mucosa and jaws constitute a group of lesions which are heterogeneous in nature and are odontogenic, salivary or metastatic in origin. This group of tumours is termed as Clear Cell Tumours. Fixation artifacts are one of the most important reasons for the cell to appear clear but clearing of cells may also result from cytoplasmic accumulation of water, presence of glycogen within the cell, intermediate filaments, immature zymogen granules, or a paucity of cellular organelles. Clear cell Odontogenic neoplasms predominantly include odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Clear cell tumours of salivary gland origin are almost invariably malignant in nature but they do include two benign lesions. Very frequently, surgical pathologist encounters clear cells in many malignant neoplasms, the nature and sources of which are undetermined on the basis of conventional histopathology. This review will selectively discuss the clinicopathological features of neoplasms which at times may pose a diagnostic challenge and dilemma due to clear cell changes. PMID:27437379

  6. Molecular interactions between albumin and proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    1998-01-01

    In glomerular diseases the filtration of excess proteins into the proximal tubule, together with their subsequent reabsorption may represent an important pathological mechanism underlying progressive renal scarring. The most prominent protein in glomerular filtrate, albumin, is reabsorbed by receptor-mediated endocytosis by proximal tubular cells. It binds both to scavenger-type receptors and to megalin in the proximal tubule. Some of these receptors appear to be shared with other cell types, particularly endothelial cells. The endocytic uptake of albumin is subjected to complex hormonal and enzymatic regulation. In addition to being reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, albumin may act as a signalling molecule in these cells, and may induce the expression of numerous pro-inflammatory genes. Modulation of the interaction of albumin with proximal tubular cells may eventually prove to be of therapeutic importance in the treatment of renal diseases. PMID:9807019

  7. A mixture of peptides and sugars derived from plant cell walls increases plant defense responses to stress and attenuates ageing-associated molecular changes in cultured skin cells.

    PubMed

    Apone, Fabio; Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Arciello, Stefania; Tortora, Assunta; Filippini, Lucio; Monoli, Irene; Cucchiara, Mirna; Gibertoni, Simone; Chrispeels, Maarten J; Colucci, Gabriella

    2010-02-15

    Small peptides and aminoacid derivatives have been extensively studied for their effect of inducing plant defense responses, and thus increasing plant tolerance to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Similarly to plants, these compounds can activate different signaling pathways in mammalian skin cells as well, leading to the up-regulation of anti-aging specific genes. This suggests the existence of analogous defense response mechanisms, well conserved both in plants and animal cells. In this article, we describe the preparation of a new mixture of peptides and sugars derived from the chemical and enzymatic digestion of plant cell wall glycoproteins. We investigate the multiple roles of this product as potential "biostimulator" to protect plants from abiotic stresses, and also as potential cosmeceutical. In particular, the molecular effects of the peptide/sugar mixture of inducing plant defense responsive genes and protecting cultured skin cells from oxidative burst damages were deeply evaluated.

  8. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY MUTAGENS IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY BROMATE AND N- ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE L YMPHOMA CELLS

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemical mutagens The Tk +1- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wide ra...

  9. Beyond a pedagogical tool: 30 years of Molecular biology of the cell.

    PubMed

    Serpente, Norberto

    2013-02-01

    In 1983, a bulky and profusely illustrated textbook on molecular and cell biology began to inhabit the shelves of university libraries worldwide. The effect of capturing the eyes and souls of biologists was immediate as the book provided them with a new and invigorating outlook on what cells are and what they do.

  10. Beyond a pedagogical tool: 30 years of Molecular biology of the cell.

    PubMed

    Serpente, Norberto

    2013-02-01

    In 1983, a bulky and profusely illustrated textbook on molecular and cell biology began to inhabit the shelves of university libraries worldwide. The effect of capturing the eyes and souls of biologists was immediate as the book provided them with a new and invigorating outlook on what cells are and what they do. PMID:23340575

  11. Global detection of molecular changes reveals concurrent alteration of several biological pathways in nonsmall cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Z.; Kapoor, M.; Newton, K; Cheon, K.; Ramaswamy, A.; Lotan, R.; Strong, L. C.; Koo, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    To identify the molecular changes that occur in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), we compared the gene expression profile of the NCI-H292 (H292) NSCLC cell line with that of normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTBE) cells. The NHTBE cells were grown in a three-dimensional organotypic culture system that permits maintenance of the normal pseudostratified mucociliary phenotype characteristic of bronchial epithelium in vivo. Microarray analysis using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide chip U95Av2 revealed that 1,683 genes showed a > 1.5-fold change in expression in the H292 cell line relative to the NHTBE cells. Specifically, 418 genes were downregulated and 1,265 were upregulated in the H292 cells. The expression data for selected genes were validated in several different NSCLC cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that WNT responses, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and cell proliferation were significantly altered in the H292 cells. Functional analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting confirmed concurrent changes in the activity of these pathways in the H292 line. These findings show that (1) NSCLC cells display deregulation of the WNT, apoptosis, proliferation and cell cycle pathways, as has been found in many other types of cancer cells, and (2) that organotypically cultured NHTBE cells can be used as a reference to identify genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in tumor cells derived from bronchogenic epithelium. PMID:16049682

  12. Molecular signature of amniotic fluid derived stem cells in the fetal sheep model of myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Pozzo, Enrico; Scorletti, Federico; Benedetti, Laura; Cusella, Gabriella; Ronzoni, Flavio Lorenzo; Sahakyan, Vardine; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mimmi, Maria Chiara; Calcaterra, Valeria; Deprest, Jan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Abnormal cord development results in spinal cord damage responsible for myelomeningocele (MMC). Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) have emerged as a potential candidate for applications in regenerative medicine. However, their differentiation potential is largely unknown as well as the molecular signaling orchestrating the accurate spinal cord development. Fetal lambs underwent surgical creation of neural tube defect and its subsequent repair. AFSCs were isolated, cultured and characterized at the 12th (induction of MMC), 16th (repair of malformation), and 20th week of gestation (delivery). After performing open hysterectomy, AF collections on fetuses with sham procedures at the same time points as the MMC creation group have been used as controls. Cytological analyses with the colony forming unit assay, XTT and alkaline-phosphatase staining, qRT-PCR gene expression analyses (normalized with aged match controls) and NMR metabolomics profiling were performed. Here we show for the first time the metabolomics and molecular signature variation in AFSCs isolated in the sheep model of MMC, which may be used as diagnostic tools for the in utero identification of the neural tube damage. Intriguingly, PAX3 gene involved in the murine model for spina bifida is modulated in AFSCs reaching the peak of expression at 16 weeks of gestation, 4 weeks after the intervention. Our data strongly suggest that AFSCs reorganize their differentiation commitment in order to generate PAX3-expressing progenitors to counteract the MMC induced in the sheep model. The gene expression signature of AFSCs highlights the plasticity of these cells reflecting possible alterations of embryonic development.

  13. Genomic imbalances in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identified by molecular cytogenetic techniques

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the chromosomal changes detected by molecular cytogenetic approaches in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the ninth most common malignancy in the world. Whole genome analyses of ESCC cell lines and tumors indicated that the most frequent genomic gains occurred at 1, 2q, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7, 8q, 9q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 15q, 16, 17, 18p, 19q, 20q, 22q and X, with focal amplifications at 1q32, 2p16-22, 3q25-28, 5p13-15.3, 7p12-22, 7q21-22, 8q23-24.2, 9q34, 10q21, 11p11.2, 11q13, 13q32, 14q13-14, 14q21, 14q31-32, 15q22-26, 17p11.2, 18p11.2-11.3 and 20p11.2. Recurrent losses involved 3p, 4, 5q, 6q, 7q, 8p, 9, 10p, 12p, 13, 14p, 15p, 18, 19p, 20, 22, Xp and Y. Gains at 5p and 7q, and deletions at 4p, 9p, and 11q were significant prognostic factors for patients with ESCC. Gains at 6p and 20p, and losses at 10p and 10q were the most significant imbalances, both in primary carcinoma and in metastases, which suggested that these regions may harbor oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Gains at 12p and losses at 3p may be associated with poor relapse-free survival. The clinical applicability of these changes as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of ESCC, or as molecular targets for personalized therapy should be evaluated. PMID:21637470

  14. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Sabita N; Kala, Rishabh; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells.

  15. Analysis of Immune Response Markers in Jorge Lobo's Disease Lesions Suggests the Occurrence of Mixed T Helper Responses with the Dominance of Regulatory T Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Michelle de C S; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Fachin, Luciana R V; Baptista, Ida Maria F D; Woods, William J; Garlet, Gustavo P; Trombone, Ana Paula F; Belone, Andrea de F F

    2015-01-01

    Jorge Lobo's disease (JLD) is a chronic infection that affects the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Its etiologic agent is the fungus Lacazia loboi. Lesions are classified as localized, multifocal, or disseminated, depending on their location. Early diagnosis and the surgical removal of lesions are the best therapeutic options currently available for JLD. The few studies that evaluate the immunological response of JLD patients show a predominance of Th2 response, as well as a high frequency of TGF-β and IL-10 positive cells in the lesions; however, the overall immunological status of the lesions in terms of their T cell phenotype has yet to be determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) markers mRNA in JLD patients by means of real-time PCR. Biopsies of JLD lesions (N = 102) were classified according to their clinical and histopathological features and then analyzed using real-time PCR in order to determine the expression levels of TGF-β1, FoxP3, CTLA4, IKZF2, IL-10, T-bet, IFN-γ, GATA3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, RORC, IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 and to compare these levels to those of healthy control skin (N = 12). The results showed an increased expression of FoxP3, CTLA4, TGF-β1, IL-10, T-bet, IL-17F, and IL-17A in lesions, while GATA3 and IL-4 levels were found to be lower in diseased skin than in the control group. When the clinical forms were compared, TGF-β1 was found to be highly expressed in patients with a single localized lesion while IL-5 and IL-17A levels were higher in patients with multiple/disseminated lesions. These results demonstrate the occurrence of mixed T helper responses and suggest the dominance of regulatory T cell activity, which could inhibit Th-dependent protective responses to intracellular fungi such as L. loboi. Therefore, Tregs may play a key role in JLD pathogenesis. PMID:26700881

  16. Analysis of Immune Response Markers in Jorge Lobo's Disease Lesions Suggests the Occurrence of Mixed T Helper Responses with the Dominance of Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Michelle de C. S.; Rosa, Patricia S.; Soares, Cleverson T.; Fachin, Luciana R. V.; Baptista, Ida Maria F. D.; Woods, William J.; Garlet, Gustavo P.

    2015-01-01

    Jorge Lobo’s disease (JLD) is a chronic infection that affects the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Its etiologic agent is the fungus Lacazia loboi. Lesions are classified as localized, multifocal, or disseminated, depending on their location. Early diagnosis and the surgical removal of lesions are the best therapeutic options currently available for JLD. The few studies that evaluate the immunological response of JLD patients show a predominance of Th2 response, as well as a high frequency of TGF-β and IL-10 positive cells in the lesions; however, the overall immunological status of the lesions in terms of their T cell phenotype has yet to be determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) markers mRNA in JLD patients by means of real-time PCR. Biopsies of JLD lesions (N = 102) were classified according to their clinical and histopathological features and then analyzed using real-time PCR in order to determine the expression levels of TGF-β1, FoxP3, CTLA4, IKZF2, IL-10, T-bet, IFN-γ, GATA3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, RORC, IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 and to compare these levels to those of healthy control skin (N = 12). The results showed an increased expression of FoxP3, CTLA4, TGF-β1, IL-10, T-bet, IL-17F, and IL-17A in lesions, while GATA3 and IL-4 levels were found to be lower in diseased skin than in the control group. When the clinical forms were compared, TGF-β1 was found to be highly expressed in patients with a single localized lesion while IL-5 and IL-17A levels were higher in patients with multiple/disseminated lesions. These results demonstrate the occurrence of mixed T helper responses and suggest the dominance of regulatory T cell activity, which could inhibit Th-dependent protective responses to intracellular fungi such as L. loboi. Therefore, Tregs may play a key role in JLD pathogenesis. PMID:26700881

  17. Analysis of Immune Response Markers in Jorge Lobo's Disease Lesions Suggests the Occurrence of Mixed T Helper Responses with the Dominance of Regulatory T Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Michelle de C S; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Fachin, Luciana R V; Baptista, Ida Maria F D; Woods, William J; Garlet, Gustavo P; Trombone, Ana Paula F; Belone, Andrea de F F

    2015-01-01

    Jorge Lobo's disease (JLD) is a chronic infection that affects the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Its etiologic agent is the fungus Lacazia loboi. Lesions are classified as localized, multifocal, or disseminated, depending on their location. Early diagnosis and the surgical removal of lesions are the best therapeutic options currently available for JLD. The few studies that evaluate the immunological response of JLD patients show a predominance of Th2 response, as well as a high frequency of TGF-β and IL-10 positive cells in the lesions; however, the overall immunological status of the lesions in terms of their T cell phenotype has yet to be determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) markers mRNA in JLD patients by means of real-time PCR. Biopsies of JLD lesions (N = 102) were classified according to their clinical and histopathological features and then analyzed using real-time PCR in order to determine the expression levels of TGF-β1, FoxP3, CTLA4, IKZF2, IL-10, T-bet, IFN-γ, GATA3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, RORC, IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 and to compare these levels to those of healthy control skin (N = 12). The results showed an increased expression of FoxP3, CTLA4, TGF-β1, IL-10, T-bet, IL-17F, and IL-17A in lesions, while GATA3 and IL-4 levels were found to be lower in diseased skin than in the control group. When the clinical forms were compared, TGF-β1 was found to be highly expressed in patients with a single localized lesion while IL-5 and IL-17A levels were higher in patients with multiple/disseminated lesions. These results demonstrate the occurrence of mixed T helper responses and suggest the dominance of regulatory T cell activity, which could inhibit Th-dependent protective responses to intracellular fungi such as L. loboi. Therefore, Tregs may play a key role in JLD pathogenesis.

  18. Application of 3A molecular sieve layer in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yuan; Wang, Jinzhong E-mail: qingjiang.yu@hit.edu.cn; Yu, Qingjiang E-mail: qingjiang.yu@hit.edu.cn; Huang, Yuewu; Chang, Quanhong; Hao, Chunlei; Jiao, Shujie; Gao, Shiyong; Li, Hongtao; Wang, Dongbo

    2014-08-25

    3A molecular sieve layer was used as dehydration and electronic-insulation layer on the TiO{sub 2} electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells. This layer diminished the effect of water in electrolyte efficiently and enhanced the performance of cells. The conversion efficiency increased from 9.58% to 10.2%. The good moisture resistance of cells was attributed to the three-dimensional interconnecting structure of 3A molecular sieve with strong adsorption of water molecule. While the performance enhancement benefited from the suppression of the charge recombination of electronic-insulation layer and scattering effect of large particles.

  19. 'Porosome' discovered nearly 20 years ago provides molecular insights into the kiss-and-run mechanism of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2015-07-01

    Secretion is a fundamental cellular process in living organisms, from yeast to cells in humans. Since the 1950s, it was believed that secretory vesicles completely merged with the cell plasma membrane during secretion. While this may occur, the observation of partially empty vesicles in cells following secretion suggests the presence of an additional mechanism that allows partial discharge of intra-vesicular contents during secretion. This proposed mechanism requires the involvement of a plasma membrane structure called 'porosome', which serves to prevent the collapse of secretory vesicles, and to transiently fuse with the plasma membrane (Kiss-and-run), expel a portion of its contents and disengage. Porosomes are cup-shaped supramolecular lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane ranging in size from 15 nm in neurons and astrocytes to 100-180 nm in endocrine and exocrine cells. Neuronal porosomes are composed of nearly 40 proteins. In comparison, the 120 nm nuclear pore complex is composed of >500 protein molecules. Elucidation of the porosome structure, its chemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, and the molecular assembly of membrane-associated t-SNARE and v-SNARE proteins in a ring or rosette complex resulting in the establishment of membrane continuity to form a fusion pore at the porosome base, has been demonstrated. Additionally, the molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling, and its requirement for intra-vesicular content release during cell secretion has also been elucidated. Collectively, these observations provide a molecular understanding of cell secretion, resulting in a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process.

  20. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  1. Deciphering the stem cell machinery as a basis for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bosnali, Manal; Münst, Bernhard; Thier, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells provide fascinating prospects for biomedical applications by combining the ability to renew themselves and to differentiate into specialized cell types. Since the first isolation of embryonic stem (ES) cells about 30 years ago, there has been a series of groundbreaking discoveries that have the potential to revolutionize modern life science. For a long time, embryos or germ cell-derived cells were thought to be the only source of pluripotency—a dogma that has been challenged during the last decade. Several findings revealed that cell differentiation from (stem) cells to mature cells is not in fact an irreversible process. The molecular mechanism underlying cellular reprogramming is poorly understood thus far. Identifying how pluripotency maintenance takes place in ES cells can help us to understand how pluripotency induction is regulated. Here, we review recent advances in the field of stem cell regulation focusing on key transcription factors and their functional interplay with non-coding RNAs. PMID:19662495

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells: Molecular characteristics and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, Farbod; Shenaq, Deana; Huang, Jiayi; Zhang, Wenli; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; He, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Liang; Zuo, Guo-Wei; Luo, Qing; Shi, Qiong; Wagner, Eric R; Huang, Enyi; Gao, Yanhong; Gao, Jian-Li; Kim, Stephanie H; Zhou, Jian-Zhong; Bi, Yang; Su, Yuxi; Zhu, Gaohui; Luo, Jinyong; Luo, Xiaoji; Qin, Jiaqiang; Reid, Russell R; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Deng, Zhong-Liang; He, Tong-Chuan

    2010-08-26

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-hematopoietic stem cells with the capacity to differentiate into tissues of both mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal origin. MSCs can differentiate into osteoblastic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages, although recent studies have demonstrated that MSCs are also able to differentiate into other lineages, including neuronal and cardiomyogenic lineages. Since their original isolation from the bone marrow, MSCs have been successfully harvested from many other tissues. Their ease of isolation and ex vivo expansion combined with their immunoprivileged nature has made these cells popular candidates for stem cell therapies. These cells have the potential to alter disease pathophysiology through many modalities including cytokine secretion, capacity to differentiate along various lineages, immune modulation and direct cell-cell interaction with diseased tissue. Here we first review basic features of MSC biology including MSC characteristics in culture, homing mechanisms, differentiation capabilities and immune modulation. We then highlight some in vivo and clinical evidence supporting the therapeutic roles of MSCs and their uses in orthopedic, autoimmune, and ischemic disorders.

  3. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sergé, Arnauld

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors, and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation, and metastasis. PMID:27200348

  4. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  5. Open to Suggestion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Reading, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) suggestions for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) suggestions for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) suggestions for using postcards in remedial reading…

  6. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  7. Smooth muscles and stem cells of embryonic guts express KIT, PDGFRRA, CD34 and many other stem cell antigens: suggestion that GIST arise from smooth muscles and gut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is believed to original from interstitial cells of (ICC) present in Auerbach's nerve plexus. GIST frequently shows gain-of-function mutations of KIT and PDGFRA. In practical pathology, GIST is diagnosed by positive immunostaining or KIT and/or CD34. The author herein demonstrates that human embryonic gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles (HEGITSM) and human embryonic stem gastrointestinal cells (HEGISC) consistently express KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA and other stem cell (SC) antigens NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, bcl-2, ErbB, and MET throughout the embryonic development of 7-40 gestational week (GW). CK14 was negative. The author examines 42 cases (7-40 GW) of embryonic GI tract (EGI). The HEGISM, HEGIST, and gall bladder smooth muscles (SM) were consistently positive for KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA, synaptophysin, chromogranin, NSE, bcl-2, ErbB2, and MET in foregut, stomach, GB, midgut, and hindgut throughout the fetal life (7-40 GW). The stem cells (SC) were seen to create the SM, nerves, ICC, and other all structures of GI tract. In adult gastrointestinal walls (n=30), KIT, CD34, PDGFRA, and S100 proteins were expressed in Auerbach's nerve plexus and ICC. The bronchial and vascular SM of embryos did not express these molecules. In GIST, frequent expressions of KIT (100%, 30/30), CD34 (90%, 27/30), and PDGFRA (83%, 25/30) were seen. In general, characteristics of tumors recapitulate their embryonic life. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that GIST may be originated from GI SM and/or GI SC in addition to ICC.

  8. Molecular delivery into live cells using gold nanoparticle coated substrates fabricated by pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Xiao, Fan; Teitell, Michael A.; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2010-02-01

    A massively-parallel molecular delivery system for mammalian cells is demonstrated by pulsed-laser irradiation of a gold-nanoparticles-coated substrate situated below a cell monolayer. This system is capable of high throughput and spatially-targeted delivery into desired areas of a cell culture by designing the laser irradiation pattern. Large area, rapid fabrication of the gold-nanoparticle-coated substrate is achieved by pulsed laser annealing of a continuous gold thin film. Randomly distributed gold nanoparticles and periodic gold nanoparticle arrays were obtained by pulsed laser flood exposure and by polymer mold guided laser annealing respectively. Optical image patterned molecular delivery into adherent cells were demonstrated in HeLa and HEK 293T cells. Delivery efficiencies of fluorescent dye, calcein, were as high as >90% with high cell viability (>90%) in HEK 293T using this device.

  9. Gene signatures associated with mouse postnatal hindbrain neural stem cells and medulloblastoma cancer stem cells identify novel molecular mediators and predict human medulloblastoma molecular classification.

    PubMed

    Corno, Daniela; Daniela, Corno; Pala, Mauro; Cominelli, Manuela; Cipelletti, Barbara; Leto, Ketty; Croci, Laura; Barili, Valeria; Brandalise, Federico; Melzi, Raffaella; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Bulfone, Alessandro; Rossi, Paola; Rossi, Ferdinando; Consalez, Gian Giacomo; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Galli, Rossella

    2012-06-01

    Medulloblastoma arises from mutations occurring in stem/progenitor cells located in restricted hindbrain territories. Here we report that the mouse postnatal ventricular zone lining the IV ventricle also harbors bona fide stem cells that, remarkably, share the same molecular profile with cerebellar white matter-derived neural stem cells (NSC). To identify novel molecular mediators involved in medulloblastomagenesis, we compared these distinct postnatal hindbrain-derived NSC populations, which are potentially tumor initiating, with murine compound Ptch/p53 mutant medulloblastoma cancer stem