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Sample records for cellular proliferation ultrastructure

  1. Lycopene modulates cellular proliferation, glycolysis and hepatic ultrastructure during hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prachi; Bhatia, Nisha; Bansal, Mohinder Pal; Koul, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of lycopene extracted from tomatoes (LycT) on ultrastructure, glycolytic enzymes, cell proliferation markers and hypoxia during N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODS Female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: The Control, NDEA (200 mg NDEA/kg b.w. given i.p.), LycT (5 mg/kg b.w. given orally on alternate days) and LycT + NDEA group. The mRNA and protein expression of various cell proliferation markers (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The ultrastructure of hepatic tissue was analyzed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The enzymatic activity of glycolytic enzymes was estimated using standardized protocols, while glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity level was estimated using a kit obtained from Reckon Diagnostic P. Ltd. (India). RESULTS Uncontrolled proliferation in the liver of NDEA (P ≤ 0.001) mice was evident from the high expression of cell-proliferation associated genes (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) when compared to control and LycT mice. In addition, enhanced activities of hexokinase, phosphoglucoisomerase, aldolase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were observed in NDEA mice as compared to control (P ≤ 0.001) and LycT (P ≤ 0.001) mice. The alterations in hepatic ultrastructure observed in the NDEA group correlated with the changes in the above parameters. LycT pre-treatment in NDEA-challenged mice ameliorated the investigated pathways disrupted by NDEA treatment. Moreover, hepatic electron micrographs from the LycT + NDEA group showed increased macrophages, apoptotic bodies and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in comparison to undifferentiated HCC as observed in the NDEA treated group. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that dietary supplementation with LycT has a multidimensional role in preventing

  2. Immunohistochemical localisation of the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine in insect tissue: preservation of cellular ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Swales, L S; Smith, P J

    1990-01-01

    The incorporation of the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and its detection by a specific monoclonal antibody, is proving a valuable tool in the study of cell kinetics and proliferation. To date, however, its use has been largely restricted to the light microscope level. The fixatives and processing required do not preserve the cellular ultrastructure. This paper details an immunohistochemical procedure which retains both structural details and preserves sufficient antigenicity for the use of the monoclonal at the electron microscopical level.

  3. Cellular Ultrastructure and Crystal Development in Amorphophallus (Araceae)

    PubMed Central

    Prychid, Christina J.; Jabaily, Rachel Schmidt; Rudall, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Species of Araceae accumulate calcium oxalate in the form of characteristically grooved needle-shaped raphide crystals and multi-crystal druses. This study focuses on the distribution and development of raphides and druses during leaf growth in ten species of Amorphophallus (Araceae) in order to determine the crystal macropatterns and the underlying ultrastructural features associated with formation of the unusual raphide groove. Methods Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and both bright-field and polarized-light microscopy were used to study a range of developmental stages. Key Results Raphide crystals are initiated very early in plant development. They are consistently present in most species and have a fairly uniform distribution within mature tissues. Individual raphides may be formed by calcium oxalate deposition within individual crystal chambers in the vacuole of an idioblast. Druse crystals form later in the true leaves, and are absent from some species. Distribution of druses within leaves is more variable. Druses initially develop at leaf tips and then increase basipetally as the leaf ages. Druse development may also be initiated in crystal chambers. Conclusions The unusual grooved raphides in Amorphophallus species probably result from an unusual crystal chamber morphology. There are multiple systems of transport and biomineralization of calcium into the vacuole of the idioblast. Differences between raphide and druse idioblasts indicate different levels of cellular regulation. The relatively early development of raphides provides a defensive function in soft, growing tissues, and restricts build-up of dangerously high levels of calcium in tissues that lack the ability to adequately regulate calcium. The later development of druses could be primarily for calcium sequestration. PMID:18285357

  4. Effect of Cadmium on Cellular Ultrastructure in Mouse Ovary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Xuejuan; Wang, Yanwu; Fan, Rong; Qiu, Chao; Zhong, Shan; Wei, Lei; Luo, Daji

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the cytotoxicity and pathological effects of cadmium on the ovary. Our studies revealed that cadmium was deposited in the mouse ovary after 8 d cadmium injection in vivo. Also, the increase in the rate of body weight was slowed, while the gonadosomatic index was reduced in the CdCl2 group, compared with the control group. Meanwhile, cadmium affected the maturation of follicles, the degradation of corpus luteum, the arrangement of follicles and corpus luteum, and increased the number of atresia follicles. Besides, under the electron microscope, chromatin margination, karopyknosis, swelling of mature cisternae of Golgi apparatus, mitochondrial cristae disappearance, and swelling of the rough endoplasmic reticulum can be observed in the CdCl2 group mice. Collectively, our findings elucidated the morphological mechanism that the exposure of cadmium changed the ultrastructure of cells in ovary tissues.

  5. Cellular proliferation after experimental glaucoma filtration surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jampel, H.D.; McGuigan, L.J.; Dunkelberger, G.R.; L'Hernault, N.L.; Quigley, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    We used light microscopic autoradiography to determine the time course of cellular incorporation of tritiated thymidine (a correlate of cell division) following glaucoma filtration surgery in seven eyes of four cynomolgus monkeys with experimental glaucoma. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was detected as early as 24 hours postoperatively. Peak incorporation occurred five days postoperatively and had returned to baseline levels by day 11. Cells incorporating tritiated thymidine included keratocytes, episcleral cells, corneal and capillary endothelial cells, and conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy was correlated with the autoradiographic results to demonstrate that fibroblasts were dividing on the corneoscleral margin. These findings have potential clinical implications for the use of antiproliferative agents after filtration surgery.

  6. Role of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) in controlling cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Dasgupta, Asish; Ding, Jinhui; Indig, Fred E.; Ghosh, Paritosh; Longo, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that Mitofusin2 (Mfn2) inhibits cell proliferation when overexpressed. We wanted to study the role of endogenous Mfn2 in cell proliferation, along with the structural features of Mfn2 that influence its mitochondrial localization and control of cell proliferation. Mfn2-knockdown clones of a B-cell lymphoma cell line BJAB exhibited an increased rate of cell proliferation. A 2-fold increase in cell proliferation was also observed in Mfn2-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells as compared with the control wild-type cells, and the proliferative advantage of the knockout MEF cells was blocked on reintroduction of the Mfn2 gene. Mfn2 exerts its antiproliferative effect by acting as an effector molecule of Ras, resulting in the inhibition of the Ras-Raf-ERK signaling pathway. Furthermore, both the N-terminal (aa 1–264) and the C-terminal (aa 265–757) fragments of Mfn2 blocked cell proliferation through distinct mechanisms: the N-terminal-mediated inhibition was due to its interaction with Raf-1, whereas the C-terminal fragment of Mfn2 inhibited cell proliferation by interacting with Ras. The inhibition of proliferation by the N-terminal fragment was independent of its mitochondrial localization. Collectively, our data provide new insights regarding the role of Mfn2 in controlling cellular proliferation.—Chen, K.-H., Dasgupta, A., Ding, J., Indig, F. E., Ghosh, P., Longo, D. L. Role of Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) in controlling cellular proliferation. PMID:24081906

  7. Combined carbonate carbon isotopic and cellular ultrastructural studies of individual benthic foraminifera: Method description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jonathan B.; Bernhard, Joan M.; Curtis, Jason; Rathburn, Anthony E.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon isotopes of foraminiferal tests provide a widely used proxy for past oceanographic environmental conditions. This proxy can be calibrated using live specimens, which are reliably identified with observations of cell ultrastructure. Observations of ultrastructures can also be used for studies of biological characteristics such as diet and presence of symbionts. Combining biological and isotopic studies on individual foraminifera could provide novel information, but standard isotopic methods destroy ultrastructures by desiccating specimens and observations of ultrastructure require removal of carbonate tests, preventing isotope measurements. The approach described here preserves cellular ultrastructure during isotopic analyses by keeping the foraminifera in an aqueous buffer (Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS)). The technique was developed and standardized with 36 aliquots of NBS-19 standard of similar weight to foraminiferal tests (5 to 123 μg). Standard errors ranged from ± 0.06 to ± 0.85‰ and were caused by CO2 contaminants dissolved in the PBS. The technique was used to measure δ13C values of 96 foraminifera, 10 of which do not precipitate carbonate tests. Calcareous foraminiferal tests had corrected carbon isotope ratios of -8.5 to +3.2‰. This new technique allows comparisons of isotopic compositions of tests made by foraminifera known to be alive at the time of collection with their biological characteristics such as prey composition and presence or absence of putative symbionts. The approach may be applied to additional biomineralizing organisms such as planktonic foraminifera, pteropods, corals, and coccolithophores to elucidate certain biological controls on their paleoceanographic proxy signatures.

  8. Cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability on conducting polymer substrates.

    PubMed

    del Valle, Luis J; Estrany, Francesc; Armelin, Elaine; Oliver, Ramón; Alemán, Carlos

    2008-12-01

    This work reports a comprehensive study about cell adhesion and proliferation on the surface of different electroactive substrates formed by pi-conjugated polymers. Biological assays were performed considering four different cellular lines: two epithelial and two fibroblasts. On the other hand, the electroactivity of the three conducting systems was determined in physiological conditions. Results indicate that the three substrates behave as a cellular matrix, even though compatibility with cells is larger for PPy and the 3-layered system. Furthermore, the three polymeric systems are electro-compatible with the cellular monolayers. PMID:18683167

  9. The emergence of electron tomography as an important tool for investigating cellular ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B F; Marko, M

    2001-05-01

    Electron tomography has emerged as the leading method for the study of three-dimensional (3D) ultrastructure in the 5-20-nm resolution range. It is ideally suited for studying cell organelles, subcellular assemblies and, in some cases, whole cells. Tomography occupies a place in 3D biological electron microscopy between the work now being done at near-atomic resolution on isolated macromolecules or 2D protein arrays and traditional serial-section reconstructions of whole cells and tissue specimens. Tomography complements serial-section reconstruction by providing higher resolution in the depth dimension, whereas serial-section reconstruction is better able to trace continuity over long distances throughout the depth of a cell. The two techniques can be combined with good results for favorable specimens. Tomography also complements 3D macromolecular studies by offering sufficient resolution to locate the macromolecular complexes in their cellular context. The technology has matured to the point at which application of electron tomography to specimens in plastic sections is routine, and new developments to overcome limitations due to beam exposure and specimen geometry promise to further improve its capabilities. In this review we give a brief description of the methodology and a summary of the new insights gained in a few representative applications.(J Histochem Cytochem 49:553-563, 2001)

  10. Cryo FIB-SEM: volume imaging of cellular ultrastructure in native frozen specimens.

    PubMed

    Schertel, Andreas; Snaidero, Nicolas; Han, Hong-Mei; Ruhwedel, Torben; Laue, Michael; Grabenbauer, Markus; Möbius, Wiebke

    2013-11-01

    Volume microscopy at high resolution is increasingly required to better understand cellular functions in the context of three-dimensional assemblies. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling for serial block face imaging in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is an efficient and fast method to generate such volume data for 3D analysis. Here, we apply this technique at cryo-conditions to image fully hydrated frozen specimen of mouse optic nerves and Bacillus subtilis spores obtained by high-pressure freezing (HPF). We established imaging conditions to directly visualize the ultrastructure in the block face at -150 °C by using an in-lens secondary electron (SE) detector. By serial sectioning with a focused ion beam and block face imaging of the optic nerve we obtained a volume as large as X=7.72 μm, Y=5.79 μm and Z=3.81 μm with a lateral pixel size of 7.5 nm and a slice thickness of 30 nm in Z. The intrinsic contrast of membranes was sufficient to distinguish structures like Golgi cisternae, vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum and cristae within mitochondria and allowed for a three-dimensional reconstruction of different types of mitochondria within an oligodendrocyte and an astrocytic process. Applying this technique to dormant B. subtilis spores we obtained volumes containing numerous spores and discovered a bright signal in the core, which cannot be related to any known structure so far. In summary, we describe the use of cryo FIB-SEM as a tool for direct and fast 3D cryo-imaging of large native frozen samples including tissues. PMID:24121039

  11. The antidepressant tranylcypromine alters cellular proliferation and migration in the adult goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Romanczyk, Tara B; Jacobowitz, David M; Pollard, Harvey B; Wu, Xingjia; Anders, Juanita J

    2014-10-01

    The goldfish (Carassius auratus) is a widely studied vertebrate model organism for studying cell proliferation in the adult brain, and provide the experimental advantage of growing their body and brain throughout their ∼30-year life time. Cell proliferation occurs in the teleost brain in widespread proliferation zones. Increased cell proliferation in the brain has been linked to the actions of certain antidepressants, including tranylcypromine (TCP), which is used in the treatment of depression. We hypothesized that proliferation zones in the adult goldfish brain can be used to determine the antidepressant effects on cellular proliferation. Here, we report that bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling over a 24-hr period can be used to rapidly identify the proliferation zones throughout the goldfish brain, including the telencephalon, diencephalon, optic tectal lobes, cerebellum, and facial and vagal lobes. In the first 24 hr of BrdU administration, TCP caused an approximate and significant doubling of labeled cells in the combined brain regions examined, as detected by BrdU immunohistochemistry. TCP caused the greatest increase in cell proliferation in the cerebellum. The normal migratory paths of the proliferating cells within the cerebellum were not affected by TCP treatment. These results indicate that the goldfish provide significant advantages as a vertebrate model for rapidly investigating the effects of antidepressant drugs on cellular proliferation and migration in the normal and injured brain.

  12. Effect of monensin on ultrastructure and cellular invasion by the turkey coccidia Eimeria adenoeides and Eimeria meleagrimitis.

    PubMed

    Augustine, P C; Watkins, K L; Danforth, H D

    1992-06-01

    Freshly excysted sporozoites (SZ) of the turkey coccidia Eimeria meleagrimitis and Eimeria adenoeides were incubated at 41 C in concentrations of monensin from .01 to 1.0 microgram/mL, washed free of the drug, and either processed for phase, fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy or inoculated into cultures of turkey kidney cells. Phase microscopy indicated that after 1.5 h incubation in 1.0 micrograms/mL monensin, about 60% of the SZ of E. meleagrimitis had become notably rounded or displayed localized protrusions. These alterations were accompanied by ultrastructural abnormalities (in 90% of the SZ) including vacuoles in the cytoplasm, bulging and separation of plasma membrane layers, and dense bands in the refractile bodies that extended toward the periphery of the refractile body. Similar morphological and ultrastructural changes were observed in over half of the E. adenoeides SZ after 2 h incubation in 1.0 micrograms/mL monensin. Additionally, some specimens contained a pycnotic nucleus that was usually surrounded by a large vacuole. After 4 h incubation, almost all of the SZ displayed some degree of ultrastructural damage. Indirect fluorescent antibody labeling with parasite-specific monoclonal antibodies demonstrated clouds of antigen surrounding the monensin-treated but not the untreated SZ, suggesting an increase in permeability with incubation in monensin. With both E. meleagrimitis and E. adenoeides, the structural changes were reflected in a significant inhibition of cellular invasion. The inhibitory activity of monensin was concentration- and time-dependent in that the greatest inhibition of invasion was observed in SZ incubated for 4 h in 1.0 micrograms/mL of monensin; shorter incubation times or lower concentrations of monensin having less effect.

  13. Influence of drought stress on cellular ultrastructure and antioxidant system in tea cultivars with different drought sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Das, Akan; Mukhopadhyay, Mainaak; Sarkar, Bipasa; Saha, Dipanwita; Mondal, Tapan K

    2015-07-01

    Drought is the major yield-limiting abiotic factor of tea cultivation. In the present study, influence of drought stress on cellular ultrastructure and antioxidants was studied drought-tolerant (TV-23) and -sensitive (S.3/A3) tea cultivars by imposing drought stress for 21 days. Drought stress led to considerable structural alterations in mitochondria, chloroplast and vacuole. Lesser membrane integrity and higher structural damage was observed in S.3/A3. Chlorophyll a, chl-b and carotenoids content in leaves decreased in each cultivar; however, the decrement was more brisk in S.3/A3. Proline, total soluble sugar, ascorbic acid and abscisic acid were elevated in TV-23 whereas hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage increased rapidly in S.3/A3. Starch content decreased both in leaves and roots of each cultivar and was more pronounced in roots of TV-23. Under drought, enhanced activities of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were recorded in both roots and leaves of each cultivar, but the rate of enhancement was more in TV-23. This indicated that tolerant cultivar exhibited higher antioxidant capacity and a stronger protective mechanism such that their ultrastructural integrity was better maintained during exposure to drought stress. PMID:26364464

  14. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  15. Ultrastructural and cellular basis for the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics during the transition from hypertension to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J; Aistrup, Gary L; Gupta, Deepak K; O'Toole, Matthew J; Nahhas, Amanda F; Schuster, Daniel; Chirayil, Nimi; Bassi, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Beussink, Lauren; Misener, Sol; Kane, Bonnie; Wang, David; Randolph, Blake; Ito, Aiko; Wu, Megan; Akintilo, Lisa; Mongkolrattanothai, Thitipong; Reddy, Mahendra; Kumar, Manvinder; Arora, Rishi; Ng, Jason; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics represents a key step during the transition from hypertension to overt heart failure (HF), the underlying ultrastructural and cellular basis of abnormal myocardial mechanics remains unclear. We therefore investigated how changes in transverse (T)-tubule organization and the resulting altered intracellular Ca(2+) cycling in large cell populations underlie the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics in a model of chronic hypertension. Hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 72) were studied at different ages and stages of hypertensive heart disease and early HF and were compared with age-matched control (Wistar-Kyoto) rats (n = 34). Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed just before euthanization, after which T-tubule organization and Ca(2+) transients were studied using confocal microscopy. In SHRs, abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occurred early in response to hypertension, before the development of overt systolic dysfunction and HF. Reduced longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain as well as reduced tissue Doppler early diastolic tissue velocities occurred in concert with T-tubule disorganization and impaired Ca(2+) cycling, all of which preceded the development of cardiac fibrosis. The time to peak of intracellular Ca(2+) transients was slowed due to T-tubule disruption, providing a link between declining cell ultrastructure and abnormal myocardial mechanics. In conclusion, subclinical abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occur early in response to hypertension and coincide with the development of T-tubule disorganization and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) cycling. These changes occur before the development of significant cardiac fibrosis and precede the development of overt cardiac dysfunction and HF.

  16. Effects of Selected Egyptian Honeys on the Cellular Ultrastructure and the Gene Expression Profile of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wasfi, Reham; Elkhatib, Walid F; Khairalla, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (i) evaluate the antibacterial activities of three Egyptian honeys collected from different floral sources (namely, citrus, clover, and marjoram) against Escherichia coli; (ii) investigate the effects of these honeys on bacterial ultrastructure; and (iii) assess the anti-virulence potential of these honeys, by examining their impacts on the expression of eight selected genes (involved in biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and stress survival) in the test organism. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the honey samples against E. coli ATCC 8739 were assessed by the broth microdilution assay in the presence and absence of catalase enzyme. Impacts of the honeys on the cellular ultrastructure and the expression profiles of the selected genes of E. coli were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis, respectively. The susceptibility tests showed promising antibacterial activities of all the tested honeys against E. coli. This was supported by the TEM observations, which revealed "ghost" cells lacking DNA, in addition to cells with increased vacuoles, and/or with irregular shrunken cytoplasm. Among the tested honeys, marjoram exhibited the highest total antibacterial activity and the highest levels of peroxide-dependent activity. The qPCR analysis showed that all honey-treated cells share a similar overall pattern of gene expression, with a trend toward reduced expression of the virulence genes of interest. Our results indicate that some varieties of the Egyptian honey have the potential to be effective inhibitor and virulence modulator of E. coli via multiple molecular targets. PMID:26954570

  17. Effects of Selected Egyptian Honeys on the Cellular Ultrastructure and the Gene Expression Profile of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatib, Walid F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (i) evaluate the antibacterial activities of three Egyptian honeys collected from different floral sources (namely, citrus, clover, and marjoram) against Escherichia coli; (ii) investigate the effects of these honeys on bacterial ultrastructure; and (iii) assess the anti-virulence potential of these honeys, by examining their impacts on the expression of eight selected genes (involved in biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and stress survival) in the test organism. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the honey samples against E. coli ATCC 8739 were assessed by the broth microdilution assay in the presence and absence of catalase enzyme. Impacts of the honeys on the cellular ultrastructure and the expression profiles of the selected genes of E. coli were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis, respectively. The susceptibility tests showed promising antibacterial activities of all the tested honeys against E. coli. This was supported by the TEM observations, which revealed “ghost” cells lacking DNA, in addition to cells with increased vacuoles, and/or with irregular shrunken cytoplasm. Among the tested honeys, marjoram exhibited the highest total antibacterial activity and the highest levels of peroxide-dependent activity. The qPCR analysis showed that all honey-treated cells share a similar overall pattern of gene expression, with a trend toward reduced expression of the virulence genes of interest. Our results indicate that some varieties of the Egyptian honey have the potential to be effective inhibitor and virulence modulator of E. coli via multiple molecular targets. PMID:26954570

  18. Ultrastructure and molecular phylogeny of Calkinsia aureus: cellular identity of a novel clade of deep-sea euglenozoans with epibiotic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Euglenozoa is a large group of eukaryotic flagellates with diverse modes of nutrition. The group consists of three main subclades – euglenids, kinetoplastids and diplonemids – that have been confirmed with both molecular phylogenetic analyses and a combination of shared ultrastructural characteristics. Several poorly understood lineages of putative euglenozoans live in anoxic environments, such as Calkinsia aureus, and have yet to be characterized at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. Improved understanding of these lineages is expected to shed considerable light onto the ultrastructure of prokaryote-eukaryote symbioses and the associated cellular innovations found within the Euglenozoa and beyond. Results We collected Calkinsia aureus from core samples taken from the low-oxygen seafloor of the Santa Barbara Basin (580 – 592 m depth), California. These biflagellates were distinctively orange in color and covered with a dense array of elongated epibiotic bacteria. Serial TEM sections through individually prepared cells demonstrated that C. aureus shares derived ultrastructural features with other members of the Euglenozoa (e.g. the same paraxonemal rods, microtubular root system and extrusomes). However, C. aureus also possessed several novel ultrastructural systems, such as modified mitochondria (i.e. hydrogenosome-like), an "extrusomal pocket", a highly organized extracellular matrix beneath epibiotic bacteria and a complex flagellar transition zone. Molecular phylogenies inferred from SSU rDNA sequences demonstrated that C. aureus grouped strongly within the Euglenozoa and with several environmental sequences taken from low-oxygen sediments in various locations around the world. Conclusion Calkinsia aureus possesses all of the synapomorphies for the Euglenozoa, but lacks traits that are specific to any of the three previously recognized euglenozoan subgroups. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of C. aureus demonstrate that this lineage is

  19. Effect of X-irradiation and radiation modifiers on cellular ultrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.G.; Raaphorst, G.P.; Lobreau, A.U.; Copps, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes produced in cultured cells after irradiation by X-rays reflect the temporal development of the original lesions. Alterations in membrane structures, especially the plasma and nuclear membranes, are documented, supporting the suggestion that membrane and membrane-DNA attachment sites are relevant to radiation-induced cell killing. Alterations produced by the radiosensitizer diamide and by anisotonic salt treatments were also observed. Diamide, at 0.4 to 0.6 mmol/L, rapidly decreased the active uptake of K+ ions at the plasma membrane and produced clear, organelle-free regions of cytoplasm and distorted nuclei. Anisotonic NaCl treatment of mitotic cells swells chromosomes under both hypo- and hypertonic conditions, leaving the chromatin open to free-radical attack. In interphase, the cell is drastically shrunken during the first few minutes of hypertonic (1.5 mol/L NaCl) salt treatment, after which breaks and localized blebs appear at the plasma membrane, while the nucleus swells, leaving the chromatin in an open state. This process occurs more quickly at 37 degrees C than at room temperature (22 degrees C) and correlates with the relative radiosensitivity of cells treated at these temperatures.

  20. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus

  1. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Michael J.; Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K.

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  2. Functional ultrastructure of eggs and cellular organization of hexacanths of the cyclophyllidean cestode Thysanotaenia congolensis: a phylogenetic implication of obtained results.

    PubMed

    Świderski, Zdzisław; Miquel, Jordi; Conn, David Bruce

    2016-03-01

    The functional ultrastructure of eggs and cellular organization of hexacanths from gravid proglottids of Thysanotaenia congolensis, from black rats from Cape Verde, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Mature eggs with fully formed hexacanths are grouped within parenchymatous capsules of gravid proglottids. Oncospheral envelopes surrounding mature hexacanths are reduced to a very thin membranous embryophore as their protective function is taken over by the parenchymatous capsules originating from the medullary parenchyma of immature proglottids and composed of three layers. Six major cell types are present: a bi-nucleate medullary centre; a six-nucleate U-shaped penetration gland; a second type of penetration gland; two neurosecretory-type nerve cells; about 30 somatic cells; and about 12 germinative cells. Present results on the functional ultrastructure of eggs and cellular organization of hexacanths support the phylogenetic distinction between T. congolensis and cestodes of the subfamily Anoplocephalinae. PMID:26689933

  3. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and inhibition of cellular proliferation in vitro. I. Caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmi, G.E.; Vogt, T.F.; Tice, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    While many agents have been examined for their ability to induce SCE's, complete dose-response information has often been lacking. We have reexamined the ability of one such compound - caffeine - to induce SCEs and also to inhibit cellular proliferation in human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. An acute exposure to caffeine prior to the DNA synthetic period did not affect either SCE frequency or the rate of cellular proliferation. Chronic exposure to caffeine throughout the culture period lead to both a dose-dependent increase in SCEs (SCE/sub d/ or doubling dose = 2.4 mM; SCE/sub 10/ or the dose capable of inducing 10 SCE = 1.4 mM) and a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation (IC/sub 50/ or the 50% inhibition concentration = 2.6 mM). The relative proportion of first generation metaphase cells, an assessment of proliferative inhibiton, increased linearly with increasing caffeine concentrations. However, SCE frequency increased nonlinearly over the same range of caffeine concentrations. Examination of the ratio of nonsymmetrical to symmetrical SCEs in third generation metaphase cells indicated that caffeine induced SCEs in equal frequency in each of three successive generations. The dependency of SCE induction and cellular proliferative inhibition on caffeine's presence during the DNA synthetic period suggests that caffeine may act as an antimetabolite in normal human cells.

  4. In vivo imaging of cellular proliferation in colorectal cancer using positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Francis, D L; Freeman, A; Visvikis, D; Costa, D C; Luthra, S K; Novelli, M; Taylor, I; Ell, P J

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F labelled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) is an established imaging tool, although the recent development of a biologically stable thymidine analogue [18F] 3′-deoxy-3-fluorothymidine (18FLT) has allowed PET to image cellular proliferation by utilising the salvage pathway of DNA synthesis. In this study, we have compared uptake of 18FLT and 18FDG with MIB-1 immunohistochemistry to evaluate the role of PET in quantifying in vivo cellular proliferation in colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and methods: Patients with resectable, primary, or recurrent CRC were prospectively studied. Thirteen lesions from 10 patients (five males, five females), median age 68 years (range 54–87), were evaluated. Patients underwent 18FDG and 18FLT PET scanning. Tracer uptake within lesions was quantified using standardised uptake values (SUVs). Histopathological examination and MIB-1 immunohistochemistry were performed on all lesions, and proliferation quantified by calculating a labelling index (% of MIB-1 positively stained nuclei within 1500 tumour cells). Results: Histology confirmed adenocarcinoma in 12 of 13 lesions; the remaining lesion was reactive. All eight extrahepatic lesions were visualised using both 18FLT and 18FDG. Three of the five resected liver metastases were also avid for 18FLT and showed high proliferation, while the remaining two lesions which demonstrated no uptake of 18FLT had correspondingly very low proliferation. There was a statistically significant positive correlation (r =0.8, p<0.01) between SUVs of the tumours visualised with 18FLT and the corresponding MIB-1 labelling indices. No such correlation was demonstrated with 18FDG avid lesions (r =0.4). Conclusions: 18FLT PET correlates with cellular proliferation markers in both primary and metastatic CRC. This technique could provide a mechanism for in vivo grading of malignancy and early prediction of response to adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID

  5. Histological and ultrastructural observation reveals significant cellular differences between Agrobacterium transformed embryogenic and non-embryogenic calli of cotton.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hai-Hong; Liu, Chuan-Liang; Zhang, Chao-Jun; Li, Feng-Lian; Hong, Wei-Dong; Li, Fu-Guang

    2009-05-01

    Over the past few decades genetic engineering has been applied to improve cotton breeding. Agrobacterium medicated transformation is nowadays widely used as an efficient approach to introduce exogenous genes into cotton for genetically modified organisms. However, it still needs to be improved for better transformation efficiency and higher embryogenic callus induction ratios. To research further the difference of mechanisms for morphogenesis between embryogenic callus and non-embryogenic callus, we carried out a systematical study on the histological and cellular ultrastructure of Agrobacterium transformed calli. Results showed that the embryogenic callus developed nodule-like structures, which were formed by small, tightly packed, hemispherical cells. The surface of some embryogenic callus was covered with a fibrilar-like structure named extracellular matrix. The cells of embryogenic calli had similar morphological characteristics. Organelles of embryogenic callus cells were located near the nucleus, and chloroplasts degraded to proplastid-like structures with some starch grains. In contrast, the non-embryogenic calli were covered by oval or sphere cells or small clusters of cells. It was observed that cells had vacuolation of cytoplasm and plastids with a well organized endomembrane system. This study aims to understand the mechanisms of embryogenic callus morphogenesis and to improve the efficiency of cotton transformation in future.

  6. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. PMID:25986976

  7. A regional ultrastructural analysis of the cellular and synaptic architecture in the chinchilla cristae ampullares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysakowski, A.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The chinchilla crista ampullaris was studied in 10 samples, each containing 32 consecutive ultrathin sections of the entire neuroepithelium. Dissector methods were used to estimate the incidence of various synaptic features, and results were confirmed in completely reconstructed hair cells. There are large regional variations in cellular and synaptic architecture. Type I and type II hair cells are shorter, broader, and less densely packed in the central zone than in the intermediate and peripheral zones. Complex calyx endings are most common centrally. On average, there are 15-20 ribbon synapses and 25-30 calyceal invaginations in each type I hair cell. Synapses and invaginations are most numerous centrally. Central type II hair cells receive considerably fewer afferent boutons than do peripheral type II hair cells, but have similar numbers of ribbon synapses. The numbers are similar because central type II hair cells make more synapses with the outer faces of calyx endings and with individual afferent boutons. Most afferent boutons get one ribbon synapse. Boutons without ribbon synapses were only found peripherally, and boutons getting multiple synapses were most frequent centrally. Throughout the neuroepithelium, there is an average of three to four efferent boutons on each type II hair cell and calyx ending. Reciprocal synapses are rare. Most synaptic ribbons in type I hair cells are spherules; those in type II hair cells can be spherical or elongated and are particularly heterogeneous centrally. Consistent with the proposal that the crista is concentrically organized, the intermediate and peripheral zones are each similar in their cellular and synaptic architecture near the base and near the planum. An especially differentiated subzone may exist in the middle of the central zone.

  8. Acute lethal graft-versus-host disease stimulates cellular proliferation in the adult rat liver.

    PubMed

    Klein, R M; Clancy, J; Stuart, S

    1982-11-01

    The present investigation was designed to analyse the effects of acute lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in adult (DA x LEW)F1 rats on cellular proliferation within the liver. The influence of the host thymus on GVHD-induced proliferation was also assessed. From 1-28 days after initiation of GVHD [3H]thymidine ([3H]-TdR) was injected i.v. and rats were killed one hour later. Percentage labelled cells (LI) of periportal infiltrating cells (PIC), hepatocytes (H), and sinusoidal lining cells (SC) were counted. Mean values for control rats were 0.3 +/- 0.1% (H), 0.4 +/- 0.1% (SC) and 0.2 +/- 0.1% (PIC). GVHD rats demonstrated a significant increase in LI of PIC (days 1-21), SC (days 2-17) and H (days 2-17). Most labelled cells in PIC were large lymphocytes. Peak LI values were 7.0 +/- 1.0% PIC (day 17), 6.8 +/- 0.9% SC (day 17), and 5.2 +/- 0.9% H (day 7), with all cellular compartments returning to near normal LI values by day 28. Stimulation of cellular proliferation occurred in all three liver cell compartments in neonatally thymectomized (TXM) rats. The intensity of GVHD-induced cell proliferation was significantly decreased at day 7 in all compartments and PIC was dramatically decreased at day 21 in TXM-GVHD rats as compared to non-TXM-GVHD rats. It is hypothesized that the general stimulation of hepatocyte cell proliferation in GVHD is related to the secretion of lymphokines by primarily donor and secondarily host T cells in the periportal infiltrate. PMID:7172201

  9. NOTE: Effects of cellular repair and proliferation on targeted radionuclide therapy: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atthey, M.; Nahum, A. E.; Flower, M. A.; McCready, V. R.

    2000-04-01

    A previous targeted radionuclide therapy modelling study has been extended to include the radiobiological effects of cellular repair and proliferation. Dose distributions have been converted into biologically effective dose (BED) distributions using a previously published formulation. With suitable estimated parameters, corrected tumour control probability (TCP) values were derived. The dependence of BED on the physical half-life of the radionuclide was also modelled. Results indicate that the TCP is greater when a shorter physical half-life is employed.

  10. Transferrin synthesis by small cell lung cancer cells acts as an autocrine regulator of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Vostrejs, M; Moran, P L; Seligman, P A

    1988-01-01

    Since transferrin is required for cellular proliferation, we investigated transferrin synthesis by a small cell lung cancer line (NCI-H510) that survives in serum-free media without added transferrin. Immunoassays for human transferrin demonstrated that these cells contained immunoreactive human transferrin. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the protein is expressed on the surface of cells, presumably bound to transferrin receptor. Media conditioned by NCI-H510 cells support proliferation of human leukemic cells that would not survive in media lacking transferrin. [35S]Methionine incorporation documented transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells as well as three other small cell lines. Transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells increased more than 10-fold when cells entered active phases of the cell cycle, and this increase was seen before large increases in transferrin-receptor expression. Further experiments examining the effects of agents that affect iron metabolism show that the addition of transferrin-iron or hemin to the media is associated with a more rapid initial rate of proliferation and lower rates of transferrin synthesis than control cells. Gallium salts, which inhibit iron uptake, inhibited proliferation of these cells. If the cells recovered from this effect, transferrin synthesis remained greatly increased compared to control. We conclude that transferrin synthesis by these malignant cells is ultimately related to an iron requirement for cellular proliferation. It appears that this synthesized transferrin acts as part of an important autocrine mechanism permitting proliferation of these cells, and perhaps permitting tumor cell growth in vivo in areas not well vascularized. Images PMID:2839550

  11. Three-dimensional mass density mapping of cellular ultrastructure by ptychographic X-ray nanotomography.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ana; Malkova, Barbora; Holler, Mirko; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Lima, Enju; Panneels, Valerie; Pigino, Gaia; Bittermann, Anne Greet; Wettstein, Larissa; Tomizaki, Takashi; Bunk, Oliver; Schertler, Gebhard; Ishikawa, Takashi; Wepf, Roger; Menzel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate absolute quantitative mass density mapping in three dimensions of frozen-hydrated biological matter with an isotropic resolution of 180 nm. As model for a biological system we use Chlamydomonas cells in buffer solution confined in a microcapillary. We use ptychographic X-ray computed tomography to image the entire specimen, including the 18 μm-diameter capillary, thereby providing directly an absolute mass density measurement of biological matter with an uncertainty of about 6%. The resulting maps have sufficient contrast to distinguish cells from the surrounding ice and several organelles of different densities inside the cells. Organelles are identified by comparison with a stained, resin-embedded specimen, which can be compared with established transmission electron microscopy results. For some identified organelles, the knowledge of their elemental composition reduces the uncertainty of their mass density measurement down to 1% with values consistent with previous measurements of dry weight concentrations in thin cellular sections by scanning transmission electron microscopy. With prospects of improving the spatial resolution in the near future, we expect that the capability of non-destructive three-dimensional mapping of mass density in biological samples close to their native state becomes a valuable method for measuring the packing of organic matter on the nanoscale. PMID:26470812

  12. A loss of FUS/TLS function leads to impaired cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ward, C L; Boggio, K J; Johnson, B N; Boyd, J B; Douthwright, S; Shaffer, S A; Landers, J E; Glicksman, M A; Bosco, D A

    2014-01-01

    Fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS or FUS) is a multifunctional RNA/DNA-binding protein that is pathologically associated with cancer and neurodegeneration. To gain insight into the vital functions of FUS and how a loss of FUS function impacts cellular homeostasis, FUS expression was reduced in different cellular models through RNA interference. Our results show that a loss of FUS expression severely impairs cellular proliferation and leads to an increase in phosphorylated histone H3, a marker of mitotic arrest. A quantitative proteomics analysis performed on cells undergoing various degrees of FUS knockdown revealed protein expression changes for known RNA targets of FUS, consistent with a loss of FUS function with respect to RNA processing. Proteins that changed in expression as a function of FUS knockdown were associated with multiple processes, some of which influence cell proliferation including cell cycle regulation, cytoskeletal organization, oxidative stress and energy homeostasis. FUS knockdown also correlated with increased expression of the closely related protein EWS (Ewing's sarcoma). We demonstrate that the maladaptive phenotype resulting from FUS knockdown is reversible and can be rescued by re-expression of FUS or partially rescued by the small-molecule rolipram. These results provide insight into the pathways and processes that are regulated by FUS, as well as the cellular consequences for a loss of FUS function. PMID:25501833

  13. Effect of the dietary fibre content of lifelong diet on colonic cellular proliferation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C A; Wilson, R G; Hanlon, L; Eastwood, M A

    1992-08-01

    The effect of the fibre content of lifelong (18 months) diets on proximal and distal colonic cellular proliferation and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) content was investigated in 40 rats. Rats were fed a low fibre diet (17 g/kg non-starch polysaccharides NSP) or the stock diet (133 g/kg NSP). The higher fibre fed rats had increased caecal and colonic total contents (p < 0.001) and SCFAs than the low fibre fed rats (caecal SCFAs: higher fibre rats 96.4 (6.8) mumol/g wet weight v low fibre 22.7 (3.0): p < 0.001, colonic SCFAs: higher fibre 52.3 (3.1) mumol/g wet weight v low fibre 6.9 (2.2) mumol/g wet weight: p < 0.001). Cellular proliferation was increased in the proximal colon (bromodeoxyuridine labelling index, higher fibre 9.3 v low fibre 8.4 p < 0.05; flow cytometry, % cells in S phase higher fibre diet 7.9 v low fibre 6.9; p < 0.01) and there was a shift of proliferating cells to a higher region in each crypt. There was no significant difference in the percentage of cells in S phase in the distal colon of rats in both diet groups. The proliferative zone, however, was expanded in the distal colon of the higher fibre diet fed rats. This study indicates that long term higher fibre intake in rats is associated with a modest increase in cellular proliferation in the proximal colon but not the distal colon.

  14. Locust cellular defense against infections: sites of pathogen clearance and hemocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Duressa, Tewodros Firdissa; Vanlaer, Ria; Huybrechts, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The locust cellular defense is mediated by hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue. In Locusta migratoria, the hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue mutually assist each other in clearing invading pathogens from circulation. A β-1, 3-glucan infection induces nodule formation and apoptotic, TUNEL positive, cells in the hematopoietic tissue and massive loss of hemocytes in the circulation, calling for instant proliferation of hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue cells to assure continued host cellular defense. As the locust hematopoietic tissue persists at the adult stage, it was originally designated as being the major source for the replenishment process. Revisiting post infection hemocyte proliferation, using immunofluorescence based tests for DNA synthesis and mitosis, evidenced the lack of β-1, 3-glucan induced cell proliferation in the hematopoietic tissue. Instead these tests identified the circulating hemocytes as the major source for hemocyte replenishment in the circulation. The hematopoietic tissue, however, undergoes a continuous, slow and infection independent regeneration, thereby accumulating potential phagocytes despite infection, and might serve a prophylactic role in containing pathogens in this swarming insect. PMID:25281274

  15. Effect of the mannose-binding Artocarpus integer lectin on the cellular proliferation of murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, S B; Kanthimathi, M S; Hashim, O H

    1998-12-01

    The effect of the mannose-binding champedak (Artocarpus integer) lectin-M on the cellular proliferation of murine lymphocytes was investigated in this study. Our data demonstrated that the lectin was the main mitogenic component in the crude extract of the champedak seeds. It stimulated the proliferation of murine T cells at an optimal concentration of 2.5 microg/ml in a 3 day culture. Lectin-M appeared to be a T-cell mitogen as it does not induce significant DNA synthesis when cultured with spleen cells from the nude mouse. In the absence of T cells, the lectin was incapable of inducing resting B cells to differentiate into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  16. Ultrastructural features of the differentiating thyroid primordium in the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis L.) from the differentiation of the cellular cords to the formation of the follicular lumen.

    PubMed

    Rupik, Weronika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Swadźba, Elwira; Maślak, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The differentiation of the thyroid primordium of lacertilian species is poorly understood. The present study reports on the ultrastructural analysis of the developing thyroid primordium in the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis) during the early stages of differentiation. The early thyroid primordium of sand lizard embryos was composed of cellular cords that contained single cells with a giant lipid droplet, which were eliminated by specific autophagy (lipophagy). The follicular lumens at the periphery of the primordium differentiated even before the division of the cellular cords. When the single cells within the cords started to die through paraptosis, the adjacent cells started to polarise and junctional complexes began to form around them. After polarisation and clearing up after the formation of the lumens, the cellular cords divided into definitive follicles. The cellular cords in the central part of the primordium started to differentiate later than those at the periphery. The cellular cords divided into presumptive follicles first and only later differentiated into definitive follicles. During this process, a population of centrally located cells was removed through apoptosis to form the lumen. Although the follicular lumen in sand lizard embryos is differentiated by cavitation similar to that in the grass snake, there were very important differences during the early stages of the differentiation of the cellular cords and the formation of the thyroid follicles.

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of EGFR in oral leukoplakia: Association with clinicopathological features and cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniela C.; Gleber-Netto, Frederico O.; Sousa, Sílvia F.; Bernardes, Vanessa F.; Guimarães-Abreu, Mauro H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: to investigate the immunoexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a sample of oral leukoplakias (OL) and to determine the receptor’s association with dysplasia, tobacco consumption, lesion site, and proliferation rate. Although EGFR should be overexpressed in some oral leukoplakias, the factors that may interfere with this expression and the influence of this receptor on epithelial proliferation have yet to be investigated. Study Design: Samples of oral leukoplakias (48) and of normal oral epithelium (10) were immunohistologically examined for expression of EGFR. Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67, and p27 were also performed in leukoplakias. EGFR expression was associated with clinical and pathological features. Results: EGFR was positive in 62.5% of the leukoplakias and 50% of normal oral epithelium. The number of EGFR positive OL located in high-risk sites was significantly higher than EGFR positive OL located in low-risk sites. Most of the p27 negative leukoplakias were EGFR positive, and the p27 index in the parabasal layer was diminished in the presence of dysplasia. Positivity for EGFR was not associated with dysplasia, tobacco exposure, or Ki-67. Conclusion: EGFR is expressed in leukoplakia regardless of dysplasia, but EGFR positivity should be more frequent in lesions sited in areas of high cancer risk. The association between EGFR and p27 may represent an important mechanism in the control of cellular proliferation and malignant progression of oral epithelium and therefore warrants further investigation. Key words:Oral leukoplakia, EGFR, p27, Ki-67, epithelial dysplasia. PMID:22322523

  18. Graphene Enhances Cellular Proliferation through Activating the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liao, Chunyang; Cui, Lin; Li, Haishan; Qu, Guangbo; Yu, Wenlian; Song, Naining; Cui, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Wenping; Chen, Huiming; Zhou, Qunfang

    2016-07-27

    Graphene has promising applications in food packaging, water purification, and detective sensors for contamination monitoring. However, the biological effects of graphene are not fully understood. It is necessary to clarify the potential risks of graphene exposure to humans through diverse routes, such as foods. In the present study, graphene, as the model nanomaterial, was used to test its potential effects on the cell proliferation based on multiple representative cell lines, including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cells. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, particle size analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular responses to graphene exposure were evaluated using flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and alamarBlue assays. Rat cerebral astrocyte cultures, as the non-cancer cells, were used to assess the potential cytotoxicity of graphene as well. The results showed that graphene stimulation enhanced cell proliferation in all tested cell cultures and the highest elevation in cell growth was up to 60%. A western blot assay showed that the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was upregulated upon graphene treatment. The phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and the downstream proteins, ShC and extracellular regulating kinase (ERK), were remarkably induced, indicating that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway was triggered. The activation of PI3 kinase p85 and AKT showed that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was also involved in graphene-induced cell proliferation, causing the increase of cell ratios in the G2/M phase. No influences on cell apoptosis were observed in graphene-treated cells when compared to the negative controls, proving the low cytotoxicity of this emerging nanomaterial. The findings in this study revealed the potential cellular biological effect of graphene, which may give useful hints on its biosafety

  19. Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi

    2011-09-01

    Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause

  20. Modulation of 17β-Estradiol Signaling on Cellular Proliferation by Caveolin-2.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Gionfra, Fabio; Busonero, Claudia; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    The sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts pleiotropic effects by binding to the ligand-activated transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα). The E2:ERα complex regulates several physiological processes, including cell survival and proliferation, through transcriptional effects (i.e., estrogen responsive element [ERE]-based gene transcription) and non-transcriptional membrane-initiated effects (i.e., the activation of extra-nuclear signaling cascades), which derive from the activation of the pool of ERα that is localized to plasma membrane caveolae. Caveolae are ω-shaped membrane sub-domains that are composed of scaffold proteins named caveolins (i.e., caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3). Although caveolin-3 is exclusively expressed in muscles, caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 are co-expressed in all human tissues. From a functional point of view, caveolin-2 can operate both dependently on and independently of caveolin-1, which is the main coat component of caveolae. Interestingly, while a functional interplay between caveolin-1 and ERα has been reported in the control of E2-induced physiological effects, the role of caveolin-2 in E2:ERα signaling within the cell remains poorly understood. This study shows that siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion in breast ductal carcinoma cells (MCF-7) reduces E2-induced ERα phosphorylation at serine residue 118 (S118), controls intracellular receptor levels, precludes ERα-mediated extra-nuclear activation of signaling pathways, reduces ERα transcriptional activity, and prevents cellular proliferation. Meanwhile, the impact of caveolin-1 depletion on ERα signaling in MCF-7 cells is shown to be similar to that elicited by siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion. Altogether, these data demonstrate that caveolin-2 expression is necessary for the control of E2-dependent cellular proliferation. PMID:26480297

  1. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  2. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  3. Structural Development, Cellular Differentiation and Proliferation of the Respiratory Epithelium in the Bovine Fetal Lung.

    PubMed

    Drozdowska, J; Cousens, C; Finlayson, J; Collie, D; Dagleish, M P

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine lung samples of 11 different gestational ages were assigned to a classical developmental stage based on histological morphology. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the morphology of forming airways, proliferation rate of airway epithelium and the presence of epithelial cell types (i.e. ciliated cells, club cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and type II pneumocytes). Typical structural organization of pseudoglandular (84-98 days gestational age [DGA]), canalicular (154-168 DGA) and alveolar (224-266 DGA) stages was recognized. In addition, transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular (112-126 DGA) and canalicular-saccular (182 DGA) morphologies were present. The embryonic stage was not observed. A significantly (P <0.05) higher proliferation rate of pulmonary epithelium, on average 5.5% and 4.4% in bronchi and bronchioles, respectively, was present in the transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular phase (112-126 DGA) compared with all other phases, while from 8 weeks before term (224-266 DGA) proliferation had almost ceased. The first epithelial cells identified by specific marker proteins in the earliest samples available for study (84 DGA) were ciliated cells and NECs. Club cells were present initially at 112 DGA and type II pneumocytes at 224 DGA. At the latest time points (224-226 DGA) these latter cell types were still present at a much lower percentage compared with adult cattle. This study characterized bovine fetal lung development by histological morphology and cellular composition of the respiratory epithelium and suggests that the apparent structural anatomical maturity of the bovine lung at term is not matched by functional maturity of the respiratory epithelium.

  4. Adenovirus type 5 exerts genome-wide control over cellular programs governing proliferation, quiescence, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L; Myers, Chad L; Rickards, Brenden; Coller, Hilary A; Flint, S Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses, such as serotype 5 (Ad5), encode several proteins that can perturb cellular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as those that mediate mRNA production and translation. However, a global view of the effects of Ad5 infection on such programs in normal human cells is not available, despite widespread efforts to develop adenoviruses for therapeutic applications. Results We used two-color hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor changes in cellular RNA concentrations as a function of time after Ad5 infection of quiescent, normal human fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of some 2,000 genes, about 10% of those examined, increased or decreased by a factor of two or greater following Ad5 infection, but were not altered in mock-infected cells. Consensus k-means clustering established that the temporal patterns of these changes were unexpectedly complex. Gene Ontology terms associated with cell proliferation were significantly over-represented in several clusters. The results of comparative analyses demonstrate that Ad5 infection induces reversal of the quiescence program and recapitulation of the core serum response, and that only a small subset of the observed changes in cellular gene expression can be ascribed to well characterized functions of the viral E1A and E1B proteins. Conclusion These findings establish that the impact of adenovirus infection on host cell programs is far greater than appreciated hitherto. Furthermore, they provide a new framework for investigating the molecular functions of viral early proteins and information relevant to the design of conditionally replicating adenoviral vectors. PMID:17430596

  5. Selected cases from the Arkadi M. Rywlin international pathology slide series: granular cell nevus of congenital type: a melanocytic proliferation exhibiting distinct morphologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features.

    PubMed

    De Pellegrin, Alessandro; Luzar, Bostjan; Suster, Saul; Falconieri, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    A case of combined melanocytic nevus characterized by extensive granular cytoplasmic changes is described. Clinically, the lesion presented as an irregular, slightly asymmetric, and raised pigmented lesion of back with indistinct borders. Microscopically, a congenital pattern of distribution of melanocytes could be recognized growing along follicular and adnexal units. Melanocytes were arranged in sheets of epithelioid cells with abundant granular cytoplasm. A minor component featuring conventional dermal melanocytes was also present. Mitotic figures were not recognized. Immunohistochemistry was positive for Melan A and S100 protein in both conventional melanocytes and granular cells. In addition, the granular cells were also strongly positive for HMB45 and NKI-C3. The proliferative marker Ki67/MIB1 was nonreactive. Ultrastructural examination showed large cells with round to oval nuclei and numerous scattered cytoplasmic granules showing features consistent with lysosomes or autophagosomes. No premelanosomes, glycogen, lipid, or other distinctive organelles could be identified. Clinical follow-up at 2 years was uneventful. This unusual lesion may represent a peculiar dermal melanocytic proliferation in which the abundant granular cytoplasm is most likely due to degeneration of melanosomes induced by autophagocytic activity. The striking cytoplasmic granularity observed in this lesion may lead to confusion with other conditions, thus warranting adding granular cell nevus to the phenotypic spectrum of benign melanocytic proliferations.

  6. Surfactant tuning of hydrophilicity of porous degradable copolymer scaffolds promotes cellular proliferation and enhances bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Leknes, Knut N; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (poly(LLA-co-CL)) has been blended with Tween 80 to tune the material properties and optimize cell-material interactions. Accordingly, the aims of this study were fourfold: to evaluate the effect of low concentrations of Tween 80 on the surface microstructure of 3D poly(LLA-co-CL) porous scaffolds: to determine the effect of different concentrations of Tween 80 on proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro under dynamic cell culture at 7 and 21 days; to assess the influence of Tween 80 on the degradation rate of poly(LLA-co-CL) at 7 and 21 days; and in a subcutaneous rat model, to evaluate the effect on bone formation of porous scaffolds modified with 3% Tween 80 at 2 and 8 weeks. Blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly(LLA-co-CL) improves the surface wettability (p < 0.001). Poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 shows significantly increased cellular proliferation at days 7 and 21 (p < 0.001). Moreover, the presence of Tween 80 facilitates the degradation of poly(LLA-co-CL). Two weeks post-implantation, the poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds exhibit significant mRNA expression of Runx2 (p = 0.004). After 8 weeks, poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds show significantly increased de novo bone formation, demonstrated by μ-CT (p = 0.0133) and confirmed histologically. It can be concluded that blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly (LLA-co-CL) improves the hydrophilicity and osteogenic potential of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2049-2059, 2016.

  7. Proliferation and cellular kinetics of villous epithelial cells and M cells in the chicken caecum

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, TAKASHI; KITAGAWA, HIROSHI; IMAGAWA, TOMOHIRO; UEHARA, MASATO

    1998-01-01

    The proliferation sites and cellular kinetics of villous epithelial cells and M cells in the intestine of the adult chicken have never been clarified. In this study, we determined the proliferation sites in the chicken caecum using colchicine treatment and detection of proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The cellular kinetics of these cells were also studied using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) as a tracer. Enterocytes in their mitotic period were observed along the entire length of the intestinal crypt of the caecum, with a denser distribution in the middle portion of the crypt, except for the caecal tonsil. The centres of distributions were at 49% of the distance from the bottom of the crypt in the base and 41% in the apex of the caecum. In the caecal tonsil, the centres of distributions were at 64% in the long type of crypt from the bottom of the crypt and at 44% in the short type of crypt. On the other hand, the PCNA-positive enterocytes were distributed more densely at the bottom of the crypt, except for the caecal tonsil. The centres of distributions were at 36% in the base from the bottom of the crypt, 37% in the body, and 34% in the apex. In the caecal tonsil, they were at 54% in the long type of crypt and 44% in the short type. The BrdU-labelled enterocytes reached to the basement of the intestinal villi in all caecal portions at 1 d after the BrdU administration. The leading edge of the labelled enterocytes disappeared from the villous tips at 4 d in the base and the body and 3 d in the apex. In the caecal tonsil, the BrdU-labelled microvillous epithelial cells and the M cells appeared near the orifice of the crypt at 1 d, and BrdU-labelled M cells were not observed in the crypt. Thereafter, almost all of these cells disappeared at 5 d from the follicle associated epithelium (FAE). These results suggest that M cells are transformed from their precursors within 1 d, and the turnover time for M cells occurs within 4 d after the cell division of the

  8. Effects of fractionated radiation on the brain vasculature in a murine model: Blood-brain barrier permeability, astrocyte proliferation, and ultrastructural changes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Hong; Gaber, M. Waleed . E-mail: wgaber@utmem.edu; Boyd, Kelli; Wilson, Christy M.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy of CNS tumors damages the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and normal brain tissue. Our aims were to characterize the short- and long-term effects of fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) on cerebral microvasculature in mice and to investigate the mechanism of change in BBB permeability in mice. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a cranial window technique were used to measure BBB permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran and leukocyte endothelial interactions before and after cranial irradiation. Daily doses of 2 Gy were delivered 5 days/week (total, 40 Gy). We immunostained the molecules to detect the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and to demonstrate astrocyte activity in brain parenchyma. To relate the permeability changes to endothelial ultrastructural changes, we used electron microscopy. Results: Blood-brain barrier permeability did not increase significantly until 90 days after FRT, at which point it increased continuously until 180 days post-FRT. The number of adherent leukocytes did not increase during the study. The number of astrocytes in the cerebral cortex increased significantly; vesicular activity in endothelial cells increased beginning 90 days after irradiation, and most tight junctions stayed intact, although some were shorter and less dense at 120 and 180 days. Conclusions: The cellular and microvasculature response of the brain to FRT is mediated through astrogliosis and ultrastructural changes, accompanied by an increase in BBB permeability. The response to FRT is delayed as compared with single-dose irradiation treatment, and does not involve leukocyte adhesion. However, FRT induces an increase in the BBB permeability, as in the case of single-dose irradiation.

  9. The expression of AIB1 correlates with cellular proliferation in human prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Carretero, José; Blanco, Enrique J; Carretero, Manuel; Carretero-Hernández, Marta; García-Barrado, Ma José; Iglesias-Osma, Ma Carmen; Burks, Deborah Jane; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2013-05-01

    Estrogens as well as certain growth factors strongly influence the development and growth of prolactinomas. However, the molecular mechanisms by which extracellular factors trigger prolactinomas are not well known. Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), also known as steroid receptor co-activator 3 (SRC-3), belongs to the p160/SRC family of nuclear receptor co-activators and is a major co-activator of the estrogen receptor. Here, we report that the estrogen receptor coactivator AIB1 is overexpressed in human prolactinomas and correlates with the detection of aromatase and estrogen receptor α (ERα). Of the 87 pituitary tumors evaluated in women, 56%, corresponding to hyperoprolactinemic women, contained an enriched population of prolactin-positive cells and hence were further classified as prolactinomas. All prolactinomas stained positive for both ERα and AIB1. Moreover, AIB1 sub-cellular distribution was indicative of the cell-cycle status of tumors; the nuclear expression of AIB1 was correlated with proliferative markers whereas the cytoplasmic localization of AIB1 coincided with active caspase-3. Thus, our results demonstrate for the first time that AIB1 is expressed in prolactinomas and suggest its participation in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis of tumoral cells. Because aromatase expression is also enhanced in these prolactinomas and it is involved in the local production of estradiol, both mechanisms, ER-AIB1 and aromatase could be related.

  10. Dysfunction of nucleus accumbens-1 activates cellular senescence and inhibits tumor cell proliferation and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Ren, Xingcong; Hori, Tsukasa; Huber-Keener, Kathryn J; Zhang, Li; Yap, Kai Lee; Liu, David; Shantz, Lisa; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong; Wang, Hong-Gang; Shih, Ie-Ming; Yang, Jin-Ming

    2012-08-15

    Nucleus accumbens-1 (NAC1), a nuclear factor belonging to the BTB/POZ gene family, has emerging roles in cancer. We report here that NAC1 acts as a negative regulator of cellular senescence in transformed and nontransformed cells, and dysfunction of NAC1 induces senescence and inhibits its oncogenic potential. We show that NAC1 deficiency markedly activates senescence and inhibits proliferation in tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of γ-irradiation. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts from NAC1 knockout mice, following infection with a Ras virus, NAC1-/- cells undergo significantly more senescence and are either nontransformed or less transformed in vitro and less tumorigenic in vivo when compared with NAC1+/+ cells. Furthermore, we show that the NAC1-caused senescence blunting is mediated by ΔNp63, which exerts its effect on senescence through p21, and that NAC1 activates transcription of ΔNp63 under stressful conditions. Our results not only reveal a previously unrecognized function of NAC1, the molecular pathway involved and its impact on pathogenesis of tumor initiation and development, but also identify a novel senescence regulator that may be exploited as a potential target for cancer prevention and treatment.

  11. Hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids precedes cellular proliferation in asbestos-stimulated tracheobronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sesko, A.; Mossman, B. ); Cabot, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Metabolism of inositol phospholipids and phosphatidylcholine was investigated in tracheobronchial epithelial cells exposed to mitogenic concentrations of crocidolite asbestos. Alterations in levels of diacylglycerol, the endogenous activator of protein kinase C, and inositol polyphosphates, presumed mobilizers of intracellular calcium, were examined. Cultures labeled with ({sup 3}H)diacylglycerol. In contrast, crocidolite-exposed cells labeled with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid or ({sup 3}H)choline did not display elevated production of ({sup 3}H)diacylglycerol or release of ({sup 3}H)choline metabolites (i.e., evidence of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis). The soluble tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate catalyzed both of these changes. myo-({sup 3}H)Inositol-labeled cells exposed as briefly as 10 min to mitogenic concentrations of crocidolite demonstrated elevations in ({sup 3}H)inositol mono-, tris-, and terakisphosphates, phenomena indicating turnover of inositol phospholipids. The detection of diacylglycerol and inositol phosphates in crocidolite asbestos-exposed cells suggests that this fibrous tumor promoter activates phospholipase C as it stimulates cellular proliferation.

  12. III. Cellular ultrastructures in situ as key to understanding tumor energy metabolism: biological significance of the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, Halina; Oh, Phil; Schnitzer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the universality of metabolic pathways, malignant cells were found to have their metabolism reprogrammed to generate energy by glycolysis even under normal oxygen concentrations (the Warburg effect). Therefore, the pathway energetically 18 times less efficient than oxidative phosphorylation was implicated to match increased energy requirements of growing tumors. The paradox was explained by an abnormally high rate of glucose uptake, assuming unlimited availability of substrates for tumor growth in vivo. However, ultrastructural analysis of tumor vasculature morphogenesis showed that the growing tissue regions did not have continuous blood supply and intermittently depended on autophagy for survival. Erythrogenic autophagy, and resulting ATP generation by glycolysis, appeared critical to initiating vasculature formation where it was missing. This study focused on ultrastructural features that reflected metabolic switch from aerobic to anaerobic. Morphological differences between and within different types of cells were evident in tissue sections. In cells undergoing nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion into erythrosomes (erythrogenesis), gradual changes led to replacing mitochondria with peroxisomes, through an intermediate form connected to endoplasmic reticulum. Those findings related to the issue of peroxisome biogenesis and to the phenomenon of hemogenic endothelium. Mitochondria were compacted also during mitosis. In vivo, cells that lost and others that retained capability to use oxygen coexisted side-by-side; both types were important for vasculature morphogenesis and tissue growth. Once passable, the new vasculature segment could deliver external oxygen and nutrients. Nutritional and redox status of microenvironment had similar effect on metabolism of malignant and non-malignant cells demonstrating the necessity to maintain structure-energy equivalence in all living cells. The role of glycolysis in initiating vasculature formation, and in progression of

  13. Cellular proliferation in the canine pancreas after d,l-ethionine dosage as detected by double immunohistochemical labelling.

    PubMed

    Govendir, Merran; Canfield, Paul J; Church, David B

    2003-09-01

    d,l-Ethionine produces pancreatic exocrine necrosis and islet proliferation in hamsters and dogs. As a first step in examining whether induction of islet proliferation has therapeutic applications in animals with exhausted or destroyed insulin-producing beta-cells, we studied pancreatic cellular proliferation after intravenous administration of d,l-ethionine in normal dogs. Double immunohistochemical labelling of pancreatic tissue was used to identify proliferating cells in three groups of six clinically normal crossbred dogs administered d,l-ethionine (100 mg/kg) intravenously three times a week for two weeks. Six additional dogs served as untreated controls. Group I was euthanased and necropsied on day 15 (72 hours after the final dose of ethionine). Groups II and III were euthanased on days 29 and 43 respectively. Utilising markers for proliferating nuclei, insulin and cytokeratin, proliferating cells were classified as acinar, endocrine (both intra or extra-islet), duct or 'other' (i.e. infiltrative or interstitial) and counted under the light microscope (40x magnification). Compared to controls, an increase in the number of proliferating cells was found in all categories except ducts. Acinar cells demonstrated statistically significant (p < 0.05) proliferation, greatest two weeks after ethionine cessation continuing over four weeks. The interstitial, infiltrative or 'other' group also showed proliferation, however this was a more immediate response, which substantially decreased two weeks after ethionine administration. Endocrine cells showed only minor and non-significant proliferative activity and were probably not responsible for a significant increase in apparent beta-cell mass. The number of proliferating duct cells was inconsequential and there appeared to be no specific relationship between any cell populations and duct cells.

  14. Quantitative and ultrastructural analysis of the chondriome in ovogenesis and embryogenesis of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. 2. Growth and proliferation of mitochondria in embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sukhomlinova MYu; Kireyev, I I; Fais, D; Giudice, G; Polyakov VYu

    2001-07-01

    The dynamics of structural changes of the chondriome in the early development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus was studied. Mature eggs and embryos at various stages of cleavage were used for quantitative and ultrastructural analysis based on computerized 3D reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections. The following structural transformations of the chondriome were shown to occur in the course of embryogenesis: (i) 15 min after fertilization, mitochondrial clusters disintegrate, and mitochondrial division is induced. At the stage of two blastomeres the population of mitochondria increases twofold; (ii) the mitochondria divide by means of the contraction of both outer and inner membranes. The forming furrow divides the "parental" mitochondrion into two equal "daughter" parts; (iii) at the four-cell stage the division ceases, and mitochondria start to grow, so that the mitochondrial length increases; (iv) cell differentiation further stimulates elongation of rod-shaped mitochondria, and the ratio of rod-shaped to spherical mitochondria changes; (v) in an unfertilised egg, the mitochondria are in a condensed form; after fertilisation all the mitochondria acquire a conventional form. Modern concepts of chondriome proliferation in eukaryotic cells are discussed. PMID:11699864

  15. BnSP-7 toxin, a basic phospholipase A2 from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom, interferes with proliferation, ultrastructure and infectivity of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Débora C O; Figueira, Márcia M N R; Lopes, Daiana S; De Souza, Dayane L Naves; Izidoro, Luiz Fernando M; Ferro, Eloísa A V; Souza, Maria A; Rodrigues, Renata S; Rodrigues, Veridiana M; Yoneyama, Kelly A G

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the effects of BnSP-7 toxin, a catalytically inactive phospholipase A2 from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom, on Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. BnSP-7 presented activity against promastigote parasite forms both in the MTT assay, with IC50 of 58.7 μg mL(-1) of toxin, and a growth curve, inhibiting parasite proliferation 60-70% at concentrations of 50-200 μg mL(-1) of toxin 96 h after treatment. Also, the toxin presented effects on amastigotes, reducing parasite viability by 50% at 28.1 μg mL(-1) and delaying the amastigote-promastigote differentiation process. Ultrastructural studies showed that BnSP-7 caused severe morphological changes in promastigotes such as mitochondrial swelling, nuclear alteration, vacuolization, acidocalcisomes, multiflagellar aspects and a blebbing effect in the plasma membrane. Finally, BnSP-7 interfered with the infective capacity of promastigotes in murine peritoneal macrophages, causing statistically significant infectivity-index reductions (P < 0.05) of 20-35%. These data suggest that the BnSP-7 toxin is an important tool for the discovery of new parasite targets that can be exploited to develop new drugs for treating leishmaniasis. PMID:23442579

  16. Cellular immunity in vitro. Clonal proliferation of antigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W H; Valentine, F T; Lawrence, H S

    1969-08-01

    When sensitive lymphocytes are cultured with the appropriate antigen, lymphoblasts appear after 24-48 hr of incubation and the number of these increases steadily from the 2nd to the 6th or 7th day. Our problem was to discover, at a cellular level, how this increase takes place; whether it is a massive response of many cells, stepwise recruitment of cells into the lymphoblast class, or simply repeated division of a few cells to form clones. In these experiments lymphocytes were incubated with antigen in culture tubes for 2-4 days and then a few cells, usually less than 200, were transferred to special microchambers for further culture. In these microchambers the cells could be viewed continually with a microscope and their fate recorded over the next 3-5 days by time-lapse cinemicrography. Examination of the film produced in this way showed that lymphoblasts divided and redivided to produce clones of 64 cells or more. It was possible to measure generation times from the film for 301 cells; the majority were between 8 and 13 hr but the range was 7.5-38.0 hr. There was no clear difference between generation times of human lymphocytes stimulated with tuberculin, streptokinase-streptodrnase, extract of the American pokeweed, or in the mixed leukocyte reaction. Similar times were also found for rat cells in the mixed leukocyte reaction. While these observations show that clonal proliferation does occur and could reasonably account for all the increase of lymphoblasts in lymphocyte cultures, the experiments, because of their design, do not exclude the possibility that other mechanisms such as recruitment may play a role as well, particularly during the first 48 hr after contact between sensitive cells and antigens.

  17. The DEK oncogene promotes cellular proliferation through paracrine Wnt signaling in Ron receptor positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Privette Vinnedge, Lisa M.; Benight, Nancy M.; Wagh, Purnima K.; Pease, Nicholas A.; Nashu, Madison A.; Serrano-Lopez, Juana; Adams, Allie K.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Waltz, Susan E.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Disease progression and recurrence are major barriers to surviving breast cancer. Understanding the etiology of recurrent or metastatic breast cancer and underlying mechanisms is critical for the development of new treatments and improved survival. Here, we report that two commonly over-expressed breast cancer oncogenes, Ron and DEK, cooperate to promote advanced disease through multi-pronged effects on β-catenin signaling. The Ron receptor is commonly activated in breast cancers, and Ron over-expression in human disease stimulates β-catenin nuclear translocation and is an independent predictor of metastatic dissemination. Dek is a chromatin-associated oncogene whose expression has been linked to cancer through multiple mechanisms, including β-catenin activity. We demonstrate here that Dek is a downstream target of Ron receptor activation in murine and human models. The absence of Dek in the MMTV-Ron mouse model led to a significant delay in tumor development, characterized by decreased cell proliferation, diminished metastasis, and fewer cells expressing cancer stem cell markers. Dek complementation of cell lines established from this model was sufficient to promote cellular growth and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Dek expression stimulated the production and secretion of Wnt ligands to sustain an autocrine/paracrine canonical β-catenin signaling loop. Finally, we show that Dek over-expression promotes tumorigenic phenotypes in immortalized human mammary epithelial MCF10A cells and, in the context of Ron receptor activation, correlates with disease recurrence and metastasis in patients. Overall, our studies demonstrate that DEK over-expression, due in part to Ron receptor activation, drives breast cancer progression through the induction of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24954505

  18. Early-life environmental intervention may increase the number of neurons, astrocytes, and cellular proliferation in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann-Duarte, Elisa C; Padilha-Hoffmann, Camila B; Martins, Daniel F; Schuh, Artur F S; Fernandes, Marilda C; Santin, Ricardo; Merlo, Suelen; Sanvitto, Gilberto L; Lucion, Aldo B

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal handling reduces the stress response in adulthood due to a feedback mechanism. The present study analyzed the effects of repeated neonatal environmental intervention (daily handling during the first 10 days after birth) on neuron-, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation of the hippocampal (CA1, CA2, and CA3) pyramidal cell layers in female rats. Pups were divided into two groups, nonhandled and handled, which were submitted to repeated handling sessions between postnatal days 1 and 10. Histological and immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine changes in neuron density, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation. We found an increase in neuron density in each pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3) in female rats (11 and 90 day old) that were handled during the neonatal period. Furthermore, we found an increase in astroglial cell density in both hemispheres of the brain in the handled group. Finally, we observed an increase in cellular proliferation in both hippocampi (CA1, CA2, and CA3) of the brain in female pups (11 days old) handled during the neonatal period. This study demonstrates that an early-life environmental intervention may induce morphological changes in a structure involved with several functions, including the stress response. The results of the current study suggest that neonatal handling may influence the animals' responses to environmental adversities later in life.

  19. Arsenic acid inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts, and increases cellular senescence through ROS mediated MST1-FOXO signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yuya; Madhyastha, Harishkumar; Madhyastha, Radha; Choijookhuu, Narantsog; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Pengjam, Yutthana; Nakajima, Yuichi; Maruyama, Masugi

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a major public health problem. It causes a number of toxic effects on skin. Arsenic has been reported to inhibit cell proliferation in in vitro conditions. However, reports about the molecular mechanisms are limited. Here, we investigated the mechanism involved in arsenic acid-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation using mouse skin fibroblast cell line. The present study found that 10 ppm arsenic acid inhibited cell proliferation, without any effect on cell death. Arsenic acid induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative stress to DNA. It also activated the mammalian Ste20-like protein kinase 1 (MST1); however the serine/threonine kinase Akt was downregulated. Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are activated through phosphorylation by MST1 under stress conditions. They are inhibited by phosphorylation by Akt through external and internal stimuli. Activation of FOXOs results in their nuclear localization, followed by an increase in transcriptional activity. Our results showed that arsenic induced the nuclear translocation of FOXO1 and FOXO3a, and altered the cell cycle, with cells accumulating at the G2/M phase. These effects caused cellular senescence. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic acid inhibited cell proliferation through cellular senescence process regulated by MST1-FOXO signaling pathway. PMID:26763397

  20. Cellular and molecular changes associated with competence acquisition during passion fruit somatic embryogenesis: ultrastructural characterization and analysis of SERK gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Diego Ismael; Pinto, Daniela Lopes Paim; Vieira, Lorena Melo; Tanaka, Francisco André Ossamu; Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier; Otoni, Wagner Campos

    2016-03-01

    The integration of cellular and molecular data is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in the acquisition of competence by plant somatic cells and the cytological changes that underlie this process. In the present study, we investigated the dynamics and fate of Passiflora edulis Sims cotyledon explants that were committed to somatic embryogenesis by characterizing the associated ultrastructural events and analysing the expression of a putative P. edulis ortholog of the Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor-like Kinase (SERK) gene. Embryogenic calli were obtained from zygotic embryo explants cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 6-benzyladenine. Callus formation was initiated by the division of cells derived from the protodermal and subprotodermal cells on the abaxial side of the cotyledons. The isodiametric protodermal cells of the cotyledon explants adopted a columnar shape and became meristematic at the onset of PeSERK expression, which was not initially detected in explant cells. Therefore, we propose that these changes represent the first observable steps towards the acquisition of a competent state within this regeneration system. PeSERK expression was limited to the early stages of somatic embryogenesis; the expression of this gene was confined to proembryogenic zones and was absent in the embryos after the globular stage. Our data also demonstrated that the dynamics of the mobilization of reserve compounds correlated with the differentiation of the embryogenic callus. PMID:26008651

  1. Depolarization of Cellular Resting Membrane Potential Promotes Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jen-Yu; Williams, Corin; Levin, Michael; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) undergo a rapid transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth soon after birth, which is a major challenge to the development of engineered cardiac tissue for pediatric patients. Resting membrane potential (Vmem) has been shown to play an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation during development. We hypothesized that depolarization of neonatal CMs would stimulate or maintain CM proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we isolated postnatal day 3 neonatal rat CMs and subjected them to sustained depolarization via the addition of potassium gluconate or Ouabain to the culture medium. Cell density and CM percentage measurements demonstrated an increase in mitotic CMs along with a ~2 fold increase in CM numbers with depolarization. In addition, depolarization led to an increase in cells in G2 and S phase, indicating increased proliferation, as measured by flow cytometry. Surprisingly depolarization of Vmem with either treatment led to inhibition of proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. This effect is abrogated when the study was carried out on postnatal day 7 neonatal CMs, which are less proliferative, indicating that the likely mechanism of depolarization is the maintenance of the proliferating CM population. In summary, our findings suggest that depolarization maintains postnatal CM proliferation and may be a novel approach to encourage growth of engineered tissue and cardiac regeneration in pediatric patients. PMID:25295125

  2. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo-associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes. PMID:25609971

  3. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo-associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes.

  4. Cellular differentiation and proliferation in the ovine lung during gestation and early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Martineau, H M; Dagleish, M P; Cousens, C; Underwood, C; Forbes, V; Palmarini, M; Griffiths, D J

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation in specific anatomical regions of the ovine lung during prenatal and postnatal development. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify ciliated epithelial cells, Clara cells, neuroepithelial bodies and type II pneumocytes in the lungs of preterm (67, 127 and 140 days of gestation), full-term (147 days) and postnatal (9, 16 and 91 days old) lambs. Differentiation of ciliated epithelial cells was seen at 67 days of gestation and at term for Clara cells. Neuroepithelial bodies were first detected at 127 days of gestation. From 16 to 91 days of age there was a significant (P <0.05) increase in beta-tubulin (present in ciliated epithelial cells) and Clara cell protein (present in Clara cells) in multiple regions of the lung. Detection of Ki67, a marker of proliferation, in preterm lambs showed a reduction in proliferation index in multiple anatomical regions of the lung between 70 days of gestation and term. Cell proliferation increased following parturition, and then decreased between 16 and 91 days of age, with the largest reduction occurring in the alveolar compartment. Knowledge of which cells are present at specific times of lung development provides valuable information on the anatomy of the ovine lung, improving its use as a model for ovine and human neonatal disease. In addition, the antibodies used here will be valuable for future studies requiring the identification and quantification of respiratory epithelial cell phenotypes in the sheep lung.

  5. The ultrastructural aspects of neoplastic myoepithelial cell in pleomorphic adenomas of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Margaritescu, C; Raica, M; Florescu, Maria; Simionescu, Cristiana; Surpateanu, M; Jaubert, F; Bogdan, F

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study has been to establish the major ultrastructural aspects of the myoepithelial cell and the myoepithelial-like cells proliferated in the pleomorphic adenomas of salivary glands. Thus, twelve benign pleomorphic adenomas of salivary glands have been studied by electron-microscopy transmission techniques. Our analysis has proved the proliferation of two major cellular populations, one of ductal type and one of myoepithelial type, which tried to reproduce the tubulo-acinar cytoarchitecture from the normal salivary glands. We have also noticed the key role of the so-called 'modified' myoepithelial cells from the periphery of the proliferating epithelial units in the genesis of the myxoid and chondromyxoid tumoral stromal areas. All these ultrastructural aspects have explained the great histological diversity of these salivary gland neoplasms as well as the key role of the myoepithelial cell in its histogenesis.

  6. The effect of ruby laser light on cellular proliferation of epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Liew, S H; Grobbelaar, A O; Gault, D T; Green, C J; Linge, C

    1999-11-01

    In ruby laser-assisted hair removal, microscopic damage is often seen in the basal epidermal cells, where melanosomes are concentrated. It is not known whether this treatment leads to cellular hyperproliferation. It was the aim of this study to investigate this. Ten white patients were treated with the Chromos 694-nm Depilation Ruby Laser, and biopsies taken before and after treatments to assess the presence of cell hyperproliferation, which normally accompanies epidermal damage, with immunohistochemical staining of keratin 16 and Ki67. No evidence of cell hyperproliferation was seen in all specimens examined after ruby laser irradiation. The authors conclude that despite the possible microscopic damages seen in the basal epidermis after laser hair removal, there is no evidence of cellular hyperproliferation. This is in contrast to ultraviolet-irradiated cell damage, in which increased basal cell turnover is seen.

  7. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  8. Human DMTF1β antagonizes DMTF1α regulation of the p14ARF Tumor Suppressor and Promotes Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tschan, Mario P.; Federzoni, Elena A.; Haimovici, Aladin; Britschgi, Christian; Moser, Bettina A.; Jin, Jing; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.; Sheeter, Dennis A.; Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Sun, Peiqing; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    The human DMTF1 (DMP1) transcription factor, a DNA binding protein that interacts with cyclin D, is a positive regulator of the p14ARF (ARF) tumor suppressor. Our earlier studies have shown that three differentially spliced human DMP1 mRNAs, α, β and γ, arise from the human gene. We now show that DMP1α, β and γ isoforms differentially regulate ARF expression and promote distinct cellular functions. In contrast to DMP1α, DMP1β and γ did not activate the ARF promoter, whereas only β resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of DMP1α-induced transactivation of the ARF promoter. Ectopic expression of DMP1β reduced endogenous ARF mRNA levels in human fibroblasts. The DMP1β- and γ-isoforms share domains necessary for the inhibitory function of the β-isoform. That DMP1β may interact with DMP1α to antagonize its function was shown in DNA binding assays and in cells by the close proximity of DMP1α/β in the nucleus. Cells stably expressing DMP1β, as well as shRNA targeting all DMP1 isoforms, disrupted cellular growth arrest induced by serum deprivation or in PMA-derived macrophages in the presence or absence of cellular p53. DMP1 mRNA levels in acute myeloid leukemia samples, as compared to granulocytes, were reduced. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia patient samples with all-trans retinoic acid promoted differentiation to granulocytes and restored DMP1 transcripts to normal granulocyte levels. Our findings imply that DMP1α- and β-ratios are tightly regulated in hematopoietic cells and DMP1β antagonizes DMP1α transcriptional regulation of ARF resulting in the alteration of cellular control with a gain in proliferation. PMID:26187004

  9. SGK1 inhibits cellular apoptosis and promotes proliferation via the MEK/ERK/p53 pathway in colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jian-An; Xu, Gui-Fang; Yan, Li-Jun; Zeng, Wei-Wen; Ji, Qian-Qian; Wu, Jin-Dao; Tang, Qi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of serum-and-glucocorticoid-inducible-kinase-1 (SGK1) in colitis and its potential pathological mechanisms. METHODS: SGK1 expression in mucosal biopsies from patients with active Crohn’s disease (CD) and normal controls was detected by immunohistochemistry. We established an acute colitis model in mice induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonicacid, and demonstrated the presence of colitis using the disease activity index, the histologic activity index and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The cellular events and potential mechanisms were implemented with small interference RNA and an inhibitor of signaling molecule (i.e., U0126) in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The interaction between SGK1 and the signaling molecule was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: SGK1 expression was significantly increased in the inflamed epithelia of patients with active CD and TNBS-induced colitis model (0.58 ± 0.055 vs 0.85 ± 0.06, P < 0.01). At the cellular level, silencing of SGK1 by small interference RNA (siSGK1) significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) and the downstream molecule extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, which induced the upregulation of p53 and Bcl-2-associated X protein, mediating the subsequent cellular apoptosis and proliferation in IECs. Cells treated with MEK1 inhibitor (i.e., U0126) before siSGK1 transfection showed a reversal of the siSGK1-induced cellular apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Our data suggested that SGK1 may protect IECs in colitis from tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis partly by triggering MEK/ERK activation. PMID:26034353

  10. MicroRNA-124 inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion by targeting Ets-1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Zang, Wenqiao; Liu, Pei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Deng, Meng; Sun, Wencong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guoqiang; Zhai, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that, by targeting certain messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for translational repression or cleavage, can regulate the expression of these genes. In addition, miRNAs may also function as oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, as the abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with various human tumors. However, the effects of the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer remain unclear. The present study was conducted to study the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer, paying particular attention to miR-124's relation to the proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis in breast cancer cell MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to identify miR-124 that was down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. We also showed E26 transformation specific-1 (Ets-1) and miR-124 expression levels in breast cancer tissues that were associated with lymph node metastases. With transfected synthetic miR-124 agomir into MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony forming potential was observed after treatment with miR-124. Apoptosis and migration rates were found to be significantly higher in two breast-derived cell lines transfected with a miR-124 agomir (P < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay and Western blot were used to verify Ets-1 as a potential major target gene of miR-124, and the result showed that miR-124 can bind to putative binding sites within the Ets-1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR) to reduce its expression. Based on these findings, we propose that miR-124 and Ets-1 may serve as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer.

  11. New melanogenesis and photobiological processes in activation and proliferation of precursor melanocytes after UV-exposure: ultrastructural differentiation of precursor melanocytes from Langerhans cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbow, K.; Uesugi, T.

    1982-02-01

    Photobiological processes involving new melanogenesis after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light were experimentally studied in C57 black adult mice by histochemistry, cytochemistry, and autoradiography. The trunk and the plantar region of the foot, where no functioning melanocytes were present before exposure, were exposed to UV-A for 14 consecutive days. Both regions revealed a basically similar pattern for new melanogenesis which involved an activation of precursor melanocytes. Essentially all of ''indeterminate'' cells appeared to be precursor melanocytes, the fine structure of which could be differentiated even from poorly developed Langerhans cells. New melanogenesis was manifested by 4 stages of cellular and subcellular reactions of these cells as indicated by histochemistry of dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) and autoradiography of thymidine incorporation: (a) an initial lag in the activation of precursor melanocytes with development of Golgi cisternae and rough endoplasmic reticulum followed by formation of unmelanized melanosomes (day 0 to 2); (b) synthesis of active tyrosinase accumulated in Golgi cisternae and vesicles with subsequent formation of melanized melanosomes in these cells (day 3 to 5); (c) mitotic proliferation of many of these activated cells, followed by an exponential increase of new melanocytes (day 6 to 7); and (d) melanosome transfer with differentiation of 10 nm filaments and arborization of dendrites, but without any significant change in the melanocyte population (day 8 to 14). The melanosome transfer was, however, not obvious until after 7 days of exposure. The size of newly synthesized melanosomes was similar to that of tail skin where native melanocytes were present before exposure.

  12. p53 immunoexpression in stepwise progression of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and correlation with angiogenesis and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Florence, Michelle Etienne Baptistella; Massuda, Juliana Yumi; Soares, Tânia Cristina Benetti; Stelini, Rafael Fantelli; Poppe, Lidia Marilia; Bröcker, Eva-Bettina; Metze, Konradin; Cintra, Maria Letícia; de Souza, Elemir Macedo

    2015-10-01

    Multistep carcinogenesis involves loss of function of tumor suppressor proteins such as p53 and induction of angiogenesis. Such mechanisms contribute to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression and may be interconnected. We aimed to explore p53 immunoexpression in spectral stages of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and correlate expression to both neovascularization and cellular proliferation. We estimated the percentages of immunostained cells for p53 and Ki67 (proliferation marker) in three groups: 23 solar keratoses, 28 superficially invasive squamous cell carcinomas and 28 invasive squamous cell carcinomas. The Chalkley method was used to quantify the microvascular area by neoangiogenesis (CD105) immunomarker in each group. There was no significant difference for rate of p53- and Ki67-positive cells between groups. Significant positive correlation was found between the CD105 microvascular area and the rate of p53 positive cells in superficially invasive squamous cell carcinoma as well as between the rate of p53- and Ki67-positive cells in invasive squamous cell carcinoma. p53 and Ki67 immunoexpression did not increase with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression. Neovascularization in the initial stage of invasion and proliferative activity in the frankly invasive stage were both associated with p53 immunoexpression. Loss of p53 tumor suppressor function through progressive steps may be directly involved in skin carcinogenesis.

  13. Uteroglobin induces the development and cellular proliferation of the mouse early embryo.

    PubMed

    Riffo, Marta; González, Keybell Díaz; Nieto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Two-cell mouse embryos cultured in vitro in the presence of either purified rabbit uteroglobin (UG) or recombinant human UG developed and proliferated faster than controls cultured in the absence of this protein. Both the percentage of embryos developing to the blastocyst stage and the number of cells per embryo were increased. Treatment with UG for 3 hr was enough to trigger this response. The effect of UG was blocked by genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine protein kinases, suggesting the involvement of these kinases in the stimulation of the embryo by UG. To further support this suggestion, embryos were metabolically labeled in vitro with [32P] and the phosphorylated proteins were immunoprecipitated with anti-phosphotyrosine. Analysis of the immunoprecipitates by SDS-PAGE showed that UG induced the phosphorylation of several proteins of M(r) between 200 and 37 kDa. This induction was observed after 1 hr of stimulation with UG and further increased after 3 hr of treatment. Since UG is synthesized and secreted in the uterus and the oviduct, these results suggest a physiological role of this protein in the correct development of the embryo in vivo. PMID:17094107

  14. Evaluation of residual cellularity and proliferation on preoperatively treated breast cancer: a comparison between image analysis and light microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Corletto, V; Verderio, P; Giardini, R; Cipriani, S; Di Palma, S; Rilke, F

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo- or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB 1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (kappa(w)) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (kappa(w)). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category-specific kappa statistics (kappa(cs)). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical.

  15. Evaluation of Residual Cellularity and Proliferation on Preoperatively Treated Breast Cancer: A Comparison between Image Analysis and Light Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Corletto, Valentina; Verderio, Paolo; Giardini, Roberto; Cipriani, Sonia; Di Palma, Silvana; Rilke, Franco

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo‐ or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (Kw) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (K~w). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category‐specific kappa statistics (Kcs). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical. PMID:9692682

  16. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, S.; Chiao, J.; Rossi, J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h/sub 3/ at the end of which time cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, (/sup 3/H)uridine, (/sup 14/C)lysine and (/sup 35/S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins.

  17. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  18. Ultrastructural changes to rat hippocampus in pentylenetetrazol- and kainic acid-induced status epilepticus: A study using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhvania, Mzia G; Ksovreli, Mariam; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Lordkipanidze, Tamar G

    2015-07-01

    A pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus model in rats was used in the study. The brains were studied one month after treatment. Ultrastructural observations using electron microscopy performed on the neurons, glial cells, and synapses, in the hippocampal CA1 region of epileptic brains, demonstrated the following major changes over normal control brain tissue. (i) There is ultrastructural alterations in some neurons, glial cells and synapses in the hippocampal CA1 region. (ii) The destruction of cellular organelles and peripheral, partial or even total chromatolysis in some pyramidal cells and in interneurons are observed. Several astrocytes are proliferated or activated. Presynaptic terminals with granular vesicles and degenerated presynaptic profiles are rarely observed. (iii) The alterations observed are found to be dependent on the frequency of seizure activities following the PTZ treatment. It was observed that if seizure episodes are frequent and severe, the ultrastructure of hippocampal area is significantly changed. Interestingly, the ultrastructure of CA1 area is found to be only moderately altered if seizure episodes following the status epilepticus are rare and more superficial; (iv) alterations in mitochondria and dendrites are among the most common ultrastructural changes seen, suggesting cell stress and changes to cellular metabolism. These morphological changes, observed in brain neurons in status epilepticus, are a reflection of epileptic pathophysiology. Further studies at the chemical and molecular level of neurotransmitter release, such as at the level of porosomes (secretory portals) at the presynaptic membrane, will further reveal molecular details of these changes.

  19. Combined carbonate carbon isotopic and cellular ultrastructural studies of individual benthic foraminifera: 2. Toward an understanding of apparent disequilibrium in hydrocarbon seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Joan M.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Rathburn, Anthony E.

    2010-10-01

    Numerous previous studies show disequilibrium between stable carbon isotope ratios of foraminiferal calcite and pore water dissolved inorganic carbon in hydrocarbon seeps, calling into question the utility of this widely used paleoceanographic tracer as a proxy. We use a recently developed method to compare stable carbon isotope ratios of foraminiferal carbonate with cell ultrastructural observations from individual benthic foraminifera from seep (under chemosynthetic bivalves) and nonseep habitats in Monterey Bay, California, to better understand control(s) of benthic foraminiferal carbon isotope ratios. Two attributes previously proposed to cause the isotopic offsets are diet and symbionts. Ultrastructural analysis shows that positive staining with Rose Bengal indicates presence of foraminiferal cytoplasm, bacterial biomass, or a combination of both and, thus, is not an unequivocal indicator of viability. We also show for the first time that some living seep foraminifera have endobionts. Results from our unique, yet limited, data set are consistent with suggestions that, in our sites, several foraminiferal species collected from seep clam beds may not survive there, diet and symbiont presence do not appear to be major contributors to disequilibrium, little calcification of seep-tolerant foraminiferal species occurs while seep conditions prevail, and microscale variability in habitats could influence δ13C of benthic foraminiferal carbonate. Results further suggest that our knowledge of benthic foraminiferal ecology and biomineralization, especially in extreme habitats such as seeps, must be bolstered before we fully understand the fidelity of paleoenvironmental records derived from benthic foraminiferal test δ13C data.

  20. NOX5-L can stimulate proliferation and apoptosis depending on its levels and cellular context, determining cancer cell susceptibility to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eun-Soo; Lim, Jae Cheong; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase, NOX5, is known to stimulate cell proliferation in some cancers by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show here that the long form of NOX5 (NOX5-L) also promotes cell death, and thus determines the balance of proliferation and death, in skin, breast and lung cancer cells. Moderate expression of NOX5-L induced cell proliferation accompanied by AKT and ERK phosphorylation, whereas an increase in NOX5-L above a certain threshold promoted cancer cell death accompanied by caspase-3 activation. Notably, cisplatin treatment increased NOX5-L levels through CREB activation and enhanced NOX5-L activity through augmentation of Ca2+ release and c-Abl expression, ultimately triggering ROS-mediated cancer cell death—a distinct pathway absent in normal cells. These results indicate that NOX5-L determines cellular responses in a concentration- and context-dependent manner. PMID:26513170

  1. Changes in phenolic compounds and cellular ultrastructure of arctic and antarctic strains of Zygnema (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) after exposure to experimentally enhanced UV to PAR ratio.

    PubMed

    Pichrtová, Martina; Remias, Daniel; Lewis, Louise A; Holzinger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has become an important stress factor in polar regions due to anthropogenically induced ozone depletion. Although extensive research has been conducted on adaptations of polar organisms to this stress factor, few studies have focused on semi-terrestrial algae so far, in spite of their apparent vulnerability. This study investigates the effect of UV on two semi-terrestrial arctic strains (B, G) and one Antarctic strain (E) of the green alga Zygnema, isolated from Arctic and Antarctic habitats. Isolates of Zygnema were exposed to experimentally enhanced UV A and B (predominant UV A) to photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) ratio. The pigment content, photosynthetic performance and ultrastructure were studied by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), chlorophyll a fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, phylogenetic relationships of the investigated strains were characterised using rbcL sequences, which determined that the Antarctic isolate (E) and one of the Arctic isolates (B) were closely related, while G is a distinct lineage. The production of protective phenolic compounds was confirmed in all of the tested strains by HPLC analysis for both controls and UV-exposed samples. Moreover, in strain E, the content of phenolics increased significantly (p = 0.001) after UV treatment. Simultaneously, the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry significantly decreased in UV-exposed strains E and G (p < 0.001), showing a clear stress response. The phenolics were most probably stored at the cell periphery in vacuoles and cytoplasmic bodies that appear as electron-dense particles when observed by TEM after high-pressure freeze fixation. While two strains reacted moderately on UV exposure in their ultrastructure, in strain G, damage was found in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Plastidal pigments and xanthophyll cycle pigments were investigated by HPLC analysis; UV A- and UV B

  2. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  3. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 is a crucial target for histone deacetylase 1 as a regulator of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zupkovitz, Gordin; Grausenburger, Reinhard; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Senese, Silvia; Tischler, Julia; Jurkin, Jennifer; Rembold, Martina; Meunier, Dominique; Egger, Gerda; Lagger, Sabine; Chiocca, Susanna; Propst, Fritz; Weitzer, Georg; Seiser, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are chromatin-modifying enzymes that are involved in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation and development. HDAC inhibitors induce cell cycle arrest, differentiation, or apoptosis in tumor cells and are therefore promising antitumor agents. Numerous genes were found to be deregulated upon HDAC inhibitor treatment; however, the relevant target enzymes are still unidentified. HDAC1 is required for mouse development and unrestricted proliferation of embryonic stem cells. We show here that HDAC1 reversibly regulates cellular proliferation and represses the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in embryonic stem cells. Disruption of the p21 gene rescues the proliferation phenotype of HDAC1(-/-) embryonic stem cells but not the embryonic lethality of HDAC1(-/-) mice. In the absence of HDAC1, mouse embryonic fibroblasts scarcely undergo spontaneous immortalization and display increased p21 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate a direct regulation of the p21 gene by HDAC1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Transformation with simian virus 40 large T antigen or ablation of p21 restores normal immortalization of primary HDAC1(-/-) fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that repression of the p21 gene is crucial for HDAC1-mediated control of proliferation and immortalization. HDAC1 might therefore be one of the relevant targets for HDAC inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

  4. Combined ultrastructural and biochemical study of cellular processing of vasoactive intestinal peptide and its receptors in human colonic carcinoma cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Hejblum, G; Gali, P; Boissard, C; Astesano, A; Marie, J C; Anteunis, A; Hui Bon Hoa, D; Rosselin, G

    1988-11-01

    Desensitization of human carcinoma colonic cells in culture (HT-29) to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been reported previously (C. Boissard, J. C. Marie, G. Hejblum, C. Gespach, and G. Rosselin, Cancer Res., 46: 4406-4413, 1986). In the present study, we have determined the ultrastructural localization of VIP and its receptor after exposure of HT-29 cells to VIP monoiodinated on tyrosyl residue 10 together with the molecular forms and the activity of the internalized VIP receptor. Quantitative electron microscope autoradiography showed that after binding at the cell surface, VIP is internalized in heterogeneous endosomes. Cross-linking experiments followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis were performed in different experimental conditions allowing us to selectively obtain cell surface-associated, internalized, or recycled receptors. No detectable alteration of the labeled VIP-receptor complex occurred during the internalization and recycling processes. Furthermore, a loss of the forskolin potentiation of the VIP-induced stimulation of adenylate cyclase was observed after VIP exposure. This feature was time and temperature dependent as was the VIP-induced loss of cell surface receptors, indicating that the internalized VIP receptor is dissociated from the adenylate cyclase. PMID:2844402

  5. The human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 controls cellular proliferation through regulation of p27{sup Kip1} protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, Nicole; Ruetz, Stephan; Natt, Francois; Hall, Jonathan; Weiler, Jan; Mestan, Juergen; Ducarre, Monique; Grossenbacher, Rita; Hauser, Patrick; Kempf, Dominique; Hofmann, Francesco . E-mail: francesco.hofmann@pharma.novartis.com

    2005-02-15

    Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} was shown to be required for the activation of key cyclin-dependent kinases, thereby triggering the onset of DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Although the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase has been reported to mediate p27{sup Kip1} degradation, the nature of the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme involved in this process has not yet been determined at the cellular level. Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides targeting the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 downregulate its expression, inhibit the degradation of p27{sup Kip1}, and prevent cellular proliferation. Elevation of p27{sup Kip1} protein level is found to be the sole requirement for the inhibition of cellular proliferation induced upon downregulation of Cdc34. Indeed, reducing the expression of p27{sup Kip1} with a specific antisense oligonucleotide is sufficient to reverse the anti-proliferative phenotype elicited by the Cdc34 antisense. Furthermore, downregulation of Cdc34 is found to specifically increase the abundance of the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase substrate p27{sup Kip1}, but has no concomitant effect on the level of IkB{alpha} and {beta}-catenin, which are known substrates of a closely related SCF ligase.

  6. Control of cellular proliferation by modulation of oxidative phosphorylation in human and rodent fast-growing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Enriquez, Sara . E-mail: rodsar@mail.cardiologia.org.mx; Vital-Gonzalez, Paola A.; Flores-Rodriguez, Fanny L.; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between cell proliferation and the rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in HeLa (human) and AS-30D (rodent) tumor cells was evaluated. In glutamine plus glucose medium, both tumor lines grew optimally. Mitochondria were the predominant source of ATP in both cell types (66-75%), despite an active glycolysis. In glucose-free medium with glutamine, proliferation of both lines diminished by 30% but oxidative phosphorylation and the cytosolic ATP level increased by 50%. In glutamine-free medium with glucose, proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP concentration diminished drastically, although the cells were viable. Oligomycin, in medium with glutamine plus glucose, abolished growth of both tumor lines, indicating an essential role of mitochondrial ATP for tumor progression. The presumed mitochondrial inhibitors rhodamines 123 and 6G, and casiopeina II-gly, inhibited tumor cell proliferation and oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. In contrast, gossypol, iodoacetate and arsenite strongly blocked glycolysis; however, they did not affect tumor proliferation or mitochondrial metabolism. Growth of both tumor lines was highly sensitive to rhodamines and casiopeina II-gly, with IC{sub 5} values for HeLa cells lower than 0.5 {mu}M, whereas viability and proliferation of human lymphocytes were not affected by these drugs (IC{sub 5} > 30 {mu}M). Moreover, rhodamine 6G and casiopeina II-gly, at micromolar doses, prolonged the survival of animals bearing i.p. implanted AS-30D hepatoma. It is concluded that fast-growing tumor cells have a predominantly oxidative type of metabolism, which might be a potential therapeutic target.

  7. PUMILIO-2 is involved in the positive regulation of cellular proliferation in human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigunov, Patrícia; Sotelo-Silveira, Jose; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Rebelatto, Carmen K; Moutinho, José A; Brofman, Paulo S; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel; Munroe, David; Correa, Alejandro; Dallagiovanna, Bruno

    2012-01-20

    Stem cells can either differentiate into more specialized cells or undergo self-renewal. Several lines of evidence from different organisms suggest that these processes depend on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The presence of the PUF [Pumilio/FBF (fem-3 binding factor)] domain defines a conserved family of RNA binding proteins involved in repressing gene expression. It has been suggested that a conserved function of PUF proteins is to repress differentiation and sustain the mitotic proliferation of stem cells. In humans, Pumilio-2 (PUM2) is expressed in embryonic stem cells and adult germ cells. Here we show that PUM2 is expressed in a subpopulation of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) cultures, with a granular pattern of staining in the cytoplasm. Protein levels of PUM2 showed no changes during the differentiation of ASCs into adipocytes. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of pum2 did not alter the rate of adipogenic differentiation compared with wild-type control cells. A ribonomic approach was used to identify PUM2-associated mRNAs. Microarray analysis showed that PUM2-bound mRNAs are part of gene networks involved in cell proliferation and gene expression control. We studied pum2 expression in cell cultures with low or very high levels of proliferation and found that changes in pum2 production were dependent on the proliferation status of the cell. Transient knockdown of pum2 expression by RNAi impaired proliferation of ASCs in vitro. Our results suggest that PUM2 does not repress differentiation of ASCs but rather is involved in the positive control of ASCs division and proliferation.

  8. PUMILIO-2 Is Involved in the Positive Regulation of Cellular Proliferation in Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shigunov, Patrícia; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Rebelatto, Carmen K.; Moutinho, José A.; Brofman, Paulo S.; Krieger, Marco A.; Goldenberg, Samuel; Munroe, David; Correa, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells can either differentiate into more specialized cells or undergo self-renewal. Several lines of evidence from different organisms suggest that these processes depend on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The presence of the PUF [Pumilio/FBF (fem-3 binding factor)] domain defines a conserved family of RNA binding proteins involved in repressing gene expression. It has been suggested that a conserved function of PUF proteins is to repress differentiation and sustain the mitotic proliferation of stem cells. In humans, Pumilio-2 (PUM2) is expressed in embryonic stem cells and adult germ cells. Here we show that PUM2 is expressed in a subpopulation of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) cultures, with a granular pattern of staining in the cytoplasm. Protein levels of PUM2 showed no changes during the differentiation of ASCs into adipocytes. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of pum2 did not alter the rate of adipogenic differentiation compared with wild-type control cells. A ribonomic approach was used to identify PUM2-associated mRNAs. Microarray analysis showed that PUM2-bound mRNAs are part of gene networks involved in cell proliferation and gene expression control. We studied pum2 expression in cell cultures with low or very high levels of proliferation and found that changes in pum2 production were dependent on the proliferation status of the cell. Transient knockdown of pum2 expression by RNAi impaired proliferation of ASCs in vitro. Our results suggest that PUM2 does not repress differentiation of ASCs but rather is involved in the positive control of ASCs division and proliferation. PMID:21649561

  9. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed.

  10. The expression of S100P increases and promotes cellular proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Luyan; Chen, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongye; Huang, Jiaming; Jin, Wenyan; Yao, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that S100P has a significant role in cancer, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer and normal endometrium tissues was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we reduced the expression of S100P in HEC-1A and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines by siRNA transfection. Based on the reduced S100P mRNA expression, we measured the effects of S100P on cellular proliferation by the cell-counting kit-8. Nuclear β-catenin protein level was detected by western blotting. Cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA expression regulated by β-catenin was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We found that the expression of S100P mRNA and protein increased in endometrial cancer tissues compared with the normal endometrium. Local S100P expression progressively increased from pathologic differenciation grade 1 to 3. After reducing the S100P expression, the cellular proliferation ability, nuclear β-catenin protein level, cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA levels reduced. It indicated that S100P could promote cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer significantly increased and is associated with pathologic differenciation grade. S100P may promote endometrial cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin.

  11. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed. PMID:26689739

  12. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in vitro: effect of cyclic AMP on cellular morphology and proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Davison, P M; Karasek, M A

    1981-02-01

    Macrovascular endothelial cells isolated from the human umbilical vein and microvessel endothelium from the newborn foreskin dermis differ in their requirements for optimal growth in vitro. In the presence of 5 X 10(-4) M dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP), human dermal microvessel endothelial cell proliferation rate increased to give a cell number of 203% of controls values by day 10 in culture. The cells retained their characteristic endothelial cell morphology, reached confluence, and could be serially passaged. Cells grown in the absence of Bt2cAMP did not proliferate readily and grew in a disorganized pattern. The effect of Bt2cAMP on microvascular endothelial cell proliferation rate and morphology could be duplicated by cholera toxin (CT) used together with isobutyl methylxanthine (IMX). These agents were found to elevate intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in microvascular endothelium over 40-fold. Human umbilical vein cells in culture failed to respond to either Bt2cAMP or CT together with IMX. The growth-promoting effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP) on human foreskin dermal microvascular endothelium in vitro is in marked contrast to the lack of response of human umbilical vein cells. These results provide further evidence of differences in the mechanisms that regulate macro and microvessel endothelial cell proliferation in vitro.

  13. Platelet Rich Concentrate Promotes Early Cellular Proliferation and Multiple Lineage Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shani, Samuel; Vasudevaraj Naveen, Sangeetha; Murali, Malliga Raman; Puvanan, Karunanithi; Abbas, Azlina Amir; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Platelet rich concentrate (PRC) is a natural adjuvant that aids in human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) proliferation in vitro; however, its role requires further exploration. This study was conducted to determine the optimal concentration of PRC required for achieving the maximal proliferation, and the need for activating the platelets to achieve this effect, and if PRC could independently induce early differentiation of hMSC. The gene expression of markers for osteocytes (ALP, RUNX2), chondrocytes (SOX9, COL2A1), and adipocytes (PPAR-γ) was determined at each time point in hMSC treated with 15% activated and nonactivated PRC since maximal proliferative effect was achieved at this concentration. The isolated PRC had approximately fourfold higher platelet count than whole blood. There was no significant difference in hMSC proliferation between the activated and nonactivated PRC. Only RUNX2 and SOX9 genes were upregulated throughout the 8 days. However, protein expression study showed formation of oil globules from day 4, significant increase in ALP at days 6 and 8 (P ≤ 0.05), and increased glycosaminoglycan levels at all time points (P < 0.05), suggesting the early differentiation of hMSC into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This study demonstrates that the use of PRC increased hMSC proliferation and induced early differentiation of hMSC into multiple mesenchymal lineages, without preactivation or addition of differentiation medium. PMID:25436230

  14. Tart cherry juice induces differential dose-dependent effects on apoptosis, but not cellular proliferation, in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Wooden, Alissa

    2012-11-01

    Consumption of polyphenol-rich fruits, for example, tart cherries, is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This is due, in large part, to the diverse myriad bioactive agents, that is, polyphenol anthocyanins, present in fruits. Anthocyanin-rich tart cherries purportedly modulate numerous cellular processes associated with oncogenesis such as apoptosis, cellular proliferation (CP), and cell cycle progression, although the effective concentrations eliciting these effects are unclear. We hypothesized that several dose-dependent effects over a large concentration range of 100% tart cherry juice (TCJ) would exist and affect these processes differentially with the potential for cellular protection and cellular death either by apoptosis or by necrosis. In this in vitro study, we tested the dose response of TCJ on CP and cell death in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. TCJ was added at 0.03-30% (v/v) to cells and incubated overnight with the medium alone or with increasing TCJ. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly reduced by 20% at ≥10% (v/v) TCJ and associated with necrosis, but was not different between the control and treatment groups at <10% TCJ. MTT reduction was also significantly reduced by 27% and 80% at 10% and 30% TCJ, respectively, and associated with necrosis. Apoptosis, but not necrosis, was increased ∼63% at 3% TCJ (∼307 nM monomeric anthocyanins), yet significantly decreased (P<.05) by 20% at 1% TCJ (920 nM) both of which were physiologically relevant concentrations of anthocyanins. The data support a biphasic effect on apoptosis and no effect on proliferation. PMID:23057779

  15. Effect of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk protein on antigen-specific and nonspecific cellular proliferation in mice.

    PubMed

    Brix, Susanne; Magyar, Orit H; Barkholt, Vibeke; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2005-05-01

    The impact of dietary components on the immune system is gaining increased attention in the effort to develop safe food products, some even with health-promoting potential, as well as to improve the basic understanding of the immunomodulatory potential of common food components. In such studies, which are mainly based on experiments in vitro, it is important to be able to differentiate nonspecific activation of immune cells induced by dietary components from ex vivo restimulation of antigen-specific cells that might be present in cell cultures owing to prior dietary exposure to the antigens in cell donors. Focusing on the immunostimulatory potential of cows' milk proteins and peptides, we studied the impact of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk on proliferation of murine immune cells upon ex vivo stimulation with bovine milk proteins. Nonspecific proliferation induced by beta-casein peptides was further assessed on cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Regarding the dietary effect, we found that prior oral intake of cows' milk proteins affected cell proliferation induced by culturing with cows' milk proteins in vitro, as spleen cells from mice fed a milk-containing diet showed a significantly greater proliferative response than did cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Studies of immune enhancing potentials of beta-casein peptides showed that some peptides stimulate proliferation of immune cells nonspecifically. In conclusion, these findings stress the importance of employing immune cells from mice unexposed to cows' milk for studies of the immunomodulating capacity of cows' milk proteins and peptides, in order to rule out the interference caused by antigen-specific immune responses. By using such cells, we here show that some beta-casein peptides possess the potential to induce proliferation in immune cells in a nonspecific manner. PMID:15909688

  16. Disentangling cellular proliferation and differentiation in the embryonic stem cell test, and its impact on the experimental protocol.

    PubMed

    van Dartel, Dorien A M; Zeijen, Nicole J L; de la Fonteyne, Liset J J; van Schooten, Frederik J; Piersma, Aldert H

    2009-09-01

    The mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) was designed to predict embryotoxicity based on the inhibition of the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) into beating cardiomyocytes in combination with cytotoxicity data in monolayer ESC cultures and 3T3 cells. In the present study, we have tested a diverse group of chemicals in the EST, applying different exposure durations, in an attempt to discriminate between effects on proliferation and differentiation within the EST protocol. Chemicals tested were monobutyl phthalate (MBP), 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). We showed that 5-FU and BrdU behaved principally different from MBP and 6-AN. 5-FU and BrdU specifically affected cell proliferation during the first three days of the EST protocol, as shown by EB size, protein concentration and cell cycle stage analysis. In addition, we studied the differentiation state of cells in the EST protocol with time to elucidate the transition of pluripotent ESC to more differentiated cell types. Analysis by flow cytometry of the pluripotency marker SSEA-1 in EST showed that although total SSEA-1 positive cells remained unchanged up to and including day 5, the signal intensity already decreased from day 3 onwards. Furthermore, RT-PCR data showed an upregulation of the mesodermal marker T at day 3, whereas the cardiac muscle marker Myh6 was upregulated from day 5 onwards. These findings confirm that proliferation and differentiation of ESC in the EST are highly intertwined processes. Based on these findings we suggest an amended EST protocol which could more clearly discriminate between proliferation and differentiation effects of chemicals within the same EST differentiation protocol. This proposal includes a cytotoxicity assessment in EB at day 3 of the EST after day 0-3 exposure, and cardiac muscle foci counts after exposure from day 3-10 in the EST.

  17. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Does Not Control Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Human Metastatic Renal Cellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Ilaria; Potenza, Duilio Michele; Bottino, Cinzia; Glasnov, Toma N.; Ferulli, Federica; Mosca, Alessandra; Guerra, Germano; Rosti, Vittorio; Luinetti, Ombretta; Porta, Camillo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is activated following depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ pool to regulate proliferation in immortalized cell lines established from either primary or metastatic lesions. The molecular nature of SOCE may involve both Stim1, which senses Ca2+ levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ reservoir, and a number of a Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membrane, including Orai1, Orai3, and members of the canonical transient receptor (TRPC1–7) family of ion channels. The present study was undertaken to assess whether SOCE is expressed and controls proliferation in primary cultures isolated from secondary lesions of heavily pretreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. SOCE was induced following pharmacological depletion of the ER Ca2+ store, but not by InsP3-dependent Ca2+ release. Metastatic RCC cells express Stim1-2, Orai1–3, and TRPC1–7 transcripts and proteins. In these cells, SOCE was insensitive to BTP-2, 10 µM Gd3+ and Pyr6, while it was inhibited by 100 µM Gd3+, 2-APB, and carboxyamidotriazole (CAI). Neither Gd3+ nor 2-APB or CAI impaired mRCC cell proliferation. Consistently, no detectable Ca2+ signal was elicited by growth factor stimulation. Therefore, a functional SOCE is expressed but does not control proliferation of mRCC cells isolated from patients resistant to multikinase inhibitors. PMID:25126575

  18. In Vivo Bystander Effect: Cranial X-Irradiation Leads to Elevated DNA Damage, Altered Cellular Proliferation and Apoptosis, and Increased p53 Levels in Shielded Spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Koturbash, Igor; Loree, Jonathan; Kutanzi, Kristy; Koganow, Clayton; Pogribny, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: It is well accepted that irradiated cells may 'forward' genome instability to nonirradiated neighboring cells, giving rise to the 'bystander effect' phenomenon. Although bystander effects were well studied by using cell cultures, data for somatic bystander effects in vivo are relatively scarce. Methods and Materials: We set out to analyze the existence and molecular nature of bystander effects in a radiation target-organ spleen by using a mouse model. The animal's head was exposed to X-rays while the remainder of the body was completely protected by a medical-grade shield. Using immunohistochemistry, we addressed levels of DNA damage, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and p53 protein in the spleen of control animals and completely exposed and head-exposed/body bystander animals. Results: We found that localized head radiation exposure led to the induction of bystander effects in the lead-shielded distant spleen tissue. Namely, cranial irradiation led to increased levels of DNA damage and p53 expression and also altered levels of cellular proliferation and apoptosis in bystander spleen tissue. The observed bystander changes were not caused by radiation scattering and were observed in two different mouse strains; C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Conclusion: Our study proves that bystander effects occur in the distant somatic organs on localized exposures. Additional studies are required to characterize the nature of an enigmatic bystander signal and analyze the long-term persistence of these effects and possible contribution of radiation-induced bystander effects to secondary radiation carcinogenesis.

  19. A Model of the Ultrastructure of a Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushell, Jean

    2001-01-01

    Presents a project for modeling cellular ultrastructure for 14-17 year old students that helps to develop concepts of measurement and scaling in addition to supporting student understanding of cell biology. (Author/YDS)

  20. CD1d-dependent expansion of NKT follicular helper cells in vivo and in vitro is a product of cellular proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rampuria, Pragya; Lang, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    NKT follicular helper cells (NKTfh cells) are a recently discovered functional subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells. Given the potential for NKTfh cells to promote specific antibody responses and germinal center reactions, there is much interest in determining the conditions under which NKTfh cells proliferate and/or differentiate in vivo and in vitro. We confirm that NKTfh cells expressing the canonical semi-invariant Vα14 TCR were CXCR5(+)/ICOS(+)/PD-1(+)/Bcl6(+) and increased in number following administration of the CD1d-binding glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) to C57Bl/6 mice. We show that the α-GC-stimulated increase in NKTfh cells was CD1d-dependent since the effect was diminished by reduced CD1d expression. In vivo and in vitro treatment with α-GC, singly or in combination with IL-2, showed that NKTfh cells increased in number to a greater extent than total NKT cells, but proliferation was near-identical in both populations. Acquisition of the NKTfh phenotype from an adoptively transferred PD-1-depleted cell population was also evident, showing that peripheral NKT cells differentiated into NKTfh cells. Therefore, the α-GC-stimulated, CD1d-dependent increase in peripheral NKTfh cells is a result of cellular proliferation and differentiation. These findings advance our understanding of the immune response following immunization with CD1d-binding glycolipids.

  1. Probiotics prevent the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic tumorigenesis through suppressed colonic mucosa cellular proliferation and increased stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Foo, Ning-Ping; Ou Yang, Hui; Chiu, Hsueh-Huei; Chan, Hing-Yuen; Liao, Chii-Cherng; Yu, Chung-Keung; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2011-12-28

    Probiotics modulate immunity and inhibit colon carcinogenesis in experimental models, but these effects largely depend on the bacterial strain, and the precise mechanisms are not well understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of Bifidobacterium longum and/or Lactobacillus gasseri on the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic precancerous lesions and tumors in mice while delineating the possible mechanisms involved. The results suggest that dietary consumption of probiotics (B. longum and L. gasseri) resulted in a significant inhibition of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in male ICR mice. Long-term (24 weeks) dietary consumption of probiotics resulted in a reduction of colon tumor multiplicity and the size of the tumors. Administration of B. longum and L. gasseri suppressed the rate of colonic mucosa cellular proliferation in a manner correlating with the inhibition of tumor induction by DMH. In addition, the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was significantly increased in the DMH-treated mice that were fed various doses of B. longum, but not with L. gasseri or combined probiotics (B. longum + L. gasseri). We also found that L. gasseri significantly increased the proliferation of RAW264.7 macrophage cells through an increase in S phase DNA synthesis, which was related to the up-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin A. Taken together, these results demonstrate the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy and the immune stimulating mechanisms of dietary probiotics against DMH-induced colonic tumorigenesis.

  2. Cellular proliferation in the skin of X-rayed newt limbs (with a note on x-ray-induced limb regression)

    SciTech Connect

    Wertz, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    Left hind limbs, including the pelvis, of adult newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) were locally irradiated with a dose of x-rays that inhibited regeneration (2,000 R). This x-ray dose and other doses (700-2,000 R) capable of inhibiting limb regeneration also cause limb regression prior to amputation. Before limb regression occurred, there was a latent period of 3 to 6 weeks. Limb regression was characterized by necrotic wasting and resorption of distal elements. The degree of loss was variable and dependent upon dosage. After this further degenerative changes were not noted. Proliferation of epidermal cells was examined 4 days after irradiation prior to limb regression or after x-ray-induced degeneration of the limbs had ended. Proliferative activity in x-rayed limbs was also compared at various stages of contralateral control limb regeneration. Limbs examined after x-ray-induced limb regression had ended showed levels of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA comparable to normal epidermis. In contrast, limbs examined 4 days after irradiation had lower levels of DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Amputation of limbs in both groups caused an increase in DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Histological examination showed that cellular proliferation was associated primarily with the epidermis. These results indicate that epidermal cell proliferation was not resistant to x-rays. However, levels of normal cell division were observed after amputation of after cessation of x-ray-induced limb regression.

  3. Downregulation of cellular prion protein inhibited the proliferation and invasion and induced apoptosis of Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xuerui; Yang, Runxia; Liu, Guilin; Zhu, Manling; Zhang, Tianliang; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytomembrane of a considerable number of eukaryotic cells. Although several studies have investigated the functions of PrPC in cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and tumorigenesis of mammals, the correlated functions of chicken PrPC (chPrPC) remain unknown. In this study, stable chPrPC-downregulated Marek's disease (MD) virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1-SiRNA-3) were established by introducing short interfering RNA (SiRNA) targeting chicken prion protein genes. We found that downregulation of chPrPC inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration, and induces G1 cell cycle phase arrest and apoptosis of MSB1-SiRNA-3 cells compared with Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1) and negative control cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence supporting the positive correlation between the expression level of chPrPC and the proliferation, migration, and invasion ability of MSB1 cells, but appears to protect MSB1 cells from apoptosis, which suggests it functions in the formation and development of MD tumors. This evidence may contribute to future research into the specific molecular mechanisms of chPrPC in the formation and development of MD tumors. PMID:26243599

  4. Probiotics prevent the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic tumorigenesis through suppressed colonic mucosa cellular proliferation and increased stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Foo, Ning-Ping; Ou Yang, Hui; Chiu, Hsueh-Huei; Chan, Hing-Yuen; Liao, Chii-Cherng; Yu, Chung-Keung; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2011-12-28

    Probiotics modulate immunity and inhibit colon carcinogenesis in experimental models, but these effects largely depend on the bacterial strain, and the precise mechanisms are not well understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of Bifidobacterium longum and/or Lactobacillus gasseri on the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic precancerous lesions and tumors in mice while delineating the possible mechanisms involved. The results suggest that dietary consumption of probiotics (B. longum and L. gasseri) resulted in a significant inhibition of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in male ICR mice. Long-term (24 weeks) dietary consumption of probiotics resulted in a reduction of colon tumor multiplicity and the size of the tumors. Administration of B. longum and L. gasseri suppressed the rate of colonic mucosa cellular proliferation in a manner correlating with the inhibition of tumor induction by DMH. In addition, the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was significantly increased in the DMH-treated mice that were fed various doses of B. longum, but not with L. gasseri or combined probiotics (B. longum + L. gasseri). We also found that L. gasseri significantly increased the proliferation of RAW264.7 macrophage cells through an increase in S phase DNA synthesis, which was related to the up-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin A. Taken together, these results demonstrate the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy and the immune stimulating mechanisms of dietary probiotics against DMH-induced colonic tumorigenesis. PMID:22049926

  5. Effects of 5-Fluorouracil in Nuclear and Cellular Morphology, Proliferation, Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, Cytoskeletal and Caveolar Distribution in Primary Cultures of Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras, Marcelo de Carvalho; Morrot, Alexandre; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:23646193

  6. Effects of 5-fluorouracil in nuclear and cellular morphology, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeletal and caveolar distribution in primary cultures of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Marcelo de Carvalho; Morrot, Alexandre; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer.

  7. Fatty Acid Synthase as a Factor Required for Exercise-Induced Cognitive Enhancement and Dentate Gyrus Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chorna, Nataliya E.; Santos-Soto, Iván J.; Carballeira, Nestor M.; Morales, Joan L.; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P.; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis. PMID:24223732

  8. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chorna, Nataliya E; Santos-Soto, Iván J; Carballeira, Nestor M; Morales, Joan L; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation in dexamethasone-resistant and hypersensitive rat hepatoma cell variants.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P W; Swanson, K T; Edwards, C P; Firestone, G L

    1988-01-01

    Exposure of the Fu5 rat hepatoma cell line to glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone and hydrocortisone, suppressed the growth rate and final density of cells grown in the presence of serum. This hormonal effect was proportional to receptor occupancy and affinity and, in addition, the glucocorticoid antagonist RU38486 prevented this response. Two classes of dexamethasone-resistant variants that failed to be growth inhibited were recovered from ethyl methylsulfonate-mutagenized populations by continuous culture in the presence of 1 microM dexamethasone. The first class, represented by the EDR3 subclone, was completely glucocorticoid unresponsive and failed to express receptor transcripts. The second class, represented by the EDR1, EDR5, and EDR7 subclones, possessed significant levels of glucocorticoid receptor but were only partially glucocorticoid responsive when stimulated with saturating levels of hormone. Introduction of functional glucocorticoid receptor genes into both classes of dexamethasone-resistant variants by a recombinant retrovirus expression vector restored glucocorticoid responsiveness and suppression of cell growth. A hypersensitive variant (BDS1), recovered by bromodeoxyuridine selection, was fully glucocorticoid responsive, and its inhibition of proliferation was more acutely regulated by dexamethasone. Taken together, our results established that the inhibition of proliferation in Fu5 rat hepatoma cells represents a new glucocorticoid response that requires the expression of a functional glucocorticoid receptor. Images PMID:3380086

  10. Sensitivity to methylmercury toxicity is enhanced in oxoguanine glycosylase 1 knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts and is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Tamblyn, Laura; McPherson, John Peter; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a persistent environmental contaminant with potent neurotoxic action for which the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be conclusively delineated. Our objectives herein were twofold: first, to corroborate our previous findings of an increased sensitivity of spontaneously-immortalized oxoguanine glycosylase 1-null (Ogg1{sup −/−}) murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to MeHg through generation of Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen-immortalized wild-type and Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs; and second, to determine whether MeHg toxicity is proliferation-dependent. As with the spontaneously-immortalized cells used previously, the SV40 large T antigen-immortalized cells exhibited similar tendencies to undergo MeHg-initiated cell cycle arrest, with increased sensitivity in the Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs as measured by clonogenic survival and DNA damage. Compared to exponentially growing cells, those seeded at a higher density exhibited compromised proliferation, which proved protective against MeHg-mediated cell cycle arrest and induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), measured by phosphorylation of the core histone H2A variant (H2AX) on serine 139 (γH2AX), and by its functional confirmation by micronucleus assessment. This enhanced sensitivity of Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs to MeHg toxicity using discrete SV40 immortalization corroborates our previous studies, and suggests a novel role for OGG1 in minimizing MeHg-initiated DNA lesions that trigger replication-associated DSBs. Furthermore, proliferative capacity may determine MeHg toxicity in vivo and in utero. Accordingly, variations in cellular proliferative capacity and interindividual variability in repair activity may modulate the risk of toxicological consequences following MeHg exposure. - Highlights: • SV40 large T antigen-immortalized Ogg1{sup −/−} cells are more sensitive to MeHg. • Sensitivity to MeHg is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity. • OGG1 maintains genomic

  11. Acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53−/− cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  12. Epithelial restitution and cellular proliferation after gastric mucosal damage caused by hypertonic NaCl in rats.

    PubMed

    Sørbye, H; Svanes, C; Stangeland, L; Kvinnsland, S; Svanes, K

    1988-01-01

    Hypertonic NaCl enhances gastric cancer in rats induced by N-nitroso compounds. This study was designed to examine the structural changes and alterations in mitotic activity occurring after mucosal exposure to hypertonic NaCl. Wistar rats were given one ml of 4.5 M NaCl by gastric tube and groups of 4-5 animals were sacrificed at different time intervals up to 120 h. An i.p. injection of thymidine was given 1 h before death. Samples of antral and corpus mucosa were prepared for microscopy and autoradiography. Hypertonic NaCl caused uniform destruction of surface mucous cells and pits in the corpus and antrum. Epithelial restitution with the formation of a thin epithelial layer occurred within one h of damage. The mucosa changed towards normal within 24-48 h. The distance between mucosal surface and the replicating cells decreased during the first 2 h. The proliferation zone remained in the middle of the glandular layer throughout the experiment. The proliferative activity increased during the first 24 h after mucosal damage. The number of labelled cells per unit area of mucosa was somewhat larger in the corpus than the antrum, but in the corpus the distance between proliferating cells and mucosal surface was double that of the antrum. Hypertonic NaCl causes a series of changes in the gastric mucosa. The increased mitotic activity can only partly explain the cocarcinogenic effect, since N-nitroso-induced adenocarcinomas occur predominantly in the antrum while the mitotic activity is maximal in the corpus.

  13. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Garcia, Cristiana B; Matos-Silva, Flavia A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2014-02-28

    SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET-hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  14. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  15. Immunohistochemical analysis of factors related to apoptosis and cellular proliferation in relation to inflammation in dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Gadiputi; Raju, M. Vijaya; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Manjunath, SM; Shetty, Sujan; Agarwal, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effect of inflammation on pathogenesis and biological behavior of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and dentigerous cyst (DC) is not completely understood. Hence, we aimed to analyze the effect of inflammation on biological behavior of OKC and DC using a proliferative and anti-apoptotic marker, i.e., proliferative cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Bcl-2, respectively. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was performed using anti-PCNA and Bcl-2 antibody in 10 cases each of classical OKC, inflamed OKC and classical DC and inflamed DC. Results: Inflamed OKC and DC showed a significant increase in PCNA expression and decrease in Bcl-2 expression when compared with non-inflamed cyst. Correlation between inflammation and proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity was found to be statistically non-significant. Conclusion: Inflammation is responsible for change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC and hence should be treated meticulously, whereas in DC it is responsible for changes in the epithelial lining. PMID:24678208

  16. Activin Modulates the Transcriptional Response of LβT2 Cells to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone and Alters Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Bailey, Janice S.; Coss, Djurdjica; Lin, Bo; Tsutsumi, Rie; Lawson, Mark A.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Both GnRH and activin are crucial for the correct function of pituitary gonadotrope cells. GnRH regulates LH and FSH synthesis and secretion and gonadotrope proliferation, whereas activin is essential for expression of FSH. Little is known, however, about the interplay of signaling downstream of these two hormones. In this study, we undertook expression profiling to determine how activin pre-treatment alters the transcriptional response of LβT2 gonadotrope cells to GnRH stimulation. Activin treatment alone altered the transcriptional profile of 303 genes including inducing that of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B1 gene that converts estrone to 17β-estradiol, altering the sensitivity of the cells to estrone. Furthermore, activin had a dramatic effect on the response of LβT2 cells to GnRH. Hierarchical clustering of 2453 GnRH-responsive genes identified groups of genes the response of which to GnRH was either enhanced or blunted after activin treatment. Mapping of these genes to gene ontology classifications or signaling pathways highlighted significant differences in the classes of altered genes. In the presence of activin, GnRH regulates genes in pathways controlling cell energetics, cytoskeletal rearrangements, organelle organization, and mitosis in the absence of activin, but genes controlling protein processing, cell differentiation, and secretion. Therefore, we demonstrated that activin enhanced GnRH induction of p38MAPK activity, caused GnRH-dependent phosphorylation of p53, and reduced the ability of GnRH to cause G1 arrest. Thus, although activin alone changes a modest number of transcripts, activin pretreatment dramatically alters the response to GnRH from an antiproliferative response to a more differentiated, synthetic response appropriate for a secretory cell. PMID:16772531

  17. A chimera embryo assay reveals a decrease in embryonic cellular proliferation induced by sperm from X-irradiated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Raabe, O.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1989-05-01

    Male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. Mice in the experimental groups received one of three doses of acute X irradiation (1.73, 0.29, and 0.05 Gy) and together with the control unirradiated mice were then mated weekly to unirradiated female mice for a 9-week experimental period. Embryos were recovered from the weekly matings at the four-cell stage and examined by the chimera assay for proliferative disadvantage. Aggregation chimeras were constructed of embryos from female mice mated to irradiated males (experimental embryos) and embryos from females mated to unexposed males (control embryos) and contained either one experimental embryo and one control embryo (heterologous chimera) or two control embryos (control chimera). The control embryo in heterologous chimeras and either embryo in control chimeras were prelabeled with the vital dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h and viewed under phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution from the FITC-labeled embryo. Experimental and control embryos that were cultured singly were also examined for embryo cell number at the end of the 40-h culture period. In control chimeras, the mean ratio of the unlabeled cells:total chimera cell number (henceforth referred to as ''mean ratio'') was 0.50 with little or no weekly variation over the 9-week experimental period. During Weeks 4-7, the mean ratios of heterologous chimeras differed significantly from the mean ratio of control chimeras with the greatest differences occurring during Week 7 (0.41 for chimeras of 0.05 Gy dose group, 0.40 for chimeras of the 0.29 Gy dose group, and 0.17 for chimeras of the 1.73 Gy dose group).

  18. The effect of secondary cholestasis on the CD68-positive and CD163-positive macrophage population, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Jiang, Li; Xie, Hai-Yang; Xu, Jian; Zhu, You-Fa; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of hypogonadism in male patients with cirrhosis is complex and not well explained. Systemic infection and inflammation can inhibit testicular functions of endocrine and spermatogenesis. The acute inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide can cause testicular acute inflammation. Both clinical and animal experimental data indicate that the developing process of cholestasis/cirrhosis can lead to endotoxemia. Little is known about the long-term effects of cholestasis on the intratesticular macrophage population, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. A rat model of secondary cholestasis caused by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) was used to evaluate the impact of cholestasis on them, and the influence of biliary decompression (choledochoduodenostomy). Endotoxemia occurred in animals at 20 days CBDL (20dCBDL) and 30 days CBDL (30dCBDL), but disappeared after 30 days biliary decompression in rats with CBDL. There was a considerable increase in the numbers of intratesticular CD68(+) and CD163(+) macrophages following CBDL. After biliary decompression, CD68(+) macrophage numbers decreased, but remained higher than that of controls; meanwhile, CD163(+) remained elevated only in rats with 30dCBDL. After CBDL, there was a progressive decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 protein and in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA(+)) cells, and a dramatic increase in the expression of Bax, active caspase-3 and apoptotic cells. These data suggest that secondary cholestasis expands the population of CD68(+) and CD163(+) macrophages in the testicular interstitium, decreases testicular proliferative activity, and promotes testicular apoptosis, which may be one of the mechanisms of biliary cirrhosis-related hypogonadism.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A promotes cellular proliferation by repression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1.

    PubMed

    Tursiella, Melissa L; Bowman, Emily R; Wanzeck, Keith C; Throm, Robert E; Liao, Jason; Zhu, Junjia; Sample, Clare E

    2014-10-01

    Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I). Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R) - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C), in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14(ARF) and p16I(NK4a). By contrast, p16(INK4a) was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14(ARF) was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21(WAF1/CIP1), a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the

  20. Effects of iron and copper overload on the human liver: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Fanni, D; Fanos, V; Gerosa, C; Piras, M; Dessi, A; Atzei, A; Van, Eyken P; Gibo, Y; Faa, G

    2014-01-01

    Iron and copper ions play important roles in many physiological functions of our body, even though the exact mechanisms regulating their absorption, distribution and excretion are not fully understood. Metal-related human pathology may be observed in two different clinical settings: deficiency or overload. The overload in liver cells of both trace elements leads to multiple cellular lesions. Here we report the main pathological changes observed at transmission electron microscopy in the liver of subjects affected by Beta-thalassemia and by Wilson's disease. The hepatic iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients is associated with haemosiderin storage both in Kupffer cells and in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Haemosiderin granules are grouped inside voluminous lysosomes, also called siderosomes. Other ultrastructural changes are fat droplets, proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and fibrosis. Apoptosis of hepatocytes and infiltration of sinusoids by polymorphonucleates is also detected in beta-thalassemia. Ultrastructural changes in liver biopsies from Wilson's disease patients are characterized by severe mitochondrial changes, associated with an increased number of perossisomes, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and the presence of lipolysosomes, characteristic cytoplasmic bodies formed by lipid vacuoles surrounded by electron-dense lysosomes. In patients affected by Wilson's disease, nuclei are frequently involved, with disorganization of the nucleoplasm and with glycogen inclusions. On the contrary, no significant changes are detected in Kupffer cells. Our data show that iron and copper, even though are both transition metals, are responsible of different pathological changes at ultrastructural level. In particular, copper overload is associated with mitochondrial damage, whereas iron overload only rarely may cause severe mitochondrial changes. These differences underlay the need for further studies in which biochemical analyses should be associated with

  1. Fibrosarcoma versus fibromatoses and cellular nodular fasciitis. A comparative study of their proliferative activity using proliferating cell nuclear antigen, DNA flow cytometry, and p53.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Y; Fukuda, T; Tsuneyoshi, M

    1994-07-01

    We analyzed the proliferative activities, immunoreactivity of the p53 protein, and aneuploidy in patients with benign and malignant fibrous lesions, including 19 with nodular fasciitis (cellular type) (6-88 years old, mean 42.9), 11 with abdominal fibromatoses (22-74 years old, mean 37.9), 13 with extraabdominal fibromatoses (2-38 years old, mean 19.5), and 23 with fibrosarcomas (adult type: 16-71 years old, mean 47.3; infantile type: 3 months to 9 years, mean 2.9) using immunohistochemistry to determine proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PC10) and p53 protein (CM1) as well as performing DNA flow cytometry. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) score was measured as the ratio of PCNA-positive nuclear size/total nuclear size determined by an image analysis computer system. The distribution pattern of the PCNA-positive cells was uneven in each instance of nodular fasciitis, in contrast to the distribution in abdominal fibromatosis, extraabdominal fibromatosis, and fibrosarcoma. Both fibrosarcoma (28.4 +/- 20.0) and nodular fasciitis (33.6 +/- 20.9) exhibited a larger value and a greater variation in the PCNA score than did either abdominal (13.5 +/- 14.5) or extraabdominal fibromatosis (19.9 +/- 21.5). Abdominal fibromatosis exhibited a smaller value and less variation in the score. In short, the PCNA score did not correlate with the malignant potential. The proliferative index (S + G2 + M fraction) in fibrosarcoma was significantly higher than in either nodular fasciitis or abdominal fibromatosis. Aneuploidy was detected in five cases (26%) of fibrosarcoma, while six (26%) fibrosarcomas showed p53 positivity. Furthermore, p53-positive patients had a worse survival (0.01 < p < 0.05), and p53 positivity correlated with the proliferative index (p < 0.01). In conclusion, the PCNA score simply indicates the proliferative activity independent of malignant potential. On the other hand, p53 positivity, proliferative index, and aneuploidy are all indicators of

  2. Cellular changes in the hamster testicular interstitium with ageing and after exposure to short photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Frutos, E; Seco-Rovira, V; Ferrer, C; Madrid, J F; Sáez, F J; Canteras, M; Pastor, L M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular changes that occur in the hamster testicular interstitium in two very different physiological situations involving testicular involution: ageing and exposure to a short photoperiod. The animals were divided into an 'age group' with three subgroups - young, adult and old animals - and a 'regressed group' with animals subjected to a short photoperiod. The testicular interstitium was characterised by light and electron microscopy. Interstitial cells were studied histochemically with regard to their proliferation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP in situ nick end labelling (TUNEL+) and testosterone synthetic activity. We identified two types of Leydig cell: Type A cells showed a normal morphology, while Type B cells appeared necrotic. With ageing, pericyte proliferation decreased but there was no variation in the index of TUNEL-positive Leydig cells. In the regressed group, pericyte proliferation was greater and TUNEL-positive cells were not observed in the interstitium. The testicular interstitium suffered few ultrastructural changes during ageing and necrotic Leydig cells were observed. In contrast, an ultrastructural involution of Leydig cells with no necrosis was observed in the regressed group. In conclusion, the testicular interstitium of Mesocricetus auratus showed different cellular changes in the two groups (age and regressed), probably due to the irreversible nature of ageing and the reversible character of changes induced by short photoperiod. PMID:25437143

  3. Ultrastructural alterations of the hepatopancreas in Porcellio scaber under stress.

    PubMed

    Znidaršič, Nada; Strus, Jasna; Drobne, Damjana

    2003-04-01

    Cellular ultrastructure varies in accordance with physiological processes, also reflecting responses to environmental stress factors. Ultrastructural changes of the hepatopancreatic cells in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber exposed to sublethal concentrations of zinc or cadmium in their food were identified by transmission electron microscopy. The exclusive structural characteristic of the hepatopancreas of animals exposed to metal-dosed food was grain-like electrondense deposits (EDD) observed in the intercellular spaces and in vesicles of B cells. In addition, hepatopancreatic cells of metal-exposed animals displayed non-specific, stress-indicating alterations such as cellular disintegration, the reduction of energetic reserves (lipid droplets, glycogen), electron dense cytoplasm, ultrastructural alterations of granular endoplasmic reticulum (GER), the Golgi complex and mitochondria.

  4. Systematic Verification of Upstream Regulators of a Computable Cellular Proliferation Network Model on Non-Diseased Lung Cells Using a Dedicated Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; Poussin, Carine; Gebel, Stephan; Mathis, Carole; Schlage, Walter K.; Lichtner, Rosemarie B.; Quadt-Humme, Sibille; Wagner, Sandra; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently constructed a computable cell proliferation network (CPN) model focused on lung tissue to unravel complex biological processes and their exposure-related perturbations from molecular profiling data. The CPN consists of edges and nodes representing upstream controllers of gene expression largely generated from transcriptomics datasets using Reverse Causal Reasoning (RCR). Here, we report an approach to biologically verify the correctness of upstream controller nodes using a specifically designed, independent lung cell proliferation dataset. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells were arrested at G1/S with a cell cycle inhibitor. Gene expression changes and cell proliferation were captured at different time points after release from inhibition. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated cell cycle response specificity via an overrepresentation of proliferation related gene sets. Coverage analysis of RCR-derived hypotheses returned statistical significance for cell cycle response specificity across the whole model as well as for the Growth Factor and Cell Cycle sub-network models. PMID:23926424

  5. Antenatal taurine supplementation for improving brain ultrastructure in fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, L; Chen, H

    2011-05-01

    Changes in brain ultrastructure of fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were explored and the effects of antenatal taurine supplementation on their brain ultrastructure were determined. Fifteen pregnant rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group, IUGR model group and IUGR group given antenatal taurine supplements. Taurine was added to the diet of the taurine group at a dose of 300 mg/kg/d from 12 days after conception until natural delivery. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes in the brains of the newborn rats. At the same time, brain cellular apoptosis was detected using TUNEL, and the changes in protein expression of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that: 1) The average body weight and cerebral weight were significantly lower in the IUGR group than in the control group (p<0.01) and both of them were less so after taurine was supplemented (p<0.01). 2) Transmission electron microscopy revealed that brain cortex structures were sparse IUGR rats, showing many scattered apoptotic cells, decreased numbers of synapses, lower glial cell proliferation, and fewer neurons, more sparsely arranged, while these factors were significantly improved with taurine supplementation. 3) The results of TUNEL showed that the counts of apoptotic brain cells in IUGR groups were significantly increased from those in control groups and that taurine could significantly decrease brain cell apoptosis (p<0.001). 4) The results of immunohistochemistry showed that antenatal taurine-supplementation could significantly increase the counts of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive cells in fetal rats with IUGR (p<0.001). It can be concluded that it IUGR has a significant detrimental influence on the development of fetal rat brains, and antenatal supplement of taurine can significantly improve the IUGR

  6. Nerve Regeneration Potential of Protocatechuic Acid in RSC96 Schwann Cells by Induction of Cellular Proliferation and Migration through IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ju, Da-Tong; Liao, Hung-En; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chung, Li-Chin; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-12-31

    Peripheral nerve injuries, caused by accidental trauma, acute compression or surgery, often result in temporary or life-long neuronal dysfunctions and inflict great economic or social burdens on the patients. Nerve cell proliferation is an essential process to restore injured nerves of adults. Schwann cells play a crucial role in endogenous repair of peripheral nerves due to their ability to proliferate, migrate and provide trophic support to axons via expression of various neurotrophic factors, such as the nerve growth factor (NGF), especially after nerve injury. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a dihydroxybenzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid, isolated from the kernels of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq (AOF), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine the fruits of which are widely used as a tonic, aphrodisiac, anti-salivation and anti-diarrheatic. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms by which PCA induces Schwann cell proliferation by activating IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt pathway. Treatment with PCA induces phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/serine - threonine kinase (PI3K/Akt) pathway, and activates expression of cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after 18 h of treatment showed that proliferation of the RSC96 cells was enhanced by PCA treatment. The PCA induced proliferation was accompanied by modulation in the expressions of cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E and cyclin A. Knockdown of PI3K using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and inhibition of IGF-IR receptor resulted in the reduction in cell survival proteins. The results collectively showed that PCA treatment promoted cell proliferation and cell survival via IGF-I signaling. PMID:26717920

  7. Ultrastructural observations on vasomotor rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Elwany, S; Bumsted, R

    1987-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the respiratory nasal mucosa of patients suffering from vasomotor rhinitis was studied and compared with the reported ultrastructural findings in cases of chronic perennial allergic rhinitis. The principal ultrastructural differences were the absence of interendothelial gap junctions, the scarcity of eosinophils and plasma cells, and the absence of immunologically stimulated or degranulated mast cells in vasomotor rhinitis. These differences were discussed in the light of the known pathophysiologic facts.

  8. The ultrastructure of conjunctival melanocytic tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A

    1984-01-01

    The ultrastructure of conjunctival melanocytic lesions in 49 patients was evaluated to find significant differences between benign and malignant cells. The patients studied included 9 with benign epithelial (racial) melanosis, 2 with pigmented squamous cell papillomas, 16 with conjunctival nevi, 18 with primary acquired melanosis, and 11 with invasive nodules of malignant melanoma. In benign epithelial melanosis, dendritic melanocytes were situated along the basement membrane region of the conjunctival epithelium, with one basilar dendritic melanocyte lodged among every five or six basilar keratinocytes. The dendritic melanocytes extended arborizing cellular processes between the basilar and among the suprabasilar keratinocytes, which manifested considerable uptake of melanin granules into their cytoplasm. The benign dendritic melanocytes possessed nuclei with clumped heterochromatin at the nuclear membrane, small, tightly wound nucleoli, and large, elongated, fully melaninized melanin granules. In two patients with benign hyperplasia of the dendritic melanocytes, occasional dendritic melanocytes were located in a suprabasilar position, but were always separated from each other by keratinocytes or their processes. In the two black patients with benign pigmented squamous papillomas, the benign dendritic melanocytes were located hapharzardly at all levels of the acanthotic epithelium and not just along the basement membrane region. Melanin uptake by the proliferating keratinocytes was minimal. In benign melanocytic nevi of the conjunctiva, nevus cells within the intraepithelial junctional nests displayed a more rounded cellular configuration; short villi and broader cellular processes suggestive of abortive dendrites were found. The nuclear chromatin pattern was clumped at the nuclear membrane, but the nucleoli were somewhat larger than those of benign dendritic melanocytes in epithelial melanosis. The melanosomes were smaller and rounder than those in dendritic

  9. Ectopic Expression of a Maize Hybrid Down-Regulated Gene ZmARF25 Decreases Organ Size by Affecting Cellular Proliferation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingxue; Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Yang, Hua; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis is associated with differential gene expression between hybrids and their parental lines, and the genes involved in cell proliferation played important roles. AtARF2 is a general cell proliferation repressor in Arabidopsis. In our previous study, two homologues (ZmARF10 and ZmARF25) of AtARF2 were identified in maize, but their relationship with heterosis was not elucidated. Here, the expression patterns of ZmARF10 and ZmARF25 in seedling leaves of maize hybrids and their parental lines were analyzed. The results of qRT-PCR exhibited that ZmARF25 was down-regulated in leaf basal region of hybrids. Moreover, overexpression of ZmARF25 led to reduced organ size in Arabidopsis, which was mainly due to the decrease in cell number, not cell size. In addition, the cell proliferation related genes AtANT, AtGIF1 and AtGRF5 were down-regulated in 35S::ZmARF25 transgenic lines. Collectively, we proposed that the down-regulation of ZmARF25 in maize hybrid may accelerate cell proliferation and promote leaf development, which, in turn, contributes to the observed leaf size heterosis in maize. PMID:24756087

  10. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  11. 3D Morphology, Ultrastructure and Development of Ceratomyxa puntazzi Stages: First Insights into the Mechanisms of Motility and Budding in the Myxozoa

    PubMed Central

    Alama-Bermejo, Gema; Bron, James Emmanuel; Raga, Juan Antonio; Holzer, Astrid Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    Free, amoeboid movement of organisms within media as well as substrate-dependent cellular crawling processes of cells and organisms require an actin cytoskeleton. This system is also involved in the cytokinetic processes of all eukaryotic cells. Myxozoan parasites are known for the disease they cause in economical important fishes. Usually, their pathology is related to rapid proliferation in the host. However, the sequences of their development are still poorly understood, especially with regard to pre-sporogonic proliferation mechanisms. The present work employs light microscopy (LM), electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with specific stains (Nile Red, DAPI, Phalloidin), to study the three-dimensional morphology, motility, ultrastructure and cellular composition of Ceratomyxa puntazzi, a myxozoan inhabiting the bile of the sharpsnout seabream. Our results demonstrate the occurrence of two C. puntazzi developmental cycles in the bile, i.e. pre-sporogonic proliferation including frequent budding as well as sporogony, resulting in the formation of durable spore stages and we provide unique details on the ultrastructure and the developmental sequence of bile inhabiting myxozoans. The present study describes, for the first time, the cellular components and mechanisms involved in the motility of myxozoan proliferative stages, and reveals how the same elements are implicated in the processes of budding and cytokinesis in the Myxozoa. We demonstrate that F-actin rich cytoskeletal elements polarize at one end of the parasites and in the filopodia which are rapidly de novo created and re-absorbed, thus facilitating unidirectional parasite motility in the bile. We furthermore discover the myxozoan mechanism of budding as an active, polarization process of cytokinesis, which is independent from a contractile ring and thus differs from the mechanism, generally observed in eurkaryotic cells. We hereby demonstrate that CLSM

  12. The effects of low-level laser irradiation on cellular viability and proliferation of human skin fibroblasts cultured in high glucose mediums.

    PubMed

    Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Bayat, Mohammad; Darbandi, Hasan; Bayat, Mehrnoush; Mosaffa, Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the most challenging complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) in clinical medicine. This study has aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) cultured in a high glucose concentration. HSFs were cultured either in a concentration of physiologic glucose (5.5 mM/l) or high glucose media (11.1 and 15 mM/l) for either 1 or 2 weeks after which they were subsequently cultured in either the physiologic glucose or high concentration glucose media during laser irradiation. LLLT was carried out with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser unit at energy densities of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2), and power density of 0.66 mW/cm(2) on 3 consecutive days. HSFs' viability and proliferation rate were evaluated with the dimethylthiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The LLLT at densities of 0.5 and 1 J/cm(2) had stimulatory effects on the viability and proliferation rate of HSFs cultured in physiologic glucose (5.5 mM/l) medium compared to their control cultures (p = 0.002 and p = 0.046, respectively). All three doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2) had stimulatory effects on the proliferation rate of HSFs cultured in high glucose concentrations when compared to their control cultures (p = 0.042, p = 0.000, and p = 0.000, respectively). This study showed that HSFs originally cultured for 2 weeks in high glucose concentration followed by culture in physiologic glucose during laser irradiation showed enhanced cell viability and proliferation. Thus, LLLT had a stimulatory effect on these HSFs. PMID:23455657

  13. Cell membrane CD44v6 levels in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: association with high cellular proliferation and high concentrations of EGFR and CD44v5.

    PubMed

    Ruibal, Álvaro; Aguiar, Pablo; Del Río, María Carmen; Nuñez, Matilde Isabel; Pubul, Virginia; Herranz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Membranous CD44v6 levels in tumors and surrounding samples obtained from 94 patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas were studied and compared to clinical stage, cellular proliferation, membranous CD44v5 levels, epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and cytoplasmatic concentrations of CYFRA 21.1. CD44v6 positive values were observed in 33/38 non-tumor samples and in 76/94 tumor samples, but there were not statistically significant differences between both subgroups. In CD44v6 positive tumor samples, CD44v6 was not associated with clinical stage, histological grade, ploidy and lymph node involvement, but significant association was found with high cellular proliferation. Likewise, CD44v6 positive tumors had significantly higher levels of EGFR and CD44v5. In patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas and clinical stage I, positive CD44v6 cases were associated with the same parameters. Furthermore, positive CD44v5 squamous tumors were associated significantly with histological grade III and lower levels of CYFRA21.1. Our findings support the value of CD44v6 as a possible indicator of poor outcome in patients with squamous lung carcinomas. PMID:25809603

  14. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein promotes human hepatoma cell proliferation through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via cellular receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lanjuan; Wang Lu; Ren Hao; Cao Jie; Li Li; Ke Jinshan; Qi Zhongtian . E-mail: qizt53@hotmail.com

    2005-04-15

    Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways by various viruses has been shown to be responsible for viral pathogenicity. The molecular mechanism by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused human liver diseases has been investigated on the basis of abnormal intracellular signal events. Current data are very limited involved in transmembrane signal transduction triggered by HCV E2 protein. Here we explored regulation of the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway by E2 expressed in Chinese hamster oval cells. In human hepatoma Huh-7 cells, E2 specifically activated the MAPK/ERK pathway including downstream transcription factor ATF-2 and greatly promoted cell proliferation. CD81 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on the cell surface mediated binding of E2 to Huh-7 cells. The MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation driven by E2 were suppressed by blockage of CD81 as well as LDLR. Furthermore, pretreatment with an upstream kinase MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also impaired the MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation induced by E2. Our results suggest that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway triggered by HCV E2 via its receptors maintains survival and growth of target cells.

  15. Ultrastructural alterations in allylamine cardiovascular toxicity. Late myocardial and vascular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Boor, P. J.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    The late myocardial and vascular ultrastructural changes in rat hearts following consumption of the cardiovascular toxin allylamine were studied. Rats were given 0.1% allylamine HCl in drinking water for 10-104 days. From 10 to 21 days, there was organization of acute myocardial necrosis by macrophages and scattered polymorphonuclear leukocytes with prominent interstitial-cell proliferation. Alterations at 21-104 days included extensive scarring with formation of dense mature collagen with scattered fibroblasts present, grossly evident left-ventricular aneurysm, and gross and microscopic changes similar to those observed in the secondary form of endocardial fibroelastosis. Areas of scar contained highly cellular foci of smooth-muscle cells, myofibroblasts, and abundant extracellular elastin. Cardiac myocytes frequently showed markedly disorganized myofilaments, bizarrely distorted mitochondria with condensed cristae, and other severe degenerative changes. Small vessels within and adjacent to scar showed proliferation of intimal smooth-muscle cells. Endothelial lesions or recent or organized thrombi were not seen. Focal endocardial metaplasia, consisting of both chondroid and osseous tissue, was found in areas of transmural scarring, or ventricular aneurysm. Chondrocytes had the overall nuclear and cellular morphology, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, and surrounding lacunae typical of mature fibrocartilage. In some areas, the collagen matrix was undergoing calcification with the typical cross-banded pattern of calcifying connective tissue. Osteocytes were located in a densely calcified bone matrix and displayed characteristic cellular extensions into surrounding canaliculi. These findings indicate a severe myocardial, small-vessel, and endocardial injury during the course of chronic allylamine intoxication. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 15 Figure

  16. [Ultrastructure of cervical mucus].

    PubMed

    Chretien, F C

    1973-09-01

    This discussion covers the chemical structure of cervical mucus, accepted thoeries of its ultrastructure, and the author's data from the scanning electron microscope. A theory of the ultrastructure of cervical mucus must explain how it can be viscous and hostile to sperm for most of the cycle, but elastic and arranged parallel to their upward migration at ovulation. Cervical mucus is a hydrogel with 2%-12% solid phase composed of glucoproteins, probably meshed noncovalently into protein chains, with oligosaccharide side chains ending in sialic acid. A popular thoery generated by nuclear magnetic resonnance studies suggests that there may be sheaves of fibers arranged into micelles, with transverse fibers forming a netwrok that enlarges at ovulation. The light microscope is useless for studying mucus structure, but transmission electron microscopes have tentatively verified this hypothesis. The author's work with the scanning electron microscope showed a tangled web of filaments approximately 500-750 Angstroms, 1000-1500 or 300-6000 Angstroms thick. Usually the margin of the specimen appeared thin, like a spider web, but the center appeared thick with open channels, like the skeleton of a sponge, with a secondary network at the level of the oblique and transverse fibers.

  17. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF MYCOPLASMA SPECIES

    PubMed Central

    Domermuth, C. H.; Nielsen, M. H.; Freundt, E. A.; Birch-Andersen, A.

    1964-01-01

    Domermuth, C. H. (Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark), M. H. Nielsen, E. A. Freundt, and A. Birch-Andersen. Ultrastructure of Mycoplasma species. J. Bacteriol. 88:727–744. 1964.—The ultrastructure of 19 strains (15 species) of Mycoplasmatales grown on solid medium was studied with the aid of an electron microscope. The cells possessed a triple-layered limiting membrane 75 to 100 A thick. This membrane appeared to be symmetrical in some strains and asymmetrical in others. An electron-dense material found in close contact with the cell surface was tentatively interpreted to be a capsular substance. Ribosomes and strands of nuclear material were observed in the cytoplasm of cells of all strains. Ribosomes observed in the JA strain of M. gallisepticum were frequently arranged in a regular geometric pattern of characteristic appearance. Dense inclusions sometimes limited by triple-layered membranes (possibly developing elementary bodies), as well as membrane-surrounded vesicles, were observed in the cytoplasm of cells of some strains. Images PMID:14208513

  18. Ultrastructural preservation of plasma membranes by non-lethal slow freezing to liquid nitrogen temperature.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, S; Miura, K

    1987-02-01

    Secondary hyphae of Lyophyllum ulmarium were shown to tolerate slow freezing, which allowed extracellular freezing, to -196 degrees C. A freeze-fracture study showed that under this non-lethal freezing condition, the plasma membrane of the secondary hyphae did not show any ultrastructural changes as compared with the control, except gross cellular shrinkage. Tertiary hyphae of Lyophyllum ulmarium, on the other hand, were completely injured by slow freezing to -196 degrees C, and the plasma membrane showed distinct intramembrane particle aggregation as a result of direct membrane contact caused by severe cellular deformation. It is suggested that the absence of freezing injury in the secondary hyphae was due to ultrastructural preservation of the plasma membrane, which resulted from avoidance of severe cellular deformation, while occurrence of freezing injury in the tertiary hyphae is considered to be due to ultrastructural changes in the plasma membrane caused by severe cellular deformation. PMID:3568151

  19. Ultrastructural evidence for differentiation in a human glioblastoma cell line treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.E.; Anderson, K.M. ); Seed, T.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Human glioblastoma cells incubated in the presence of inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis show decreased cellular proliferation without cytotoxicity. The authors studied the ultrastructural morphology of a human glioblastoma cell line cultured with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lipoxygenase inhibitor, or 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitor. When glioblastoma cells were treated for 3 days with antiproliferative concentrations of either agent, they shared many morphological characteristics, including evidence for increased astrocytic differentiation with only limited signs of toxicity. The inhibited glioma cells demonstrated an increase in the number and length of astrocytic processes containing greater numbers of glial filaments, and the NDGA-treated cells also demonstrated extensive lateral pseudopod formation along the processes. The glioblastoma cell shape also become more elongated, losing the usual nuclear lobularity and nuclear inclusions, especially in NDGA-treated cells. Many cytoplasmic organelles packed the cytosol of the inhibited glioma cells, including prominent Golgi apparatus, dilated smooth endoplasmic reticulum evolving into dilated vesicles, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and numerous concentric laminations. There was limited evidence for toxicity, however, as the mitochondria were more pleomorphic with some mitochondrial distension and disruption of the cristae along with an increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization. The authors conclude that the inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis. NDGA and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, not only suppress glioblastoma cell proliferation, but also include increased astrocytic differentiation.

  20. Diagnostic and prognostic value of cellular proliferation assessment with Ki-67 protein in dogs suffering from benign and malignant perianal tumors.

    PubMed

    Brodzki, Adam; Łopuszyński, Wojciech; Brodzki, Piotr; Tatara, Marcin R

    2014-01-01

    In the perianal region of carnivores, skin consists of modified sebaceous glands called perianal glands. Tumors originating from perianal glands are the third most frequent type of neoplasm in male dogs after neoplastic diseases of testes and skin. Ki-67 is a nuclear non-histone protein considered a proliferation marker in normal and neoplastic proliferating cells. Previous investigations revealed that Ki-67 expression may be used as a prognostic factor for breast cancer in humans. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic and prognostic value of Ki-67 evaluation in dogs suffering from benign and malignant perianal tumors. The highest value of the Ki-67 index was obtained in the carcinoma group (18.50% ± 2.68), significantly higher compared to the values obtained in the control tissue (7.63% ± 2.12) and adenoma (7.33% ± 1.06; all P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences in the Ki-67 index were not found between the epithelioma group (11.95% ± 1.96) and all other groups (P < 0.05). This investigation on dogs with perianal gland tumors has shown significantly increased expression of Ki-67 antigen in carcinoma cells, while the expression of this protein was similar in the case of control tissues, adenoma and epithelioma. Thus, it may be postulated that Ki-67 evaluation in perianal gland tumors in dogs may serve as a useful marker possessing high diagnostic and prognostic value and enabling differentiation of malignant and benign tumors. PMID:25412511

  1. Leishmania Induces Survival, Proliferation and Elevated Cellular dNTP Levels in Human Monocytes Promoting Acceleration of HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Overstreet, Michael G.; Lazarski, Chris A.; Fowell, Deborah J.; Kim, Baek

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that is widely prevalent in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Infection with Leishmania has been recognized to induce a striking acceleration of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) infection in coinfected individuals through as yet incompletely understood mechanisms. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are the predominant cell types coinfected by both pathogens. Monocytes and macrophages contain extremely low levels of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) due to their lack of cell cycling and S phase, where dNTP biosynthesis is specifically activated. Lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, are unique among retroviruses in their ability to replicate in these non-dividing cells due, at least in part, to their highly efficient reverse transcriptase (RT). Nonetheless, viral replication progresses more efficiently in the setting of higher intracellular dNTP concentrations related to enhanced enzyme kinetics of the viral RT. In the present study, in vitro infection of CD14+ peripheral blood-derived human monocytes with Leishmania major was found to induce differentiation, marked elevation of cellular p53R2 ribonucleotide reductase subunit and R2 subunit expression. The R2 subunit is restricted to the S phase of the cell cycle. Our dNTP assay demonstrated significant elevation of intracellular monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) dNTP concentrations in Leishmania-infected cell populations as compared to control cells. Infection of Leishmania-maturated MDMs with a pseudotyped GFP expressing HIV-1 resulted in increased numbers of GFP+ cells in the Leishmania-maturated MDMs as compared to control cells. Interestingly, a sub-population of Leishmania-maturated MDMs was found to have re-entered the cell cycle, as demonstrated by BrdU labeling. In conclusion, Leishmania infection of primary human monocytes promotes the induction of an S phase environment and elevated dNTP levels with notable elevation of HIV-1 expression

  2. Studies on Ultrastructure and Purification of Isolated Plant Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James E.; Elfvin, Lars-G.; Biale, Jacob B.; Honda, S. I.

    1968-01-01

    Sweetpotato mitochondria, that showed respiratory control, were studied with respect to ultrastructure. If fixed in media containing sucrose at 0.4 M, the cristae were dilated and the matrix was highly condensed. A more orthodox ultrastructural form was observed when the mitochondria were fixed in a medium containing sucrose at 0.25 M, i.e., the matrix was more expanded, the cristae were less dilated, and peripherally, the inner membrane element lay adjacent to the outer membrane element. These results are discussed in terms of a sucrose-accessible space (space between outer and inner membrane elements including intracristal space), and a space relatively inaccessible to sucrose (matrix). Ultrastructural shifts were not observed with change in metabolic steady state of the mitochondria. High resolution electron micrographs showed that the ultrastructure of sweetpotato mitochondria is very similar to that of animal mitochondria. Purity and homogeneity of mitochondrial fractions were followed both by phase-contrast and electron microscopy. Preparations from sweetpotato, using older methods, were relatively homogeneous with respect to particle type and size, whereas avocado preparations contained a high proportion of chloroplasts and cellular debris. A method of purification involving sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation was developed. Purified mitochondria exhibited respiratory control and appeared similar to unpurified mitochondria under the electron microscope. Images PMID:16657002

  3. Ultrastructural lesions induced by neptunium-237: apoptosis or necrosis?

    PubMed

    Pusset, D; Fromm, M; Poncy, J L; Kantelip, B; Galle, P; Chambaudet, A; Baud, M; Boulahdour, H

    2002-07-01

    In this study, we are concerned with the 237 isotope of neptunium (237Np), which is a by-product of uranium in nuclear reactors. To study ultrastructural lesions induced by this element, a group of rats were injected with a solution of 237Np-nitrate once a day for 14 weeks. Lesions observed in liver and kidney are described using electron microscopy. Ultrastructural alterations of cellular membranes and intracellular organelles demonstrated the existence of neptunium toxicity. This toxicity was characterized by various lesions, such as cytoplasmic clarification, disappearance of mitochondrial cristae, swollen mitochondria, abnormal condensation of nuclear chromatin, and nuclear fragmentations. This study demonstrated the probable induction of apoptosis by neptunium both in liver and kidneys.

  4. Inhibition of Lon blocks cell proliferation, enhances chemosensitivity by promoting apoptosis and decreases cellular bioenergetics of bladder cancer: potential roles of Lon as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target in baldder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongzhang; Lan, Linhua; Huang, Kate; Wang, Rongrong; Xu, Cuicui; Shi, Yang; Wu, Xiaoyi; Wu, Zhi; Zhang, Jiliang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Lu; Yu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Haibo; Lu, Bin

    2014-11-30

    ATP-dependent Lon protease within mitochondrial matrix contributes to the degradation of abnormal proteins. The oxidative or hypoxic stress which represents the stress phenotype of cancer leads to up-regulation of Lon. However, the role of Lon in bladder cancer remains undefined. Here, we found that Lon expression in bladder cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in noncancerous tissues; down-regulation of Lon in bladder cancer cells significantly blocked cancer cell proliferation via suppression c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation due to decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and enhanced the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents by promoting apoptosis. We further found that Lon down-regulation in bladder cancer cells decreased cellular bioenergetics as determined by measuring aerobic respiration and glycolysis using extracellular flux analyzer. The tissue microarray (TMA) results showed that high expression of Lon was related to the T and TNM stage, as well as histological grade of bladder cancer patients. We also demonstrated that Lon was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of bladder cancer. Taken together, our data suggest that Lon could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for treatment of bladder cancer, as well as for prediction of the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

  5. Ultrastructural spectrum of solitary fibrous tumor: a unique perivascular tumor with alternative lines of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Obara, Kumi; Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2005-06-01

    Eight tumors diagnosed as solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the oral cavity were studied. Histologic spectrum was entirely comparable with the extrapleural SFT of other sites. One tumor had glomus tumor-like foci. Immunohistochemical results confirmed most of the previous observations, indicating characteristic expression of vimentin, CD34, bcl-2, and CD99. Factor XIIIa and alpha-smooth muscle actin were less commonly reactive and a very few cells were faintly positive for factor VIII-related antigen and Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1. All were essentially negative for S-100 protein, desmin, CD31, and CD68. In stark contrast to the conclusive immunoprofile, ultrastructural investigation of six tumors demonstrated considerable cellular heterogeneity. Other than fibroblasts, perivascular undifferentiated cells and pericytes predominated, but endothelial cells were regularly present. There was a distinctive proliferation of pericytic cells in four tumors, one of which had glomoid foci of myopericytes. The extreme increase in number of Weibel-Palade bodies occurred in voluminous capillary endothelium. Occasional single and clustered cells with consistent features of endothelium showed intracytoplasmic lumen formation. Such composite cells constituted an integral segment of richly vascularized SFT. Myofibroblastic form smooth muscle differentiation was present in only a minority of cells. From phenotypic analysis by electron microscopy, SFT may originate from a unique, perivascular multipotent mesenchyme sharing with its lineage with pericytes, fibroblasts, and infrequently, endothelium. Consequently, morphological features of SFT may become diversely varied by whether predominantly constituent cells are undifferentiated, pericytic or fibroblastic in nature.

  6. Comparative sperm ultrastructure in Nemertea.

    PubMed

    von Döhren, J; Beckers, P; Vogeler, R; Bartolomaeus, T

    2010-07-01

    Although the monophyly of Nemertea is strongly supported by unique morphological characters and results of molecular phylogenetic studies, their ingroup relationships are largely unresolved. To contribute solving this problem we studied sperm ultrastructure of 12 nemertean species that belong to different subtaxa representing the commonly recognized major monophyletic groups. The study yielded a set of 26 characters with an unexpected variation among species of the same genus (Tubulanus and Procephalothrix species), whereas other species varied in metric values or only one character state (Ramphogordius). In some species, the sperm nucleus has grooves (Zygonemertes virescens, Amphiporus imparispinosus) that may be twisted and give a spiral shape to the sperm head (Paranemertes peregrina, Emplectonema gracile). To make the characters from sperm ultrastructure accessible for further phylogenetic analyses, they were coded in a character matrix. Published data for eight species turned out to be sufficiently detailed to be included. Comparative evaluation of available information on the sperm ultrastructure suggests that subtaxa of Heteronemertea and Hoplonemertea are supported as monophyletic by sperm morphology. However, the data do not provide information on the existing contradictions regarding the internal relationships of "Palaeonemertea." Nevertheless, our study provides evidence that sperm ultrastructure yields numerous potentially informative characters that will be included in upcoming phylogenetic analyses.

  7. Imaging Cellular Proliferation During Chemo-Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study of Serial {sup 18}F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Everitt, Sarah; Hicks, Rodney J.; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Walter, Tania; Binns, David; Mac Manus, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To establish whether {sup 18}F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluoro-L-thymidine ({sup 18}F-FLT) can monitor changes in cellular proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during radical chemo-radiotherapy (chemo-RT). Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective pilot study, 5 patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent serial {sup 18}F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment. Baseline {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT scans were compared with routine staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two on-treatment {sup 18}F-FLT scans were performed for each patient on Days 2, 8, 15 or 29, providing a range of time points for response assessment. Results: In all 5 patients, baseline lesional uptake of {sup 18}F-FLT on PET/CT corresponded to staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT abnormalities. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in tumor was observed on five of nine (55%) on-treatment scans, on Days 2, 8 and 29, but not Day 15. A 'flare' of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in the primary tumor of one case was observed after 2 Gy of radiation (1.22 x baseline). The remaining eight on-treatment scans demonstrated a mean reduction in {sup 18}F-FLT tumor uptake of 0.58 x baseline. A marked reduction of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in irradiated bone marrow was observed for all cases. This reduction was observed even after only 2 Gy, and all patients demonstrated a complete absence of proliferating marrow after 10 Gy. Conclusions: This proof of concept study indicates that {sup 18}F-FLT uptake can monitor the distinctive biologic responses of epithelial cancers and highly radiosensitive normal tissue changes during radical chemo-RT. Further studies of {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT imaging during therapy may suggest that this tracer is useful in developing response-adapted RT for NSCLC.

  8. Effect of Chaihu-Shugan-San on the mRNA expression of the 5-HT1A receptor and cellular proliferation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats with depression

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PING; LI, LIANG; LIU, XUE-JUN; CAI, XIONG; SUN, MEI-ZHEN; HE, JUN-FENG; ZENG, GUANG; HUANG, HUI-YONG

    2016-01-01

    Chaihu-Shugan-San (CHSGS) is a herbal preparation that has been shown to effectively relieve neurologic impairment and reduce depression. However, the efficacy of CHSGS in the treatment of patients with epilepsy with depression is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, adult rats were exposed to chronic mild stress following the establishment of chronic pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Subsequently, a sucrose consumption test and open-field test (OFT) were performed to assess depression-like behavior. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control, model, fluoxetine (1.8 g/kg) and CHSGS (2.7 g/kg) groups. The control and model groups received normal saline. The mRNA expression levels of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptor and the number of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. Treatment administration was conducted by once daily intragastric perfusion for 28 days. The mRNA expression levels of the 5-HT1A receptor, the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, the consumption of sucrose, and frequency of vertical and horizontal movement scores in the OFT were enhanced in the fluoxetine and CHSGS groups compared with the model group (P<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was detected between the fluoxetine and CHSGS groups. These data suggest that CHSGS is able to increase the expression of 5-HT1A receptor mRNA and cellular proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in epileptic rats with depression, and thus effectively improve certain symptoms of depression. PMID:26889228

  9. Ultrastructure of a magnetotactic spirillum.

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, D L; Maratea, D; Blakemore, R P

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of a magnetotactic bacterium (strain MS-1) was examined by transmission, scanning, and scanning-transmission electron microscopy. The organism resembled other spirilla in general cell morphology, although some differences were detected at the ultrastructural level. Electron-dense particles within magnetotactic cells were shown by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis to be localizations containing iron. A non-magnetotactic variant of strain MS-1 lacked these novel bacterial inclusion bodies. A chain of these particles traversed each magnetotactic cell in a specific arrangement that was consistent from cell to cell, seemingly associated with the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. Each particle was surrounded by an electron-dense layer separated from the particle surface by an electron-transparent region. The term "magnetosome" is proposed for the electron-dense particles with their enveloping layer(s) as found in this and other magnetotactic bacteria. Images PMID:6245069

  10. Ultrastructural Analysis of Drosophila Ovaries by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Sanchez, Carlos G.; Teixeira, Felipe K.; Petzold, Chris; Dancel-Manning, Kristen; Wang, Ju-Yu S.; Lehmann, Ruth; Liang, Feng-Xia A.

    2016-01-01

    i. Summary The Drosophila melanogaster ovary is a powerful, genetically tractable system through which one can elucidate the principles underlying cellular function and organogenesis in vivo. In order to understand the intricate process of oogenesis at the subcellular level, microscopic analysis with the highest possible resolution is required. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of ovaries for ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. We discuss and provide protocols for chemical fixation of Drosophila ovaries that facilitate optimal imaging with particular attention paid to preserving and resolving mitochondrial membrane morphology and structure. PMID:26324436

  11. Characterization of Septin Ultrastructure in Budding Yeast Using Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Aurélie; Nogales, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Summary Septins are essential for the completion of cytokinesis. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, septins are located at the bud neck during mitosis and are closely connected to the inner plasma membrane. In vitro, yeast septins have been shown to self-assemble into a variety of filamentous structures, including rods, paired filaments, bundles and rings [1–3]. Using electron tomography of freeze-substituted section and cryo-electron tomography of frozen sections, we determined the three dimensional organization of the septin cytoskeleton in dividing budding yeast with molecular resolution [4,5]. Here we describe the detailed procedures used for our characterization of the septin cellular ultrastructure. PMID:26519309

  12. [Ultrastructure of human oligodendroglioma].

    PubMed

    Himuro, H; Kubo, O; Tajika, Y; Kamiya, M; Inoue, N; Hon-ami, T; Kitamura, K

    1983-02-01

    Ten cases of human oligodendroglioma were examined with electron microscope. The materials were specimens derived through surgical operations. Results were as follow. The shape of tumor cells are various, round, oval, polygonal and irregular. The majority of tumor cells have round or ovoid nuclei, some have irregular nuclei or nuclear indentation. Chromatin distributions tend to clump. In the cytoplasm, there are commonly ribosomes, rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulums, mitochondria, microtubules and lysosome. Glial filament is rare or almost absent. Crystalline structures are seen in 3 cases. Cellular junctions, though immature, are seen in 4 cases. Perinuclear halo in the light microscopy was explained to be a fixation artifact in 10% formol. The samples, which were fixed in 2.5% cold glutaraldehyde and post-fixed in 1% osmium tetraoxide, did not show perinclear halo under the light and electron microscope. The specimen, which were fixed in 10% formol, were examined with electron microscope. Plasma membrane of the tumor cell was partly destroyed, intracytoplasmic organelles and matrix were also broken, and the cytoplasm was empty. It is confirmed in this study that empty cytoplasm represents the peculiar perinuclear halo in the light microscopy. PMID:6843766

  13. Modelling mammalian cellular quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible non-proliferating state. The reactivation of ‘sleep-like’ quiescent cells (e.g. fibroblasts, lymphocytes and stem cells) into proliferation is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration and a key to the growth, development and health of higher multicellular organisms, such as mammals. Quiescence has been a primarily phenotypic description (i.e. non-permanent cell cycle arrest) and poorly studied. However, contrary to the earlier thinking that quiescence is simply a passive and dormant state lacking proliferating activities, recent studies have revealed that cellular quiescence is actively maintained in the cell and that it corresponds to a collection of heterogeneous states. Recent modelling and experimental work have suggested that an Rb-E2F bistable switch plays a pivotal role in controlling the quiescence–proliferation balance and the heterogeneous quiescent states. Other quiescence regulatory activities may crosstalk with and impinge upon the Rb-E2F bistable switch, forming a gene network that controls the cells’ quiescent states and their dynamic transitions to proliferation in response to noisy environmental signals. Elucidating the dynamic control mechanisms underlying quiescence may lead to novel therapeutic strategies that re-establish normal quiescent states, in a variety of hyper- and hypo-proliferative diseases, including cancer and ageing. PMID:24904737

  14. Ultrastructural apoptotic lesions induced in bone marrow after neptunium-237 contamination.

    PubMed

    Pusset, D; Boulahdour, H; Fromm, M; Poncy, J L; Kantelip, B; Griffond, B; Baud, M; Galle, P

    2003-01-01

    This study describes the ultrastructure of lesions induced by neptunium-237 (237Np), a by-product of uranium in nuclear reactors, in the bone marrow. A group of rats were given a single injection of 237Np-nitrate solution in order to observe the acute toxicity effects of this actinide. Electron microscopy was used to describe the different lesions. Observations included the swelling of the cell membrane, nuclear membrane lyses, abnormal chromatin condensation or nucleus convolution. These ultrastructural alterations of the nucleus and the cellular membrane appeared shortly after treatment. This study demonstrates the toxic effects of neptunium and its implication in the induction of apoptosis in bone marrow.

  15. Loss of Sleep Affects the Ultrastructure of Pyramidal Neurons in the Adolescent Mouse Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    de Vivo, Luisa; Nelson, Aaron B.; Bellesi, Michele; Noguti, Juliana; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: The adolescent brain may be uniquely affected by acute sleep deprivation (ASD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR), but direct evidence is lacking. We used electron microscopy to examine how ASD and CSR affect pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of adolescent mice, focusing on mitochondria, endosomes, and lysosomes that together perform most basic cellular functions, from nutrient intake to prevention of cellular stress. Methods: Adolescent (1-mo-old) mice slept (S) or were sleep deprived (ASD, with novel objects and running wheels) during the first 6–8 h of the light period, chronically sleep restricted (CSR) for > 4 days (using novel objects, running wheels, social interaction, forced locomotion, caffeinated water), or allowed to recover sleep (RS) for ∼32 h after CSR. Ultrastructural analysis of 350 pyramidal neurons was performed (S = 82; ASD = 86; CSR = 103; RS = 79; 4 to 5 mice/group). Results: Several ultrastructural parameters differed in S versus ASD, S versus CSR, CSR versus RS, and S versus RS, although the different methods used to enforce wake may have contributed to some of the differences between short and long sleep loss. Differences included larger cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondria in CSR versus S, and higher number of secondary lysosomes in CSR versus S and RS. We also found that sleep loss may unmask interindividual differences not obvious during baseline sleep. Moreover, using a combination of 11 ultrastructural parameters, we could predict in up to 80% of cases whether sleep or wake occurred at the single cell level. Conclusions: Ultrastructural analysis may be a powerful tool to identify which cellular organelles, and thus which cellular functions, are most affected by sleep and sleep loss. Citation: de Vivo L, Nelson AB, Bellesi M, Noguti J, Tononi G, Cirelli C. Loss of sleep affects the ultrastructure of pyramidal neurons in the adolescent mouse frontal cortex. SLEEP 2016;39(4):861–874. PMID:26715225

  16. Functional ultrastructure of the plant nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2014-11-01

    Nucleoli are nuclear domains present in almost all eukaryotic cells. They not only specialize in the production of ribosomal subunits but also play roles in many fundamental cellular activities. Concerning ribosome biosynthesis, particular stages of this process, i.e., ribosomal DNA transcription, primary RNA transcript processing, and ribosome assembly proceed in precisely defined nucleolar subdomains. Although eukaryotic nucleoli are conservative in respect of their main function, clear morphological differences between these structures can be noticed between individual kingdoms. In most cases, a plant nucleolus shows well-ordered structure in which four main ultrastructural components can be distinguished: fibrillar centers, dense fibrillar component, granular component, and nucleolar vacuoles. Nucleolar chromatin is an additional crucial structural component of this organelle. Nucleolonema, although it is not always an unequivocally distinguished nucleolar domain, has often been described as a well-grounded morphological element, especially of plant nucleoli. The ratios and morphology of particular subcompartments of a nucleolus can change depending on its metabolic activity which in turn is correlated with the physiological state of a cell, cell type, cell cycle phase, as well as with environmental influence. Precise attribution of functions to particular nucleolar subregions in the process of ribosome biosynthesis is now possible using various approaches. The presented description of plant nucleolar morphology summarizes previous knowledge regarding the function of nucleoli as well as of their particular subdomains not only in the course of ribosome biosynthesis.

  17. Correlated light and electron microscopy: ultrastructure lights up!

    PubMed

    de Boer, Pascal; Hoogenboom, Jacob P; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2015-06-01

    Microscopy has gone hand in hand with the study of living systems since van Leeuwenhoek observed living microorganisms and cells in 1674 using his light microscope. A spectrum of dyes and probes now enable the localization of molecules of interest within living cells by fluorescence microscopy. With electron microscopy (EM), cellular ultrastructure has been revealed. Bridging these two modalities, correlated light microscopy and EM (CLEM) opens new avenues. Studies of protein dynamics with fluorescent proteins (FPs), which leave the investigator 'in the dark' concerning cellular context, can be followed by EM examination. Rare events can be preselected at the light microscopy level before EM analysis. Ongoing development-including of dedicated probes, integrated microscopes, large-scale and three-dimensional EM and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy-now paves the way for broad CLEM implementation in biology.

  18. Assessment of murine bone ultrastructure using synchrotron light: towards nano-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Voide, Romain; Stauber, Martin; Stampanoni, Marco; Donahue, Leah Rae; Wyss, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs; Müller, Ralph

    2006-08-01

    To describe the different aspects of bone quality, we follow a hierarchical approach and assess bone tissue properties in different regimes of spatial resolution, beginning at the organ level and going down to cellular dimensions. For these purposes we developed different synchrotron radiation (SR) based computed-tomography (CT) methods to assess murine bone ultrastructure. In a first step, a tubular system and the osteocyte lacunar system within murine cortical bone have been established as novel ultrastructural quantitative traits. Results in two mouse strains showed that morphometry of these quantitative traits was dependent on strain and partially on gender, and that their scaling behavior with bone size was fundamentally different. In a second step, we explored bone competence on an ultrastructural level and related our findings to the two ultrastructural quantitative traits introduced before. We showed that SR CT imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the initiation and propagation of microcracks, which may alter bone quality and may lead to increased fracture risk by means of microdamage accumulation. In summary, investigation of ultrastructural bone tissue properties will eventually lead to a better understanding of bone quality and its relative contribution to bone competence.

  19. Protein-energy malnutrition alters histological and ultrastructural characteristics of the bone marrow and decreases haematopoiesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J G; Favero, M E; Vinolo, M A R; Rogero, M M; Dagli, M L Z; Arana-Chavez, V E; Borojevic, R; Borelli, P

    2007-06-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) decreases resistance to infection by impairing a number of physiological processes, including haematopoiesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microanatomical aspects of bone marrow (BM) in mice that were subjected to PEM, in particular, with respect to the components of the local extracellular matrix and the proliferative activity of haematopoietic cells. For this, histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural techniques were used. Two-month old male Swiss mice were fed with a low-protein diet containing 4% protein and control mice fed a 20% protein diet. When the experimental group had attained a 25% loss of their original body weight, we collected the different biological samples. Malnourished mice had presented severe BM atrophy as well as a reduction in proliferating cell nuclear antigen and gelatinous degeneration. The malnourished mice had more fibronectin accretion in paratrabecular and endosteal regions and more laminin deposition in perisinusal sites than controls. Endosteal cell activation and hyperplasia were found, suggesting their participation in the process. Additionally, we have observed a decrease in the capacity of malnourished haematopoietic stroma to support the growth of haematopoietic stem cells (CD34+) in vitro. These findings point to a structural impairment of the haematopoietic microenvironments in mice with PEM, possibly hampering the interactions between cells and cellular signalling.

  20. Immunohistochemistry, ultrastructure and pathology of gills of Abramis brama from Lake Mondsee, Austria, infected with Ergasilus sieboldi (Copepoda).

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, Bahram Sayyaf; Giari, Luisa; Konecny, Robert; Jaeger, Paul; Manera, Maurizio

    2003-02-27

    Immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and pathological studies were carried out on the gills of bream Abramis brama (L.) from Lake Mondsee, Austria, that were naturally infected with Ergasilus sieboldi Nordmann, 1832. Of a total of 14 specimens of bream examined, the gills of 7 (50%) were parasitized with this copepod and the intensity of infection ranged from 1 to 23 crustaceans per host. Histopathological investigations of infected gill showed extensive tissue damage due to attachment and feeding of the crustacean. Parasites attached close to the base of filaments near the gill arch. Pressure exerted by the ectoparasite attached to the lateral margin of the gill filaments induced atrophy of the secondary lamellae. Tissue reactions included hyperplasia and mucous cell proliferation of the respiratory epithelium. Mucous cells displayed an intense immunohistochemical reactivity with the anti-nitric oxide synthase antibody. In parasitized primary and secondary lamellae, a high number of eosinophilic granular cells and rodlet cells were noticed. Rodlet cells represent an inflammatory cell type closely linked to other piscine inflammatory cells. Presence of a high number of inflammatory cells at the site of E. sieboldi attachment is related to intense host cellular reaction.

  1. Salivary gland monomorphic adenoma. Ultrastructural, immunoperoxidase, and histogenetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Dardick, I.; Kahn, H. J.; Van Nostrand, A. W.; Baumal, R.

    1984-01-01

    Monomorphic adenoma of basal cell type is a salivary gland tumor believed to result from a proliferation of a single type of cell. However, ultrastructural and immunocytochemical investigations of 6 monomorphic adenomas (5 from parotid and 1 from intraoral minor salivary gland) indicate that there are two classes of these lesions, one composed of two types of tumor cells and the other wholly or predominantly made up of one type of cell (isomorphic). In the former group, the organization of the tumor cells closely mimicked that of normal and hyperplastic salivary gland intercalated ducts. Aggregates of tumor cells were arranged as an inner layer of luminal epithelial cells which were surrounded by an outer layer of cells that, in some cases, had ultrastructural and immunohistochemical features indicating myoepithelial cell differentiation. In some adenomas formed by two types of tumor cells, basal-lamina-lined extracellular spaces were identified ultrastructurally in relation to modified myoepithelial cells; such spaces had the same fine-structural features as those reported in pleomorphic adenoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. Predominantly isomorphic adenomas were composed exclusively of luminal epithelial cells. These results indicate that despite the varied histologic patterns in the numerous subtypes of monomorphic adenoma, there is a central theme of differentiation and organization in this type of neoplasm which recapitulates the ductoacinar unit of normal salivary gland parenchyma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6375388

  2. Ultrastructural Analysis of Candida albicans When Exposed to Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Muñoz, Roberto; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, and recently some studies have reported the antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against some Candida species. However, ultrastructural analyses on the interaction of AgNPs with these microorganisms have not been reported. In this work we evaluated the effect of AgNPs on C. albicans, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was found to have a fungicidal effect. The IC50 was also determined, and the use of AgNPs with fluconazole (FLC), a fungistatic drug, reduced cell proliferation. In order to understand how AgNPs interact with living cells, the ultrastructural distribution of AgNPs in this fungus was determined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed a high accumulation of AgNPs outside the cells but also smaller nanoparticles (NPs) localized throughout the cytoplasm. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirmed the presence of intracellular silver. From our results it is assumed that AgNPs used in this study do not penetrate the cell, but instead release silver ions that infiltrate into the cell leading to the formation of NPs through reduction by organic compounds present in the cell wall and cytoplasm. PMID:25290909

  3. On the ultrastructure of the canine mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed Central

    Sinowatz, S; Wrobel, K H; El Etreby, M F; Sinowatz, F

    1980-01-01

    During pregnancy and lactation marked changes are observed in the fine structure of the secretory cells in the Beagle mammary gland: especially pronounced are differences in cellular height, shape and size of the nuclei and distribution of mitochondria. In later stages of pregnancy a proceeding development of those cellular organelles involved in synthesis and extrusion of secretory material (i.e. rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus) can be observed. Myoepithelial cells which can be first discerned from secretory cells by ultrastructural features from day 40 on show only minor variations of their ultrastructure during pregnancy and lactation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Figs. 12-13 Fig. 14 PMID:7462099

  4. Ultrastructural characteristics of type A epithelioid cells during BCG-granulomatosis and treatment with lysosomotropic isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Shkurupii, V A; Kozyaev, M A; Nadeev, A P

    2006-04-01

    We studied BCG-granulomas, their cellular composition, and ultrastructure of type A epithelioid cells in the liver of male BALB/c mice with spontaneous granulomatous inflammation. The animals received free isoniazid or isoniazid conjugated with lysosomotropic intracellularly prolonged matrix (dialdehyde dextran, molecular weight 65-75 kDa). Lysosomotropic isoniazid was accumulated in the vacuolar apparatus of epithelioid cells and produced a stimulatory effect on plastic processes in these cells.

  5. Ultrastructural alterations during embryonic rats' lung development caused by ozone.

    PubMed

    López, Irma; Sánchez, Ivonne; Bizarro, Patricia; Acevedo, Sandra; Ustarroz, Martha; Fortoul, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is an oxidizing agent that acts on phospholipids, proteins and sugars of cellular membranes producing free radicals, which cause oxidative damages. The O3 exposure has been used as a model to study oxidative stress, in which the respiratory airways represent the entrance to the organism. In this study, ultrastructural alterations were identified at the bronchiolar level during the intra-uterine lung development, using an O3 exposure model in pregnant rats during 18, 20 and 21 days of gestation. Twelve pregnant Wistar rats, six controls and six exposed to 1 ppm O3 inhalation during 12 h per day, were used. The rats were sacrificed at gestational days 18, 20 and 21; the fetuses were obtained and their lungs dissected. The ultrastructural analysis evidenced swollen mitochondria, cytoplasmic vacuolization of the epithelial cells and structural disorder caused by the oxidative stress. At gestation day 20, flake-off epithelial cells and laminar bodies in the bronchiolar lumen were observed. In the 21-gestation-day group, the mitochondria were edematous and their cristae were disrupted by the damage caused in mitochondrial membranes. PMID:18083976

  6. Effect of Hydrofiber wound dressings on bacterial ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Hobot, Jan; Walker, Michael; Newman, Geoffrey; Bowler, Philip

    2008-04-01

    Ionic silver has well-proven bactericidal properties, and silver-containing wound dressings are now widely used to aid in the creation of an antimicrobial environment in wounds. The effect of silver ions on bacterial ultrastructure can best be studied by viewing bacterial cells under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Bacterial cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were incubated within a control dressing (e.g. a non-antimicrobial Hydrofiber dressing) (Hydrofiber is a registered trademark of E.R. Squibb and Sons, L.L.C.) and a silver-containing Hydrofiber dressing, followed by processing for TEM. Liquid cultures, with and without silver, were prepared for comparison. The addition of silver to growing bacterial cultures stopped growth of the cells very quickly. Ultrastructurally, the presence of silver was found to affect both the shape of the bacterial nucleoid and the organization of bacterial DNA. X-ray microanalysis of bacteria from liquid cultures showed the presence of silver within silver-treated cells and the absence of calcium. It is suggested that the presence of available silver ions within the Hydrofiber dressing could lead to the loss of cellular ions, vital for maintaining the structural integrity of the nuclear area.

  7. Ultrastructure of cilia and flagella - back to the future!

    PubMed

    Fisch, Cathy; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2011-06-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella perform motility and sensory functions which are essential for cell survival in protozoans, and to organism development and homoeostasis in metazoans. Their ultrastructure has been studied from the early beginnings of electron microscopy, and these studies continue to contribute to much of our understanding about ciliary biology. In the light of the progress made in the visualization of cellular structures over the last decade, we revisit the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella. We briefly describe the typical features of a 9+2 axoneme before focusing extensively on the transition zone, the ciliary necklace, the singlet zone, the ciliary cap and the ciliary crown. We discuss how the singlet zone is linked to sensory and/or motile function, the contribution of the ciliary crown to ovocyte and mucosal propulsion, and the relationship between the ciliary cap and microtubule growth and shortening, and its relation to ciliary beat. We further examine the involvement of the transition zone/the ciliary necklace in axonemal stabilization, autotomy and as a diffusion barrier.

  8. A morphometric analysis of cellular differentiation in caps of primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine if patterns of cell differentiation are similar in primary and lateral roots, I performed a morphometric analysis of the ultrastructure of calyptrogen, columella, and peripheral cells in primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus. Each cell type is characterized by a unique ultrastructure, and the ultrastructural changes characteristic of cellular differentiation in root caps are organelle specific. No major structural differences exist in the structures of the composite cell types, or in patterns of cell differentiation in caps of primary vs. lateral roots.

  9. Ultrastructural changes in rat epididymides induced by cowpeas.

    PubMed

    Umapathy, E; Msamati, B C; Torode, M

    1994-01-01

    The ultrastructure of tubular inclusions of caput and cauda epididymides were studied in rats that were fed only cowpeas from weaning (20-22 days old) to 130 days. The results showed significant (p < .001) fall in body weight and testicular, caput, and cauda epididymal weights in the cowpea-fed animals. Although the walls of the epididymides remained intact, the lumina of both segments showed cellular inclusions of various types amid sperm clumps. Unlike controls, where sperm flagella and headpieces were free-floating in lumina of both segments of epididymides, the experimental tubules showed cytoplasmic droplets containing trapped flagella at various stages of disintegration. Other inclusions included multilobular giant cells, lymphocytes, and membrane-bound amorphous bodies. It is proposed that these changes might be due to an altered immune response induced by lectins, one of the antinutritional factors found in cowpeas, which causes epididymal dysfunction and possibly renders these animals infertile. PMID:8166576

  10. [The rebirth of the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella].

    PubMed

    Fisch, Cathy; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    The sensory and motility functions of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for cell survival in protozoans and for cell differentiation and homoeostasis in metazoans. Ciliary biology has benefited early on from the input of electron microscopy. Over the last decade, the visualization of cellular structures has greatly progressed, thus it becomes timely to review the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella. Briefly touching upon the typical features of a 9+2 axoneme, we dwell extensively on the transition zone, the singlet zone, the ciliary necklace, cap and crown. The relation of the singlet zone to sensory and/or motile function, the link of the ciliary cap to microtubule dynamics and to ciliary beat, the involvement of the ciliary crown in ovocyte and mucosal propulsion, and the role of the transition zone/the ciliary necklace in axonemal stabilization, autotomy and as a diffusion barrier will all be discussed.

  11. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT): an ultrastructural study of six cases.

    PubMed

    Kordek, R; Biernat, W; Zakrzewski, K; Polis, L; Liberski, P P

    1999-01-01

    We report six cases od DNT with a detailed ultrastructural characteristics. The patient age ranged from 7 to 16 years (mean 12), the location was temporal in three cases and frontal, temporooccipital and parietooccipital in each of one remaining cases. The predominant clinical feature in each case was history of episodes of intractable seizures. Histopathologically, the neoplasms were multinodular, each nodule was well-circumscribed and was composed of glioneuronal elements embedded in the variable amount of myxoid matrix. The oligodendroglial-like cells (OLC) predominated in the nodules with some accompanying mature neurons. The nodules were frequently surrounded by small calcifications which could be found also within the tumors. OLCs were immunoreactive for S-100 protein and neurons had the expression of synaptophysin and neurofilament proteins. Ultrastructurally, each tumor consisted of three major elements: neoplastic cells (OLC), elongated processes forming neuropil-like structure and expanded "mucoid" extracellular space: the latter gave an impression of cellular elements floating within it. Neoplastic cells had round, oval or elongated nuclei, no discernible nucleoli and a relatively narrow rim of the cytoplasm. Some nuclei were irregular and invaginated and pseudoinclusions were observed; a part of cytoplasm sequestered within pseudoinclusions often appeared degenerated with large blabs and electron-lucent vesicles, some of these contained in turn semicircular profiles of unknown significance. The second element consisted of innumerable cellular processes. Some of these were elongated and formed stacks connected by symmetrical symmetric or asymmetric adhesive plaque junctions. The others had shorter "neck" containing microtubules, these extended into bullous extensions. Dense-cored vesicles were occasionally observed, in both cytoplasm of neoplastic cells and within processes. In one cell, cross-sectioned annulate lamellae were found. In cytoplasm of a few

  12. Dysembryoplastic neuroectodermal tumor: an ultrastructural study of six cases.

    PubMed

    Biernat, W; Liberski, P P; Kordek, R; Zakrzewski, K; Polis, L; Budka, H

    2001-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroectodermal tumor (DNT) is a rare brain neoplasm. Although the tumor pathology is relatively well charactererized, its full clinicopathological spectrum is still discussed, and ultrastructural data on it are very limited. Here, the authors describe detailed ultrastructural pathology of 7 cases of DNT. Each tumor consisted of 3 major elements: neoplastic cells (oligodendroglial-like cells, OLC), elongated processes forming neuropil-like structure, and expanded "mucoid" extracellular space, the latter giving an impression of cellular elements floating within it. Neoplastic cells had round, oval, or elongated nuclei, no discernible nucleoli, and a relatively narrow rim of cytoplasm. Some nuclei were irregular and invaginated, and pseudoinclusions (invaginations of cytoplasm penetrated into toroid-like nuclear formations) were observed. Part of the cytoplasm sequestrated within pseudoinclusions often appeared degenerated with large blebs and electron-lucent vesicles, and some of these contained, in turn, semicircular profiles of unknown significance. Chromatin was clustered below the nuclear membrane. The cytoplasm contained a few mitochondria, round rather than elongated, a few stacks of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and scanty microtubules and clear vesicles. The second element consisted of innumerable cellular processes. Some of these were elongated and formed stacks connected by symmetric or asymetric adhesive plaque junctions. Others had shorter "neck" containing microtubules extending into bulbous extensions. Dense-cored vesicles were occasionally observed, both in the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells and within processes. In one cell, cross-sectioned annulate lamellae were found. In the cytoplasm of a few cells, unusual inclusions reminiscent of ribosome-lamellae resembled "laboratory tubes" with cone-like endings. At higher power, walls of the "tubes" resolved into layered structures composed of several laminae; between these, ribosome

  13. Ultrastructure of bovine sperm chromatin.

    PubMed

    Filho, Romualdo Morandi; Beletti, Marcelo Emilio; de Oliveira, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian semen chromatin comprises DNA, protamine, and, at lower levels, other proteins. This constitution confers intense compaction to the chromatin, helping to protect the DNA and causing the head of the sperm to be very small, facilitating the safe transport of its genetic contents. It is known that changes in the sperm chromatin compaction lead to fertility problems in bulls, justifying studies of this structure. Although there are theoretical models of sperm chromatin because of its high compaction, there is no morphological evidence of such models. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ultrastructure of bovine sperm chromatin in an attempt to corroborate the theoretical chromatin models existing today. The isolated bull sperm heads had their chromatin partially unpacked by chemical treatment using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dithiothreitol (DTT) and were then embedded in Epon resin. Using an ultramicrotome, ultrathin sections were obtained, which were contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and then viewed under transmission electron microscopy. The methodology used allowed the visualization of toroidal structures interconnected by a filamentous nuclear matrix, which is entirely consistent with the most current theoretical models. PMID:26515508

  14. Ultrastructure and three-dimensional imaging of epimyoepithelial islands in benign lymphoepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, T; Morita, M; Ishii, T

    1995-01-01

    Benign lymphoepithelial lesions of the salivary glands associated with Sjögren's syndrome are characterized by extensive infiltration of lymphoid cells, atrophy of acini and the presence of so-called epimyoepithelial islands. This report describes ultrastructural and three-dimensional reconstructive studies of epimyoepithelial islands performed at Tokyo Women's Medical College. Ultrastructural examination showed that these islands are composed mainly of epithelial cells containing intermediate filaments and/or tonofilament bundles, scattered lymphocytes and plasma cells. Myoepithelium-like cells containing myofilaments were sometimes found in the peripheral portion of the myoepithelial islands. Also, mitotic figures were rarely found in these islands. Three-dimensional reconstructive study revealed that the epimyoepithelial islands are not isolated cell clusters but are continuous hypertrophic duct-like structures. These results suggest that the epimyoepithelial islands are derived from proliferating duct epithelial cells, especially those of large peripheral ducts.

  15. Ultrastructural and morphological changes in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis treated with synthetic chalcones.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Tatiane F P; Cardoso, Bruna M; Bitencourt, Heriberto R; Donatti, Lucélia; Aristides, Sandra M A; Lonardoni, Maria V C; Silveira, Thais G V

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis has an estimated incidence of 1.5 million new cases per year and the treatment options available are old, expensive, toxic, and difficult to administer. Chalcones have shown good activity against several species of Leishmania. However few studies have discussed the mechanisms of action and drug target of this group of compounds in Leishmania. The synthetic chalcones that were evaluated in the present study were previously shown to exhibit activity against Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. The objective of the present study was to identify ultrastructural and morphological changes in L. (V.) braziliensis after treatment with three synthetic chalcones (1-3). Promastigotes were treated with chalcones 1-3 and evaluated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Cellular and nuclear morphology of the parasites, changes in membrane permeability, and DNA fragmentation in agarose electrophoresis gel were also investigated after exposure to synthetic chalcones. All three synthetic chalcones (1-3) induced ultrastructural alterations in mitochondria, intense vacuolization, two nuclei with rounding of parasites, and cellular and nuclear shrinkage. Chalcones 1-3 also induced no changes in membrane permeability, and presence of nucleosome-sized DNA fragments. Synthetic chalcones 1-3 induced ultrastructural and morphological changes, suggesting that chalcones 1-3 induce apoptosis-like cell death. Further studies should be conducted to elucidate other aspects of the action of these chalcones against Leishmania spp. and their use for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  16. Characterisation of Growth and Ultrastructural Effects of the Xanthoria elegans Photobiont After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Annette; Posthoff, Eva; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Onofri, Silvano; Ott, Sieglinde

    2016-06-01

    The lichen Xanthoria elegans has been exposed to space and simulated Mars-analogue environment in the Lichen and Fungi Experiment (LIFE) on the EXPOSE-E facility at the International Space Station (ISS). This long-term exposure of 559 days tested the ability of various organisms to cope with either low earth orbit (LEO) or Mars-analogue conditions, such as vacuum, Mars-analogue atmosphere, rapid temperature cycling, cosmic radiation of up to 215 ± 16 mGy, and insolation of accumulated doses up to 4.87 GJm-2, including up to 0.314 GJm-2 of UV irradiation. In a previous study, X. elegans demonstrated considerable resistance towards these conditions by means of photosynthetic activity as well as by post-exposure metabolic activity of 50-80 % in the algal and 60-90 % in the fungal symbiont (Brandt et al. Int J Astrobiol 14(3):411-425, 2015). The two objectives of the present study were complementary: First, to verify the high post-exposure viability by using a qualitative cultivation assay. Second, to characterise the cellular damages by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) which were caused by the space and Mars-analogue exposure conditions of LIFE. Since the algal symbiont of lichens is considered as the more susceptible partner (de Vera and Ott 2010), the analyses focused on the photobiont. The study demonstrated growth and proliferation of the isolated photobiont after all exposure conditions of LIFE. The ultrastructural analysis of the algal cells provided an insight to cellular damages caused by long-term exposure and highlighted that desiccation-induced breakdown of cellular integrity is more pronounced under the more severe space vacuum than under Mars-analogue atmospheric conditions. In conclusion, desiccation-induced damages were identified as a major threat to the photobiont of X. elegans. Nonetheless, a fraction of the photobiont cells remained cultivable after all exposure conditions tested in LIFE.

  17. Characterisation of Growth and Ultrastructural Effects of the Xanthoria elegans Photobiont After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Annette; Posthoff, Eva; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Onofri, Silvano; Ott, Sieglinde

    2016-06-01

    The lichen Xanthoria elegans has been exposed to space and simulated Mars-analogue environment in the Lichen and Fungi Experiment (LIFE) on the EXPOSE-E facility at the International Space Station (ISS). This long-term exposure of 559 days tested the ability of various organisms to cope with either low earth orbit (LEO) or Mars-analogue conditions, such as vacuum, Mars-analogue atmosphere, rapid temperature cycling, cosmic radiation of up to 215 ± 16 mGy, and insolation of accumulated doses up to 4.87 GJm(-2), including up to 0.314 GJm(-2) of UV irradiation. In a previous study, X. elegans demonstrated considerable resistance towards these conditions by means of photosynthetic activity as well as by post-exposure metabolic activity of 50-80% in the algal and 60-90% in the fungal symbiont (Brandt et al. Int J Astrobiol 14(3):411-425, 2015). The two objectives of the present study were complementary: First, to verify the high post-exposure viability by using a qualitative cultivation assay. Second, to characterise the cellular damages by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) which were caused by the space and Mars-analogue exposure conditions of LIFE. Since the algal symbiont of lichens is considered as the more susceptible partner (de Vera and Ott 2010), the analyses focused on the photobiont. The study demonstrated growth and proliferation of the isolated photobiont after all exposure conditions of LIFE. The ultrastructural analysis of the algal cells provided an insight to cellular damages caused by long-term exposure and highlighted that desiccation-induced breakdown of cellular integrity is more pronounced under the more severe space vacuum than under Mars-analogue atmospheric conditions. In conclusion, desiccation-induced damages were identified as a major threat to the photobiont of X. elegans. Nonetheless, a fraction of the photobiont cells remained cultivable after all exposure conditions tested in LIFE. PMID:26526425

  18. Characterisation of Growth and Ultrastructural Effects of the Xanthoria elegans Photobiont After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Annette; Posthoff, Eva; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Onofri, Silvano; Ott, Sieglinde

    2016-06-01

    The lichen Xanthoria elegans has been exposed to space and simulated Mars-analogue environment in the Lichen and Fungi Experiment (LIFE) on the EXPOSE-E facility at the International Space Station (ISS). This long-term exposure of 559 days tested the ability of various organisms to cope with either low earth orbit (LEO) or Mars-analogue conditions, such as vacuum, Mars-analogue atmosphere, rapid temperature cycling, cosmic radiation of up to 215 ± 16 mGy, and insolation of accumulated doses up to 4.87 GJm(-2), including up to 0.314 GJm(-2) of UV irradiation. In a previous study, X. elegans demonstrated considerable resistance towards these conditions by means of photosynthetic activity as well as by post-exposure metabolic activity of 50-80% in the algal and 60-90% in the fungal symbiont (Brandt et al. Int J Astrobiol 14(3):411-425, 2015). The two objectives of the present study were complementary: First, to verify the high post-exposure viability by using a qualitative cultivation assay. Second, to characterise the cellular damages by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) which were caused by the space and Mars-analogue exposure conditions of LIFE. Since the algal symbiont of lichens is considered as the more susceptible partner (de Vera and Ott 2010), the analyses focused on the photobiont. The study demonstrated growth and proliferation of the isolated photobiont after all exposure conditions of LIFE. The ultrastructural analysis of the algal cells provided an insight to cellular damages caused by long-term exposure and highlighted that desiccation-induced breakdown of cellular integrity is more pronounced under the more severe space vacuum than under Mars-analogue atmospheric conditions. In conclusion, desiccation-induced damages were identified as a major threat to the photobiont of X. elegans. Nonetheless, a fraction of the photobiont cells remained cultivable after all exposure conditions tested in LIFE.

  19. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review.

  20. Ultrastructural analysis of the decellularized cornea after interlamellar keratoplasty and microkeratome-assisted anterior lamellar keratoplasty in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yoshihide; Hattori, Shinya; Sasaki, Shuji; Honda, Takako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Kishida, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The decellularized cornea has received considerable attention for use as an artificial cornea. The decellularized cornea is free from cellular components and other immunogens, but maintains the integrity of the extracellular matrix. However, the ultrastructure of the decellularized cornea has yet to be demonstrated in detail. We investigated the influence of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the decellularization of the corneal ultrastructure and its involvement in transparency, and assessed the in vivo behaviour of the decellularized cornea using two animal transplantation models, in relation to remodelling of collagen fibrils. Decellularized corneas were prepared by the HHP method. The decellularized corneas were executed by haematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining to demonstrate the complete removal of corneal cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructure of the decellularized cornea prepared by the HHP method was better maintained than that of the decellularized cornea prepared by the detergent method. The decellularized cornea after interlamellar keratoplasty and microkeratome-assisted anterior lamellar keratoplasty using a rabbit model was stable and remained transparent without ultrastructural alterations. We conclude that the superior properties of the decellularized cornea prepared by the HHP method were attributed to the preservation of the corneal ultrastructure. PMID:27291975

  1. Ultrastructural Imaging of Endocytic Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Immunolabeling

    PubMed Central

    Buser, Christopher; Drubin, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the ultrastructure of endocytic sites and localization of endocytic proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by immunoelectron microscopy is central in understanding the mechanisms of membrane deformation and scission during endocytosis. We show that an improved sample preparation protocol based on high-pressure freezing, freeze substitution, and low-temperature embedding allows us to maintain the cellular fine structure and to immunolabel green fluorescent protein–tagged endocytic proteins or actin in the same sections. Using this technique we analyzed the stepwise deformation of endocytic membranes and immuno-localized the endocytic proteins Abp1p, Sla1p, Rvs167p, and actin, and were able to draw a clear ultrastructural distinction between endocytic sites and eisosomes by immunolocalizing Pil1p. In addition to defining the geometry and the fine structure of budding yeast endocytic sites, we observed associated actin filaments forming a cage-like meshwork around the endocytic membrane. PMID:23458500

  2. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation.

    PubMed

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl C H; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. PMID:26259873

  3. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation

    PubMed Central

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl CH; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05793.001 PMID:26259873

  4. The selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, A63162 reduces PC3 proliferation and initiates morphologic changes consistent with secretion.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T.; Ondrey, F.; Harris, J. E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Rush Medical Coll.; Univ. of Minnesota

    1994-09-01

    We examined the effect of A63162 (Abbott), a selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase on human prostate (PC3) cell proliferation. Within 5 min DNA synthesis was reversibly inhibited by 40 {micro}M A63162, without altered cellular attachment or uptake of trypan blue. After 72 Hr, cells continues to be attached and exclude dye, were reduced in number and their histology was altered. Many treated cells were larger, more pleomorphic, with nuclear and cytoplasmic ultrastructural changes consistent with preparation for secretion. Some cells contained moderately swollen, distorted mitochondria. ETYA, a less selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase that also inhibits cell replication, acutely reduced O2 uptake by 40%, but A63162 did not. The retention of the supravital mitochondrial dye, rhodamine 123 was increased by ETYA at 4 hr, but not after 24 hr; retention was not altered by A63162. Although the mechanism by which A63162 reversibly inhibits PC3 proliferation and initiates preparation for secretion is not identified, additional studies should further define its role in these events

  5. Effects of camptothecin derivatives and topoisomerase dual inhibitors on Trypanosoma cruzi growth and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease that is an endemic disease in Latin America and affects about 8 million people. This parasite belongs to the Trypanosomatidae family which contains a single mitochondrion with an enlarged region, named kinetoplast that harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). The kinetoplast and the nucleus present a great variety of essential enzymes involved in DNA replication and topology, including DNA topoisomerases. Such enzymes are considered to be promising molecular targets for cancer treatment and for antiparasitic chemotherapy. In this work, the proliferation and ultrastructure of T. cruzi epimastigotes were evaluated after treatment with eukaryotic topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as topotecan and irinotecan, as well as with dual inhibitors (compounds that block eukaryotic topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II activities), such as baicalein, luteolin and evodiamine. Previous studies have shown that such inhibitors were able to block the growth of tumor cells, however most of them have never been tested on trypanosomatids. Results Considering the effects of topoisomerase I inhibitors, our results showed that topotecan decreased cell proliferation and caused unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin, however none of these alterations were observed after treatment with irinotecan. The dual inhibitors baicalein and evodiamine decreased cell growth; however the nuclear and kinetoplast ultrastructures were not affected. Conclusions Taken together, our data showed that camptothecin is more efficient than its derivatives in decreasing T. cruzi proliferation. Furthermore, we conclude that drugs pertaining to a certain class of topoisomerase inhibitors may present different efficiencies as chemotherapeutical agents. PMID:24917086

  6. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  7. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  8. The Effect of Spaceflight on the Ultrastructure of the Cerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, Gay R.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2003-01-01

    In weightlessness, astronauts and cosmonauts may experience postural illusions as well as motion sickness symptoms known as the space adaptation syndrome. Upon return to Earth, they have irregularities in posture and balance. The adaptation to microgravity and subsequent re-adaptation to Earth occurs over several days. At the cellular level, a process called neuronal plasticity may mediate this adaptation. The term plasticity refers to the flexibility and modifiability in the architecture and functions of the nervous system. In fact, plastic changes are thought to underlie not just behavioral adaptation, but also the more generalized phenomena of learning and memory. The goal of this experiment was to identify some of the structural alterations that occur in the rat brain during the sensory and motor adaptation to microgravity. One brain region where plasticity has been studied extensively is the cerebellar cortex-a structure thought to be critical for motor control, coordination, the timing of movements, and, most relevant to the present experiment, motor learning. Also, there are direct as well as indirect connections between projections from the gravity-sensing otolith organs and several subregions of the cerebellum. We tested the hypothesis that alterations in the ultrastructural (the structure within the cell) architecture of rat cerebellar cortex occur during the early period of adaptation to microgravity, as the cerebellum adapts to the absence of the usual gravitational inputs. The results show ultrastructural evidence for neuronal plasticity in the central nervous system of adult rats after 24 hours of spaceflight. Qualitative studies conducted on tissue from the cerebellar cortex (specifically, the nodulus of the cerebellum) indicate that ultrastructural signs of plasticity are present in the cerebellar zones that receive input from the gravity-sensing organs in the inner ear (the otoliths). These changes are not observed in this region in cagematched

  9. Influence of basic fibroblast growth factor and astroglial cells on the ultrastructure of developing rat brain neuronal precursors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miehe, M; Leterrier, J F; Deloulme, J C; Gensburger, C; Knoetgen, M F; Sensenbrenner, M

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the ultrastructural aspect of neuronal precursors derived from 14-day-old rat embryos during their development under various culture conditions. Cells maintained in serum-free medium which have developed for 1 week in vitro present ultrastructural features of young neurons. They contain many free ribosomes and microtubules, but few other organelles and incompletely developed Golgi apparatus. In the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), besides cells remaining in aggregates and displaying morphological features of undifferentiated cells, dispersed neuroblasts underwent accelerated ultrastructural maturation. They present well-developed Golgi apparatus, axodendritic synapses and dense-core vesicles already after 3 days in culture. By contrast, in the presence of astroglial-conditioned medium a more homogeneous population developed showing ultrastructural features of relatively mature neurons. However, the neuronal precursors acquired the most mature ultrastructural aspect when they were cocultured with astroglial cells. The neuronal cell bodies contain highly developed Golgi complexes, well-differentiated ergastoplasm and Niss1 body formations, while in the complex neurite network much more numerous mature synapses with clear and dense-core vesicles are visible. These observations indicate that a combination of soluble factors and membrane-bound factors is essential for extensive ultrastructural development of neuronal precursors in vitro. Another finding was that in these cultured neurons neurofilaments (NF) were never seen, while NF protein subunits were found. These data suggest that the polymerization of the three NF subunits into intermediate filaments might need particular cellular factors which probably do not exist under our in vitro conditions.

  10. Comparative characteristic of mitochondria ultrastructural organization in Chlorella cells under altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, A. F.

    2003-05-01

    Results from experiments that used cells from the unicellular alga Chlorella vulgaris (strain Larg-1) grown on a clinostat, demonstrated the occurrence of rearrangements in cellular organelles, including changes in the mitochondrial ultrastructure compared to controls. Changes in mitochondrial structure were observed in auto- and heterotrophic regimes of cells grown in altered gravity conditions, especially in long-term experiments. The mitochondrial rearrangements become apparent during cell proliferation, which resulted in an increase in the relative volume of mitochondria per cell: up to 2.7±0.3% in short-term clino-rotation (2.2±0.1% in the control) and up to 5.3±0.4% and 5.1±0.4% in long-term clino-rotation (2.3±0.2% in the control). The size of the mitochondria and their cristae increased in cells grown under long-time clino-rotation. In addition, hypertrophied organelles, not typical for this strain, were observed. These changes in the cells were accompanied by increased electron density of the matrix and a well-ordered topography of the cristae. To examine the separation of oxidative phosphorylation and respiration, an inhibitory agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) was applied to cells which resulted in insignificant volume changes of the mitochondria (2.5±0.4% versus 2.1±0.2% in the control). The increase of mitochondrial size with regularly arranged cristae, with more condensed matrix and extension of cristae areas of clino-rotated cells, may demonstrate higher functional activity of the mitochondria under altered gravity conditions. Changes observed early in clino-rotated cells, in particular the increased level of respiration, adenylate content (especially ATP) and more intensive electron-cytochemical reactions of Mg 2+-ATPase and succinat dehydrogenase (SDH) in mitochondria (including hypertrophic organelles), also suggest increased activity of mitochondria from cells grown under altered gravity conditions compared to controls.

  11. Correlation of some cytomorphological and ultrastructural modifications of synovial fluid in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, A; Ciobanu, I R; Stroescu, I; Stoicescu, M; Gorinoiu, G; Stroe, S; Marian, M

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been performed on 25 synovial fluid samples from patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (mono- and polyarticular forms) and with hydroarthrosis, the latter considered as controls. By cytomorphologic studies, we determined the cellularity, ragocytosis and synoviocytogram of the synovial fluid cellular pellet and found out that the synovial fluid from cases of juvenile chronic arthritis is characterised by cytosis (11.270/mm3; 15.275/mm3), polynucleosis (67.3%, 72.2%) and ragocytosis (12.8%, 17.5%) whereas hydroarthrosis synovial fluid is characterised by lymphocytosis (47.8%). Ultrastructurally, ragocyte-like polymorphonuclear cells are characterised by: a) segmentation of the nucleus and preferential concentration of chromatime on the periphery of the nuclear membrane: b) frequent intracytoplasmic inclusions and phagolysosomes. Phagocyte-like mononuclear cells present numerous inclusions and phagolysosomes, certainly indicating an endocytic activity. Lymphocytes are characterised by a narrow cytoplasmic rim, presenting relatively few cellular organelles. They coexist with immunely activated lymphocytes rich in cytoplasm, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticle. Corroboration of cytomorphological and ultrastructural date enables us to explain the morphological modifications and emphasize their importance in juvenile chronic arthritis pathogenesis and diagnosis. PMID:8772365

  12. Pulsed electromagnetic wave exposure induces ultrastructural damage and upregulated expression of heat shock protein 70 in the rat adenohypophysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Ren, Dong-Qing; Yi, Jun; Zhou, Xiao-Guang; Yang, Wen-Qing; Chen, Yong-Bin; Li, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Zeng, Gui-Ying

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ultrastructural damage and the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in the rat adenohypophysis following pulsed electromagnetic wave (PEMW) exposure. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: Sham PEMW exposure, 1 x 10(4) pulses of PEMW exposure, 1 x 10(5) pulses of PEMW exposure and 3 x 10(5) pulses of PEMW exposure. Whole body radiation of 1 x 10(4) pulses, 1 x 10(5) pulses and 3 x 10(5) pulses of PEMW were delivered with a field strength of 100 kV/m. The rats in each group (n=6 in each) were sacrificed 12, 24, 48 and 96 h after PEMW exposure. Transmission electron microscopy was then used to detect the ultrastructural changes and immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of HSP70. Cellular damage, including mitochondrial vacuolation occurred as early as 12 h after PEMW exposure.More severe cellular damages, including cell degeneration and necrosis, occurred 24 and 48 h after PEMW exposure. The PEMW-induced cellular damage increased as the number of PEMW pulses increased. In addition, the expression of HSP70 significantly increased following PEMW exposure and peaked after 12 h. These findings suggested that PEMW induced ultrastructural damages in the rat adenohypophysis and that HSP70 may have contributed to the PEMW-induced adenohypophyseal damage.

  13. Ultrastructural analysis of testicular tissue and sperm by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chemes, Hector E

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have provided the basis for an in-depth understanding of the cell biology and normal functioning of the testis and male gametes and have opened the way to characterize the functional role played by specific organelles in spermatogenesis and sperm function. The development of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) extended these boundaries to the recognition of cell and organ surface features and the architectural array of cells and tissues. The merging of immunocytochemical and histochemical approaches with electron microscopy has completed a series of technical improvements that integrate structural and functional features to provide a broad understanding of cell biology in health and disease. With these advances the detailed study of the intricate structural and molecular organization as well as the chemical composition of cellular organelles is now possible. Immunocytochemistry is used to identify proteins or other components and localize them in specific cells or organelles with high specificity and sensitivity, and histochemistry can be used to understand their function (i.e., enzyme activity). When these techniques are used in conjunction with electron microscopy their resolving power is further increased to subcellular levels. In the present chapter we will describe in detail various ultrastructural techniques that are now available for basic or translational research in reproductive biology and reproductive medicine. These include TEM, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural histochemistry, and SEM.

  14. Ultrastructural Analysis of Leishmania infantum chagasi Promastigotes Forms Treated In Vitro with Usnic Acid

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, João S. B.; de Oliveira, Erwelly B.; Martins, Monica C. B.; da Silva, Nicácio H.; Alves, Luiz C.; dos Santos, Fábio A. B.; da Silva, Luiz L. S.; Silva, Eliete C.; de Medeiros, Paloma L.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is considered by the World Health Organization as one of the infectious parasitic diseases endemic of great relevance and a global public health problem. Pentavalent antimonials used for treatment of this disease are limited and new phytochemicals emerge as an alternative to existing treatments, due to the low toxicity and cost reduction. Usnic acid is uniquely found in lichens and is especially abundant in genera such as Alectoria, Cladonia, Evernia, Lecanora, Ramalina, and Usnea. Usnic acid has been shown to exhibit antiviral, antiprotozoal, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileishmanial activity of usnic acid on Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes and the occurrence of drug-induced ultrastructural damage in the parasite. Usnic acid was effective against the promastigote forms (IC50 = 18.30 ± 2.00 µg/mL). Structural and ultrastructural aspects of parasite were analyzed. Morphological alterations were observed as blebs in cell membrane and shapes given off, increasing the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, and cellular and mitochondrial swelling, with loss of cell polarity. We concluded that the usnic acid presented antileishmanial activity against promastigote forms of Leishmania infantum chagasi and structural and ultrastructural analysis reinforces its cytotoxicity. Further, in vitro studies are warranted to further evaluate this potential. PMID:25767824

  15. Meibomian gland studies: histologic and ultrastructural investigations.

    PubMed

    Jester, J V; Nicolaides, N; Smith, R E

    1981-04-01

    Heightened interest in meibomian gland dysfunction has prompted us to evaluate the normal morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of the meibomian gland. Histologic analysis of human, primate, steer, and rabbit glands revealed evidence of keratinized epithelium extending throughout the meibomian gland duct. Characteristic ultrastructural features of keratinized epithelium identified in primate and rabbit glands included tonofilaments, keratohyaline granules, lamellar bodies, and keratinized squamous cells. Comparison of the meibomian gland duct to the pilosebaceous canal and the sebaceous duct brought out certain dissimilarities such as (1) the lack of a well-developed stratum granulosum and (2) the absence of lipid inclusions within transitional cells from duct to acini. We postulate that abnormalities of the keratinizing process may be responsible for meibomian gland dysfunction states.

  16. Ciliary ultrastructure of polyplacophorans (Mollusca, Amphineura, Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Lundin, K; Schander, C

    2001-01-01

    This study is part of a series of papers aiming to investigate the phylogenetic significance of ciliary ultrastructure among molluscs and to test the hypothesis of a relationship between Xenoturbella and the molluscs. The ultrastructure of the ciliary apparatus on the gills of the polyplacophorans Leptochiton asellus and Tonicella rubra was studied. The gill cilia of the two species are similar in shape. The free part of the cilium is long with a slender distal part. There are two ciliary rootlets. One of them is short, broad and placed on the anterior face of the basal body. The other rootlet is conical and has a vertical orientation. Among the mollusca, two ciliary rootlets in the ciliary apparatus of multiciliate ectodermal cells have only been reported from the Chaetodermomorpha and Neomeniomorpha. This character state is likely plesiomorphic for the Mollusca and indicates a basal (nonderived) position of these taxa among the molluscs. No possible synapomorphic character with Xenoturbella bocki was found.

  17. Real space flight travel is associated with ultrastructural changes, cytoskeletal disruption and premature senescence of HUVEC.

    PubMed

    Kapitonova, M Y; Muid, S; Froemming, G R A; Yusoff, W N W; Othman, S; Ali, A M; Nawawi, H M

    2012-12-01

    Microgravity, hypergravity, vibration, ionizing radiation and temperature fluctuations are major factors of outer space flight affecting human organs and tissues. There are several reports on the effect of space flight on different human cell types of mesenchymal origin while information regarding changes to vascular endothelial cells is scarce. Ultrastructural and cytophysiological features of macrovascular endothelial cells in outer space flight and their persistence during subsequent culturing were demonstrated in the present investigation. At the end of the space flight, endothelial cells displayed profound changes indicating cytoskeletal lesions and increased cell membrane permeability. Readapted cells of subsequent passages exhibited persisting cytoskeletal changes, decreased metabolism and cell growth indicating cellular senescence.

  18. Ultrastructural localization of extracellular matrix proteins in liver biopsies using ultracryomicrotomy and immuno-gold labelling.

    PubMed

    Burt, A D; Griffiths, M R; Schuppan, D; Voss, B; MacSween, R N

    1990-01-01

    We describe a technique for the localization of extracellular matrix proteins in wedge and needle biopsy specimens of human liver. Using ultra-thin (50-70 nm) sections of puncture perfusion fixed tissue, extracellular matrix proteins were localized using a protein A-gold labelling procedure. We obtained good preservation of ultrastructural detail and specific labelling for collagen types I, III and IV and fibronectin. The method represents a sensitive means of identifying the extracellular distribution and the cellular origin of these proteins in normal and diseased human liver.

  19. Structure and ultrastructure of adrenocorticotropic hormone cells in goats in anoestrus, gestation and milk production.

    PubMed

    Navarro, J A; Gómez, M A; Sánchez, J; Gómez, S; Bernabé, A

    1991-01-01

    The structural and ultrastructural characteristics of adrenocorticotropic hormone cells in adult female goats in anoestrus, gestation and milk production were studied with an immunohistochemical method (peroxidase-antiperoxidase). Only one cellular type has been identified and is characterized by numerous secretory granules of different electron density and an average diameter of 275 nm. During pregnancy these cells increase in number and size, and there is a frequent presence of vacuoles. During lactation the number of size of the cells decreases but without reaching the state observed in anoestrus and the involution of the cytoplasmic vacuolizations which appear in pregnancy.

  20. Ultrastructural differences between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Grover, Madhusudan; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Bernard, Cheryl E; Lurken, Matthew S; Smyrk, Thomas C; Parkman, Henry P; Abell, Thomas L; Snape, William J; Hasler, William L; Ünalp-Arida, Aynur; Nguyen, Linda; Koch, Kenneth L; Calles, Jorges; Lee, Linda; Tonascia, James; Hamilton, Frank A; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The ultrastructural changes in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis are not well studied and it is not known whether there are different defects in the two disorders. As part of the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium, full thickness gastric body biopsies from 20 diabetic and 20 idiopathic gastroparetics were studied by light microscopy. Abnormalities were found in many (83%) but not all patients. Among the common defects were loss of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and neural abnormalities. No distinguishing features were seen between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis. Our aim was to provide a detailed description of the ultrastructural abnormalities, compare findings between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis and determine if patients with apparently normal immunohistological features have ultrastructural abnormalities. Tissues from 40 gastroparetic patients and 24 age- and sex-matched controls were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interstitial cells of Cajal showing changes suggestive of injury, large and empty nerve endings, presence of lipofuscin and lamellar bodies in the smooth muscle cells were found in all patients. However, the ultrastructural changes in ICC and nerves differed between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis and were more severe in idiopathic gastroparesis. A thickened basal lamina around smooth muscle cells and nerves was characteristic of diabetic gastroparesis whereas idiopathic gastroparetics had fibrosis, especially around the nerves. In conclusion, in all the patients TEM showed abnormalities in ICC, nerves and smooth muscle consistent with the delay in gastric emptying. The significant differences found between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis offers insight into pathophysiology as well as into potential targeted therapies. PMID:21914127

  1. Ultrastructure of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Willingale-Theune, J; Schweiger, M; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Meek, A E; Paulin-Levasseur, M; Traub, P

    1989-08-01

    Employing indirect immunofluorescence and conventional electron microscopy, gross nuclear aberrations were observed in cultured interphase fibroblasts derived from a patient suffering from Fanconi's anemia (FA). Such aberrations were predominantly expressed in cells at high passages between 28 and 34. The structure of the nuclei appeared compound in nature, often consisting of two to three nuclear fragments connected to each other by thin nuclear bridges containing chromatin and nuclear lamin material. In other cases, the nuclei appeared lobed or budded but the cells did not contain distinct nuclear fragments. Chromatin was conspicuously absent from some nuclear lobes, revealing empty, cage-like structures comprising nuclear lamin material. Micronuclei were often abundant in the perinuclear cytoplasm but in some instances they appeared to be composed of chromatin lacking a delineating nuclear lamin matrix. Residual cytoskeletons examined by whole-mount electron microscopy revealed a network of intermediate filaments (IFs) within FA fibroblasts forming a bridge between the plasma membrane and the nucleus or its major fragments. In addition, there were thinner, 3-4 nm filaments connecting individual IFs with the surface of the nucleus. Micronuclei that were not connected to the main nuclear body, but which were delineated by a distinct lamina and possessed nuclear pores, did not appear to be anchored to the IF network. Multinuclearity, nuclear fragmentation, irregular chromatin distribution and inter-nuclear chromatin/lamin bridges might result from a failure in the redistribution of chromatin to sister nuclei, incomplete cytokinesis and proliferation of nuclear envelope material. These phenomena point to precocious aging of FA fibroblasts and may occur as a consequence of spontaneous damage to the sister chromatids or through the action of DNA-toxic agents.

  2. Ultrastructural studies on dengue virus infection of human lymphoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Sriurairatna, S; Bhamarapravati, N; Diwan, A R; Halstead, S B

    1978-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies of dengue-2 virus-infected lymphoblastoid Raji cells showed that the virus induced an increase in the size of the rough endoplasmic reticula (RER) and that the replication of the virus was confined to the cisternae of these RER. The proliferating RER formed cytoplasmic inclusions that could be seen by light microscopy. This observation could be used as evidence of a cytopathogenic effect of dengue virus on infected Rajii cells in routine cultures. Accumulation of virions in the infected cells was minimal in comparison with other cell systems, however. Sporadic clusters of mature virions were often seen on the plasma membrane. These extracellular virions were distributed adjacent to the virus-bearing RER and were presumably released virions. Vertical transmission of the virus was evident in mitotic lymphoblasts. The replication pattern of dengue virus in lymphoblastoid cells suggests that efforts should be made to determine whether blast-transformed lymphocytes, numerous in secondary dengue infections, support dengue virus replication in vivo. Images PMID:669791

  3. Dexamethasone induced ultrastructural changes in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; McCartney, M D; Miggans, S T; Clark, A F

    1993-09-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced ocular hypertension has been demonstrated in both animals and humans. It is possible that glucocorticoid-induced changes in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells are responsible for this hypertension. In order to elaborate further the effect of glucocorticoids on the trabecular meshwork, the ultrastructural consequences of dexamethasone (DEX) treatment were examined in three different human TM cell lines. Confluent TM cells were treated with 0.1 microM of DEX for 14 days, and then processed for light, epifluorescent microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of DEX treatment on TM cell and nuclear size was quantified using computer assisted morphometrics. Morphometric analysis showed a significant increase in both TM cell and nuclear size after 14 days of DEX treatment. Epifluorescent microscopy of rhodamine-phalloidin stained, control TM cells showed the normal arrangement of stress fibers. In contrast, DEX-treated TM cells showed unusual geodesic dome-like cross-linked actin networks. Control TM cells had the normal complement and arrangement of organelles as well as electron dense inclusions and large vacuoles. DEX-treated TM cells showed stacked arrangements of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, proliferation of the Golgi apparatus, pleomorphic nuclei and increased amounts of extracellular matrix material. The DEX-induced alterations observed in the present study may be an indication of the processes that are occurring in the in vivo disease process. PMID:8261790

  4. Ultrastructural findings in lymph nodes from pigs suffering from naturally occurring postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cariño, C; Segalés, J

    2009-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate ultrastructural lesions in lymph nodes from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS)-affected pigs and to correlate these alterations with detection of viral-like particles (VLPs). Samples of lymph nodes were taken from 4 PMWS-affected pigs and 2 healthy animals and processed by transmission electron microscopy. Significant ultrastructural alterations were only noted in PMWS-affected pigs, mainly in histiocytes and rarely in other cell types. Histiocytes showed severe swelling and proliferation of mitochondria, and proliferation and dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Infected histiocytes contained large numbers of intracytoplasmic inclusion (ICI) bodies with VLPs; some histiocytes also had intranuclear inclusions (INIs). Small inclusions were surrounded by double membrane, with a granular appearance or containing paracrystalline arrays; icosahedral VLPs were 8-17 nm in diameter. Large ICIs were double-membrane bounded or not and contained VLPs usually forming paracrystalline arrays. ICIs were often found next to mitochondria with severe swelling, and also inside them. INIs were not surrounded by membranes and contained virions of 10-13 nm diameter. Lymphocyte depletion was a striking finding of lymph nodes from PMWS-affected pigs. The inclusion bodies containing VLPs referred to in the present study should be classified as viral factories, suggesting that viral replication is probably a frequent event in macrophages, in which mitochondria might play a role.

  5. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction, by TEM Tomography, of the Ultrastructural Modifications Occurring in Cucumis sativus L. Mitochondria under Fe Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Faoro, Franco; Ferretti, Anna Maria; Cantele, Francesca; Maffi, Dario; Marelli, Marcello; Maver, Mauro; Murgia, Irene; Zocchi, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondria, as recently suggested, might be involved in iron sensing and signalling pathways in plant cells. For a better understanding of the role of these organelles in mediating the Fe deficiency responses in plant cells, it is crucial to provide a full overview of their modifications occurring under Fe-limited conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize the ultrastructural as well as the biochemical changes occurring in leaf mitochondria of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants grown under Fe deficiency. Methodology/Results Mitochondrial ultrastructure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography techniques, which allowed a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of cellular structures. These analyses reveal that mitochondria isolated from cucumber leaves appear in the cristae junction model conformation and that Fe deficiency strongly alters both the number and the volume of cristae. The ultrastructural changes observed in mitochondria isolated from Fe-deficient leaves reflect a metabolic status characterized by a respiratory chain operating at a lower rate (orthodox-like conformation) with respect to mitochondria from control leaves. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report showing a 3D reconstruction of plant mitochondria. Furthermore, these results suggest that a detailed characterization of the link between changes in the ultrastructure and functionality of mitochondria during different nutritional conditions, can provide a successful approach to understand the role of these organelles in the plant response to Fe deficiency. PMID:26107946

  6. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  7. Photodynamic therapy on the ultrastructure of glioma cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaoshan; Zhang, Ruyou; Zheng, Yongri

    2005-07-01

    OBJECTIVE :the main purpose of this experiment was to study the change of C6 glioma cells' ultrastructure treated by photodynamic therapy(PDT), observe the change of morphology METHOD :Make the model of rat glioma by transplanted C6 glioma cells into caudate nucleus,treated the glioma rat by PDT after two weeks. Observed the difference of subcellular structure before and after PDT by electron microscope. RESULT : Apoptosis and necrosis can be seen after treated by PDT in the C6 glioma, basal membrance damaged ,number of cellular organ of endothelial cell of blood capillary declined,tight junction of endothelial cell lengthen and the gap enlarge. The PDT has slightly effect on the nomorl rat"s subcellular structue. CONCLUSION: PDT can induce the apoptosis and necrosis of C6 glioma cell. The damage of the ultramicrostructure of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was the foundmentol of the change. PDT initiate the damage of BBB of the C6 glioma cell and weeken the function、and makes it a useful way of treating the glioma combained with chemotherapy.

  8. Ultrastructure of the adipose tissue matrix in children with malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Alexa, A; Drăgan, M; Popa, I; Raica, M; Dema, E

    1995-01-01

    Bioptic fragments of adipose white tissue taken from trochanterian area from children of 2-22 months old were ultrastructurally investigated. Children were of both sexes, 5 normal and 22 with clinical diagnosis of malnutrition. There were studied many interadipocyte spaces signalling out in cases with malnutrition modifications of different components, some of them related with the degree of malnutrition. There were noted: disorganisation and disappearance of basal membranes of capillaries and glycolema; modifications of endothelial cells with lesions of the capillary wall and free degraded red blood cells; disorganization of the ground substance in small areas or sometimes extended to all matrix of the space; collagen fibres reduced in number and size, and in two cases the presence of collagen fibrils with severe lesions, realeasing an electrondense material, fibrinoid-like; matrix infiltration, in some cases with lipids. In only one interadipocyte space a synaptic button was noted in contact with capillary. In malnutrition lesions of cellular elements of the white adipose tissue the following were observed: adipocytes, fibroblasts, fibrocytes, endothelial cells, mast cells--which in their turn are responsible for modifications of macromolecular structures of the extracellular matrix--glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans, components of which biosyntheses are cell-dependent. PMID:8772367

  9. Ultrastructural changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to ethanol stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Manli; Han, Pei; Zhang, Ruimin; Li, Hao

    2013-09-01

    In the fermentative process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce bioethanol, the performance of cells is often compromised by the accumulation of ethanol. However, the mechanism of how S. cerevisiae responds against ethanol stress remains elusive. In the current study, S. cerevisiae cells were cultured in YPD (yeast extract - peptone - dextrose) medium containing various concentrations of ethanol (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15% (v/v)). Compared with the control group without ethanol, the mean cell volume of S. cerevisiae decreased significantly in the presence of 7.5% and 10% ethanol after incubation for 16 h (P < 0.05), and in the presence of 15% ethanol at all 3 sampling time points (1, 8, and 16 h) (P < 0.05). The exposure of S. cerevisiae cells to ethanol also led to an increase in malonyldialdehyde content (P < 0.05) and a decrease in sulfhydryl group content (P < 0.05). Moreover, the observations through transmission electron microscopy enabled us to relate ultrastructural changes elicited by ethanol with the cellular stress physiology. Under ethanol stress, the integrity of the cell membrane was compromised. The swelling or distortion of mitochondria together with the occurrence of a single and large vacuole was correlated with the addition of ethanol. These results suggested that the cell membrane is one of the targets of ethanol, and the degeneration of mitochondria promoted the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

  10. Ultrastructure of Mycobacterium marinum granuloma in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging epizootic of mycobacteriosis currently threatens striped bass Morone saxatilis populations in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Several species of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium marinum, species resembling M. avium, M. gordonae, M. peregrinum, M. scrofulaceum and M. terrae, and the new species M. shottsii have been isolated from diseased and healthy bass. In this study, we describe the ultrastructure of developing M. marinum granulomas in experimentally infected bass over a period of 45 wk. The primary host response to injected mycobacteria was formation of large macrophage aggregations containing phagocytosed bacilli, M. marinum were always contained within phagosomes. Close association of lysosomes with mycobacterial phagosomes, as well as the presence of electron-opaque material within phagosomes, suggested phagolysosomal fusion. Development of granulomas involved epithelioid transformation of macrophages, followed by appearance of central necrosis. Desmosomes were present between mature epithelioid cells. The necrotic core region of M. marinum granulomas was separated from overlying epithelioid cells by several layers of flattened, electron-opaque spindle-shaped cells. These cells appeared to be formed by compression of epithelioid cells and, aside from a flattened nucleus, did not possess recognizable organelles. Following the development of well-defined, paucibacillary granulomas, secondary disease was observed. Recrudescence was marked by bacterial replication followed by disruption of granuloma architecture, including loss of epithelioid and spindle cell layers. In advanced recrudescent lesions, normal tissue was replaced by macrophages, fibroblasts, and other inflammatory leukocytes. Large numbers of mycobacteria were observed, both intracellular and suspended in cellular debris.

  11. Ultrastructure of novel thrombocytes in the dog snapper Lutjanus jocu.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, C; Matos, P; Rocha, S; Matos, E; Oliveira, E; Al-Quraishy, S; Casal, G

    2014-04-01

    Myxosporean cysts containing spores of Henneguya sp. were observed in the gills of the dog snapper Lutjanus jocu. Adjacent to the cysts were capillaries, allowing observation of peripheral blood cells. Numerous white blood cells displaying uncommon cytoplasmic projections were observed amongst the erythrocytes. Their morphology allowed them to be identified as thrombocytes (TCs). Each TC displayed 18-26 cytoplasmic projections, most of which were in close proximity to erythrocytes. At their apical end, each cytoplasmic projection presented an ellipsoidal vacuole (c. 0·6 µm × 0·3 µm) from which a secretory tubule, 0·3-0·4 µm long and c. 120 nm in total diameter, extended towards the periphery of the TC plasmalemma and fused with the cellular membrane. From this opening, contents of vacuoles were apparently released into the lumen of the capillaries. Other vacuoles with similar features, and containing an electron-lucent matrix, were observed in the cytoplasm of the TC. This is the first description of fish TC with these ultrastructural features and organization, which suggest that they perform a secretory function.

  12. Ultrastructure of the early embryonic stages of Corallobothrium fimbriatum (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea).

    PubMed

    Młocicki, Daniel; Swiderski, Zdzisław; Conn, David Bruce

    2010-10-01

    Cellular details of early embryogenesis have been studied extensively among cyclophyllidean cestodes, but have been reported for only 2 species of the order Proteocephalidea, both belonging to the genus Proteocephalus. Thus, we performed a detailed ultrastructural analysis of early embryos of a second species, Corallobothrium fimbriatum, including early events in the formation of the embryonic envelopes. Adult worms were collected from the small intestine of brown bullhead catfish, Ameiurus nebulosus, from the St. Lawrence River in North America and processed by standard methods for transmission electron microscopy. The vitelline capsule consists of 2 closely apposed electron-dense membranous layers, separated by a more electron-lucent material. The 2 vitellocytes that accompany each oocyte contain numerous ribosomes, vesicles, and lipid droplets. These fuse to form a vitelline syncytium, which elongates and almost completely encircles the cleaving embryo by the 4-blastomere stage, forming a partial lipid-rich cellular envelope that undergoes apoptosis as cleavage continues. This envelope is later replaced by outer and inner embryonic envelopes. The outer envelope derives from the fusion of the vitelline syncytium with the cytoplasm of macromeres, whereas the inner envelope originates from 3 mesomeres. Simultaneous to the formation of the embryonic envelopes, other blastomeres multiply and differentiate, while some micromeres undergo degeneration or apoptosis. In most respects, ultrastructural features of early C. fimbriatum embryos closely resemble those of previously studied Proteocephalus longicollis, but differ somewhat from those of other orders. This demonstrates that, despite marked ultrastructural heterogeneity within some orders such as the Cyclophyllidea, some embryonic traits distinguish cestode orders from each other.

  13. Comparison of pigment cell ultrastructure and organisation in the dermis of marble trout and brown trout, and first description of erythrophore ultrastructure in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Djurdjevič, Ida; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sušnik Bajec, Simona

    2015-11-01

    Skin pigmentation in animals is an important trait with many functions. The present study focused on two closely related salmonid species, marble trout (Salmo marmoratus) and brown trout (S. trutta), which display an uncommon labyrinthine (marble-like) and spot skin pattern, respectively. To determine the role of chromatophore type in the different formation of skin pigment patterns in the two species, the distribution and ultrastructure of chromatophores was examined with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of three types of chromatophores in trout skin was confirmed: melanophores; xanthophores; and iridophores. In addition, using correlative microscopy, erythrophore ultrastructure in salmonids was described for the first time. Two types of erythrophores are distinguished, both located exclusively in the skin of brown trout: type 1 in black spot skin sections similar to xanthophores; and type 2 with a unique ultrastructure, located only in red spot skin sections. Morphologically, the difference between the light and dark pigmentation of trout skin depends primarily on the position and density of melanophores, in the dark region covering other chromatophores, and in the light region with the iridophores and xanthophores usually exposed. With larger amounts of melanophores, absence of xanthophores and presence of erythrophores type 1 and type L iridophores in the black spot compared with the light regions and the presence of erythrophores type 2 in the red spot, a higher level of pigment cell organisation in the skin of brown trout compared with that of marble trout was demonstrated. Even though the skin regions with chromatophores were well defined, not all the chromatophores were in direct contact, either homophilically or heterophilically, with each other. In addition to short-range interactions, an important role of the cellular environment and long-range interactions between chromatophores in promoting adult pigment pattern

  14. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    PubMed

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  15. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  16. The ultrastructure and genetic traits of plants under the condition of hypobaric and hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Wang, Shulei; Cheng, Quanyong; Zhao, Qi

    This study analyzed the cellular, sub-cellular and molecular levels, particle composition and volume changes of Indian lettuce under the conditions of hypobaric and hypoxia. Firstly, in the hypobaric and hypoxia conditions, two kinds of sample showed a decrease in the num-ber of cells, the increase in volume and the deflation in nuclear size. Secondly, Significant changes of the chloroplast ultrastructure have taken place in the two conditions. Thirdly, in the hypoxia condition, the chloroplast grana lamellae fractured and aggregated, which caused the chloroplasts to enlarge, their lamellae to reduce,become vaguer and finally to disintegrate. Fourthly, the volume change and aggregation of the chloroplasts induced mitochondria to ap-proach the chloroplasts. Fifthly, cytoskeleton immunofluorescence positioning results showed that the microtubules had decreased in number, shortened in length and gathered in the vicinity of the nucleus. In addition, total leaf DNA-sequence alignment found no rbcl gene mutation in the extreme conditions. Keywords: Chloroplast Ultrastructure Cytoskeleton rbcl gene Indian lettuce

  17. Choanocyte ultrastructure in Halisarca dujardini (Demospongiae, Halisarcida).

    PubMed

    Gonobobleva, Elisaveta; Maldonado, Manuel

    2009-05-01

    Understanding poriferan choanocyte ultrastructure is crucial if we are to unravel the steps of a putative evolutionary transition between choanoflagellate protists and early metazoans. Surprisingly, some aspects of choanocyte cytology still remain little investigated. This study of choanocyte ultrastructure in the halisarcid demosponge Halisarca dujardini revealed a combination of minor and major distinctive traits, some of them unknown in Porifera so far. Most significant features were 1) an asymmetrical periflagellar sleeve, 2) a battery of specialized intercellular junctions at the lateral cell surface complemented with an array of lateral interdigitations between adjacent choanocytes that provides a particular sealing system of the choanoderm, and 3) a unique, unexpectedly complex, basal apparatus. The basal apparatus consists of a basal body provided with a small basal foot and an intricate transverse skeleton of microtubules. An accessory centriole, which is not perpendicular to the basal body, is about 45 degrees . In addition, a system of short striated rootlets (periodicity = 50-60 nm) arises from the proximal edge of the basal body and runs longitudinally to contact the nuclear apex. This is the first flagellar rootlet system ever found in a choanocyte. The accessory centriole, the rootlet system, and the nuclear apex are all encircled by a large Golgi apparatus, adding another distinctive feature to the choanocyte cytology. The set of distinct features discovered in the choanocyte of H. dujardini indicates that the ultrastructure of the poriferan choanocyte may vary substantially between sponge groups. It is necessary to improve understanding of such variation, as the cytological features of choanocytes are often coded as characters both for formulation of hypotheses on the origin of animals and inference of phylogenetic relationships at the base of the metazoan tree.

  18. Gross, histological and ultrastructural morphology of the aglomerular kidney in the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus.

    PubMed

    Fogelson, S B; Yanong, R P E; Kane, A; Teal, C N; Berzins, I K; Smith, S A; Brown, C; Camus, A

    2015-09-01

    Histologic evaluation of the renal system in the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus reveals a cranial kidney with low to moderate cellularity, composed of a central dorsal aorta, endothelial lined capillary sinusoids, haematopoietic tissue, fine fibrovascular stroma, ganglia and no nephrons. In comparison, the caudal kidney is moderately to highly cellular with numerous highly convoluted epithelial lined tubules separated by interlacing haematopoietic tissue, no glomeruli, fine fibrovascular stroma, numerous capillary sinusoids, corpuscles of Stannius and clusters of endocrine cells adjacent to large calibre vessels. Ultrastructural evaluation of the renal tubules reveals minimal variability of the tubule epithelium throughout the length of the nephron and the majority of tubules are characterized by epithelial cells with few apical microvilli, elaborate basal membrane infolding, rare electron dense granules and abundant supporting collagenous matrix.

  19. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration of pea leaves under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brykov, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    Respiration is essential for growth, maintenance, and carbon balance of all plant cells. Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation (production). Mitochondria are not only the energetic organelles in a cell but they play an essential regulatory role in many basic cellular processes. As plants adapt to real and simulated microgravity, it is very important to understand the state of mitochondria in these conditions. Disturbance of respiratory metabolism can significantly affect the productivity of plants in long-term space flights. We have established earlier that the rate of respiration in root apices of pea etiolated seedlings rose after 7 days of clinorotation. These data indicate the oxygen increased requirement by root apices under clinorotation, that confirms the necessity of sufficient substrate aeration in space greenhouses to provide normal respiratory metabolism and supply of energy for root growth. In etiolated seedlings, substrate supply of mitochondria occurs at the expense of the mobilization of cotyledon nutrients. A goal of our work was to study the ultrastructure and respiration of mitochondria in pea leaves after 12 days of clinorotation during (2 rpm/min). Plants grew at a light level of 180 μµmol m ^{-2} s ^{-1} PAR and a photoperiod of 16 h light/4 h dark. It was showed an essential increase in the mitochondrion area on 53% in palisade parenchyma cells at the sections. Such phenomenon can not be described as swelling of mitochondria, since enlarged mitochondria contained a more quantity of crista 1.76 times. In addition, the cristae total area per organelle also increased in comparison with that in control. An increase in a size of mitochondria in the experimental conditions is supposed to occur by a partial alteration of the chondriom. Thus, a size of 49% mitochondria in control was 0.1 - 0.3 μµm ^{2}, whereas only 26

  20. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  1. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amy E.; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M.; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  2. Ultrastructure of Cosmarium strains (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) collected from various geographic locations shows species-specific differences both at optimal and stress temperatures.

    PubMed

    Stamenković, Marija; Woelken, Elke; Hanelt, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Plant species collected from various climatic zones and stressed in vitro at various temperatures reveal changes in cellular ultrastructure which are in accordance with the climate at their sampling sites. This observation initiated the investigation to establish if stress at different temperatures may cause diverse extents of changes in the ultrastructure of microalgal strains originating from different geographic zones. The study revealed that the six Cosmarium strains demonstrated ultrastructural characteristics that were consistent with their source location under optimal, low and high temperature conditions, pointing to their preference to specific climatic niches. Interestingly, chloroplasts of all of the Cosmarium strains correspond to a sun-adapted type, which is concomitant with earlier statements that these strains are rendered as high-light adapted algae. The Cosmarium strains developed multiple ultrastructural responses which enabled them to cope with excessive temperatures, occasionally occurring in desmid natural habitats. The appearance of cubic membranes and increased number of plastoglobules may represent the first line in protection against high-temperature stress, which is accompanied by the alteration of protein synthesis and the appearance of stress granules in order to preserve cell homeostasis. However, the prolonged warm- or cold-temperature stress obviously initiated the programmed cell death, as concluded from the appearance of several ultrastructural features observed in all of the Cosmarium strains. The fair acclimation possibilities and the ability to undergo programmed cell death in order to save the population, certainly favor the cosmopolitan distribution of the genus Cosmarium.

  3. [Stimulation of proliferation by carnosine: cellular and transcriptome approaches].

    PubMed

    Vishniakova, Kh S; Babizhaev, M A; Aliper, A M; Buzdin, A A; Kudriavtseva, A V; Egorov, E E

    2014-01-01

    Concentration of endogenous dipeptide carnosine in human muscle tissue reaches tens of millimoles. For more than 100 years of research, a lot of data concerning carnosine functions were accumulated, among which anti-aging effects are regarded most important. Heire, effect of carnosine in cell cultures was studied. It has been found that apart from the known action--an increase of the Hayflick limit and morphological rejuvenation--carnosine stimulates cell division in colony-forming assays and in the course of transition of cells to the quiescent state. The analysis of the transcriptome showed that carnosine-induced changes are mainly related to positive regulation of the cell cycle at all levels, from the onset of the DNA synthesis to chromosome condensation. One can suppose that the revealed stimulation of the cell cycle account for the carnosine-induced rejuvenation processes and a high concentration ofcarnosine in muscle tissue is required for the muscle recovery (regeneration) after excess loads. PMID:25842868

  4. Cytological and ultrastructural studies on root tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Gaynor, J. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomy and fine structure of roots from oat and mung bean seedlings, grown under microgravity conditions for 8 days aboard the Space Shuttle, was examined and compared to that of roots from ground control plants grown under similar conditions. Roots from both sets of oat seedlings exhibited characteristic monocotyledonous tissue organization and normal ultrastructural features, except for cortex cell mitochondria, which exhibited a 'swollen' morphology. Various stages of cell division were observed in the meristematic tissues of oat roots. Ground control and flight-grown mung bean roots also showed normal tissue organization, but root cap cells in the flight-grown roots were collapsed and degraded in appearance, especially at the cap periphery. At the ultrastructural level, these cells exhibited a loss of organelle integrity and a highly-condensed cytoplasm. This latter observation perhaps suggests a differing tissue sensitivity for the two species to growth conditions employed in space flight. The basis for abnormal root cap cell development is not understood, but the loss of these putative gravity-sensing cells holds potential significance for long term plant growth orientation during space flight.

  5. How methylglyoxal kills bacteria: An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Erika; Serem, June Cheptoo; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Gaspar, Anabella Regina Marques; Bester, Megan Jean

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of honey is due to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO), H2O2, bee defensin as well as polyphenols. High MGO levels in manuka honey are the main source of antibacterial activity. Manuka honey has been reported to reduce the swarming and swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to de-flagellation. Due to the complexity of honey it is unknown if this effect is directly due to MGO. In this ultrastructural investigation the effects of MGO on the morphology of bacteria and specifically the structure of fimbriae and flagella were investigated. MGO effectively inhibited Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis; MIC 0.8 mM and Staphylococcus aureus; MIC 1.2 mM) and Gram negative (P. aeruginosa; MIC 1.0 mM and Escherichia coli; MIC 1.2 mM) bacteria growth. The ultrastructural effects of 0.5, 1.0 and 2 mM MGO on B. substilis and E. coli morphology was then evaluated. At 0.5 mM MGO, bacteria structure was unaltered. For both bacteria at 1 mM MGO fewer fimbriae were present and the flagella were less or absent. Identified structures appeared stunted and fragile. At 2 mM MGO fimbriae and flagella were absent while the bacteria were rounded with shrinkage and loss of membrane integrity. Antibacterial MGO causes alterations in the structure of bacterial fimbriae and flagella which would limit bacteria adherence and motility. PMID:26986806

  6. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies of rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; De Martino, C; Scorza Barcellona, P; Natali, P G

    1983-01-01

    The anatomical distribution of smooth muscle actin, myosin, fibronectin and basement membrane has been investigated immunohistochemically, using the indirect immunofluorescence technique, in the rat epididymis. The findings were correlated with the ultrastructural organization of the organ. Actin was found to be distributed in the stereociliary region of the epithelial principal cells and in the terminal web region. Actin was also visible along the base of the epithelium. Myosin was detected in the terminal web and in the terminal bar regions of the epithelium. The contractile cells showed a strong stain for both proteins. Basement membrane immunoreactivity was distributed along the epithelial basement membrane and around the contractile cells of the wall. In the cauda, between the epithelium and the contractile cell layers, the lamina propria, containing blood vessels and a thin layer of cells, was negative for all antigens investigated. Fibronectin showed a granular distribution around the contractile cells, mainly in the cauda. The ultrastructural study showed only thin (5-6 nm in diameter) filaments in the stereocilia and terminal web region. Thin filaments were also visible in the cytoplasm of the basal cells, thus suggesting a contractile function of this cell type. The heterogeneous appearance of the contractile cells of the wall seemed to support the different contractile pattern of the epididymal regions: caput, corpus and cauda. The cells present in the lamina propria showed cytoplasmic vesicles with dark granules resembling the "A" cell granules of the endocrine pancreas and gut mucosa cells.

  7. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies of rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; De Martino, C; Scorza Barcellona, P; Natali, P G

    1983-01-01

    The anatomical distribution of smooth muscle actin, myosin, fibronectin and basement membrane has been investigated immunohistochemically, using the indirect immunofluorescence technique, in the rat epididymis. The findings were correlated with the ultrastructural organization of the organ. Actin was found to be distributed in the stereociliary region of the epithelial principal cells and in the terminal web region. Actin was also visible along the base of the epithelium. Myosin was detected in the terminal web and in the terminal bar regions of the epithelium. The contractile cells showed a strong stain for both proteins. Basement membrane immunoreactivity was distributed along the epithelial basement membrane and around the contractile cells of the wall. In the cauda, between the epithelium and the contractile cell layers, the lamina propria, containing blood vessels and a thin layer of cells, was negative for all antigens investigated. Fibronectin showed a granular distribution around the contractile cells, mainly in the cauda. The ultrastructural study showed only thin (5-6 nm in diameter) filaments in the stereocilia and terminal web region. Thin filaments were also visible in the cytoplasm of the basal cells, thus suggesting a contractile function of this cell type. The heterogeneous appearance of the contractile cells of the wall seemed to support the different contractile pattern of the epididymal regions: caput, corpus and cauda. The cells present in the lamina propria showed cytoplasmic vesicles with dark granules resembling the "A" cell granules of the endocrine pancreas and gut mucosa cells. PMID:6354463

  8. Ultrastructure, biology, and phylogenetic relationships of kinorhyncha.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Birger; Higgins, Robert P

    2002-07-01

    The article summarizes current knowledge mainly about the (functional) morphology and ultrastructure, but also about the biology, development, and evolution of the Kinorhyncha. The Kinorhyncha are microscopic, bilaterally symmetrical, exclusively free-living, benthic, marine animals and ecologically part of the meiofauna. They occur throughout the world from the intertidal to the deep sea, generally in sediments but sometimes associated with plants or other animals. From adult stages 141 species are known, but 38 species have been described from juvenile stages. The trunk is arranged into 11 segments as evidenced by cuticular plates, sensory spots, setae or spines, nervous system, musculature, and subcuticular glands. The ultrastructure of several organ systems and the postembryonic development are known for very few species. Almost no data are available about the embryology and only a single gene has been sequenced for a single species. The phylogenetic relationships within Kinorhyncha are unresolved. Priapulida, Loricifera, and Kinorhyncha are grouped together as Scalidophora, but arguments are found for every possible sistergroup relationship within this taxon. The recently published Ecdysozoa hypothesis suggests a closer relationship of the Scalidophora, Nematoda, Nematomorpha, Tardigrada, Onychophora, and Arthropoda. PMID:21708758

  9. Ultrastructure of human malignant diffuse mesothelioma.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y.; Kannerstein, M.

    1976-01-01

    Eleven cases of malignant diffuse mesotheliomas, histologically classified into two groups, epithelial (5 pleural and 3 peritoneal) and biphasic or mixed (2 pleural and 1 peritoneal) forms, were stuied by electron microscopy to elucidate their ultrastructural characteristics. The neoplastic cells of the epithelial forms were varied in ultrastructure, from well differentiated (marked by polarity, micovilli, glycogen granules, junctional structures, tonofilaments, intracellular vacuoles, and a basement membrane) to poorly differentiated (which lacked some of these epithelial characteristics). In four of eight instances in epithelial type tumors, nonepithelial or mesenchymal neoplastic cells were recognized. The biphasic or mixed cases included three major cell types: epithelial, atypical epithelial, and mesenchymal. It appeared that there were transitional forms among the three cell types. The observations support the concept that the neoplastic cell of malignant mesothelioma can differentiate into a number of cell lines. Images Figures 20 and 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figures 24 and 25 Figure 26 Figure 27A Figure 27B and C Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figures 32 and 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Figure 36 Figures 1-4 Figures 5 and 6 Figure 37 Figures 7-10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figures 17 and 18 Figure 19 PMID:998721

  10. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  11. Spermatogenesis and sperm ultrastructure in the polychaete genus Ophryotrocha (Dorvilleidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfannenstiel, Hans-Dieter; Grünig, Charlotte

    1990-06-01

    The details of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis are described for Ophryotrocha puerilis. The ultrastructure of mature sperm is shown for O. puerilis, O. hartmanni, O. gracilis, O. diadema, O. labronica, and O. notoglandulata. Clusters of sixteen cells each are proliferated by two stem cells in each setigerous segment of O. puerilis representing the very early stages of both oogenesis and spermatogenesis. In each spermatocyte-I cluster, the cells are interconnected by cytoplasmic bridges. Early, clusters are enveloped by peritoneal sheath cells. These transient gonad walls break down prior to meiosis. The meiotic processes may start in the clusters with the cells still interconnected, or during breakdown of the original cluster, giving rise to smaller subclusters of both spermatocytes I and spermatocytes II with various numbers of cells. Finally, spermatid tetrads are present. As spermiogenesis progresses, the tetrads disintegrate. Golgi vesicles in both spermatocytes and spermatids contain electron-dense material, presumably preacrosomal. The acrosome is formed by such vesicles. In the six species studied here, the acrosomes appear to be of a similar overall structure but are of different shape. Centrioles are usually located beneath the acrosome. The distal centriole forms the basal body of a flagellum-like cytoplasmic process. The microtubules of these flagellar equivalents do not show a normal ciliar arrangement. The flagellar equivalent appears to be non-motile. In O. hartmanni and in O. notoglandulata, a flagellar equivalent is missing. Microtubules originating from the proximal end of the distal centriole stretch to the nuclear envelope. This feature appears to be especially conspicuous in O. puerilis and in O. labronica. In O. labronica and in O. notoglandulata, bundles of microtubules paralleling the cell perimeter appear to stabilise the sperm. Various numbers of mitochondria are either randomly distributed around the nucleus or accumulate on one side

  12. Phytohemagglutinin improves the development and ultrastructure of in vitro-cultured goat (Capra hircus) preantral follicles

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, E.V.; Costa, J.J.N.; Rossi, R.O.D.S.; Silva, A.W.B.; Passos, J.R.S.; Portela, A.M.L.R.; Pereira, D.C.S.T.; Donato, M.A.M.; Campello, C.C.; Saraiva, M.V.A.; Peixoto, C.A.; Silva, J.R.V.; Santos, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective this study was to determine the effect of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) on survival, growth and gene expression in caprine secondary follicles cultured in vitro. Secondary follicles (∼0.2 mm) were isolated from the cortex of caprine ovaries and cultured individually for 6 days in α-MEM+ supplemented with PHA (0, 1, 10, 50, 100, or 200 µg/mL). After 6 days of culture, follicle diameter and survival, antrum formation, ultrastructure and expression of mRNA for FSH receptors (FSH-R), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase were determined. All treatments maintained follicular survival [α-MEM+ (94.59%); 1 µg/mL PHA (96.43%); 10 µg/mL PHA (84.85%); 50 µg/mL PHA (85.29%); 100 µg/mL PHA (88.57%), and 200 µg/mL PHA (87.50)], but the presence of 10 µg/mL PHA in the culture medium increased the antrum formation rate (21.21%) when compared with control (5.41%, P < 0.05) and ensured the maintenance of oocyte and granulosa cell ultrastructures after 6 days of culture. The expression of mRNA for FSH-R (2.7 ± 0.1) and PCNA (4.4 ± 0.2) was also significantly increased in follicles cultured with 10 µg/mL PHA in relation to those cultured in α-MEM+ (1.0 ± 0.1). In conclusion, supplementation of culture medium with 10 µg/mL PHA maintains the follicular viability and ultrastructure, and promotes the formation of antral cavity after 6 days of culture in vitro. PMID:23558855

  13. Ultrastructural and molecular changes in the developing small intestine of the toad Bufo regularis.

    PubMed

    Sakr, S A; Badawy, G M; El-Borm, H T

    2014-01-01

    The ontogenetic development of the small intestine of the toad Bufo regularis was investigated using twofold approaches, namely, ultrastructural and molecular. The former has been done using transmission electron microscope and utilizing the developmental stages 42, 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66. The most prominent ultrastructural changes were recorded at stage 60 and were more evident at stage 63. These included the appearance of apoptotic bodies/nuclei within the larval epithelium, the presence of macrophages, swollen mitochondria, distorted rough endoplasmic reticulum, chromatin condensation, and irregular nuclear envelop, and the presence of large vacuoles and lysosomes. The molecular investigation involved examining DNA content and fragmentation. The results showed that the DNA content decreased significantly during the metamorphic stages 60 and 63 compared with both larval (50 and 55) and postmetamorphic (66) stages. The metamorphic stages (60 and 63) displayed extensive DNA laddering compared with stages 50, 55, and 66. The percentage of DNA damage was 0.00%, 12.91%, 57.26%, 45.48%, and 4.43% for the developmental stages 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66, respectively. In conclusion, the recorded remodeling of the small intestine represents a model for clarifying the mechanism whereby cell death and proliferation are controlled.

  14. Ultrastructural and Molecular Changes in the Developing Small Intestine of the Toad Bufo regularis

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, S. A.; Badawy, G. M.; El-Borm, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    The ontogenetic development of the small intestine of the toad Bufo regularis was investigated using twofold approaches, namely, ultrastructural and molecular. The former has been done using transmission electron microscope and utilizing the developmental stages 42, 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66. The most prominent ultrastructural changes were recorded at stage 60 and were more evident at stage 63. These included the appearance of apoptotic bodies/nuclei within the larval epithelium, the presence of macrophages, swollen mitochondria, distorted rough endoplasmic reticulum, chromatin condensation, and irregular nuclear envelop, and the presence of large vacuoles and lysosomes. The molecular investigation involved examining DNA content and fragmentation. The results showed that the DNA content decreased significantly during the metamorphic stages 60 and 63 compared with both larval (50 and 55) and postmetamorphic (66) stages. The metamorphic stages (60 and 63) displayed extensive DNA laddering compared with stages 50, 55, and 66. The percentage of DNA damage was 0.00%, 12.91%, 57.26%, 45.48%, and 4.43% for the developmental stages 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66, respectively. In conclusion, the recorded remodeling of the small intestine represents a model for clarifying the mechanism whereby cell death and proliferation are controlled. PMID:24715821

  15. Antiproliferative, Ultrastructural, and Physiological Effects of Amiodarone on Promastigote and Amastigote Forms of Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo-Silva, Sara Teixeira; de Oliveira Silva, Thais Larissa Araújo; Urbina, Julio A.; de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Amiodarone (AMIO), the most frequently antiarrhythmic drug used for the symptomatic treatment of chronic Chagas' disease patients with cardiac compromise, has recently been shown to have also specific activity against fungi, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania. In this work, we characterized the effects of AMIO on proliferation, mitochondrial physiology, and ultrastructure of Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. The IC50 values were 4.21 and 0.46 μM against promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes, respectively, indicating high selectivity for the clinically relevant stage. We also found that treatment with AMIO leads to a collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, in a dose-dependent manner. Fluorescence microscopy of cells labeled with JC-1, a marker for mitochondrial energization, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed severe alterations of the mitochondrion, including intense swelling and modification of its membranes. Other ultrastructural alterations included (1) presence of numerous lipid-storage bodies, (2) presence of large autophagosomes containing part of the cytoplasm and membrane profiles, sometimes in close association with the mitochondrion and endoplasmic reticulum, and (3) alterations in the chromatin condensation and plasma membrane integrity. Taken together, our results indicate that AMIO is a potent inhibitor of L. amazonensis growth, acting through irreversible alterations in the mitochondrial structure and function, which lead to cell death by necrosis, apoptosis and/or autophagy. PMID:22091415

  16. Epithelial Proliferation on Curved Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Marquez, Samantha; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. In strongly interacting epithelial cells, cells coordinate their behavior to respond to mechanical constraints in 2D. Local differences in tissue tension has also been shown to impact cell reproduction within an epithelial-cell sheet. Much less is known about how cells respond to out-of-plane curvatures. Here, we describe the proliferation of MDCK on toroidal hydrogel substrates, which unlike spheres or planes, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus, allowing us to quantify the relation between substrate curvature and cell proliferation.

  17. Effect of c-myc on the ultrastructural structure of cochleae in guinea pigs with noise induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yu; Zhong, Cuiping; Hong, Liu; Wang, Ye; Qiao, Li; Qiu, Jianhua

    2009-12-18

    Noise over-stimulation may induce hair cells loss and hearing deficit. The c-myc oncogene is a major regulator for cell proliferation, growth, and apoptosis. However, the role of this gene in the mammalian cochlea is still unclear. The study was designed to firstly investigate its function under noise condition, from the aspect of cochlear ultrastructural changes. We had established the adenoviral vector of c-myc gene and delivered the adenovirus suspension into the scala tympani of guinea pigs 4 days before noise exposure. The empty adenoviral vectors were injected as control. Then, all subjects were exposed to 4-kHz octave-band noise at 110 dB SPL for 8 h/day, 3 days consecutively. Auditory thresholds were assessed by auditory brainstem response, prior to and 7 days following noise exposure. On the seventh days after noise exposure, the cochlear sensory epithelia surface was observed microscopically and the cochleae were taken to study the ultrastructural changes. The results indicated that auditory threshold shift after noise exposure was higher in the ears treated with Ad.EGFP than that treated with Ad.c-myc-EGFP. Stereocilia loss and the disarrangement of outer hair cells were observed, with greater changes found in the Ad.EGFP group. Also, the ultrastructure changes were severe in the Ad.EGFP group, but not obvious in the Ad.c-myc-EGFP group. Therefore, c-myc gene might play an unexpected role in hearing functional and morphological protection from acoustic trauma.

  18. Lipoid proteinosis: clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural investigations.

    PubMed

    Muda, A O; Paradisi, M; Angelo, C; Mostaccioli, S; Atzori, F; Puddu, P; Faraggiana, T

    1995-10-01

    The case of a 12-year-old boy with lipoid proteinosis is reported. Physical examination revealed long-standing varicella-like scars and areas of hyperpigmentation on the face and upper limbs with no evidence of photosensitivity, hoarseness, small papules along the free margins of eyelids, tongue firmness with short frenulum, and widespread papular lesions of the oral cavity. Histologic and ultrastructural examination revealed the characteristic skin changes: pink, hyaline-like, strongly periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the dermis, surrounding blood vessels, and sweat glands; thin (30 to 35 nm) collagen fibrils interspersed in abundant amorphous material; blood vessels surrounded by thickened, multilayered basement membranes, in which layers of typical, homogeneous basement membrane material were alternating with electronlucent areas filled by various amounts of thin, cross-striated fibrils, arranged perpendicularly. These findings are of great interest since they show a complex relationship between type IV and type III-like collagen components.

  19. Ultrastructure of internal jugular vein defective valves

    PubMed Central

    Tisato, V; Menegatti, E; Mascoli, F; Gianesini, S; Salvi, F; Secchiero, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the ultrastructure of intraluminal defects found in the internal jugular vein by using a scanning electron microscopy. Methods Using a scanning electron microscopy, intraluminal septa and/or defective valves blocking the flow in the distal internal jugular vein of seven patients were studied together with the adjacent wall and compared with control specimen. Results The internal jugular veins’ wall showed a significant derangement of the endothelial layer as compared to controls. Surprisingly, no endothelial cells were found in the defective cusps, and the surface of the structure is covered by a fibro-reticular lamina. Conclusions Although the lack of endothelial cells in the internal jugular vein intraluminal obstacles is a further abnormality found in course of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, our investigation cannot clarify whether this finding is primary or caused by progressive loss of endothelium in relation to altered haemodynamic forces and/or to a past post-thrombotic/inflammatory remodelling. PMID:24972760

  20. Influence of kavain on hepatic ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shuang; Korkmaz, Emine; Braet, Filip; Ngo, Quan; Ramzan, Iqbal

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the major kavalactone kavain imposes adverse effects on the liver ultrastructure and function by affecting vascular and microvascular architecture and altering hepatocellular morphology. METHODS: Kavain solution (10 μg/mL or 43.5 μmol/L) was perfused for 2 h in isolated rat livers. After standard fixation and tissue preparation, the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and light microscopy (LM). RESULTS: LM, SEM, and TEM examinations indicated kavain-treated rat livers (n = 4) displayed severe vascular and endothelial damage compared to control livers (n = 4). CONCLUSION: The data so far support the hypothesis that kavain induces adverse effects on liver; additional investigations with other kavalactones and their effects on liver are urgently needed. PMID:18203285

  1. Ultrastructure and phylogeny of Ustilago coicis *

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-ze; Guan, Pei-gang; Tao, Gang; Ojaghian, Mohammad Reza; Hyde, Kevin David

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago coicis causes serious smut on Coix lacryma-jobi in Dayang Town, Jinyun County, Zhejiang Province of China. In this paper, ultrastructural assessments on fungus-host interactions and teliospore development are presented, and molecular phylogenetic analyses have been done to elucidate the phylogenetic placement of the taxon. Hyphal growth within infected tissues was both intracellular and intercellular and on the surface of fungus-host interaction, and the fungal cell wall and the invaginated host plasma membrane were separated by a sheath comprising two distinct layers between the fungal cell wall and the invaginated host plasma membrane. Ornamentation development of teliospore walls was unique as they appeared to be originated from the exosporium. In addition, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large subunit (LSU) sequence data showed that U. coicis is closely related to Ustilago trichophora which infects grass species of the genus Echinochloa (Poaceae). PMID:23549851

  2. Effects of ultrasound upon endothelial cell ultrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemer, Claus; Jenne, Jürgen; Fatar, Marc; Hennerici, Michael G.; Meairs, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    A number of new brain applications for therapeutic ultrasound are emerging including drug delivery through BBB opening, enhancement of angiogenesis, sonothrombolysis and neuromodulation. Safety remains important as alterations in the cytoskeleton and tight junctions of endothelial cells have been described. In this study we characterize the in vitro effects of ultrasound on cell morphology using a new human brain cell line (hCMEC/D3). Changes in ultrastructure were analyzed with antibodies against tubulin, actin and catenin. Transport was analyzed by measuring transferrin uptake. No significant changes were seen after continuous wave ultrasound treatment of hCMEC/D3 cells grown in Opticell{trade mark, serif} chambers. We could not observe disassembled actin stress fibers or variations in the microtubule network. However, severe damage occurred in cells cultured in petri dishes.

  3. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  4. The influenza fingerprints: NS1 and M1 proteins contribute to specific host cell ultrastructure signatures upon infection by different influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Terrier, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Carron, Coralie; Cartet, Gaeelle; Frobert, Emilie; Yver, Matthieu; Traversier, Aurelien; Wolff, Thorsten; Naffakh, Nadia; and others

    2012-10-10

    Influenza A are nuclear replicating viruses which hijack host machineries in order to achieve optimal infection. Numerous functional virus-host interactions have now been characterized, but little information has been gathered concerning their link to the virally induced remodeling of the host cellular architecture. In this study, we infected cells with several human and avian influenza viruses and we have analyzed their ultrastructural modifications by using electron and confocal microscopy. We discovered that infections lead to a major and systematic disruption of nucleoli and the formation of a large number of diverse viral structures showing specificity that depended on the subtype origin and genomic composition of viruses. We identified NS1 and M1 proteins as the main actors in the remodeling of the host ultra-structure and our results suggest that each influenza A virus strain could be associated with a specific cellular fingerprint, possibly correlated to the functional properties of their viral components.

  5. [Odontogenic induction and ameloblastoma. Histoenzymological and ultrastructural studies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Chomette, G; Auriol, M; Vaillant, J M

    1981-01-01

    The ameloblastoma is usually thought to be devoid of any odontogenic capacity. However, the histological, ultrastructural and histoenzymological study of 5 cases demonstrates the fairly high level of differentiation of some ameloblastic cells in such neoplasms. Furthermore, it suggests very early stage of epithelio-conjunctive interaction. The tumours consist, in addition to stellate, squamous, clear and dark epithelial cells, of densely packed peripheral columnar cells similar to the differentiated ameloblasts of the inner epithelium of enamel organ (median nucleus, well-developed rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and lysosomal-vacuolar system located in the distal end of the cells). Besides, the cytoplasmic membrane shows some pocket-like apical invaginations similar to early Tomes processes. On the other hand, similarly to physiological odontogenesis, an abundant amount of granulo-filamentous material is found along the lateral cellular membranes, and the basement membrane. This substance, sometimes, is intermingled with vertical collagenous fibers. In some areas, it is disrupted and cytoplasmic invaginations of epithelial cells, passing through these gaps, are connected with neighbouring mesenchymatous cells. In other respects, despite the lack of any odontoblastic differentiation, the high level of alkaline phosphatase activity found in these cells by means of histo and cytoenzymological technics, looks like that of odontogenic mesenchymal cells. These findings seem to demonstrate the histogenetic unicity of odontogenic tumours. These neoplasms, like the embryonary dental organ, are provided with two types of cells (epithelial and stromal cells). Thus, they are able to induce odontogenesis. But, in ameloblastoma, this power of induction is restricted to a very early stage of odontogenesis.

  6. Ultrastructure of the human spinal arachnoid mater and dura mater.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, F; Creemers, J; Lambrichts, I

    1996-01-01

    Human spinal dura and arachnoid, obtained during neurosurgical operations, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure of spinal meninges largely conformed to the morphology of the cranial meninges, but some minor differences were detected. The dura was composed of an outermost loosely arranged fibroelastic layer, a middle basically fibrous portion and an innermost cellular layer (dural border cell layer). The dural border cell layer was characterised by multiple interdigitating cell processes, no extracellular collagen, significant extracellular spaces and few cell junctions. Paravascular vesiculated nerve profiles were encountered within the fibroadipose epidural tissue. The arachnoid was composed of an outermost portion (arachnoid barrier cell layer), presenting tightly packed cells, numerous tight junctions and no extracellular collagen. In view of its numerous tight junctions, the arachnoid barrier cell layer is considered to represent an effective morphological and physiological meningeal barrier between the cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space and the blood circulation in the dura. The arachnoid barrier layer was always characterised by a distinct continuous basal lamina on its inner surface towards the innermost collagenous portion of the arachnoid (arachnoid reticular cell layer). The interweaving arachnoid trabecular cells within this layer possessed numerous mitochondria and were anchored to the inner surface of the arachnoid barrier cell layer by desmosomes. An additional layer of flattened branching cells was demonstrated along the inner surface of the arachnoid reticular cell layer and assumed to be an "arachnoid border cell layer'. Morphological data suggest that the dura and arachnoid closely adhere at spinal levels in man without any naturally occurring "subdural space'. However, structurally, the dural border cell layer forms a weak cell layer at the dura-arachnoid continuum that is easily disrupted. The creation

  7. Fractal Dimensions of In Vitro Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lambrou, George I.

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems are characterized by their potential for dynamic adaptation. One of the challenges for systems biology approaches is their contribution towards the understanding of the dynamics of a growing cell population. Conceptualizing these dynamics in tumor models could help us understand the steps leading to the initiation of the disease and its progression. In vitro models are useful in answering this question by providing information over the spatiotemporal nature of such dynamics. In the present work, we used physical quantities such as growth rate, velocity, and acceleration for the cellular proliferation and identified the fractal structures in tumor cell proliferation dynamics. We provide evidence that the rate of cellular proliferation is of nonlinear nature and exhibits oscillatory behavior. We also calculated the fractal dimensions of our cellular system. Our results show that the temporal transitions from one state to the other also follow nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, we calculated self-similarity in cellular proliferation, providing the basis for further investigation in this topic. Such systems biology approaches are very useful in understanding the nature of cellular proliferation and growth. From a clinical point of view, our results may be applicable not only to primary tumors but also to tumor metastases. PMID:25883653

  8. Ultrastructure: effects of melanin pigment on target specificity using a pulsed dye laser (577 nm)

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, A.K.; Tan, O.T.; Boll, J.; Parrish, J.A.; Murphy, G.F.

    1987-06-01

    It has been shown recently that brief pulses of 577 nm radiation from the tunable dye laser are absorbed selectively by oxyhemoglobin. This absorption is associated with highly specific damage to superficial vascular plexus blood vessels in those with lightly pigmented (type I-II) skin. To determine whether pigmentary differences in the overlying epidermis influence this target specificity, we exposed both type I (fair) and type V (dark) normal human skin to varying radiant exposure doses over 1.5-microsecond pulse durations from the tunable dye laser at a wavelength of 577 nm. Using ultrastructural techniques, we found in type I skin that even clinical subthreshold laser exposures caused reproducible alterations of erythrocytes and adjacent dermal vascular endothelium without comparable damage to the overlying epidermis. In contrast, degenerated epidermal basal cells represented the predominant form of cellular damage after laser exposure of type V skin at comparable doses. We conclude that epidermal melanin and vascular hemoglobin are competing sites for 577 nm laser absorption and damage, and that the target specificity of the 577 nm tunable dye laser is therefore influenced by variations in epidermal pigmentation. This finding is relevant to the clinical application of the tunable dye laser in the ablative treatment of vascular lesions. We also found on ultrastructure that the presence of electron-lucent circular structures of approximately 800 A in diameter were observed only at and above clinical threshold doses in those with type I skin and at the highest dose of 2.75 J/cm2 in type V skin. It has been proposed that these structures might be heat-fixed molds of water vapor. Both this and ultrastructural changes of epidermal basal cells demonstrate mechanisms responsible for alteration of tissue after exposure to 577 nm, which are discussed.

  9. Effect of low temperature on growth and ultra-structure of Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Laura A; Dunstan, R Hugh; Gottfries, Johan; von Eiff, Christof; Roberts, Timothy K

    2012-01-01

    The effect of temperature fluctuation is an important factor in bacterial growth especially for pathogens such as the staphylococci that have to remain viable during potentially harsh and prolonged transfer conditions between hosts. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis when exposed to low temperature (4°C) for prolonged periods, and how this factor affected their subsequent growth, colony morphology, cellular ultra-structure, and amino acid composition in the non-cytoplasmic hydrolysate fraction. Clinical isolates were grown under optimal conditions and then subjected to 4°C conditions for a period of 8 wks. Cold-stressed and reference control samples were assessed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify potential ultra-structural changes. To determine changes in amino acid composition, cells were fractured to remove the lipid and cytoplasmic components and the remaining structural components were hydrolysed. Amino acid profiles for the hydrolysis fraction were then analysed for changes by using principal component analysis (PCA). Exposure of the three staphylococci to prolonged low temperature stress resulted in the formation of increasing proportions of small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. TEM revealed that SCV cells had significantly thicker and more diffuse cell-walls than their corresponding WT samples for both S. aureus and S. epidermidis, but the changes were not significant for S. lugdunensis. Substantial species-specific alterations in the amino acid composition of the structural hydrolysate fraction were also observed in the cold-treated cells. The data indicated that the staphylococci responded over prolonged periods of cold-stress treatment by transforming into SCV populations. The observed ultra-structural and amino acid changes were proposed to represent response mechanisms for staphylococcal survival amidst hostile conditions, thus maintaining the viability of the

  10. The chorion ultrastructure of ova of Lophius spp.

    PubMed

    Colmenero, A I; Tuset, V M; Fortuño, J-M; Sánchez, P

    2015-06-01

    The chorion surface ultrastructure of unfertilized eggs of black anglerfish Lophius budegassa and white anglerfish Lophius piscatorius was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Species-specific differences were observed. PMID:25943723

  11. [Ultrastructural changes in the lung in acute adult respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szemenyei, K; Széll, K; Kádas, L

    1980-04-01

    Morphological alterations of the lung in respiratory distress syndrome of adults (ARDS) were analyzed in 10 cases with traumatic-and septic shock, laryngitis subglottica descendens and bronchopneumonia. For the better understanding of the pathomechanism of the disease in addition to the standard methods, first of all ultrastructural alterations were studied. Two phases of the morphologic alterations could be distinguished, the phase of the destruction and the phase of the repair. These two processes are not sharply distinguishable. Genesis of the characteristic histological alterations (damage to the epithelial and endothelial cells, formation of hyaline membranes, microcoagulation, proliferation of the type II pneumocytes and fibroblasts, fibrosis) is discussed, with regard to the data of the literature.

  12. Cellular structural biology as revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N; Martins, Bruno; Medalia, Ohad

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the function of cellular machines requires a thorough analysis of the structural elements that underline their function. Electron microscopy (EM) has been pivotal in providing information about cellular ultrastructure, as well as macromolecular organization. Biological materials can be physically fixed by vitrification and imaged with cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) in a close-to-native condition. Using this technique, one can acquire three-dimensional (3D) information about the macromolecular architecture of cells, depict unique cellular states and reconstruct molecular networks. Technical advances over the last few years, such as improved sample preparation and electron detection methods, have been instrumental in obtaining data with unprecedented structural details. This presents an exciting opportunity to explore the molecular architecture of both individual cells and multicellular organisms at nanometer to subnanometer resolution. In this Commentary, we focus on the recent developments and in situ applications of cryo-ET to cell and structural biology.

  13. Gestational protein restriction alters cell proliferation in rat placenta.

    PubMed

    Rebelato, Hércules Jonas; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marreto; de Sousa Righi, Eloá Fernanda; Catisti, Rosana

    2016-04-01

    We recently showed that gestational protein restriction (GPR) alters the structure of the rat placenta on day 19 of gestation (dG). The aim of the study was to investigate the spatial and temporal immunolocalization of proliferating cell antigen Ki67 in normal and GPR placental development. Pregnant Wistar rats were divided into two groups: normal (NP, 17 % casein) or low-protein diet (LP, 6 % casein). Placentas and fetus were collected and weighed at 15, 17, 19 and 21 dG. Morphological, morphometric and ultrastructural analyses were performed. Immunoperoxidase was used to identify nuclear antigen Ki67 in placental sections. We observed a significant reduction in the number of trophoblast giant cells and glycogen cells in the LP group. Placental weight was significantly reduced only at 17 dG in the LP group, in parallel to a decrease in glycogen cells. From 15 to 21 dG, the thickness of the junctional zone (JZ) decreased in NP and LP animals, while that of the labyrinth zone (LZ) increased in parallel to a reduction in the number of proliferating cells in this LZ zone. GPR significantly inhibits cell proliferation in the JZ, especially at 15 and 17 dG. The ultrastructural appearance of the cytoplasm of giant and cytotrophoblastic cells indicates degeneration from 15 to 21 dG and this effect is enhanced in LP animals suggesting early aging. Offspring of NP dams were significantly heavier than offspring of LP dams at 21 dG. GPR causes modifications in specific regions of the placenta, cell proliferation inhibition and fetal growth restriction. PMID:26779652

  14. Gestational protein restriction alters cell proliferation in rat placenta.

    PubMed

    Rebelato, Hércules Jonas; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marreto; de Sousa Righi, Eloá Fernanda; Catisti, Rosana

    2016-04-01

    We recently showed that gestational protein restriction (GPR) alters the structure of the rat placenta on day 19 of gestation (dG). The aim of the study was to investigate the spatial and temporal immunolocalization of proliferating cell antigen Ki67 in normal and GPR placental development. Pregnant Wistar rats were divided into two groups: normal (NP, 17 % casein) or low-protein diet (LP, 6 % casein). Placentas and fetus were collected and weighed at 15, 17, 19 and 21 dG. Morphological, morphometric and ultrastructural analyses were performed. Immunoperoxidase was used to identify nuclear antigen Ki67 in placental sections. We observed a significant reduction in the number of trophoblast giant cells and glycogen cells in the LP group. Placental weight was significantly reduced only at 17 dG in the LP group, in parallel to a decrease in glycogen cells. From 15 to 21 dG, the thickness of the junctional zone (JZ) decreased in NP and LP animals, while that of the labyrinth zone (LZ) increased in parallel to a reduction in the number of proliferating cells in this LZ zone. GPR significantly inhibits cell proliferation in the JZ, especially at 15 and 17 dG. The ultrastructural appearance of the cytoplasm of giant and cytotrophoblastic cells indicates degeneration from 15 to 21 dG and this effect is enhanced in LP animals suggesting early aging. Offspring of NP dams were significantly heavier than offspring of LP dams at 21 dG. GPR causes modifications in specific regions of the placenta, cell proliferation inhibition and fetal growth restriction.

  15. Ultrastructural Characterization of Fresh and Vitrified In Vitro- and In Vivo-Produced Sheep Embryos.

    PubMed

    Romão, R; Bettencourt, E; Pereira, R M L N; Marques, C C; Baptista, M C; Barbas, J P; Oliveira, E; Bettencourt, C; Sousa, M

    2016-06-01

    The lower results in cryopreservation of in vitro-produced (IVP) sheep embryos, when compared to the in vivo derived, limits its use. Four groups of blastocyst (BL) were evaluated: fresh IVP (n = 3), fresh in vivo derived (n = 3), warmed IVP cryopreserved in open pulled straws (OPS, n = 3) and warmed in vivo derived cryopreserved in OPS (n = 3). Ultrastructural observation of processed fresh embryos showed a reduced number of microvilli and mitochondria in the IVP ones, as well as a lower number of mature mitochondria, that can be associated with deficient metabolism in IVP embryos, possibly involved in the lower resistance to cryopreservation. Both in vivo-derived and IVP embryos had a large number of vesicles, with light and dense content. In embryos vitrified by OPS, major changes were observed mainly in IVP embryos with small changes in grade 2 (fair) and high changes in grade 3 (bad) semithin scoring. The main changes associated with cryopreservation included disruption of cellular membranes and poor intracellular preservation, with loss of microvilli and the presence of cellular debris. In conclusion, ultrastructural evaluation of IVP blastocysts cryopreserved in OPS was herein described for the first time, reporting more severe cellular damage in these embryos when compared to those produced in vivo. This is probably associated with a lower cryotolerance that can be related to their lipid content and metabolism. PMID:27144917

  16. Ultrastructural Characterization of Fresh and Vitrified In Vitro- and In Vivo-Produced Sheep Embryos.

    PubMed

    Romão, R; Bettencourt, E; Pereira, R M L N; Marques, C C; Baptista, M C; Barbas, J P; Oliveira, E; Bettencourt, C; Sousa, M

    2016-06-01

    The lower results in cryopreservation of in vitro-produced (IVP) sheep embryos, when compared to the in vivo derived, limits its use. Four groups of blastocyst (BL) were evaluated: fresh IVP (n = 3), fresh in vivo derived (n = 3), warmed IVP cryopreserved in open pulled straws (OPS, n = 3) and warmed in vivo derived cryopreserved in OPS (n = 3). Ultrastructural observation of processed fresh embryos showed a reduced number of microvilli and mitochondria in the IVP ones, as well as a lower number of mature mitochondria, that can be associated with deficient metabolism in IVP embryos, possibly involved in the lower resistance to cryopreservation. Both in vivo-derived and IVP embryos had a large number of vesicles, with light and dense content. In embryos vitrified by OPS, major changes were observed mainly in IVP embryos with small changes in grade 2 (fair) and high changes in grade 3 (bad) semithin scoring. The main changes associated with cryopreservation included disruption of cellular membranes and poor intracellular preservation, with loss of microvilli and the presence of cellular debris. In conclusion, ultrastructural evaluation of IVP blastocysts cryopreserved in OPS was herein described for the first time, reporting more severe cellular damage in these embryos when compared to those produced in vivo. This is probably associated with a lower cryotolerance that can be related to their lipid content and metabolism.

  17. Ultrastructure of immature and mature human oocytes after cryotop vitrification

    PubMed Central

    PALMERINI, Maria Grazia; ANTINORI, Monica; MAIONE, Marta; CERUSICO, Fabrizio; VERSACI, Caterina; NOTTOLA, Stefania Annarita; MACCHIARELLI, Guido; KHALILI, Mohammad Ali; ANTINORI, Severino

    2014-01-01

    In vitro maturation of vitrified immature germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes is a promising fertility preservation option. We analyzed the ultrastructure of human GV oocytes after Cryotop vitrification (GVv) and compared it with fresh GV (GVc), fresh mature metaphase II (MIIc) and Cryotop-vitrified mature (MIIv) oocytes. By phase contrast microscopy and light microscopy, the oolemmal and cytoplasmic organization of fresh and vitrified oocytes did not show significant changes. GVv oocytes showed significant ultrastructural alterations of the microvilli in 40% of the samples; small vacuoles and occasional large/isolated vacuoles were abnormally present in the ooplasm periphery of 50% of samples. The ultrastructure of nuclei and mitochondria-vesicle (MV) complexes, as well as the distribution and characteristics of cortical granules (CGs), were comparable with those of GVc oocytes. MIIv oocytes showed an abnormal ultrastructure of microvilli in 30% of the samples and isolated large vacuoles in 70% of the samples. MV complexes were normal, but mitochondria-smooth endoplasmic reticulum aggregates appeared to be of reduced size. CGs were normally located under the oolemma but presented abnormalities in distribution and matrix electron density. In conclusion, Cryotop vitrification preserved main oocyte characteristics in the GV and MII stages, even if peculiar ultrastructural alterations appeared in both stages. This study also showed that the GV stage appears more suitable for vitrification than the MII stage, as indicated by the good ultrastructural preservation of important structures that are present only in immature oocytes, like the nucleus and migrating CGs. PMID:25168087

  18. Nanoparticles as Alternative Strategies for Drug Delivery to the Alzheimer Brain: Electron Microscopy Ultrastructural Analysis.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Daza, Jesús; Herrera, Arturo Solís; del Carmen Arias Esparza, María; Morales, Ludis; Echeverria, Valentina; Bachurin, Sergey Olegovich; Barreto, George Emilio

    2015-01-01

    One of the biggest problems and challenges for the development of new drugs and treatment strategies against Alzheimer Disease (AD) is the crossing of target drugs into the blood brain barrier. The use of nanoparticles in drug delivery therapy holds much promise in targeting remote tissues, and as a result many studies have attempted to study the ultrastructural localization of nanoparticles in various tissues. However, there are currently no in vivo studies demonstrating the ultrastructural distribution of nanoparticles in the brain. The aim of this study was to address how intraperitoneal injection of silver nanoparticles in the brain leads to leaking on the inter-endothelial contact and luminal plasma membrane, thus elucidating the possibility of penetrating into the most affected areas in the Alzheimer brain (vascular endothelium, perivascular, neuronal and glial cells). Our results show that the silver nanoparticles reached the brain and were found in hippocampal areas, indicating that they can be conjugated and used to deliver the drugs into the cell cytoplasm of the damaged brain cells. The present study can be useful for the development of novel drug delivering therapy and useful in understanding the delivery, distribution and effects of silver nanoparticles in AD brain tissue at cellular and subcellular level.

  19. Ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution in lichens exposed around a cement plant (SW Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Guttová, Anna; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Sorbo, Sergio; Basile, Adriana; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated the ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution from a cement industry in the lichen species Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina, which were exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, two quarries, and inhabited and agricultural sites in SW Slovakia. The results showed that dust deposition from quarrying activities and cement works at the cement mill (mainly enriched in Ca, Fe and Ti) significantly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of E. prunastri (sensitive to dust and habitat eutrophication), while X. parietina (tolerant to dust and habitat eutrophication) adapted to the new environment. The length of the exposure strongly affected the vitality of the mycobiont (measured as dehydrogenase activity) in transplanted lichens. Dust deposition led to ultrastructural alterations, including lipid droplets increase, swelling of cellular components, thylakoid degeneration and sometimes plasmolysis, which, on the whole, gave the cells an aged appearance. Photosynthetic parameters deserve further attention as potential indicators for monitoring early biological symptoms of the air pollution caused during cement production. PMID:26044142

  20. Synaptic plasticity and gravity: Ultrastructural, biochemical and physico-chemical fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmann, H.; Slenzka, K.; Körtje, K. H.; Hilbig, R.

    On the basis of quantitative disturbances of the swimming behaviour of aquatic vertebrates (``loop-swimming'' in fish and frog larvae) following long-term hyper-g-exposure the question was raised whether or not and to what extent changes in the gravitational vector might influence the CNS at the cellular level. Therefore, by means of histological, histochemical and biochemical analyses the effect of 2-4 x g for 9 days on the gross morphology of the fish brain, and on different neuronal enzymes was investigated. In order to enable a more precise analysis in future-μg-experiments of any gravity-related effects on the neuronal synapses within the gravity-perceptive integration centers differentiated electron-microscopical and electronspectroscopical techniques have been developed to accomplish an ultrastructural localization of calcium, a high-affinity Ca2+-ATPase, creatine kinase and cytochrome oxidase. In hyper-g animals vs. 1-g controls, a reduction of total brain volume (15 %), a decrease in creatine kinase activity (20 %), a local increase in cytochrome oxidase activity, but no differences in Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase activities were observed. Ultrastructural peculiarities of synaptic contact formation in gravity-related integration centers (Nucleus magnocellularis) were found. These results are discussed on the basis of a direct effect of hyper-gravity not only on the gravity-sensitive neuronal integration centers but possibly also on the physico-chemical properties of the lipid bilayer of neuronal membranes in general.

  1. Cardiac ultrastructure and electrocardiogram of the short-tailed shrew, Blarina brevicauda.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, C J; Keith, J C

    1993-10-01

    The smaller species of shrews have been of considerable interest to scientists because of their high rate of metabolism, structure-functional and behavioral adaptations to support their energy demands. The present data are the first detailed cardiac ultrastructural findings and electrocardiographic (ECG) data of adult and immature small short-tailed shrews, Blarina brevicauda. The heart is morphologically elongated and heart rates in excess of 900 b/min were observed, but ECG components and pattern are non-distinctive for this species. Ultrastructurally, the sarcomeres, tubular and sarcotubular systems and Purkinje cells resemble closely those observed in larger, less active mammals. Several distinctive features resembling those seen in some other shrews or hummingbirds exist, including reduced quantities of myocyte glycogen, irregularly shaped and tightly packed mitochondria, increased neural and vascular elements in the myocardium, and small size and unusual dispersion of atrial specific granules. These morphologic findings suggest that the remarkable physiologic performance of the heart of Blarina brevicauda is supported by a combination of macroscopic, histologic and cellular adaptations. PMID:8269404

  2. Studying kinetochore-fiber ultrastructure using correlative light-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Ian A.; Royle, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) has dominated high-resolution cellular imaging for over 50 years thanks to its ability to resolve on a nanometer-scale intracellular structures such as the microtubules of the mitotic spindle. It is advantageous to view the cell of interest prior to processing the sample for EM. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) is a technique that allows one to visualize cells of interest by light microscopy (LM) before being transferred to EM for ultra-structural examination. Here we describe how CLEM can be applied as an effective tool to study the spindle apparatus of mitotic cells. This approach allows transfected cells of interest, in desirable stages of mitosis, to be followed from LM through to EM. CLEM has often been considered as a technically challenging and laborious technique. In this chapter we provide step-by-step pictorial guides that allow successful CLEM to be achieved. In addition we explain how it is possible to vary the sectioning plane, allowing spindles and microtubules to be analyzed from different angles, and the outputs that can be obtained from these methods when applied to the study of kinetochore fiber (K-fiber) ultrastructure. PMID:23973081

  3. Ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution in lichens exposed around a cement plant (SW Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Guttová, Anna; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Sorbo, Sergio; Basile, Adriana; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated the ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution from a cement industry in the lichen species Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina, which were exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, two quarries, and inhabited and agricultural sites in SW Slovakia. The results showed that dust deposition from quarrying activities and cement works at the cement mill (mainly enriched in Ca, Fe and Ti) significantly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of E. prunastri (sensitive to dust and habitat eutrophication), while X. parietina (tolerant to dust and habitat eutrophication) adapted to the new environment. The length of the exposure strongly affected the vitality of the mycobiont (measured as dehydrogenase activity) in transplanted lichens. Dust deposition led to ultrastructural alterations, including lipid droplets increase, swelling of cellular components, thylakoid degeneration and sometimes plasmolysis, which, on the whole, gave the cells an aged appearance. Photosynthetic parameters deserve further attention as potential indicators for monitoring early biological symptoms of the air pollution caused during cement production.

  4. Ultrastructural characterization of the rabbit mandibular condyle following experimental induction of anterior disk displacement.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, M; Ali, A M; Choi, W S; Larke, V

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that surgical induction of anterior disk displacement (ADD) in the rabbit craniomandibular joint (CMJ) leads to cellular and extracellular alterations consistent with osteoarthritis. Similar findings were also reported in human ADD as well as osteoarthritis of other joints. The purpose of this study was to further characterize these histopathological findings at the ultrastructural level. The right joint of 15 rabbits was exposed surgically and all discal attachments were severed except for the posterior attachment. The disk was then repositioned anteriorly and sutured to the zygomatic arch. The left joint served as a sham-operated control. Ten additional joints were used as nonoperated controls. Mandibular condyles were excised 2 weeks following surgery and processed for transmission electron microscopy. Experimental condyles showed neovascularization, fibrillation and vacuolation of the extracellular matrix and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells compared to controls. In addition, chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage showed an increase in the amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex suggesting an increase in protein synthesis. The presence of thick collagen fibers in osteoarthritic cartilage supports our previous immunohistochemical results of the presence of type I collagen instead of normally existing type II collagen. It was concluded that surgical induction of ADD in the rabbit CMJ leads to ultrastructural changes in the mandibular condylar cartilage consistent with degenerative alterations known to occur in osteoarthritis. PMID:10899715

  5. Spent metal working fluids produced alterations on photosynthetic parameters and cell-ultrastructure of leaves and roots of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Grijalbo, Lucía; Fernandez-Pascual, Mercedes; García-Seco, Daniel; Gutierrez-Mañero, Francisco Javier; Lucas, Jose Antonio

    2013-09-15

    In this work we assess the capacity of maize (Zea mays) plants to phytoremediate spent metal working fluids (MWFs) and its effects on photosynthesis and ultrastructure of mesophyll and root cells. A corn-esparto fibre system patented by us has been used to phytoremediate MWFs in hydroponic culture. Furthermore, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has been used to improve the process. The results show that this system is capable of significantly reducing the chemical oxygen demand, under local legislation limits. However, plant systems are really damaged, mainly its photosynthetic system, as shown by the photosynthetical parameters. Nevertheless, strain inoculated improves these parameters, especially Hill reaction. The ultrastructure of photosynthetic apparatus was also affected. Chloroplast number decreased and becomes degraded in the mesophyll of MWFs treated plants. In some cases even plasmolysis of chloroplast membrane was detected. Early senescence symptoms were detected in root ultrastructural study. Severe cellular damage was observed in the parenchymal root cells of plants grown with MWFs, while vascular bundles cell remained unchanged. It seems that the inoculation minimises the damage originated by the MWFs pollutants, appearing as less degenerative organelles and higher chloroplast number than in non-inoculated ones. PMID:23770488

  6. Histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Successful rotator cuff repair requires biological anchoring of the repaired tendon to the bone. However, the histological structure of the repaired tendon-bone interface differs from that of a normal tendon insertion. We analysed differences between the normal tendon insertion and the repaired tendon-bone interface after surgery in the mechanical properties, histomorphometric analysis, and 3-dimensional ultrastructure of the cells using a rat rotator cuff repair model. Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent complete cuff tear and subsequent repair of the supraspinatus tendon. The repaired tendon-bone interface was evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. At each time point, shoulders underwent micro-computed tomography scanning and biomechanical testing (N = 6), conventional histology and histomorphometric analysis (N = 6), and ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography (N = 4). We demonstrated that the cellular distribution between the repaired tendon and bone at 12 weeks after surgery bore similarities to the normal tendon insertion. However, the ultrastructure of the cells at any time point had a different morphology than those of the normal tendon insertion. These morphological differences affect the healing process, partly contributing to re-tearing at the repair site. These results may facilitate future studies of the regeneration of a normal tendon insertion. PMID:27647121

  7. Effect of the photoperiod and administration of melatonin on the pars tuberalis of viscacha (Lagostomus maximus maximus): an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Romera, Edith Perez; Mohamed, Fabian; Fogal, Teresa; Dominguez, Susana; Piezzi, Ramón; Scardapane, Luis

    2010-05-01

    The pituitary pars tuberalis (PT) is a glandular zone exhibiting well-defined structural characteristics. Morphologically, it is formed by specific secretory cells, folliculostellate cells, and migratory cells coming from the pars distalis. The purpose of this work was to investigate differences in specific cellular characteristics in the PT of viscachas captured in summer (long photoperiod) and winter (short photoperiod), as well as the effects of chronic melatonin administration in viscachas captured in summer and kept under long photoperiod. In summer, the PT-specific cells exhibited cell-like characteristics with an important secretory activity and a moderate amount of glycogen. In winter, the PT-specific granulated cells showed ultrastructural variations with signs of a reduced synthesis activity. Also, PT showed a high amount of glycogen and a great number of cells in degeneration. After melatonin administration, the ultrastructural characteristics were similar to those observed in winter, but the amount of glycogen was higher. These results suggest possible functional implications as a result of morphological differences between long and short photoperiods, and are in agreement with the variations of the pituitary-gonadal axis, probably in response to the natural photoperiod changes through the pineal melatonin. The ultrastructural differences observed in PT, after melatonin administration, were similar to those observed in the short photoperiod, thus supporting the hypothesis that these cytological changes are induced by melatonin.

  8. Histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Successful rotator cuff repair requires biological anchoring of the repaired tendon to the bone. However, the histological structure of the repaired tendon-bone interface differs from that of a normal tendon insertion. We analysed differences between the normal tendon insertion and the repaired tendon-bone interface after surgery in the mechanical properties, histomorphometric analysis, and 3-dimensional ultrastructure of the cells using a rat rotator cuff repair model. Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent complete cuff tear and subsequent repair of the supraspinatus tendon. The repaired tendon-bone interface was evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. At each time point, shoulders underwent micro-computed tomography scanning and biomechanical testing (N = 6), conventional histology and histomorphometric analysis (N = 6), and ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography (N = 4). We demonstrated that the cellular distribution between the repaired tendon and bone at 12 weeks after surgery bore similarities to the normal tendon insertion. However, the ultrastructure of the cells at any time point had a different morphology than those of the normal tendon insertion. These morphological differences affect the healing process, partly contributing to re-tearing at the repair site. These results may facilitate future studies of the regeneration of a normal tendon insertion. PMID:27647121

  9. Evolution of Cellular Inclusions in Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Furusato, Emiko; Cameron, J. Douglas; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD) consists of small, yellow-white, glistening intraretinal crystals in the posterior pole, tapetoretinal degeneration with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and “sclerosis” of the choroid; in addition, sparking yellow crystals in the superficial marginal cornea are also found in many patients. BCD is inherited as an autosomal-recessive trait (4q35-tel) and usually has its onset in the third decade of life. This review focuses on the ultrastructure of cellular crystals and lipid inclusions of BCD. PMID:21359135

  10. Myocyte proliferation in the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Sedmera, David; Thompson, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of organ growth is critical during embryogenesis. At the cellular level, mechanisms controlling the size of individual embryonic organs include cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and attrition through cell death. All these mechanisms play a role in cardiac morphogenesis, but experimental studies have shown that the major determinant of cardiac size during prenatal development is myocyte proliferation. As this proliferative capacity becomes severely restricted after birth, the number of cell divisions that occur during embryogenesis limits the growth potential of the postnatal heart. We summarize here current knowledge concerning regional control of myocyte proliferation as related to cardiac morphogenesis and dysmorphogenesis. There are significant spatial and temporal differences in rates of cell division, peaking during the pre-septation period and then gradually decreasing towards birth. Analysis of regional rates of proliferation helps to explain the mechanics of ventricular septation, chamber morphogenesis, and the development of the cardiac conduction system. Proliferation rates are influenced by hemodynamic loading, and transduced by autocrine and paracrine signaling via growth factors. Understanding the biological response of the developing heart to such factors and physical forces will further our progress in engineering artificial myocardial tissues for heart repair and designing optimal treatment strategies for congenital heart disease. PMID:21538685

  11. Proposed mechanism in the change of cellular composition in the outer medullary collecting duct during potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Park, E-Y; Kim, W-Y; Kim, Y-M; Lee, J-H; Han, K-H; Weiner, I D; Kim, J

    2012-12-01

    Potassium depletion (K⁺-D) induces hypertrophy and hyperplasia of collecting duct cells, and potassium repletion (K⁺-R) induces regression of these changes. The purpose of this study was to examine the time courses of the changes in cellular composition, the origin of intercalated cells (ICs) and the mechanism responsible for these changes. SD rats received K⁺-depleted diets for 1, 7, or 14 days. After K⁺-D for 14 days some of the rats received normal diets for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days. In the inner stripe of the outer medulla, K⁺-D increased significantly the number and proportion of H⁺-ATPase-positive ICs, but decreased the proportion of H⁺-ATPase-negative principal cells (PCs). However, proliferation was limited to H⁺-ATPase-negative PCs. During K⁺-R, the cellular composition was recovered to control level. Apoptosis increased during K⁺-R and exclusively limited in H⁺-ATPase-negative PCs. Double immunolabeling with antibodies to PC and IC markers identified both cells negative or positive for all markers during both K⁺-D and K⁺-R. Electron microscopic observation showed that ultrastructure of AE1-positive some cells were similar to AE1-negative some cells during K⁺-R. LC3 protein expression increased significantly and autophagic vacuoles appeared particularly in PCs on days 14 of K⁺-D and in ICs on days 3 of K⁺-R. These results suggest that PCs and ICs may interconvert in response to changes in dietary K+ availability and that autophagic pathways may be involved in the interconversion.

  12. Ultrastructural modification of the ciliate protozoan, Colpidium colpoda following chronic exposure to partially degraded crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rogerson, A.; Berger, J.

    1982-06-01

    Protozoa are important consumers of the microflora that biodegrade oil spills. In the study presented, the ultrastructural effects induced by chronic oil stress in the ciliate protozoan, Colpidium colpoda are discussed. Colpidia were grown in control cultures containing a dilute organic medium and a dense suspension of prey bacteria. After 20 days' oil exposure, C. colpoda contained more stained cytoplasmic inclusions than ciliates grown in the control media. Although the extent of Sudan Black staining in the oil-stressed cells indicates the presence of lipids, these droplets are better termed lipid-hydrocarbon (LH) inclusions until their definitive composition is known. C. colpoda accumulated significant quantities of lipid-hydrocarbons accounting for up to 20% of their cellular volume. Studies are currently being conducted to characterized these inclusions and to evaluate the effects of feeding these ''oil-labeled'' prey to predators, an important issue with the increasing concern about the biomagnification of environmental pollutants. (JMT)

  13. Ultrastructure of the membrana limitans interna after dye-assisted membrane peeling.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Tobias; Steger, Claudia; Westermann, Martin; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koenigsdoerffer, Ekkehart; Strobel, Juergen; Dawczynski, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ultrastructure of the membrana limitans interna (internal limiting membrane, ILM) and to evaluate alterations to the retinal cell layers after membrane peeling with vital dyes. Twenty-five patients (25 eyes) who underwent macular hole surgery were included, whereby 12 indocyanine green (ICG)- and 13 brilliant blue G (BBG)-stained ILM were analyzed using light, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy. Retinal cell fragments on the ILM were identified in both groups using immunohistochemistry. Comparing ICG- and BBG-stained membranes, larger cellular fragments were observed at a higher frequency in the BBG group. Thereby, the findings indicate that ICG permits an enhanced separation of the ILM from the underlying retina with less mechanical destruction. A possible explanation might be seen in the known photosensitivity of ICG, which induces a stiffening and shrinkage of the ILM but also generates retinal toxic metabolites.

  14. Resolving new ultrastructural features of cytokinetic abscission with soft-X-ray cryo-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shachar; Kirchenbuechler, David; Nachmias, Dikla; Tamir, Adi; Werner, Stephan; Elbaum, Michael; Elia, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cytokinetic abscission is mediated by the ESCRT membrane fission machinery. While much has been clarified on the topology and kinetics of abscission through high-resolution microscopy, key questions regarding the mechanism of abscission remain open. Here we apply cryogenic soft-X-ray tomography to elucidate new ultrastructural details in the intercellular membrane bridge connecting cells undergoing abscission. In particular, we resolve defined ring-like structures inside the midbody dark zone that have been inaccessible to EM, and identify membrane extrusions at the abscission sites. In cells at late stages of abscission we resolve a complex array of helical spirals, extending the structural information obtained by EM. Our results highlight the advantages of soft-X-ray tomography and emphasize the importance of using complementary approaches for characterizing cellular structures. Notably, by providing new structural data from intact cells we present a realistic view on the topology of abscission and suggest new mechanistic models for ESCRT mediated abscission. PMID:27282220

  15. Resolving new ultrastructural features of cytokinetic abscission with soft-X-ray cryo-tomography.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Shachar; Kirchenbuechler, David; Nachmias, Dikla; Tamir, Adi; Werner, Stephan; Elbaum, Michael; Elia, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cytokinetic abscission is mediated by the ESCRT membrane fission machinery. While much has been clarified on the topology and kinetics of abscission through high-resolution microscopy, key questions regarding the mechanism of abscission remain open. Here we apply cryogenic soft-X-ray tomography to elucidate new ultrastructural details in the intercellular membrane bridge connecting cells undergoing abscission. In particular, we resolve defined ring-like structures inside the midbody dark zone that have been inaccessible to EM, and identify membrane extrusions at the abscission sites. In cells at late stages of abscission we resolve a complex array of helical spirals, extending the structural information obtained by EM. Our results highlight the advantages of soft-X-ray tomography and emphasize the importance of using complementary approaches for characterizing cellular structures. Notably, by providing new structural data from intact cells we present a realistic view on the topology of abscission and suggest new mechanistic models for ESCRT mediated abscission. PMID:27282220

  16. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  17. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  18. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  19. Ultrastructural study of neoplastic cells in Macoma balthica (Bivalvia) from the Gulf of Gdansk (Poland).

    PubMed

    Smolarz, Katarzyna; Renault, Tristan; Wołowicz, Maciej

    2006-06-01

    In the Baltic clam Macoma balthica from the Gulf of Gdansk, neoplasia is considered as a serious epizootic linked to bad environmental conditions and high levels of pollutants. Previous research was focused on the diagnosis, prevalence, seasonality and histopathological characteristic of the cancer. This study is focused on electron microscopy analyses describing cell ultrastructure abnormalities related to neoplasia. Examinations using the electron microscopy highlighted changes confined to anatomic ultrastructures, shapes and functions of neoplastic cells. The lobulated appearance of the nucleus, changes in cellular matrix and the occurrence of large granular cells with hyperchromatic nuclei, atypical Golgi structures and deterioration of rough endoplasmic reticulum manifested the disease. The presence of atypical mitochondria, free ribosomes and hypertrophic nuclei suggests the adaptation of neoplastic cells to increased mitotic activity, while the observed modification of cellular membranes may reflect functional changes connected to increased pinocytotic activity or intercellular transport. The cancer cells were found to appear in two types, abnormal round-shaped cells and spindle-shaped cells, both with increased frequencies of cell division. Round-shaped cells typical for disseminated neoplasia were observed in all affected bivalves, in a few cases co-occurring with abnormal spherical cells. Spindle-shaped cells containing some intracytoplasmic filaments, and with a tendency of the nuclei to be orientated as in a palisade were interpreted as myofibroblasts-like cells and were observed in five out of eleven clams diagnosed as neoplastic. This finding represents the first demonstration of phenotypic differences in the cell types co-occurring in animals diagnosed as neoplastic and by that suggests coexistence of two types of bivalve cancer, disseminated neoplasia and probable fibrosarcoma.

  20. The cytochemical and ultrastructural characteristics of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Xin, Lusheng; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Phagocytes have been proved to play vital roles in the innate immune response. However, the cellular characteristics of phagocytes in invertebrates, especially in molluscs, remain largely unknown. In the present study, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was employed to sort the phagocytes from the non-phagocytic haemocytes of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The cytochemical staining analysis revealed that phagocytes were positive staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase, while negative staining for toluidine blue and periodic acid-Schiff. The non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited positive staining for periodic acid-Schiff, weak positive staining for toluidine blue, but negative staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase. In addition, phagocytes exhibited ultrastructural cellular features similar to those of macrophages, with large cell diameter, rough cell membrane and extended pseudopodia revealed by the scanning electron microscopy, while the non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited small cell diameter, smooth cell surface and round spherical shape. Transmission electron microscopy further demonstrated that phagocytes were abundant of cytoplasmic bodies and mitochondria, while non-phagocytic haemocytes were characterized as the comparatively large cell nucleus with contorted and condensed heterochromatin adherent to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, compared with non-phagocytic haemocytes, phagocytes exhibited significantly higher levels of intracellular cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor, interferon-like protein and interleukin-17, and significantly higher abundance of lysosome and reactive oxygen species, which were of great importance to the activation of immune response and pathogen clearance. Taken together, these findings revealed the different cytochemical and ultrastructural features between phagocytes and non-phagocytic haemocytes in C. gigas, which would provide an important clue to investigate the

  1. Ultrastructure of potato tubers formed in microgravity under controlled environmental conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Martha E.; Croxdale, Judith G.; Tibbitts, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Previous spaceflight reports attribute changes in plant ultrastructure to microgravity, but it was thought that the changes might result from growth in uncontrolled environments during spaceflight. To test this possibility, potato explants were examined (a leaf, axillary bud, and small stem segment) grown in the ASTROCULTURETM plant growth unit, which provided a controlled environment. During the 16 d flight of space shuttle Columbia (STS-73), the axillary bud of each explant developed into a mature tuber. Upon return to Earth, tuber slices were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the cell ultrastructure of flight-grown tubers could not be distinguished from that of tuber cells grown in the same growth unit on the ground. No differences were observed in cellular features such as protein crystals, plastids with starch grains, mitochondria, rough ER, or plasmodesmata. Cell wall structure, including underlying microtubules, was typical of ground-grown plants. Because cell walls of tubers formed in space were not required to provide support against the force due to gravity, it was hypothesized that these walls might exhibit differences in wall components as compared with walls formed in Earth-grown tubers. Wall components were immunolocalized at the TEM level using monoclonal antibodies JIM 5 and JIM 7, which recognize epitopes of pectins, molecules thought to contribute to wall rigidity and cell adhesion. No difference in presence, abundance or distribution of these pectin epitopes was seen between space- and Earth-grown tubers. This evidence indicates that for the parameters studied, microgravity does not affect the cellular structure of plants grown under controlled environmental conditions.

  2. Ultrastructural cytochemical analysis of intranuclear arsenic inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, E.M.B.

    1987-01-01

    To establish the chemical composition of the arsenic inclusion, freshly isolated preparations of inclusions and epon-embedded thin sections of inclusions were subjected to ultrastructural cytochemical analysis. Intranuclear inclusions are composed of amorphous, arsenic-containing subunits aligned linearly to form a coiled complex. Lipase, ribonuclease, deoxyribonuclease, trypsin, pepsin, protease, amylase, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was used to digest or chelate these inclusions. Following enzymatic digestion or chelation, the electron opacity of inclusions was compared with that of control sections exposed for equal times to equivalent solutions lacking the enzymes. Exposure to amylase caused a consistent reduction in the electron opacity of thin sections of inclusions and almost complete digestion of the freshly isolated preparations of inclusions. This was indicative of the presence of a carbohydrate moiety within arsenic inclusions. Incubation of inclusions with EDTA resulted in solubilization of freshly isolated and thin-sectioned embedded material. These data indicated that the intranuclear arsenic inclusion is composed of both metallic and carbohydrate moieties, confirming earlier studies which identified arsenic within inclusions using instrumental neutron activation analysis and x-ray microprobe analysis.

  3. Ultrastructure of mitochondrial nucleoid and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Prachař, Jarmil

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial nucleoids (hereafter nucleoids) contain genetic information, mitochondrial DNA, prerequisite for mitochondrial functioning, particularly information required for mitochondrial electron transport. To understand nucleoid functioning, it is imperative to know its ultrastructure and dynamics in the context of the actual mitochondrial state. In this study, we document the internal structure, different positions of nucleoids inside the mitochondrial tube and their different morphology. The nucleoid cores appear in section as circular or slightly oval objects ranging from 50 to 100 nm in diameter. They are mainly located in the matrix between cristae inside the mitochondrial tube but they are also frequently found close to the inner mitochondrial surface. In tightly packed form, their interior exhibits sophisticated nucleoprotein regularity. The core surroundings form an electron-lucent thick layer which is probably partitioned into separate chambers. We suggest that the morphology of nucleoids mirrors the mode of energy production, glycolysis versus oxidative phosphorylation. The new high resolution transmission electron microscopy method enabled us to obtain morphological characteristics on yet unpublished level. PMID:27174900

  4. Food restriction modifies ultrastructure of hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Babits, Réka; Szőke, Balázs; Sótonyi, Péter; Rácz, Bence

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of high-energy diets may compromise health and may also impair cognition; these impairments have been linked to tasks that require hippocampal function. Conversely, food restriction has been shown to improve certain aspects of hippocampal function, including spatial memory and memory persistence. These diet-dependent functional changes raise the possibility that the synaptic structure underlying hippocampal function is also affected. To examine how short-term food restriction (FR) alters the synaptic structure of the hippocampus, we used quantitative electron microscopy to analyze the organization of neuropil in the CA1 stratum radiatum of the hippocampus in young rats, consequent to reduced food. While four weeks of FR did not modify the density, size, or shape of postsynaptic spines, the synapses established by these spines were altered, displaying increased mean length, and more frequent perforations of postsynaptic densities. That the number of perforated synapses (believed to be an indicator of synaptic enhancement) increased, and that the CA1 spine population had on average significantly longer PSDs suggests that synaptic efficacy of axospinous synapses also increased in the CA1. Taken together, our ultrastructural data reveal previously unrecognized structural changes at hippocampal synapses as a function of food restriction, supporting a link between metabolic balance and synaptic plasticity.

  5. Spermatozoon ultrastructure in two monorchiid digeneans.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Yann; Bakhoum, Abdoulaye J S; Justine, Jean-Lou; Bray, Rodney A; Bâ, Cheikh T; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spermatological characteristics of species from two monorchiid genera, Opisthomonorchis and Paramonorcheides, have been investigated, for the first time, by means of transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructural study reveals that the mature spermatozoon of Opisthomonorchis dinema and Paramonorcheides selaris share several characters such as the presence of two axonemes of different lengths showing the 9+"1" pattern of the Trepaxonemata, a nucleus, two mitochondria, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, granules of glycogen and similar morphologies of the anterior and posterior extremities. The slight differences between the male gamete of O. dinema and P. selaris are the length of the first axoneme and the position of the second mitochondrion. This study also elucidates the general morphology of the spermatozoon in all monorchiid species described so far, which corresponds to a unique spermatozoon type. Other interesting finds concern the spermatological similarities between monorchiid spermatozoa and the mature spermatozoon reported in the apocreadiid Neoapocreadium chabaudi. These similarities allow us to suggest a close phylogenetical relationship between the Monorchiidae and the Apocreadiidae, although more studies are needed, especially in the unexplored taxa. PMID:27688980

  6. Spermatozoon ultrastructure in two monorchiid digeneans

    PubMed Central

    Bakhoum, Abdoulaye J.S.; Justine, Jean-Lou; Bray, Rodney A.; Bâ, Cheikh T.; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spermatological characteristics of species from two monorchiid genera, Opisthomonorchis and Paramonorcheides, have been investigated, for the first time, by means of transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructural study reveals that the mature spermatozoon of Opisthomonorchis dinema and Paramonorcheides selaris share several characters such as the presence of two axonemes of different lengths showing the 9+“1” pattern of the Trepaxonemata, a nucleus, two mitochondria, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, granules of glycogen and similar morphologies of the anterior and posterior extremities. The slight differences between the male gamete of O. dinema and P. selaris are the length of the first axoneme and the position of the second mitochondrion. This study also elucidates the general morphology of the spermatozoon in all monorchiid species described so far, which corresponds to a unique spermatozoon type. Other interesting finds concern the spermatological similarities between monorchiid spermatozoa and the mature spermatozoon reported in the apocreadiid Neoapocreadium chabaudi. These similarities allow us to suggest a close phylogenetical relationship between the Monorchiidae and the Apocreadiidae, although more studies are needed, especially in the unexplored taxa. PMID:27688980

  7. THE ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE CAT MYOCARDIUM

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Don W.; McNutt, N. Scott

    1969-01-01

    The ultrastructure of cat papillary muscle was studied with respect to the organization of the contractile material, the structure of the organelles, and the cell junctions. The morphological changes during prolonged work in vitro and some effects of fixation were assessed. The myofilaments are associated in a single coherent bundle extending throughout the fiber cross-section. The absence of discrete "myofibrils" in well preserved cardiac muscle is emphasized. The abundant mitochondria confined in clefts among the myofilaments often have slender prolongations, possibly related to changes in their number or their distribution as energy sources within the contractile mass. The large T tubules that penetrate ventricular cardiac muscle fibers at successive I bands are arranged in rows and are lined with a layer of protein-polysaccharide. Longitudinal connections between T tubules are common. The simple plexiform sarcoplasmic reticulum is continuous across the Z lines, and no circumferential "Z tubules" were identified. Specialized contacts between the reticulum and the sarcolemma are established on the T tubules and the cell periphery via subsarcolemmal saccules or cisterns. At cell junctions, a 20 A gap can be demonstrated between the apposed membranes in those areas commonly interpreted as sites of membrane fusion. In papillary muscles worked in vitro without added substrate, there is a marked depletion of both glycogen and lipid. No morphological evidence for preferential use of glycogen was found. PMID:4891913

  8. Spermatozoon ultrastructure in two monorchiid digeneans

    PubMed Central

    Bakhoum, Abdoulaye J.S.; Justine, Jean-Lou; Bray, Rodney A.; Bâ, Cheikh T.; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spermatological characteristics of species from two monorchiid genera, Opisthomonorchis and Paramonorcheides, have been investigated, for the first time, by means of transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructural study reveals that the mature spermatozoon of Opisthomonorchis dinema and Paramonorcheides selaris share several characters such as the presence of two axonemes of different lengths showing the 9+“1” pattern of the Trepaxonemata, a nucleus, two mitochondria, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, granules of glycogen and similar morphologies of the anterior and posterior extremities. The slight differences between the male gamete of O. dinema and P. selaris are the length of the first axoneme and the position of the second mitochondrion. This study also elucidates the general morphology of the spermatozoon in all monorchiid species described so far, which corresponds to a unique spermatozoon type. Other interesting finds concern the spermatological similarities between monorchiid spermatozoa and the mature spermatozoon reported in the apocreadiid Neoapocreadium chabaudi. These similarities allow us to suggest a close phylogenetical relationship between the Monorchiidae and the Apocreadiidae, although more studies are needed, especially in the unexplored taxa.

  9. Respiratory scleroma: a clinicopathologic and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sedano, H O; Carlos, R; Koutlas, I G

    1996-06-01

    Respiratory scleroma (rhinoscleroma) is a chronic granulomatous infection produced by Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis, a gram-negative aerobic coccobacillus. This disease is endemic to Africa, Central and South America, South Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and China. Sporadic cases have been reported in the United States, especially in persons who migrated from the aforementioned areas. The majority of cases affect the nose, but extension to the soft and hard palate, upper lip, and maxillary sinuses also is frequent. This study comprises 11 patients (6 females and 5 males) with respiratory scleroma identified over a 6-year period in Guatemala. Their ages ranged from 16 to 60 years. Light microscopy showed a dense plasmacytic infiltrate, Mikulicz histiocytes, and Russell bodies within the plasma cells. Ultrastructural study revealed Mikulicz histiocytes, cytoplasmic vacuoles containing bacilli, and so-called A and B granules. We favor the term respiratory scleroma for this lesion because it affects not only the nose but also the upper and lower respiratory tracts as well as the mouth. PMID:8784898

  10. Predicting cellular growth from gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gresham, David; Lu, Charles; Caudy, Amy A; Dunham, Maitreya J; Broach, James R; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazoans is a major factor in the development of cancer. In this paper, we develop statistical methodology to identify quantitative aspects of the regulatory mechanisms underlying cellular proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the expression levels of a small set of genes can be exploited to predict the instantaneous growth rate of any cellular culture with high accuracy. The predictions obtained in this fashion are robust to changing biological conditions, experimental methods, and technological platforms. The proposed model is also effective in predicting growth rates for the related yeast Saccharomyces bayanus and the highly diverged yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that the underlying regulatory signature is conserved across a wide range of unicellular evolution. We investigate the biological significance of the gene expression signature that the predictions are based upon from multiple perspectives: by perturbing the regulatory network through the Ras/PKA pathway, observing strong upregulation of growth rate even in the absence of appropriate nutrients, and discovering putative transcription factor binding sites, observing enrichment in growth-correlated genes. More broadly, the proposed methodology enables biological insights about growth at an instantaneous time scale, inaccessible by direct experimental methods. Data and tools enabling others to apply our methods are available at http://function.princeton.edu/growthrate.

  11. Ultrastructure of pea and cress root statocytes exposed to high gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.; Chernishov, V. I.; Polishchuk, O. V.; Kondrachuk, A. V.

    As it was demonstrated by Kuznetsov & Hasenstein (1996) the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) can produce a ponderomotive force that results in displacements of amyloplasts and causes the root response similar to the graviresponse. It was suggested that the HGMF could allow to imitate the effects of gravity in microgravity and/or change them in laboratory conditions correspondingly, as well as to study statolith-related processes in graviperception. Therefore, the correlation between the direction of the ponderomotive force resulting in statolith displacements and the direction of the HGMF-induced plant curvature can be the serious argument to support this suggestion and needs the detailed ultrastructural analysis. Seeds of dicotyledon Pisum sativum L. cv. Damir-2 and monocotyledon Lepidium sativum L. cv. P896 were soaked and grown in a vertical position on moist filter paper in chambers at room temperature. Tips of primary roots of vertical control, gravistimulated and exposed to HGMF seedlings were fixed for electron microscopy using conventional techniques. At ultrastructural level, we observed no significant changes in the volume of the individual statocytes or amyloplasts, relative volumes of cellular organelles (except vacuoles), number of amyloplasts per statocyte or surface area of endoplasmic reticulum. No consistent contacts between amyloplasts and any cellular structures, including plasma membrane, were revealed at any stage of magneto- and gravistimulation. By 5 min after onset of magnetostimulation, amyloplasts were located along cell wall distant from magnets. In HGMF, the locations of amyloplasts in columella cells were similar to those in horizontally-oriented roots up to 1 h stimulation. In the latter case, there were sometimes cytoplasmic spherical bodies with a dense vesicle-rich cytoplasm in pea statocytes, which were absent in seedlings exposed to HGMF. In cress root statocytes, both gravi- and magnetostimulation were found to cause the

  12. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelec, K. M. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.; Wardale, R. J. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  13. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Therapeutic hypolipidemic agents and industrial chemicals that cause peroxisome proliferation and induce liver tumors in rodents activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Research has elucidated the cellular and molecular events by w...

  14. Ultrastructural study of a tetratrichomonad isolated from pig fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Windell L; Lupisan, Albert Joseph B; Baking, John Michael P

    2008-11-01

    Trichomonads found in pigs include the commensal Tritrichomonas suis (more well known because of its synonymy to Tritrichomonas foetus, a trichomonad parasite of cattle and other animals) and Tetratrichomonas buttreyi, which appear similar to Tritrichomonas suis under the light microscope. A trichomonad isolated from pig fecal samples was subjected to scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ultrastructural study. The organism's ultrastructure revealed features commonly found in trichomonads; however, features such as the number and length of flagella, type of undulating membrane, general body form, and shape and location of organelles such as the nucleus, Golgi complex, and hydrogenosomes indicated that the isolated trichomonad is not Tritrichomonas suis nor Tritrichomonas foetus. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) corroborated these results. Moreover, the ultrastructure was similar to the ultrastructure of previously described tetratrichomonads. It is especially suggested that the isolate is T. buttreyi. These findings could be of significance in the differentiation among different porcine trichomonads in diagnostic procedures. In addition, this is the first known detailed ultrastructural study of T. buttreyi isolated from pigs; thus, this can serve as an aid for future comparison between porcine and bovine T. buttreyi.

  15. Cellular signalling: the role of the peroxisome.

    PubMed

    Masters, C J

    1996-03-01

    This article reviews the role of the peroxisome in cellular signalling, with particular emphasis on the unique contributions of this organelle to the complex regulatory inter-relationships of cellular processes within the mammalian organism. Among the topics covered are the close alignments between the signalling systems governing peroxisome proliferation and those of the steroid hormone/thyroid hormone/vitamin D nuclear-receptor superfamily; the regulation of the permeability of the peroxisomal membrane; the involvements of lysophosphatidic acid as an intra- and inter-cellular messenger; the special role of the phosphatidylcholine cycle and its derivative messengers in relation to peroxisomal metabolism; peroxisomal contributions to the regulation of oxygen free radical levels in tissues and the significance of these radicals as second messengers; the evidence of peroxisomal influences on inter-cellular signalling from metabolic turnover studies; modifications of the regulatory significance of fatty acids by the peroxisome; the commonalities in metabolic relationships between the peroxisome and other cellular organelles; and regulatory shuttles associated with peroxisomal function. It is concluded that the peroxisome displays several significant interconnections with the cellular-signalling apparatus, that it is capable of imprinting a characteristic influence on the regulatory network in the cell, and that the contributions of this organelle deserve greater consideration in future investigations of cell-signalling phenomena.

  16. Ultrastructural features of degenerated cardiac muscle cells in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Maron, B. J.; Ferrans, V. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Degenerated cardiac muscle cells were present in hypertrophied ventricular muscle obtained at operation from 12 (38%) of 32 patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) or aortic valvular disease. Degenerated cells demonstrated a wide variety of ultrastructural alterations. Mildly altered cells were normal-sized or hypertrophied and showed focal changes, including preferential loss of thick (myosin) filaments, streaming and clumping of Z band material, and proliferation of the tubules of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were normal-sized or atrophic and showed additional changes, including extensive myofibrillar lysis and loss of T tubules. The appearance of the most severely degenerated cells usually reflected the cytoplasmic organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum, glycogen, or mitochondria) which underwent proliferation and filled the myofibril-free areas of these cells. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were present in areas of fibrosis, had thickened basement membranes, and had lost their intercellular connections. These observations suggest that degenerated cardiac muscle cells have poor contractile function and may be responsible for impaired cardiac performance in some patients with chronic ventricular hypertrophy. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Figs 4-6 Figs 7-8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Figs 12-15 Fig 16 Fig 17 Figs 18-21 Figs 22-23 Fig 24 Fig 25 Fig 26 Fig 27 Figs 28-29 Fig 30 Figs 31-32 Fig 33 PMID:124533

  17. Changes in the ultrastructure of human cells related to certain biological responses under hyperthermic culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Iwagami, Y

    1996-12-01

    It has been reported that human cancer cells are more sensitive to high temperatures than normal human cells, and that cell proliferation and viability are affected by the temperature environment. In this study, we proceeded further, and turning our attention to the close relationship between cell morphology and temperature, used two human cancer cell lines and two normal cell strains to investigate how intracellular fine structure changes in a high temperature environment. The results showed that 1) both of the human cancer cell lines were more sensitive to high temperature than the normal human cell strains, and a difference between the temperature sensitivity of the human cancer cell lines was also confirmed. 2) There is no clear difference between the manner in which normal human cells and malignant human cells are affected by hyperthermia. 3) Among other cell structures, effects on the membrane system were observed as early changes in cell structure. The mitochondria were particularly affected, followed by the rER. 4) Changes in the nucleoplasm, as well as the nuclear membrane (inner membrane), and then the intranuclear chromatin, etc., were observed as late changes. 5) Changes in mitochondria were observed in the early stage, but temporarily tended to recover, and were then fatally affected again in the late stage. We discuss the relationship between cell proliferation, cell viability, and cell ultrastructure based on the above results. PMID:9183669

  18. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. )

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  19. Ultrastructural studies of the epiphyseal plate of chicks fed a vitamin D-deficient and low-calcium diet.

    PubMed

    Takechi, M; Itakura, C

    1995-08-01

    The epiphyseal plates of rachitic chicks fed a vitamin D-deficient and low-calcium diet were examined ultrastructurally at 4, 7, 14, 18 and 21 days old. On and after 14 days, changes were observed. Chondrocytes in resting, proliferating and maturing zones commonly showed a reduction in cell organelles, suggestive of a decrease in synthetic activity of matrix components. In addition, the resting zone cells had numerous intracytoplasmic microfilaments. Mitotic figures were present but not increased in number in the proliferating zone. Autolysosome-like dense bodies in the chondrocytes and clusters of degenerative and necrotic chondrocytes were observed in the proliferating and maturing zones. In the calcifying zone of the rachitic epiphyseal plate, initial calcification was observed characterized by the deposition of apatite crystals in matrix vesicles and the formation of spherical crystal clusters. The crystal clusters were separated from each other by collagen fibrils on which only small amounts of apatite crystals had been deposited. In this zone, hypertrophic chondrocytes responsible for the initial calcification were seen, but not the stellate chondrocytes responsible for the progression of matrix calcification after its initiation. These findings suggest that accumulation of the proliferating and maturing zone cells as a characteristic lesion of the epiphyseal plate in rachitic chicks is caused by a disturbance of cell maturation. Such disturbance in the calcifying zone may explain the progression of the defect in matrix calcification.

  20. Basilar artery of the capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris): an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Islam, S; Ribeiro, A A C M; Loesch, A

    2004-04-01

    The present study investigated the ultrastructural features of the basilar artery of the largest rodent species, the capybara. The study suggests that the general ultrastructural morphological organization of the basilar artery of the capybara is similar to that of small rodents. However, there are some exceptions. The basilar artery of the capybara contains a subpopulation of 'granular' vascular smooth muscle cells resembling monocytes and/or macrophages. The possibility cannot be excluded that the presence of these cells reflects the remodelling processes of the artery due to animal maturation and the regression of the internal carotid artery. To clarify this issue, more systemic studies are required involving capybaras of various ages.

  1. Overview of cellular CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William C. Y.

    1991-05-01

    A general description of code division multiple access (CDMA) is presented. This overview of CDMA highlights the potential of increasing capacity in future cellular communications. The author describes the mobile radio environment and its impact on narrowband and wideband propagation. The advantage of having CDMA in cellular systems is discussed, and the concept of radio capacity in cellular is introduced. The power control schemes in CDMA are analyzed in detail.

  2. A morphological study of the changes in the ultrastructure of a bacterial biofilm disrupted by an ac corona discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Rybalchenko, Oksana; Astafiev, Alexander; Orlova, Olga; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Kapustina, Valentina

    2016-08-01

    The morphology of bacterial cells and biofilms subjected to a low frequency (˜105 Hz) ac (˜10-1 A) corona discharge was investigated using electron microscopy. A low-frequency ac corona discharge in air is shown to have a bactericidal and bacteriostatic effect on Escherichia coli M17 culture at both the cellular and population levels. Corona exposure inhibits the formation of a microbial community and results in the destruction of formed biofilms. This paper presents data on changes in the ultrastructure of cells and biofilms after corona treatment. Our results suggest that the E. coli M17 cells inside biofilms are affected with results similar to sub-lethal and lethal thermal exposure. Some of the biological aspects of colony and biofilm cells death are evaluated. Morphological changes in the ultrastructure of the biofilms under corona treatment are described. Our results indicate that the heating effect is the main factor responsible for the corona-induced inactivation of bacteria.

  3. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates

  4. Genetic code expansion enables live-cell and super-resolution imaging of site-specifically labeled cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith; Howe, Jonathan D; Lang, Kathrin; Beránek, Václav; Davis, Lloyd; Mahesh, Mohan; Barry, Nicholas P; Chin, Jason W

    2015-04-15

    Methods to site-specifically and densely label proteins in cellular ultrastructures with small, bright, and photostable fluorophores would substantially advance super-resolution imaging. Recent advances in genetic code expansion and bioorthogonal chemistry have enabled the site-specific labeling of proteins. However, the efficient incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins and the specific, fluorescent labeling of the intracellular ultrastructures they form for subdiffraction imaging has not been accomplished. Two challenges have limited progress in this area: (i) the low efficiency of unnatural amino acid incorporation that limits labeling density and therefore spatial resolution and (ii) the uncharacterized specificity of intracellular labeling that will define signal-to-noise, and ultimately resolution, in imaging. Here we demonstrate the efficient production of cystoskeletal proteins (β-actin and vimentin) containing bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne-lysine at genetically defined sites. We demonstrate their selective fluorescent labeling with respect to the proteome of living cells using tetrazine-fluorophore conjugates, creating densely labeled cytoskeletal ultrastructures. STORM imaging of these densely labeled ultrastructures reveals subdiffraction features, including nuclear actin filaments. This work enables the site-specific, live-cell, fluorescent labeling of intracellular proteins at high density for super-resolution imaging of ultrastructural features within cells.

  5. Genetic Code Expansion Enables Live-Cell and Super-Resolution Imaging of Site-Specifically Labeled Cellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Methods to site-specifically and densely label proteins in cellular ultrastructures with small, bright, and photostable fluorophores would substantially advance super-resolution imaging. Recent advances in genetic code expansion and bioorthogonal chemistry have enabled the site-specific labeling of proteins. However, the efficient incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins and the specific, fluorescent labeling of the intracellular ultrastructures they form for subdiffraction imaging has not been accomplished. Two challenges have limited progress in this area: (i) the low efficiency of unnatural amino acid incorporation that limits labeling density and therefore spatial resolution and (ii) the uncharacterized specificity of intracellular labeling that will define signal-to-noise, and ultimately resolution, in imaging. Here we demonstrate the efficient production of cystoskeletal proteins (β-actin and vimentin) containing bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne-lysine at genetically defined sites. We demonstrate their selective fluorescent labeling with respect to the proteome of living cells using tetrazine-fluorophore conjugates, creating densely labeled cytoskeletal ultrastructures. STORM imaging of these densely labeled ultrastructures reveals subdiffraction features, including nuclear actin filaments. This work enables the site-specific, live-cell, fluorescent labeling of intracellular proteins at high density for super-resolution imaging of ultrastructural features within cells. PMID:25831022

  6. Odd-skipped related 2 regulates genes related to proliferation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-07-23

    Cell proliferation is a biological process in which chromosomes replicate in one cell and equally divide into two daughter cells. Our previous findings suggested that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation under epigenetic regulation. However, the mechanism used by Osr2 to establish and maintain proliferation is unknown. To examine the functional role of Osr2 in cell proliferation, we analyzed its downstream target genes using microarray analysis following adenovirus-induced overexpression of Osr2 as well as knockdown with Osr2 siRNA, which showed that Osr2 regulates a multitude of genes involved in proliferation and the cell cycle, as well as development. Additional proliferation assays also indicated that Osr2 likely functions to elicit cell proliferation. Together, these results suggest that Osr2 plays important roles in proliferation and development.

  7. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Stafman, Laura L.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  8. Proliferation: Threat and response

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    ;Table of Contents: Section I: The Regional Proliferation Challenge; Northeast Asia; The Middle East and North Africa; The Former Soviet Union: Russia, Ukrane, Kazakstan, And Belarus; South Asia; The International Threat: Dangers from Terrorism, Insurgencies, Civil Wars, And Organized Crime; Section II: Department of Defense Response; Technical Annex: Accessible Technologies; Glossary.

  9. Suppression of splenic lymphocyte proliferation by Eucommia ulmoides and genipin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gabsik; Kyoung Seo, Eun; Lee, Je-Hyun; Young Lee, Joo

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the modulation of innate and adaptive immune cell activation by Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extract (EUE) and its ingredient genipin. As an innate immunity indicator, the phagocytic activity of macrophages was determined by measuring engulfed, fluorescently labeled Escherichia coli. As a surrogate marker for the respective activation of cellular and humoral adaptive immunity, concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induction of primary splenocyte proliferation was assayed in in vitro and ex vivo systems. EUE and genipin suppressed the proliferation of primary splenic lymphocytes induced by Con A or LPS, but not macrophage phagocytosis. Oral administration of EUE and genipin to mice decreased splenic lymphocyte proliferation induced by Con A or LPS. These results revealed that E. ulmoides and genipin suppressed cellular and humoral adaptive immunity, and they suggest that E. ulmoides and genipin are promising candidates for immunosuppressive drugs that target diseases that involve excessive activation of adaptive immunity. PMID:25879499

  10. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  11. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela; Leisch, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  12. Cadmium-induced ultrastructural changes in Euglena cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duret, S.; Bonaly, J.; Bariaud, A.; Vannereau, A.; Mestre, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    The ultrastructure of Euglena gracilis grown in the presence of Cd showed only numerous myelin-like structures in mitochondria, chloroplasts altered in shape, and thylakoid arrangement and increase of osmiophilic plastoglobuli. These alterations indicate that respiratory processes are the initial target of Cd toxicity.

  13. Hypertextual Ultrastructures: Movement and Containment in Texts and Hypertexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coste, Rosemarie L.

    2009-01-01

    The surface-level experience of hypertextuality as formless and unbounded, blurring boundaries among texts and between readers and writers, is created by a deep structure which is not normally presented to readers and which, like the ultrastructure of living cells, defines and controls texts' nature and functions. Most readers, restricted to…

  14. Ultrastructural study of Helicobacter pylori adherence properties in gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Rudmann, D G; Eaton, K A; Krakowka, S

    1992-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected gnotobiotic piglets identified four general adherence patterns comparable to those observed in human patients. Intimate associations between the bacterial and mucosal cell membranes, including cuplike invaginations and adherence pedestals, were present and were accompanied by alterations to microvilli and cell membrane morphology. Images PMID:1563801

  15. Ultrastructural changes in sweet orange with symptoms of huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing [HLB]) is one of the most destructive citrus diseases worldwide. To better understand the ultrastructural changes of sweet orange seedlings in response to infection, anatomical analyses of HLB-infected sweet orange were carried out by light and electron microscopy. A...

  16. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  17. Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 (Taeniidae): new data on sperm ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Jordi; Świderski, Zdzisław; Azzouz-Maache, Samira; Pétavy, Anne-Françoise

    2016-06-01

    The present study establishes the ultrastructural organisation of the mature spermatozoon of Echinococcus multilocularis, which is essential for future research on the location of specific proteins involved in the sperm development in this species and also in Echinococcus granulosus. Thus, the ultrastructural characteristics of the sperm cell are described by means of transmission electron microscopy. The spermatozoon of E. multilocularis is a filiform cell, which is tapered at both extremities and lacks mitochondria. It exhibits all the characteristics of type VII spermatozoon of tapeworms, namely a single axoneme, crested bodies, spiralled cortical microtubules and nucleus, a periaxonemal sheath and intracytoplasmic walls. Other characteristics observed in the male gamete are the presence of a >900-nm long apical cone in its anterior extremity and only the axoneme in its posterior extremity. The ultrastructural characters of the spermatozoon of E. multilocularis are compared with those of other cestodes studied to date, with particular emphasis on representatives of the genus Taenia. The most interesting finding concerns the presence of two helical crested bodies in E. multilocularis while in the studied species of Taenia, there is only one crested body. Future ultrastructural studies of other species of the genus Echinococcus would be of particular interest in order to confirm whether or not the presence of two crested bodies is a characteristic of this genus. PMID:26960958

  18. Effects of a 2X gravity environment on the ultrastructure of the gerbil parathyroid gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sannes, P. L.; Hayes, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    A number of studies concerning the effects of hypergravity on bone have shown increases in bone mass or bone dimensions. Correlative studies, which could provide clues to the mechanism for such a response, have been lacking. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ultrastructure of parathyroid glands of Mongolian gerbils exposed to a continuous 2 X gravity force for 60 d. It was found that the experimental animals had parathyroid glands which had a greater percentage of chief cells in the active stage of their secretory cycle when compared with control animals. This result was interpreted to indicate an increase in parathyroid gland secretory activity and, hence, an increase in parathyroid hormone release. It was suggested that increased parathyroid secretory activity was necessary to maintain serum calcium levels of hypergravity animals within normal limits. Cellular forms resembling water clear cells and highly compact, degenerating cells were described in experimental animals but not in controls. Areas suggestive of cellular dissolution and disorganization were also reported in experimental parathyroids.

  19. Tracheomalacia in a neonate with kniest dysplasia: histopathologic and ultrastructural features.

    PubMed

    Hicks, J; De Jong, A; Barrish, J; Zhu, S H; Popek, E

    2001-01-01

    Kniest dysplasia is an autosomal-dominant chondrodysplastic condition characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, short trunk, small pelvis, kyphoscoliosis, short limbs, prominent joints, premature osteoarthritis, and craniofacial manifestations. The craniofacial abnormalities include tracheomalacia, midface hypoplasia, cleft palate, early onset myopia, retinal detachment, prominent eyes, and sensorineural hearing loss. Radiologic features include dumbbell-shaped femora, platyspondylia with anterior wedging of vertebral bodies, coronal clefts of thoracolumbar vertebral bodies, low broad ilia, and short tubular bones with broad metaphyses and deformed large epiphyses. This form of chondrodysplasia is associated with mutations in type II collagen splicing sequences. Mutations have been identified in the COL2A1 (type II collagen) gene between exons 12 and 24. Type II collagen is the predominant structural protein in cartilage, and mutations in this collagen account for the Kniest dysplasia phenotype. Histopathologic and ultrastructural features of epiphyseal plate cartilage have been described, but tracheal cartilage in an affected neonate has not been examined. The authors report the histopathologic and ultrastructural findings of anterior tracheal cartilage from a 35-day-old female with suspected chondrodysplasia who had tracheomalacia with airway obstruction. The tracheal cartilage was moderately cellular, but lacked cystic and myxoid changes in its matrix. The chondrocytes had abundant cytoplasmic PAS-positive inclusions. Some of these inclusions were diastase-resistant and were also highlighted on Alcian blue staining. Ultrastructural examination revealed chondrocytes with greatly dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum containing granular proteinaceous material. There were also frequent aggregates of typical glycogen. The defect in the COL2A1 gene is secondary to mutations, especially at splice junctions, and this markedly disrupts triple helix formation. The

  20. Ultrastructural study of cultured ovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Desantis, Salvatore; Accogli, Gianluca; Zizza, Sara; Mastrodonato, Maria; Blasi, Antonella; Francioso, Edda; Rossi, Roberta; Crovace, Antonio; Resta, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Ovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (oBM-MSCs) represent a good animal model for cell-based therapy and tissue engineering. Despite their use as a new therapeutic tool for several clinical applications, the morphological features of oBM-MSCs are yet unknown. Therefore, in this study the ultrastructural phenotype of these cells was analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The oBM-MSCs were isolated from the iliac crest and cultured until they reached near-confluence. After trypsinization, they were processed to investigate their ultrastructural features as well as specific surface marker proteins by flow cytometry and immunogold electron microscopy. Flow cytometry displayed that all oBM-MSCs lacked expression of CD31, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR whereas they expressed CD44, CD58, HLAI and a minor subset of the cell population (12%) exhibited CD90. TEM revealed the presence of two morphologically distinct cell types: cuboidal electron-lucent cells and spindle-shaped electron-dense cells, both expressing the CD90 antigen. Most of the electron-lucent cells showed glycogen aggregates, dilated cisternae of RER, moderately developed Golgi complex, and secretory activity. The electron-dense cell type was constituted by two different cell-populations: type A cells with numerous endosomes, dense bodies, rod-shaped mitochondria and filopodia; type B cells with elongated mitochondria, thin pseudopodia and cytoplasmic connectivity with electron-lucent cells. These morphological findings could provide a useful support to identify "in situ" the cellular components involved in the cell-therapy when cultured oBM-MSCs are injected.

  1. Ultra-structural morphology of long-term cultivated white adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Varga, Ivan; Miko, Michal; Oravcová, Lenka; Bačkayová, Tatiana; Koller, Ján; Danišovič, Ľuboš

    2015-12-01

    White adipose tissue was long perceived as a passive lipid storage depot but it is now considered as an active and important endocrine organ. It also harbours not only adipocytes and vascular cells but also a wide array of immunologically active cells, including macrophages and lymphocytes, which may induce obesity-related inflammation. Recently, adipose tissue has been reported as a source of adult mesenchymal stem cells with wide use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Their relatively non-complicated procurement and collection (often performed as liposuction during aesthetic surgery) and grand plasticity support this idea even more. We focused our research on exploring the issues of isolation and long-term cultivation of mesenchymal stem cells obtained from adipose tissue. Ultra-structural morphology of the cells cultivated in vitro has been studied and analysed in several cultivation time periods and following serial passages--up to 30 passages. In the first passages they had ultra-structural characteristics of cells with high proteosynthetic activity. Within the cytoplasm, big number of small lipid droplets and between them, sparsely placed, small and inconspicuous, electron-dense, lamellar bodies, which resembled myelin figures were observed. The cells from the later passages contained high number of lamellar electron-dense structures, which filled out almost the entire cytoplasm. In between, mitochondria were often found. These bodies were sometimes small and resembled myelin figures, but several of them reached huge dimensions (more than 1 µm) and their lamellar structure was not distinguishable. We did not have an answer to the question about their function, but they probably represented the evidence of active metabolism of lipids present in the cytoplasm of these cells or represented residual bodies, which arise after the breakdown of cellular organelles, notably mitochondria during long-term cultivation.

  2. Daytime food restriction alters liver glycogen, triacylglycerols, and cell size. A histochemical, morphometric, and ultrastructural study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Temporal restriction of food availability entrains circadian behavioral and physiological rhythms in mammals by resetting peripheral oscillators. This entrainment underlies the activity of a timing system, different from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), known as the food entrainable oscillator (FEO). So far, the precise anatomical location of the FEO is unknown. The expression of this oscillator is associated with an enhanced arousal prior to the food presentation that is called food anticipatory activity (FAA). We have focused on the study of the role played by the liver as a probable component of the FEO. The aim of this work was to identify metabolic and structural adaptations in the liver during the expression of the FEO, as revealed by histochemical assessment of hepatic glycogen and triacylglycerol contents, morphometry, and ultrastructure in rats under restricted feeding schedules (RFS). Results RFS promoted a decrease in the liver/body weight ratio prior to food access, a reduction of hepatic water content, an increase in cross-sectional area of the hepatocytes, a moderate reduction in glycogen content, and a striking decrease in triacylglyceride levels. Although these adaptation effects were also observed when the animal displayed FAA, they were reversed upon feeding. Mitochondria observed by electron microscopy showed a notorious opacity in the hepatocytes from rats during FAA (11:00 h). Twenty four hour fasting rats did not show any of the modifications observed in the animals expressing the FEO. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that FEO expression is associated with modified liver handling of glycogen and triacylglycerides accompanied by morphometric and ultrastructural adaptations in the hepatocytes. Because the cellular changes detected in the liver cannot be attributed to a simple alternation between feeding and fasting conditions, they also strengthen the notion that RFS promotes a rheostatic adjustment in liver physiology during FEO

  3. Lithium-induced changes in gravicurvature, statocyte ultrastructure and calcium balance of pea roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    Calcium signaling has been implicated in plant graviperception. In order to investigate the role of intracellular calcium in the process, I used lithium ions (LiCl), which suppress inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) cycling and signaling by inhibiting inositol-1-phosphatase. After 4 h of gravistimulation, no curvature was observed in 81% of the roots of 5-day Pisum sativum seedlings pretreated with 5 mM LiCl. Structural features of statocyte ultrastructure in these roots were the following: loss of a cellular polarity, appearance of amyloplast clusters, condensed mitochondria, local dilations in a perinuclear space, increases in a relative volume of vacuoles. The intensity of a cytochemical reaction (pyroantimonate staining which detected Ca2+ ions) was moderate: the Ca2+ pyroantimonate deposits were observed in all organelles. There were few granules of this precipitate in a hyaloplasm of the statocytes. Mitochondria and vacuoles were found to contain more granules of the precipitate compared with the controls. Additionally, Ca2+-ATPase activity in the statocytes of pea roots pretreated with LiCl was approximately the same as in control roots. Data obtained by using inhibitor of inositol signaling suggest that the observed effects of LiCl on root gravicurvature and ultrastructure of root statocytes were due to effects on Ca2+ homeostasis, particularly on IP3-mediated release of intracellular Ca2+ which can be inhibited by inositol depletion. The work demonstrates the key role played by second messengers (Ca2+ and IP3) in a gravity perception and response.

  4. Ultrastructural study of cultured ovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Desantis, Salvatore; Accogli, Gianluca; Zizza, Sara; Mastrodonato, Maria; Blasi, Antonella; Francioso, Edda; Rossi, Roberta; Crovace, Antonio; Resta, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Ovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (oBM-MSCs) represent a good animal model for cell-based therapy and tissue engineering. Despite their use as a new therapeutic tool for several clinical applications, the morphological features of oBM-MSCs are yet unknown. Therefore, in this study the ultrastructural phenotype of these cells was analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The oBM-MSCs were isolated from the iliac crest and cultured until they reached near-confluence. After trypsinization, they were processed to investigate their ultrastructural features as well as specific surface marker proteins by flow cytometry and immunogold electron microscopy. Flow cytometry displayed that all oBM-MSCs lacked expression of CD31, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR whereas they expressed CD44, CD58, HLAI and a minor subset of the cell population (12%) exhibited CD90. TEM revealed the presence of two morphologically distinct cell types: cuboidal electron-lucent cells and spindle-shaped electron-dense cells, both expressing the CD90 antigen. Most of the electron-lucent cells showed glycogen aggregates, dilated cisternae of RER, moderately developed Golgi complex, and secretory activity. The electron-dense cell type was constituted by two different cell-populations: type A cells with numerous endosomes, dense bodies, rod-shaped mitochondria and filopodia; type B cells with elongated mitochondria, thin pseudopodia and cytoplasmic connectivity with electron-lucent cells. These morphological findings could provide a useful support to identify "in situ" the cellular components involved in the cell-therapy when cultured oBM-MSCs are injected. PMID:26196242

  5. Ultrastructure damage of oviduct telocytes in rat model of acute salpingitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Chi, Chi; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Gang; Shen, Zong-Ji; Yang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acute salpingitis (AS) is an inflammatory disease which causes severe damage to a subset of classically described cells lining in oviduct wall and contributes to interstitial fibrosis and fertility problems. Telocytes (TCs), a newly discovered peculiar type of stromal cells, have been identified in many organs, including oviduct, with proposed multiple potential bio-functions. However, with recent increasing reports regarding TCs alterations in disease-affected tissues, there is still lack of evidence about TCs involvement in AS-affected oviduct tissues and potential pathophysiological roles. We presently identified normal TCs by their characteristic ultrastructural features and immunophenotype. However, in AS-affected oviduct tissues, TCs displayed multiple ultrastructural damage both in cellular body and prolongations, with obvious loss of TCs and development of tissue fibrosis. Furthermore, TCs lose their interstitial 3-D network connected by homocellular or heterocellular junctions between TCs and adjacent cells. And especially, TCs connected to the activated immunocytes (mononuclear cells, eosinophils) and affected local immune state (repression or activation). Meanwhile, massive neutrophils infiltration and overproduced Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), COX-2, suggested mechanism of inflammatory-induced TCs damage. Consequently, TCs damage might contribute to AS-induced structural and reproductive functional abnormalities of oviduct, probably via: (i) substances, energy and functional insufficiency, presumably, e.g. TC-specific genetic material profiles, ion channels, cytoskeletal elements, Tps dynamics, etc., (ii) impaired TCs-mediated multicellular signalling, such as homeostasis/angiogenesis, tissue repair/regeneration, neurotransmission, (iii) derangement of 3-D network and impaired mechanical support for TCs-mediated multicellular signals within the stromal compartment, consequently induced interstitial fibrosis, (iv) involvement in local

  6. Pirin inhibits cellular senescence in melanocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-05-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  7. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  8. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-02

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Taiwan; (4) Hungary, Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina; (6) Afghanistan, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland.

  9. Proliferating pilomatricoma - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Rogerio Nabor; Pontello Junior, Rubens; Belinetti, Francine Milenkovich; Cilião, Caroline; Vasconcellos, Vanessa Regina Bulla; Grimaldi, Dora Maria

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating pilomatricoma is proliferative, rare tumor variant of pilomatricoma. It is a benign neoplasm of hair matrix that can have potentially involve local recurrence. We report the case of a 60-year-old man who presented an asymptomatic nodule on the scalp. Histological exam demonstrated a basaloid epithelium at the periphery, filled with eosinophilic cornified material containing shadow cells. The tumor was excised and there was no evidence of recurrence one year later. PMID:26312685

  10. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  11. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Cellular Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Beheshte; Wilson, James; Masood, Samina

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of organisms with environmental magnetic fields at the cellular level is well documented, yet not fully understood. We review the existing experimental results to understand the physics behind the effects of ambient magnetic fields on the growth, metabolism, and proliferation of in vitro cell cultures. Emphasis is placed on identifying the underlying physical principles responsible for alterations to cell structure and behavior.

  12. Roles of cell volume in molecular and cellular biology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Marc; Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Extracellular tonicity and volume regulation control a great number of molecular and cellular functions including: cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, hormone and neuromediator release, gene expression, ion channel and transporter activity and metabolism. The aim of this review is to describe these effects and to determine if they are direct or are secondarily the result of the activity of second messengers. PMID:22192789

  13. beta. -Adrenergic stimulation of brown adipocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Geloeen, A.; Collet, A.J.; Guay, G.; Bukowiecki, L.J. Laboratoire de Thermoregulation et Metabolisme Energetique, Lyon )

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of brown adipose tissue (BAT) growth were studied by quantitative photonic radioautography using tritiated thymidine to follow mitotic activity. To identify the nature of the adrenergic pathways mediating brown adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, the effects of cold exposure (4 days at 4{degree}C) on BAT growth were compared with those induced by treating rats at 25{degree}C with norepinephrine (a mixed agonist), isoproterenol (a {beta}-agonist), and phenylephrine (an {alpha}-agonist). Norepinephrine mimicked the effects of cold exposure, not only on the mitotic activity, but also on the distribution of the labeling among the various cellular types. Isoproterenol entirely reproduced the effects of norepinephrine both on the labeling index and on the cellular type labeling frequency. These results demonstrate that norepinephrine triggers a coordinated proliferation of brown adipocytes and endothelial cells in warm-exposed rats that is similar to that observed after cold exposure. They also suggest that cold exposure stimulates BAT growth by increasing the release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerves and that the neurohormone activates mitoses in BAT precursor cells via {beta}-adrenergic pathways.

  14. Proliferation and fission of peroxisomes - An update.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Michael; Costello, Joseph L; Godinho, Luis F; Azadi, Afsoon S; Islinger, Markus

    2016-05-01

    In mammals, peroxisomes perform crucial functions in cellular metabolism, signalling and viral defense which are essential to the health and viability of the organism. In order to achieve this functional versatility peroxisomes dynamically respond to molecular cues triggered by changes in the cellular environment. Such changes elicit a corresponding response in peroxisomes, which manifests itself as a change in peroxisome number, altered enzyme levels and adaptations to the peroxisomal structure. In mammals the generation of new peroxisomes is a complex process which has clear analogies to mitochondria, with both sharing the same division machinery and undergoing a similar division process. How the regulation of this division process is integrated into the cell's response to different stimuli, the signalling pathways and factors involved, remains somewhat unclear. Here, we discuss the mechanism of peroxisomal fission, the contributions of the various division factors and examine the potential impact of post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, on the proliferation process. We also summarize the signalling process and highlight the most recent data linking signalling pathways with peroxisome proliferation.

  15. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  16. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  17. Experience in the diagnosis of glomerulonephritis using combined light microscopical, ultrastructural and immunofluorescence techniques--an analysis of 134 cases.

    PubMed

    Dische, F E; Parsons, V

    1977-09-01

    The contribution of electron and immunofluorescence microscopy to renal biopsy diagnosis is illustrated by the results obtained in a personal series of patients with various types of glomerulonephritis. Introductory notes on the ultrastructure of the glomerular capillary and on immunological processes are also included. Immunofluorescent staining has particular value in demonstrating IgG-containing deposits in early membranous glomerulonephritis at a stage when ordinary microscopy is inconclusive. It is capable of throwing light on the mechanism of glomerular damage in severe extracapillary proliferation and in some cases of recurrent haematuria, but is less successful in separating minimal change disease from proliferative processes. Electron microscopy reveals the precise site of immune deposits and fibrin together with basement membrane changes, the microtubular structures common in SLE, and other details. It is concluded that for the accurate diagnosis of kidney disease it is essential to supplement light microscopy by one, or preferably both these methods.

  18. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  19. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  20. Cellular microRNAs and Picornaviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of short, endogenous, and non-coding RNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. The miRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism is involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses. Picornaviridae is a large family of RNA viruses, which includes a number of causative agents of many human and animal diseases viz., poliovirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), and coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). Accumulated evidences have demonstrated that replication of picornaviruses can be regulated by miRNAs and picornaviral infections can alter the expression of cellular miRNAs. Herein, we outline the intricate interactions between miRNAs and picornaviral infections. PMID:24921242

  1. [Neuroendocrine tumors of digestive system: morphologic spectrum and cell proliferation (Ki67 index)].

    PubMed

    Delektorskaia, V V; Kushliskiĭ, N E

    2013-01-01

    This review deals with the analysis of up-to-date concepts ofdiferent types of human neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system. It summarizes the information on the specifics of recent histological classifications and criteria of morphological diagnosis accounting histological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical parameters. Current issues of the nomenclature as well as various systems of grading and staging are discussed. In the light of these criteria the results of the own research clinical value of the determination of cell proliferation in primary and metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms on the basis of evaluation of the Ki67 antigen expression are also presented.

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopic photoconversion: a new method to stabilize fluorescently labeled cellular elements for electron microscopic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colello, Raymond J.; Tozer, Jordan; Henderson, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Photoconversion, the method by which a fluorescent dye is transformed into a stable, osmiophilic product that can be visualized by electron microscopy, is the most widely used method to enable the ultrastructural analysis of fluorescently-labeled cellular structures. Nevertheless, the conventional method of photoconversion using widefield fluorescence microscopy requires long reaction times and results in low resolution cell targeting. Accordingly, we have developed a photoconversion method that ameliorates these limitations by adapting confocal laser scanning microscopy to the procedure. We have found that this method greatly reduces photoconversion times as compared to conventional wide field microscopy. Moreover, region of interest scanning capabilities of a confocal microscope facilitate the targeting of the photoconversion process to individual cellular or subcellular elements within a fluorescent field. This reduces the area of the cell exposed to light energy, thereby reducing the ultrastructural damage common to this process when widefield microscopes are employed. PMID:23042499

  3. Enhanced lymphocyte proliferation in patients with adrenoleukodystrophy treated with erucic acid (22:1)-rich triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Pour, R B; Stöckler-Ipsiroglu, S; Hunneman, D H; Gahr, M; Korenke, G C; Pabst, W; Hanefeld, F; Peters, A

    2000-03-01

    Lymphocytopenia and depression of natural killer cells have been observed in patients with adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) treated with glycerol trioleate and glycerol trierucate ('Lorenzo's oil'). To investigate possible alterations of cellular immunoreactivity, we measured lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens (PHA, Con A, PWM, OKT3) in 27 patients on treatment and in 14 patients without treatment. In patients on treatment, lymphocyte proliferation in response to the mitogens PHA and Con A was significantly higher than in patients without treatment. Lymphocyte proliferation in patients without treatment was comparable to that of normal control lymphocytes. Additionally, we found increased concentrations of erucic acid, C22:1, in lymphocytes from patients with treatment. The enhanced proliferation of lymphocytes in response to mitogens is an indication of increased reactivity of cellular immunity to unspecific immunological stimuli. Long-term side-effects on cellular immunoreactivity have to be considered in ALD patients treated with Lorenzo's oil.

  4. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on Escherichia coli ultrastructure, membrane integrity and molecular composition as assessed by FTIR spectroscopy and microscopic imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Calvo, María; Prieto, Miguel; López, Mercedes; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2014-12-18

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a novel food processing technology that is considered as an attractive alternative to conventional heat treatments for the preservation of foods, due to its lethal effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, while causing minor effects on food quality and sensorial attributes. This study is aimed at investigating how HHP treatments at varying intensities in the range 50-900 MPa affect the viability, membrane integrity, ultrastructure and molecular composition of Escherichia coli. Results of membrane integrity tests (measurement of cellular leakage and monitoring of propidium iodide uptake through fluorescence microscopy) and ultrastructural observations by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that HHP gave rise to cellular enlargement, membrane damage or detachment, DNA and protein denaturation and loss of intracellular contents. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses evidenced minor changes in molecular composition in response to high pressures, which were mostly observed on the spectral region w4 (1200-900 cm-1), mainly informative of carbohydrates and polysaccharides of the cell wall. These findings suggest that exposure of E. coli cells to HHP causes alterations in their physical integrity while producing minor modifications in biochemical cellular composition. The current study increases the knowledge on the mechanisms of E. coli inactivation by HHP and provides valuable information for the design of more effective food preservation regimes based on the integration of mild HHP in combination with other food preservation strategies into a multi-target hurdle technology approach.

  5. TRIB2 regulates normal and stress-induced thymocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kai Ling; O’Connor, Caitriona; Veiga, J Pedro; McCarthy, Tommie V; Keeshan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    TRIB2, a serine/threonine pseudokinase identified as an oncogene, is expressed at high levels in the T-cell compartment of hematopoiesis. The proliferation of developing thymocytes is tightly controlled to prevent leukemic transformation of T cells. Here we examine Trib2 loss in murine hematopoiesis under steady state and proliferative stress conditions, including genotoxic and oncogenic stress. Trib2−/− developing thymocytes show increased proliferation, and Trib2−/− mice have significantly higher thymic cellularity at steady state. During stress hematopoiesis, Trib2−/− developing thymocytes undergo accelerated proliferation and demonstrate hypersensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced cell death. Despite the increased cell death post 5-FU-induced proliferative stress, Trib2−/− mice exhibit accelerated thymopoietic recovery post treatment due to increased cell division kinetics of developing thymocytes. The increased proliferation in Trib2−/− thymocytes was exacerbated under oncogenic stress. In an experimental murine T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) model, Trib2−/− mice had reduced latency in vivo, which associated with impaired MAP kinase (MAPK) activation. High and low expression levels of Trib2 correlate with immature and mature subtypes of human T-ALL, respectively, and associate with MAPK. Thus, TRIB2 emerges as a novel regulator of thymocyte cellular proliferation, important for the thymopoietic response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress, and possessing tumor suppressor function. PMID:27462446

  6. Effects of the presence of indium on the mammary gland ultrastructure, body weight, food intake and plasmatic prolactin concentration.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Ahlem; Maghraoui, Samira; Kammoun, Sayda; Tekaya, Leila

    2014-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the toxic effect of indium. This element induces impairments in many organs such as spleen, lungs and testicles after its systemic administration. Teratogenic and embryotoxic effects of this element have also been established. In the present study, we attempt to investigate the histological and the ultrastructural consequences of the presence of this element in mammary gland tissue using conventional transmission electron microscopy and to evaluate the incidences of its presence on the food intake, body weight and prolactin plasmatic concentration of lactating female rats. Our study showed that this element induced a significant decrease in food intake and body weight, and caused some cellular damage in the glandular epithelial cell such as cytoplasmic vacuolization and expansion of the ergastoplasm. The ultrastructural observations also showed many electron-dense surcharges in the lysosomes of the glandular epithelial cells. The electron probe microanalysis showed that these deposits are composed of indium and phosphorus. The lysosomes, known for their protective role of sequestrating foreign elements to avoid their diffusion in the blood, failed to stop the toxic effect of indium.

  7. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  8. Survival and ultrastructural features of peach palm (Bactris gasipaes, Kunth) somatic embryos submitted to cryopreservation through vitrification.

    PubMed

    Heringer, Angelo Schuabb; Steinmacher, Douglas André; Schmidt, Éder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2013-10-01

    Bactris gasipaes (Arecaceae), also known as peach palm, was domesticated by Amazonian Indians and is cultivated for its fruit and heart-of-palm, a vegetable grown in the tree's inner core. Currently, the conservation of this species relies on in situ conditions and field gene banks. Complementary conservation strategies, such as those based on in vitro techniques, are indicated in such cases. To establish an appropriate cryopreservation protocol, this study aimed to evaluate the ultrastructural features of B. gasipaes embryogenic cultures submitted to vitrification and subsequent cryogenic temperatures. Accordingly, somatic embryo clusters were submitted to Plant Vitrification Solution 3 (PVS3). In general, cells submitted to PVS3 had viable cell characteristics associated with apparently many mitochondria, prominent nucleus, and preserved cell walls. Cells not incubated in PVS3 did not survive after the cryogenic process in liquid nitrogen. The best incubation time for the vitrification technique was 240 min, resulting in a survival rate of 37 %. In these cases, several features were indicative of quite active cell metabolism, including intact nuclei and preserved cell walls, an apparently many of mitochondria and lipid bodies, and the presence of many starch granules and condensed chromatin. Moreover, ultrastructure analysis revealed that overall cellular structures had been preserved after cryogenic treatment, thus validating the use of vitrification in conjunction with cryopreservation of peach palm elite genotypes, as well as wild genotypes, which carry a rich pool of genes that must be conserved. PMID:23636432

  9. Pulsed 86Sr-labeling and NanoSIMS imaging to study coral biomineralization at ultra-structural length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmi, C.; Domart-Coulon, I.; Rougée, L.; Pyle, D. G.; Stolarski, J.; Mahoney, J. J.; Richmond, R. H.; Ostrander, G. K.; Meibom, A.

    2012-09-01

    A method to label marine biocarbonates is developed based on a concentration enrichment of a minor stable isotope of a trace element that is a natural component of seawater, resulting in the formation of biocarbonate with corresponding isotopic enrichments. This biocarbonate is subsequently imaged with a NanoSIMS ion microprobe to visualize the locations of the isotopic marker on sub-micrometric length scales, permitting resolution of all ultra-structural details. In this study, a scleractinian coral, Pocillopora damicornis, was labeled 3 times with 86Sr-enhanced seawater for a period of 48 h with 5 days under normal seawater conditions separating each labeling event. Two non-specific cellular stress biomarkers, glutathione-S-transferase activity and porphyrin concentration plus carbonic anhydrase, an enzymatic marker involved in the physiology of carbonate biomineralization, as well as unchanged levels of zooxanthellae photosynthesis efficiency indicate that coral physiological processes are not affected by the 86Sr-enhancement. NanoSIMS images of the 86Sr/44Ca ratio in skeleton formed during the experiment allow for a determination of the average extension rate of the two major ultra-structural components of the coral skeleton: Rapid Accretion Deposits are found to form on average about 4.5 times faster than Thickening Deposits. The method opens up new horizons in the study of biocarbonate formation because it holds the potential to observe growth of calcareous structures such as skeletons, shells, tests, spines formed by a wide range of organisms under essentially unperturbed physiological conditions.

  10. High resolution imaging of the ultrastructure of living algal cells using soft x-ray contact microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, T.W.; Cotton, R.A.; Page, A.M.; Tomie, T.; Majima, T.; Stead, A.D.

    1995-12-31

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy provides the biologist with a technique for examining the ultrastructure of living cells at a much higher resolution than that possible by various forms of light microscopy. Readout of the developed photoresist using atomic force microscopy (AFM) produces a detailed map of the carbon densities generated in the resist following exposure of the specimen to water-window soft x-rays (2--4nm) produced by impact of a high energy laser onto a suitable target. The established high resolution imaging method of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has inherent problems in the chemical pre-treatment required for producing the ultrathin sections necessary for this technique. Using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas the ultrastructural appearance of the cells following SXCM and TEM has been compared. While SXCM confirms the basic structural organization of the cell as seen by TEM (e.g., the organization of the thylakoid membranes within the chloroplast; flagellar insertion into the cytoplasm), there are important differences. These are in the appearance of the cell covering and the presence of carbon-dense spherical cellular inclusions.

  11. First ultrastructural observations on gastritis caused by Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae) in hedgehogs (Erinaceus europeaus).

    PubMed

    Gorgani-Firouzjaee, T; Farshid, A A; Naem, S

    2015-10-01

    Ultrastructural changes of gastritis due to infection with Physaloptera clausa in 12 fresh carcasses of euthanized European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) collected from different part of Urmia, Iran, in which they were highly populated with this animal, six females and six males were subjected to detail necropsy with special reference to the stomach. Macroscopic changes of stomach were recorded and some of the worms collected. Based on number of parasites present in the stomach, they were divided into light infection, mild infection, and severe infection. Parasites were collected, and worms identification of the species was confirmed on the basis of light microscope examination with reference to keys. Tissues fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, post-fixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and processed and plastic embedded; ultrathin sections of 60-70 nm were cut and stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate; electron microscopic observations showed that, in light infection some changes were observed in gastric cells such as dilatation and vesiculation of the endoplasmic reticulum, large numbers of lipid granules, mitochondrial swelling, nuclear chromatin margination, and some nucleus showed washed out appearance. Other cells showed some alterations in mitochondria, dilatation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, loss of both free and bound ribosomes, vesiculation in cytoplasm, and increase Golgi apparatus and secretory vesicles. The inflammatory cells including lymphocytes, macrophages, mast cells, and predominantly eosinophils were identified. In moderate infection, the cellular pattern of gastric mucosa replaced with inflammatory cells. The marked increase of macrophages and other inflammatory cell was observed. A particular finding in our study was the presence of globule leukocyte in the moderate stage. Moreover, scant formation and distribution of collagen fibers as well as fibroblasts were also noted. In severe infection, the most obvious observation was marked distribution

  12. A role for antizyme inhibitor in cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tania M; Cirenajwis, Helena; Wallace, Heather M; Oredsson, Stina; Persson, Lo

    2015-07-01

    The polyamines are important for a variety of cellular functions, including cell growth. Their intracellular concentrations are controlled by a complex network of regulatory mechanisms, in which antizyme (Az) has a key role. Az reduces the cellular polyamine content by down-regulating both the enzyme catalysing polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and the uptake of polyamines. The activity of Az is repressed by the binding of a protein, named Az inhibitor (AzI), which is an enzymatically inactive homologue of ODC. Two forms of AzI have been described: AzI1, which is ubiquitous, and AzI2 which is expressed in brain and testis. In the present study, we have investigated the role of AzI1 in polyamine homeostasis and cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. The results obtained showed that the cellular content of AzI increased transiently after induction of cell proliferation by diluting cells in fresh medium. Inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis induced an even larger increase in the cellular AzI content, which remained significantly elevated during the 7-day experimental period. However, this increase was not a consequence of changes in cell cycle progression, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. Instead, the increase appeared to correlate with the cellular depletion of polyamines. Moreover, induced overexpression of AzI resulted in an increased cell proliferation with a concomitant increase in ODC activity and putrescine content. During mitosis, AzI1 was localised in a pattern that resembled that of the two centrosomes, confirming earlier observations. Taken together, the results indicate that AzI fulfils an essential regulatory function in polyamine homeostasis and cell proliferation. PMID:25813938

  13. Inducing cellular senescence using defined genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Opitz, Oliver G

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. Cellular senescence can be induced through several different mechanisms. Primary mammalian cells display a finite life span, suggesting a mechanism that counts cell divisions. Those cells initially proliferate but eventually enter a state of permanent growth arrest, called replicative senescence. Erosion of telomeric DNA has emerged as a key factor in replicative senescence, which is antagonized during cell immortalization. Nevertheless, besides telomere shortening, there are other mechanisms inducing a growth arrest similar to the replicative senescencent phenotype. Oncogenic or mitogenic signals as well as DNA damage can induce such a phenotype of cellular senescence. All forms of cellular senescence share common signaling pathways and morphological features. Thereby, p53 seems to be essential for the senescence response. Many of these senescence inducing mechanisms can be experimentally recapitulated by the introduction of defined genetic elements. Replicative senescence due to telomere shortening can, for example, be induced by a dominant negative version of telomerase, premature senescence by the overexpression of oncogenic ras, or p16. PMID:17634581

  14. Perfluorinated alginate for cellular encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Gattás-Asfura, Kerim M; Fraker, Christopher A; Stabler, Cherie L

    2012-08-01

    Molecules of pentadecafluorooctanoyl chloride (PFC) were grafted onto alginate (Alg) using a linear poly(ethylene glycol) linker and amide bonds. The resulting Alg-PFC material was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies. The degree of PFC functionalization significantly influenced the physical and chemical properties of Alg-PFC, particularly when the resulting polymer was ionically crosslinked into hydrogels. Alg-PFC hydrogel beads fabricated via Ba(2+) crosslinking were found to match the permeability properties of control alginate beads, except upon swelling over time in culture media. When used to encapsulate MIN6 cells, a beta cell line, Alg-PFC beads demonstrated enhanced cell proliferation over alginate control beads. These results indicate that Alg-PFC hydrogels retain some of the PFC's biological-relevant benefits, such as enhancement of mass transport and bioinertness, to enhance cellular viability within alginate three-dimensional hydrogel environments. We envision these functionalized hydrogels to be particularly useful in the encapsulation of cells with a high metabolic demand, such as pancreatic islets.

  15. Ultrastructural pathology and immunohistochemistry of mustard gas lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrali, J.P.; Oglesby, S.B.; Hamilton, T.A.; Mills, K.R.

    1993-05-13

    The ultrastructural pathology of sulfur mustard gas (HD) skin toxicity has been characterized for several in vivo and in vitro model systems. In animal models, the pathology involves the latent lethal targeting of skin basal cells, a disabling of hemidesmosomes and a progressive edema of the lamina lucida, all of which contribute to the formation of characteristic microblisters at the dermal-epidermal junction. However, the effects of HD toxicity on structural proteins of extracellular domains of the dermal-epidermal junction have not been elucidated. We are beginning an immunohistochemical study of these domains in the hairless guinea pig and summarize here the time course effects of HD of three structural proteins: bullous pemphigoid antigen, laminin and Type IV collagen. The results of this combined ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study indicate that proteins of extracellular matrices of the basement membrane are antigenically altered during the development of HD-induced skin pathology and may contribute to the formation of microblisters.

  16. Organic aerogels: A new type of ultrastructured polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; LeMay, J.D.

    1991-02-01

    Organic aerogels with different ultrastructures can be successfully synthesized from the aqueous sol-gel polymerization of (1) resorcinol with formaldehyde or (2) melamine with formaldehyde. In addition, RF aerogels can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to give vitreous carbon aerogels. The (resorcinol)/(sodium carbonate) ratio is the major variable in the RF polymerization while pH and acid type regulate the MF polymerization. Mechanical property, TEM, and surface area data provide evidence that organic aerogels are similar to their silica counterparts. Based upon these data, we are continuing to explore commonalities between inorganic and organic aerogels so that a universal model might be developed for the structure and properties of these unique materials. Such a model would have a major impact upon the materials science community by opening up new routes for the nanodesign of microporous materials with novel compositions, ultrastructures, and properties. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Focal dermal hypoplasia: ultrastructural abnormalities of the connective tissue.

    PubMed

    del Carmen Boente, María; Asial, Raúl A; Winik, Beatriz C

    2007-02-01

    We followed over 10 years three girls with focal dermal hypoplasia syndrome. The histopathological changes demonstrated at the optical level an hypoplastic dermis with thin and scarce collagen bundles and a marked diminution of elastic fibers. Mature adipose tissue was found scattered within the papillary and reticular dermis. No alterations in the basal membrane were observed by immunocytochemical or ultrastructural techniques. Ultrastructurally, in the skin-affected areas, loosely arranged collagen bundles composed of few fibrils were seen scattered in the extracellular matrix. Scarce elastic fibers of normal morphology were also observed. Fibroblasts were smaller, oval-shaped, and diminished in number with a poorly developed cytoplasm. In these fibroblasts, the most conspicuous feature was a remarkable and irregular thickening of the nuclear fibrous lamina. Taking into account that a common link between all laminopaties may be a failure of stem cells to regenerate mesenchymal tissue, this failure would induce the dermal hypoplasia observed in our patients presenting Goltz syndrome.

  18. Ultrastructure of mitosis in the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi.

    PubMed

    Schuster, F L

    1975-01-01

    Naegleria gruberi is an amoeboflagellate found in soil; mitosis is restricted to the amoeboid phase of its life-cycle. Ultrastructural examination of mitotic stages has confirmed some aspects of karyokinesis reported in earlier light-microscopic studies and expanded on other features of nuclear division described in electron-microscopic studies of Naegleria. The nuclear envelope remained intact throughout division, the nucleolus persisted, and centrioles were not found. Chromosomes were indistinguishable at the ultrastructural level, nor was any evidence detected of sites of microtubular attachment to possible chromosomes. An interzonal body, formed during separation in two of the nucleolus, was not an invariable feature of mitosis. The same was true of the polar caps, which appeared to be little more than the ends of the mitotic spindle. It is suggested that, in line with comparable situations in other protists, expansion of the nuclear envelope is chiefly responsible for separation of the nucleus into two daughter nuclei.

  19. Bacillus atrophaeus Outer Spore Coat Assembly and Ultrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Pitesky, M E; Malkin, A J

    2005-11-21

    Our previous atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies successfully visualized native Bacillus atrophaeus spore coat ultrastructure and surface morphology. We have shown that the outer spore coat surface is formed by a crystalline array of {approx}11 nm thick rodlets, having a periodicity of {approx}8 nm. We present here further AFM ultrastructural investigations of air-dried and fully hydrated spore surface architecture. In the rodlet layer, planar and point defects, as well as domain boundaries, similar to those described for inorganic and macromolecular crystals, were identified. For several Bacillus species, rodlet structure assembly and architectural variation appear to be a consequence of species-specific nucleation and crystallization mechanisms that regulate the formation of the outer spore coat. We propose a unifying mechanism for nucleation and self-assembly of this crystalline layer on the outer spore coat surface.

  20. Vitiligo in two water buffaloes: histological, histochemical, and ultrastructural investigations.

    PubMed

    Cerundolo, R; De Caprariis, D; Esposito, L; Maiolino, P; Restucci, B; Roperto, F

    1993-02-01

    Vitiligo, a skin disease, characterized by the spontaneous loss of melanin, has been described in several animals as well as in humans. Most of the reports of large domestic animals have dealt with clinical investigations without morphological data. In this report, the histological and ultrastructural characteristics of two cases of vitiligo in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) are presented. Interestingly, many of the ultrastructural observations for vitiliginous buffaloes resemble those previously described for other species, e.g., humans, mouse, and chicken. These data suggest that one or more forms of human vitiligo may have a similar etiopathogenesis to that of the buffalo. Therefore, it is proposed that vitiliginous buffalo may prove to be a useful animal model for the human disease.

  1. Cell proliferation and cell cycle control: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Golias, C H; Charalabopoulos, A; Charalabopoulos, K

    2004-12-01

    Tumourigenesis is the result of cell cycle disorganisation, leading to an uncontrolled cellular proliferation. Specific cellular processes-mechanisms that control cell cycle progression and checkpoint traversation through the intermitotic phases are deregulated. Normally, these events are highly conserved due to the existence of conservatory mechanisms and molecules such as cell cycle genes and their products: cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKI) and extra cellular factors (i.e. growth factors). Revolutionary techniques using laser cytometry and commercial software are available to quantify and evaluate cell cycle processes and cellular growth. S-phase fraction measurements, including ploidy values, using histograms and estimation of indices such as the mitotic index and tumour-doubling time indices, provide adequate information to the clinician to evaluate tumour aggressiveness, prognosis and the strategies for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in experimental researches.

  2. Considerations on the ultrastructural particularities of the dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Manolea, H; Deva, V; Bogdan, Fl; Moraru, Iren; Pancă, Oana-Adina; Caraivan, O

    2008-01-01

    We realized an ultrastructural study of the cells of the dental pulp, having in view their particularities relative to other types of conjunctive tissue. For this purpose, we selected five cases represented by teeth without subjective or objective symptomatology. Within the paper there are exposed the morphological aspects observed by means of electron microscopy. The results are then discussed in relation with a series of observations made by other researchers regarding the particularities of the pulp cells structures.

  3. Ultrastructure of psammoma bodies of meningioma in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Lipper, S; Dalzell, J C; Watkins, P J

    1979-12-01

    An 8-day-old tissue culture of a human meningioma was studied by electron microscopy. Psammoma bodies were detected in all stages of evolution, affording a unique opportunity for observing the genesis of these structures. Matrix vesicles appeared instrumental in the calcification of a granular extracellular material. Although matrix vesicles are described in both physiologic and pathologic calcification, they have not been previously reported in the very few ultrastructural studies of psammoma bodies in meningiomas.

  4. Pituitary adenomas: immunohistology and ultrastructural analysis of 118 tumors.

    PubMed

    Esiri, M M; Adams, C B; Burke, C; Underdown, R

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the immunohistological and ultrastructural features in a series of 118 surgically removed pituitary adenomas all of which were studied immunohistologically using antisera to growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) ACTH, beta FSH, beta LH and beta TSH, and 75 of which were studied ultrastructurally. Results were analysed according to the mode of presentation of patients. Forty-one (35%) of the tumours were from patients with acromegaly or gigantism, ten (9%) from patients with Cushing's syndrome or Nelson's syndrome, 19 (16%) from patients with clinical features associated with hyperprolactinaemia and 48 (40%) from patients with space occupying lesions which appeared clinically to be overtly endocrinologically functionless. By light microscopy, using the immunoperoxidase (PAP) technique, immunoreactive GH was demonstrated in all the tumours from patients with acromegaly or gigantism, immunoreactive ACTH in all tumours from patients with Cushing's syndrome or Nelson's syndrome and immunoreactive PRL in 95% of tumours associated with effects of hyperprolactinaemia. Forty-five percent of the tumours from acromegalic patients contained some PRL-positive cells as well as GH-positive cells. Among the tumours which appeared clinically to be endocrinologically functionless were three tumours (from males) uniformly stained for immunoreactive PRL. Of the remainder, 60% were negative for immunoreactive hormones and 40% contained small numbers of cells which were positive for a variety of immunoreactive hormones. ACTH-cell and PRL-cell tumours had ultrastructural features as described in previous studies. Fifty percent of GH-cell tumours examined at the EM level contained fibrous bodies, while in the remainder these structures were not identified. Tumours with fibrous bodies were more likely to contain PRL as well as GH with immunoperoxidase. All tumours that were endocrinologically functionless and which were examined at the EM level contained

  5. Ultrastructural observations on the differentiation of spermatids in man.

    PubMed

    Holstein, A F

    1976-01-01

    Ultrastructural aspects of the normal development of human spermatids are presented. Eight typical pictures of differentiation of spermatids are described based on cytological details of the acrosome, nucleus and tail. The transient appearance of a spindle-shaped body, connected to the principal piece of the tail, is pointed out. In most cases, malformed spermatids have developmental disturbances of only one component of the cell, e.g. of the acrosome, nucleus or tail. Some typical malformations are described.

  6. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural findings in a mature retroperitoneal teratoma.

    PubMed

    Warson, F; Smets, G; Gepts, W; Velkeniers, B; Vanhaelst, L; Sacre, R; Peters, O

    1987-12-01

    Report is made of a mature retroperitoneal teratoma in a 32-year-old man. Investigation of the tumor revealed cells immunoreactive for ACTH, Met-enkephalin, beta-LPH, serotonin, FSH, BPP, S100, Neuron-specific-enolase. These cells were mainly present in the glandular epithelium, lining the cysts of the tumor. Ultrastructurally, neuro-secretory granules were demonstrated in the cytoplasm of the tumoral endocrine cells. At no time did the patient display endocrine symptoms.

  7. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  8. Lanthanum Probe Studies of Cellular Pathophysiology Induced by Hypoxia in Isolated Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Karen P.; Hagler, Herbert K.; Templeton, Gordon H.; Willerson, James T.; Buja, L. Maximilian

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate directly the relationship between evolution of irreversible myocardial injury induced by hypoxia in an isolated papillary muscle preparation and the development of pathophysiological alterations related to severely impaired membrane function. An ionic lanthanum probe technique was employed as a cytochemical marker to monitor the progression of cellular injury, and data from this cytologic technique were correlated with ultrastructure and measurements of contractile parameters in a total of 67 muscles subjected to control conditions or to graded intervals of hypoxia with or without reoxygenation. Marked depression of developed tension and rate of tension development occurred after 30 min of hypoxia. Contractile function showed significant recovery with reoxygenation after 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia but remained depressed when reoxygenation was provided after 2 or 3 h of hypoxia. Examination by transmission and analytical electron microscopy (energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis) revealed lanthanum deposition only in extracellular regions of control muscles and muscles subjected to 30 min of hypoxia. After hypoxic intervals of over 1 h, abnormal intracytoplasmic and intramitochondrial localization of lanthanum were detected. After 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia, abnormal intracellular lanthanum accumulation was associated with only minimal ultrastructural evidence of injury; muscle provided reoxygenation after 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia showed improved ultrastructure and did not exhibit intracellular lanthanum deposits upon exposure to lanthanum during the reoxygenation period. After 2 to 3 h of hypoxia, abnormal intracellular lanthanum accumulation was associated with ultrastructural evidence of severe muscle injury which persisted after reoxygenation. Thus, the data support the conclusion that cellular and membrane alterations responsible for abnormal intracellular lanthanum deposition precede the development of irreversible injury

  9. Composition and Ultrastructure of Streptomyces venezuelae

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, S. G.; Ritzi, Donna

    1968-01-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae is a filamentous bacterium with branching vegetative hyphae embedded in the substrate and aerial hyphae bearing spores. The exterior of the spore is inlaid with myriads of tiny rods which can be removed with xylene. The spore wall is approximately 30 nanometers thick. Occasionally, it can be seen that the plasma membrane and the membranous bodies within a spore are connected. The spore's germ plasm is not separated from the cytoplasm by a nuclear envelope. The cell walls of the vegetative hyphae, which are about 15 nanometers thick, are structurally and chemically similar to those of gram-positive bacteria. The numerous internal membranous bodies, some of which arise from the plasma membrane of the vegetative hypha, may be vesicular, whirled, or convoluted. Membranous bodies are usually prominent at the hyphal apices and are associated with septum formation. The germ plasm is an elongate, contorted, centrally placed area of lower electron density than the hyphal cytoplasm. The spores differ from the vegetative hyphae, not only in fine structure, but also in the arginine and leucine contents of their total cellular proteins. Images PMID:5669907

  10. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway.

  11. Pathologic and ultrastructural changes of acute and chronic delta hepatitis in an experimentally infected chimpanzee.

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, S.; Fields, H. A.; Humphrey, C. D.; Margolis, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    A hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) chronic carrier chimpanzee experimentally superinfected with delta virus (DV) developed chronic DV infection. Over a period of 12 months, serologic and biochemical changes were correlated with morphologic abnormalities of the liver. Severe hepatic necrosis and inflammation accompanied the initial acute episode of hepatitis on Day 35 after inoculation, followed by complete resolution of these lesions over the next 3 months. A second episode of hepatitis occurred on Day 145, and severe necrosis and inflammation recurred along with the reappearance of delta antigen in the hepatocytes. Delta antigen persisted in the liver following the second episode of hepatitis and has remained positive throughout the observation period of 1 year. During the initial acute episode, the hepatocytes exhibited foamy cytoplasmic changes resembling microvesicular fat. However, ultrastructural studies of the same cells revealed only vacuolization of the cytoplasm without evidence of fat droplets. The inflammatory infiltrate during both episodes of hepatitis demonstrated a striking predominance of macrophages over lymphocytes. Hepatocyte abnormalities observed by electron microscopy included vacuoles, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum, and tubules similar to those seen in posttransfusion non-A, non-B hepatitis. However, the tubular and reticular abnormalities coincided with delta antigen expression in liver biopsies detected by direct immunoperoxidase staining and abnormal alanine aminotransferase levels in the serum, which suggests a possible causal relationship. Nuclear abnormalities were not seen. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:3511726

  12. Regeneration of the uterine epithelium in later stages of pseudopregnancy in the rabbit. An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Busch, L C; Winterhager, E; Fischer, B

    1986-01-01

    Morphological changes of the uterine epithelium in later stages of pseudopregnancy in the rabbit have been studied using different morphological methods. The highly proliferated mucosa with numerous symplasms of a pseudopregnant animal returns to the morphology of a nonpregnant animal by apoptosis, moderate necrosis and lytic transformation of symplasms back to typical endometrial cells without desquamation of cells. The first signs of lytic transformation are observed on Day 8 of pseudopregnancy. Enhanced regeneration with apoptosis and lysis of the symplasmic nuclei is observed between Day 14 and Day 16. Full restoration of the epithelium with reappearance of ciliated cells, typical columnar and partly mucified epithelial cells is not completed earlier than Day 24 p. hCG. This epithelium, however, differs clearly from the epithelium of a virgin rabbit due to several residues of epithelial transformation. Thus, from a morphological point of view, pseudopregnancy in the rabbit lasts up to or even longer than Day 28 p. hCG with persisting ultrastructural remnants of the preceding cycle.

  13. Effects of hypoxic preconditioning on synaptic ultrastructure in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Sun, Zhishan; Sun, Shufeng; Duan, Yunxia; Shi, Jingfei; Qi, Zhifeng; Meng, Ran; Sun, Yongxin; Zeng, Xianwei; Chui, Dehua; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) elicits resistance to more drastic subsequent insults, which potentially provide neuroprotective therapeutic strategy, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the effects of HPC on synaptic ultrastructure in olfactory bulb of mice. Mice underwent up to five cycles of repeated HPC treatments, and hypoxic tolerance was assessed with a standard gasp reflex assay. As expected, HPC induced an increase in tolerance time. To assess synaptic responses, Western blots were used to quantify protein levels of representative markers for glia, neuron, and synapse, and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic ultrastructure and mitochondrial density. HPC did not significantly alter the protein levels of astroglial marker (GFAP), neuron-specific markers (GAP43, Tuj-1, and OMP), synaptic number markers (synaptophysin and SNAP25) or the percentage of excitatory synapses versus inhibitory synapses. However, HPC significantly affected synaptic curvature and the percentage of synapses with presynaptic mitochondria, which showed concomitant change pattern. These findings demonstrate that HPC is associated with changes in synaptic ultrastructure. PMID:25155519

  14. Innervation of amphibian reproductive system. Histological and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Cisint, Susana; Crespo, Claudia A; Medina, Marcela F; Iruzubieta Villagra, Lucrecia; Fernández, Silvia N; Ramos, Inés

    2014-10-01

    In the present study we describe for the first time in anuran amphibians the histological and ultrastructural characteristics of innervation in the female reproductive organs. The observations in Rhinella arenarum revealed the presence of nerve fibers located predominantly in the ovarian hilium and in the oviduct wall. In both organs the nerves fibers are placed near blood vessels and smooth muscles fibers. In the present study the histological observations were confirmed using antibodies against peripherin and neurofilament 200 proteins. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated that the innervation of the reproductive organs is constituted by unmyelinated nerve fibers surrounded by Schwann cells. Axon terminals contain a population of small, clear, translucent vesicles that coexist with a few dense cored vesicles. The ultrastructural characteristics together with the immunopositive reaction to tyrosine hydroxylase of the nerve fibers and the type of synaptic vesicles present in the axon terminal would indicate that the reproductive organs of R. arenarum females are innervated by the sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system.

  15. Spermatozoa ultrastructure in Sciaenidae and Polynemidae (Teleostei:Perciformes) with some consideration on Percoidei spermatozoa ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Gusmão-Pompiani, P; Oliveira, C; Quagio-Grassiotto, I

    2005-06-01

    Spermatozoa ultrastructure was studied in five marines (Paralonchurus brasiliensis, Larimus breviceps, Cynoscion striatus, Micropogonias furnieri, Menticirrhus americanus, Umbrina coroides, Stellifer rastrifer), and one freshwater (Plagioscion squamosissimus) species of Sciaenidae and one species of Polynemidae (Polydactylus virginicus). The investigation revealed that, in all species, spermatozoa display a round head, a nucleus containing highly condensed, filamentous chromatin clusters, no acrosome, a short midpiece with a short cytoplasmic channel, and a flagellum showing the classic axoneme structure (9+2) and short irregular lateral fins. In Sciaenidae, the spermatozoa are type II, the flagellar axis is parallel to the nucleus, the lateral nuclear fossa is double arched, the centriolar complex is outside the nuclear fossa, the proximal centriole is anterior and perpendicular to the distal centriole, and no more than ten spherical (marine species) or elongate (freshwater species) mitochondria are observed. Polynemidae spermatozoa are of the intermediate type with the flagellar axis eccentric to the hemi-arc-shaped nucleus, and exhibit no nuclear fossa, the centriolar complex close to the upper nuclear end, the proximal centriole lateral and oblique to the distal centriole, and one large ring-shaped mitocondrion. The data available show that no characteristic is exclusively found in the spermatozoa of members of the Sciaenidae family when compared to other Percoidei with type II spermatozoa. However, three characteristics were exclusively found in Polynemidae: (1) the hemi-arched nucleus; the positioning of the centrioles; and (2) the ring-shaped mitocondrion. The interrelationships between Sciaenidae and Polynemidae as well as between these two families and other Percoidei are herein discussed. PMID:15936355

  16. Quantitative Imaging of Scattering Changes Associated With Epithelial Proliferation, Necrosis and Fibrosis in Tumors Using Microsampling Reflectance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Highly localized reflectance measurements can be used to directly quantify scatter changes in tissues. This study presents a microsampling approach that is used to raster scan tumors to extract parameters believed to be related to the tissue ultra-structure. A confocal reflectance imager was developed to examine scatter changes across pathologically distinct regions within tumor tissues. Tissue sections from two murine tumors, AsPC-1 pancreas tumor and the Mat-LyLu Dunning prostate tumor, were imaged. After imaging, histopathology-guided region-of-interest studies of the images allowed analysis of the variations in scattering resulting from differences in tissue ultra-structure. On average, the median scatter power of tumor cells with high proliferation index was about 26% less compared to tumor cells with low proliferation index (LPI). Necrosis exhibited the lowest scatter power signature across all the tissue types considered, with about 55% lower median scatter power than LPI tumor cells. Additionally, the level and maturity of the tumor's fibroplastic response was found to influence the scatter signal. This approach to scatter visualization of tissue ultra-structure in situ could provide a unique tool for guiding surgical resection, but this kind of interpretation into what the signal means relative to the pathology is required before proceeding to clinical studies. PMID:19256692

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuguo; Tanaka, Naoki . E-mail: naopi@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Nakajima, Takero; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-08-11

    Hepatic peroxisome proliferation, increases in the numerical and volume density of peroxisomes, is believed to be closely related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) activation; however, it remains unknown whether peroxisome proliferation depends absolutely on this activation. To verify occurrence of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation, fenofibrate treatment was used, which was expected to significantly enhance PPAR{alpha} dependence in the assay system. Surprisingly, a novel type of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation and enlargement was uncovered in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. The increased expression of dynamin-like protein 1, but not peroxisome biogenesis factor 11{alpha}, might be associated with the PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation at least in part.

  18. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition.

  19. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  20. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  1. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  2. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  3. The nucleolar structure and nucleolar proteins in proliferating cells of Arabidopsis seeds germinated in the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matía, I.; González-Camacho, F.; Marco, R.; Kiss, J. Z.; Gasset, G.; Medina, F. J.

    Seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were sent to the ISS in the ``Cervantes Mission'' (Spanish Soyuz Mission) within MAMBA Biocontainers (Dutch Space B.V.). These Biocontainers are capable of supplying liquids to the biosample by means of a motorized mechanism based on the ``Berlingot-Ampoule'' concept. Seed germination was activated by supplying culture medium to them, and the process progressed for 4 days at 22°C. Then, growth was stopped by the addition of paraformaldehyde (PFA) fixative. Once back on the ground, samples were immediately processed for microscopical observation. A parallel ground control experiment was simultaneously replicated, following the same schedule and conditions. Seed germination occurred at a high rate in the Space. No differences in the germination rate were observed with respect to the ground control, although Space-grown seedlings were substantially longer (affecting the roots and also the hypocotyl) than the parallel samples grown at 1 g. The mitotic index and the cellular morphometric parameters (length, width, nuclear size) were measured and compared in both the experimental and control conditions. Bidimensional protein electrophoresis was performed on samples in which PFA fixation was reverted by prolonged (two weeks) storage in PBS buffer. The total proteomic profile of seedlings showed differences between the Space sample and the ground control, affecting to nearly one third of the spots. Remarkably, a set of spots around 35 kDa and pI 8.0 are conspicuous in the Space sample and do not appear in the ground control. A more specialized proteomic analysis, with functional significance, was carried out using the AgNOR staining method on Western blots, a technique revealing nucleolar proteins associated with cell proliferation. Immunocytochemical experiments showed the in situ distribution of nucleolin, a nucleolar multifunctional protein regulated by kinases related with cell cycle and proliferation control mechanisms. Finally, the

  4. Ultrastructure of single cells, callus-like and monospore-like cells in Porphyra yezoensis ueda on semisolid culture medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Junxue; Shen, Songdong; Jiang, Ming; Fei, Xiugeng

    2003-06-01

    It had been demonstrated that individual cells or protoplasts isolated from Porphyra thallus by enzyme could develop into normal leafy thalli in the same way as monospores, and that isolated cells develop in different way in liquid and on semi-solid media. The authors observed the ultrastructure of isolated vegetative cells cultured on semi-solid media and compared them with those of monospores and isolated cells cultured in liquid media. The results showed that subcellular structures were quite different among cells in different conditions. In their development, isolated cells on semi-solid media did not show the characteristic subcellular feature of monospore formation, such as production of fibrous vesicles. Callus-like cells formed on semi-solid media underwent a distinctive modification in cellular organization. They developed characteristic cell inclusions and a special 2-layer cell covering. Golgi bodies, ER, starch grains, mitochondria. Vacuoles were not commonly found in them.

  5. Novel tubular inclusions in the bone marrow in multiple sclerosis: an ultrastructural study of early autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Kirk, J; Dermott, E

    1981-01-01

    Samples of bone marrow taken at early autopsy from patients who died with multiple sclerosis and from control cases, were examined ultrastructurally with the aim of detecting any infectious agents which might be present. No recognizable virus or mycoplasma was detected. However, rare bizarre cellular inclusions were found in 2 cases. The inclusions which are unlike anything previously described in MS consisted of fine (ca 17 nm) sinuous tubules occasionally showing dilated discoid ends. They occurred together with fragmentary electron opaque material in large membrane bound vacuoles in unidentified cells. Despite superficial resemblance to some viral nucleocapsids it is considered more likely that they have been formed as a result of degenerative phagocytic or autolytic activity. The specificity or otherwise of these inclusions to MS remains to be demonstrated. PMID:6939232

  6. Histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Rong-Hua; Zuo, Zhong-Nan; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were the remnant of LARS ligament used for repairing posterior cruciate ligament obtained from operation. We want to study histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits. Therefore, we replaced the original ACL with polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament which was covering with the remnant of ACL in 9 rabbits (L-LARS group), while just only polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were transplanted in 3 rabbits (LARS group) with the remnant of ACL. Compared with group LARS, inflammatory cell reaction and foreign body reaction were more significant in group L-LARS. Moreover, electron microscopy investigation showed the tissue near LARS fibers was highly cellular with a matrix of thin collagen fibrils (50-100 nm) in group L-LARS. These above findings suggest the polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament possess the high biocompatibility, which contributes to the polyethylene terephthalate LARS covered with recipient connective tissues. PMID:25356104

  7. The Crossroads of Iron with Hypoxia and Cellular Metabolism. Implications in the Pathobiology of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Brian B.; Rouault, Tracey C.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic hallmark of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is pulmonary vascular remodeling, characterized by endothelial cell proliferation, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and perivascular inflammation, ultimately contributing to increased pulmonary arterial pressures. Several recent studies have observed that iron deficiency in patients with various forms of PAH is associated with worsened clinical outcome. Iron plays a key role in many cellular processes regulating the response to hypoxia, oxidative stress, cellular proliferation, and cell metabolism. Given the potential importance of iron supplementation in patients with the disease and the broad cellular functions of iron, we review its role in processes that pertain to PAH. PMID:24988529

  8. Potential clinical implications of BRAF mutations in histiocytic proliferations

    PubMed Central

    Bubolz, Anna-Maria; Weissinger, Stephanie E.; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Arndt, Annette; Steinestel, Konrad; Brüderlein, Silke; Cario, Holger; Lubatschofski, Anneli; Welke, Claudia; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Barth, Thomas F. E.; Beer, Ambros J.; Möller, Peter; Gottstein, Martin

    2014-01-01

    For a growing number of tumors the BRAF V600E mutation carries therapeutic relevance. In histiocytic proliferations the distribution of BRAF mutations and their relevance has not been clarified. Here we present a retrospective genotyping study and a prospective observational study of a patient treated with a BRAF inhibitor. Genotyping of 69 histiocytic lesions revealed that 23/48 Langerhans cell lesions were BRAF-V600E-mutant whereas all non-Langerhans cell lesions (including dendritic cell sarcoma, juvenile xanthogranuloma, Rosai-Dorfman disease, and granular cell tumor) were wild-type. A metareview of 29 publications showed an overall mutation frequency of 48.5%; and with N=653 samples, this frequency is well defined. The BRAF mutation status cannot be predicted based on clinical parameters and outcome analysis showed no difference. Genotyping identified a 45 year-old woman with an aggressive and treatment-refractory, ultrastructurally confirmed systemic BRAF-mutant LCH. Prior treatments included glucocorticoid/vinblastine and cladribine-monotherapy. Treatment with vemurafenib over 3 months resulted in a dramatic metabolic response by FDG-PET and stable radiographic disease; the patient experienced progression after 6 months. In conclusion, BRAF mutations in histiocytic proliferations are restricted to lesions of the Langerhans-cell type. While for most LCH-patients efficient therapies are available, patients with BRAF mutations may benefit from the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. PMID:24938183

  9. The changing proliferation threat

    SciTech Connect

    Sopko, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Technological advances and new adversaries with new motives have reduced the relevancy and effectiveness of the American nonproliferation strategy that was developed during the Cold War. The Cold War`s end and the breakup of the Soviet Union have created new proliferation dangers even as they have reduced others. The familiar balance of nuclear terror that linked the superpowers and their client states for nearly 50 years in a choreographed series of confrontations has given way to a much less predictable situation, where weapons of unthinkable power appear within the grasp of those more willing to use them. Rogue nations and {open_quotes}clientless{close_quotes} states, terrorist groups, religious cults, ethnic minorities, disaffected political groups, and even individuals appear to have jointed a new arms race toward mass destruction. The author describes recent events that suggest the new trends and a serious challenge to US national security.

  10. Reversible effect of all-trans-retinoic acid on AML12 hepatocyte proliferation and cell cycle progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation is well documented. Numerous studies have established the cancer preventive propertiesofatRAwhichfunctionstoregulate levels ofcellcycleproteinsessentialfortheGliS transition...

  11. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  12. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  13. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  14. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, René L; Valenzuela, José I; Luján, Rafael; Couve, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Background Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Results Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking. PMID:19386132

  15. Studies on the effects of microgravity on the ultrastructure and functions of cultured mammalian cells (L-6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Atsushige

    1993-01-01

    The human body consists of 10(exp 13) cells. Understanding the mechanisms by which the cells sense and respond to microgravity is very important as the basis for space biology. The cells were originally isolated aseptically from mammalian bodies and cultured in vitro. A set of cell culture vessels was developed to be applied to three kinds of space flight experiments. Experiment 1 is to practice the cell culture technique in a space laboratory and obtain favorable growth of the cells. Aseptic handling in tryspin treatment and medium renewal will be tested. The cells, following space flight, will be returned to the ground and cultured continuously to investigate the effects of space flight on the cellular characteristics. Experiment 2 is to examine the cytoskeletal structure of the cells under microgravity conditions. The cytoskeletal structure plays essential roles in the morphological construction, movements, axonal transport, and differentiation of the cells. The cells fixed during space flight will be returned and the cytoskeleton and ultrastructure observed using electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Experiment 3 is to study the cellular productivity of valuable substances. The waste medium harvested during space flight are returned and quantitated for the cellular products. The effects of microgravity on mammalian cells will be clarified from the various aspects.

  16. Ultrastructural effects of the nonsteroidal contraceptive centchroman on rat uterine luminal epithelium in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, P K; Nilsson, B O

    1984-01-01

    Centchroman (3,4-trans-2,2-dimethyl-3-phenyl-4-p-(beta-pyrrolidinoethoxy) -phenyl-7-methoxychroman), a nonsteroidal contraceptive developed by the Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, India, was administered orally (1.25 mg/kg) to rats in a state of experimentally delayed implantation both during the progesterone treatment (preattachment stage) and in conjunction with the addition of estradiol (attachment stage). When given during preattachment, centchroman did not change the characteristic ultrastructure of the uterine epithelium significantly, except that there was an increase in the size and number of secondary lysosomes. Thus, no definite estrogenic or antiprogestational potency of centchroman was observed in this test system. However, when administered simultaneously with, before, or after estrogen during attachment, centchroman both abolished the estradiol-induced attachment reaction and produced or potentiated some changes of an estrogen type. Thus, no typical antiestrogen action but the sign of an estrogen action was observed in this test system. Further, the drug also produced certain specific changes in the lysosomal system of the epithelial cells during attachment. It is suggested that, in addition to some estrogenic effects, centchroman also possesses specific cellular effects, probably of a nonhormonal nature.

  17. Fenugreek powder exerts protective effects on alcoholised rats' kidney, highlighted using ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Pribac, George Ciprian; Sferdian, Mircea Florin; Neamţu, Carmen; Crăciun, Constantin; Roşioru, Corina Luminiţa; Ardelean, Aurel; Totolici, Bogdan Dan

    2015-01-01

    Trigonella foenum-graecum (TFG) seeds exert a protective antioxidant effect and membrane protector through their rich content in polyphenolic flavonoids. The previous research focused on the hypoglycemic action of the seeds, with scarce studies on the preventive effects in the pathology of the kidney. Our work was conducted on an experimental in vivo model; the animals were given two different concentrations of TFG seeds, consequently to alcohol intoxication. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed vacuolation in cytoplasm, edemas at the apical pole of the nephrocytes, diffusion of the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial matrix and the increase in number of the lysozymes and especially peroxisomes, as well as the congestion of blood capillaries. In the case of the groups T5R and T10R, which received Trigonella powder together with ethanol, the structural and ultrastructural changes produced by the ethylic intoxication were more reduced, being somewhat improved in the T5R group. Therefore, the majority of the cells nuclei have retained their spherical shape, being at the same time predominantly euchromatic, with little heterochromatin and evenly dispersed. Our results suggest the use of Trigonella seeds as a food supplement to prevent cellular deterioration and improve renal morphology and function. PMID:26193212

  18. [Effects of silicon on the ultrastructures of wheat radical cells under copper stress].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dai-Jing; Ma, Jian-Hui; Yang, Shu-Fang; Chen, Hui-Ting; Liu, Pei; Wang, Wen-Fei; Li, Chun-Xi

    2014-08-01

    To explore the alleviation effect of silicon on wheat growth under copper stress, cultivar Aikang 58 was chosen as the experimental material. The growth, root activities and root tip ultrastructures of wheat seedlings, which were cultured in Hoagland nutrient solution with five different treatments (control, 15 mg x L(-1) Cu2+, 30 mg x L(-1) Cu2+, 15 mg x L(-1) Cu2+ and 50 mg x L(-1) silicon, 30 mg x L(-1) Cu2+ and 50 mg x L(-1) silicon), were fully analyzed. The results showed that root length, plant height and root activities of wheat seedlings were significantly restrained under the copper treatments compared with the control (P < 0.01), while these restraining effects were alleviated after adding silicon to copper-stress Hoagland nutrient solution. Under copper stress, the cell wall and cell membrane of wheat seedling root tips suffered to varying degrees of destruction, which caused the increase of intercellular space and the disappearance of some organelles. After adding silicon, the cell structure was maintained intact, although some cells and organelles were still slightly deformed compared with the control. In conclusion, exogenous silicon could alleviate the copper stress damages on wheat seedlings and cellular components to some extent.

  19. Ultrastructural observation of altered chloroplast morphology in space-grown Brassica rapa cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Jiao, S; Hilaire, E; Paulsen, A Q; Guikema, J A

    1999-07-01

    Photosynthesis will be indispensable in a bioregenerative life-support systems for long space missions. It is critical understand the effects of space on this complex process, especially the loss of gravity. Past has noted changes in plant growth and development; differences about cell size, shape, division, and differentiation; and plastid distribution and structure alterations. The amyloplast-containing columelar cells in root tips were carefully examined since they are likely gravity-sensing sites. Changes on photosynthetic physiology and chloroplast structure have been reported. Both increases and decreases of chlorophyll and carotenoid contents were reported. Structural changes of thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts were observed in pea and Arabidopsis grown in space or clinorotation. Recently, a decrease of CO2 assimilation rate and of electron transport rate of both PSI and PSII on thylakoid membranes were reported in space-grown wheat. These imply an overall decrease of photosynthetic activities, and implicate thylakoid-old structural changes. For example, PSI activity, and its reaction center subunits (PsaA, PsaB, and PsaC) and the LHCIs, were decreased under microgravity. Here, we further examined cellular morphology and ultrastructural features of the chloroplast and its thylakoid membranes by electron microscopy and in situ immunolocalization.

  20. Growth inhibition and root ultrastructure of cucumber seedlings exposed to allelochemicals from rye (Secale cereale).

    PubMed

    Burgos, N R; Talbert, R E; Kim, K S; Kuk, Y I

    2004-03-01

    Inhibition of "Calypso" cucumber seedling growth by rye allelochemicals, 2(3H)-benzoxazolinone BOA and 2,4-dihydroxy-1,4(2H)-benzoxazin-3-one DIBOA, was studied by analyzing the growth of seedling tissues and organs. Light and electron microscopy of seedling root cells were also carried out to investigate the mechanism(s) of root growth inhibition and mode of action of these compounds. BOA inhibited root elongation and reduced the number of cucumber lateral roots by 77 and 100% at 0.1 and 0.43 mg BOA/ml deionized (DI) water, respectively. DIBOA also inhibited root growth, but did not affect the number of lateral roots. BOA increased size of cucumber cortical root cells fivefold, but DIBOA had no effect. Both compounds reduced the regeneration of root cap cells and increased the width of cortical cells resulting in increased root diameter. BOA and DIBOA caused increased cytoplasmic vacuolation, reduced ribosome density and dictyosomes, reduced number of mitochondria, and reduced lipid catabolism. Starch granules in amyloplasts of seedling roots treated with BOA and DIBOA were also greatly reduced compared to the control. Changes in cellular ultrastructure indicated that BOA and DIBOA reduced root growth by disrupting lipid metabolism, reducing protein synthesis, and reducing transport or secretory capabilities.

  1. Effects of gamma irradiation on the midgut ultrastructure of Glossina palpalis subspecies

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, J.K.; Molyneux, D.H.; Wallbanks, K.R.; Van der Vloedt, A.M.

    1989-05-01

    In the sterile insect technique, insects are sterilized prior to release in areas where they are pests. The sterile males compete for and with fertile wild individuals for mates, thus reducing the population's reproductive rate. Tsetse fly (Glossina spp.) populations have been eradicated after release of laboratory-bred flies sterilized by gamma irradiation. However, no studies exist on radiation-induced damage to the midgut morphology and function of the radiation-sterilized insects. After G. palpalis palpalis and G. p. gambiensis were subjected to 130 Gy gamma radiation, their midgut damage and recovery were monitored by electron microscopy. The first sign of damage was atrophy and loss of the microvillous border from epithelial cells. The rate of cell degeneration increased, with young as well as old cells being affected and cellular debris filling the ectoperitrophic space. Muscle cells were destroyed, patches of basal lamina were left bare, intracellular virus- and rickettsia-like organisms became more frequent, and many replacement cells became unusually large. Partial recovery occurred from the 10th day postirradiation. Such changes in midgut ultrastructure and the corresponding inhibition of functions may increase the susceptibility of the fly to trypanosome infection.

  2. Ultrastructural changes resulting from keratin-9 gene mutations in two families with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Navsaria, H A; Swensson, O; Ratnavel, R C; Shamsher, M; McLean, W H; Lane, E B; Griffiths, D; Eady, R A; Leigh, I M

    1995-03-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma of Voerner type (or epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of keratinization with histologic features of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. We studied members of two large unrelated kindreds with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, and biopsy specimens of lesional palmar skin from both families confirmed the histologic changes of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Whorls of abnormally aggregated keratin filaments were seen ultrastructurally to be associated with signs of cellular disintegration in spinous and granular cells. Direct sequencing of genomic DNA samples obtained from several members of each family established the substitution of a highly conserved arginine by tryptophan (R162W) in the 1A region of the alpha-helical rod domain of keratin 9. This arginine residue in a highly conserved region of keratins 1 and 10 is affected by disruptive missense point mutations in many patients with bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma. An equivalent position in the sole and palm restricted keratin 9 appears to be the mutation hot spot in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. To date, R162W is the most prevalent genetic defect reported in this genodermatosis.

  3. Capitate glandular trichomes of Helianthus annuus (Asteraceae): ultrastructure and cytological development.

    PubMed

    Amrehn, Evelyn; Heller, Annerose; Spring, Otmar

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that capitate glandular trichomes (CGT) of the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus, produce sesquiterpene lactones (STL) and flavonoids, which are sequestered and accumulated between the apical cuticle and the wall of the tip cells. To explore the cellular structures required and putatively involved in the STL biosynthesis and secretion, the present study was focused on the development of CGT and the comparison of the ultrastructure of its different cell types. Gradual maturation of flowers in the capitulum of the sunflower provided the possibility to study the simultaneous differentiation from the primordial to the secretory stage of CGT located by light microscopy (bright field, differential interference contrast and fluorescence) as well as transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the CGT of sunflower anthers had a biseriate structure with up to 14 cell pairs. In mature trichomes, the apical cells called secretory cells were covered entirely by a large cuticle globe, which enclosed the resinous terpenoids and was specialised in thickness and structure. The secretory cells lacked chloroplasts and contained mainly smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER). Conspicuous cell wall protuberances and an accumulation of mitochondria nearby occurred in the horizontally oriented cell walls. The cytological differences between stalk cells and secretory cells indicate a different function. The dominance of sER suggests its involvement in STL biosynthesis and cell wall protuberances enlarge the surface of the plasmamembrane of secretory cells and may be involved in the secretion processes of STL into the subcuticular space.

  4. Morphological and ultrastructural analysis of Turritopsis nutricula during life cycle reversal.

    PubMed

    Carla', E C; Pagliara, P; Piraino, S; Boero, F; Dini, L

    2003-06-01

    The hydrozoa life cycle is characterized, in normal conditions, by the alternation of a post-larval benthic polyp and an adult pelagic medusa; however, some species of Hydrozoa react to environmental stress by reverting their life cycle: i.e. an adult medusa goes back to the juvenile stage of polyp. This very uncommon life cycle could be considered as some sort of inverted metamorphosis. A morphological study of different stages during the reverted life cycle of Turritopsis nutricula led to the characterization of four different stages: healthy medusa, unhealthy medusa, four-leaf clover and cyst. The ultrastructural study of the cellular modifications (during the life cycle reversion of T. nutricula) showed the presence of both degenerative and apoptotic processes. Degeneration was prevalent during the unhealthy medusa and four-leaf clover stages, while the apoptotic rate was higher during the healthy medusa and cyst stages. The significant presence of degenerative and apoptotic processes could be related to the occurrence of a sort of metamorphosis when an adult medusa transforms itself into a polyp.

  5. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein 1 on Sharpey's fibers in monkey tooth cementum.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Ishikawa, T; Shintani, S; Yanagisawa, T

    2012-07-01

    Despite the importance of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) in the formation of mineralized tissue, including dentinogenesis and osteogenesis, its precise role in cementogenesis remains to be clarified fully. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the ultrastructural immunolocalization of DMP1 in monkey molar tooth cementum. Japanese Macaca fuscata monkeys were fixed by perfusion. The upper molar teeth and accompanying periodontium then were dissected and demineralized with EDTA. Cryosections were obtained, incubated in anti-DMP1 polyclonal antibody, and processed by immunoperoxidase and immunogold labeling. Intense immunoperoxidase staining for DMP1 was observed in acellular extrinsic fiber cementum, particularly in Sharpey's fibers. Cementocyte lacunae with canaliculi showed DMP1 staining in the apical region of the tooth root. Electron immunomicroscopy revealed the close proximity of DMP1 to collagen fibrils in Sharpey's fibers at the mineralization front. Intense immunogold labeling was localized on the walls of the cementocyte lacunae in cellular cementum. These results should contribute to better understanding of the role of DMP1, not only in Sharpey's fiber biomineralization, but also in the maintenance of the cementocyte lacunar space in cementum. PMID:22435407

  6. Morphogenesis of pestiviruses: new insights from ultrastructural studies of strain Giraffe-1.

    PubMed

    Schmeiser, Stefanie; Mast, Jan; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; König, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge on the morphogenesis of pestiviruses is limited due to low virus production in infected cells. In order to localize virion morphogenesis and replication sites of pestiviruses and to examine intracellular virion transport, a cell culture model was established to facilitate ultrastructural studies. Based on results of virus growth kinetic analysis and quantification of viral RNA, pestivirus strain Giraffe-1 turned out to be a suitable candidate for studies on virion generation and export from culture cells. Using conventional transmission electron microscopy and single-tilt electron tomography, we found virions located predominately in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in infected cells and were able to depict the budding process of virions at ER membranes. Colocalization of the viral core protein and the envelope glycoprotein E2 with the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) was demonstrated by immunogold labeling of cryosections. Moreover, pestivirions could be shown in transport vesicles and the Golgi complex and during exocytosis. Interestingly, viral capsid protein and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were detected in multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which implies that the endosomal compartment plays a role in pestiviral replication. Significant cellular membrane alterations such as those described for members of the Flavivirus and Hepacivirus genera were not found. Based on the gained morphological data, we present a consistent model of pestivirus morphogenesis. PMID:24352462

  7. Ultrastructural confirmation of neuronal protection by melatonin against the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine cell damage.

    PubMed

    Mayo, J C; Sainz, R M; Antolín, I; Rodriguez, C

    1999-02-13

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin used in the induction of experimental Parkinson's disease in both animals and cultured neuronal cells. Biochemical and molecular approaches showed previously that low doses of 6-OHDA induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, while high doses of this neurotoxin induced necrosis. Melatonin has been shown to protect against the neuronal programmed cell death induced by 6-OHDA, although it was not able to prevent the massive necrotic cellular death occurring after the addition of high doses of the neurotoxin. In the present work, we demonstrate by ultrastructural analysis that although low doses of 6-OHDA induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, it also damaged the non-apoptotic cells, morphologically corresponding this damage to incipient and reversible necrotic lesions. When the doses of the neurotoxin increase, there are still apoptotic cells, although most of the cells show necrotic irreversible lesions. We also found that melatonin partially prevents the incipient necrotic lesions caused by low doses of 6-OHDA. The fact that melatonin was shown in previous work to prevent apoptosis caused by low doses of 6-OHDA, but not necrosis induced by high doses of the neurotoxin, seemed to indicate that this agent is only able to protect against apoptosis. However, our present results, melatonin preventing also the incipient necrotic neuronal lesions, suggest that this hormone may provide a general protection against cell death, suggesting that higher doses should be tried in order to prevent the necrotic cell death induced by high doses of the neurotoxin.

  8. Immunomodulation of vascular endothelium. 1. Ultrastructural changes following ultraviolet B irradiation of peripheral veins

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, M.L.; Gordon, R.E.; Hardy, M.A.; Reemtsma, K.; Benvenisty, A.I. )

    1990-02-01

    Immunologic function of endothelial cells is especially important in consideration of vein allografting for arterial reconstruction and in organ allotransplantation. Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) has previously been shown to modulate graft immunogenicity, and to alter cell surface receptor function. In this study, superficial epigastric veins were UVB irradiated with 10, 24, 40, 80, and 150 mJ/cm2 while control veins were not irradiated; all specimens were examined for endothelial ultrastructural changes. Veins were perfuse-fixed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after irradiation, and were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Control veins had a normal appearing endothelial lining, composed of elongated, attenuated endothelial cells. Veins irradiated with more than 24 mJ/cm2 displayed injured endothelial cells characterized by altered microvilli, defects in the cell surface, and a change in cell shape. The degree of cell damage correlated closely with increasing UVB dose. At doses of 80 mJ/cm2 or greater there was moderate to severe endothelial cell separation from the underlying basement membrane and an increase in cellular lysosomes. The effects of UVB were maximal at 3 days with virtual recovery in resurfacing of all specimens with endothelium 28 days after irradiation. These data suggest that UVB has a dose-dependent effect on venous endothelium that is morphologically reversible with time. Cell membrane changes seen following exposure to UVB may contribute to altered cell surface receptor function.

  9. New Ultrastructural Analysis of the Invasive Apparatus of the Plasmodium Ookinete

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Kailash P.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the mosquito midgut by the Plasmodium ookinete determines the success of transmission of malaria parasites from humans to mosquitoes and therefore, is a potential target for molecular intervention. Here, we show higher-resolution ultrastructural details of developing and mature P. gallinaceum ookinetes than previously available. Improved fixation and processing methods yielded substantially improved transmission electron micrographs of ookinetes, particularly with regard to visualization of subcellular secretory and other organelles. These new images provide new insights into the synthesis and function of vital invasive machinery focused on the following features: apical membrane protrusions presumptively used for attachment and protein secretion, dark spherical bodies at the apical end of the mature ookinete, and the presence of a dense array of micronemes apposed to microtubules at the apical end of the ookinete involved in constitutive secretion. This work advances understanding of the molecular and cellular details of the Plasmodium ookinete and provides the basis of future, more detailed mechanistic experimentation on the biology of the Plasmodium ookinete. PMID:22802443

  10. Latency- and Defense-Related Ultrastructural Characteristics of Apple Fruit Tissues Infected with Botryosphaeria dothidea.

    PubMed

    Kim, K W; Park, E W; Kim, Y H; Ahn, K K; Kim, P G; Kim, K S

    2001-02-01

    ABSTRACT Apple fruit tissues infected with Botryosphaeria dothidea were examined by transmission electron microscopy using susceptible cv. Fuji and resistant cv. Jonathan. Immature (green) and mature (red) fruits of cv. Fuji with restricted or expanding lesions were also examined to reveal subcellular characteristics related with latent and restricted disease development. In infected susceptible mature fruits, cytoplasmic degeneration and organelle disruption commonly occurred, accompanying cell wall dissolution around invading hyphae. Cell wall dissolution around invading hyphae in subepidermis was rare in immature, red halo-symptomed cv. Fuji and resistant cv. Jonathan fruits. In infected immature fruits of cv. Fuji, presumably at the latent state of disease development, cellular degeneration was less severe, and invading hyphae contained prominent microbody-lipid globule complexes or the deposition of thin electron-dense outer layer around cell wall of intercellular hyphae. Both mature fruits with red halos and resistant apple fruits formed cell wall protuberances at the outside of cell walls. In addition, electron-dense extramural layers were formed in the resistant apple fruits. Aberrant hyphal structures such as intrahyphal hyphae were found only in resistant fruit tissues, indicating the physiologically altered fungal growth. These ultrastructural changes of host tissues and fungal hyphae may reflect the pathogenesis of apple white rot under varying conditions of apple fruits.

  11. Toward visualization of nanomachines in their native cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jason; Sani, Musa; Tomova, Cveta; Godsave, Susan; Peters, Peter J

    2009-09-01

    The cellular nanocosm is made up of numerous types of macromolecular complexes or biological nanomachines. These form functional modules that are organized into complex subcellular networks. Information on the ultra-structure of these nanomachines has mainly been obtained by analyzing isolated structures, using imaging techniques such as X-ray crystallography, NMR, or single particle electron microscopy (EM). Yet there is a strong need to image biological complexes in a native state and within a cellular environment, in order to gain a better understanding of their functions. Emerging methods in EM are now making this goal reachable. Cryo-electron tomography bypasses the need for conventional fixatives, dehydration and stains, so that a close-to-native environment is retained. As this technique is approaching macromolecular resolution, it is possible to create maps of individual macromolecular complexes. X-ray and NMR data can be 'docked' or fitted into the lower resolution particle density maps to create a macromolecular atlas of the cell under normal and pathological conditions. The majority of cells, however, are too thick to be imaged in an intact state and therefore methods such as 'high pressure freezing' with 'freeze-substitution followed by room temperature plastic sectioning' or 'cryo-sectioning of unperturbed vitreous fully hydrated samples' have been introduced for electron tomography. Here, we review methodological considerations for visualizing nanomachines in a close-to-physiological, cellular context. EM is in a renaissance, and further innovations and training in this field should be fully supported.

  12. Solitary fibrous tumour of the thyroid: clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of three cases.

    PubMed

    Taccagni, G; Sambade, C; Nesland, J; Terreni, M R; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    1993-01-01

    We describe three cases of solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) arising from thyroid stroma. Grossly, the tumours were clearly delimited but only partly encapsulated. The following histomorphological growth patterns were observed: bundles of cells in storiform configuration; non-structured bundles; prevalence of fibrous matrix; highly cellular, non-structured; prevalence of loose, non-structured extracellular substance; cellular proliferation and vascular spaces in a haemangiopericytic configuration and a lipomatous component. Immunohistochemical investigation demonstrated intense, diffuse vimentin positivity and focal, less intense actin positivity in all three cases. At electron microscopy we observed a primitive cell of mesenchymal type, with cytoplasm poor in organelles and rich in filaments; this cell sometimes presented differentiation characteristics. SFT is at present the most correct term for the lesions presented here despite some morphological characteristics which differ from cases reported in the literature.

  13. Proliferation of the surface-connected intracytoplasmic membranous network in skeletal muscle disease.

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, N. N.; Wilson, P. E.

    1986-01-01

    A surface-connected intracytoplasmic membranous (SCIM) network proliferates in skeletal muscle diseases and in myotubes grown in vitro. The authors observed frequent occurrence of "coated" microdomains in the form of budding vesicles in the proliferated components of this network and suspected a potential role the proliferated membranes might have in the endocytosis of molecules into myotubes undergoing repair or regeneration. Five-day-old myotubes in culture were incubated at 37 C and between 2 and 4 C with two tracers, Lucifer yellow and ferritin, both known to enter other types of cells via a fluid-phase endocytotic pathway. The differential penetration of Lucifer yellow at 37 C and below 2-4 C was examined by fluorescence microscopy and by electron microscopy. Lucifer yellow was rendered electron-opaque by photoreacting it with an intense light in the presence of DAB. Ferritin penetration at 37 C and between 2 and 4 C was compared and quantitated ultrastructurally. The authors found that endocytosis of the tracers into myotubes and eventually into lysosomes took place after the tracers had diffused into the lumen of the proliferated SCIM network. These processes were inhibited below 4 C. This finding, coupled with the presence of "coated" microdomains in the proliferated membranes, led us to suspect that the SCIM network may have a role in membrane turnover of metabolically active diseased muscle cells undergoing regeneration. Images Figure 5 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 p367-a PMID:3789091

  14. Building and re-building the heart by cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Matthew J; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-03-01

    The adult human heart does not regenerate significant amounts of lost tissue after injury. Rather than making new, functional muscle, human hearts are prone to scarring and hypertrophy, which can often lead to fatal arrhythmias and heart failure. The most-cited basis of this ineffective cardiac regeneration in mammals is the low proliferative capacity of adult cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian cardiomyocytes can avidly proliferate during fetal and neonatal development, and both adult zebrafish and neonatal mice can regenerate cardiac muscle after injury, suggesting that latent regenerative potential exists. Dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote cardiomyocyte proliferation throughout life, deciphering why proliferative capacity normally dissipates in adult mammals, and deriving means to boost this capacity are primary goals in cardiovascular research. Here, we review our current understanding of how cardiomyocyte proliferation is regulated during heart development and regeneration.

  15. Human keratinocytes have two interconvertible modes of proliferation.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Amit; Murai, Kasumi; Fowler, Joanna; Simons, Benjamin D; Nikolaidou-Neokosmidou, Varvara; Jones, Philip H

    2016-02-01

    Single stem cells, including those in human epidermis, have a remarkable ability to reconstitute tissues in vitro, but the cellular mechanisms that enable this are ill-defined. Here we used live imaging to track the outcome of thousands of divisions in clonal cultures of primary human epidermal keratinocytes. Two modes of proliferation were seen. In 'balanced' mode, similar proportions of proliferating and differentiating cells were generated, achieving the 'population asymmetry' that sustains epidermal homeostasis in vivo. In 'expanding' mode, an excess of cycling cells was produced, generating large expanding colonies. Cells in expanding mode switched their behaviour to balanced mode once local confluence was attained. However, when a confluent area was wounded in a scratch assay, cells near the scratch switched back to expanding mode until the defect was closed. We conclude that the ability of a single epidermal stem cell to reconstitute an epithelium is explained by two interconvertible modes of proliferation regulated by confluence. PMID:26641719

  16. Human keratinocytes have two interconvertible modes of proliferation.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Amit; Murai, Kasumi; Fowler, Joanna; Simons, Benjamin D; Nikolaidou-Neokosmidou, Varvara; Jones, Philip H

    2016-02-01

    Single stem cells, including those in human epidermis, have a remarkable ability to reconstitute tissues in vitro, but the cellular mechanisms that enable this are ill-defined. Here we used live imaging to track the outcome of thousands of divisions in clonal cultures of primary human epidermal keratinocytes. Two modes of proliferation were seen. In 'balanced' mode, similar proportions of proliferating and differentiating cells were generated, achieving the 'population asymmetry' that sustains epidermal homeostasis in vivo. In 'expanding' mode, an excess of cycling cells was produced, generating large expanding colonies. Cells in expanding mode switched their behaviour to balanced mode once local confluence was attained. However, when a confluent area was wounded in a scratch assay, cells near the scratch switched back to expanding mode until the defect was closed. We conclude that the ability of a single epidermal stem cell to reconstitute an epithelium is explained by two interconvertible modes of proliferation regulated by confluence.

  17. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  18. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  19. Quinotrierixin inhibits proliferation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Joshua J.; Li, Jingming; Yu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of quinotrierixin, a previously reported inhibitor of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), on cell proliferation and viability in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Methods Subconfluent human RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to quinotrierixin for 16–24 h. Cell proliferation was determined with 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, hemocytometer counts, and CyQUANT NF Cell Proliferation Assay. Apoptosis was detected with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5′-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling assay. XBP1 mRNA splicing and expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress response genes were determined in cells exposed to thapsigargin in the presence or absence of quinotrierixin. Overexpression of spliced XBP1 was achieved with adenovirus. Results Quinotrierixin reduced RPE cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner without inducing apoptosis. In cells exposed to thapsigargin, quinotrierixin inhibited XBP1 mRNA splicing and PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase activation, and reduced cellular and nuclear levels of spliced XBP1 and C/EBP homologous protein. Paradoxically, quinotrierixin exacerbated endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced phosphorylation of eIF2α, which in turn led to decreased protein translation. Overexpressing spliced XBP1 partially reversed the inhibition of cell proliferation by quinotrierixin. These results suggest that inhibiting XBP1 splicing contributes to quinotrierixin’s negative effect on RPE cell proliferation, but other mechanisms such as reduction of protein translation are also involved. Conclusions Quinotrierixin inhibits RPE cell proliferation and may be used as a novel antiproliferative drug for treating proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Future studies are needed to investigate the in vivo effect of quinotrierixin on RPE proliferation in animal models of proliferative vitreoretinopathy. PMID:23335849

  20. Hypergravity Stimulates Osteoblast Proliferation Via Matrix-Integrin-Signaling Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, W.; Parra, M.; Roden, C.; DaCosta, M.; Wing, A.; Damsky, C.; Holton, E.; Searby, N.; Globus, R.; Almeida, E.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive characterizations of the physiologic consequences of microgravity and gravity indicate that lack of weight-bearing may cause tissue atrophy through cellular and subcellular level mechanisms. We hypothesize that gravity is needed for the efficient transduction of cell growth and survival signals from the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in mechanosensitive tissues. Recent work from our laboratory and from others shows that an increase of gravity increases bone cell growth and survival. We found that 50-g hypergravity stimulation increased osteoblast proliferation for cells grown on Collagen Type I and Fibronectin, but not on Laminin or uncoated plastic. This may be a tissue-specific response, because 50-g hypergravity stimulation caused no increase in proliferation for primary rat fibroblasts. These results combined with RT-PCR for all possible integrins indicate that beta1 integrin subunit may be involved. The osteoblast proliferation response on Collagen Type I was greater at 25-g than at 10-g or 50-g; 24-h duration of hypergravity was necessary to see an increase in proliferation. Survival was enhanced during hypergravity stimulation by the presence of matrix. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that cell cycle may be altered; BrdU incorporation in proliferating cells showed an increase in the number of actively dividing cells from about 60% at 1-g to over 90% at 25-g. To further investigate the molecular components involved, we applied fluorescence labeling of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules to cells after 2 to 30 minutes of hypergravity stimulation. While structural components did not appear to be altered, phosphorylation increased, indicating that signaling pathways may be activated. These data indicate that gravity mechanostimulation of osteoblast proliferation involves specific matrix-integrin signaling pathways which are sensitive to duration and g-level.

  1. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  2. Global proliferation of cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Doubleday, Zoë A; Prowse, Thomas A A; Arkhipkin, Alexander; Pierce, Graham J; Semmens, Jayson; Steer, Michael; Leporati, Stephen C; Lourenço, Sílvia; Quetglas, Antoni; Sauer, Warwick; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2016-05-23

    Human activities have substantially changed the world's oceans in recent decades, altering marine food webs, habitats and biogeochemical processes [1]. Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a unique set of biological traits, including rapid growth, short lifespans and strong life-history plasticity, allowing them to adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions [2-4]. There has been growing speculation that cephalopod populations are proliferating in response to a changing environment, a perception fuelled by increasing trends in cephalopod fisheries catch [4,5]. To investigate long-term trends in cephalopod abundance, we assembled global time-series of cephalopod catch rates (catch per unit of fishing or sampling effort). We show that cephalopod populations have increased over the last six decades, a result that was remarkably consistent across a highly diverse set of cephalopod taxa. Positive trends were also evident for both fisheries-dependent and fisheries-independent time-series, suggesting that trends are not solely due to factors associated with developing fisheries. Our results suggest that large-scale, directional processes, common to a range of coastal and oceanic environments, are responsible. This study presents the first evidence that cephalopod populations have increased globally, indicating that these ecologically and commercially important invertebrates may have benefited from a changing ocean environment. PMID:27218844

  3. Vertical nuclear proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sidel, Victor W

    2007-01-01

    All the nuclear-weapon states are working to develop new nuclear-weapon systems and upgrade their existing ones. Although the US Congress has recently blocked further development of small nuclear weapons and earth-penetrating nuclear weapons, the United States is planning a range of new warheads under the Reliable Replacement Warhead programme, and renewing its nuclear weapons infrastructure. The United Kingdom is spending 1 billion pounds sterling on updating the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston, and about 20 billion pounds sterling on replacing its Vanguard submarines and maintaining its Trident warhead stockpile. The US has withdrawn from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and plans to install missile defence systems in Poland and the Czech Republic; Russia threatens to upgrade its nuclear countermeasures. The nuclear-weapon states should comply with their obligations under Article VI of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, as summarised in the 13-point plan agreed at the 2000 NPT Review Conference, and they should negotiate a Nuclear Weapons Convention.

  4. Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    PubMed Central

    Agapie, Alexandru; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case—connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders—the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  5. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  6. Ultrastructural features of eosinophilic oesophagitis: impact of treatment on desmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Capocelli, Kelley E; Fernando, Shahan D; Menard-Katcher, Calies; Furuta, Glenn T; Masterson, Joanne C; Wartchow, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Aims A growing body of evidence suggests a role for altered epithelial barrier function in the pathophysiology of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but few have described the epithelial structure during inflammation. The purpose of this study was to define ultrastructural features of active, inactive EoE and control subject’s oesophageal epithelia. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy for evaluation of EoE. Mucosal pinch biopsies were obtained from the distal oesophagus and processed for routine histology and electron microscopic assessment. Clinical features of enrolled subjects were analysed and subjects were divided into four groups: normal, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), inactive EoE and active EoE. Representative photomicrographs of the basal and superficial epithelia were reviewed for abnormalities. Desmosomes were quantified on the surface of epithelia three to four prickle-cell layers above the basal layer. Results Twenty-nine paediatric cases (ages 2–18 years) were enrolled in the study. We observed a significant decrease in the number of desmosomes per cell (DPC) of subjects with active EoE compared with inactive EoE, GERD and normal epithelia. With respect to DPC, no significant differences were found between inactive EoE compared with GERD or normal subjects. Additional ultrastructural features observed included epithelial microplicae and evidence of eosinophil transmigration, degranulation, and sombrero formation. Conclusions Consistent with clinical and molecular findings, our ultrastructural data provide support for an altered oesophageal barrier in paediatric cases with active EoE, which may improve following treatment. PMID:25359789

  7. [Cellular adaptation and cancerogenesis].

    PubMed

    La Torre, F; Silpigni, A; Tomasello, R; Picone, G S; La Torre, I; Aragona, M

    1998-06-01

    The paper describes the main adaptive mechanisms involved in the carcinogenic process. As a result of the action of carcinogenic agents (physical, chemical, biological), and in relation to the functional status of the affected cells, a number of systems are triggered off: detoxification and conjugation systems, the metabolisation of the said agents, DNA repairing enzymes, increased shock proteins (HSP), the induction of clonal proliferation. All these systems are valuable to the survival of the body and the species and culminate in the apoptosis of damaged cells as the last attempt at adaptation of a social kind for the good of the body. When these compensation mechanisms prove ineffective, imprecise or are exceeded by cell adaptive capacity, the resulting structural and functional alterations trigger off (induction) a very long process which often lasts between one and two thirds of the body's life, in various stages, multistep and multifactorial: this neoplastic transformation leads to a purposeless, egoistic, anarchic proliferation of cells which wish to survive at all costs, even to the detriment of the body of which they form part. Following the exhaustion of cell adaptive defences, there is an accumulation of additional genetic alterations (promotion and progression), the cells become manifestly neoplastic and continue their egoistic adaptation, according to the laws of natural selection: the cells which survive are those which adapt best to the hostile environment of the host's body, which are unaffected by proliferation control mechanisms (contact inhibition, differentiation factors, apoptosis, etc.), which make the best of the growth factors present in their microenvironment, which accomplish the so-called decathlon of the metastatization process, namely acquiring new capacities which can overcome the basal membrane, invade tissues to which they are attracted and continue to proliferate. Manifestly neoplastic cells become not self at a later stage

  8. Peroxiredoxins, oxidative stress, and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Immenschuh, Stephan; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2005-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a family of multifunctional antioxidant thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases that have been identified in a large variety of organisms. The major functions of Prxs comprise cellular protection against oxidative stress, modulation of intracellular signaling cascades that apply hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger molecule, and regulation of cell proliferation. In the present review, we discuss pertinent findings on the protein structure, the cell- and tissue-specific distribution, as well as the subcellular localization of Prxs. A particular emphasis is put on Prx I, which is the most abundant and ubiquitously distributed member of the mammalian Prxs. Major transcriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathways that control Prx gene expression and activity are summarized. The interaction of Prx I with the oncogene products c-Abl and c-Myc and the regulatory role of Prx I for cell proliferation and apoptosis are highlighted. Recent findings on phenotypical alterations of mouse models with targeted disruptions of Prx genes are discussed, confirming the physiological functions of Prxs for antioxidant cell and tissue protection along with an important role as tumor suppressors.

  9. Insights into UV-induced apoptosis: ultrastructure, trichrome stain and spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marian L; Andringa, Anastasia; Dixon, Kathleen; Carty, Michael P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear substructures associated with apoptosis in HeLa cells have been examined using light-microscopic morphometry, trichrome staining, spectral imaging and transmission electron microscopy. This detailed analysis reveals several sites where alterations in the normal cellular ultrastructure occur during apoptotic progression. To correlate these ultrastructural changes with the underlying molecular processes, we have characterized and quantified apoptotic cell morphology with and without inhibition of two caspases, which are key effectors of the apoptotic program. Using this analysis, early apoptotic events included: (a) the segregation of nucleolar components, a diminished granular component, and a reduction in number but increase in size of fibrillar centers, (b) an increase in the number of cytoplasmic ribosomes and (c) a very minimal increase in the amount of peripherally condensed DNA. Apoptosis progressed with: (a) an increase in the number of perichromatin granules and perichromatin fibrils, (b) a reduction in number of interchromatin granule centers concomitant with an increase in their size, (c) partial digestion and circumferential condensation of the DNA at the nuclear membrane and (d) rounding of the cytoplasm with an increase in organellar density and shrinkage in cell size. Endstage apoptotic cells showed: (a) one (or two) very large pools of incompletely digested DNA, (b) one (or two) very large interchromatin granule centers, (c) an increased number of perichromatin granules which were distanced from DNA and often closely apposed to the nucleolus, (d) formation of unusually condensed, highly coiled perinucleolar bodies and (e) blebbing of highly dense cytoplasm. In HeLa cells treated with UV and inhibitors of caspase 1 and 3, the length of time from early apoptosis to the formation of apoptotic bodies was greatly extended. Inhibiting caspase activity: (a) prevented the pooling of DNA, (b) retarded the formation of large interchromatin granule

  10. Changes in root gravitropism, ultrastructure, and calcium balance of pea root statocytes induced by A23187

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    The role for calcium in the regulation of a wide variety of cellular events in plants is well known. Calcium signaling has been implicated in plant gravitropism. A carboxylic acid antibiotic A23187 (calcimycin) has been widely used in biological studies since it can translocate calcium across membranes. Seedlings of Pisum sativum L. cv. Uladovsky germinated in a vertically oriented cylinder of moist filter paper soaked in water during 4.5 day had been treated with 10-5 M A23187 for 12 hr. Tips of primary roots of control and A23187-treated pea seedlings were fixed for electron microscopy and electron cytochemistry. Experiments with Pisum sativum 5- day seedlings placed horizontally for 4 h after treatment with 10 μM A23187 during 12 h found that the graviresponsiveness of their primary roots was lost completely (91 % of roots) or inhibited (24 +/- 6° in comparison with 88 +/- 8° in control). At ultrastructural level, there were observed distribution of amyloplasts around the nucleus, remarkable lengthening of statocytes, advanced vacuolization, changes in dictyosome structure, ER fragmentation, cell wall thinning in A23187-treated statocytes. Cytochemical study has indicated that statocytes exposed to calcimycin have contained a number of Ca-pyroantimonate granules detected Ca 2 + ions in organelles and hyaloplasm (unlike the control ones). The deposits were mainly associated with the plasma membrane. Among organelles, mitochondria were notable for their ability to accumulate Ca 2 +. In amyloplasts, a fine precipitate was predominately located in their stroma and envelope lumens. In cell walls, deposits of the reaction product were observed along the periphery and in the median zone. Localization of electron-dense granules of lead phosphate, which indicated Ca 2 +- ATPase activities in pea statocytes exposed to A23187, was generally consistent with that in untreated roots. Apart from plasma membrane, chromatin, and nucleolus components, the cytochemical reaction

  11. Myoepithelial tumors of salivary glands: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and flow-cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Alós, L; Cardesa, A; Bombí, J A; Mallofré, C; Cuchi, A; Traserra, J

    1996-05-01

    histologic patterns and cellular features. Some immunohistochemical and ultrastructural characteristics have been found in all these neoplasms, which supports the idea that myoepitheliomas are composed by neoplastic modified myoepithelial cells, not fully differentiated. These techniques can be useful for the diagnosis of these tumors.

  12. [Ultrastructure and metabolic activity of pea mitochondria under clinorotation].

    PubMed

    Brykov, V A; Generozova, I P; Shugaev, A G

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data on the mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration in root apex as well as metabolic activity of the organelles isolated from pea seedling roots after 5-day of clinorotation are presented. It was shown that mitochondrial condensation in the distal elongation zone correlated with an increased rate of oxygen uptake on 7%. We also observed increase in rate of malate oxidation and respiratory control ratio increased simultaneously with a decreased in efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. Such character of mitochondrial rearrangements in simulated microgravity is assumed to be a consequence of adaptation to these conditions.

  13. Cytochemical and ultrastructural aspects of aquatic carnivorous plant turions.

    PubMed

    Płachno, Bartosz J; Adamec, Lubomír; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Swiątek, Piotr; Kamińska, Iwona

    2014-11-01

    Turions, which are modified shoot apices, are vegetative, dormant overwintering organs produced by perennial aquatic plants. In this study, the turion cytochemistry and ultrastructure of Aldrovanda vesiculosa, Utricularia vulgaris and U. stygia were compared with particular emphasis placed on storage substances. These three aquatic, rootless carnivorous plant species were studied at the end of their winter dormancy. At this stage, the turions of all species had starch as their main storage material. In contrast with A. vesiculosa, Utricularia turions were rich in protein storage vacuoles, and proteins were also accumulated as crystalline inclusions in the nuclei. All examined species accumulated lipid droplets in cells of epidermal glands.

  14. Gravity receptors - An ultrastructural basis for peripheral sensory processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Donovan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The present ultrastructural study of serial sections has shown that type II hair cells of the anterior part of the utricular macula are integrated into the afferent neural circuitry of type I cells, which are arranged in clusters. Additionally, there exists a complex system of intramacularly originating efferent-type nerve fibers and terminals. The findings, taken together, suggest that on morphological grounds, complex processing of sensory information occurs in gravity receptors. Asymmetry of such a complex system may contribute to motion and space-motion sickness.

  15. Ulcerative colitis: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    Rumessen, J J; Vanderwinden, J-M; Horn, T

    2010-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are key regulatory cells in the gut. In the colon of patients with severe ulcerative colitis (UC), myenteric ICC had myoid ultrastructural features and were in close contact with nerve terminals. In all patients as opposed to controls, some ICC profiles showed degenerative changes, such as lipid droplets and irregular vacuoles. Nerve terminals often appeared swollen and empty. Glial cells, muscle cells, and fibroblast-like cells (FLC) showed no alterations. FLC enclosed macrophages (MLC), which were in close contact with naked axon terminals. The organization and cytological changes may be of pathophysiological significance in patients with UC. PMID:20568987

  16. Ultrastructure of free-ending nerve fibres in oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Chillida, E M; Rodrigo, J; Mayo, I; Arnedo, A; Gómez, A

    1981-01-01

    For the first time, at the ultrastructural level, the existence of free-ending, intraepithelial nerve fibres has been demonstrated in the oesophagus wall of adult cats and monkeys. Their form, the way they penetrate the epithelium, their location within the epithelium and their relationships with neighbouring cells have been established. A sensory function is suggested for this type of ending. Images Figs. 1-4 Figs. 5-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Figs. 14-15 Figs. 16-17 PMID:7333951

  17. [Ketamine-induced ultrastructural changes in the retina].

    PubMed

    Magdolina, A

    1978-10-01

    Alterations of the retina caused by ketamin were studied in experiment. After a 60-minutes monoanaesthesia with ketamin ultrastructural changes were observed on the inner members of receptor cells, in the three nuclear layers and in the layer of nerve fibres. Severe damage to the structure of the Müller's glial cells providing nutrition to neural-elements was also revealed. Three days after the anaesthesia beside the regression of these alterations, glycogen deposits could be seen in the Müller's cells. This phenomenon and some side effects caused by ketamin can be explained by increased utilization of oxygen and relative hypoxia.

  18. Cogan's microcystic dystrophy of the cornea: ultrastructure and photomicroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Dark, A J

    1978-01-01

    Corneal biopsy specimens from 3 patients with Cogan's microcystic corneal dystrophy were examined by light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from corneas showing microcysts, geographic or map-like areas, and refractile striae. In all samples there is a bilaminate subepithelial layer of fibrogranular material, the friability of which is probably the basis for recurrent erosions in this disorder. Histochemical and ultrastructural findings provide further evidence that Cogan's dystrophy, the finger print/bleb dystrophy, and Meesmann's dystrophy should be regarded as separate entities. Images PMID:310689

  19. Cytochemical and ultrastructural aspects of aquatic carnivorous plant turions.

    PubMed

    Płachno, Bartosz J; Adamec, Lubomír; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Swiątek, Piotr; Kamińska, Iwona

    2014-11-01

    Turions, which are modified shoot apices, are vegetative, dormant overwintering organs produced by perennial aquatic plants. In this study, the turion cytochemistry and ultrastructure of Aldrovanda vesiculosa, Utricularia vulgaris and U. stygia were compared with particular emphasis placed on storage substances. These three aquatic, rootless carnivorous plant species were studied at the end of their winter dormancy. At this stage, the turions of all species had starch as their main storage material. In contrast with A. vesiculosa, Utricularia turions were rich in protein storage vacuoles, and proteins were also accumulated as crystalline inclusions in the nuclei. All examined species accumulated lipid droplets in cells of epidermal glands. PMID:24770880

  20. Ultrastructure of metacercarial cysts of six heterophyid trematodes from fish.

    PubMed

    Armitage, M H

    2000-12-01

    The ultrastructure of metacercarial cysts of Ascocotyle sexidigita. A. (Phagicola) diminuta, and Pygidiopsoides spindalis (herein described for the first time) collected from natural hosts in California was compared with that of cysts from A. tenuicollis (also described for the first time), A. pachycystis, and A. leighi collected from natural fish hosts in Mississippi. The results show that none of the cysts studied approximated the thick cyst produced by A. pachycystis, but all cysts comprised several layers of putative glycoprotein except for A. (P.) diminuta, which was associated with a single layer of spongy cyst wall.

  1. Lead induced ultrastructural changes in the testis of rats.

    PubMed

    Murthy, R C; Saxena, D K; Gupta, S K; Chandra, S V

    1991-01-01

    Oral lead administration (250 ppm lead acetate through drinking water) to weaning male rats for 70 days resulted in the marked accumulation of this metal in blood and testicular tissue. No marked changes were evident in light microscopy. Ultrastructural changes were revealed in the form of vacuolisation of Sertoli cell cytoplasm and increase in the number and size of lysosomes. Some of the vacuoles contained vesicle like structures. Although there was no impairment of spermatogenesis, the changes in the Sertoli cells may lead to changes in spermatogenesis after chronic exposure. PMID:1879517

  2. Ultrastructural and cytochemical identification of peroxisomes in Balantidium coli, Ciliophora.

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, B

    1997-01-01

    Peroxisomes of the trophozoites of Balantidium coli isolated from pig intestine content were investigated, using ultrastructural and cytochemical techniques. The peroxisomes of B. coli trophozoites from pigs with subclinical balantidiasis are less then 0.8 mm in diameter whereas those from pigs with acute balantidiasis are greater than 0.8 micron in diameter. In all the trophozoites peroxisomes are round, oval or dumb-bell shaped. Catalase as an indicative enzyme was detected by cytochemical techniques in B. coli peroxisomes. PMID:9643167

  3. Ultrastructural studies of unstable angina in living man

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlieb, A.I.; Freeman, M.R.; Salerno, T.A.; Lichtenstein, S.V.; Armstrong, P.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Nineteen patients with refractory unstable angina who were undergoing aortocoronary bypass were studied to assess the extent of platelet aggregation present in the microvasculature. Ultrastructural findings on the morphology of cardiac muscle and microvasculature were correlated with the findings on coronary angiograms and thallium scans. There were no significant correlations. The presence of platelet aggregates was identified in four biopsies, two of which had thrombus by angiographic criteria. Biopsy in areas with thallium defects revealed an increased prevalence of white blood cells without acute myocardial infarction. This study confirms the presence of platelet aggregates in patients with unstable angina, albeit at a reduced frequency when compared with autopsy studies.

  4. Lead induced ultrastructural changes in the testis of rats.

    PubMed

    Murthy, R C; Saxena, D K; Gupta, S K; Chandra, S V

    1991-01-01

    Oral lead administration (250 ppm lead acetate through drinking water) to weaning male rats for 70 days resulted in the marked accumulation of this metal in blood and testicular tissue. No marked changes were evident in light microscopy. Ultrastructural changes were revealed in the form of vacuolisation of Sertoli cell cytoplasm and increase in the number and size of lysosomes. Some of the vacuoles contained vesicle like structures. Although there was no impairment of spermatogenesis, the changes in the Sertoli cells may lead to changes in spermatogenesis after chronic exposure.

  5. Ultrastructural nonisotopic mapping of nucleolar transcription sites in onion protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Melcák, I; Risueño, M C; Raska, I

    1996-01-01

    The post- and preembedding ultrastructural localization of transcribing rRNA genes has been carried out in nucleoli of permeabilized onion growing root tip protoplasts by means of the nonisotopic bromouridine method. By means of both post- and preembedding approaches, major synthetic sites were identified with morphologically distinct subdomains of dense fibrillar components, with some signal also being associated with nucleolar fibrillar centers and vacuoles. Moreover, labeled medusoid fibrils within distinct domains seen in Lowicryl thin sections likely represent the morphological correlate of transcribing nucleolar genes. PMID:8812981

  6. Piezo proteins: regulators of mechanosensation and other cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2014-11-14

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature.

  7. Ultrastructural changes and Heat Shock Proteins 70 induced by atmospheric pollution are similar to the effects observed under in vitro heavy metals stress in Conocephalum conicum (Marchantiales--Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Sorbo, Sergio; Conte, Barbara; Cardi, Manuela; Esposito, Sergio

    2013-11-01

    Changes in ultrastructure and induction of Heat Shock Proteins 70 have been studied in Conocephalum conicum (Marchantiales) collected in different urban and country sites in Italy. These results were compared to the effects in vitro of exposition to different heavy metals for several days. At urban sites, cellular ultrastructure was modified, and heavy metals could be observed accumulating in cell walls. Simultaneously, a strong increment in Hsp70 was detected, compared with results observed on control specimens. When C. conicum was exposed to heavy metals in vitro, comparable effects as in polluted sites were observed: Cd and Pb accumulated mostly within parenchyma and, within cells, were absorbed to cell walls or concentrated in vacuoles. Moreover, severe alterations were observed in organelles. Concomitantly, a progressive accumulation of Hsp70 was detected following heavy metals exposition. These effects are discussed in order to describe the dose and time-dependent response to heavy metal stress in C. conicum.

  8. Nitrogen anabolism underlies the importance of glutaminolysis in proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Meng; Chen, Shuyang; Lao, Taotao; Liang, Dongming; Sang, Nianli

    2010-10-01

    Glutaminolysis and Warburg effect are the two most noticeable metabolic features of tumor cells whereas their biological significance in cell proliferation remains elusive. A widely accepted current hypothesis is that tumor cells use glutamine as a preferred carbon source for energy and reducing power, which has been used to explain both glutaminolysis and the Warburg effect. Here we provide evidence to show that supplying nitrogen, not the carbon skeleton, underlies the major biological importance of glutaminolysis for proliferating cells. We show alternative nitrogen supplying mechanisms rescue cell proliferation in glutamine-free media. Particularly, we show that ammonia is sufficient to maintain a long-term survival and proliferation of Hep3B in glutamine-free media. We also observed that nitrogen source restriction repressed carbon metabolic pathways including glucose utilization. Based on these new observations and metabolic pathways well established in published literature, we propose an alternative model that cellular demand for glutamate as a key molecule in nitrogen anabolism is the driving force of glutaminolysis in proliferating cells. Our model suggests that the Warburg effect may be a metabolic consequence secondary to the nitrogen anabolism.

  9. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  10. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  11. Material properties of brachiopod shell ultrastructure by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Cusack, Maggie; Zhu, Wenzhong; England, Jennifer; Hughes, John

    2007-02-22

    Mineral-producing organisms exert exquisite control on all aspects of biomineral production. Among shell-bearing organisms, a wide range of mineral fabrics are developed reflecting diverse modes of life that require different material properties. Our knowledge of how biomineral structures relate to material properties is still limited because it requires the determination of these properties on a detailed scale. Nanoindentation, mostly applied in engineering and materials science, is used here to assess, at the microstructural level, material properties of two calcite brachiopods living in the same environment but with different modes of life and shell ultrastructure. Values of hardness (H) and the Young modulus of elasticity (E) are determined by nanoindentation. In brachiopod shells, calcite semi-nacre provides a harder and stiffer structure (H approximately 3-6 GPa; E=60-110/120 GPa) than calcite fibres (H=0-3 GPa; E=20-60/80 GPa). Thus, brachiopods with calcite semi-nacre can cement to a substrate and remain immobile during their adult life cycle. This correlation between mode of life and material properties, as a consequence of ultrastructure, begins to explain why organisms produce a wide range of structures using the same chemical components, such as calcium carbonate.

  12. Vanadium induced ultrastructural changes and apoptosis in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M A; Ayala, M E; Fortoul, T I; Bizarro, P; Altamirano-Lozano, M

    2005-01-01

    Vanadium is a transition metal that is emitted to the atmosphere during combustion of fossil fuels. In the environment, vanadium occurs in the (V) oxidized form, but in the body it is found exclusively in the (IV) oxidized form. Vanadium tetraoxide is an inorganic chemical species in the (IV) oxidized form that has been shown to induce toxic effects in vitro and in vivo. The reproductive toxicity of vanadium in males was studied through monitoring germ cell apoptosis during spermatogenesis. We analyzed ultrastructural damage, and testosterone and progesterone concentrations following vanadium tetraoxide administered to male mice for 60 days. Spermatogenesis stages I-III and X-XII frequently showed apoptotic germ cells in control and treated animals; vanadium tetraoxide treatment induced an increase in the number of germ cell apoptosis in stages I-III and XII at 9.4 and 18.8 mg/kg, respectively. Although spermatogenesis is regulated by testosterone, in our study this hormone level was not modified by vanadium administration; thus, germ cell death was not related with testosterone concentration. At the ultrastructural level, we observed inclusion structures that varied as to location and content in the Sertoli and germ cells. PMID:15808796

  13. Ultrastructure of Leydig cells in human ageing testes.

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, R; Amat, P; Nistal, M; Martin, A

    1986-01-01

    Ultrastructural study of Leydig cells in elderly men revealed the following Leydig cell types: (1) ultrastructurally normal Leydig cells (46.2%); (2) Leydig cells either with multiple cytoplasmic or intranuclear Reinke crystals or with numerous para-crystalline inclusions (6.1%); (3) multivacuolated Leydig cells with the cytoplasm almost filled by lipid droplets (16.7%; (4) dedifferentiated Leydig cells with poor development of agranular endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and increased amounts of lipofuscin granules (22.3%); and (5) bi- or trinucleate Leydig cells (8.7%) showing either a normal (2.8%) or dedifferentiated (5.9%) cytoplasm. These results suggest an involution of Leydig cells with advancing age. A correlation between the proportion of altered Leydig cells and the decrease in testosterone and increase in luteinising hormone levels could be observed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Figs. 6-7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:3693056

  14. Ultrastructural study of mixed growth hormone & prolactin secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C; Dinda, A K; Roy, S; Kochupillai, N; Kharbanda, K; Tandon, P N

    1992-08-01

    An ultrastructural study was done on 15 mixed growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas surgically removed from acromegalic patients with hyper-prolactinaemia, in order to see whether the 2 hormones were present in the same cell or in different cells. Double labelling immunogold technique was used for simultaneous ultrastructural localization of GH and PRL. It was found that each neoplastic cell in these 15 tumours (30 to 50 cells were studied in each case) contained 4 populations of granules viz., (i) granules positive for only GH; (ii) granules positive for only PRL; (iii) granules positive for both GH and PRL; and (iv) granules negative for both GH and PRL (unlabelled). Though the relative percentage of these 4 types of granules varied from cell to cell even within the same tumour, the major population (49.9 to 96%) was constituted by the mixed granules showing labelling for both GH and PRL. Almost all the cells examined from each tumour appeared to be mammosomatotrophs. Thus, the study indicated that mammosomatotroph adenomas are perhaps more common among mixed GH and PRL--secreting pituitary adenomas than previously believed. It could be important to recognize these tumours from the therapeutic point of view.

  15. Ultrastructural Changes of the Smooth Muscle in Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shraim, Mubarak M; Eid, Refaat A; Musalam, Adel Osman; Radad, Khaled; Ibrahim, Ashraf H M; Malki, Talal A

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) is a relatively rare congenital anomaly. Despite the advances in the management techniques and neonatal intensive care, esophageal dysmotility remains a very common problem following EA/TEF repair. Our current study aimed to describe the most significant ultrastructural changes of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) trying to highlight some of the underlying mechanisms of esophageal dysmotility following EA/TEF repair. Twenty-three biopsies were obtained from the tip of the lower esophageal pouch (LEP) of 23 patients during primary repair of EA/TEF. Light microscopic examination was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), and Van Gieson's stains. Ultrastructural examination was done using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histopathological examination showed distortion of smooth muscle layer and deposition of an abundant amount of fibrous tissue in-between smooth muscles. Using TEM, SMCs exhibited loss of the cell-to-cell adhesion, mitochondrial vacuolation, formation of myelin figures, and apoptotic fragmentation. There were also plasmalemmal projections and formation of ghost bodies. Interestingly, SMCs were found extending pseudopodia-like projections around adjacent collagen fibers. Engulfed collagen fibers by SMCs underwent degradation within autophagic vacuoles. Degeneration of SMCs and deposition of abundant extracellular collagen fibers are prominent pathological changes in LEP of EA/TEF. These changes might contribute to the pathogenesis of esophageal dysmotility in patients who have survived EA/TEF. PMID:26548437

  16. Delayed postburn blisters: an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Bergman, R; David, R; Ramon, Y; Ramon, M; Kerner, H; Kilim, S; Peled, I; Friedman-Birnbaum, R

    1997-08-01

    This study was performed in an attempt to further elucidate the pathogenesis of delayed postburn blistering. Two cases were studied ultrastructurally and immunohistochemically, 1 with blisters on the recipient site of autologous split-thickness skin grafts and the other on the donor site. Ultrastructurally, the basement membrane was on the roof of the blisters in both cases, except for a single small blister in the first case where it was on the dermal floor. In the blister roofs, the basement membrane showed small or marked segments of discontinuity. In the adjacent non-blistered healed skin, the basement membrane was usually continuous, and anchoring fibrils were present. Immunoperoxidase staining on frozen sections, using antibodies to laminin, laminin 5, collagen IV, and collagen VII, showed a mostly continuous linear pattern in the adjacent non-blistered skin, which often became discontinuous near the blisters and markedly discontinuous in the blister roofs. In the blister floors, weakly stained linear or granular deposits of some of these components were sometimes also present. The results of this study support discontinuity of the basement membrane as the main anomaly in delayed postburn blistering. Disturbance in the reassembly or local breakdown of the basement membrane components might be the underlying defect.

  17. Intrapulmonary distribution of inhaled chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos: ultrastructural features.

    PubMed Central

    Oghiso, Y.; Kagan, E.; Brody, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    Although all commercial types of asbestos can cause pulmonary fibrosis, little is known about ultrastructural differences in the evolution of pulmonary lesions induced by amphiboles and serpentines. The present study was designed to compare the histological and ultrastructural effects produced by chronic inhalation of either crocidolite (amphibole) or chrysotile (serpentine) asbestos in the rat. Animals, exposed by intermittent inhalation for 3 months, were killed after 2 to 16 months. When inhaled, both types of asbestos caused thickened alveolar duct bifurcations associated with macrophage aggregates. Crocidolite inhalation also produced subpleural collections of alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes. Electron microscopy revealed some similarities, but also distinct differences, in the pulmonary distribution of inhaled chrysotile and crocidolite. Whereas both asbestos varieties were identified within the pulmonary interstitium, only crocidolite was detected inside alveolar macrophages. Chrysotile fibres were seen infrequently within the vascular compartment. Microcalcifications were noted after chrysotile inhalation, but were never observed following crocidolite exposure. Both asbestos types induced slight pulmonary fibrosis. These findings indicate that crocidolite and chrysotile produce different pathogenetic features, although both are fibrogenic. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 5 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:6087872

  18. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  19. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural detection of intestinal spirochetes in Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Ueno, Takanori; Katayama, Yoshinari; Ohya, Tatsuo; Taharaguchi, Sadao; Yamamoto, Shinji; Umemura, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshiharu; Kadota, Koichi

    2005-03-01

    Studies of equine intestinal spirochetes have long focused on intestinal contents alone, but intestinal spirochetosis has been reported recently in a 21-month-old Thoroughbred colt in Japan. To define the clinical and pathological significances of intestinal spirochetosis in several horses, an epizootiologic survey with histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods was conducted for Brachyspira antigen-containing intestinal spirochetes in 12 diseased or injured Thoroughbred horses, aged from 35 days to 17 years. Brachyspira antigen-containing spirochetes were found in 7 of 12 horses (58.3%) and were more frequent in the cecum than in other parts of the bowel. It was not clear whether the infection was clinically related to diarrhea or dysentery, but histopathology revealed a close association between the bacterial infection and epithelial hyperplasia. Crypt epithelium consisted mainly of goblet cells and showed frequent mitosis throughout its length. Inflammatory cells and congestion were also present. There were numerous spirochetes in the crypts, and some invaded the cecal and colonic epithelia and underlying lamina propria. Ultrastructurally, the spirochetes were divided into 4 types. Three types were identified in degenerative epithelial cells or intracellularly. Brachyspira antigen-containing intestinal spirochetes invading the mucosa were capable of causing epithelial hyperplasia in the cecum and colon in the horses. The findings in this study will increase awareness of the importance of intestinal spirochetosis and may also be helpful for diagnosis and treatment of this condition. PMID:15825495

  20. Nanogold labeling of the yeast endosomal system for ultrastructural analyses.

    PubMed

    Mari, Muriel; Griffith, Janice; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2014-07-14

    Endosomes are one of the major membrane sorting checkpoints in eukaryotic cells and they regulate recycling or destruction of proteins mostly from the plasma membrane and the Golgi. As a result the endosomal system plays a central role in maintaining cell homeostasis, and mutations in genes belonging to this network of organelles interconnected by vesicular transport, cause severe pathologies including cancer and neurobiological disorders. It is therefore of prime relevance to understand the mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and organization of the endosomal system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been pivotal in this task. To specifically label and analyze at the ultrastructural level the endosomal system of this model organism, we present here a detailed protocol for the positively charged nanogold uptake by spheroplasts followed by the visualization of these particles through a silver enhancement reaction. This method is also a valuable tool for the morphological examination of mutants with defects in endosomal trafficking. Moreover, it is not only applicable for ultrastructural examinations but it can also be combined with immunogold labelings for protein localization investigations.

  1. Ultrastructural observation of oocytes in six types of stony corals.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sujune; Chang, Wei-Chieh; Chavanich, Suchana; Viyakarn, Voranop; Lin, Chiahsin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the ultrastructure of the oocytes of 6 types of scleractinian corals was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Moreover, histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed to improve our understanding of the organelles involved in coral oocyte formation. In all 6 stony coral species, the microvilli were tubular and directly grew from the surface of the oocyte membrane; yolk bodies, lipid granules, and cortical alveoli accounted for most of the volume inside the oocytes, suggesting that they are associated with energy storage and buoyancy. Clear differences were observed in the size of yolk bodies and lipid granules in the oocytes of the 6 stony coral species, which occupied approximately 55%-80% of the inner space of the oocytes. Galaxea fascicularis exhibited the largest lipid granule volume, but the oocytes contained only an average number of 12.45 lipid granules per unit area. Only Montipora incrassata oocytes contained symbiotic algae. The smallest size and proportion of lipid granules in M. incrassata oocytes may be attributed to the presence of symbiotic algae and large yolk bodies, which may help oocytes produce energy and function as a nutritional source. This study is crucial for improving the understanding of the basic biology of coral reproduction, and the ensuing datasets is critical for conservation-oriented studies seeking to cryopreserve corals during these times of dramatic global climate change. PMID:27265208

  2. Physicochemical design of the morphology and ultrastructure of cellulose beads.

    PubMed

    Trygg, Jani; Fardim, Pedro; Gericke, Martin; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose was dissolved in NaOH-urea-water and beads were prepared by coagulation into nitric acid as well as saline solution. Morphology and ultrastructure of the beads were modified by controlling the molarity of the acid (0-10M) and temperature (5-50°C) of the coagulation media and the cellulose concentration (3-7%). The beads were characterized by optical image analysis (shape, volume, and size distribution) and weight (total porosity). Cross-sections of CO2 critical point dried beads were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and specific surface areas of 336-470m(2)g(-1) were determined from nitrogen adsorption isoterms. Pore size distribution was analyzed using solute exclusion technique. Our results demonstrate that the ultrastructure can be controlled by alteration of the coagulation conditions. Changes in size, shape and surface area were substential. Also generation of micro- (⩽2Å), meso-, or macropores (⩾50Å) can be favored.

  3. Cyanobacterial ultrastructure in light of genomic sequence data.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Esquer, C R; Smarda, J; Rippka, R; Axen, S D; Guglielmi, G; Gugger, M; Kerfeld, C A

    2016-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are physiologically and morphologically diverse photosynthetic microbes that play major roles in the carbon and nitrogen cycles of the biosphere. Recently, they have gained attention as potential platforms for the production of biofuels and other renewable chemicals. Many cyanobacteria were characterized morphologically prior to the advent of genome sequencing. Here, we catalog cyanobacterial ultrastructure within the context of genomic sequence information, including high-magnification transmission electron micrographs that represent the diversity in cyanobacterial morphology. We place the image data in the context of tabulated protein domains-which are the structural, functional, and evolutionary units of proteins-from the 126 cyanobacterial genomes comprising the CyanoGEBA dataset. In particular, we identify the correspondence between ultrastructure and the occurrence of genes encoding protein domains related to the formation of cyanobacterial inclusions. This compilation of images and genome-level domain occurrence will prove useful for a variety of analyses of cyanobacterial sequence data and provides a guidebook to morphological features. PMID:27344651

  4. Ultrastructure as a Control for Protistan Molecular Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Taylor

    1999-10-01

    A variety of molecular sequences and treeing methods have been used in attempts to unravel early protistan evolution and the origins of "higher" eukaryotic taxa. How does one know which approach is closest to the real phylogenetic tree? Obviously it is the robustness of its resulting trees, the coherence with other data sets, both structural and molecular, that is the test. Simply put: it should make biological sense. It seems evident, comparing morphology, especially ultrastructure, with ribosomal DNA trees, that the major lineages have now been confirmed. In particular, the remarkably conservative mitochondrial crista type in protists is coherent with mitochondrial DNA sequences. Several amitochondrial groups, presumed to be primitive on the basis of SSU ribosomal DNA, show alarming positional volatility when other genes are used. In addition, the presence of mitochondrial genes in the nucleus of several amitochondrial flagellates raises doubts about them being primordially amitochondrial. Consequently, the root of the eukaryote tree is still in question. A disturbing question arises: can loss of features in parasitism mimic primitiveness not only in a morphological but also in a molecular way, evolving more rapidly and creating long branches that methodologically place them basal in the trees? Conflicting molecular phylogenies cannot be resolved by molecular data alone. Morpholological, especially ultrastructural, data are an essential component of phylogenetic reconstruction.

  5. Cortical ultrastructure and chemoreception in ciliated protists (Ciliophora).

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, L A

    1992-08-01

    The ciliated protists (ciliates) offer a unique opportunity to explore the relationship between chemoreception and cell structure. Ciliates resemble chemosensory neurons in their responses to stimuli and presence of cilia. Ciliates have highly patterned surfaces that should permit precise localization of chemoreceptors in relation to effector organelles. Furthermore, ciliates are easy to grow and to manipulate genetically; they can also be readily studied biochemically and by electrophysiological techniques. This review contains a comparative description of the ultrastructural features of the ciliate cell surface relevant to chemoreception, examines the structural features of putative chemoreceptive cilia, and provides a summary of the electron microscopic information available so far bearing on chemoreceptive aspects of swimming, feeding, excretion, endocytosis, and sexual responses of ciliates. The electron microscopic identification and localization of specific chemoreceptive macromolecules and organelles at the molecular level have not yet been achieved in ciliates. These await the development of specific probes for chemoreceptor and transduction macromolecules. Nevertheless, the electron microscope has provided a wealth of information about the surface features of ciliates where chemoreception is believed to take place. Such morphological information will prove essential to a complete understanding of reception and transduction at the molecular level. In the ciliates, major questions to be answered relate to the apportionment of chemoreceptive functions between the cilia and cell soma, the global distribution of receptors in relation to the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral, and left-right axes of the cell, and the relationship of receptors to ultrastructural components of the cell coat, cell membrane, and cytoskeleton.

  6. Spermatozoon ultrastructure of Thysanotaenia congolensis (Cyclophyllidea, Anoplocephalidae, Inermicapsiferinae): phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Jordi; Świderski, Zdzisław; Feliu, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The mature spermatozoon of Thysanotaenia congolensis, an intestinal parasite of black rat Rattus rattus from Cape Verde, is described by means of transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructural organization of the sperm cell of T. congolensis follows Levron et al.'s type VII of the Eucestoda. It corresponds to a uniflagellate spermatozoon that presents crested bodies, periaxonemal sheath and intracytoplasmic walls, spiralled cortical microtubules and nucleus spiralled around the axoneme. These characteristics are also present in the spermatozoa of other inermicapsiferines and differ from the characters found in species belonging to the remaining subfamilies of anoplocephalids, namely Anoplocephalinae, Linstowiinae and Thysanosomatinae. Several authors consider the family Anoplocephalidae as a polyphyletic group, and its relationships with the Davaineidae are a matter of controversy. The phylogenetic implications of spermatological ultrastructural features present in inermicapsiferines and in the remaining anoplocephalids are discussed, and the available data on anoplocephalids are compared to similar results in davaineids in order to contribute to a better knowledge of relationships between these cyclophyllidean families. PMID:27083191

  7. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural evidence of functional organization along the Corydoras paleatus intestine.

    PubMed

    Plaul, Silvia E; Pastor, Raquel; Díaz, Alcira O; Barbeito, Claudio G

    2016-03-01

    The Neotropical catfish, Corydoras paleatus (Callichthyidae) is a facultative air-breathing teleost that makes use of the caudal portion of the intestine as an accessory air-breathing organ. This portion is highly modified, being well vascularized with capillaries between epithelial cells, which makes it well suited for gas exchange. Instead, the cranial portion is a digestion and absorption site, as it has a typical intestinal epithelium with columnar cells arranged in a single row, villi and less vascularized tunica mucosa. Therefore, the intestine was studied by light and electron microscopy to assess differences between the cranial, middle and caudal portions. To characterize the potential for cell proliferation of this organ, we used anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen antibody and anti-Na(+) K(+) -ATPase monoclonal antibody to detect the presence of Na(+) /K(+) pump. In C. paleatus it was observed that cell dynamics showed a decreasing gradient of proliferation in cranio-caudal direction. Also, the intestine of this catfish is an important organ in ionoregulation: the basolateral Na(+) /K(+) pump may have an active role, transporting Na(+) out of the cell while helping to maintain the repose potential and to regulate cellular volume.

  8. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  9. Dietary bovine lactoferrin increases intestinal cell proliferation in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Elizabeth A; Comstock, Sarah S; Yi, Cuiyi; Contractor, Nikhat; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-09-01

    Lactoferrin is a bioactive milk protein that stimulates cell proliferation in vitro; however, limited in vivo evidence exists to allow lactoferrin to be incorporated into infant formula. Herein, the effect of dietary bovine lactoferrin (bLF) on neonatal intestinal growth and maturation was investigated guided by the hypothesis that bLF would increase cellular proliferation leading to functional differences in neonatal piglets. Colostrum-deprived piglets were fed formula containing 0.4 [control (Ctrl)], 1.0 (LF1), or 3.6 (LF3) g bLF/L for the first 7 or 14 d of life. To provide passive immunity, sow serum was provided orally during the first 36 h of life. Intestinal cell proliferation, histomorphology, mucosal DNA concentration, enzyme activity, gene expression, and fecal bLF content were measured. Intestinal enzyme activity, DNA concentration, and villus length were unaffected by bLF. However, crypt proliferation was 60% greater in LF1- and LF3-fed piglets than in Ctrl piglets, and crypt depth and area were 20% greater in LF3-fed piglets than in Ctrl piglets. Crypt cells from LF3-fed piglets had 3-fold higher β-catenin mRNA expression than did crypt cells from Ctrl piglets. Last, feces of piglets fed bLF contained intact bLF, suggesting that some bLF was resistant to digestion and could potentially affect intestinal proliferation through direct interaction with intestinal epithelial cells. This study is the first to our knowledge to show that dietary bLF stimulates crypt cell proliferation in vivo. The increased β-catenin expression indicates that Wnt signaling may in part mediate the stimulatory effect of bLF on intestinal cell proliferation. PMID:25056692

  10. The thorny path linking cellular senescence to organismalaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Christopher K.; Mian, Saira; Campisi, Judith

    2005-08-09

    Half a century is fast approaching since Hayflick and colleagues formally described the limited ability of normal human cells to proliferate in culture (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961). This finding--that normal somatic cells, in contrast to cancer cells, cannot divide indefinitely--challenged the prevailing idea that cells from mortal multicellular organisms were intrinsically ''immortal'' (Carrell, 1912). It also spawned two hypotheses, essential elements of which persist today. The first held that the restricted proliferation of normal cells, now termed cellular senescence, suppresses cancer (Hayflick, 1965; Sager, 1991; Campisi, 2001). The second hypothesis, as explained in the article by Lorenzini et al., suggested that the limited proliferation of cells in culture recapitulated aspects of organismal aging (Hayflick, 1965; Martin, 1993). How well have these hypotheses weathered the ensuing decades? Before answering this question, we first consider current insights into the causes and consequences of cellular senescence. Like Lorenzini et al., we limit our discussion to mammals. We also focus on fibroblasts, the cell type studied by Lorenzini et al., but consider other types as well. We suggest that replicative capacity in culture is not a straightforward assessment, and that it correlates poorly with both longevity and body mass. We speculate this is due to the malleable and variable nature of replicative capacity, which renders it an indirect metric of qualitative and quantitative differences among cells to undergo senescence, a response that directly alters cellular phenotype and might indirectly alter tissue structure and function.

  11. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2016-07-12

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. Ultrastructural characterization of the optic pathway in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis-1 optic glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, K Y; Ju, W K; Hegedus, B; Gutmann, D H; Ellisman, M H

    2010-09-29

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the progression of changes in retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve glia in neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) genetically-engineered mice with optic glioma. Optic glioma tumors were generated in Nf1+/- mice lacking Nf1 expression in GFAP+ cells (astrocytes). Standard immunohistochemistry methods were employed to identify astrocytes (GFAP, S100beta), proliferating progenitor cells (sox2, nestin), microglia (Iba1), endothelial cells (CD31) and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons (Neurofilament 68k) in Nf1+/-, Nf1(GFAP)CKO (wild-type mice with Nf1 loss in glial cells), and Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO (Nf1+/- mice with Nf1 loss in glial cells) mice. Ultrastructural changes in the optic chiasm and nerve were assessed by electron microscopy (EM). RGC were counted in whole retina preparations using high-resolution, mosaic confocal microscopy following their delineation by retrograde FluoroGold labeling. We found that only Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO mice exhibited gross pre-chiasmatic optic nerve and chiasm enlargements containing aggregated GFAP+/nestin+ and S100beta+/sox2+ cells (neoplastic glia) as well as increased numbers of blood vessels and microglia. Optic gliomas in Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO mice contained axon fiber irregularities and multilamellar bodies of degenerated myelin. EM and EM tomographic analyses showed increased glial disorganization, disoriented axonal projections, profiles of degenerating myelin and structural alterations at nodes of Ranvier. Lastly, we found reduced RGC numbers in Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO mice, supporting a model in which the combination of optic nerve Nf1 heterozygosity and glial cell Nf1 loss results in disrupted axonal-glial relationships, subsequently culminating in the degeneration of optic nerve axons and loss of their parent RGC neurons. PMID:20600672

  14. Ultrastructural evaluation of mesenchymal stem cells from inflamed periodontium in different in vitro conditions.

    PubMed

    Zaganescu, Raluca; Barbu Tudoran, Lucian; Pall, Emoke; Florea, Adrian; Roman, Alexandra; Soanca, Andrada; Mihaela Mihu, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed to observe the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from periodontal granulation tissue (gt) when manipulated ex vivo to induce three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (aggregates) formation as well as when seeded on two bone scaffolds of animal origin. Periodontal gt was chosen as a MSC source because of its availability, considering that it is eliminated as a waste material during conventional surgical therapies. 3D aggregates of cells were generated; they were grown for 3 and 7 days, respectively, and then prepared for transmission electron microscopic analysis. The two biomaterials were seeded for 72 h with gtMSCs and prepared for scanning electronic microscopic observation. The ultrastructural analysis of 3D spheroids remarked some differences between the inner and the outer cell layers, with a certain commitment observed at the inner cells. Both scaffolds showed a relatively smooth surface at low magnification. Macro- and micropores having a scarce distribution were observed on both bone substitutes. gtMSCs grew with relative difficulty on the biomaterials. After 72 h of proliferation, gtMSCs scarcely covered the surface of bovine bone scaffolds, demonstrating fibroblast-like or star-like shapes with elongated filiform extensions. Our results add other data on the possible usefulness of gtMSC and could question the current paradigm regarding the complete removal of chronically inflamed gts from the defects during periodontal surgeries. Until optimal protocols for ex vivo manipulation of MSCs are available for clinical settings, it is advisable to use biocompatible bone substitutes that allow the development of progenitor cells.

  15. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  16. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  17. Simvastatin Modulates Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zanette, Dalila Lucíola; Lorenzi, Julio Cesar Cetrulo; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Palma, Patricia Vianna Bonini; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Prata, Karen Lima; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy) minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR). These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential. PMID:25874574

  18. The cell-cycle dependence of the spectra of proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells using confocal resonance Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Alfano, Robert R.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal resonance Raman (RR) spectra were collected from single proliferating cells and analyzed to detect spectral patterns that are cell-cycle dependent, as a consequence of cellular proliferation — normal or abnormal. The cells' biochemical age at each time point was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining to identify the presence or absence of cellular components that appear and/or disappear as the cells proceed through the cell-cycle. The RR spectra were collected and compared for each time point as the cells proceeded through the cell cycle to determine what spectral vibrational patterns are cell-cycle dependent. In this study, the question is whether the cell-cycle dependent RR spectral patterns of the vibrational modes observed in proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells are due to a state of cancer or are simply the consequences of the cells' changing internal biochemistry due to the process of cellular proliferation --- normal or abnormal.

  19. Antioxidant activity and ultrastructural changes in gastric cancer cell lines induced by Northeastern Thai edible folk plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    cytotoxicity in vitro on cancer cells but not on normal cell lines as resolved in tissue culture and ultrastructural analysis. This is the first report to show the effect on cellular alteration as apoptosis of an ethyl acetate extract of S. gratum and J. gangetica. Further studies are now focused on individual isolates and their function, prioritizing on S. gratum and J. gangetica for the development of novel therapeutics and combatants against cancer. PMID:23497063

  20. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  1. Spinosad Induces Antioxidative Response and Ultrastructure Changes in Males of Red Palm Weevil Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Salaheldin A.; Alzahrani, Abdullah M.; Elmenshawy, Omar M.; Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M.

    2016-01-01

    The red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, is of great concern worldwide, especially in the Middle East, where dates are a strategic crop. Despite their ecological hazard, insecticides remain the most effective means of control. A bioinsecticide of bacterial origin, spinosad is effective against several pests, and its efficacy against male R. ferrugineus was assessed in the present study. The antioxidative responses of key enzymes including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) to spinosad were investigated in the midgut and testes, and the effects of this insecticide on the cell ultrastructure of the midgut, Malpighian tubules, and testes were also determined. The lethal concentration 50 of spinosad was measured at 58.8 ppm, and the insecticide inhibited the activities of CAT, SOD, and GST in the midgut. However, no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes were observed in the testes. Spinosad treatment resulted in concentration-dependent changes in the cellular organelles of the midgut, Malpighian tubules, and testes of R. ferrugineus, and some of these effects were similar to those exerted by other xenobiotics. However, specific changes were observed as a result of spinosad treatment, including an increase in the number and size of concretions in Malpighian tubule cells and the occasional absence of the central pair of microtubules in the axonemes of sperm tails. This study introduces spinosad for potential use as an insecticide within an integrated control program against male red palm weevils. Additionally, the study provides biochemical and ultrastructural evidence for use in the development of bioindicators.

  2. Effect of losartan with folic acid on plasma homocysteine and vascular ultrastructural changes in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihe; Yu, Jiong; Jia, Baofu; Zhao, Feng; Tang, Mengmeng; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Feiyan

    2015-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) is a high risk factor of hypertension due to its function in endothelial dysfunction. Its level in the blood is strongly influenced by folic acid. In order to investigate the effects of losartan with folic acid on plasma level of Hcy and vascular ultrastructural changes, thirty spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) involved and randomly divided into three groups (n=10): SHR-C group (control), SHR-L group (losartan 25 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)), SHR-L+Y group (losartan 25 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1) + folic acid 0.4 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)). Another 10 Wistar Rats involved as WKY-C group for normal control. The level of plasma Hcy was measured dynamically by LS-MS, the vascular ultrastructural changes were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. Moreover, the thickness and area of aorta was measured. The results showed the Hcy levels in four groups were WKY-C 7.49 ± 1.95 μmol/L; SHR-C 8.45 ± 1.90 μmol/L; SHR-L 8.28 ± 2.11 μmol/L; SHR-L+Y 7.53 ± 2.02 μmol/L at 80 days. There was no significant change for plasma Hcy (P>0.05). The morphological change showed the subendothelial space didn't increased significantly, the endothelial cells have a more smooth and intact cellular membrane in SHR-L+Y group. In conclusion, Losartan combined with folic acid could improve arterial endothelial structure in SHR which has no significant correlation with plasma Hcy.

  3. Ultrastructural features of collagen in thyroid carcinoma tissue observed by polarization second harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tokarz, Danielle; Cisek, Richard; Golaraei, Ahmad; Asa, Sylvia L.; Barzda, Virginijus; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in collagen ultrastructure between malignant and normal human thyroid tissue were investigated ex vivo using polarization second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. The second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility tensor component ratio and the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) of the SHG signal were measured. The ratio values are related to the collagen ultrastructure, while DOLP indicates the relative amount of coherent signal and incoherent scattering of SHG. Increase in ratio values and decrease in DOLP were observed for tumor tissue compared to normal thyroid, indicating higher ultrastructural disorder in tumor collagen. PMID:26417516

  4. How effectively does a clinostat mimic the ultrastructural effects of microgravity on plant cells?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Columella cells of seedlings of Zea mays L. cv. Bear Hybrid grown in the microgravity of orbital flight allocate significantly larger relative-volumes to hyaloplasm and lipid bodies, and significantly smaller relative-volumes to dictyosomes, plastids, and starch than do columella cells of seedlings grown at 1 g. The ultrastructure of columella cells of seedlings grown at 1 g and on a rotating clinostat is not significantly different. However, the ultrastructure of cells exposed to these treatments differs significantly from that of seedlings grown in microgravity. These results indicate that the actions of a rotating clinostat do not mimic the ultrastructural effects of microgravity in columella cells of Z. mays.

  5. Benign lymphoepithelial lesion (Mikulicz's disease) of the salivary gland: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Kahn, L B

    1979-01-01

    An ultrastructural study of a benign lymphoepithelial lesion of the parotid gland demonstrated that the so-called epimyoepithelial cell islands were sharply demarcated from the surrounding parenchyma by a thick basement membrane containing collagen fibers. The hyaline material seen by light microscopy within the islands was ultrastructurally similar in appearance to this delimiting basement membrane. The epithelial cells within the islands were united by well formed desmosomes and many had prominent tonofilament bundles, but myogenic differentiation was not observed. Hydropic degeneration was not seen in these epithelial cells; cells with a perinuclear clear space seen by light microscopy corresponded to large lymphoid cells ultrastructurally.

  6. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  7. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications. PMID:27689136

  8. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications.

  9. Matrix stiffness reverses the effect of actomyosin tension on cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mih, Justin D.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Liu, Fei; Sharif, Asma S.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The stiffness of the extracellular matrix exerts powerful effects on cell proliferation and differentiation, but the mechanisms transducing matrix stiffness into cellular fate decisions remain poorly understood. Two widely reported responses to matrix stiffening are increases in actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation. To delineate their relationship, we modulated cytoskeletal tension in cells grown across a physiological range of matrix stiffnesses. On both synthetic and naturally derived soft matrices, and across a panel of cell types, we observed a striking reversal of the effect of inhibiting actomyosin contractility, switching from the attenuation of proliferation on rigid substrates to the robust promotion of proliferation on soft matrices. Inhibiting contractility on soft matrices decoupled proliferation from cytoskeletal tension and focal adhesion organization, but not from cell spread area. Our results demonstrate that matrix stiffness and actomyosin contractility converge on cell spreading in an unexpected fashion to control a key aspect of cell fate. PMID:23097048

  10. Regulation of proliferation of embryonic heart mesenchyme: Role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and the interstitial matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, M.; Armstrong, M.T.; Armstrong, P.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Proliferation of atrioventricular cushion mesenchyme of the embryonic avian heart maintained in three-dimensional aggregate culture is stimulated by interaction with the interstitial matrix. Chicken serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1, which stimulates proliferation, induces matrix deposition in regions of the aggregate showing high labeling indices with tritiated thymidine. Dispersed heart mesenchyme interstitial matrix introduced into serum-free culture is incorporated into the aggregate and stimulates cellular proliferation similar to serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1. Proliferation is reversibly inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. It is suggested that transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates the production of interstitial matrix and that a sufficient stimulus for proliferation in this system is the presence of the matrix, which acts as the adhesive support for cellular anchorage.

  11. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    PubMed Central

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications. PMID:26820775

  12. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela;