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Sample records for cellular regulators part

  1. MLK3 is part of a feedback mechanism that regulates different cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Hwang, Chae Young; Shin, Sung-Young; Kwon, Ki-Sun; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-06-03

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence diverse cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis. Both endogenous and exogenous ROS activate signaling through mitogen-activated proteins kinase (MAPK) pathways, including those involving extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) or c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). Whereas low concentrations of ROS generally stimulate proliferation, high concentrations result in cell death. We found that low concentrations of ROS induced activating phosphorylation of ERKs, whereas high concentrations of ROS induced activating phosphorylation of JNKs. Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3, also known as MAP3K11) directly phosphorylates JNKs and may control activation of ERKs. Mathematical modeling of MAPK networks revealed a positive feedback loop involving MLK3 that determined the relative phosphorylation of ERKs and JNKs by ROS. Cells exposed to an MLK3 inhibitor or cells in which MLK3 was knocked down showed increased activation of ERKs and decreased activation of JNKs and were resistant to cell death when exposed to high concentrations of ROS. Thus, the data indicated that MLK3 is a critical factor controlling the activity of kinase networks that control the cellular responses to different concentrations of ROS.

  2. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  3. Glycosylation regulates prestin cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Lavanya; Organ-Darling, Louise E; Liu, Haiying; Davidson, Amy L; Raphael, Robert M; Brownell, William E; Pereira, Fred A

    2010-03-01

    Glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of proteins and is implicated in a variety of cellular functions including protein folding, degradation, sorting and trafficking, and membrane protein recycling. The membrane protein prestin is an essential component of the membrane-based motor driving electromotility changes (electromotility) in the outer hair cell (OHC), a central process in auditory transduction. Prestin was earlier identified to possess two N-glycosylation sites (N163, N166) that, when mutated, marginally affect prestin nonlinear capacitance (NLC) function in cultured cells. Here, we show that the double mutant prestin(NN163/166AA) is not glycosylated and shows the expected NLC properties in the untreated and cholesterol-depleted HEK 293 cell model. In addition, unlike WT prestin that readily forms oligomers, prestin(NN163/166AA) is enriched as monomers and more mobile in the plasma membrane, suggesting that oligomerization of prestin is dependent on glycosylation but is not essential for the generation of NLC in HEK 293 cells. However, in the presence of increased membrane cholesterol, unlike the hyperpolarizing shift in NLC seen with WT prestin, cells expressing prestin(NN163/166AA) exhibit a linear capacitance function. In an attempt to explain this finding, we discovered that both WT prestin and prestin(NN163/166AA) participate in cholesterol-dependent cellular trafficking. In contrast to WT prestin, prestin(NN163/166AA) shows a significant cholesterol-dependent decrease in cell-surface expression, which may explain the loss of NLC function. Based on our observations, we conclude that glycosylation regulates self-association and cellular trafficking of prestin(NN163/166AA). These observations are the first to implicate a regulatory role for cellular trafficking and sorting in prestin function. We speculate that the cholesterol regulation of prestin occurs through localization to and internalization from membrane microdomains by

  4. Circadian Regulation of Cellular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Peek, C.B; Ramsey, K.M; Levine, D.C; Marcheva, B; Perelis, M; Bass, J

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock synchronizes behavioral and physiological processes on a daily basis in anticipation of the light–dark cycle. In mammals, molecular clocks are present in both the central pacemaker neurons and in nearly all peripheral tissues. Clock transcription factors in metabolic tissues coordinate metabolic fuel utilization and storage with alternating periods of feeding and fasting corresponding to the rest–activity cycle. In vitro and in vivo biochemical approaches have led to the discovery of mechanisms underlying the interplay between the molecular clock and the metabolic networks. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that the circadian clock controls rhythmic synthesis of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and activity of NAD+-dependent sirtuin deacetylase enzymes to regulate mitochondrial function across the circadian cycle. In this chapter, we review current state-of-the-art methods to analyze circadian cycles in mitochondrial bioenergetics, glycolysis, and nucleotide metabolism in both cell-based and animal models. PMID:25707277

  5. Lymphatic Regulation of Cellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels play vital roles in immune surveillance and immune regulation by conveying antigen loaded dendritic cells, memory T cells, macrophages and neutrophils from the peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes where they initiate as well as modify immune responses. Until relatively recently however, there was little understanding of how entry and migration through lymphatic vessels is organized or the specific molecular mechanisms that might be involved. Within the last decade, the situation has been transformed by an explosion of knowledge generated largely through the application of microscopic imaging, transgenic animals, specific markers and function blocking mAbs that is beginning to provide a rational conceptual framework. This article provides a critical review of the recent literature, highlighting seminal discoveries that have revealed the fascinating ultrastructure of leucocyte entry sites in lymphatic vessels, as well as generating controversies over the involvement of integrin adhesion, chemotactic and haptotactic mechanisms in DC entry under normal and inflamed conditions. It also discusses the major changes in lymphatic architecture that occur during inflammation and the different modes of leucocyte entry and trafficking within inflamed lymphatic vessels, as well as presenting a timely update on the likely role of hyaluronan and the major lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor LYVE-1 in leucocyte transit. PMID:27808282

  6. Regulation of cellular iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential but potentially hazardous biometal. Mammalian cells require sufficient amounts of iron to satisfy metabolic needs or to accomplish specialized functions. Iron is delivered to tissues by circulating transferrin, a transporter that captures iron released into the plasma mainly from intestinal enterocytes or reticuloendothelial macrophages. The binding of iron-laden transferrin to the cell-surface transferrin receptor 1 results in endocytosis and uptake of the metal cargo. Internalized iron is transported to mitochondria for the synthesis of haem or iron–sulfur clusters, which are integral parts of several metalloproteins, and excess iron is stored and detoxified in cytosolic ferritin. Iron metabolism is controlled at different levels and by diverse mechanisms. The present review summarizes basic concepts of iron transport, use and storage and focuses on the IRE (iron-responsive element)/IRP (iron-regulatory protein) system, a well known post-transcriptional regulatory circuit that not only maintains iron homoeostasis in various cell types, but also contributes to systemic iron balance. PMID:21348856

  7. EBNA1 regulates cellular gene expression by binding cellular promoters.

    PubMed

    Canaan, Allon; Haviv, Izhak; Urban, Alexander E; Schulz, Vincent P; Hartman, Steve; Zhang, Zhengdong; Palejev, Dean; Deisseroth, Albert B; Lacy, Jill; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman M

    2009-12-29

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several types of lymphomas and epithelial tumors including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), HIV-associated lymphoma, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is expressed in all EBV associated tumors and is required for latency and transformation. EBNA1 initiates latent viral replication in B cells, maintains the viral genome copy number, and regulates transcription of other EBV-encoded latent genes. These activities are mediated through the ability of EBNA1 to bind viral-DNA. To further elucidate the role of EBNA1 in the host cell, we have examined the effect of EBNA1 on cellular gene expression by microarray analysis using the B cell BJAB and the epithelial 293 cell lines transfected with EBNA1. Analysis of the data revealed distinct profiles of cellular gene changes in BJAB and 293 cell lines. Subsequently, chromatin immune-precipitation revealed a direct binding of EBNA1 to cellular promoters. We have correlated EBNA1 bound promoters with changes in gene expression. Sequence analysis of the 100 promoters most enriched revealed a DNA motif that differs from the EBNA1 binding site in the EBV genome.

  8. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. 22.970 Section...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. (a) Definition... the 800 MHz band from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems will be deemed to...

  9. Regulation of Cellular Tension in Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Cells generate stress on their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) via myosin II motor generated forces which are transmitted through the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms in the cell which regulate the magnitude and spatial distribution of these stresses, however, remain unknown. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the total magnitude of traction force exerted on the ECM scales with cell size. Such scaling is observed across numerous cell types and reflects an inherent cellular tension determined by the level of myosin II activity. Surprisingly, while stiffness modulates the cellular spread area, we find this scaling relationship to be independent of ECM stiffness. To identify the biophysical mechanisms regulating the generation of tension, we utilize micro-patterning to isolate cell spread area from cell geometry and to spatially control the distribution of stress on the ECM. We find that traction stress magnitude is dependent on the local curvature of the cell. Changes in cell geometry result in a redistribution of local stresses, but little change in the total stress applied to the ECM. Finally, for a constant geometry, we find that both the total stress and the average stress exerted on the ECM increase with cell area. Together these data suggest that the cell can be modeled as a uniformly contracting mesh, where the magnitude of tension is regulated by the cell spread area, and the distribution of tension is regulated by local geometry.

  10. Rapid Aquaporin Translocation Regulates Cellular Water Flow

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Matthew T.; Conner, Alex C.; Bland, Charlotte E.; Taylor, Luke H. J.; Brown, James E. P.; Parri, H. Rheinallt; Bill, Roslyn M.

    2012-01-01

    The control of cellular water flow is mediated by the aquaporin (AQP) family of membrane proteins. The structural features of the family and the mechanism of selective water passage through the AQP pore are established, but there remains a gap in our knowledge of how water transport is regulated. Two broad possibilities exist. One is controlling the passage of water through the AQP pore, but this only has been observed as a phenomenon in some plant and microbial AQPs. An alternative is controlling the number of AQPs in the cell membrane. Here, we describe a novel pathway in mammalian cells whereby a hypotonic stimulus directly induces intracellular calcium elevations through transient receptor potential channels, which trigger AQP1 translocation. This translocation, which has a direct role in cell volume regulation, occurs within 30 s and is dependent on calmodulin activation and phosphorylation of AQP1 at two threonine residues by protein kinase C. This direct mechanism provides a rationale for the changes in water transport that are required in response to constantly changing local cellular water availability. Moreover, because calcium is a pluripotent and ubiquitous second messenger in biological systems, the discovery of its role in the regulation of AQP translocation has ramifications for diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes, as well as providing an explanation for the rapid regulation of water flow that is necessary for cell homeostasis. PMID:22334691

  11. Regulating cellular trace metal economy in algae

    DOE PAGES

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2017-06-30

    As indispensable protein cofactors, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn are at the center of multifaceted acclimation mechanisms that have evolved to ensure extracellular supply meets intracellular demand. In starting with selective transport at the plasma membrane and ending in protein metalation, metal homeostasis in algae involves regulated trafficking of metal ions across membranes, intracellular compartmentalization by proteins and organelles, and metal-sparing/recycling mechanisms to optimize metal-use efficiency. Overlaid on these processes are additional circuits that respond to the metabolic state as well as to the prior metal status of the cell. Here, we focus on recent progress made toward understanding themore » pathways by which the single-celled, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii controls its cellular trace metal economy. We also compare these mechanisms to characterized and putative processes in other algal lineages. Photosynthetic microbes continue to provide insight into cellular regulation and handling of Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn as a function of the nutritional supply and cellular demand for metal cofactors. We found that new experimental tools such as RNA-Seq and subcellular metal imaging are bringing us closer to a molecular understanding of acclimation to supply dynamics in algae and beyond.« less

  12. Regulating cellular trace metal economy in algae.

    PubMed

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2017-10-01

    As indispensable protein cofactors, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn are at the center of multifaceted acclimation mechanisms that have evolved to ensure extracellular supply meets intracellular demand. Starting with selective transport at the plasma membrane and ending in protein metalation, metal homeostasis in algae involves regulated trafficking of metal ions across membranes, intracellular compartmentalization by proteins and organelles, and metal-sparing/recycling mechanisms to optimize metal-use efficiency. Overlaid on these processes are additional circuits that respond to the metabolic state as well as to the prior metal status of the cell. In this review, we focus on recent progress made toward understanding the pathways by which the single-celled, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii controls its cellular trace metal economy. We also compare these mechanisms to characterized and putative processes in other algal lineages. Photosynthetic microbes continue to provide insight into cellular regulation and handling of Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn as a function of the nutritional supply and cellular demand for metal cofactors. New experimental tools such as RNA-Seq and subcellular metal imaging are bringing us closer to a molecular understanding of acclimation to supply dynamics in algae and beyond. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses.

  14. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Róisín M.; Finlay, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  15. Sialidases as regulators of bioengineered cellular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Cristina Y; Ryan, Matthew J; d'Alarcao, Marc; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Human sialidases (NEUs) catalyze the removal of N-acetyl neuraminic acids from the glycome of the cell and regulate a diverse repertoire of nominal cellular functions, such as cell signaling and adhesion. A greater understanding of their substrate permissivity is of interest in order to discern their physiological functions in disease states and in the design of specific and effective small molecule inhibitors. Towards this, we have synthesized soluble fluorogenic reporters of mammalian sialidase activity bearing unnatural sialic acids commonly incorporated into the cellular glycocalyx via metabolic glycoengineering. We found cell-surface sialidases in Jurkat capable of cleaving unnatural sialic acids with differential activities toward a variety of R groups on neuraminic acid. In addition, we observed modulated structure-activity relationships when cell-surface sialidases were presented glycans with unnatural bulky, hydrophobic or fluorinated moieties incorporated directly via glycoengineering. Our results confirm the importance of cell-surface sialidases in glycoengineering incorporation data. We demonstrate the flexibility of human NEUs toward derivatized sugars and highlight the importance of native glycan presentation to sialidase binding and activity. These results stand to inform not only metabolic glycoengineering efforts but also inhibitor design.

  16. Sialidases as regulators of bioengineered cellular surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Cristina Y; Ryan, Matthew J; d'Alarcao, Marc; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Human sialidases (NEUs) catalyze the removal of N-acetyl neuraminic acids from the glycome of the cell and regulate a diverse repertoire of nominal cellular functions, such as cell signaling and adhesion. A greater understanding of their substrate permissivity is of interest in order to discern their physiological functions in disease states and in the design of specific and effective small molecule inhibitors. Towards this, we have synthesized soluble fluorogenic reporters of mammalian sialidase activity bearing unnatural sialic acids commonly incorporated into the cellular glycocalyx via metabolic glycoengineering. We found cell-surface sialidases in Jurkat capable of cleaving unnatural sialic acids with differential activities toward a variety of R groups on neuraminic acid. In addition, we observed modulated structure–activity relationships when cell-surface sialidases were presented glycans with unnatural bulky, hydrophobic or fluorinated moieties incorporated directly via glycoengineering. Our results confirm the importance of cell-surface sialidases in glycoengineering incorporation data. We demonstrate the flexibility of human NEUs toward derivatized sugars and highlight the importance of native glycan presentation to sialidase binding and activity. These results stand to inform not only metabolic glycoengineering efforts but also inhibitor design. PMID:25795684

  17. Chromatin modifiers: regulators of cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taiping; Dent, Sharon Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, by definition, is epigenetic. Genome-wide profiling of pluripotent cells and differentiated cells suggests global chromatin remodeling during differentiation, resulting in progressive transition from a relatively open chromatin configuration to a more compact state. Genetic studies in mouse models demonstrate major roles for a variety of histone modifiers and chromatin remodelers in key developmental transitions, such as the segregation of embryonic and extraembryonic lineages in blastocyst stage embryos, the formation of the three germ layers during gastrulation, and differentiation of adult stem cells. Furthermore, rather than merely stabilizing the gene expression changes driven by developmental transcription factors, evidence is emerging that chromatin regulators have multifaceted roles in cell fate decisions. PMID:24366184

  18. Rethinking the regulation of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C B

    2011-01-01

    Most biologists working today have not considered the problem of how signal transduction events, which commit cells to energetically demanding processes such as growth and division, are connected to cellular metabolism. The primary reason for this is that we have believed for the last 30 or more years that the metabolism of cells is a homeostatic, self-regulating process that does not depend on any extracellular input. The traditional view is that a mammalian cell decides to take up nutrients whenever its bioenergetic and synthetic reserves are depleted. However, a considerable body of evidence now exists that challenges the notion that the nutrient uptake and metabolism of metazoan cells are cell-autonomous.

  19. Regulation of cellular therapy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Trickett, Annette E; Wall, Dominic M

    2011-10-01

    Use of cellular products for therapeutic purposes has predominantly been unregulated in Australia until recently. Transplant of haemopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) for bone marrow regeneration is now a routine treatment for many disorders with an established mechanism of facility accreditation. However, other cellular therapies do not have any form of accreditation, are not well evaluated and may be associated with significant risks. On 31 May 2011 the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) implemented a long heralded regulatory biologicals framework for cell and tissue based therapies. The framework currently excludes human HPC, organs for direct transplantation and reproductive materials which are already covered by various forms of existing peer review and accreditation. This new framework is a practical approach for applying regulation based on the risk of the product to the recipient with four classes of product. Class 1 is reserved for the least regulated products and currently does not contain any proposed products. Class 2 will be for minimally manipulated products which will only require manufacturing compliance and evaluation against product and other mandatory standards before entry onto the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG). Class 3 and 4 products will be more than minimally manipulated and these cells and tissues may be used in a non-homologous manner. Class 3 and 4 products will represent a spectrum of risk where Class 4 therapies will represent the highest potential risk to the recipient, with the same requirements for Class 2 approvals but with additional requirements for comprehensive evaluation of a dossier for quality, safety and efficacy of the product. The extent of this quality, safety and efficacy data will depend upon the nature of the product and its associated risks, but will be more comprehensive for Class 4 as opposed to Class 3 products. The only truly contentious feature of this framework is the extremely high cost for

  20. Deleted in Breast Cancer 1 regulates cellular senescence during obesity.

    PubMed

    Escande, Carlos; Nin, Veronica; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Chini, Claudia C; Thereza Barbosa, Maria; Mathison, Angela; Urrutia, Raul; Tchkonia, Tamar; Kirkland, James L; Chini, Eduardo N

    2014-10-01

    Chronic obesity leads to inflammation, tissue dysfunction, and cellular senescence. It was proposed that cellular senescence during obesity and aging drives inflammation and dysfunction. Consistent with this, clearance of senescent cells increases healthspan in progeroid mice. Here, we show that the protein Deleted in Breast Cancer-1 (DBC1) regulates cellular senescence during obesity. Deletion of DBC1 protects preadipocytes against cellular senescence and senescence-driven inflammation. Furthermore, we show protection against cellular senescence in DBC1 KO mice during obesity. Finally, we found that DBC1 participates in the onset of cellular senescence in response to cell damage by mechanism that involves binding and inhibition of HDAC3. We propose that by regulating HDAC3 activity during cellular damage, DBC1 participates in the fate decision that leads to the establishment of cellular senescence and consequently to inflammation and tissue dysfunction during obesity. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cellular Shape Memory Alloy Structures: Experiments & Modeling (Part 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    AFOSR  Grant  #FA9550-­‐08-­‐1-­‐0313 Cellular  Shape  Memory   Alloy  Structures:   Experiments  &  Modeling J.  Shaw  (UM...2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cellular Shape Memory Alloy Structures: Experiments & Modeling (Part 1) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...dense,  0.37  g/cc) Combine benefits of light-weight cellular structures with Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) adaptive behavior CombinaKon •Amplified

  2. Regulation of cellular identity in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nilotpal; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neoplastic transformation requires changes in cellular identity. Emerging evidence increasingly points to cellular reprogramming, a process during which fully differentiated and functional cells lose aspects of their identity while gaining progenitor characteristics, as a critical early step during cancer initiation. This cell identity crisis persists even at the malignant stage in certain cancers, suggesting that reactivation of progenitor functions supports tumorigenicity. Here, we review recent findings that establish the essential role of cellular reprogramming during neoplastic transformation and the major players involved in it with a special emphasis on pancreatic cancer. PMID:26702828

  3. From syncitium to regulated pump: a cardiac muscle cellular update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information on Ca2+ microdomains and local control theory, with particular emphasis on the role of Ca2+ sparks as a key regulatory component of ventricular myocyte contraction dynamics. Recent information pertaining to local Ca2+ cycling in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) as a mechanism underlying cardiac automaticity is also presented as part of the recently described coupled-clock pacemaker system. The details of this regulation are emerging; however, the notion that the sequestration and release of Ca2+ from internal stores in SANCs (similar to that observed in ventricular myocytes) regulates the rhythmic excitation of the heart (i.e., membrane ion channels) is an important advancement in this area. The regulatory role of cardiac adrenergic receptors on cardiac rate and function is also included, and fundamental concepts related to intracellular signaling are discussed. An important point of emphasis is that whole organ cardiac dynamics can be traced back to cellular events regulating intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and, as such, provides an important conceptual framework from which students can begin to think about whole organ physiology in health and disease. Greater synchrony of Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms between ventricular and pacemaker cells should enhance student comprehension of complex regulatory phenomenon in cardiac muscle. PMID:21385997

  4. Piezo proteins: regulators of mechanosensation and other cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2014-11-14

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Piezo Proteins: Regulators of Mechanosensation and Other Cellular Processes*

    PubMed Central

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature. PMID:25305018

  6. HTLV-1 Tax Effects on Cellular Mitotic Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-12

    34 HTLV -I Tax Effects on Cellular Mitotic Regulation" Randall Merling Doctor of Philosophy Degree 12 April 2007 Christophe Broder, Ph" . Department ’o...copyrighted material in the dissertation manuscript entitled: "The Effects of HTLV -1 Tax on Mitotic Regulation" Is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond...University of the Health Sciences 11 iii ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: “The Effects of HTLV -1 Tax on Mitotic Regulation” Author: Randall K. Merling

  7. Cellular pressure and volume regulation and implications for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean

    2013-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of the cell and multi-cellular tissues. Recent experiments found that during mitosis, eukaryotic cells establish a preferred steady volume and pressure, and the steady volume and pressure can robustly adapt to large osmotic shocks. Here we develop a mathematical model of cellular pressure and volume regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechano-sensitive channels, active ion pumps and active stresses in the actomyosin cortex. The model can fully explain the available experimental data, and predicts the cellular volume and pressure for several models of cell cortical mechanics. Furthermore, we show that when cells are subjected to an externally applied load, such as in an AFM indentation experiment, active regulation of volume and pressure leads to complex cellular response. We found the cell stiffness highly depends on the loading rate, which indicates the transport of water and ions might contribute to the observed viscoelasticity of cells.

  8. Regulation of Plant Cellular and Organismal Development by SUMO.

    PubMed

    Elrouby, Nabil

    2017-01-01

    This chapter clearly demonstrates the breadth and spectrum of the processes that SUMO regulates during plant development. The gross phenotypes observed in mutants of the SUMO conjugation and deconjugation enzymes reflect these essential roles, and detailed analyses of these mutants under different growth conditions revealed roles in biotic and abiotic stress responses, phosphate starvation, nitrate and sulphur metabolism, freezing and drought tolerance and response to excess copper. SUMO functions also intersect with those regulated by several hormones such as salicylic acid , abscisic acid , gibberellins and auxin, and detailed studies provide mechanistic clues of how sumoylation may regulate these processes. The regulation of COP1 and PhyB functions by sumoylation provides very strong evidence that SUMO is heavily involved in the regulation of light signaling in plants. At the cellular and subcellular levels, SUMO regulates meristem architecture, the switch from the mitotic cycle into the endocycle, meiosis, centromere decondensation and exit from mitosis, transcriptional control, and release from transcriptional silencing. Most of these advances in our understanding of SUMO functions during plant development emerged over the past 6-7 years, and they may only predict a prominent rise of SUMO as a major regulator of eukaryotic cellular and organismal growth and development.

  9. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 22/Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular (Ca) (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ((Ca)i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: (Ca)i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular (Ca) to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in (Ca)i, suggesting that the source of the increase in (Ca)i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases (Ca)i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation.

  10. Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Kevin A; Hansen, Louise L; Putker, Marrit; Olivares-Yañez, Consuelo; Day, Jason; Eades, Lorna J; Larrondo, Luis F; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2016-04-21

    Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behaviour and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes. A fundamental knowledge gap exists, however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg(2+)]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties both in a human cell line and in a unicellular alga that diverged from each other more than 1 billion years ago. Given the essential role of Mg(2+) as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg(2+)]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg(2+) availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell's more than 600 MgATP-dependent enzymes and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR is regulated through [Mg(2+)]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease.

  11. Proteoform-Specific Insights into Cellular Proteome Regulation.

    PubMed

    Norris, Emma L; Headlam, Madeleine J; Dave, Keyur A; Smith, David D; Bukreyev, Alexander; Singh, Toshna; Jayakody, Buddhika A; Chappell, Keith J; Collins, Peter L; Gorman, Jeffrey J

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge regarding compositions of proteomes at the proteoform level enhances insights into cellular phenotypes. A strategy is described herein for discovery of proteoform-specific information about cellular proteomes. This strategy involved analysis of data obtained by bottom-up mass spectrometry of multiple protein OGE separations on a fraction by fraction basis. The strategy was exemplified using five matched sets of lysates of uninfected and human respiratory syncytial virus-infected A549 cells. Template matching demonstrated that 67.3% of 10475 protein profiles identified focused to narrow pI windows indicative of efficacious focusing. Furthermore, correlation between experimental and theoretical pI gradients indicated reproducible focusing. Based on these observations a proteoform profiling strategy was developed to identify proteoforms, detect proteoform diversity and discover potential proteoform regulation. One component of this strategy involved examination of the focusing profiles for protein groups. A novel concordance analysis facilitated differentiation between proteoforms, including proteoforms generated by alternate splicing and proteolysis. Evaluation of focusing profiles and concordance analysis were applicable to cells from a single and/or multiple biological states. Statistical analyses identified proteoform variation between biological states. Regulation relevant to cellular responses to human respiratory syncytial virus was revealed. Western blotting and Protomap analyses validated the proteoform regulation. Discovery of STAT1, WARS, MX1, and HSPB1 proteoform regulation by human respiratory syncytial virus highlighted the impact of the profiling strategy. Novel truncated proteoforms of MX1 were identified in infected cells and phosphorylation driven regulation of HSPB1 proteoforms was correlated with infection. The proteoform profiling strategy is generally applicable to investigating interactions between viruses and host cells and the

  12. Proteoform-Specific Insights into Cellular Proteome Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Emma L.; Headlam, Madeleine J.; Dave, Keyur A.; Smith, David D.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Singh, Toshna; Jayakody, Buddhika A.; Chappell, Keith J.; Collins, Peter L.; Gorman, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge regarding compositions of proteomes at the proteoform level enhances insights into cellular phenotypes. A strategy is described herein for discovery of proteoform-specific information about cellular proteomes. This strategy involved analysis of data obtained by bottom-up mass spectrometry of multiple protein OGE separations on a fraction by fraction basis. The strategy was exemplified using five matched sets of lysates of uninfected and human respiratory syncytial virus-infected A549 cells. Template matching demonstrated that 67.3% of 10475 protein profiles identified focused to narrow pI windows indicative of efficacious focusing. Furthermore, correlation between experimental and theoretical pI gradients indicated reproducible focusing. Based on these observations a proteoform profiling strategy was developed to identify proteoforms, detect proteoform diversity and discover potential proteoform regulation. One component of this strategy involved examination of the focusing profiles for protein groups. A novel concordance analysis facilitated differentiation between proteoforms, including proteoforms generated by alternate splicing and proteolysis. Evaluation of focusing profiles and concordance analysis were applicable to cells from a single and/or multiple biological states. Statistical analyses identified proteoform variation between biological states. Regulation relevant to cellular responses to human respiratory syncytial virus was revealed. Western blotting and Protomap analyses validated the proteoform regulation. Discovery of STAT1, WARS, MX1, and HSPB1 proteoform regulation by human respiratory syncytial virus highlighted the impact of the profiling strategy. Novel truncated proteoforms of MX1 were identified in infected cells and phosphorylation driven regulation of HSPB1 proteoforms was correlated with infection. The proteoform profiling strategy is generally applicable to investigating interactions between viruses and host cells and the

  13. Global Self-Regulation of the Cellular Metabolic Structure

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Vadillo, Fernando; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto Luís; Pérez-Pinilla, Martín-Blas; Bidaurrazaga, Joseba; Vera-López, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background Different studies have shown that cellular enzymatic activities are able to self-organize spontaneously, forming a metabolic core of reactive processes that remain active under different growth conditions while the rest of the molecular catalytic reactions exhibit structural plasticity. This global cellular metabolic structure appears to be an intrinsic characteristic common to all cellular organisms. Recent work performed with dissipative metabolic networks has shown that the fundamental element for the spontaneous emergence of this global self-organized enzymatic structure could be the number of catalytic elements in the metabolic networks. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the factors that may affect the catalytic dynamics under a global metabolic structure characterized by the presence of metabolic cores we have studied different transitions in catalytic patterns belonging to a dissipative metabolic network. The data were analyzed using non-linear dynamics tools: power spectra, reconstructed attractors, long-term correlations, maximum Lyapunov exponent and Approximate Entropy; and we have found the emergence of self-regulation phenomena during the transitions in the metabolic activities. Conclusions/Significance The analysis has also shown that the chaotic numerical series analyzed correspond to the fractional Brownian motion and they exhibit long-term correlations and low Approximate Entropy indicating a high level of predictability and information during the self-regulation of the metabolic transitions. The results illustrate some aspects of the mechanisms behind the emergence of the metabolic self-regulation processes, which may constitute an important property of the global structure of the cellular metabolism. PMID:20209156

  14. Neurophysiology of HCN channels: from cellular functions to multiple regulations.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; Chen, Fang; Li, Bo; Hu, Zhian

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) cation channels are encoded by HCN1-4 gene family and have four subtypes. These channels are activated upon hyperpolarization of membrane potential and conduct an inward, excitatory current Ih in the nervous system. Ih acts as pacemaker current to initiate rhythmic firing, dampen dendritic excitability and regulate presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This review summarizes recent insights into the cellular functions of Ih and associated behavior such as learning and memory, sleep and arousal. HCN channels are excellent targets of various cellular signals to finely regulate neuronal responses to external stimuli. Numerous mechanisms, including transcriptional control, trafficking, as well as channel assembly and modification, underlie HCN channel regulation. In the next section, we discuss how the intracellular signals, especially recent findings concerning protein kinases and interacting proteins such as cGKII, Ca(2+)/CaMKII and TRIP8b, regulate function and expression of HCN channels, and subsequently provide an overview of the effects of neurotransmitters on HCN channels and their corresponding intracellular mechanisms. We also discuss the dysregulation of HCN channels in pathological conditions. Finally, insight into future directions in this exciting area of ion channel research is provided.

  15. Regulation and quantification of cellular mitochondrial morphology and content.

    PubMed

    Tronstad, Karl J; Nooteboom, Marco; Nilsson, Linn I H; Nikolaisen, Julie; Sokolewicz, Maciek; Grefte, Sander; Pettersen, Ina K N; Dyrstad, Sissel; Hoel, Fredrik; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in signal transduction, redox homeostasis and cell survival, which extends far beyond their classical functioning in ATP production and energy metabolism. In living cells, mitochondrial content ("mitochondrial mass") depends on the cell-controlled balance between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation. These processes are intricately linked to changes in net mitochondrial morphology and spatiotemporal positioning ("mitochondrial dynamics"), which are governed by mitochondrial fusion, fission and motility. It is becoming increasingly clear that mitochondrial mass and dynamics, as well as its ultrastructure and volume, are mechanistically linked to mitochondrial function and the cell. This means that proper quantification of mitochondrial morphology and content is of prime importance in understanding mitochondrial and cellular physiology in health and disease. This review first presents how cellular mitochondrial content is regulated at the level of mitochondrial biogenesis, degradation and dynamics. Next we discuss how mitochondrial dynamics and content can be analyzed with a special emphasis on quantitative live-cell microscopy strategies.

  16. Cellular and molecular regulation of innate inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Innate sensing of pathogens by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) plays essential roles in the innate discrimination between self and non-self components, leading to the generation of innate immune defense and inflammatory responses. The initiation, activation and resolution of innate inflammatory response are mediated by a complex network of interactions among the numerous cellular and molecular components of immune and non-immune system. While a controlled and beneficial innate inflammatory response is critical for the elimination of pathogens and maintenance of tissue homeostasis, dysregulated or sustained inflammation leads to pathological conditions such as chronic infection, inflammatory autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss some of the recent advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the establishment and regulation of innate immunity and inflammatory responses. PMID:27818489

  17. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Metabolism and Basic Cellular Processes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-08-16

    Complement is well appreciated as a critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and works by directly destroying them through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Newly identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription-factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings.

  18. Nucleosome remodelling, DNA repair and transcriptional regulation build negative feedback loops in cancer and cellular ageing.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Reiko; Kanno, Shin-Ichiro; Mohammadi Roushandeh, Amaneh; Ui, Ayako; Yasui, Akira

    2017-10-05

    Nucleosome remodelling (NR) regulates transcription in an ATP-dependent manner, and influences gene expression required for development and cellular functions, including those involved in anti-cancer and anti-ageing processes. ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodelling factor (ACF) and Brahma-associated factor (BAF) complexes, belonging to the ISWI and SWI/SNF families, respectively, are involved in various types of DNA repair. Suppression of several BAF factors makes U2OS cells significantly sensitive to X-rays, UV and especially to cisplatin, and these BAF factors contribute to the accumulation of repair proteins at various types of DNA damage and to DNA repair. Recent cancer genome sequencing and expression analysis has shown that BAF factors are frequently mutated or, more frequently, silenced in various types of cancer cells. Thus, those cancer cells are potentially X-ray- and especially cisplatin-sensitive, suggesting a way of optimizing current cancer therapy. Recent single-stem cell analysis suggests that mutations and epigenetic changes influence stem cell functionality leading to cellular ageing. Genetic and epigenetic changes in the BAF factors diminish DNA repair as well as transcriptional regulation activities, and DNA repair defects in turn negatively influence NR and transcriptional regulation. Thus, they build negative feedback loops, which accelerate both cellular senescence and transformation as common and rare cellular events, respectively, causing cellular ageing.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. REDOX REGULATION OF SIRT1 IN INFLAMMATION AND CELLULAR SENESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae-woong; Yao, Hongwei; Caito, Samuel; Sundar, Isaac K.; Rahman, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) regulates inflammation, aging (lifespan and healthspan), calorie restriction/energetics, mitochondrial biogenesis, stress resistance, cellular senescence, endothelial functions, apoptosis/autophagy, and circadian rhythms through deacetylation of transcription factors and histones. SIRT1 level and activity are decreased in chronic inflammatory conditions and aging where oxidative stress occurs. SIRT1 is regulated by a NAD+-dependent DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and subsequent NAD+ depletion by oxidative stresses may have consequent effects on inflammatory and stress responses as well as cellular senescence. SIRT1 has been shown to undergo covalent oxidative modifications by cigarette smoke-derived oxidants/aldehydes, leading to post-translational modifications, inactivation, and protein degradation. Furthermore, oxidant/carbonyl stress-mediated reduction of SIRT1 leads to the loss of its control on acetylation of target proteins including p53, RelA/p65 and FOXO3, thereby enhancing the inflammatory, pro-senescent and apoptotic responses, as well as endothelial dysfunction. In this review, the mechanisms of cigarette smoke/oxidant-mediated redox post-translational modifications of SIRT1 and its role in PARP1, NF-κB activation, FOXO3 and eNOS regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling/histone modifications during inflammaging are discussed. Furthermore, we also discussed various novel ways to activate SIRT1 either directly or indirectly, which may have therapeutic potential in attenuating inflammation and premature senescence involved in chronic lung diseases. PMID:23542362

  20. Redox regulation of SIRT1 in inflammation and cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-woong; Yao, Hongwei; Caito, Samuel; Sundar, Isaac K; Rahman, Irfan

    2013-08-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates inflammation, aging (life span and health span), calorie restriction/energetics, mitochondrial biogenesis, stress resistance, cellular senescence, endothelial functions, apoptosis/autophagy, and circadian rhythms through deacetylation of transcription factors and histones. SIRT1 level and activity are decreased in chronic inflammatory conditions and aging, in which oxidative stress occurs. SIRT1 is regulated by a NAD(+)-dependent DNA repair enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), and subsequent NAD(+) depletion by oxidative stress may have consequent effects on inflammatory and stress responses as well as cellular senescence. SIRT1 has been shown to undergo covalent oxidative modifications by cigarette smoke-derived oxidants/aldehydes, leading to posttranslational modifications, inactivation, and protein degradation. Furthermore, oxidant/carbonyl stress-mediated reduction of SIRT1 leads to the loss of its control on acetylation of target proteins including p53, RelA/p65, and FOXO3, thereby enhancing the inflammatory, prosenescent, and apoptotic responses, as well as endothelial dysfunction. In this review, the mechanisms of cigarette smoke/oxidant-mediated redox posttranslational modifications of SIRT1 and its roles in PARP1 and NF-κB activation, and FOXO3 and eNOS regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling/histone modifications during inflammaging, are discussed. Furthermore, we have also discussed various novel ways to activate SIRT1 either directly or indirectly, which may have therapeutic potential in attenuating inflammation and premature senescence involved in chronic lung diseases.

  1. Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Kevin A.; Hansen, Louise L.; Putker, Marrit; Olivares-Yañez, Consuelo; Day, Jason; Eades, Lorna J.; Larrondo, Luis F.; Hoyle, Nathaniel P.; O'Neill, John S.; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behavior and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes1–3. A fundamental knowledge gap exists however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology4,5. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg2+]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties in both a human cell line and a unicellular alga that diverged from metazoans more than 1 billion years ago6. Given the essential role of Mg2+ as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg2+]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg2+ availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell’s >600 MgATP-dependent enzymes7 and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR8 is regulated through [Mg2+]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease. PMID:27074515

  2. Cellular Bases of Light-regulated Gravity Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the most significant research accomplished in our NAG2-1347 project on the cellular bases of light-regulated gravity responses, It elaborates mainly on our discovery of the role of calcium currents in gravity-directed polar development in single germinating spore cells of the fern Ceratopteris, our development of RNA silencing as a viable method of suppressing the expression of specific genes in Ceratopteris, and on the structure, expression and distribution of members of the annexin family in flowering plants, especially Arabidopsis.

  3. Viperin Regulates Cellular Lipid Metabolism during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jun-Young; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been shown to induce increased lipogenesis in infected cells, and this is believed to be required for proper virion envelopment. We show here that this increase is a consequence of the virus-induced redistribution of the host protein viperin to mitochondria and its capacity to interact with and block the function of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP), the enzyme that mediates fatty acid-β-oxidation. The resulting decrease in cellular ATP levels activates the enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which induces expression of the glucose transporter GLUT4, resulting in increased glucose import and translocation to the nucleus of the glucose-regulated transcription factor ChREBP. This induces increased transcription of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes, increased lipid synthesis and lipid droplet accumulation, and generation of the viral envelope. Viperin-dependent lipogenesis is required for optimal production of infectious virus. We show that all of these metabolic outcomes can be replicated by direct targeting of viperin to mitochondria in the absence of HCMV infection, and that the motif responsible for Fe-S cluster binding by viperin is essential. The data indicate that viperin is the major effector underlying the ability of HCMV to regulate cellular lipid metabolism. PMID:23935494

  4. mTOR Regulates Cellular Iron Homeostasis through Tristetraprolin

    PubMed Central

    Bayeva, Marina; Khechaduri, Arineh; Puig, Sergi; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Patial, Sonika; Blackshear, Perry J.; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is an essential cofactor with unique redox properties. Iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1/2) have been established as important regulators of cellular iron homeostasis, but little is known about the role of other pathways in this process. Here we report that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates iron homeostasis by modulating transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) stability and altering cellular iron flux. Mechanistic studies identify tristetraprolin (TTP), a protein involved in anti-inflammatory response, as the downstream target of mTOR that binds to and enhances degradation of TfR1 mRNA. We also show that TTP is strongly induced by iron chelation, promotes downregulation of iron-requiring genes in both mammalian and yeast cells, and modulates survival in low-iron states. Taken together, our data uncover a link between metabolic, inflammatory, and iron regulatory pathways, and point towards the existence of a yeast-like TTP-mediated iron conservation program in mammals. PMID:23102618

  5. Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Lowe, Edward W., Jr.; Aboud, Asad A.; Neely, M. Diana; Redha, Rey; Bauer, Joshua A.; Odak, Mihir; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical `toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation.

  6. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes.

  7. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-01-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes. PMID:26387537

  8. Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Lowe, Jr., Edward W.; Aboud, Asad A.; Neely, M. Diana; Redha, Rey; Bauer, Joshua A.; Odak, Mihir; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical ‘toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation. PMID:25348053

  9. Cellular, biochemical and molecular mechanisms regulating oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Nava

    2005-04-29

    The original model for regulation of oocyte maturation proposed by us in 1978 postulated that gap junction-mediated transmission of cAMP from the follicle cells to the oocyte inhibits meiosis and that luteinizing hormone (LH) terminates the flux of the follicle cAMP to the oocyte. A decrease in oocyte cAMP below inhibitory threshold occurs since oocytes lack the ability to generate sufficient amounts of cAMP to compensate for the phosphodiesterase activity. Our previous studies provided evidence to support this model. More recent studies in our laboratory were directed at identification of the cellular biochemical and molecular events initiated within rat oocytes upon the relief of cAMP inhibition. These studies: (i) identified an oocyte specific A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that is phosphorylated in oocytes resuming meiosis, (ii) confirmed that cdc25B governs meiosis reinitiation and demonstrated that its expression is translationally regulated, (iii) substantiated the indispensable role of proteasomal degradation at completion of the first meiotic division in a mammalian system, (iv) elucidated the role of MPF reactivation in suppressing interphase between the two meiotic divisions and (v) provided evidence that mos translation is negatively regulated by a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated action of cAMP and is dependent on an active MPF. A detailed account on each of these findings is presented in this chapter.

  10. Operating principles of tristable circuits regulating cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongya; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Harrison, William; Boareto, Marcelo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Many cell-fate decisions during embryonic development are governed by a motif comprised of two transcription factors (TFs) A and B that mutually inhibit each other and may self-activate. This motif, called as a self-activating toggle switch (SATS), can typically have three stable states (phenotypes)—two corresponding to differentiated cell fates, each of which has a much higher level of one TF than the other—≤ft(A,~B\\right)=≤ft(1,~0\\right) or ≤ft(0,~1\\right) —and the third state corresponding to an ‘undecided’ stem-like state with similar levels of both A and B—≤ft(A,~B\\right)=≤ft(1/2,1/2\\right) . Furthermore, two or more SATSes can be coupled together in various topologies in different contexts, thereby affecting the coordination between multiple cellular decisions. However, two questions remain largely unanswered: (a) what governs the co-existence and relative stability of these three stable states? (b) What orchestrates the decision-making of coupled SATSes? Here, we first demonstrate that the co-existence and relative stability of the three stable states in an individual SATS can be governed by the relative strength of self-activation, external signals activating and/or inhibiting A and B, and mutual degradation between A and B. Simultaneously, we investigate the effects of these factors on the decision-making of two coupled SATSes. Our results offer novel understanding into the operating principles of individual and coupled tristable self-activating toggle switches (SATSes) regulating cellular differentiation and can yield insights into synthesizing three-way genetic circuits and understanding of cellular reprogramming.

  11. Membrane organization and regulation of cellular Cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, María S.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A; Garda, Horacio A; Finarelli, Gabriela S.; Gonzalez, Marina C.; Rimoldi, Omar J.

    2010-01-01

    An excess of intracellular free Cholesterol (Chol) is cytotoxic, and its homeostasis is crucial for cell viability. Apolipoprotein A–I (apoA-I) is a highly efficient Chol acceptor as it activates complex cellular pathways that tend to mobilize and export Chol from cellular depots. Here we hypothesize that membrane composition and/or organization is strongly involved in Chol homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a cell line over expressing Stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD-cells), which modifies plasma membrane (PM) composition by the enrichment of monounsaturated fatty,acids and determined this effect on membrane properties, cell viability and cholesterol homeostasis. PM in SCD-cells has a higher phospholipids/sphingomyelin ratio and is slightly enriched in Chol. These cells showed an increase in the cholesteryl esters/free Chol ratio, they were more resistant to Chol toxicity and in addition, they exported more caveolin than Control cells. The data suggest that cell functionality is preserved by regulating membrane fluidity and Chol exportation and storage. PMID:20336284

  12. Membrane organization and regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jaureguiberry, María S; Tricerri, M Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A; Garda, Horacio A; Finarelli, Gabriela S; Gonzalez, Marina C; Rimoldi, Omar J

    2010-04-01

    An excess of intracellular free cholesterol (Chol) is cytotoxic, and its homeostasis is crucial for cell viability. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is a highly efficient Chol acceptor because it activates complex cellular pathways that tend to mobilize and export Chol from cellular depots. We hypothesize that membrane composition and/or organization is strongly involved in Chol homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a cell line overexpressing stearoyl coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase (SCD cells), which modifies plasma membrane (PM) composition by the enrichment of monounsaturated fatty acids, and determined this effect on membrane properties, cell viability, and Chol homeostasis. PM in SCD cells has a higher ratio of phospholipids to sphingomyelin and is slightly enriched in Chol. These cells showed an increase in the ratio of cholesteryl esters to free Chol; they were more resistant to Chol toxicity, and they exported more caveolin than control cells. The data suggest that cell functionality is preserved by regulating membrane fluidity and Chol exportation and storage.

  13. Regulation of organismal proteostasis by trans-cellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Porter, Robert S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge for metazoans is to ensure that different tissues each expressing distinctive proteomes are, nevertheless, well protected at an organismal level from proteotoxic stress. We have examined this and show that expression of endogenous metastable protein sensors in muscle cells induces a systemic stress response throughout multiple tissues of C. elegans. Suppression of misfolding in muscle cells can be achieved not only by enhanced expression of HSP90 in muscle cells, but as effective by elevated expression of HSP90 in intestine or neuronal cells. This cell-non-autonomous control of HSP90 expression relies upon transcriptional feedback between somatic tissues that is regulated by the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4. This trans-cellular chaperone signaling response maintains organismal proteostasis when challenged by a local tissue imbalance in folding and provides the basis for a novel form of organismal stress sensing surveillance. PMID:23746847

  14. Complement-mediated regulation of metabolism and basic cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Complement is well appreciated as critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and functions by direct pathogen destruction and through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental processes of the cell, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Novel identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism, and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings. PMID:27533012

  15. Serine and SAM Responsive Complex SESAME Regulates Histone Modification Crosstalk by Sensing Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Swanson, Selene K; Gogol, Madelaine; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Suganuma, Tamaki

    2015-11-05

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme for glycolysis and catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which supplies cellular energy. PKM2 also phosphorylates histone H3 threonine 11 (H3T11); however, it is largely unknown how PKM2 links cellular metabolism to chromatin regulation. Here, we show that the yeast PKM2 homolog, Pyk1, is a part of a novel protein complex named SESAME (Serine-responsive SAM-containing Metabolic Enzyme complex), which contains serine metabolic enzymes, SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) synthetases, and an acetyl-CoA synthetase. SESAME interacts with the Set1 H3K4 methyltransferase complex, which requires SAM synthesized from SESAME, and recruits SESAME to target genes, resulting in phosphorylation of H3T11. SESAME regulates the crosstalk between H3K4 methylation and H3T11 phosphorylation by sensing glycolysis and glucose-derived serine metabolism. This leads to auto-regulation of PYK1 expression. Thus, our study provides insights into the mechanism of regulating gene expression, responding to cellular metabolism via chromatin modifications.

  16. Molecular and Cellular Mechanics (Part I): A moderated discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corey, David P.; Martin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topic of "Molecular and Cellular Mechanics". The discussion, moderated by the authors, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  17. Molecular and Cellular Mechanics (Part II): A moderated discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topic of "Molecular and Cellular Mechanics". The discussion, moderated by the author, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  18. Protein kinase CK2: structure, regulation and role in cellular decisions of life and death.

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, David W

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 ('casein kinase II') has traditionally been classified as a messenger-independent protein serine/threonine kinase that is typically found in tetrameric complexes consisting of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') subunits and two regulatory beta subunits. Accumulated biochemical and genetic evidence indicates that CK2 has a vast array of candidate physiological targets and participates in a complex series of cellular functions, including the maintenance of cell viability. This review summarizes current knowledge of the structural and enzymic features of CK2, and discusses advances that challenge traditional views of this enzyme. For example, the recent demonstrations that individual CK2 subunits exist outside tetrameric complexes and that CK2 displays dual-specificity kinase activity raises new prospects for the precise elucidation of its regulation and cellular functions. This review also discusses a number of the mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of CK2 in cells, and will highlight emerging insights into the role of CK2 in cellular decisions of life and death. In this latter respect, recent evidence suggests that CK2 can exert an anti-apoptotic role by protecting regulatory proteins from caspase-mediated degradation. The mechanistic basis of the observation that CK2 is essential for viability may reside in part in this ability to protect cellular proteins from caspase action. Furthermore, this anti-apoptotic function of CK2 may contribute to its ability to participate in transformation and tumorigenesis. PMID:12396231

  19. Cellular interactions regulate stem cell differentiation in tri-culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Ning E; Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Mitroo, Siddarth; Shan, Jing; Kala, Sonam; Lu, Helen H

    2016-11-01

    Currently, the mechanism governing the regeneration of the soft tissue-to-bone interface, such as the transition between the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and bone, is not known. Focusing on the ACL-to-bone insertion, this study tests the novel hypothesis that interactions between cells from the ligament (fibroblasts) and bone (osteoblasts) initiate interface regeneration. Specifically, these heterotypic cell interactions direct the fibrochondrogenic differentiation of interface-relevant cell populations, defined here as ligament fibroblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). The objective of this study is to examine the effects of heterotypic cellular interactions on BMSC or fibroblast growth and biosynthesis, as well as expression of fibrocartilage-relevant markers in tri-culture. The effects of cell-cell physical contact and paracrine interactions between fibroblasts and osteoblasts were also determined. It was found that, in tri-culture with fibroblasts and osteoblasts, BMSC exhibited greater fibrochondrogenic potential than ligament fibroblasts. The growth of BMSC decreased while proteoglycan production and TGF-β3 expression increased. Moreover, tri-culture regulated BMSC response via paracrine factors, and interestingly, fibroblast-osteoblast contact further promoted proteoglycan and TGF-β1 synthesis as well as induced SOX9 expression in BMSC. Collectively, the findings of this study suggest that fibroblast-osteoblast interactions play an important role in regulating the stem cell niche for fibrocartilage regeneration, and the mechanisms of these interactions are directed by paracrine factors and augmented with direct cell-cell contact.

  20. REGgamma modulates p53 activity by regulating its cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Yu, Guowu; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhao, Dengpan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Zeng, Yu; Dang, Yongyan; Wang, Chuangui; Gao, Guang; Long, Weiwen; Lonard, David M; Qiao, Shanlou; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Zhang, Bianhong; Luo, Honglin; Li, Xiaotao

    2010-12-01

    The proteasome activator REGγ mediates a shortcut for the destruction of intact mammalian proteins. The biological roles of REGγ and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we provide evidence that REGγ regulates cellular distribution of p53 by facilitating its multiple monoubiquitylation and subsequent nuclear export and degradation. We also show that inhibition of p53 tetramerization by REGγ might further enhance cytoplasmic relocation of p53 and reduce active p53 in the nucleus. Furthermore, multiple monoubiquitylation of p53 enhances its physical interaction with HDM2 and probably facilitates subsequent polyubiquitylation of p53, suggesting that monoubiquitylation can act as a signal for p53 degradation. Depletion of REGγ sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis, validating its crucial role in the control of apoptosis, probably through regulation of p53 function. Using a mouse xenograft model, we show that REGγ knockdown results in a significant reduction of tumor growth, suggesting an important role for REGγ in tumor development. Our study therefore demonstrates that REGγ-mediated inactivation of p53 is one of the mechanisms involved in cancer progression.

  1. Cellular mechano-environment regulates the mammary circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nan; Williams, Jack; Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; Wang, Pengbo; Olabi, Safiah; McConnell, James; Gossan, Nicole; Hughes, Alun; Cheung, Julia; Streuli, Charles H.; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks drive ∼24 h rhythms in tissue physiology. They rely on transcriptional/translational feedback loops driven by interacting networks of clock complexes. However, little is known about how cell-intrinsic circadian clocks sense and respond to their microenvironment. Here, we reveal that the breast epithelial clock is regulated by the mechano-chemical stiffness of the cellular microenvironment in primary cell culture. Moreover, the mammary clock is controlled by the periductal extracellular matrix in vivo, which contributes to a dampened circadian rhythm during ageing. Mechanistically, the tension sensing cell-matrix adhesion molecule, vinculin, and the Rho/ROCK pathway, which transduces signals provided by extracellular stiffness into cells, regulate the activity of the core circadian clock complex. We also show that genetic perturbation, or age-associated disruption of self-sustained clocks, compromises the self-renewal capacity of mammary epithelia. Thus, circadian clocks are mechano-sensitive, providing a potential mechanism to explain how ageing influences their amplitude and function. PMID:28134247

  2. Matriptase autoactivation is tightly regulated by the cellular chemical environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jehng-Kang; Teng, I-Jou; Lo, Ting-Jen; Moore, Sean; Yeo, Yee Hui; Teng, Yun-Chung; Kaul, Malvika; Chen, Chiann-Chyi; Zuo, Annie Hong; Chou, Fen-Pai; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, I-Chu; Johnson, Michael D; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The ability of cells to rapidly detect and react to alterations in their chemical environment, such as pH, ionic strength and redox potential, is essential for cell function and survival. We present here evidence that cells can respond to such environmental alterations by rapid induction of matriptase autoactivation. Specifically, we show that matriptase autoactivation can occur spontaneously at physiological pH, and is significantly enhanced by acidic pH, both in a cell-free system and in living cells. The acid-accelerated autoactivation can be attenuated by chloride, a property that may be part of a safety mechanism to prevent unregulated matriptase autoactivation. Additionally, the thio-redox balance of the environment also modulates matriptase autoactivation. Using the cell-free system, we show that matriptase autoactivation is suppressed by cytosolic reductive factors, with this cytosolic suppression being reverted by the addition of oxidizing agents. In living cells, we observed rapid induction of matriptase autoactivation upon exposure to toxic metal ions known to induce oxidative stress, including CoCl2 and CdCl2. The metal-induced matriptase autoactivation is suppressed by N-acetylcysteine, supporting the putative role of altered cellular redox state in metal induced matriptase autoactivation. Furthermore, matriptase knockdown rendered cells more susceptible to CdCl2-induced cell death compared to control cells. This observation implies that the metal-induced matriptase autoactivation confers cells with the ability to survive exposure to toxic metals and/or oxidative stress. Our results suggest that matriptase can act as a cellular sensor of the chemical environment of the cell that allows the cell to respond to and protect itself from changes in the chemical milieu.

  3. Metabolic regulation of cellular plasticity in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ninov, Nikolay; Hesselson, Daniel; Gut, Philipp; Zhou, Amy; Fidelin, Kevin; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Obese individuals exhibit an increase in pancreatic β-cell mass; conversely, scarce nutrition during pregnancy has been linked to β-cell insufficiency in the offspring (reviewed in [1, 2]). These phenomena are thought to be mediated mainly through effects on β-cell proliferation, since a nutrient sensitive β-cell progenitor population in the pancreas has not been identified. Here, we employed the FUCCI (Fluorescent Ubiquitination-based Cell Cycle Indicator) system to investigate β-cell replication in real-time, and found that high nutrient concentrations induce rapid β-cell proliferation. Importantly, we found that high nutrient concentrations also stimulate β-cell differentiation from progenitors in the intrapancreatic duct (IPD). Using a new zebrafish line where β-cells are constitutively ablated, we further show that β-cell loss and high nutrient intake synergistically activate these progenitors. At the cellular level, this activation process causes ductal cell reorganization as it stimulates their proliferation and differentiation. Notably, we link the nutrient-dependent activation of these progenitors to a down-regulation of Notch signaling specifically within the IPD. Furthermore, we show that the nutrient sensor mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) is required for endocrine differentiation from the IPD under physiological conditions as well as in the diabetic state. This study thus reveals critical insights into how cells modulate their plasticity in response to metabolic cues and identifies nutrient sensitive progenitors in the mature pancreas. PMID:23791726

  4. Cellular Regulation of Amyloid Formation in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stroo, Esther; Koopman, Mandy; Nollen, Ellen A. A.; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    As the population is aging, the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, is growing. The pathology of neurodegenerative diseases is characterized by the presence of protein aggregates of disease specific proteins in the brain of patients. Under certain conditions these disease proteins can undergo structural rearrangements resulting in misfolded proteins that can lead to the formation of aggregates with a fibrillar amyloid-like structure. Cells have different mechanisms to deal with this protein aggregation, where the molecular chaperone machinery constitutes the first line of defense against misfolded proteins. Proteins that cannot be refolded are subjected to degradation and compartmentalization processes. Amyloid formation has traditionally been described as responsible for the proteotoxicity associated with different neurodegenerative disorders. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain such toxicity, including the sequestration of key proteins and the overload of the protein quality control system. Here, we review different aspects of the involvement of amyloid-forming proteins in disease, mechanisms of toxicity, structural features, and biological functions of amyloids, as well as the cellular mechanisms that modulate and regulate protein aggregation, including the presence of enhancers and suppressors of aggregation, and how aging impacts the functioning of these mechanisms, with special attention to the molecular chaperones. PMID:28261044

  5. 21 CFR 1271.10 - Are my HCT/P's regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and the regulations in this part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are my HCT/P's regulated solely under section 361..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS General Provisions § 1271.10 Are my HCT/P's regulated solely.../P is regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and the regulations in this part if it...

  6. Enigmatic Translocator protein (TSPO) and cellular stress regulation.

    PubMed

    Batoko, Henri; Veljanovski, Vasko; Jurkiewicz, Pawel

    2015-09-01

    Translocator proteins (TSPOs) are conserved, ubiquitous membrane proteins identified initially as benzodiazepine-binding proteins in mammalian cells. Recent genetic and biochemical studies have challenged the accepted model that TSPOs are essential and required for steroidogenesis in animal cells. Instead, evidence from different kingdoms of life suggests that TSPOs are encoded by nonessential genes that are temporally upregulated in cells encountering conditions of oxidative stress, including inflammation and tissue injury. Here we discuss how TSPOs may be involved in complex homeostasis signaling mechanisms. We suggest that the main physiological role of TSPOs may be to modulate oxidative stress, irrespective of the cell type or subcellular localization, in part through the subtle regulation of tetrapyrrole metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin‐converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen‐Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J.; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R.; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E.; Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole‐body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3‐55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P < 0·01) whilst increasing ACE expression within a physiological range (<1·8‐fold at 48 h; P < 0·01). Our findings suggest novel hypotheses. Firstly, cellular feedback regulation may occur between UCPs and ACE. Secondly, cellular UCP regulation of sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. PMID:27347560

  8. 78 FR 18325 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation... Department of Defense published a notice titled Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV. DoD has completed... Transportation Regulation, Part IV Web site at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr/part-iv/phaseiii.cfm (DPM SECTION...

  9. Regulation of cellular pH: From molecules to membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabe, Michael David

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a universal class of proton pumps responsible for creating and maintaining acidic milieus in both intracellular and extracellular spaces. In the first chapter, I develop a mechanochemical model of this enzyme based upon the counter-rotation of adjacent subunits. The mathematical approach details a general integrated method for describing the mechanical and chemical reactions that occur in motor systems. A novel escapement is proposed for how the protons cross the protein-bilayer interface, and it is shown how this movement couples to ATP hydrolysis. This model reproduces a variety of experimental data while providing a framework for understanding the function of the enzyme's subunits. Specifically, it explains how ATP hydrolysis can uncouple from proton movement, which has important consequences for cellular energetics and pH regulation. Until now only an equilibrium theory of organelle acidification has been proposed; however, recent experiments show that large proton leaks prevent many cellular compartments from reaching thermodynamic equilibrium. The characterization of the V-ATPase is used in the second chapter in order to develop a unified model of organelle acidification based on the interplay of ion pumps and channels and the physical characteristics of the organelle. This model successfully describes the time dependent acidification of many different organelle systems. It accurately predicts both the electrical and concentration dependent terms of the chemical potential. In conjunction with fluorescence experiments, I determined the first measurements of the proton permeability of organelles along the secretory pathway. These measurements allowed me to make the first estimates of the number of V-ATPases in each compartment by analyzing the resting pH's of the respective organelles. I found a decrease in permeability from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (51 x 10-4 cm/s) to the Golgi (21 x 10-4 cm/s) to the mature secretory

  10. Cellular strategies for regulating functional and nonfunctional protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M Madan

    2012-11-29

    Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier's principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control.

  11. Oxidative Stress, Redox Regulation and Diseases of Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Within cells, there is a narrow concentration threshold that governs whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce toxicity or act as second messengers. Scope of review We discuss current understanding of how ROS arise, facilitate cell signaling, cause toxicities and disease related to abnormal cell differentiation and those (primarily) sulfur based pathways that provide nucleophilicity to offset these effects. Primary conclusions Cellular redox homeostasis mediates a plethora of cellular pathways that determine life and death events. For example, ROS intersect with GSH based enzyme pathways to influence cell differentiation, a process integral to normal hematopoiesis, but also affecting a number of diverse cell differentiation related human diseases. Recent attempts to manage such pathologies have focused on intervening in some of these pathways, with the consequence that differentiation therapy targeting redox homeostasis has provided a platform for drug discovery and development. General Significance The balance between electrophilic oxidative stress and protective biomolecular nucleophiles predisposes the evolution of modern life forms. Imbalances of the two can produce aberrant redox homeostasis with resultant pathologies. Understanding the pathways involved provides opportunities to consider interventional strategies. PMID:25445706

  12. Cellular Strategies for Regulating Functional and Nonfunctional Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M. Madan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier’s principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control. PMID:23168257

  13. US Food and Drug Administration international collaborations for cellular therapy product regulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapy products are an emerging medical product class undergoing rapid scientific and clinical innovation worldwide. These products pose unique regulatory challenges both for countries with existing regulatory frameworks and for countries where regulatory frameworks for cellular therapy products are under development. The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) has a history of productive working relationships with international regulatory authorities, and seeks to extend this to the cellular therapy field. The US FDA and its global regulatory counterparts are engaged in collaborations focused on the convergence of scientific and regulatory approaches, and the education of scientists, clinicians, regulators, and the public at large on the development of cellular therapies. PMID:23021082

  14. Cellular growth in plants requires regulation of cell wall biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2017-02-01

    Cell and organ morphogenesis in plants are regulated by the chemical structure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix, the cell wall. The two primary load bearing components in the plant cell wall, the pectin matrix and the cellulose/xyloglucan network, are constantly remodelled to generate the morphological changes required during plant development. This remodelling is regulated by a plethora of loosening and stiffening agents such as pectin methyl-esterases, calcium ions, expansins, and glucanases. The tight spatio-temporal regulation of the activities of these agents is a sine qua non condition for proper morphogenesis at cell and tissue levels. The pectin matrix and the cellulose-xyloglucan network operate in concert and their behaviour is mutually dependent on their chemical, structural and mechanical modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role for Mitochondrial Oxidants as Regulators of Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Shino; Takeda, Kazuyo; Yu, Zu-Xi; Ferrans, Victor J.; Finkel, Toren

    2000-01-01

    Leakage of mitochondrial oxidants contributes to a variety of harmful conditions ranging from neurodegenerative diseases to cellular senescence. We describe here, however, a physiological and heretofore unrecognized role for mitochondrial oxidant release. Mitochondrial metabolism of pyruvate is demonstrated to activate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). This metabolite-induced rise in cytosolic JNK1 activity is shown to be triggered by increased release of mitochondrial H2O2. We further demonstrate that in turn, the redox-dependent activation of JNK1 feeds back and inhibits the activity of the metabolic enzymes glycogen synthase kinase 3β and glycogen synthase. As such, these results demonstrate a novel metabolic regulatory pathway activated by mitochondrial oxidants. In addition, they suggest that although chronic oxidant production may have deleterious effects, mitochondrial oxidants can also function acutely as signaling molecules to provide communication between the mitochondria and the cytosol. PMID:10982848

  16. [Regulation of uterine cellular proliferation with estrogens and growth factors].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodríguez, C; Baiza-Guzmán, L A

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the role of estrogen and growth factors in the uterine cellular proliferation is analyzed. The evidences indicate that the estradiol-stimulate cell division is associated with the induction of expression of a variety of growth factors from the all major uterine cell types (epithelia, stroma and myometrium). These growth factors amplify the estrogen proliferation signal in autocrine and/or paracrin fashion. The best-studied growth factors in the uterine response to estradiol are epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Uterine cell proliferation is a complex process that involves interactions of several growth factors, ovarian steroids hormones action and cell to cell signaling.

  17. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  18. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  19. Molecular mechanisms regulating protein kinase Czeta turnover and cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Le Good, J Ann; Brindley, David N

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of protein kinase C (PKC)zeta in relation to its turnover, cell growth and transformation was investigated in Rat2 fibroblasts by over-expressing wild-type or mutant forms of PKCzeta. Deletion of the pseudosubstrate site (PSS) produced the most active mutant (PKCzeta Delta PSS), but mutants designed to mimic phosphorylated PKCzeta had lower specific activities in an in vitro assay. The mutant lacking phosphorylation at the Thr-560 site (T560A) had similar specific activity to wild-type PKCzeta. The T560A mutant also protected PKCzeta against proteolysis, whereas phosphorylation at Thr-410 targeted it towards proteosomal degradation. Blocking proteosomal degradation with lactacystin caused the accumulation of full-length PKCzeta Delta PSS, T410E, PKCzeta Delta PSS T410/560E, PKCzeta and T560A. Expressed PKCzeta activity was paralleled by extracellular-regulated protein kinase activation, increased cell division, serum-independent growth and focus formation. These foci were seen for cells expressing higher PKCzeta activity (PKCzeta Delta PSS, PKCzeta Delta PSS T410/560E and T560A mutants), but these fibroblasts did not show significant anchorage-independent growth. This work provides novel information concerning the role of the PSS and phosphorylation sites in regulating the activity and turnover of an atypical PKC and shows how this activity can induce cell transformation with respect to focus formation. PMID:14580237

  20. Electrophoretic coating of amphiphilic chitosan colloids on regulating cellular behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yen-Jen; Lo, Teng-Yuan; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Liu, Dean-Mo

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, we report a facile nanotopographical control over a stainless steel surface via an electrophoretic deposition of colloidal amphiphilic chitosan for preferential growth, proliferation or migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Atomic force microscopy revealed that the colloidal surface exhibited a deposition time-dependent nanotopographical evolution, wherein two different nanotopographic textures indexed by ‘kurtosis’ (Rkur) value were easily designed, which were termed as ‘sharp’ (i.e. high peak-to-valley texture) surface and ‘flat’ (i.e. low peak-to-valley texture) surface. Cellular behaviour of VSMCs and HUVECs on both surfaces demonstrated topographically dependent morphogenesis, adherent responses and biochemical properties in comparison with bare stainless steel. The formation of a biofunctionalized surface upon a facile colloidal chitosan deposition envisions the potential application towards numerous biomedical devices, and this is especially promising for cardiovascular stents wherein a new surface with optimized texture can be designed and is expected to create an advantageous environment to stimulate HUVEC growth for improved healing performance. PMID:23804439

  1. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) regulates T cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Henning, G; Kraft, M S; Derfuss, T; Pirzer, R; de Saint-Basile, G; Aversa, G; Fleckenstein, B; Meinl, E

    2001-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) is a CD2-related surface receptor expressed by activated T cells and B cells. SLAM is a self ligand and enhances T cellular proliferation and IFN-gamma production. A defective SLAM associated protein (SAP) causes X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP), a frequently lethal mononucleosis based on the inability to control EBV. We report that SLAM augments TCR-mediated cytotoxicity. In normal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, SLAM enhanced TCR-mediated cytotoxicity. In CD4(+) and CD8(+) Herpesvirus saimiri (H.saimiri) infected T cells, SLAM engagement alone triggered cytotoxicity. Using H.saimiri-transformed T cells as a model system we found that SLAM-engagement promotes the release of lytic granules and a CD95-independent killing that requires extracellular Ca(2+), cytoskeletal rearrangements, and signaling mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases MEK1/2. SLAM-enhanced cytotoxicity implies an immunoregulatory function by facilitating the elimination of APC and a role in overcoming infections with pathogens requiring a cytotoxic immune response.

  2. The cell cycle regulator protein P16 and the cellular senescence of dental follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Hullmann, Markus; Reck, Anja; Reichert, Torsten E

    2017-08-02

    Cellular senescence is a restricting factor for regenerative therapies with somatic stem cells. We showed previously that the onset of cellular senescence inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in stem cells of the dental follicle (DFCs), although the mechanism remains elusive. Two different pathways are involved in the induction of the cellular senescence, which are driven either by the cell cycle protein P21 or by the cell cycle protein P16. In this study, we investigated the expression of cell cycle proteins in DFCs after the induction of cellular senescence. The induction of cellular senescence was proved by an increased expression of β-galactosidase and an increased population doubling time after a prolonged cell culture. Cellular senescence regulated the expression of cell cycle proteins. The expression of cell cycle protein P16 was up-regulated, which correlates with the induction of cellular senescence markers in DFCs. However, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and 4 and the expression of the cell cycle protein P21 were successively decreased in DFCs. In conclusion, our data suggest that a P16-dependent pathway drives the induction of cellular senescence in DFCs.

  3. Design mobile satellite system architecture as an integral part of the cellular access digital network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, E. S. K.; Marinho, J. A.; Russell, J. E., Sr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cellular Access Digital Network (CADN) is the access vehicle through which cellular technology is brought into the mainstream of the evolving integrated telecommunications network. Beyond the integrated end-to-end digital access and per call network services provisioning of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the CADN engenders the added capability of mobility freedom via wireless access. One key element of the CADN network architecture is the standard user to network interface that is independent of RF transmission technology. Since the Mobile Satellite System (MSS) is envisioned to not only complement but also enhance the capabilities of the terrestrial cellular telecommunications network, compatibility and interoperability between terrestrial cellular and mobile satellite systems are vitally important to provide an integrated moving telecommunications network of the future. From a network standpoint, there exist very strong commonalities between the terrestrial cellular system and the mobile satellite system. Therefore, the MSS architecture should be designed as an integral part of the CADN. This paper describes the concept of the CADN, the functional architecture of the MSS, and the user-network interface signaling protocols.

  4. [Food intake regulation - 2nd part].

    PubMed

    Brunerová, Ludmila; Anděl, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The review article summarizes the principles of hedonic regulation of food intake which represents the food intake independent on the maintenance of homeostasis. The theory describing hedonic regulation, so called Incentive Salience Theory, comprises three major processes: liking (positive attribution to food stimulus), wanting (motivation to gain it) and learning (identification of these stimuli and distinguishing them from those connected with aversive reaction). Neuronal reward circuits are the anatomical and functional substrates of hedonic regulation. They react to gustatory and olfactory (or visual) stimuli associated with food intake. A food item is preferred in case its consumption is connected with a pleasant feeling thus promoting the behavioural reaction. The probability of this reaction after repetitive exposure to such a stimulus is increased (learned preference). On the contrary, learned aversion after repetitive exposure is connected with avoidance of a food item associated with a negative feeling. Main mediators of hedonic regulation are endocannabinoids, opioids and monoamines (dopamine, serotonin). Dopamine in dorsal striatum via D2 receptors generates food motivation as a key means of survival, however in ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) is responsible for motivation to food bringing pleasure. Serotonin via its receptors 5-HT1A a T-HT2C decreases intake of palatable food. It plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of eating disorders, particularly mental anorexia. There, a food restriction represents a kind of automedication to constitutionally pathologically increased serotonin levels. Detailed understanding of processes regulating food intake is a key to new pharmacological interventions in eating disorders.

  5. S-sulfhydration as a cellular redox regulation

    PubMed Central

    Iciek, Małgorzata; Kowalczyk-Pachel, Danuta; Bilska-Wilkosz, Anna; Kwiecień, Inga; Górny, Magdalena; Włodek, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    For many years reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) have been recognized as key messengers in the process of thiol-based redox regulation. Relatively recently, literature reports began to mention reactive sulfur species (RSS) and their role in thiol regulation. This review is focused on biogenesis and biological properties of RSS, including: hydropersulfides, polysulfides and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Based on the most up-to-date literature data, the paper presents biological significance of S-sulfhydration process. In this reaction, sulfane sulfur is transferred to the–SH groups forming hydropersulfides. Protein cysteine residues, called ‘redox switches’ are susceptible to such reversible modifications. In line with the most recent reports, it was emphasized that sulfane sulfur-containing compounds (mainly hydrogen persulfides and polysulfides) are real and better mediators of S-sulfhydration-based signalling than H2S. We also overviewed proteins participating in the formation and transport of RSS and in mitochondrial H2S oxidation. In addition, we reviewed many reports about proteins unrelated to sulfur metabolism which are modified by S-sulfhydration that influences their catalytic activity. We also addressed the problem of the regulatory function of S-sulfhydration reaction in the activation of KATP channels (vasorelaxant) and transcription factors (e.g. NFκB) as well as in the mechanism of therapeutic action of garlic-derived sulfur compounds. Some aspects of comparison between RNS and RSS are also discussed in this review. PMID:26607972

  6. Regulation of Piezo Channels by Cellular Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, I; Rohacs, T

    2017-01-01

    The recently identified mechanically activated Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels play major roles in various aspects of mechanosensation in mammals, and their mutations are associated with human diseases. Recent reports show that activation of cell surface receptors coupled to heterotrimeric Gq proteins increase the sensitivity of Piezo2 channels to mechanical stimuli. Activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate pathway was also shown to potentiate Piezo2 channel activity. This phenomenon may play a role in mechanical allodynia or hyperalgesia during inflammation. Both Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels are inhibited upon depletion of plasma membrane phosphoinositides, in response to phospholipase C activation by Ca(2+) influx via the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels. This review will discuss current knowledge on regulation of Piezo channels by these intracellular signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Glutathione and cellular redox control in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Seco-Cervera, Marta; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-10-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the mitotically/meiotically heritable changes in gene expression that are not due to changes in the primary DNA sequence. Over recent years, growing evidence has suggested a link between redox metabolism and the control of epigenetic mechanisms. The effect of the redox control, oxidative stress, and glutathione (GSH) on the epigenetic mechanisms occur at different levels affecting DNA methylation, miRNAs expression, and histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). Furthermore, a number of redox PTMs are being described, so enriching the histone code. Pioneer works showed how oxidized GSH inhibits the activity of S-adenosyl methionine synthetase, MAT1A, a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), which is used by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Alteration in NAD /NADH ratio affects the activity of class III histone deacetylases (HDACs) and poly-ADP ribosyltransferases (PARPs). Furthermore, the iron redox state of the catalytic center of key enzymes influences the activity of HDACs and the activity of Tet methylcytosine dioxygenases (DNA demetylases) and JmjC histone demethylases. In this communication, we will show the intricate mechanisms that participate in the redox control of the epigenetic mechanisms. We specially focus our work in the characterization of new PTMs in histones, such as histone carbonylation and glutathionylation. Demonstrating how GSH influences the epigenetic mechanisms beyond a mere regulation of SAM levels. The mechanisms described in this communication place GSH and redox control in the landscape of the epigenetic regulation. The results shown underscore the relevant role that oxidative stress and GSH play as key factors in epigenetics, opening a new window for understating the underlying mechanisms that control cell differentiation, proliferation, development, and disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Regulation of cellular gas exchange, oxygen sensing, and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Clanton, T L; Hogan, M C; Gladden, L B

    2013-07-01

    Cells must continuously monitor and couple their metabolic requirements for ATP utilization with their ability to take up O2 for mitochondrial respiration. When O2 uptake and delivery move out of homeostasis, cells have elaborate and diverse sensing and response systems to compensate. In this review, we explore the biophysics of O2 and gas diffusion in the cell, how intracellular O2 is regulated, how intracellular O2 levels are sensed and how sensing systems impact mitochondrial respiration and shifts in metabolic pathways. Particular attention is paid to how O2 affects the redox state of the cell, as well as the NO, H2S, and CO concentrations. We also explore how these agents can affect various aspects of gas exchange and activate acute signaling pathways that promote survival. Two kinds of challenges to gas exchange are also discussed in detail: when insufficient O2 is available for respiration (hypoxia) and when metabolic requirements test the limits of gas exchange (exercising skeletal muscle). This review also focuses on responses to acute hypoxia in the context of the original "unifying theory of hypoxia tolerance" as expressed by Hochachka and colleagues. It includes discourse on the regulation of mitochondrial electron transport, metabolic suppression, shifts in metabolic pathways, and recruitment of cell survival pathways preventing collapse of membrane potential and nuclear apoptosis. Regarding exercise, the issues discussed relate to the O2 sensitivity of metabolic rate, O2 kinetics in exercise, and influences of available O2 on glycolysis and lactate production. © 2013 American Physiological Society.

  9. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  10. A conformational change within the WAVE2 complex regulates its degradation following cellular activation

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Noah; Biber, Guy; Fried, Sophia; Reicher, Barak; Levy, Omer; Sabag, Batel; Noy, Elad; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2017-01-01

    WASp family Verprolin-homologous protein-2 (WAVE2), a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family of actin nucleation promoting factors, is a central regulator of actin cytoskeleton polymerization and dynamics. Multiple signaling pathways operate via WAVE2 to promote the actin-nucleating activity of the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. WAVE2 exists as a part of a pentameric protein complex known as the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), which is unstable in the absence of its individual proteins. While the involvement of WAVE2 in actin polymerization has been well documented, its negative regulation mechanism is poorly characterized to date. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE2 undergoes ubiquitylation in a T-cell activation dependent manner, followed by proteasomal degradation. The WAVE2 ubiquitylation site was mapped to lysine 45, located at the N-terminus where WAVE2 binds to the WRC. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we reveal that the autoinhibitory conformation of the WRC maintains the stability of WAVE2 in resting cells; the release of autoinhibition following T-cell activation facilitates the exposure of WAVE2 to ubiquitylation, leading to its degradation. The dynamic conformational structures of WAVE2 during cellular activation dictate its degradation. PMID:28332566

  11. 19 CFR Appendix to Part 181 - Rules of Origin Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rules of Origin Regulations Appendix to Part 181 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Pt. 181, App. Appendix to Part 181—Rules of Origin Regulations SECTION 1. CITATION This...

  12. 75 FR 16445 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation... for the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3) in the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV...

  13. Cellular regulation and molecular interactions of the ferritins.

    PubMed

    Hintze, K J; Theil, E C

    2006-03-01

    Controlling iron/oxygen chemistry in biology depends on multiple genes, regulatory messenger RNA (mRNA) structures, signaling pathways and protein catalysts. Ferritin, a protein nanocage around an iron/oxy mineral, centralizes the control. Complementary DNA (antioxidant responsive element/Maf recognition element) and mRNA (iron responsive element) responses regulate ferritin synthesis rates. Multiple iron-protein interactions control iron and oxygen substrate movement through the protein cage, from dynamic gated pores to catalytic sites related to di-iron oxygenase cofactor sites. Maxi-ferritins concentrate iron for the bio-synthesis of iron/heme proteins, trapping oxygen; bacterial mini-ferritins, DNA protection during starvation proteins, reverse the substrate roles, destroying oxidants, trapping iron and protecting DNA. Ferritin is nature's unique and conserved approach to controlled, safe use of iron and oxygen, with protein synthesis in animals adjusted by dual, genetic DNA and mRNA sequences that selectively respond to iron or oxidant signals and link ferritin to proteins of iron, oxygen and antioxidant metabolism.

  14. Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Sepsis by Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Carson, W F; Kunkel, S L

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis, septic shock, and related inflammatory syndromes are driven by the aberrant expression of proinflammatory mediators by immune cells. During the acute phase of sepsis, overexpression of chemokines and cytokines drives physiological stress leading to organ failure and mortality. Following recovery from sepsis, the immune system exhibits profound immunosuppression, evidenced by an inability to produce the same proinflammatory mediators that are required for normal responses to infectious microorganisms. Gene expression in inflammatory responses is influenced by the transcriptional accessibility of the chromatin, with histone posttranslational modifications determining whether inflammatory gene loci are set to transcriptionally active, repressed, or poised states. Experimental evidence indicates that histone modifications play a central role in governing the cytokine storm of severe sepsis, and that aberrant chromatin modifications induced during the acute phase of sepsis may mediate chronic immunosuppression in sepsis survivors. This review will focus on the role of histone modifications in governing immune responses in severe sepsis, with an emphasis on specific leukocyte subsets and the histone modifications observed in these cells during chronic stages of sepsis. Additionally, the expression and function of chromatin-modifying enzymes (CMEs) will be discussed in the context of severe sepsis, as potential mediators of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in sepsis responses. In summary, this review will argue for the use of chromatin modifications and CME expression in leukocytes as potential biomarkers of immunosuppression in patients with severe sepsis.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-1 regulates the SIRT1-p53 pathway in cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Duc; Bergholz, Johann; Zhang, Haibo; He, Hanbing; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yujun; Li, Qintong; Kirkland, James L; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence, which is known to halt proliferation of aged and stressed cells, plays a key role against cancer development and is also closely associated with organismal aging. While increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling induces cell proliferation, survival and cancer progression, disrupted IGF signaling is known to enhance longevity concomitantly with delay in aging processes. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of aging by IGF signaling and whether IGF regulates cellular senescence are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that IGF-1 exerts a dual function in promoting cell proliferation as well as cellular senescence. While acute IGF-1 exposure promotes cell proliferation and is opposed by p53, prolonged IGF-1 treatment induces premature cellular senescence in a p53-dependent manner. We show that prolonged IGF-1 treatment inhibits SIRT1 deacetylase activity, resulting in increased p53 acetylation as well as p53 stabilization and activation, thus leading to premature cellular senescence. In addition, either expression of SIRT1 or inhibition of p53 prevented IGF-1-induced premature cellular senescence. Together, these findings suggest that p53 acts as a molecular switch in monitoring IGF-1-induced proliferation and premature senescence, and suggest a possible molecular connection involving IGF-1-SIRT1-p53 signaling in cellular senescence and aging. PMID:25070626

  16. Creating Order from Chaos: Cellular Regulation by Kinase Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John D.; Dessauer, Carmen W.; Tasken, Kjetil

    2012-01-01

    Second messenger responses rely on where and when the enzymes that propagate these signals become active. Spatial and temporal organization of certain signaling enzymes is controlled in part by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). This family of regulatory proteins was originally classified on the basis of their ability to compartmentalize the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (also known as protein kinase A, or PKA). However, it is now recognized that AKAPs position G protein–coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, G proteins, and their effector proteins in relation to protein kinases and signal termination enzymes such as phosphodiesterases and protein phosphatases. This arrangement offers a simple and efficient means to limit the scope, duration, and directional flow of information to sites deep within the cell. This review focuses on the pros and cons of reagents that define the biological role of kinase anchoring inside cells and discusses recent advances in our understanding of anchored second messenger signaling in the cardiovascular and immune systems. PMID:23043438

  17. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  18. Dancing with the regulations - Part Deux

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    The disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the United States has long been subjected to two very similar regulations depending upon the location. Disposal sites located on Department of Energy (DOE) Reservations are subject to DOE Order 5820.2A {open_quotes}Radioactive Waste Management,{close_quotes} while disposal sites located elsewhere are subject to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation 10 CFR 61 {open_quotes}Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste.{close_quotes} While life was not necessarily good, there was only one sheet of music to dance to. Recently a new player, named CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act), has ridden into those DOE towns, and for those whose disposal facilities lie within or adjacent to Superfund sites, she has brought along a different drum to dance to. This paper discusses the differences and similarities between the different dance partners and their associated musical scores (i.e., the performance assessment (PA) required by the DOE order and the baseline risk assessment (BRA) required by CERCLA). The paper then provides a brief discussion on the latest dancer to cut in: the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). This discussion should help to alleviate the confusion while dancing on the LLW disposal regulatory ballroom floor.

  19. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation.

  20. Integration of Multiple Components in Polystyrene-based Microfluidic Devices Part 2: Cellular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kari B.; Halpin, Stephen T.; Johnson, Alicia S.; Martin, R. Scott; Spence, Dana M.

    2012-01-01

    In Part II of this series describing the use of polystyrene (PS) devices for microfluidic-based cellular assays, various cellular types and detection strategies are employed to determine three fundamental assays often associated with cells. Specifically, using either integrated electrochemical sensing or optical measurements with a standard multi-well plate reader, cellular uptake, production, or release of important cellular analytes are determined on a PS-based device. One experiment involved the fluorescence measurement of nitric oxide (NO) produced within an endothelial cell line following stimulation with ATP. The result was a four-fold increase in NO production (as compared to a control), with this receptor-based mechanism of NO production verifying the maintenance of cell receptors following immobilization onto the PS substrate. The ability to monitor cellular uptake was also demonstrated by optical determination of Ca2+ into endothelial cells following stimulation with the Ca2+ ionophore A20317. The result was a significant increase (42%) in the calcium uptake in the presence of the ionophore, as compared to a control (17%) (p < 0.05). Finally, the release of catecholamines from a dopaminergic cell line (PC 12 cells) was electrochemically monitored, with the electrodes being embedded into the PS-based device. The PC 12 cells had better adherence on the PS devices, as compared to use of PDMS. Potassium-stimulation resulted in the release of 114 ± 11 µM catecholamines, a significant increase (p < 0.05) over the release from cells that had been exposed to an inhibitor (reserpine, 20 ± 2 µM of catecholamines). The ability to successfully measure multiple analytes, generated in different means from various cells under investigation, suggests that PS may be a useful material for microfluidic device fabrication, especially considering the enhanced cell adhesion to PS, its enhanced rigidity/amenability to automation, and its ability to enable a wider range of

  1. Sirtuin 2 regulates cellular iron homeostasis via deacetylation of transcription factor NRF2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Shapiro, Jason S; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Sawicki, Konrad T; Chen, Chunlei; Shang, Meng; Burridge, Paul W; Epting, Conrad L; Wilsbacher, Lisa D; Jenkitkasemwong, Supak; Knutson, Mitchell; Gius, David; Ardehali, Hossein

    2017-03-13

    SIRT2 is a cytoplasmic sirtuin that plays a role in various cellular processes, including tumorigenesis, metabolism, and inflammation. Since these processes require iron, we hypothesized that SIRT2 directly regulates cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we have demonstrated that SIRT2 depletion results in a decrease in cellular iron levels both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we determined that SIRT2 maintains cellular iron levels by binding to and deacetylating nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) on lysines 506 and 508, leading to a reduction in total and nuclear NRF2 levels. The reduction in nuclear NRF2 leads to reduced ferroportin 1 (FPN1) expression, which in turn results in decreased cellular iron export. Finally, we observed that Sirt2 deletion reduced cell viability in response to iron deficiency. Moreover, livers from Sirt2-/- mice had decreased iron levels, while this effect was reversed in Sirt2-/- Nrf2-/- double-KO mice. Taken together, our results uncover a link between sirtuin proteins and direct control over cellular iron homeostasis via regulation of NRF2 deacetylation and stability.

  2. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 303 - Index for IDEA Part C Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Index for IDEA Part C Regulations A Appendix A to Part 303 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS...

  3. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 303 - Index for IDEA Part C Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Index for IDEA Part C Regulations A Appendix A to Part 303 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS...

  4. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 303 - Index for IDEA Part C Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Index for IDEA Part C Regulations A Appendix A to Part 303 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS...

  5. Odd-skipped related 2 is epigenetically regulated in cellular quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-06-11

    Cellular behavior and development are extensively altered during the transition from cell cycle into quiescence, though the mechanism involved in establishing and maintaining quiescence is largely unknown. We found that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) was up-regulated during cellular quiescence by serum starvation as well as culturing to confluence. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of Osr2 under these conditions, we characterized the mouse Osr2 promoter. CpG islands in the flanking region of the transcription start site were predominantly methylated in exponentially growing cells, resulting in silencing of Osr2 expression. In addition, CpG demethylation in quiescence caused activation of Osr2 expression, while acetylation of the H3 and H4 histones during quiescence also led to an increase in Osr2 expression. These results suggest that epigenetically regulated Osr2 plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation.

  6. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  7. CPEB regulation of human cellular senescence, energy metabolism, and p53 mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Burns, David M; Richter, Joel D

    2008-12-15

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein (CPEB) stimulates polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and neurons. Here, we show that CPEB-regulated translation is essential for the senescence of human diploid fibroblasts. Knockdown of CPEB causes skin and lung cells to bypass the M1 crisis stage of senescence; reintroduction of CPEB into the knockdown cells restores a senescence-like phenotype. Knockdown cells that have bypassed senescence undergo little telomere erosion. Surprisingly, knockdown of exogenous CPEB that induced a senescence-like phenotype results in the resumption of cell growth. CPEB knockdown cells have fewer mitochondria than wild-type cells and resemble transformed cells by having reduced respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS), normal ATP levels, and enhanced rates of glycolysis. p53 mRNA contains cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements in its 3' untranslated region (UTR), which promote polyadenylation. In CPEB knockdown cells, p53 mRNA has an abnormally short poly(A) tail and a reduced translational efficiency, resulting in an approximately 50% decrease in p53 protein levels. An shRNA-directed reduction in p53 protein by about 50% also results in extended cellular life span, reduced respiration and ROS, and increased glycolysis. Together, these results suggest that CPEB controls senescence and bioenergetics in human cells at least in part by modulating p53 mRNA polyadenylation-induced translation.

  8. CPEB regulation of human cellular senescence, energy metabolism, and p53 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David M.; Richter, Joel D.

    2008-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein (CPEB) stimulates polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and neurons. Here, we show that CPEB-regulated translation is essential for the senescence of human diploid fibroblasts. Knockdown of CPEB causes skin and lung cells to bypass the M1 crisis stage of senescence; reintroduction of CPEB into the knockdown cells restores a senescence-like phenotype. Knockdown cells that have bypassed senescence undergo little telomere erosion. Surprisingly, knockdown of exogenous CPEB that induced a senescence-like phenotype results in the resumption of cell growth. CPEB knockdown cells have fewer mitochondria than wild-type cells and resemble transformed cells by having reduced respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS), normal ATP levels, and enhanced rates of glycolysis. p53 mRNA contains cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements in its 3′ untranslated region (UTR), which promote polyadenylation. In CPEB knockdown cells, p53 mRNA has an abnormally short poly(A) tail and a reduced translational efficiency, resulting in an ∼50% decrease in p53 protein levels. An shRNA-directed reduction in p53 protein by about 50% also results in extended cellular life span, reduced respiration and ROS, and increased glycolysis. Together, these results suggest that CPEB controls senescence and bioenergetics in human cells at least in part by modulating p53 mRNA polyadenylation-induced translation. PMID:19141477

  9. Regulation of Cellular Communication by Signaling Microdomains in the Blood Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Biwer, Lauren A.; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function. PMID:24671377

  10. Mechanisms in photodynamic therapy: part two—cellular signaling, cell metabolism and modes of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been known for over a hundred years, but is only now becoming widely used. Originally developed as a tumor therapy, some of its most successful applications are for non-malignant disease. In the second of a series of three reviews, we will discuss the mechanisms that operate in PDT on a cellular level. In Part I [Castano AP, Demidova TN, Hamblin MR. Mechanism in photodynamic therapy: part one—photosensitizers, photochemistry and cellular localization. Photodiagn Photodyn Ther 2004;1:279–93] it was shown that one of the most important factors governing the outcome of PDT, is how the photosensitizer (PS) interacts with cells in the target tissue or tumor, and the key aspect of this interaction is the subcellular localization of the PS. PS can localize in mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes. An explosion of investigation and explorations in the field of cell biology have elucidated many of the pathways that mammalian cells undergo when PS are delivered in tissue culture and subsequently illuminated. There is an acute stress response leading to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and production of cytokines and stress proteins. Enzymes particularly, protein kinases, are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses are centered on mitochondria. These effects frequently lead to induction of apoptosis either by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspases and release of cytochrome c, or by pathways involving ceramide or death receptors. However, under certain circumstances cells subjected to PDT die by necrosis. Although there have been many reports of DNA damage caused by PDT, this is not thought to be an important cell-death pathway. This mechanistic research is expected to lead to optimization of PDT as a tumor treatment, and to rational selection of combination therapies that include PDT as a component. PMID:25048553

  11. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  12. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  13. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  14. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  15. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  16. MicroRNA Regulation of Oxidative Stress-Induced Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Sophia; Cavinato, Maria; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder

    2017-01-01

    Aging is a time-related process of functional deterioration at cellular, tissue, organelle, and organismal level that ultimately brings life to end. Cellular senescence, a state of permanent cell growth arrest in response to cellular stress, is believed to be the driver of the aging process and age-related disorders. The free radical theory of aging, referred to as oxidative stress (OS) theory below, is one of the most studied aging promoting mechanisms. In addition, genetics and epigenetics also play large roles in accelerating and/or delaying the onset of aging and aging-related diseases. Among various epigenetic events, microRNAs (miRNAs) turned out to be important players in controlling OS, aging, and cellular senescence. miRNAs can generate rapid and reversible responses and, therefore, are ideal players for mediating an adaptive response against stress through their capacity to fine-tune gene expression. However, the importance of miRNAs in regulating OS in the context of aging and cellular senescence is largely unknown. The purpose of our article is to highlight recent advancements in the regulatory role of miRNAs in OS-induced cellular senescence. PMID:28593022

  17. Integrin-linked kinase regulates cellular mechanics facilitating the motility in 3D extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Kunschmann, Tom; Puder, Stefanie; Fischer, Tony; Perez, Jeremy; Wilharm, Nils; Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2017-03-01

    The motility of cells plays an important role for many processes such as wound healing and malignant progression of cancer. The efficiency of cell motility is affected by the microenvironment. The connection between the cell and its microenvironment is facilitated by cell-matrix adhesion receptors and upon their activation focal adhesion proteins such as integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are recruited to sites of focal adhesion formation. In particular, ILK connects cell-matrix receptors to the actomyosin cytoskeleton. However, ILK's role in cell mechanics regulating cellular motility in 3D collagen matrices is still not well understood. We suggest that ILK facilitates 3D motility by regulating cellular mechanical properties such as stiffness and force transmission. Thus, ILK wild-type and knock-out cells are analyzed for their ability to migrate on 2D substrates serving as control and in dense 3D extracellular matrices. Indeed, ILK wild-type cells migrated faster on 2D substrates and migrated more numerous and deeper in 3D matrices. Hence, we analyzed cellular deformability, Young's modulus (stiffness) and adhesion forces. We found that ILK wild-type cells are less deformable (stiffer) and produce higher cell-matrix adhesion forces compared to ILK knock-out cells. Finally, ILK is essential for providing cellular mechanical stiffness regulating 3D motility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. N-myc downstream regulated 1 (NDRG1) is regulated by eukaryotic initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) during cellular stress caused by iron depletion.

    PubMed

    Lane, Darius J R; Saletta, Federica; Suryo Rahmanto, Yohan; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2013-01-01

    Iron is critical for cellular proliferation and its depletion leads to a suppression of both DNA synthesis and global translation. These observations suggest that iron depletion may trigger a cellular "stress response". A canonical response of cells to stress is the formation of stress granules, which are dynamic cytoplasmic aggregates containing stalled pre-initiation complexes that function as mRNA triage centers. By differentially prioritizing mRNA translation, stress granules allow for the continued and selective translation of stress response proteins. Although the multi-subunit eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) is required for translation initiation, its largest subunit, eIF3a, may not be essential for this activity. Instead, eIF3a is a vital constituent of stress granules and appears to act, in part, by differentially regulating specific mRNAs during iron depletion. Considering this, we investigated eIF3a's role in modulating iron-regulated genes/proteins that are critically involved in proliferation and metastasis. In this study, eIF3a was down-regulated and recruited into stress granules by iron depletion as well as by the classical stress-inducers, hypoxia and tunicamycin. Iron depletion also increased expression of the metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1), and a known downstream repressed target of eIF3a, namely the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p27(kip1). To determine if eIF3a regulates NDRG1 expression, eIF3a was inducibly over-expressed or ablated. Importantly, eIF3a positively regulated NDRG1 expression and negatively regulated p27(kip1) expression during iron depletion. This activity of eIF3a could be due to its recruitment to stress granules and/or its ability to differentially regulate mRNA translation during cellular stress. Additionally, eIF3a positively regulated proliferation, but negatively regulated cell motility and invasion, which may be due to the eIF3a-dependent changes in expression of NDRG1 and p27

  19. Raf/MEK/ERK can regulate cellular levels of LC3B and SQSTM1/p62 at expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hwan; Hong, Seung-Keun; Wu, Pui-Kei; Richards, Alexsia L; Jackson, William T; Park, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    While cellular LC3B and SQSTM1 levels serve as key autophagy markers, their regulation by different signaling pathways requires better understanding. Here, we report the mechanisms by which the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway regulates cellular LC3B and SQSTM1 levels. In different cell types, δRaf-1:ER- or B-RafV600E-mediated MEK/ERK activation increased LC3B-I, LC3B-II, and SQSTM1/p62 levels, which was accompanied by increased BiP/GRP78 expression. Use of the autophagy inhibitors chloroquine and bafilomycin A1, or RNA interference of ATG7, suggested that these increases in LC3B and SQSTM1 levels were in part attributed to altered autophagic flux. However, intriguingly, these increases were also attributed to their increased expression. Upon Raf/MEK/ERK activation, mRNA levels of LC3B and SQSTM1 were also increased, and subsequent luciferase reporter analyses suggested that SQSTM1 upregulation was mediated at transcription level. Under this condition, transcription of BiP/GRP78 was also increased, which was necessary for Raf/MEK/ERK to regulate LC3B at the protein, but not mRNA, level. This suggests that BiP has a role in regulating autophagy machinery when Raf/MEK/ERK is activated. In conclusion, these results suggest that, under a Raf/MEK/ERK-activated condition, the steady-state cellular levels of LC3B and SQSTM1 can also be determined by their altered expression wherein BiP is utilized as an effector of the signaling. PMID:25128814

  20. Nonsense-mediated RNA decay regulation by cellular stress: implications for tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Lawrence B

    2010-03-01

    Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) has long been viewed as an important constitutive mechanism to rapidly eliminate mutated mRNAs. More recently, it has been appreciated that NMD also degrades multiple nonmutated transcripts and that NMD can be regulated by wide variety of cellular stresses. Many of the stresses that inhibit NMD, including cellular hypoxia and amino acid deprivation, are experienced in cells exposed to hostile microenvironments, and several NMD-targeted transcripts promote cellular adaptation in response to these environmental stresses. Because adaptation to the microenvironment is crucial in tumorigenesis, and because NMD targets many mutated tumor suppressor gene transcripts, the regulation of NMD may have particularly important implications in cancer. This review briefly outlines the mechanisms by which transcripts are identified and targeted by NMD and reviews the evidence showing that NMD is a regulated process that can dynamically alter gene expression. Although much of the focus in NMD research has been in identifying the proteins that play a role in NMD and identifying NMD-targeted transcripts, recent data about the potential functional significance of NMD regulation, including the stabilization of alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms, the validation of mRNAs as bona fide NMD targets, and the role of NMD in tumorigenesis, are explored.

  1. HJURP regulates cellular senescence in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells via a p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jong-Ik; Cho, Jung Hee; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2013-08-01

    Holliday junction recognition protein (HJURP), a centromere protein-A (CENP-A) histone chaperone, mediates centromere-specific assembly of CENP-A nucleosome, contributing to high-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division. However, the role of HJURP in cellular senescence of human primary cells remains unclear. We found that the expression levels of HJURP decreased in human dermal fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells in replicative or premature senescence. Ectopic expression of HJURP in senescent cells partially overcame cell senescence. Conversely, downregulation of HJURP in young cells led to premature senescence. p53 knockdown, but not p16 knockdown, abolished senescence phenotypes caused by HJURP reduction. These data suggest that HJURP plays an important role in the regulation of cellular senescence through a p53-dependent pathway and might contribute to tissue or organismal aging and protection of cellular transformation.

  2. Retinoblastoma-binding Protein 4-regulated Classical Nuclear Transport Is Involved in Cellular Senescence*

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Akira; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Obuse, Chikashi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a fundamental cellular process in eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrated that retinoblastoma-binding protein 4 (RBBP4) functions as a novel regulatory factor to increase the efficiency of importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. RBBP4 accelerates the release of importin β1 from importin α via competitive binding to the importin β-binding domain of importin α in the presence of RanGTP. Therefore, it facilitates importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. We showed that the importin α/β pathway is down-regulated in replicative senescent cells, concomitant with a decrease in RBBP4 level. Knockdown of RBBP4 caused both suppression of nuclear transport and induction of cellular senescence. This is the first report to identify a factor that competes with importin β1 to bind to importin α, and it demonstrates that the loss of this factor can trigger cellular senescence. PMID:26491019

  3. MED28 regulates MEK1-dependent cellular migration in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Chou, Yu-Hsuan; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2012-12-01

    MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, exhibits several cellular roles, including a merlin, Grb2, and cytoskeleton-associated protein (magicin), a repressor of smooth muscle cell differentiation, and an endothelial-derived gene (EG-1). Overexpression of MED28 may stimulate cell proliferation which presumably results from the transcriptional activation of the Mediator function. Additionally, several tumors, including breast cancer, highly express MED28. We have found recently that MED28 potentiated epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced migration in human breast cancer cells. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify the role of MED28 in the aspect of cellular migration and invasion in human breast cancer cells. Suppression of MED28 blocked cellular migration and invasion with concomitant reduced expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAP2K1; MEK1); overexpression of MED28 enhanced cellular migration and upregulated MMP2 and MEK1 expression. Moreover, suppression of MEK1, by dominant-negative, kinase-dead MEK1 cDNA construct or MEK1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) as well as MEK1 inhibitors, blocked MED28-induced MMP2 activation, cellular migration, and invasion in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of MEK1 rescued the inhibitory effect of MED28 knockdown on invasion, and exogenous MMP2 recombinant protein recovered the suppression on invasion upon MED28 or MEK1 knockdown. Our data indicate that MED28 regulates cellular migration in a MEK1-dependent manner in human breast cancer cells, reinforcing the important cellular roles of MED28.

  4. Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Chunaram; Kumar, Chanchal; Gnad, Florian; Nielsen, Michael L; Rehman, Michael; Walther, Tobias C; Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2009-08-14

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylation's cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600 lysine acetylation sites on 1750 proteins and quantified acetylation changes in response to the deacetylase inhibitors suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and MS-275. Lysine acetylation preferentially targets large macromolecular complexes involved in diverse cellular processes, such as chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, splicing, nuclear transport, and actin nucleation. Acetylation impaired phosphorylation-dependent interactions of 14-3-3 and regulated the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. Our data demonstrate that the regulatory scope of lysine acetylation is broad and comparable with that of other major posttranslational modifications.

  5. Regulation of mammalian microRNA processing and function by cellular signaling and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2008-01-01

    For many microRNAs, in many normal tissues and in cancer cells, the cellular levels of mature microRNAs are not simply determined by transcription of microRNA genes. This mini-review will discuss how microRNA biogenesis and function can be regulated by various nuclear and cytoplasmic processing events, including emerging evidence that microRNA pathway components can be selectively regulated by control of their subcellular localization and by modifications that occur during dynamic cellular signaling. Finally, I will briefly summarize studies of microRNAs in synaptic fractions of adult mouse forebrain, which may serve as a model for other cell types as well. PMID:18433727

  6. The Regulation of Cellular Responses to Mechanical Cues by Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Jing Ling; Tan, Mei Hua; Koh, Cheng-Gee

    2016-01-01

    The Rho GTPases regulate many cellular signaling cascades that modulate cell motility, migration, morphology and cell division. A large body of work has now delineated the biochemical cues and pathways, which stimulate the GTPases and their downstream effectors. However, cells also respond exquisitely to biophysical and mechanical cues such as stiffness and topography of the extracellular matrix that profoundly influence cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. As these cellular responses are mediated by the actin cytoskeleton, an involvement of Rho GTPases in the transduction of such cues is not unexpected. In this review, we discuss an emerging role of Rho GTPase proteins in the regulation of the responses elicited by biophysical and mechanical stimuli. PMID:27058559

  7. Simulation of abrasive water jet cutting process: Part 2. Cellular automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbanic, Henri; Junkar, Mihael

    2004-11-01

    A new two-dimensional cellular automata (CA) model for the simulation of the abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting process is presented. The CA calculates the shape of the cutting front, which can be used as an estimation of the surface quality. The cutting front is formed based on material removal rules and AWJ propagation rules. The material removal rule calculates when a particular part of the material will be removed with regard to the energy of AWJ. The AWJ propagation rule calculates the distribution of AWJ energy through CA by using a weighted average. The modelling with CA also provides a visual narrative of the moving of the cutting front, which is hard to observe in real process. The algorithm is fast and has been successfully tested in comparison to cutting fronts obtained with cutting experiments of aluminium alloy.

  8. Possible cellular regulation schemes of isoprene synthesis and emission under different ambient carbon dioxide levels. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noe, S. M.; Schnitzler, J.; Arneth, A.; Monson, R. K.; Niinemets, U.

    2010-12-01

    Research on the effects of higher atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on isoprene synthesis and emission leaded to several newly proposed regulation schemes. They can be classified as substrate level control on one side and as energetic cofactor control of the plastidic 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway on the other one. Viewed on a whole cell scale, the precursors of isoprene, such as dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), can be found in several cellular compartments such as chloroplasts, cytosol and mitochondria. Furthermore, necessary entry points into the isoprene synthesis pathway like phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate are provided by two processes, photosynthesis and glycolysis, which are as well located in different cellular compartments. These findings imply, that the effect of modulating the isoprene emission under high levels of atmospheric CO2 have to take transport over membranes, possible concurrent pathways, i.e. Shikimi acid pathway or anaplerotic metabolism reactions and the availability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) on a cellular scale into account. In this modeling study we applied box models that include several facets of the proposed regulation and transport schemes. The models have been set up such that at least two cellular compartments, chloroplast and cytosol are taken into account. The boxes itself represent metabolites and several possible regulation schemes have been realized by the formulation of rate equations between those metabolite pools. As many intermediates are not readily available as measured values, the models aim to build a set of tools to simulate possible regulatory schemes and provide parameter estimations for key processes. Inverse modeling techniques allow to assess certain parameter ranges within the proposed regulation schemes by fitting the models to data on isoprene emission and photosynthesis under

  9. Cellular bioenergetics is regulated by PARP1 under resting conditions and during oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Módis, Katalin; Gerő, Domokos; Erdélyi, Katalin; Szoleczky, Petra; DeWitt, Douglas; Szabo, Csaba

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the current studies was to elucidate the role of the principal poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase isoform, PARP1 in the regulation of cellular energetics in endothelial cells under resting conditions and during oxidative stress. Methods We utilized bEnd.3 endothelial cells and A549 human transformed epithelial cells. PARP1 was inhibited either by pharmacological inhibitors or by siRNA silencing. The Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used to measure indices of mitochondrial respiration (oxygen consumption rate) and of glycolysis (extracellular acidification rate). Cell viability, cellular and mitochondrial NAD+ levels and mitochondrial biogenesis were also measured. Results Silencing of PARP1 increased basal cellular parameters of oxidative phosphorylation, providing direct evidence that PARP1 is a regulator of mitochondrial function in resting cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of PARP1 and siRNA silencing of PARP1 protected against the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated the respiratory reserve capacity in endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress. The observed effects were unrelated to an effect on mitochondrial biogenesis. Isolated mitochondria of A549 human transformed epithelial cells exhibited an improved resting bioenergetic status after stable lentiviral silencing of PARP1; these effects were associated with elevated resting mitochondrial NAD+ levels in PARP1 silenced cells. Conclusions PARP1 is a regulator of basal cellular energetics in resting endothelial and epithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells respond with a decrease in their mitochondrial reserve capacity during low-level oxidative stress, an effect, which is attenuated by PARP1 inhibition. While PARP1 is a regulator of oxidative phosphorylation in resting and oxidatively stressed cells, it only exerts a minor effect on glycolysis. PMID:22198485

  10. Molecular and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) protein in regulation of proteasome function.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; Kumar, Brajesh; DeMartino, George N

    2014-06-20

    We investigated molecular features and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) on regulation of proteasome function. PI31 has a C-terminal HbYX (where Hb is a hydrophobic amino acid, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) motif characteristic of several proteasome activators. Peptides corresponding to the PI31 C terminus also bind to and activate the 20 S proteasome in an HbYX-dependent manner, but intact PI31protein inhibits in vitro 20 S activity. Binding to and inhibition of the proteasome by PI31 are conferred by the HbYX-containing proline-rich C-terminal domain but do not require HbYX residues. Thus, multiple regions of PI31 bind independently to the proteasome and collectively determine effects on activity. PI31 blocks the ATP-dependent in vitro assembly of 26 S proteasome from 20 S proteasome and PA700 subcomplexes but has no effect on in vitro activity of the intact 26 S proteasome. To determine the physiologic significance of these in vitro effects, we assessed multiple aspects of cellular proteasome content and function after altering PI31 levels. We detected no change in overall cellular proteasome content or function when PI31 levels were either increased by moderate ectopic overexpression or decreased by RNA interference (RNAi). We also failed to identify a role of PI31 ADP-ribosylation as a mechanism for regulation of overall 26 S proteasome content and function, as recently proposed. Thus, despite its in vitro effects on various proteasome activities and its structural relationship to established proteasome regulators, cellular roles and mechanisms of PI31 in regulation of proteasome function remain unclear and require future definition. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Molecular and Cellular Roles of PI31 (PSMF1) Protein in Regulation of Proteasome Function*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; Kumar, Brajesh; DeMartino, George N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated molecular features and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) on regulation of proteasome function. PI31 has a C-terminal HbYX (where Hb is a hydrophobic amino acid, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) motif characteristic of several proteasome activators. Peptides corresponding to the PI31 C terminus also bind to and activate the 20 S proteasome in an HbYX-dependent manner, but intact PI31protein inhibits in vitro 20 S activity. Binding to and inhibition of the proteasome by PI31 are conferred by the HbYX-containing proline-rich C-terminal domain but do not require HbYX residues. Thus, multiple regions of PI31 bind independently to the proteasome and collectively determine effects on activity. PI31 blocks the ATP-dependent in vitro assembly of 26 S proteasome from 20 S proteasome and PA700 subcomplexes but has no effect on in vitro activity of the intact 26 S proteasome. To determine the physiologic significance of these in vitro effects, we assessed multiple aspects of cellular proteasome content and function after altering PI31 levels. We detected no change in overall cellular proteasome content or function when PI31 levels were either increased by moderate ectopic overexpression or decreased by RNA interference (RNAi). We also failed to identify a role of PI31 ADP-ribosylation as a mechanism for regulation of overall 26 S proteasome content and function, as recently proposed. Thus, despite its in vitro effects on various proteasome activities and its structural relationship to established proteasome regulators, cellular roles and mechanisms of PI31 in regulation of proteasome function remain unclear and require future definition. PMID:24770418

  12. FAD-dependent lysine-specific demethylase-1 regulates cellular energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shinjiro; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Nagaoka, Katsuya; Anan, Kotaro; Wang, Yuqing; Mimasu, Shinya; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-03-27

    Environmental factors such as nutritional state may act on the epigenome that consequently contributes to the metabolic adaptation of cells and the organisms. The lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) is a unique nuclear protein that utilizes flavin adenosine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor. Here we show that LSD1 epigenetically regulates energy-expenditure genes in adipocytes depending on the cellular FAD availability. We find that the loss of LSD1 function, either by short interfering RNA or by selective inhibitors in adipocytes, induces a number of regulators of energy expenditure and mitochondrial metabolism such as PPARγ coactivator-1α resulting in the activation of mitochondrial respiration. In the adipose tissues from mice on a high-fat diet, expression of LSD1-target genes is reduced, compared with that in tissues from mice on a normal diet, which can be reverted by suppressing LSD1 function. Our data suggest a novel mechanism where LSD1 regulates cellular energy balance through coupling with cellular FAD biosynthesis.

  13. FAD-dependent lysine-specific demethylase-1 regulates cellular energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Hino, Shinjiro; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Nagaoka, Katsuya; Anan, Kotaro; Wang, Yuqing; Mimasu, Shinya; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors such as nutritional state may act on the epigenome that consequently contributes to the metabolic adaptation of cells and the organisms. The lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) is a unique nuclear protein that utilizes flavin adenosine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor. Here we show that LSD1 epigenetically regulates energy-expenditure genes in adipocytes depending on the cellular FAD availability. We find that the loss of LSD1 function, either by short interfering RNA or by selective inhibitors in adipocytes, induces a number of regulators of energy expenditure and mitochondrial metabolism such as PPARγ coactivator-1α resulting in the activation of mitochondrial respiration. In the adipose tissues from mice on a high-fat diet, expression of LSD1-target genes is reduced, compared with that in tissues from mice on a normal diet, which can be reverted by suppressing LSD1 function. Our data suggest a novel mechanism where LSD1 regulates cellular energy balance through coupling with cellular FAD biosynthesis. PMID:22453831

  14. Oxidative stress activates a specific p53 transcriptional response that regulates cellular senescence and aging

    PubMed Central

    Gambino, Valentina; De Michele, Giulia; Venezia, Oriella; Migliaccio, Pierluigi; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Bernard, Loris; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Fazia, Maria Agnese Della; Bartoli, Daniela; Servillo, Giuseppe; Alcalay, Myriam; Luzi, Lucilla; Giorgio, Marco; Scrable, Heidi; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Migliaccio, Enrica

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a determining factor of cellular senescence and aging and a potent inducer of the tumour-suppressor p53. Resistance to oxidative stress correlates with delayed aging in mammals, in the absence of accelerated tumorigenesis, suggesting inactivation of selected p53-downstream pathways. We investigated p53 regulation in mice carrying deletion of p66, a mutation that retards aging and confers cellular resistance and systemic resistance to oxidative stress. We identified a transcriptional network of ∼200 genes that are repressed by p53 and encode for determinants of progression through mitosis or suppression of senescence. They are selectively down-regulated in cultured fibroblasts after oxidative stress, and, in vivo, in proliferating tissues and during physiological aging. Selectivity is imposed by p66 expression and activation of p44/p53 (also named Delta40p53), a p53 isoform that accelerates aging and prevents mitosis after protein damage. p66 deletion retards aging and increases longevity of p44/p53 transgenic mice. Thus, oxidative stress activates a specific p53 transcriptional response, mediated by p44/p53 and p66, which regulates cellular senescence and aging. PMID:23448364

  15. Regulation of SIRT2-dependent α-tubulin deacetylation by cellular NAD levels.

    PubMed

    Skoge, Renate Hvidsten; Dölle, Christian; Ziegler, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    Acetylation of α-tubulin on lysine 40 is one of the major posttranslational modifications of microtubules. The acetylation reaction is catalyzed by alpha-tubulin N-acetyltransferase and the modification can be reversed by either the NAD-independent class II histone deacetylase HDAC6 or the NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT2. In this study, we assessed to what extent cellular NAD levels are involved in the regulation of the α-tubulin acetylation state. Cells were subjected to different treatments known to influence cellular NAD content. In response to NAD depletion caused by inhibition of NAD synthesis from nicotinamide, α-tubulin was hyperacetylated. Under these conditions, the normal tubulin acetylation state could be restored by providing the cells with alternative NAD precursors. Likewise, decreasing the rate of endogenous NAD consumption using an inhibitor of poly-ADP-ribosylation also stabilized the acetylation of α-tubulin. Conversely, the level of acetylated α-tubulin decreased when NAD synthesis was enhanced by overexpression of an NAD biosynthetic enzyme. Combined, these results show that the tubulin acetylation status is reciprocally regulated by cellular NAD levels. Furthermore, we provide evidence confirming that the NAD-dependent regulation of tubulin acetylation is mediated by SIRT2.

  16. Cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying blood flow regulation in the retina choroid in health disease

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A.; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2012-01-01

    We review the cellular and physiological mechanisms responsible for the regulation of blood flow in the retina and choroid in health and disease. Due to the intrinsic light sensitivity of the retina and the direct visual accessibility of fundus blood vessels, the eye offers unique opportunities for the non-invasive investigation of mechanisms of blood flow regulation. The ability of the retinal vasculature to regulate its blood flow is contrasted with the far more restricted ability of the choroidal circulation to regulate its blood flow by virtue of the absence of glial cells, the markedly reduced pericyte ensheathment of the choroidal vasculature, and the lack of intermediate filaments in choroidal pericytes. We review the cellular and molecular components of the neurovascular unit in the retina and choroid, techniques for monitoring retinal and choroidal blood flow, responses of the retinal and choroidal circulation to light stimulation, the role of capillaries, astrocytes and pericytes in regulating blood flow, putative signaling mechanisms mediating neurovascular coupling in the retina, and changes that occur in the retinal and choroidal circulation during diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease. We close by discussing issues that remain to be explored. PMID:22580107

  17. Regulation of TGF-β signaling, exit from the cell cycle, and cellular migration through cullin cross-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Tarek; Keaton, Mignon; Dutta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of the cell cycle and genome instability are common features of cancer cells and various mechanisms exist to preserve the integrity of the genome and guard against cancer. The cullin 4-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) with the substrate receptor Cdt2 (CRL4Cdt2) promotes cell cycle progression and prevents genome instability through ubiquitylation and degradation of Cdt1, p21, and Set8 during S phase of the cell cycle and following DNA damage. Two recently published studies report the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of Cdt2 via the cullin 1-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL1) in association with the substrate specificity factor and tumor suppressor FBXO11 (CRL1FBXO11). The newly identified pathway restrains the activity of CRL4Cdt2 on p21 and Set8 and regulates cellular response to TGF-β, exit from the cell cycle and cellular migration. Here, we show that the CRL1FBXO11 also promotes the degradation of Cdt2 during an unperturbed cell cycle to promote efficient progression through S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We discuss how this new method of regulating the abundance of Cdt2 participates in various cellular activities. PMID:23892434

  18. Proposed changes for part N of suggested state regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, R.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses proposed changes for Part N regulations regarding naturally occuring radioactive materials. It describes the work of the Commission on NORM of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), toward adjusting the regulations. A set of questions was formulated and a review panel established to address these questions and come back with recommended actions. The panel recommended the distinction that the material being regulated is `Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material` (TENORM). By this they mean `naturally occurring radioactive material not regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) whose radionuclide concentrations have been increased by or as a result of human practices.` Recommendations also include: using a dose based instead of concentration based standard; refined definition of exemptions from regulations; exclusion of radon from Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) calculations; provide states flexibility in implementation; inclusion of prospective remedial and operations aspects for TENORM; provision of institutional controls.

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates L-arginine mediated cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our prior study revealed the loss in short-term L-Arginine (ARG) therapeutic efficacy after continuous exposure; resulting in tolerance development, mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) down-regulation, secondary to oxidative stress and induced glucose accumulation. However, the potential factor regulating ARG cellular response is presently unknown. Method Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 100 μM ARG for 2 h in buffer (short-term or acute), or for 7 days in culture medium and challenged for 2 h in buffer (continuous or chronic), in the presence or absence of other agents. eNOS activity was determined by analyzing cellular nitrite/nitrate (NO2–/NO3–), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity was assayed using SAMS peptide. 13C6 glucose was added to medium to measure glucose uptake during cellular treatments, which were determined by LC-MS/MS. Cellular glucose was identified by o-toluidine method. Superoxide (O2•–) was identified by EPR-spin-trap, and peroxynitrite (ONOO–) was measured by flow-cytometer using aminophenyl fluorescein dye. Results Short-term incubation of cells with 100 μM ARG in the presence or absence of 30 μM L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 30 μM AMPK inhibitor (compound C, CMP-C) increased cellular oxidative stress and overall glucose accumulation with no variation in glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), or AMPK activity from control. The increase in total NO2–/NO3– after 2 h 100 μM ARG exposure, was suppressed in cells co-incubated with 30 μM CMP-C or L-NAME. Long-term exposure of ARG with or without CMP-C or L-NAME suppressed NO2–/NO3–, glucose uptake, GLUT-1, AMPK expression and activity below control, and increased overall cellular glucose, O2•– and ONOO–. Gluconeogenesis inhibition with 30 μM 5-Chloro-2-N-2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonamido-benzoxazole (CDB) during ARG exposure for 2 h maintained overall cellular glucose to control, but increased

  20. Genome-wide network model capturing seed germination reveals coordinated regulation of plant cellular phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.; Lan, Hui; Glaab, Enrico; Gibbs, Daniel J.; Gerjets, Tanja; Krasnogor, Natalio; Bonner, Anthony J.; Holdsworth, Michael J.; Provart, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed germination is a complex trait of key ecological and agronomic significance. Few genetic factors regulating germination have been identified, and the means by which their concerted action controls this developmental process remains largely unknown. Using publicly available gene expression data from Arabidopsis thaliana, we generated a condition-dependent network model of global transcriptional interactions (SeedNet) that shows evidence of evolutionary conservation in flowering plants. The topology of the SeedNet graph reflects the biological process, including two state-dependent sets of interactions associated with dormancy or germination. SeedNet highlights interactions between known regulators of this process and predicts the germination-associated function of uncharacterized hub nodes connected to them with 50% accuracy. An intermediate transition region between the dormancy and germination subdomains is enriched with genes involved in cellular phase transitions. The phase transition regulators SERRATE and EARLY FLOWERING IN SHORT DAYS from this region affect seed germination, indicating that conserved mechanisms control transitions in cell identity in plants. The SeedNet dormancy region is strongly associated with vegetative abiotic stress response genes. These data suggest that seed dormancy, an adaptive trait that arose evolutionarily late, evolved by coopting existing genetic pathways regulating cellular phase transition and abiotic stress. SeedNet is available as a community resource (http://vseed.nottingham.ac.uk) to aid dissection of this complex trait and gene function in diverse processes. PMID:21593420

  1. Coordination of Cellular Localization-Dependent Effects of Sumoylation in Regulating Cardiovascular and Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jun-Ichi; Sandhu, Uday G; Hoang, Nguyet Minh; Thangam, Manoj; Quintana-Quezada, Raymundo A; Fujiwara, Keigi; Le, Nhat Tu

    2017-01-01

    Sumoylation, a reversible post-transcriptional modification process, of proteins are involved in cellular differentiation, growth, and even motility by regulating various protein functions. Sumoylation is not limited to cytosolic proteins as recent evidence shows that nuclear proteins, those associated with membranes, and mitochondrial proteins are also sumoylated. Moreover, it is now known that sumoylation plays an important role in the process of major human ailments such as malignant, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. In this chapter, we will highlight and discuss how the localization of SUMO protease and SUMO E3 ligase in different compartments within a cell regulates biological processes that depend on sumoylation. First, we will discuss the key role of sumoylation in the nucleus, which leads to the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis . We will then discuss how sumoylation of plasma membrane potassium channel proteins are involved in epilepsy and arrhythmia. Mitochondrial proteins are known to be also sumoylated, and the importance of dynamic-related protein 1 (DRP1) sumoylation on mitochondrial function will be discussed. As we will emphasize throughout this review, sumoylation plays crucial roles in different cellular compartments, which is coordinately regulated by the translocation of various SUMO proteases and SUMO E3 ligase. Comprehensive approach will be necessary to understand the molecular mechanism for efficiently moving around various enzymes that regulate sumoylation within cells.

  2. Ion regulation in fish gills: recent progress in the cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Pung-Pung; Lee, Tsung-Han; Lin, Li-Yih

    2011-07-01

    Fish encounter harsh ionic/osmotic gradients on their aquatic environments, and the mechanisms through which they maintain internal homeostasis are more challenging compared with those of terrestrial vertebrates. Gills are one of the major organs conducting the internal ionic and acid-base regulation, with specialized ionocytes as the major cells carrying out active transport of ions. Exploring the iono/osmoregulatory mechanisms in fish gills, extensive literature proposed several models, with many conflicting or unsolved issues. Recent studies emerged, shedding light on these issues with new opened windows on other aspects, on account of available advanced molecular/cellular physiological approaches and animal models. Respective types of ionocytes and ion transporters, and the relevant regulators for the mechanisms of NaCl secretion, Na(+) uptake/acid secretion/NH(4)(+) excretion, Ca(2+) uptake, and Cl(-) uptake/base secretion, were identified and functionally characterized. These new ideas broadened our understanding of the molecular/cellular mechanisms behind the functional modification/regulation of fish gill ion transport during acute and long-term acclimation to environmental challenges. Moreover, a model for the systematic and local carbohydrate energy supply to gill ionocytes during these acclimation processes was also proposed. These provide powerful platforms to precisely study transport pathways and functional regulation of specific ions, transporters, and ionocytes; however, very few model species were established so far, whereas more efforts are needed in other species.

  3. 76 FR 66281 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation...). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Jim Teague, United States Transportation Command, TCJ5/4-PI, 508...

  4. An overview of the regulation of bone remodelling at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Kular, Jasreen; Tickner, Jennifer; Chim, Shek Man; Xu, Jiake

    2012-08-01

    To review the current literature on the regulation of bone remodelling at the cellular level. The cellular activities of the cells in the basic multicellular unit (BMU) were evaluated. Bone remodelling requires an intimate cross-talk between osteoclasts and osteoblasts and is tightly coordinated by regulatory proteins that interact through complex autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. Osteocytes, bone lining cells, osteomacs, and vascular endothelial cells also regulate bone remodelling in the BMU via cell signalling networks of ligand-receptor complexes. In addition, through secreted and membrane-bound factors in the bone microenvironment, T and B lymphocytes mediate bone homeostasis in osteoimmunology. Osteoporosis and other bone diseases occur because multicellular communication within the BMU is disrupted. Understanding the cellular and molecular basis of bone remodelling and the discovery of novel paracrine or coupling factors, such as RANKL, sclerostin, EGFL6 and semaphorin 4D, will lay the foundation for drug development against bone diseases. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Lynne D.; Asara, John M.; Cheruiyot, Collins K.; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J.; Newstein, Michael C.; Dooner, Mark S.; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A.; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1–infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1–infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1–infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  6. Catecholamine Stress Hormones Regulate Cellular Iron Homeostasis by a Posttranscriptional Mechanism Mediated by Iron Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tapryal, Nisha; Vivek G, Vishnu; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate availability of iron is important for cellular energy metabolism. Catecholamines such as epinephrine and norepinephrine promote energy expenditure to adapt to conditions that arose due to stress. To restore the energy balance, epinephrine/norepinephrine-exposed cells may face higher iron demand. So far, no direct role of epinephrine/norepinephrine in cellular iron homeostasis has been reported. Here we show that epinephrine/norepinephrine regulates iron homeostasis components such as transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H in hepatic and skeletal muscle cells by promoting the binding of iron regulatory proteins to iron-responsive elements present in the UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H transcripts. Increased transferrin receptor-1, decreased ferritin-H, and increased iron-responsive element-iron regulatory protein interaction are also observed in liver and muscle tissues of epinephrine/norepinephrine-injected mice. We demonstrate the role of epinephrine/norepinephrine-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in converting cytosolic aconitase (ACO1) into iron regulatory protein-1 to bind iron-responsive elements present in UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H. Our study further reveals that mitochondrial iron content and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2) activity are elevated by epinephrine/norepinephrine that are blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and iron regulatory protein-1 siRNA, suggesting involvement of reactive oxygen species and iron regulatory protein-1 in this mechanism. This study reveals epinephrine and norepinephrine as novel regulators of cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:25572399

  7. Cellular Proteomes Drive Tissue-Specific Regulation of the Heat Shock Response

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Grant, Christopher E.; Plagens, Rosemary N.; Barrett, Lindsey N.; Guisbert, Karen S. Kim; Guisbert, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a cellular stress response that senses protein misfolding and restores protein folding homeostasis, or proteostasis. We previously identified an HSR regulatory network in Caenorhabditis elegans consisting of highly conserved genes that have important cellular roles in maintaining proteostasis. Unexpectedly, the effects of these genes on the HSR are distinctly tissue-specific. Here, we explore this apparent discrepancy and find that muscle-specific regulation of the HSR by the TRiC/CCT chaperonin is not driven by an enrichment of TRiC/CCT in muscle, but rather by the levels of one of its most abundant substrates, actin. Knockdown of actin subunits reduces induction of the HSR in muscle upon TRiC/CCT knockdown; conversely, overexpression of an actin subunit sensitizes the intestine so that it induces the HSR upon TRiC/CCT knockdown. Similarly, intestine-specific HSR regulation by the signal recognition particle (SRP), a component of the secretory pathway, is driven by the vitellogenins, some of the most abundant secretory proteins. Together, these data indicate that the specific protein folding requirements from the unique cellular proteomes sensitizes each tissue to disruption of distinct subsets of the proteostasis network. These findings are relevant for tissue-specific, HSR-associated human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, we characterize organismal phenotypes of actin overexpression including a shortened lifespan, supporting a recent hypothesis that maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton is an important factor for longevity. PMID:28143946

  8. Distinct 5′ UTRs regulate XIAP expression under normal growth conditions and during cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Alura; Jordan, Lindsay E.; Holcik, Martin

    2010-01-01

    X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis, XIAP, is cellular caspase inhibitor and a key regulator of apoptosis. We and others have previously shown that XIAP expression is regulated primarily at the level of protein synthesis; the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of XIAP mRNA contains an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) that supports cap-independent expression of XIAP protein during conditions of pathophysiological stress, such as serum deprivation or gamma irradiation. Here, we show that XIAP is encoded by two distinct mRNAs that differ in their 5′ UTRs. We further show that the dominant, shorter, 5′ UTR promotes a basal level of XIAP expression under normal growth conditions. In contrast, the less abundant longer 5′ UTR contains an IRES and supports cap-independent translation during stress. Our data suggest that the combination of alternate regulatory regions and distinct translational initiation modes is critical in maintaining XIAP levels in response to cellular stress and may represent a general mechanism of cellular adaptation. PMID:20385593

  9. Posttranscriptional regulation of cellular gene expression by the c-myc oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, G.C.; Cole, M.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been implicated in the development of many different cancers, yet the mechanism by which the c-myc protein alters cellular growth control has proven elusive. The authors used a cDNA hybridization difference assay to isolate two genes, mr1 and mr2, that were constitutively expressed (i.e., deregulated) in rodent fibroblast cell lines immortalized by transfection of a viral promoter-linked c-myc gene. Both cDNAs were serum inducible in quiescent G/sub o/ fibroblasts, suggesting that they are functionally related to cellular proliferative processes. Although there were significant differences in cytoplasmic mRNA levels between myc-immortalized and control cells, the rates of transcription and mRNA turnover of both genes were similar, suggesting that c-myc regulates mr1 and mr2 expression by some nuclear posttranscriptional mechanism. Their results provide evidence that c-myc can rapidly modulate cellular gene expression and suggest that c-myc may function in gene regulation at the level of RNA export, splicing, or nuclear RNA turnover.

  10. SaeRS Is Responsive to Cellular Respiratory Status and Regulates Fermentative Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; Gries, Casey M; Scherr, Tyler D; Kielian, Tammy; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    Biofilms are multicellular communities of microorganisms living as a quorum rather than as individual cells. The bacterial human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus uses oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor during respiration. Infected human tissues are hypoxic or anoxic. We recently reported that impaired respiration elicits a programmed cell lysis (PCL) phenomenon in S. aureus leading to the release of cellular polymers that are utilized to form biofilms. PCL is dependent upon the AtlA murein hydrolase and is regulated, in part, by the SrrAB two-component regulatory system (TCRS). In the current study, we report that the SaeRS TCRS also governs fermentative biofilm formation by positively influencing AtlA activity. The SaeRS-modulated factor fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) also contributed to the fermentative biofilm formation phenotype. SaeRS-dependent biofilm formation occurred in response to changes in cellular respiratory status. Genetic evidence presented suggests that a high cellular titer of phosphorylated SaeR is required for biofilm formation. Epistasis analyses found that SaeRS and SrrAB influence biofilm formation independently of one another. Analyses using a mouse model of orthopedic implant-associated biofilm formation found that both SaeRS and SrrAB govern host colonization. Of these two TCRSs, SrrAB was the dominant system driving biofilm formation in vivo We propose a model wherein impaired cellular respiration stimulates SaeRS via an as yet undefined signal molecule(s), resulting in increasing expression of AtlA and FnBPA and biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Nuclear localization signal sequence is required for VACM-1/CUL5-dependent regulation of cellular growth.

    PubMed

    Willis, Angelica N; Dean, Shirley E Bradley; Habbouche, Joe A; Kempers, Brian T; Ludwig, Megan L; Sayfie, Aaron D; Lewis, Steven P; Harrier, Stephanie; DeBruine, Zachary J; Garrett, Richard; Burnatowska-Hledin, Maria A

    2017-04-01

    VACM-1/CUL5 is a member of the cullin family of proteins involved in the E3 ligase-dependent degradation of diverse proteins that regulate cellular proliferation. The ability of VACM-1/CUL5 to inhibit cellular growth is affected by its posttranslational modifications and its localization to the nucleus. Since the mechanism of VACM-1/CUL5 translocation to the nucleus is not clear, the goal of this project was to determine the role that the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) we identified in the VACM-1/CUL5 ((640)PKLKRQ(646)) plays in the cellular localization of VACM-1/CUL5 and its effect on cellular growth. We used site-directed mutagenesis to change Lys642 and Lys644 to Gly and the mutated cDNA constructs were transfected into COS-1 cells. Mutation of the NLS in VACM-1/CUL5 significantly reduced its localization to the nucleus and compromised its effect on cellular growth. We have shown previously that the antiproliferative effect of VACM-1/CUL5 could be reversed by mutation of PKA-specific phosphorylation sequence ((S730A)VACM-1/CUL5), which was associated with its increased nuclear localization and modification by NEDD8. Thus, we examined whether these properties can be controlled by the NLS. The mutation of NLS in (S730A)VACM-1/CUL5 cDNA compromised its proliferative effect and reduced its localization to the nucleus. The immunocytochemistry results showed that, in cells transfected with the mutant cDNAs, the nuclear NEDD8 signal was decreased. Western blot analysis of total cell lysates, however, showed that VACM-1/CUL5 neddylation was not affected. Together, these results suggest that the presence of the NLS, both in VACM-1/CUL5 and in (S730A)VACM-1/CUL5 sequences, is critical for their control of cell proliferation.

  12. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kirjavainen, Anna; Laos, Maarja; Anttonen, Tommi; Pirvola, Ulla

    2015-03-13

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea.

  13. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, Jessica A.; Rickel, Kirby E.; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A.; Carlisle, Gabriel B.; Nelson, Heidi J.; Cardillo, Andrew L.; Weber, Emily A.; Vitiello, Peter F.; Pearce, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  14. BAF180 regulates cellular senescence and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis through p21

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemin; Dai, Fangyan; Zhuang, Li; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; Kim, Jongchan; Zhang, Yilei; Ma, Li; You, M. James; Wang, Zhong; Gan, Boyi

    2016-01-01

    BAF180 (also called PBRM1), a subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, plays critical roles in the regulation of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, and is frequently mutated in several human cancers. However, the role of mammalian BAF180 in tumor suppression and tissue maintenance in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, using a conditional somatic knockout approach, we explored the cellular and organismal functions of BAF180 in mouse. BAF180 deletion in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) triggers profound cell cycle arrest, premature cellular senescence, without affecting DNA damage response or chromosomal integrity. While somatic deletion of BAF180 in adult mice does not provoke tumor development, BAF180 deficient mice exhibit defects in hematopoietic system characterized by progressive reduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), defective long-term repopulating potential, and hematopoietic lineage developmental aberrations. BAF180 deletion results in elevated p21 expression in both MEFs and HSCs. Mechanistically, we showed that BAF180 binds to p21 promoter, and BAF180 deletion enhances the binding of modified histones associated with transcriptional activation on p21 promoter. Deletion of p21 rescues cell cycle arrest and premature senescence in BAF180 deficient MEFs, and partially rescues hematopoietic defects in BAF180 deficient mice. Together, our study identifies BAF180 as a critical regulator of cellular senescence and HSC homeostasis, which is at least partially regulated through BAF180-mediated suppression of p21 expression. Our results also suggest that senescence triggered by BAF180 inactivation may serve as a failsafe mechanism to restrain BAF180 deficiency-associated tumor development, providing a conceptual framework to further understand BAF180 function in tumor biology. PMID:26992241

  15. Cellular energy stress induces AMPK-mediated regulation of YAP and the Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jung-Soon; Meng, Zhipeng; Kim, Young Chul; Park, Hyun Woo; Hansen, Carsten Gram; Kim, Soohyun; Lim, Dae-Sik; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-04-01

    YAP (Yes-associated protein) is a transcription co-activator in the Hippo tumour suppressor pathway and controls cell growth, tissue homeostasis and organ size. YAP is inhibited by the kinase Lats, which phosphorylates YAP to induce its cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation. YAP induces gene expression by binding to the TEAD family transcription factors. Dysregulation of the Hippo-YAP pathway is frequently observed in human cancers. Here we show that cellular energy stress induces YAP phosphorylation, in part due to AMPK-dependent Lats activation, thereby inhibiting YAP activity. Moreover, AMPK directly phosphorylates YAP Ser 94, a residue essential for the interaction with TEAD, thus disrupting the YAP-TEAD interaction. AMPK-induced YAP inhibition can suppress oncogenic transformation of Lats-null cells with high YAP activity. Our study establishes a molecular mechanism and functional significance of AMPK in linking cellular energy status to the Hippo-YAP pathway.

  16. Cellular energy stress induces AMPK-mediated regulation of YAP and the Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jung-Soon; Meng, Zhipeng; Kim, Young Chul; Park, Hyun Woo; Hansen, Carsten Gram; Kim, Soohyun; Lim, Dae-Sik; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    YAP (Yes-associated protein) is a transcription co-activator in the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and controls cell growth, tissue homeostasis, and organ size. YAP is inhibited by the kinase Lats, which phosphorylates YAP to induce its cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation. YAP induces gene expression by binding to the TEAD family transcription factors. Dysregulation of the Hippo-YAP pathway is frequently observed in human cancers. Here we show that cellular energy stress induces YAP phosphorylation, in part due to AMPK-dependent Lats activation, thereby inhibiting YAP activity. Moreover, AMPK directly phosphorylates YAP S94, a residue essential for the interaction with TEAD, thus disrupting the YAP-TEAD interaction. AMPK-induced YAP inhibition can suppress oncogenic transformation of Lats-null cells with high YAP activity. Our study establishes a molecular mechanism and functional significance of AMPK in linking cellular energy status to the Hippo-YAP pathway. PMID:25751140

  17. New insights into the regulation and cellular functions of the ARP2/3 complex.

    PubMed

    Rotty, Jeremy D; Wu, Congying; Bear, James E

    2013-01-01

    The actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex nucleates branched actin filament networks, but requires nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) to stimulate this activity. NPFs include proteins such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP), neural WASP (NWASP), WASP family verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE; also known as SCAR) and the recently identified WASP and SCAR homologue (WASH) complex. The mechanisms underlying NPF-dependent regulation and the cellular functions of ARP2/3 are being unravelled using new chemical and genetic approaches. Of particular interest is the role of the ARP2/3 complex in vesicular trafficking and directional cell motility.

  18. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 385 - Regulations Pertaining to Remedial Directives in Part 385, Subpart J

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulations Pertaining to Remedial Directives in Part 385, Subpart J C Appendix C to Part 385 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to...—Regulations Pertaining to Remedial Directives in Part 385, Subpart J § 395.1(h)(1)(i)Requiring or permitting...

  19. Protein O-GlcNAcylation: A critical regulator of the cellular response to stress

    PubMed Central

    Chatham, John C.; Marchase, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The post-translational modification of serine and threonine residues of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins by the O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide ß-N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a highly dynamic and ubiquitous protein modification that plays a critical role in regulating numerous biological processes. Much of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of O-GlcNAc on cellular function has been in the context of chronic disease processes. However, there is increasing evidence that O-GlcNAc levels are increased in response to stress and that acute augmentation of this response is cytoprotective, at least in the short term. Conversely, a reduction in O-GlcNAc levels appears to be associated with decreased cell survival in response to an acute stress. Here we summarize our current understanding of protein O-GlcNAcylation on the cellular response to stress and in mediating cellular protective mechanisms focusing primarily on the cardiovascular system as an example. We consider the potential link between O-GlcNAcylation and cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and explore the parallels between O-GlcNAc signaling and redox signaling. We also discuss the apparent paradox between the reported adverse effects of increased O-GlcNAcylation with its recently reported role in mediating cell survival mechanisms. PMID:22308107

  20. The cellular factor TRP-185 regulates RNA polymerase II binding to HIV-1 TAR RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Baer, F; Lane, W S; Gaynor, R B

    1995-01-01

    Activation of HIV-1 gene expression by the transactivator Tat is dependent on an RNA regulatory element located downstream of the transcription initiation site known as TAR. To characterize cellular factors that bind to TAR RNA and are involved in the regulation of HIV-1 transcription, HeLa nuclear extract was fractionated and RNA gel-retardation analysis was performed. This analysis indicated that only two cellular factors, RNA polymerase II and the previously characterized TAR RNA loop binding protein TRP-185, were capable of binding specifically to TAR RNA. To elucidate the function of TRP-185, it was purified from HeLa nuclear extract, amino acid microsequence analysis was performed and a cDNA encoding TRP-185 was isolated. TRP-185 is a novel protein of 1621 amino acids which contains a leucine zipper and potentially a novel RNA binding motif. In gel-retardation assays, the binding of both recombinant TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II was dependent on the presence of an additional group of proteins designated cellular cofactors. Both the TAR RNA loop and bulge sequences were critical for RNA polymerase II binding, while TRP-185 binding was dependent only on TAR RNA loop sequences. Since binding of TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II to TAR RNA was found to be mutually exclusive, our results suggest that TRP-185 may function either alone or in conjunction with Tat to disengage RNA polymerase II which is stalled upon binding to nascently synthesized TAR RNA during transcriptional elongation. Images PMID:8846792

  1. Polyanhydride micelles with diverse morphologies for shape-regulated cellular internalization and blood circulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Jie; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Biodegradable amphiphilic poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based ether-anhydride terpolymer, consisting of PEG, 1, 3-bis (p-carboxyphenoxy) propane (CPP) and sebacic acid (SA), namely PEG-CPP-SA terpolymer, was employed to self-assemble into micelles by adding water into a solution of the terpolymer in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The shape of polyanhydride micelles can be regulated by simply adjusting the water addition rate, where spherical, rod-like and comb-like micelles can obtained under water addition rate of 20, 3 and 1 ml/h, respectively. The effect of micellar morphologies on the cellular internalization and intracellular distribution were characterized qualitatively with cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) and hepatoma cells (HepG2 cells) by fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results reveal that the cellular uptake of micelles are micelle-shape-dependent (rod-like micelles may possess the highest cellular internalization rate) and cell-type-specific. Each endocytic pathway can make a contribution to this process in different degree. Moreover, blood circulation experiments of these micelles were carried out, demonstrating that comb-like micelles have a relatively longer blood circulating feature, which may due to its irregular shape help to increase the sensitivity to fluid forces and allows them to tumble and align with the blood flow. PMID:28596913

  2. Temporal Regulation of Somatic Embryogenesis by Adjusting Cellular Polyamine Content in Eggplant1

    PubMed Central

    Singh Yadav, Jitender; Venkat Rajam, Manchikatla

    1998-01-01

    Four critical stages of embryogenesis, including callus induction, cellular acquisition of morphogenetic competence, expression of embryogenic program, and development and maturation of somatic embryos during somatic embryogenesis from leaf discs of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Temporal changes in arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity and polyamines (PAs) during critical stages of embryogenesis revealed that high levels of PAs (especially putrescine [PUT]), due to higher ADC activity in discs from the apical region (with high embryogenic capacity) than from the basal region of the leaf (with poor embryogenic capacity), were correlated with differential embryogenesis response. Kinetic studies of the up- and down-regulation of embryogenesis revealed that PUT and difluoromethylarginine pretreatments were most effective before the onset of embryogenesis. Basal discs pretreated with PUT for 4 to 7 d showed improved embryogenesis that was comparable to apical discs. PA content at various critical steps in embryogenesis from basal discs were found to be comparable to that of apical discs following adjustments of cellular PA content by PUT. In contrast, pretreatment of apical discs with difluoromethylarginine for 3 d significantly reduced ADC activity, cellular PA content, and embryogenesis to levels that were comparable to basal discs. Discs from the basal region of leaves treated with PUT for 3 d during the identified stages of embryogenesis improved their embryogenic potential. PMID:9490762

  3. Under lock and key: spatiotemporal regulation of WASP family proteins coordinates separate dynamic cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Burianek, Lauren E; Soderling, Scott H

    2013-04-01

    WASP family proteins are nucleation promoting factors that bind to and activate the Arp2/3 complex in order to stimulate nucleation of branched actin filaments. The WASP family consists of WASP, N-WASP, WAVE1-3, WASH, and the novel family members WHAMM and JMY. Each of the family members contains a C-terminus responsible for their nucleation promoting activity and unique N-termini that allow for them to be regulated in a spatiotemporal manner. Upon activation they reorganize the cytoskeleton for different cellular functions depending on their subcellular localization and regulatory protein interactions. Emerging evidence indicates that WASH, WHAMM, and JMY have functions that require the coordination of both actin polymerization and microtubule dynamics. Here, we review the mechanisms of regulation for each family member and their associated in vivo functions including cell migration, vesicle trafficking, and neuronal development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Under lock and key: Spatiotemporal regulation of WASP family proteins coordinates separate dynamic cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Burianek, Lauren E.; Soderling, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    WASP family proteins are nucleation promoting factors that bind to and activate the Arp2/3 complex in order to stimulate nucleation of branched actin filaments. The WASP family consists of WASP, N-WASP, WAVE1-3, WASH, and the novel family members WHAMM and JMY. Each of the family members contains a C-terminus responsible for their nucleation promoting activity and unique N-termini that allow for them to be regulated in a spatiotemporal manner. Upon activation they reorganize the cytoskeleton for different cellular functions depending on their subcellular localization and regulatory protein interactions. Emerging evidence indicates that WASH, WHAMM, and JMY have functions that require the coordination of both actin polymerization and microtubule dynamics. Here, we review the mechanisms of regulation for each family member and their associated in vivo functions including cell migration, vesicle trafficking, and neuronal development. PMID:23291261

  5. Senescence-Inflammatory Regulation of Reparative Cellular Reprogramming in Aging and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Alarcón, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    The inability of adult tissues to transitorily generate cells with functional stem cell-like properties is a major obstacle to tissue self-repair. Nuclear reprogramming-like phenomena that induce a transient acquisition of epigenetic plasticity and phenotype malleability may constitute a reparative route through which human tissues respond to injury, stress, and disease. However, tissue rejuvenation should involve not only the transient epigenetic reprogramming of differentiated cells, but also the committed re-acquisition of the original or alternative committed cell fate. Chronic or unrestrained epigenetic plasticity would drive aging phenotypes by impairing the repair or the replacement of damaged cells; such uncontrolled phenomena of in vivo reprogramming might also generate cancer-like cellular states. We herein propose that the ability of senescence-associated inflammatory signaling to regulate in vivo reprogramming cycles of tissue repair outlines a threshold model of aging and cancer. The degree of senescence/inflammation-associated deviation from the homeostatic state may delineate a type of thresholding algorithm distinguishing beneficial from deleterious effects of in vivo reprogramming. First, transient activation of NF-κB-related innate immunity and senescence-associated inflammatory components (e.g., IL-6) might facilitate reparative cellular reprogramming in response to acute inflammatory events. Second, para-inflammation switches might promote long-lasting but reversible refractoriness to reparative cellular reprogramming. Third, chronic senescence-associated inflammatory signaling might lock cells in highly plastic epigenetic states disabled for reparative differentiation. The consideration of a cellular reprogramming-centered view of epigenetic plasticity as a fundamental element of a tissue's capacity to undergo successful repair, aging degeneration or malignant transformation should provide challenging stochastic insights into the current

  6. Senescence-Inflammatory Regulation of Reparative Cellular Reprogramming in Aging and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Alarcón, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    The inability of adult tissues to transitorily generate cells with functional stem cell-like properties is a major obstacle to tissue self-repair. Nuclear reprogramming-like phenomena that induce a transient acquisition of epigenetic plasticity and phenotype malleability may constitute a reparative route through which human tissues respond to injury, stress, and disease. However, tissue rejuvenation should involve not only the transient epigenetic reprogramming of differentiated cells, but also the committed re-acquisition of the original or alternative committed cell fate. Chronic or unrestrained epigenetic plasticity would drive aging phenotypes by impairing the repair or the replacement of damaged cells; such uncontrolled phenomena of in vivo reprogramming might also generate cancer-like cellular states. We herein propose that the ability of senescence-associated inflammatory signaling to regulate in vivo reprogramming cycles of tissue repair outlines a threshold model of aging and cancer. The degree of senescence/inflammation-associated deviation from the homeostatic state may delineate a type of thresholding algorithm distinguishing beneficial from deleterious effects of in vivo reprogramming. First, transient activation of NF-κB-related innate immunity and senescence-associated inflammatory components (e.g., IL-6) might facilitate reparative cellular reprogramming in response to acute inflammatory events. Second, para-inflammation switches might promote long-lasting but reversible refractoriness to reparative cellular reprogramming. Third, chronic senescence-associated inflammatory signaling might lock cells in highly plastic epigenetic states disabled for reparative differentiation. The consideration of a cellular reprogramming-centered view of epigenetic plasticity as a fundamental element of a tissue's capacity to undergo successful repair, aging degeneration or malignant transformation should provide challenging stochastic insights into the current

  7. 75 FR 59102 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Part 204, Administrative Matters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ...; Part 204, Administrative Matters AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System, Department of Defense.... 0 Therefore 48 CFR part 204 is amended as follows: PART 204--ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS 0 1....

  8. Regulation of cellular marker modulated upon irradiation of low power laser light in burn injured mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnakar, Bharath; Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Chandra, Subhash; Rai, Sharada; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-12-01

    The present study intends to understand the importance of cellular marker in tissue regeneration regulated upon irradiation of low power laser light in burn inflicted mice. Under anesthetic conditions, the thermal injury was induced on Swiss albino mice of either sex. Following injury, the animals were randomly divided into three groups; i. e., un-illuminated control, the group treated with 5% Povidone iodine (reference standard) and single exposure of 3 J/cm2 (830 nm). Burn tissue samples from each group were excised at day 6 post burn injury upon euthanization and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) staining was performed on the selected sections to asses proliferation and angiogenesis at day 6 post-injury. For immunohistochemical analysis, tissue sections from all the three treatment groups on day 6 were stained using specific antibody against Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The results of the histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed improved tissue restoration in animals treated with optimal laser influence as compared to un-illuminated controls. The findings of present study clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of 830 nm laser in burn wound healing and its influence in regulating the cellular marker.

  9. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4) and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293) cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn) present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1) levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells. PMID:20546600

  10. Zoledronic acid and geranylgeraniol regulate cellular behaviour and angiogenic gene expression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zafar, S; Coates, D E; Cullinan, M P; Drummond, B K; Milne, T; Seymour, G J

    2014-10-01

    The mevalonate pathway (MVP) and the anti-angiogenic effect of bisphosphonates have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). This study determined the effect of the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid and the replenishment of the MVP by geranylgeraniol on human gingival fibroblasts. Cell viability, apoptosis, morphological analysis using transmission electron microscopy, and gene expression for vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenic protein 2, ras homologue gene family member B, epiregulin and interferon-alpha were conducted. Results showed cellular viability was decreased in the presence of zoledronic acid and the co-addition of zoledronic acid with geranylgeraniol restored cell viability to control levels. Caspase 3/7 was detected in zoledronic-acid-treated cells indicating apoptosis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed dilation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum with zoledronic acid and the appearance of multiple lipid-like vesicles following the addition of geranylgeraniol. Zoledronic acid significantly (P < 0.05, FR > ± 2) up-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenic protein 2, ras homologue gene family member B and epiregulin at one or more time points but not interferon-alpha. Addition of geranylgeraniol resulted in a reduction in the expression of all five genes compared with zoledronic-acid-treated human gingival fibroblasts. The study concluded geranylgeraniol partially reversed the effects of zoledronic acid in human gingival fibroblasts both at the cellular and genetic levels, suggesting the regulation of these genes is mediated via the mevalonate pathway.

  11. Cellular microRNAs up-regulate transcription via interaction with promoter TATA-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Fan, Miaomiao; Zhang, Xue; Huang, Feng; Wu, Kang; Zhang, Junsong; Liu, Jun; Huang, Zhuoqiong; Luo, Haihua; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    The TATA box represents one of the most prevalent core promoters where the pre-initiation complexes (PICs) for gene transcription are assembled. This assembly is crucial for transcription initiation and well regulated. Here we show that some cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Among them, let-7i sequence specifically binds to the TATA-box motif of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene and elevates IL-2 mRNA and protein production in CD4(+) T-lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Through direct interaction with the TATA-box motif, let-7i facilitates the PIC assembly and transcription initiation of IL-2 promoter. Several other cellular miRNAs, such as mir-138, mir-92a or mir-181d, also enhance the promoter activities via binding to the TATA-box motifs of insulin, calcitonin or c-myc, respectively. In agreement with the finding that an HIV-1-encoded miRNA could enhance viral replication through targeting the viral promoter TATA-box motif, our data demonstrate that the interaction with core transcription machinery is a novel mechanism for miRNAs to regulate gene expression.

  12. Molecular and cellular regulation of hypothalamic melanocortin neurons controlling food intake and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Koch, M; Horvath, T L

    2014-07-01

    The brain receives and integrates environmental and metabolic information, transforms these signals into adequate neuronal circuit activities, and generates physiological behaviors to promote energy homeostasis. The responsible neuronal circuitries show lifetime plasticity and guaranty metabolic health and survival. However, this highly evolved organization has become challenged nowadays by chronic overload with nutrients and reduced physical activity, which results in an ever-increasing number of obese individuals worldwide. Research within the last two decades has aimed to decipher the responsible molecular and cellular mechanisms for regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin neurons, which have a key role in the control of food intake and energy metabolism. This review maps the central connections of the melanocortin system and highlights its global position and divergent character in physiological and pathological metabolic events. Moreover, recently uncovered molecular and cellular processes in hypothalamic neurons and glial cells that drive plastic morphological and physiological changes in these cells, and account for regulation of food intake and energy metabolism, are brought into focus. Finally, potential functional interactions between metabolic disorders and psychiatric diseases are discussed.

  13. The polycystins are modulated by cellular oxygen-sensing pathways and regulate mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Padovano, Valeria; Kuo, Ivana Y.; Stavola, Lindsey K.; Aerni, Hans R.; Flaherty, Benjamin J.; Chapin, Hannah C.; Ma, Ming; Somlo, Stefan; Boletta, Alessandra; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Rinehart, Jesse; Caplan, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), which form an ion channel complex that may mediate ciliary sensory processes and regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ release. Loss of PC1 expression profoundly alters cellular energy metabolism. The mechanisms that control the trafficking of PC1 and PC2, as well as their broader physiological roles, are poorly understood. We found that O2 levels regulate the subcellular localization and channel activity of the polycystin complex through its interaction with the O2-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain containing protein EGLN3 (or PHD3), which hydroxylates PC1. Moreover, cells lacking PC1 expression use less O2 and show less mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in response to bradykinin-induced ER Ca2+ release, indicating that PC1 can modulate mitochondrial function. These data suggest a novel role for the polycystins in sensing and responding to cellular O2 levels. PMID:27881662

  14. Pancreatic Mesenchyme Regulates Islet Cellular Composition in a Patched/Hedgehog-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Hibsher, Daniel; Epshtein, Alona; Oren, Nufar; Landsman, Limor

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas development requires restrained Hedgehog (Hh) signaling activation. While deregulated Hh signaling in the pancreatic mesenchyme has been long suggested to be detrimental for proper organogenesis, this association was not directly shown. Here, we analyzed the contribution of mesenchymal Hh signaling to pancreas development. To increase Hh signaling in the pancreatic mesenchyme of mouse embryos, we deleted Patched1 (Ptch1) in these cells. Our findings indicate that deregulated Hh signaling in mesenchymal cells was sufficient to impair pancreas development, affecting both endocrine and exocrine cells. Notably, transgenic embryos displayed disrupted islet cellular composition and morphology, with a reduced β-cell portion. Our results indicate that the cell-specific growth rates of α- and β-cell populations, found during normal development, require regulated mesenchymal Hh signaling. In addition, we detected hyperplasia of mesenchymal cells upon elevated Hh signaling, accompanied by them acquiring smooth-muscle like phenotype. By specifically manipulating mesenchymal cells, our findings provide direct evidence for the non-autonomous roles of the Hh pathway in pancreatic epithelium development. To conclude, we directly show that regulated mesenchymal Hh signaling is required for pancreas organogenesis and establishment of its proper cellular composition. PMID:27892540

  15. Mitochondrial Ion Channels/Transporters as Sensors and Regulators of Cellular Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Shin-Young; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and the electron transport chain (ETC) serve as key sensors and regulators for cellular redox signaling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) in mitochondria, and balancing cell survival and death. Although the functional and pharmacological characteristics of mitochondrial ion transport mechanisms have been extensively studied for several decades, the majority of the molecular identities that are responsible for these channels/transporters have remained a mystery until very recently. Recent Advances: Recent breakthrough studies uncovered the molecular identities of the diverse array of major mitochondrial ion channels/transporters, including the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter pore, mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel. This new information enables us to form detailed molecular and functional characterizations of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and their roles in mitochondrial redox signaling. Critical Issues: Redox-mediated post-translational modifications of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and ETC serve as key mechanisms for the spatiotemporal control of mitochondrial ROS/RNS generation. Future Directions: Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms for redox-mediated regulation of mitochondrial ion channels will enable us to find novel therapeutic targets for many diseases that are associated with cellular redox signaling and mitochondrial ion channels/transporters. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 987–1006. PMID:24180309

  16. Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate cellular fitness and functionality of T cell lineages through distinct gene programs.

    PubMed

    Pioli, Peter D; Whiteside, Sarah K; Weis, Janis J; Weis, John H

    2016-05-01

    T lymphocytes are essential contributors to the adaptive immune system and consist of multiple lineages that serve various effector and regulatory roles. As such, precise control of gene expression is essential to the proper development and function of these cells. Previously, we identified Snai2 and Snai3 as being essential regulators of immune tolerance partly due to the impaired function of CD4(+) regulatory T cells in Snai2/3 conditional double knockout mice. Here we extend those previous findings using a bone marrow transplantation model to provide an environmentally unbiased view of the molecular changes imparted onto various T lymphocyte populations once Snai2 and Snai3 are deleted. The data presented here demonstrate that Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate the cellular fitness and functionality of not only CD4(+) regulatory T cells but effector CD8(α+) and CD4(+) conventional T cells as well. This is achieved through the modulation of gene sets unique to each cell type and includes transcriptional targets relevant to the survival and function of each T cell lineage. As such, Snai2 and Snai3 are essential regulators of T cell immunobiology.

  17. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress – regulations and functional significance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  18. Cellular context–mediated Akt dynamics regulates MAP kinase signaling thresholds during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellesøy, Monica; Lorens, James B.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of new blood vessels by sprouting angiogenesis is tightly regulated by contextual cues that affect angiogeneic growth factor signaling. Both constitutive activation and loss of Akt kinase activity in endothelial cells impair angiogenesis, suggesting that Akt dynamics mediates contextual microenvironmental regulation. We explored the temporal regulation of Akt in endothelial cells during formation of capillary-like networks induced by cell–cell contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) and vSMC-associated VEGF. Expression of constitutively active Akt1 strongly inhibited network formation, whereas hemiphosphorylated Akt1 epi-alleles with reduced kinase activity had an intermediate inhibitory effect. Conversely, inhibition of Akt signaling did not affect endothelial cell migration or morphogenesis in vSMC cocultures that generate capillary-like structures. We found that endothelial Akt activity is transiently blocked by proteasomal degradation in the presence of SMCs during the initial phase of capillary-like structure formation. Suppressed Akt activity corresponded to the increased endothelial MAP kinase signaling that was required for angiogenic endothelial morphogenesis. These results reveal a regulatory principle by which cellular context regulates Akt protein dynamics, which determines MAP kinase signaling thresholds necessary drive a morphogenetic program during angiogenesis. PMID:26023089

  19. Early vertebrate origin and diversification of small transmembrane regulators of cellular ion transport.

    PubMed

    Pirkmajer, Sergej; Kirchner, Henriette; Lundell, Leonidas S; Zelenin, Pavel V; Zierath, Juleen R; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2017-07-15

    Small transmembrane proteins such as FXYDs, which interact with Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase, and the micropeptides that interact with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase play fundamental roles in regulation of ion transport in vertebrates. Uncertain evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships among these regulators of ion transport have led to inconsistencies in their classification across vertebrate species, thus hampering comparative studies of their functions. We discovered the first FXYD homologue in sea lamprey, a basal jawless vertebrate, which suggests small transmembrane regulators of ion transport emerged early in the vertebrate lineage. We also identified 13 gene subfamilies of FXYDs and propose a revised, phylogeny-based FXYD classification that is consistent across vertebrate species. These findings provide an improved framework for investigating physiological and pathophysiological functions of small transmembrane regulators of ion transport. Small transmembrane proteins are important for regulation of cellular ion transport. The most prominent among these are members of the FXYD family (FXYD1-12), which regulate Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase, and phospholamban, sarcolipin, myoregulin and DWORF, which regulate the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase (SERCA). FXYDs and regulators of SERCA are present in fishes, as well as terrestrial vertebrates; however, their evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships are obscure, thus hampering comparative physiological studies. Here we discovered that sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative of extant jawless vertebrates (Cyclostomata), expresses an FXYD homologue, which strongly suggests that FXYDs predate the emergence of fishes and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Using a combination of sequence-based phylogenetic analysis and conservation of local chromosome context, we determined that FXYDs markedly diversified in the lineages leading to cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) and

  20. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  1. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  2. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  3. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  4. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  5. 75 FR 20825 - Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Part 211...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Part 211, Describing Agency Needs AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System... the message. Fax: 703-602-0350. Mail: Defense Acquisition Regulations System, Attn: Ms....

  6. Nuclear FAK: a New Mode of Gene Regulation from Cellular Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) crucial in regulation of cell migration and proliferation. In addition to its canonical roles as a cytoplasmic kinase downstream of integrin and growth factor receptor signaling, recent studies revealed new aspects of FAK action in the nucleus. Nuclear FAK promotes p53 and GATA4 degradation via ubiquitination, resulting in enhanced cell proliferation and reduced inflammatory responses. FAK can also serve as a co-transcriptional regulator that alters a gene transcriptional activity. These findings established a new paradigm of FAK signaling from cellular adhesions to the nucleus. Although physiological stimuli for controlling FAK nuclear localization have not been completely characterized, FAK shuttles from focal adhesions to the nucleus to directly convey extracellular signals. Interestingly, nuclear translocation of FAK becomes prominent in kinase-inhibited conditions such as in de-adhesion and pharmacological FAK inhibition, while a small fraction of nuclear FAK is observed a normal growth condition. In this review, roles of nuclear FAK in regulating transcription factors will be discussed. Furthermore, a potential use of a pharmacological FAK inhibitor to target nuclear FAK function in diseases such as inflammation will be emphasized. PMID:23686429

  7. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  8. A cellular repressor regulates transcription initiation from the minute virus of mice P38 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Krauskopf, A; Aloni, Y

    1994-01-01

    We previously reported that the P38 promoter of minute virus of mice (MVM) is trans activated by the viral nonstructural protein, NS1, through an interaction with a downstream promoter element designated DPE. In this communication we report the identification of a distinct downstream promoter element which inhibits transcription from the P38 promoter in vitro, in the absence of the DPE. Removal of 34 bp from the region between +95 and +129 downstream from the P38 initiation start site relieved inhibition of transcription in whole-cell extract. Inhibition was also relieved by the addition, to the transcription reaction, of excess DNA fragments which span the putative inhibiting element. This indicated the involvement of a trans-acting factor, in inhibition of transcription from the P38. Gel retardation experiments demonstrated the specific binding of a cellular protein to the inhibitory element. This P38 inhibitory element shows spacing and orientation dependence as well as promoter specificity. The regulation of viral transcription by a cellular repressor may play an important role in obtaining a fine temporal order of viral gene expression during the course of infection. Images PMID:8139925

  9. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms.

  10. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Perry E.; Tansey, John T.; Welte, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kiloDaltons (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  11. Cellular and tissue distribution of potassium: physiological relevance, mechanisms and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Izhar; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2014-05-15

    Potassium (K(+)) is the most important cationic nutrient for all living organisms. Its cellular levels are significant (typically around 100mM) and are highly regulated. In plants K(+) affects multiple aspects such as growth, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress and movement of plant organs. These processes occur at the cell, organ and whole plant level and not surprisingly, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms for the uptake, efflux and distribution of K(+) both within cells and between organs. Great progress has been made in the last decades regarding the molecular mechanisms of K(+) uptake and efflux, particularly at the cellular level. For long distance K(+) transport our knowledge is less complete but the principles behind the overall processes are largely understood. In this chapter we will discuss how both long distance transport between different organs and intracellular transport between organelles works in general and in particular for K(+). Where possible, we will provide examples of specific genes and proteins that are responsible for these phenomena.

  12. Pyruvate kinase is a dosage-dependent regulator of cellular amino acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Grüning, Nana-Maria; Feichtinger, René; Krüger, Antje; Wamelink, Mirjam; Lehrach, Hans; Tate, Stephen; Neureiter, Daniel; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) is required for cancer development, and has been implicated in the metabolic transition from oxidative to fermentative metabolism, the Warburg effect. However, the global metabolic response that follows changes in PK activity is not yet fully understood. Using shotgun proteomics, we identified 31 yeast proteins that were regulated in a PK-dependent manner. Selective reaction monitoring confirmed that their expression was dependent on PK isoform, level and activity. Most of the PK targets were amino acid metabolizing enzymes or factors of protein translation, indicating that PK plays a global regulatory role in biosynthethic amino acid metabolism. Indeed, we found strongly altered amino acid profiles when PK levels were changed. Low PK levels increased the cellular glutamine and glutamate concentrations, but decreased the levels of seven amino acids including serine and histidine. To test for evolutionary conservation of this PK function, we quantified orthologues of the identified PK targets in thyroid follicular adenoma, a tumor characterized by high PK levels and low respiratory activity. Aminopeptidase AAP-1 and serine hydroxymethyltransferase SHMT1 both showed PKM2- concentration dependence, and were upregulated in the tumor. Thus, PK expression levels and activity were important for maintaining cellular amino acid homeostasis. Mediating between energy production, ROS clearance and amino acid biosynthesis, PK thus plays a central regulatory role in the metabolism of proliferating cells. PMID:23154538

  13. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Splinter, Daniël; Razafsky, David S.; Schlager, Max A.; Serra-Marques, Andrea; Grigoriev, Ilya; Demmers, Jeroen; Keijzer, Nanda; Jiang, Kai; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; King, Stephen J.; Akhmanova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end–directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein–dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein–dynactin recruitment to cargo by the conserved motor adaptor Bicaudal D2 (BICD2). We show that dynein and dynactin depend on each other for BICD2-mediated targeting to cargo and that BICD2 N-terminus (BICD2-N) strongly promotes stable interaction between dynein and dynactin both in vitro and in vivo. Direct visualization of dynein in live cells indicates that by itself the triple BICD2-N–dynein–dynactin complex is unable to interact with either cargo or microtubules. However, tethering of BICD2-N to different membranes promotes their microtubule minus-end–directed motility. We further show that LIS1 is required for dynein-mediated transport induced by membrane tethering of BICD2-N and that LIS1 contributes to dynein accumulation at microtubule plus ends and BICD2-positive cellular structures. Our results demonstrate that dynein recruitment to cargo requires concerted action of multiple dynein cofactors. PMID:22956769

  14. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 385 - Regulations Pertaining to Remedial Directives in Part 385, Subpart J

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Part 385, Subpart J C Appendix C to Part 385 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Pt. 385, App. C Appendix C to Part 385.... § 395.3(c)(1)Requiring or permitting a property-carrying commercial motor vehicle driver to restart...

  15. Copper-dependent regulation of NMDA receptors by cellular prion protein: implications for neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stys, Peter K; You, Haitao; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    Abstract N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate a wide range of important nervous system functions. Conversely, excessive NMDA receptor activity leads to cytotoxic calcium overload and neuronal damage in a wide variety of CNS disorders. It is well established that NMDA receptors are tightly regulated by a number of cell signalling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that NMDA receptor activity is modulated by cellular prion protein (PrPC) in a copper-dependent manner. Here we give an overview of the current state of knowledge concerning the novel concept of potent modulation of this receptor's kinetics by copper ions, and the interplay between NMDA receptors and PrPC in the context of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, pain and depression. PMID:22310309

  16. HTLV Tax: A Fascinating Multifunctional Co-Regulator of Viral and Cellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Currer, Robert; Van Duyne, Rachel; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Das, Ravi; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been identified as the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The virus infects between 15 and 20 million people worldwide of which approximately 2–5% develop ATL. The past 35 years of research have yielded significant insight into the pathogenesis of HTLV-1, including the molecular characterization of Tax, the viral transactivator, and oncoprotein. In spite of these efforts, the mechanisms of oncogenesis of this pleiotropic protein remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we illustrate the multiple oncogenic roles of Tax by summarizing a recent body of literature that refines our understanding of cellular transformation. A focused range of topics are discussed in this review including Tax-mediated regulation of the viral promoter and other cellular pathways, particularly the connection of the NF-κB pathway to both post-translational modifications (PTMs) of Tax and subcellular localization. Specifically, recent research on polyubiquitination of Tax as it relates to the activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex is highlighted. Regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage responses due to Tax are also discussed, including Tax interaction with minichromosome maintenance proteins and the role of Tax in chromatin remodeling. The recent identification of HTLV-3 has amplified the importance of the characterization of emerging viral pathogens. The challenge of the molecular determination of pathogenicity and malignant disease of this virus lies in the comparison of the viral transactivators of HTLV-1, -2, and -3 in terms of transformation and immortalization. Consequently, differences between the three proteins are currently being studied to determine what factors are required for the differences in tumorogenesis. PMID:23226145

  17. Aldosterone regulates cellular turnover and mitogen-activated protein kinase family expression in the neonatal rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Bae, In Sun; Jang, Gi Young; Hong, Young Sook; Lee, Joo Won

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that aldosterone is a potent mitogenic signal regulating genes involved in antiapoptosis, cell proliferation and growth. We investigated the role of endogenous aldosterone in renal development, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family expression. Newborn rats were treated with either spironolactone (200 mg/kg/d) in olive oil or only olive oil for 7 days. TUNEL assay and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) stain were performed on kidney sections. Immunoblots, immunohistochemical (IHC) stain, and reverse transcriptase-PCR for MAPKs were performed. PCNA-positive proliferating cells decreased and apoptotic cells increased significantly with spironolactone (P < 0.05). In the spironolactone-treated group, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-2 expression increased, whereas extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)-2 and p38 expressions decreased in immunoblots (P < 0.05) and IHC stain. ERK-2 and p38 mRNA expressions increased in the spironolactone-treated group (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that aldosterone blockade in the developing kidney decreases cellular proliferation, increases apoptosis, and modulates the expressions of JNK-2, ERK-2, and p38. Aldosterone possibly participates in renal development and MAPK family may serve as, in part, the signaling intermediate through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the developing kidney. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 724-733, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Transcriptional program of Kpna2/Importin-α2 regulates cellular differentiation-coupled circadian clock development in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Yasuhiro; Koike, Nobuya; Matsumoto, Tsuguhiro; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Chen, Zheng; Yasuhara, Noriko; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock in mammalian cells is cell-autonomously generated during the cellular differentiation process, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Here we show that perturbation of the transcriptional program by constitutive expression of transcription factor c-Myc and DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) ablation disrupts the differentiation-coupled emergence of the clock from mouse ESCs. Using these model ESCs, 484 genes are identified by global gene expression analysis as factors correlated with differentiation-coupled circadian clock development. Among them, we find the misregulation of Kpna2 (Importin-α2) during the differentiation of the c-Myc-overexpressed and Dnmt1−/− ESCs, in which sustained cytoplasmic accumulation of PER proteins is observed. Moreover, constitutive expression of Kpna2 during the differentiation culture of ESCs significantly impairs clock development, and KPNA2 facilitates cytoplasmic localization of PER1/2. These results suggest that the programmed gene expression network regulates the differentiation-coupled circadian clock development in mammalian cells, at least in part via posttranscriptional regulation of clock proteins. PMID:25389311

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  20. Cellular levels of feedback regulator of adenylate cyclase and the effect of epinephrine and insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, R j; Russell, T R; Asakawa, T; Sutherland, E W

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained direct evidence that shows the cellular formation and subsequent release of a potent inhibitor (feedback regulator) of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by adipocytes, upon stimulation with epinephrine. The appearance of such a feedback regulator in adipocytes preceded its release into the medium. During a 30 min incubation, intracellular regulator levels rose rapidly and reached 39-61 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Release of inhibitor into the medium increased slowly and was 11-16 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Upon continued incubation, the cells at 30 min contained 30-41 units/g of ingibitor, slightly less than the content at 30 min; meanwhile, the medium content rose more than 3-fold. The inhibitor from both locations appeared to have the same characteristics, judging from the purification procedures and the biological activities on hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase was inhibited by the feedback regulator in vitro when either epinephrine, corticotropin (ACTH), or glucagon was used as activator. The site of action of this inhibitor is therefore most likely beyond the specific hormone receptors. A new in vitro action of insulin has been found. Insulin, 50-500 microunits/ml, inhibited the formation and release of this factor from isolated rat or hamster adipocytes by 29-81% after these cells were stimulated by hormones that raise intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate. This factor enhaced the effect of insulin in lowering the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in fresh rat adipocytes. A reduced formation of such a factor may modify the metabolic events in adipocytes, and some as yet unexplained effects of insulin could therefore be linked to the metabolic effects of this factor. PMID:174073

  1. Immediate-Early (IE) gene regulation of cytomegalovirus: IE1- and pp71-mediated viral strategies against cellular defenses.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lilith; Tang, Qiyi

    2014-12-01

    Three crucial hurdles hinder studies on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV): strict species specificity, differences between in vivo and in vitro infection, and the complexity of gene regulation. Ever since the sequencing of the whole genome was first accomplished, functional studies on individual genes have been the mainstream in the CMV field. Gene regulation has therefore been elucidated in a more detailed fashion. However, viral gene regulation is largely controlled by both cellular and viral components. In other words, viral gene expression is determined by the virus-host interaction. Generally, cells respond to viral infection in a defensive pattern; at the same time, viruses try to counteract the cellular defense or else hide in the host (latency). Viruses evolve effective strategies against cellular defense in order to achieve replicative success. Whether or not they are successful, cellular defenses remain in the whole viral replication cycle: entry, immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, and viral egress. Many viral strategies against cellular defense, and which occur in the immediate-early time of viral infection, have been documented. In this review, we will summarize the documented biological functions of IE1 and pp71 proteins, especially with regard to how they counteract cellular intrinsic defenses.

  2. Immediate–Early (IE) gene regulation of cytomegalovirus: IE1- and pp71-mediated viral strategies against cellular defenses

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lilith; Tang, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Three crucial hurdles hinder studies on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV): strict species specificity, differences between in vivo and in vitro infection, and the complexity of gene regulation. Ever since the sequencing of the whole genome was first accomplished, functional studies on individual genes have been the mainstream in the CMV field. Gene regulation has therefore been elucidated in a more detailed fashion. However, viral gene regulation is largely controlled by both cellular and viral components. In other words, viral gene expression is determined by the virus–host interaction. Generally, cells respond to viral infection in a defensive pattern; at the same time, viruses try to counteract the cellular defense or else hide in the host (latency). Viruses evolve effective strategies against cellular defense in order to achieve replicative success. Whether or not they are successful, cellular defenses remain in the whole viral replication cycle: entry, immediate–early (IE) gene expression, early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, and viral egress. Many viral strategies against cellular defense, and which occur in the immediate–early time of viral infection, have been documented. In this review, we will summarize the documented biological functions of IE1 and pp71 proteins, especially with regard to how they counteract cellular intrinsic defenses. PMID:25501994

  3. Regulations, products, waste handling needs change parts-washing procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Jessen, H.M.; Paradis, D.L.; Filson, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    Industry traditionally has relied on vapor degreasing to remove contaminants from machined parts, such as printed circuit boards, electronic components, auto and aircraft parts, medical equipment, screw products, plastic-injected molded parts, and cast products. Although vapor degassing is simple, efficient and cost-effective, it uses such environmentally harmful solvents as chlorofluorocarbons, methyl chloroform and chlorinated compounds. Production and use of chlorofluorocarbons and methyl chloroform, which are considered ozone-depleting chemicals under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, will be banned after this year. Although such chlorinated solvents as trichloroethylene, methylene chloride and perchloroethylene still may be used in vapor degreasing, they release volatile organic compounds, whose emissions are regulated as hazardous air pollutants. The ban on ozone-depleting chemicals, along with the high costs of using and disposing chlorinated solvents, has prompted industry to abandon vapor degreasing in favor of aqueous alkaline or semi-aqueous cleaners. Aqueous alkaline cleaners are prepared by diluting biodegradable, concentrated liquid or solid detergents with water.

  4. Lipolysis – A highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores

    PubMed Central

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5 years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic “lipolytic machinery”. Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the “lipolysome”. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. PMID:21087632

  5. Lipolysis - a highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores.

    PubMed

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic "lipolytic machinery". Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the "lipolysome". This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cellular resolution models for even skipped regulation in the entire Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Ilsley, Garth R; Fisher, Jasmin; Apweiler, Rolf; De Pace, Angela H; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2013-08-06

    Transcriptional control ensures genes are expressed in the right amounts at the correct times and locations. Understanding quantitatively how regulatory systems convert input signals to appropriate outputs remains a challenge. For the first time, we successfully model even skipped (eve) stripes 2 and 3+7 across the entire fly embryo at cellular resolution. A straightforward statistical relationship explains how transcription factor (TF) concentrations define eve's complex spatial expression, without the need for pairwise interactions or cross-regulatory dynamics. Simulating thousands of TF combinations, we recover known regulators and suggest new candidates. Finally, we accurately predict the intricate effects of perturbations including TF mutations and misexpression. Our approach imposes minimal assumptions about regulatory function; instead we infer underlying mechanisms from models that best fit the data, like the lack of TF-specific thresholds and the positional value of homotypic interactions. Our study provides a general and quantitative method for elucidating the regulation of diverse biological systems. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00522.001.

  7. Proteolysis of AKAP121 regulates mitochondrial activity during cellular hypoxia and brain ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, Annalisa; Adornetto, Annagrazia; Scorziello, Antonella; Viggiano, Davide; Foca, Mariapaola; Cuomo, Ornella; Annunziato, Lucio; Gottesman, Max; Feliciello, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A-kinase anchor protein 121 (AKAP121) assembles a multivalent signalling complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane that controls persistence and amplitude of cAMP and src signalling to mitochondria, and plays an essential role in oxidative metabolism and cell survival. Here, we show that AKAP121 levels are regulated post-translationally by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Seven In-Absentia Homolog 2 (Siah2), an E3–ubiquitin ligase whose expression is induced in hypoxic conditions, formed a complex and degraded AKAP121. In addition, we show that overexpression of Siah2 or oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) promotes Siah2-mediated ubiquitination and proteolysis of AKAP121. Upregulation of Siah2, by modulation of the cellular levels of AKAP121, significantly affects mitochondrial activity assessed as mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative capacity. Also during cerebral ischaemia, AKAP121 is degraded in a Siah2-dependent manner. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of attenuation of cAMP/PKA signaling, which occurs at the distal sites of signal generation mediated by proteolysis of an AKAP scaffold protein. By regulating the stability of AKAP121-signalling complex at mitochondria, cells efficiently and rapidly adapt oxidative metabolism to fluctuations in oxygen availability. PMID:18323779

  8. ECM Signaling Regulates Collective Cellular Dynamics to Control Pancreas Branching Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hung Ping; Panlasigui, Devin; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Sander, Maike

    2016-01-12

    During pancreas development, epithelial buds undergo branching morphogenesis to form an exocrine and endocrine gland. Proper morphogenesis is necessary for correct lineage allocation of pancreatic progenitors; however, the cellular events underlying pancreas morphogenesis are unknown. Here, we employed time-lapse microscopy and fluorescent labeling of cells to analyze cell behaviors associated with pancreas morphogenesis. We observed that outer bud cells adjacent to the basement membrane are pleomorphic and rearrange frequently; additionally, they largely remain in the outer cell compartment even after mitosis. These cell behaviors and pancreas branching depend on cell contacts with the basement membrane, which induce actomyosin cytoskeleton remodeling via integrin-mediated activation of FAK/Src signaling. We show that integrin signaling reduces E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion in outer cells and provide genetic evidence that this regulation is necessary for initiation of branching. Our study suggests that regulation of cell motility and adhesion by local niche cues initiates pancreas branching morphogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. ECM signaling regulates collective cellular dynamics to control pancreas branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hung Ping; Panlasigui, Devin; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Sander, Maike

    2015-01-01

    Summary During pancreas development, epithelial buds undergo branching morphogenesis to form an exocrine and endocrine gland. Proper morphogenesis is necessary for correct lineage allocation of pancreatic progenitors; however, the cellular events underlying pancreas morphogenesis are unknown. Here, we employed time-lapse microscopy and fluorescent labeling of cells to analyze cell behaviors associated with pancreas morphogenesis. We observed that outer bud cells adjacent to the basement membrane are pleomorphic and rearrange frequently; as well, they largely remain in the outer cell compartment even after mitosis. These cell behaviors and pancreas branching depend on cell contacts with the basement membrane, which induce actomyosin cytoskeleton remodeling via integrin-mediated activation of FAK/Src signaling. We show that integrin signaling reduces E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion in outer cells, and provide genetic evidence that this regulation is necessary for initiation of branching. Our study suggests that regulation of cell motility and adhesion by local niche cues initiates pancreas branching morphogenesis. PMID:26748698

  10. The cellular origin of laminin determines its role in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H; Strickland, Sidney

    2015-03-01

    Laminin of different cellular sources has distinct functions. In addition to vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), aorta also contains a small population of nestin(+) cells, whose function remains unknown. This study investigates the role of SMC- and nestin(+) cell-derived laminin in blood pressure (BP) regulation and SMC contractibility. Using mice with laminin deficiency in SMCs (SKO) or nestin(+) cells (NKO), we examined laminin-dependent changes in BP. Contractile protein expression was reduced in SKO but not NKO mice, consistent with their, respectively, low and normal baseline BP measurements. At the ultrastructural level, SKO SMCs maintained the contractile phenotype with reduced elasticity, whereas NKO SMCs switched to the synthetic phenotype and showed degeneration. Additionally, angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased BP in SKO but not NKO mice. It also enhanced contractile proteins to the same levels and induced SMC degeneration in both knockout mice. These data suggest that SMC laminin regulates BP via modulating contractile protein expression, whereas nestin(+) cell-derived laminin contributes to SMC phenotypic switch.

  11. Cellular resolution models for even skipped regulation in the entire Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Ilsley, Garth R; Fisher, Jasmin; Apweiler, Rolf; DePace, Angela H; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional control ensures genes are expressed in the right amounts at the correct times and locations. Understanding quantitatively how regulatory systems convert input signals to appropriate outputs remains a challenge. For the first time, we successfully model even skipped (eve) stripes 2 and 3+7 across the entire fly embryo at cellular resolution. A straightforward statistical relationship explains how transcription factor (TF) concentrations define eve’s complex spatial expression, without the need for pairwise interactions or cross-regulatory dynamics. Simulating thousands of TF combinations, we recover known regulators and suggest new candidates. Finally, we accurately predict the intricate effects of perturbations including TF mutations and misexpression. Our approach imposes minimal assumptions about regulatory function; instead we infer underlying mechanisms from models that best fit the data, like the lack of TF-specific thresholds and the positional value of homotypic interactions. Our study provides a general and quantitative method for elucidating the regulation of diverse biological systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00522.001 PMID:23930223

  12. Regulation of the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of viral and cellular proteins by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao E.; Pernet, Olivier; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of many cellular proteins is regulated by nuclear import/export signals as well as post-translational modifications such as covalent conjugation of ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs). Ubiquitination and SUMOylation are rapid and reversible ways to modulate the intracellular localisation and function of substrate proteins. These pathways have been co-opted by some viruses, which depend on the host cell machinery to transport their proteins in and out of the nucleus. In this review, we will summarise our current knowledge on the ubiquitin/SUMO-regulated nuclear/subnuclear trafficking of cellular proteins and describe examples of viral exploitation of these pathways. PMID:22188262

  13. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K.; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Song, Shaoming; He, Hua-Jun; Armour, Sean M.; Hubbard, Basil P.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Wang, Lili; Zong, Yaping; Sinclair, David A.; de Cabo, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is regulated by the deacetylase SIRT1. However, whether the newly described nongenomic actions of STAT3 toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are dependent on SIRT1 is unclear. In this study, Sirt1 gene knock-out murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells were used to delineate the role of SIRT1 in the regulation of STAT3 mitochondrial function. Here, we show that STAT3 mRNA and protein levels and the accumulation of serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria were increased significantly in Sirt1-KO cells as compared with wild-type MEFs. Various mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters, such as the oxygen consumption rate in cell cultures, enzyme activities of the electron transport chain complexes in isolated mitochondria, and production of ATP and lactate, indicated that Sirt1-KO cells exhibited higher mitochondrial respiration as compared with wild-type MEFs. Two independent approaches, including ectopic expression of SIRT1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of STAT3, led to reduction in intracellular ATP levels and increased lactate production in Sirt1-KO cells that were approaching those of wild-type controls. Comparison of profiles of phospho-antibody array data indicated that the deletion of SirT1 was accompanied by constitutive activation of the pro-inflammatory NF-κB pathway, which is key for STAT3 induction and increased cellular respiration in Sirt1-KO cells. Thus, SIRT1 appears to be a functional regulator of NF-κB-dependent STAT3 expression that induces mitochondrial biogenesis. These results have implications for understanding the interplay between STAT3 and SIRT1 in pro-inflammatory conditions. PMID:21467030

  14. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine.

  15. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  16. Regulation of HTLV-1 tax stability, cellular trafficking and NF-κB activation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-10-23

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%-5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis.

  17. Regulation of cellular behaviors of fibroblasts related to wound healing by sol-gel derived bioactive glass particles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weihan; Chen, Xiaofeng; Miao, Guohou; Tang, Jieying; Fu, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Sol-gel derived bioactive glass (BG) holds great potential in the application of skin repair. However, the specific regulation of BG on skin cells is still unclear and demands more investigation. Herein, we synthesized sol-gel derived BGs with different compositions (60S, 70S, 80S, and 90S) and found 90S BGs (90 mol % SiO2 , 6 mol % CaO, 4 mol % P2 O5 ) exhibited the best supportiveness for the proliferation of normal human foreskin fibroblasts. Thus, 90S BG particles were used as a model to systematically study the wound healing related cellular response of fibroblasts to BGs. Time-lapse imaging revealed a promoted fibroblast motility stimulated by 90S BG particles. Results on the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) related genes illustrated that 90S BG particles modulated the synthesis capacity for critical ECM molecules including type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin-C. Moreover, the myofibroblastic differentiation of fibroblasts was greatly inhibited by 90S BG particles. Further analysis on the intracellular signaling pathways demonstrated that 90S BG particles down-regulated the collagen synthesis and fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation via TGF-β1-Smad2 signaling, evidenced by the decreased expression levels of TGF-β receptor I and its downstream effector Smad2. Our study provided a further understanding of the specific regulation of 90S BG particles on fibroblasts, which may guide the future design of BG based wound dressing and benefit the clinical application of BG particles in skin repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2420-2429, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cellular Basis of Pineal Gland Development: Emerging Role of Microglia as Phenotype Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez Rodriguez, María P.

    2016-01-01

    The adult pineal gland is composed of pinealocytes, astrocytes, microglia, and other interstitial cells that have been described in detail. However, factors that contribute to pineal development have not been fully elucidated, nor have pineal cell lineages been well characterized. We applied systematic double, triple and quadruple labeling of cell-specific markers on prenatal, postnatal and mature rat pineal gland tissue combined with confocal microscopy to provide a comprehensive view of the cellular dynamics and cell lineages that contribute to pineal gland development. The pineal gland begins as an evagination of neuroepithelium in the roof of the third ventricle. The pineal primordium initially consists of radially aligned Pax6+ precursor cells that express vimentin and divide at the ventricular lumen. After the tubular neuroepithelium fuses, the distribution of Pax6+ cells transitions to include rosette-like structures and later, dispersed cells. In the developing gland all dividing cells express Pax6, indicating that Pax6+ precursor cells generate pinealocytes and some interstitial cells. The density of Pax6+ cells decreases across pineal development as a result of cellular differentiation and microglial phagocytosis, but Pax6+ cells remain in the adult gland as a distinct population. Microglial colonization begins after pineal recess formation. Microglial phagocytosis of Pax6+ cells is not common at early stages but increases as microglia colonize the gland. In the postnatal gland microglia affiliate with Tuj1+ nerve fibers, IB4+ blood vessels, and Pax6+ cells. We demonstrate that microglia engulf Pax6+ cells, nerve fibers, and blood vessel-related elements, but not pinealocytes. We conclude that microglia play a role in pineal gland formation and homeostasis by regulating the precursor cell population, remodeling blood vessels and pruning sympathetic nerve fibers. PMID:27861587

  19. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Jingbo; Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora; Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R.; Chung, Dai H.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  20. Redox Regulation of Human OGG1 Activity in Response to Cellular Oxidative Stress▿

    PubMed Central

    Bravard, Anne; Vacher, Monique; Gouget, Barbara; Coutant, Alexandre; de Boisferon, Florence Hillairet; Marsin, Stéphanie; Chevillard, Sylvie; Radicella, J. Pablo

    2006-01-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common and mutagenic form of oxidized guanine in DNA, is eliminated mainly through base excision repair. In human cells its repair is initiated by human OGG1 (hOGG1), an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase. We investigated the effects of an acute cadmium exposure of human lymphoblastoid cells on the activity of hOGG1. We show that coinciding with alteration of the redox cellular status, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of hOGG1 was nearly completely inhibited. However, the hOGG1 activity returned to normal levels once the redox cellular status was normalized. In vitro, the activity of purified hOGG1 was abolished by cadmium and could not be recovered by EDTA. In cells, however, the reversible inactivation of OGG1 activity by cadmium was strictly associated with reversible oxidation of the protein. Moreover, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of purified OGG1 and that from crude extracts were modulated by cysteine-modifying agents. Oxidation of OGG1 by the thiol oxidant diamide led to inhibition of the activity and a protein migration pattern similar to that seen in cadmium-treated cells. These results suggest that cadmium inhibits hOGG1 activity mainly by indirect oxidation of critical cysteine residues and that excretion of the metal from the cells leads to normalization of the redox cell status and restoration of an active hOGG1. The results presented here unveil a novel redox-dependent mechanism for the regulation of OGG1 activity. PMID:16923968

  1. Cellular Basis of Pineal Gland Development: Emerging Role of Microglia as Phenotype Regulator.

    PubMed

    Ibañez Rodriguez, María P; Noctor, Stephen C; Muñoz, Estela M

    2016-01-01

    The adult pineal gland is composed of pinealocytes, astrocytes, microglia, and other interstitial cells that have been described in detail. However, factors that contribute to pineal development have not been fully elucidated, nor have pineal cell lineages been well characterized. We applied systematic double, triple and quadruple labeling of cell-specific markers on prenatal, postnatal and mature rat pineal gland tissue combined with confocal microscopy to provide a comprehensive view of the cellular dynamics and cell lineages that contribute to pineal gland development. The pineal gland begins as an evagination of neuroepithelium in the roof of the third ventricle. The pineal primordium initially consists of radially aligned Pax6+ precursor cells that express vimentin and divide at the ventricular lumen. After the tubular neuroepithelium fuses, the distribution of Pax6+ cells transitions to include rosette-like structures and later, dispersed cells. In the developing gland all dividing cells express Pax6, indicating that Pax6+ precursor cells generate pinealocytes and some interstitial cells. The density of Pax6+ cells decreases across pineal development as a result of cellular differentiation and microglial phagocytosis, but Pax6+ cells remain in the adult gland as a distinct population. Microglial colonization begins after pineal recess formation. Microglial phagocytosis of Pax6+ cells is not common at early stages but increases as microglia colonize the gland. In the postnatal gland microglia affiliate with Tuj1+ nerve fibers, IB4+ blood vessels, and Pax6+ cells. We demonstrate that microglia engulf Pax6+ cells, nerve fibers, and blood vessel-related elements, but not pinealocytes. We conclude that microglia play a role in pineal gland formation and homeostasis by regulating the precursor cell population, remodeling blood vessels and pruning sympathetic nerve fibers.

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1-LPA6) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA1 and LPA5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA1.

  3. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Heat Stress-Induced Up-Regulation of Occludin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dokladny, Karol; Ye, Dongmei; Kennedy, John C.; Moseley, Pope L.; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2008-01-01

    The heat stress (HS)-induced increase in occludin protein expression has been postulated to be a protective response against HS-induced disruption of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The aim of this study was to elucidate the cellular and molecular processes that mediate the HS-induced up-regulation of occludin expression in Caco-2 cells. Exposure to HS (39°C or 41°C) resulted in increased expression of occludin protein; this was preceded by an increase in occludin mRNA transcription and promoter activity. HS-induced activation of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) resulted in cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation of HSF-1 and binding to its binding motif in the occludin promoter region. HSF-1 activation was associated with an increase in occludin promoter activity, mRNA transcription, and protein expression; which were abolished by the HSF-1 inhibitor quercetin. Targeted HSF-1 knock-down by siRNA transfection inhibited the HSF-1-induced increase in occulin expression and junctional localization of occulin protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of the HSF-1 binding motif in the occludin promoter region inhibited HS-induced binding of HSF-1 to the occludin promoter region and subsequent promoter activity. In conclusion, our data show for the first time that the HS-induced increase in occludin protein expression is mediated by HSF-1 activation and subsequent binding of HSF-1 to the occludin promoter, which initiates a series of molecular and cellular events culminating in increased junctional localization of occludin protein. PMID:18276783

  4. Endothelin Receptor Down-Regulation Mediated Ligand Regulation Mechanisms Protect Against Cellular Hypoxia Injury in Rat Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Hu, Mushuang; Zheng, Long; Zhang, Chao; Li, Jiawei; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; Jia, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the effect of endothelin receptor A (ETaR)-targeting small interfering RNA (siRNA) on rat vascular endothelial cellular hypoxia injury, as well as its underlying mechanism. An in vitro rat vascular smooth muscle cells - endothelial cells co-culture model was established and transfected with ETaR siRNA before hypoxia treatment. Cell culture supernatant, cellular protein and RNA were collected and examined at 0.5hrs, 1hrs, 2hrs, 4hrs, 8hrs, 16hrs, 24hrs and 48hrs of hypoxia with 1% oxygen. The time point at which the best silencing effect was achieved was chosen, eNOS inhibitor L-NAME was added, and post hypoxia cell culture supernatant, cellular protein and RNA was collected for further examination. After hypoxic treatment, endothelial-1 (ET-1) and ETaR expression levels gradually increased as oxygen deprivation extended. ET-1 and ETaR expression levels were significantly lower in the ETaR siRNA group compared with the Hypoxia group (P<0.001). Such difference peaked at 4hrs of hypoxia. ELISA examination of cell culture supernatant revealed that the amount of ET-1 and TGF-βin the ETaR siRNA group were significantly lower compared to the Hypoxia group at all times, while the amount of NO and eNOS was higher. After 4 hrs of hypoxia, Smad2, Smad3, HIF-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, MCP-1, NF-κb, ET-1 and ANG II mRNA expression in endothelial cells and ETaR mRNA expression in A-10 cells of the ETaR siRNA group were lower than those of the Hypoxia siRNA group, while such results were much higher in the L-NAME group. Western Blot results showed lower expression of ETaR in the ETaR siRNA group compared with the hypoxia and negative siRNA groups, as well as significantly higher ETaR expression in the L-NAME group compared with the ETaR siRNA group. PI3K and p-AKT expression levels were mildly elevated after mild oxygen deprivation, and ETaR siRNA was able to enhance such elevation induced by hypoxia. In the L-NAME group, PI3K and p-AKT expression was much higher

  5. The mitogen-inducible gene-6 is involved in regulation of cellular senescence in normal diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bushan; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Hao; Jin, Bo; Mao, Zebin; Yao, Zhi

    2013-10-01

    The mitogen-inducible gene-6 (Mig-6) is a non-kinase scaffolding adaptor protein. It has been shown that Mig-6 may play important roles in regulating stress response, maintaining homeostasis and functioning as a tumour suppressor. In this study, we investigated the role of Mig-6 in cellular senescence. Our results showed that Mig-6 is up-regulated during the senescence process. Functional analysis indicated that cells over-expressing Mig-6 have reduced DNA synthesis and showed the signs of senescence. Knockdown of Mig-6 delayed the initiation of Ras-induced cellular senescence. These results suggest that the increase of Mig-6 expression contributes to establishment of cellular senescence. Furthermore, our results showed that Mig-6 induction of senescence is related to its inhibition of EGF receptor (EGFR)/Erb B signalling. Subsequent analysis of the mechanism responsible for the up-regulation of its expression showed that FOXO3A transcriptionally up-regulates Mig-6 expression via directly binding to the FOXO response element in Mig-6 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Mig-6 induces premature senescence via functioning in regulation of cellular senescence in normal diploid fibroblasts. © 2013 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cellular Up-regulation of Nedd4 Family Interacting Protein 1 (Ndfip1) using Low Levels of Bioactive Cobalt Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Christine; Howitt, Jason; Putz, Ulrich; White, Jonathan M.; Parish, Clare L.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2011-01-01

    The delivery of metal ions using cell membrane-permeable metal complexes represents a method for activating cellular pathways. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of new [CoIII(salen)(acac)] complexes capable of up-regulating the ubiquitin ligase adaptor protein Ndfip1. Ndfip1 is a neuroprotective protein that is up-regulated in the brain after injury and functions in combination with Nedd4 ligases to ubiquitinate harmful proteins for removal. We previously showed that Ndfip1 can be increased in human neurons using CoCl2 that is toxic at high concentration. Here we demonstrate a similar effect can be achieved by low concentrations of synthetic CoIII complexes that are non-toxic and designed to be activated following cellular entry. Activation is achieved by intracellular reduction of CoIII to CoII leading to release of CoII ions for Ndfip1 up-regulation. The cellular benefit of Ndfip1 up-regulation by CoIII complexes includes demonstrable protection against cell death in SH-SY5Y cells during stress. In vivo, focal delivery of CoIII complexes into the adult mouse brain was observed to up-regulate Ndfip1 in neurons. These results demonstrate that a cellular response pathway can be advantageously manipulated by chemical modification of metal complexes, and represents a significant step of harnessing low concentration metal complexes for therapeutic benefit. PMID:21187286

  7. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  8. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  9. 49 CFR 192.13 - What general requirements apply to pipelines regulated under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Regulated onshore gathering line to which this part did not apply until April 14, 2006 March 15 2007. All... Offshore gathering line July 31, 1977. Regulated onshore gathering line to which this part did not apply...

  10. The laforin-malin complex negatively regulates glycogen synthesis by modulating cellular glucose uptake via glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2012-02-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD.

  11. The Laforin-Malin Complex Negatively Regulates Glycogen Synthesis by Modulating Cellular Glucose Uptake via Glucose Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD. PMID:22124153

  12. 17 CFR 210.1-01 - Application of Regulation S-X (17 CFR part 210).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application of Regulation S-X... POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Application of Regulation S-X (17 Cfr Part 210) § 210.1-01 Application of Regulation S-X (17 CFR part 210). (a) This part (together with the Financial Reporting...

  13. 17 CFR 210.1-01 - Application of Regulation S-X (17 CFR part 210).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application of Regulation S-X... POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Application of Regulation S-X (17 Cfr Part 210) § 210.1-01 Application of Regulation S-X (17 CFR part 210). (a) This part (together with the Financial Reporting...

  14. 17 CFR 210.1-01 - Application of Regulation S-X (17 CFR part 210).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application of Regulation S-X... POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Application of Regulation S-X (17 Cfr Part 210) § 210.1-01 Application of Regulation S-X (17 CFR part 210). (a) This part (together with the Financial Reporting...

  15. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 100 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 100 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education.... 100, App. A Appendix A to Part 100—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply Part...

  16. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 100 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 100 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education.... 100, App. A Appendix A to Part 100—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply Part...

  17. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 100 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 100 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education.... 100, App. A Appendix A to Part 100—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply Part...

  18. 16 CFR 312.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of regulations in this part. 312.1 Section 312.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part...

  19. 31 CFR 547.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 547.101 Section 547.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... THE CONGO SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Laws and Regulations § 547.101 Relation...

  20. Dual function of Yap in the regulation of lens progenitor cells and cellular polarity.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji Yun; Park, Raehee; Kim, Jin Young; Hughes, Lucinda; Lu, Li; Kim, Seonhee; Johnson, Randy L; Cho, Seo-Hee

    2014-02-15

    Hippo-Yap signaling has been implicated in organ size determination via its regulation of cell proliferation, growth and apoptosis (Pan, 2007). The vertebrate lens comprises only two major cell types, lens progenitors and differentiated fiber cells, thereby providing a relatively simple system for studying size-controlling mechanisms. In order to investigate the role of Hippo-Yap signaling in lens size regulation, we conditionally ablated Yap in the developing mouse lens. Lens progenitor-specific deletion of Yap led to near obliteration of the lens primarily due to hypocellularity in the lens epithelium (LE) and accompanying lens fiber (LF) defects. A significantly reduced LE progenitor pool resulted mainly from failed self-renewal and increased apoptosis. Additionally, Yap-deficient lens progenitor cells precociously exited the cell cycle and expressed the LF marker, β-Crystallin. The mutant progenitor cells also exhibited multiple cellular and subcellular alterations including cell and nuclear shape change, organellar polarity disruption, and disorganized apical polarity complex and junction proteins such as Crumbs, Pals1, Par3 and ZO-1. Yap-deficient LF cells failed to anchor to the overlying LE layer, impairing their normal elongation and packaging. Furthermore, our localization study results suggest that, in the developing LE, Yap participates in the cell context-dependent transition from the proliferative to differentiation-competent state by integrating cell density information. Taken together, our results shed new light on Yap's indispensable and novel organizing role in mammalian organ size control by coordinating multiple events including cell proliferation, differentiation, and polarity.

  1. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  2. NR4A2 Is Regulated by Gastrin and Influences Cellular Responses of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K.; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells. PMID:24086717

  3. Comparative Analysis of Nuclear Transfer Embryo-Derived Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells. Part I: Cellular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kobolak, Julianna; Mamo, Solomon; Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ujhelly, Olga; Csonka, Erika; Hadlaczky, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells derived from nuclear transfer embryos (ntESCs) are particularly valuable for regenerative medicine, as they are a patient-specific and histocompatible cell source for the treatment of varying diseases. However, currently, little is known about their cellular and molecular profile. In the present study, in a mouse model different donor cell-derived ntESCs from various genetic backgrounds were compared with reference ESCs and analyzed comprehensively at the cellular level. A number of pluripotency marker genes were compared by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry analysis. Significant differences at the protein level were observed for POU5F1, SOX2, FGF4, NANOG, and SSEA-1. However, such differences had no effect on in vitro cell differentiation and cell fate: derivatives of the three germ layers were detected in all ntESC lines. The neural and cardiac in vitro differentiation revealed minor differences between the cell lines, both at the mRNA and protein level. Karyotype analyses and cell growth studies did not reveal any significant variations. Despite some differences observed, the present study revealed that ntESC lines had similar differentiation competences compared to other ESCs. The results indicate that the observed differences may be related to the genotype rather than to the nuclear transfer technology. PMID:22204592

  4. Cellular DDX3 regulates Japanese encephalitis virus replication by interacting with viral un-translated regions.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ge, Ling-ling; Li, Peng-peng; Wang, Yue; Dai, Juan-juan; Sun, Ming-xia; Huang, Li; Shen, Zhi-qiang; Hu, Xiao-chun; Ishag, Hassan; Mao, Xiang

    2014-01-20

    Japanese encephalitis virus is one of the most common causes for epidemic viral encephalitis in humans and animals. Herein we demonstrated that cellular helicase DDX3 is involved in JEV replication. DDX3 knockdown inhibits JEV replication. The helicase activity of DDX3 is crucial for JEV replication. GST-pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that DDX3 could interact with JEV non-structural proteins 3 and 5. Co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that DDX3 interacts and colocalizes with these viral proteins and viral RNA during the infection. We determined that DDX3 binds to JEV 5' and 3' un-translated regions. We used a JEV-replicon system to demonstrate that DDX3 positively regulates viral RNA translation, which might affect viral RNA replication at the late stage of virus infection. Collectively, we identified that DDX3 is necessary for JEV infection, suggesting that DDX3 might be a novel target to design new antiviral agents against JEV or other flavivirus infections.

  5. Clathrin regulates lymphocyte migration by driving actin accumulation at the cellular leading edge.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Santiago, Guillermo; Robles-Valero, Javier; Morlino, Giulia; Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Zaldivar, Airen; Torres-Torresano, Mónica; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Sorrentino, Andrea; Pereiro, Eva; Carrascosa, José L; Megías, Diego; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Veiga, Esteban

    2016-10-01

    Lymphocyte migration, which is essential for effective immune responses, belongs to the so-called amoeboid migration. The lymphocyte migration is up to 100 times faster than between mesenchymal and epithelial cell types. Migrating lymphocytes are highly polarized in three well-defined structural and functional zones: uropod, medial zone, and leading edge (LE). The actiomyosin-dependent driving force moves forward the uropod, whereas massive actin rearrangements protruding the cell membrane are observed at the LE. These actin rearrangements resemble those observed at the immunological synapse driven by clathrin, a protein normally involved in endocytic processes. Here, we used cell lines as well as primary lymphocytes to demonstrate that clathrin and clathrin adaptors colocalize with actin at the LE of migrating lymphocytes, but not in other cellular zones that accumulate both clathrin and actin. Moreover, clathrin and clathrin adaptors, including Hrs, the clathrin adaptor for multivesicular bodies, drive local actin accumulation at the LE. Clathrin recruitment at the LE resulted necessary for a complete cell polarization and further lymphocyte migration in both 2D and 3D migration models. Therefore, clathrin, including the clathrin population associated to internal vesicles, controls lymphocyte migration by regulating actin rearrangements occurring at the LE.

  6. Reverse Signaling by Semaphorin-6A Regulates Cellular Aggregation and Neuronal Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Branguli, Francesc; Zagar, Yvrick; Shanley, Daniel K.; Graef, Isabella A.; Chédotal, Alain; Mitchell, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane semaphorin, Sema6A, has important roles in axon guidance, cell migration and neuronal connectivity in multiple regions of the nervous system, mediated by context-dependent interactions with plexin receptors, PlxnA2 and PlxnA4. Here, we demonstrate that Sema6A can also signal cell-autonomously, in two modes, constitutively, or in response to higher-order clustering mediated by either PlxnA2-binding or chemically induced multimerisation. Sema6A activation stimulates recruitment of Abl to the cytoplasmic domain of Sema6A and phos¡phorylation of this cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, as well as phosphorylation of additional cytoskeletal regulators. Sema6A reverse signaling affects the surface area and cellular complexity of non-neuronal cells and aggregation and neurite formation of primary neurons in vitro. Sema6A also interacts with PlxnA2 in cis, which reduces binding by PlxnA2 of Sema6A in trans but not vice versa. These experiments reveal the complex nature of Sema6A biochemical functions and the molecular logic of the context-dependent interactions between Sema6A and PlxnA2. PMID:27392094

  7. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction. PMID:24995125

  8. LPA signaling through LPA receptors regulates cellular functions of endothelial cells treated with anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shiori; Araki, Mutsumi; Ishii, Shuhei; Hirane, Miku; Fukushima, Kaori; Tomimatsu, Ayaka; Takahashi, Kaede; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-10-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via LPA receptors provides a variety of cellular functions, including angiogenesis. In this study, to assess an involvement of LPA receptors in cell motile activities of endothelial cells during chemotherapy, F-2 cells were treated with cisplatin (CDDP) and doxorubicin (DOX) at a concentration of 0.01 μM every 24 h for at least 1 month. The treatment of CDDP and DOX inhibited the expression levels of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1), Lpar2, and Lpar3 genes in F-2 cells. The cell motile activities of CDDP and DOX treated cells were relatively lower than those of untreated cells. Next, we investigated whether cancer cells could stimulate the cell motile activities of F-2 cells treated with CDDP and DOX. For cell motility assay, CDDP- and DOX-treated cells were co-cultured with pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells. The cell motile activities of CDDP- and DOX-treated cells were significantly enhanced by the existence of PANC-1 cells, correlating with the LPA receptor expressions. In addition, the elevated cell motile activities were suppressed by the pretreatment of an autotaxin inhibitor S32826. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA receptors may regulate the cell motile activities of F-2 cells treated with anticancer drugs.

  9. Clathrin self-assembly involves coordinated weak interactions favorable for cellular regulation.

    PubMed

    Wakeham, Diane E; Chen, Chih-Ying; Greene, Barrie; Hwang, Peter K; Brodsky, Frances M

    2003-10-01

    The clathrin triskelion self-assembles into a polyhedral coat surrounding membrane vesicles that sort receptor cargo to the endocytic pathway. A triskelion comprises three clathrin heavy chains joined at their C-termini, extending into proximal and distal leg segments ending in a globular N-terminal domain. In the clathrin coat, leg segments entwine into parallel and anti-parallel interactions. Here we define the contributions of segmental interactions to the clathrin assembly reaction and measure the strength of their interactions. Proximal and distal leg segments were found to lack sufficient affinity to form stable homo- or heterodimers under assembly conditions. However, chimeric constructs of proximal or distal leg segments, trimerized by replacement of the clathrin trimerization domain with that of the invariant chain protein, were able to self-assemble in reversible reactions. Thus clathrin assembly occurs because weak leg segment affinities are coordinated through trimerization, sharing a dependence on multiple weak interactions with other biopolymers. Such polymerization is sensitive to small environmental changes and is therefore compatible with cellular regulation of assembly, disassembly and curvature during formation of clathrin-coated vesicles.

  10. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces ER stress by regulating of Akt-dependent cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeo Min; Lee, Jun Hee; Yun, Seung Pil; Han, Yong-Seok; Yun, Chul Won; Lee, Hyun Jik; Noh, Hyunjin; Lee, Sei-Jung; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Sang Hun

    2016-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for regenerative medicine, ischemia-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces low MSC engraftment and limits their therapeutic efficacy. To overcome this, we investigated the protective effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a bile acid, on ER stress in MSCs in vitro and in vivo. In ER stress conditions, TUDCA treatment of MSCs reduced the activation of ER stress-associated proteins, including GRP78, PERK, eIF2α, ATF4, IRE1α, JNK, p38, and CHOP. In particular, TUDCA inhibited the dissociation between GRP78 and PERK, resulting in reduced ER stress-mediated cell death. Next, to explore the ER stress protective mechanism induced by TUDCA treatment, TUDCA-mediated cellular prion protein (PrPC) activation was assessed. TUDCA treatment increased PrPC expression, which was regulated by Akt phosphorylation. Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) expression also increased significantly in response to signaling through the TUDCA-Akt axis. In a murine hindlimb ischemia model, TUDCA-treated MSC transplantation augmented the blood perfusion ratio, vessel formation, and transplanted cell survival more than untreated MSC transplantation did. Augmented functional recovery following MSC transplantation was blocked by PrPC downregulation. This study is the first to demonstrate that TUDCA protects MSCs against ER stress via Akt-dependent PrPC and Akt-MnSOD pathway. PMID:28004805

  11. Plasmin and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promote cellular motility by regulating the interaction between the urokinase receptor and vitronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, D A; Natkin, L R; Fujita, R M; Wei, Y; Chapman, H A

    1997-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) coordinates plasmin-mediated cell-surface proteolysis and promotes cellular adhesion via a binding site for vitronectin on uPAR. Because vitronectin also binds plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), and plasmin cleavage of vitronectin reduces PAI-1 binding, we explored the effects of plasmin and PAI-1 on the interaction between uPAR and vitronectin. PAI-1 blocked cellular binding of and adhesion to vitronectin by over 80% (IC50 approximately 5 nM), promoted detachment of uPAR-bearing cells from vitronectin, and increased cellular migration on vitronectin. Limited cleavage of vitronectin by plasmin also abolished cellular binding and adhesion and induced cellular detachment. A series of peptides surrounding a plasmin cleavage site (arginine 361) near the carboxy-terminal end of vitronectin were synthesized. Two peptides spanning res 364-380 blocked binding of uPAR to vitronectin (IC50 approximately 8-25 microM) identifying this region as an important site of uPAR-vitronectin interaction. These data illuminate a complex regulatory scheme for uPAR-dependent cellular adhesion to vitronectin: Active urokinase promotes adhesion and also subsequent detachment through activation of plasmin or complex formation with PAI-1. Excess PAI-1 may also promote migration by blocking cellular adhesion and/or promoting detachment, possibly accounting in part for the strong correlation between PAI-1 expression and tumor cell metastasis. PMID:9202057

  12. Molecular mechanism of a new Laminaria japonica polysaccharide on the suppression of macrophage foam cell formation via regulating cellular lipid metabolism and suppressing cellular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xue-Qiang; Xue, Lei; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Asghar, Muhammad-Naeem; Pan, Li-Hua; Liu, Jian; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Laminaria japonica is an important marine vegetable with great health benefits for preventing atherosclerosis. Since the foam cell formation is an important hallmark for the initiation of atherosclerosis, we examined the effect and underlying mechanism of a purified L. japonica polysaccharide (LJP61A) on the suppression of macrophage foam cell formation in this study. The chemical structure was further characterized. Using oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced foam cell model, we found that the cellular lipid accumulation was significantly attenuated by 25 μg/mL LJP61A. Meanwhile, LJP61A caused a remarkable decrease in mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ that was accompanied by the reduction of CD36 and Acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 mRNA levels, and the enhancement of ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and scavenger receptor B1 mRNA levels. Besides these, the ox-LDL-induced cellular inflammation was also restricted by LJP61A treatment via mammalian target of rapamycin-mediated Toll-like receptor 2/4-Mitogen-activated protein kinases/nuclear factor kappa-B pathways. The structure of LJP61A was characterized as a repeating unit consisting of →3,6)-α-d-Manp-(1→, →4)-α-d-Manp-(1→, →4)-2-O-acetyl-β-d-Glcp-(1→, →4)-β-d-Glcp-(1→, →6)-4-O-SO3 -β-d-Galp-(1→, →6)-β-d-Galp-(1→, →3)-β-d-Galp-(1→, and a terminal residue of α-d-Glcp-(1→. Our findings suggest that LJP61A inhibits the conversion of macrophage into foam cell via regulating cellular lipid metabolism and suppressing cellular inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of Kv1.2 regulation in the rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael R; Fuchs, Jason R; Green, John T; Morielli, Anthony D

    2012-01-01

    The potassium channel Kv1.2 alpha-subunit is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) dendrites where its pharmacological inhibition increases excitability (Khavandgar et al., 2005). Kv1.2 is also expressed in cerebellar basket cell (BC) axon terminals (Sheng et al., 1994), where its blockade increases BC inhibition of PCs (Southan and Robertson, 1998a). Secretin receptors are also expressed both in PC dendrites and BC axon terminals (reviewed in (Yuan et al.). The effect of secretin on PC excitability is not yet known, but, like Kv1.2 inhibitors, secretin potently increases inhibitory input to PCs (Yung et al., 2001). This suggests secretin may act in part by suppressing Kv1.2. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a mechanism of Kv1.2 suppression (Nesti et al., 2004). This process can be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA) (Connors et al., 2008). Since secretin receptors activate PKA (Wessels-Reiker et al., 1993), we tested the hypothesis that secretin regulates Kv1.2 trafficking in the cerebellum. Using cell surface protein biotinylation of rat cerebellar slices, we found secretin decreased cell-surface Kv1.2 levels by modulating Kv1.2 endocytic trafficking. This effect was mimicked by activating adenylate cyclase (AC) with forskolin, and was blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of AC or PKA. Imaging studies identified the BC axon terminal and Purkinje cell dendrites as loci of AC-dependent Kv1.2 trafficking. The physiological significance of secretin regulated Kv1.2 endocytosis is supported by our finding that infusion into the cerebellar cortex of either the Kv1.2 inhibitor Tityustoxin-Kα, or of the Kv1.2 regulator secretin, significantly enhances acquisition of eyeblink conditioning in rats. PMID:22764231

  14. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Pundrik; Soldati, Thierry; Thewes, Sascha; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2012-01-23

    extracellular cAMP levels are the other major determinants regulating aggregate size and pattern. Importantly, the aggregation process is conserved among different lineages of cellular slime molds despite using unrelated signalling molecules for aggregation.

  15. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    that cytosolic glucose and extracellular cAMP levels are the other major determinants regulating aggregate size and pattern. Importantly, the aggregation process is conserved among different lineages of cellular slime molds despite using unrelated signalling molecules for aggregation. PMID:22269093

  16. Ubiquitylation-dependent regulation of NEIL1 by Mule and TRIM26 is required for the cellular DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Matthew J.; Carter, Rachel J.; Nickson, Catherine M.; Williams, Sarah C.; Parsons, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Endonuclease VIII-like protein 1 (NEIL1) is a DNA glycosylase involved in initiating the base excision repair pathway, the major cellular mechanism for repairing DNA base damage. Here, we have purified the major E3 ubiquitin ligases from human cells responsible for regulation of NEIL1 by ubiquitylation. Interestingly, we have identified two enzymes that catalyse NEIL1 polyubiquitylation, Mcl-1 ubiquitin ligase E3 (Mule) and tripartite motif 26 (TRIM26). We demonstrate that these enzymes are capable of polyubiquitylating NEIL1 in vitro, and that both catalyse ubiquitylation of NEIL1 within the same C-terminal lysine residues. An siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mule or TRIM26 leads to stabilisation of NEIL1, demonstrating that these enzymes are important in regulating cellular NEIL1 steady state protein levels. Similarly, a mutant NEIL1 protein lacking residues for ubiquitylation is more stable than the wild type protein in vivo. We also demonstrate that cellular NEIL1 protein is induced in response to ionising radiation (IR), although this occurs specifically in a Mule-dependent manner. Finally we show that stabilisation of NEIL1, particularly following TRIM26 siRNA, contributes to cellular resistance to IR. This highlights the importance of Mule and TRIM26 in maintaining steady state levels of NEIL1, but also those required for the cellular DNA damage response. PMID:27924031

  17. Ebi, a Drosophila homologue of TBL1, regulates the balance between cellular defense responses and neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young-Mi; Tsuda, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Transducin β-like 1 (TBL1), a transcriptional co-repressor complex, is a causative factor for late-onset hearing impairments. Transcriptional co-repressor complexes play pivotal roles in gene expression by making a complex with divergent transcription factors. However, it remained to be clarified how co-repressor complex regulates cellular survival. We herein demonstrated that ebi, a Drosophila homologue of TBL1, suppressed photoreceptor cell degeneration in the presence of excessive innate immune signaling. We also showed that the balance between NF-κB and AP-1 is a key component of cellular survival under stress conditions. Given that Ebi plays an important role in innate immune responses by regulating NF-κB activity and inhibition of apoptosis induced by associating with AP-1, it may be involved in the regulation of photoreceptor cell survival by modulating cross-talk between NF-κB and AP-1. PMID:27073743

  18. GDF15 contributes to radioresistance and cancer stemness of head and neck cancer by regulating cellular reactive oxygen species via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Lu, Ya-Ching; Li, Yi-Chen; Chiang, Chang-Hsu; You, Guo-Rung; Chen, Hsin-Ying; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an integral part for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC), while radioresistance is a major cause leads to treatment failure. GDF15, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is hypothesized to participate in various types of homeostasis. However, the potential role of this molecule in regulation of radiosensitivity remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance of HNC, as determined by both gain- and lost-of-functional experiments. These results were achieved by the induction of mitochondrial membrane potential and suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We further showed that GDF15 facilitated the conversion of cancer stemness, as assessed by the promotion of CD44+ and ALDH1+ cell populations and spheroid cell formation. At molecular level, GDF15 conferred to these cellular functions was through phosphorylated SMAD1 proteins to elite downstream signaling molecules. These cellular results were further confirmed in a tumor xenograft mouse study. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance and cancer stemness by regulating cellular ROS levels via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway. GDF15 may serve as a prediction marker of radioresistance and a therapeutic target for the development of radio-sensitizing agents for the treatment of refractory HNC. PMID:27903972

  19. GDF15 contributes to radioresistance and cancer stemness of head and neck cancer by regulating cellular reactive oxygen species via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Liang; Chang, Joseph T; Lee, Li-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Lu, Ya-Ching; Li, Yi-Chen; Chiang, Chang-Hsu; You, Guo-Rung; Chen, Hsin-Ying; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2017-01-03

    Radiotherapy is an integral part for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC), while radioresistance is a major cause leads to treatment failure. GDF15, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is hypothesized to participate in various types of homeostasis. However, the potential role of this molecule in regulation of radiosensitivity remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance of HNC, as determined by both gain- and lost-of-functional experiments. These results were achieved by the induction of mitochondrial membrane potential and suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We further showed that GDF15 facilitated the conversion of cancer stemness, as assessed by the promotion of CD44+ and ALDH1+ cell populations and spheroid cell formation. At molecular level, GDF15 conferred to these cellular functions was through phosphorylated SMAD1 proteins to elite downstream signaling molecules. These cellular results were further confirmed in a tumor xenograft mouse study. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance and cancer stemness by regulating cellular ROS levels via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway. GDF15 may serve as a prediction marker of radioresistance and a therapeutic target for the development of radio-sensitizing agents for the treatment of refractory HNC.

  20. The cellular environment regulates in situ kinetics of T-cell receptor interaction with peptide major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Natarajan, Kannan; Li, Zhenhai; Margulies, David H; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    T cells recognize antigens at the two-dimensional (2D) interface with antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which trigger T-cell effector functions. T-cell functional outcomes correlate with 2D kinetics of membrane-embedded T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to surface-tethered peptide-major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHCs). However, most studies have measured TCR-pMHC kinetics for recombinant TCRs in 3D by surface plasmon resonance, which differs drastically from 2D measurements. Here, we compared pMHC dissociation from native TCR on the T-cell surface to recombinant TCR immobilized on glass surface or in solution. Force on TCR-pMHC bonds regulated their lifetimes differently for native than recombinant TCRs. Perturbing the cellular environment suppressed 2D on-rates but had no effect on 2D off-rate regardless of whether force was applied. In contrast, for the TCR interacting with its monoclonal antibody, the 2D on-rate was insensitive to cellular perturbations and the force-dependent off-rates were indistinguishable for native and recombinant TCRs. These data present novel features of TCR-pMHC kinetics that are regulated by the cellular environment, underscoring the limitations of 3D kinetics in predicting T-cell functions and calling for further elucidation of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate 2D kinetics in physiological settings.

  1. Monoubiquitination of survival motor neuron regulates its cellular localization and Cajal body integrity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ke-Jun; Foster, Daniel; Harhaj, Edward W.; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein cause spinal muscular atrophy, the leading genetic disorder for infant mortality. SMN is ubiquitously expressed in various cell types and localizes in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it concentrates in two subnuclear structures termed Cajal body (CB) and gems. In addition, SMN can also be detected in the nucleolus of neurons. Mechanisms that control SMN sorting in the cell remain largely unknown. Here, we report that the ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Itch directly interacts with and monoubiquitinates SMN. Monoubiquitination of SMN has a mild effect on promoting proteasomal degradation of SMN. We generated two SMN mutants, SMN(K0), in which all lysines are mutated to arginines and thereby abolishing SMN ubiquitination, and Ub-SMN(K0), in which a single Ub moiety is fused at the N-terminus of SMN(K0) and thereby mimicking SMN monoubiquitination. Immunostaining assays showed that SMN(K0) mainly localizes in the nucleus, whereas Ub-SMN(K0) localizes in both the cytoplasm and the nucleolus in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Interestingly, canonical CB foci and coilin/small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) co-localization are significantly impaired in SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing SMN(K0) or Ub-SMN(K0). Thus, our studies discover that Itch monoubiquitinates SMN and monoubiquitination of SMN plays an important role in regulating its cellular localization. Moreover, mislocalization of SMN disrupts CB integrity and likely impairs snRNP maturation. PMID:26908624

  2. The tissue, cellular, and molecular regulation of orthodontic tooth movement: 100 years after Carl Sandstedt.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Murray C

    2006-06-01

    The first experimental investigation of orthodontic tooth movement was published by Sandstedt in 1904-1905. After 100 years, there is a good understanding of the sequence of events at both tissue and cellular levels and now the current focus of research is at the molecular level. The techniques of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization to detect mRNAs of interest have revolutionized tooth movement studies and an expanding list of antibodies and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays directed against human and animal proteins will facilitate their identification in tissue sections and/or culture supernatants. Nevertheless, although this technology has greatly simplified research for the clinical and laboratory investigator, message is not always translated into protein, and the presence of a protein does not necessarily mean it is biologically active. In vivo and in vitro methods have been widely used in tooth movement studies. However, data from in vitro models, in which the mechanical stimulus can be carefully controlled (tension versus compression; intermittent versus continuous), should be correlated with in vivo data from animal models. The current evidence suggests that downstream from the initial mechanotransduction event at focal adhesions which link the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton, mechanically induced remodelling is mediated by a complex feedback mechanism involving the synthesis of cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and receptor activator of nuclear factor k B ligand by cells of the osteoblast and/or fibroblast lineages. These in turn act in an autocrine/paracrine fashion to regulate the expression of transcription factors, cytokines, growth factors, enzymes, and structural molecules involved in the differentiation, proliferation, and function of mesenchymal and other cell types. Contrary to the impression gained from the literature, tooth movement is not confined to events within the periodontal

  3. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Tang, Yao; Qiu, Bo; Wu, Ziqing; Yan, Jinhai; Zhou, Xinhua; Zhao, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin’s and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20) into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (cHL) cells (L428) into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2) in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL. PMID:26000982

  4. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wenjing; Zhong, Lin; Wen, Jing; Tang, Yao; Qiu, Bo; Wu, Ziqing; Yan, Jinhai; Zhou, Xinhua; Zhao, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20) into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) cells (L428) into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2) in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  5. Monoubiquitination of survival motor neuron regulates its cellular localization and Cajal body integrity.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke-Jun; Foster, Daniel; Harhaj, Edward W; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein cause spinal muscular atrophy, the leading genetic disorder for infant mortality. SMN is ubiquitously expressed in various cell types and localizes in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it concentrates in two subnuclear structures termed Cajal body (CB) and gems. In addition, SMN can also be detected in the nucleolus of neurons. Mechanisms that control SMN sorting in the cell remain largely unknown. Here, we report that the ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Itch directly interacts with and monoubiquitinates SMN. Monoubiquitination of SMN has a mild effect on promoting proteasomal degradation of SMN. We generated two SMN mutants, SMN(K0), in which all lysines are mutated to arginines and thereby abolishing SMN ubiquitination, and Ub-SMN(K0), in which a single Ub moiety is fused at the N-terminus of SMN(K0) and thereby mimicking SMN monoubiquitination. Immunostaining assays showed that SMN(K0) mainly localizes in the nucleus, whereas Ub-SMN(K0) localizes in both the cytoplasm and the nucleolus in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Interestingly, canonical CB foci and coilin/small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) co-localization are significantly impaired in SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing SMN(K0) or Ub-SMN(K0). Thus, our studies discover that Itch monoubiquitinates SMN and monoubiquitination of SMN plays an important role in regulating its cellular localization. Moreover, mislocalization of SMN disrupts CB integrity and likely impairs snRNP maturation.

  6. The tumor suppressor protein menin inhibits AKT activation by regulating its cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Ozawa, Atsushi; Zaman, Shadia; Prasad, Nijaguna B.; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.; Agarwal, Sunita K.; Marx, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated mainly with tumors of multiple endocrine organs. Mutations in the MEN1 gene that encodes for the menin protein are the predominant cause for hereditary MEN1 syndrome. Though menin is a tumor suppressor, its molecular mechanism of action has not been defined. Here we report that menin interacts with AKT1 in vitro and in vivo. Menin downregulates the level of active AKT and its kinase activity. Through interaction with AKT1, menin suppresses both AKT1 induced proliferation and anti-apoptosis in non-endocrine and endocrine cells. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that menin regulates AKT1 in part by reducing the translocation of AKT1 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane during growth factor stimulation. Our findings may be generalizable to other cancers, insofar as we found that loss of menin expression was also associated with AKT activation in a mouse model of pancreatic islet adenoma. Together, our results suggest menin as an important novel negative regulator of AKT kinase activity. PMID:21127195

  7. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 1004 - Official Commentary on Regulation D

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official Commentary on Regulation D A Appendix A to Part 1004 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION ALTERNATIVE MORTGAGE TRANSACTION PARITY (REGULATION D) Pt. 1004, App. A Appendix A to Part 1004—Official Commentary on Regulation...

  8. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 1004 - Official Commentary on Regulation D

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official Commentary on Regulation D A Appendix A to Part 1004 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION ALTERNATIVE MORTGAGE TRANSACTION PARITY (REGULATION D) Pt. 1004, App. A Appendix A to Part 1004—Official Commentary on Regulation...

  9. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 1004 - Official Commentary on Regulation D

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official Commentary on Regulation D A Appendix A to Part 1004 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION ALTERNATIVE MORTGAGE TRANSACTION PARITY (REGULATION D) Pt. 1004, App. A Appendix A to Part 1004—Official Commentary on Regulation...

  10. 49 CFR 192.13 - What general requirements apply to pipelines regulated under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... regulated under this part? 192.13 Section 192.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... General § 192.13 What general requirements apply to pipelines regulated under this part? (a) No person may... second column, unless: (1) The pipeline has been designed, installed, constructed, initially inspected...

  11. The Emerging Role of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism as a Biological Target and Cellular Regulator of Cancer-Induced Muscle Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Carson, James A.; Hardee, Justin P.; VanderVeen, Brandon N.

    2015-01-01

    While skeletal muscle mass is an established primary outcome related to understanding cancer cachexia mechanisms, considerable gaps exist in our understanding of muscle biochemical and functional properties that have recognized roles in systemic health. Skeletal muscle quality is a classification beyond mass, and is aligned with muscle’s metabolic capacity and substrate utilization flexibility. This supplies an additional role for the mitochondria in cancer-induced muscle wasting. While the historical assessment of mitochondria content and function during cancer-induced muscle loss was closely aligned with energy flux and wasting susceptibility, this understanding has expanded to link mitochondria dysfunction to cellular processes regulating myofiber wasting. The primary objective of this article is to highlight muscle mitochondria and oxidative metabolism as a biological target of cancer cachexia and also as a cellular regulator of cancer-induced muscle wasting. Initially, we examine the role of muscle metabolic phenotype and mitochondria content in cancer-induced wasting susceptibility. We then assess the evidence for cancer-induced regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, mitophagy, and oxidative stress. In addition, we discuss environments associated with cancer cachexia that can impact the regulation of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. The article also examines the role of cytokine-mediated regulation of mitochondria function regulation, followed by the potential role of cancer-induced hypogonadism. Lastly, a role for decreased muscle use in cancer-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed. PMID:26593326

  12. The homeoprotein SIX1 controls cellular senescence through the regulation of p16INK4A and differentiation-related genes.

    PubMed

    Adrados, I; Larrasa-Alonso, J; Galarreta, A; López-Antona, I; Menéndez, C; Abad, M; Gil, J; Moreno-Bueno, G; Palmero, I

    2016-07-07

    Cellular senescence is an antiproliferative response with essential functions in tumor suppression and tissue homeostasis. Here we show that SIX1, a member of the SIX family of homeobox transcriptional factors, is a novel repressor of senescence. Our data show that SIX1 is specifically downregulated in fibroblasts upon oncogenic stress and other pro-senescence stimuli, as well as in senescent skin premalignant lesions. Silencing of SIX1 in human fibroblasts suffices to trigger senescence, which is mediated by p16INK4A and lacks a canonical senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Interestingly, SIX1-associated senescence is further characterized by the expression of a set of development and differentiation-related genes that significantly overlap with genes associated with SIX1 in organogenesis or human tumors, and show coincident regulation in oncogene-induced senescence. Mechanistically, we show that gene regulation by SIX1 during senescence is mediated, at least in part, by cooperation with Polycomb repressive complexes. In summary, our results identify SIX1, a key development regulator altered in human tumors, as a critical repressor of cellular senescence, providing a novel connection between senescence, differentiation and tumorigenesis.

  13. Dynamic interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and phosphoproteins regulate diverse cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins exert an extraordinarily widespread influence on cellular processes in all eukaryotes. They operate by binding to specific phosphorylated sites on diverse target proteins, thereby forcing conformational changes or influencing interactions between their targets and other molecules. In these ways, 14-3-3s ‘finish the job’ when phosphorylation alone lacks the power to drive changes in the activities of intracellular proteins. By interacting dynamically with phosphorylated proteins, 14-3-3s often trigger events that promote cell survival – in situations from preventing metabolic imbalances caused by sudden darkness in leaves to mammalian cell-survival responses to growth factors. Recent work linking specific 14-3-3 isoforms to genetic disorders and cancers, and the cellular effects of 14-3-3 agonists and antagonists, indicate that the cellular complement of 14-3-3 proteins may integrate the specificity and strength of signalling through to different cellular responses. PMID:15167810

  14. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Masanori; Nagao, Tetsuhiko; Yoshinari, Mototaka

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2. The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different glucose concentrations and the effects of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ and of SGLT and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) inhibitors on cellular size were determined. The cellular sizes and the contractile response were examined during a 6-day incubation with high glucose with or without phlorizin, an SGLT inhibitor. Western blotting revealed an SGLT2 band, and RT-PCR analysis of SGLT2 revealed the predicted 422-bp band in both rat mesangial and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The cell surface area changed according to the extracellular glucose concentration. The glucose-induced contraction was abolished by the absence of either extracellular Na+ or Ca2+ and by SGLT and NCX inhibitors. Under the high glucose condition, the cell size decreased for 2 days and increased afterwards; these cells did not contract in response to angiotensin II, and the SGLT inhibitor restored the abolished contraction. These data suggest that SGLT2 is expressed in rat mesangial cells, acts as a normal physiological glucose sensor and regulates cellular contractility in rat mesangial cells.

  15. Metals on the move: zinc ions in cellular regulation and in the coordination dynamics of zinc proteins.

    PubMed

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Homeostatic control maintains essential transition metal ions at characteristic cellular concentrations to support their physiological functions and to avoid adverse effects. Zinc is especially widely used as a catalytic or structural cofactor in about 3000 human zinc proteins. In addition, the homeostatic control of zinc in eukaryotic cells permits functions of zinc(II) ions in regulation and in paracrine and intracrine signaling. Zinc ions are released from proteins through ligand-centered reactions in zinc/thiolate coordination environments, and from stores in cellular organelles, where zinc transporters participate in zinc loading and release. Muffling reactions allow zinc ions to serve as signaling ions (second messengers) in the cytosol that is buffered to picomolar zinc ion concentrations at steady-state. Muffling includes zinc ion binding to metallothioneins, cellular translocations of metallothioneins, delivery of zinc ions to transporter proteins, and zinc ion fluxes through cellular membranes with the result of removing the additional zinc ions from the cytosol and restoring the steady-state. Targets of regulatory zinc ions are proteins with sites for transient zinc binding, such as membrane receptors, enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and sensor proteins that control gene expression. The generation, transmission, targets, and termination of zinc ion signals involve proteins that use coordination dynamics in the inner and outer ligand spheres to control metal ion association and dissociation. These new findings establish critically important functions of zinc ions and zinc metalloproteins in cellular control.

  16. E2F transcription factor 1 regulates cellular and organismal senescence by inhibiting Forkhead box O transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-12-05

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. 41 CFR 102-33.15 - How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? 102-33.15 Section 102-33.15 Public Contracts and Property... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? This part does not supersede any of the regulations in 14 CFR chapter I (Federal Aviation Regulations)....

  18. 41 CFR 102-33.15 - How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? 102-33.15 Section 102-33.15 Public Contracts and Property... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? This part does not supersede any of the regulations in 14 CFR chapter I (Federal Aviation Regulations)....

  19. 41 CFR 102-33.15 - How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? 102-33.15 Section 102-33.15 Public Contracts and Property... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? This part does not supersede any of the regulations in 14 CFR chapter I (Federal Aviation Regulations)....

  20. 41 CFR 102-33.15 - How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? 102-33.15 Section 102-33.15 Public Contracts and Property... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? This part does not supersede any of the regulations in 14 CFR chapter I (Federal Aviation Regulations)....

  1. 41 CFR 102-33.15 - How does this part relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? 102-33.15 Section 102-33.15 Public Contracts and Property... relate to the Federal Aviation Regulations? This part does not supersede any of the regulations in 14 CFR chapter I (Federal Aviation Regulations)....

  2. Enabled (Xena) regulates neural plate morphogenesis, apical constriction, and cellular adhesion required for neural tube closure in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Roffers-Agarwal, Julaine; Xanthos, Jennifer B.; Kragtorp, Katherine A.; Miller, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cellular adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics is essential for neurulation, though it remains unclear how these two processes are coordinated. Members of the Ena/VASP family of proteins are localized to sites of cellular adhesion and actin dynamics and lack of two family members, Mena and VASP, in mice results in failure of neural tube closure. The precise mechanism by which Ena/VASP proteins regulate this process, however, is not understood. In this report, we show that Xenopus Ena (Xena) is localized to apical adhesive junctions of neuroepithelial cells during neurulation and that Xena knockdown disrupts cell behaviors integral to neural tube closure. Changes in the shape of the neural plate as well as apical constriction within the neural plate are perturbed in Xena knockdown embryos. Additionally, we demonstrate that Xena is essential for cell-cell adhesion. These results demonstrate that Xena plays an integral role in coordinating the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular adhesion during neurulation in Xenopus. PMID:18201691

  3. [The regulated effect of the coded amino acids on the basic cellular processes in young and old animals].

    PubMed

    Chalisova, N I; Kontsevaia, E A; Voĭtsekhovskaia, M A; Komashnia, A V

    2011-01-01

    The aspects of the regulatory effect of 20 coded amino acids on the basic cellular processes--proliferation and apoptosis--are discussed. This effect is performed due to the regulation by the amino acids of the specific genes at the levels of the transcription and translation. This leads to the triggering of the regulation of any cellular processes. The investigations in organotypic culture of the tissues of the different genesis have demonstrated that the different amino acids perform the cell proliferation or apoptosis. The group of low molecular mass hydrophile amino acids with the charge chains stimulated the cell proliferation in the tissues of mesodermal genesis. The other group of high molecular mass hydrophobe amino acids stimulated the cell proliferation in the tissues of ectodermal genesis. Thus, the coded amino acids are not only the structural elements of the proteins, but can participate in the regulation of the specific genes, controlling the cellular cycle. The number of the active amino acids is decreased in 2.7 times in the explants from the old rats, as compared to the young, reflecting the disturbances in the amino acid transport and gene expression by the aging.

  4. 75 FR 41161 - Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Part 251...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Part 251, Contractor Use of Government Supply Sources AGENCY: Defense Acquisition... extension of an approved information collection requirement. SUMMARY: In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2...

  5. Systemic Activin signaling independently regulates sugar homeostasis, cellular metabolism, and pH balance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arpan C.; O’Connor, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to maintain cellular and physiological metabolic homeostasis is key for the survival of multicellular organisms in changing environmental conditions. However, our understanding of extracellular signaling pathways that modulate metabolic processes remains limited. In this study we show that the Activin-like ligand Dawdle (Daw) is a major regulator of systemic metabolic homeostasis and cellular metabolism in Drosophila. We find that loss of canonical Smad signaling downstream of Daw leads to defects in sugar and systemic pH homeostasis. Although Daw regulates sugar homeostasis by positively influencing insulin release, we find that the effect of Daw on pH balance is independent of its role in insulin signaling and is caused by accumulation of organic acids that are primarily tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. RNA sequencing reveals that a number of TCA cycle enzymes and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes including genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and β-oxidation are up-regulated in the daw mutants, indicating either a direct or indirect role of Daw in regulating these genes. These findings establish Activin signaling as a major metabolic regulator and uncover a functional link between TGF-β signaling, insulin signaling, and metabolism in Drosophila. PMID:24706779

  6. Parasitoid wasp venom SERCA regulates Drosophila calcium levels and inhibits cellular immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Nathan T.; Goecks, Jeremy; Kacsoh, Balint Z.; Mobley, James A.; Bowersock, Gregory J.; Taylor, James; Schlenke, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Because parasite virulence factors target host immune responses, identification and functional characterization of these factors can provide insight into poorly understood host immune mechanisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model system for understanding humoral innate immunity, but Drosophila cellular innate immune responses remain incompletely characterized. Fruit flies are regularly infected by parasitoid wasps in nature and, following infection, flies mount a cellular immune response culminating in the cellular encapsulation of the wasp egg. The mechanistic basis of this response is largely unknown, but wasps use a mixture of virulence proteins derived from the venom gland to suppress cellular encapsulation. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying wasp virulence and fly cellular immunity, we used a joint transcriptomic/proteomic approach to identify venom genes from Ganaspis sp.1 (G1), a previously uncharacterized Drosophila parasitoid species, and found that G1 venom contains a highly abundant sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump. Accordingly, we found that fly immune cells termed plasmatocytes normally undergo a cytoplasmic calcium burst following infection, and that this calcium burst is required for activation of the cellular immune response. We further found that the plasmatocyte calcium burst is suppressed by G1 venom in a SERCA-dependent manner, leading to the failure of plasmatocytes to become activated and migrate toward G1 eggs. Finally, by genetically manipulating plasmatocyte calcium levels, we were able to alter fly immune success against G1 and other parasitoid species. Our characterization of parasitoid wasp venom proteins led us to identify plasmatocyte cytoplasmic calcium bursts as an important aspect of fly cellular immunity. PMID:23690612

  7. Parasitoid wasp venom SERCA regulates Drosophila calcium levels and inhibits cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Nathan T; Goecks, Jeremy; Kacsoh, Balint Z; Mobley, James A; Bowersock, Gregory J; Taylor, James; Schlenke, Todd A

    2013-06-04

    Because parasite virulence factors target host immune responses, identification and functional characterization of these factors can provide insight into poorly understood host immune mechanisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model system for understanding humoral innate immunity, but Drosophila cellular innate immune responses remain incompletely characterized. Fruit flies are regularly infected by parasitoid wasps in nature and, following infection, flies mount a cellular immune response culminating in the cellular encapsulation of the wasp egg. The mechanistic basis of this response is largely unknown, but wasps use a mixture of virulence proteins derived from the venom gland to suppress cellular encapsulation. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying wasp virulence and fly cellular immunity, we used a joint transcriptomic/proteomic approach to identify venom genes from Ganaspis sp.1 (G1), a previously uncharacterized Drosophila parasitoid species, and found that G1 venom contains a highly abundant sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump. Accordingly, we found that fly immune cells termed plasmatocytes normally undergo a cytoplasmic calcium burst following infection, and that this calcium burst is required for activation of the cellular immune response. We further found that the plasmatocyte calcium burst is suppressed by G1 venom in a SERCA-dependent manner, leading to the failure of plasmatocytes to become activated and migrate toward G1 eggs. Finally, by genetically manipulating plasmatocyte calcium levels, we were able to alter fly immune success against G1 and other parasitoid species. Our characterization of parasitoid wasp venom proteins led us to identify plasmatocyte cytoplasmic calcium bursts as an important aspect of fly cellular immunity.

  8. Mutant IDH1 Expression Drives TERT Promoter Reactivation as Part of the Cellular Transformation Process.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Johannessen, Tor-Christian; Mancini, Andrew; Chow, Tracy T; Wood, Matthew; Jones, Lindsey; Mazor, Tali; Marshall, Roxanne E; Viswanath, Pavithra; Walsh, Kyle M; Perry, Arie; Bell, Robert J A; Phillips, Joanna J; Costello, Joseph F; Ronen, Sabrina M; Pieper, Russell O

    2016-11-15

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene IDH1 are common in low-grade glioma, where they result in the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), disrupted patterns of histone methylation, and gliomagenesis. IDH1 mutations also cosegregate with mutations in the ATRX gene and the TERT promoter, suggesting that IDH mutation may drive the creation or selection of telomere-stabilizing events as part of immortalization/transformation process. To determine whether and how this may occur, we investigated the phenotype of pRb-/p53-deficient human astrocytes engineered with IDH1 wild-type (WT) or R132H-mutant (IDH1(mut)) genes as they progressed through their lifespan. IDH1(mut) expression promoted 2HG production and altered histone methylation within 20 population doublings (PD) but had no effect on telomerase expression or telomere length. Accordingly, cells expressing either IDH1(WT) or IDH1(mut) entered a telomere-induced crisis at PD 70. In contrast, only IDH1(mut) cells emerged from crisis, grew indefinitely in culture, and formed colonies in soft agar and tumors in vivo Clonal populations of postcrisis IDH1(mut) cells displayed shared genetic alterations, but no mutations in ATRX or the TERT promoter were detected. Instead, these cells reactivated telomerase and stabilized their telomeres in association with increased histone lysine methylation (H3K4me3) and c-Myc/Max binding at the TERT promoter. Overall, these results show that although IDH1(mut) does not create or select for ATRX or TERT promoter mutations, it can indirectly reactivate TERT, and in doing so contribute to astrocytic immortalization and transformation. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6680-9. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Mechanisms in photodynamic therapy: part one—-photosensitizers, photochemistry and cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The use of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) in combination with harmless visible light that is known as photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been known for over a hundred years, but is only now becoming widely used. Originally developed as a tumor therapy, some of its most successful applications are for non-malignant disease. In a series of three reviews we will discuss the mechanisms that operate in the field of PDT. Part one discusses the recent explosion in discovery and chemical synthesis of new PS. Some guidelines on how to choose an ideal PS for a particular application are presented. The photochemistry and photophysics of PS and the two pathways known as Type I (radicals and reactive oxygen species) and Type II (singlet oxygen) photochemical processes are discussed. To carry out PDT effectively in vivo, it is necessary to ensure sufficient light reaches all the diseased tissue. This involves understanding how light travels within various tissues and the relative effects of absorption and scattering. The fact that most of the PS are also fluorescent allows various optical imaging and monitoring strategies to be combined with PDT. The most important factor governing the outcome of PDT is how the PS interacts with cells in the target tissue or tumor, and the key aspect of this interaction is the subcellular localization of the PS. Examples of PS that localize in mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes are given. Finally the use of 5-aminolevulinic acid as a natural precursor of the heme biosynthetic pathway, stimulates accumulation of the PS protoporphyrin IX is described. PMID:25048432

  10. Regulation of cellular manganese and manganese transport rates in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Sunda, W.G.; Huntsman, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular accumulation and uptake kinetics of manganese by Chlamydomonas sp. were studied in model chelate buffer systems. Cellular manganese concentrations and uptake rates were related to the computed free manganese ion concentration and were independent of the total or chelated manganese concentration. Cellular manganese was constant at about 1 mmol liter/sup -1/ of cellular volume at free manganese ion concentrations of 10/sup -7/ /sup 6/-10/sup -6/ /sup 3/ mol liter/sup -1/ and decreased below this range. Manganese uptake rates followed saturation kinetics and V/sub max/, but not K/sub s/, varied with the free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium. V/sub max/ appeared to be under negative feedback control and increased with decreasing manganese ion concentration. Variations of up to 30-fold in this parameter seemed to be instrumental in limiting the variation in cellular manganese to a sixfold range despite a 1000-fold variation in free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium.

  11. [Musculoskeletal tissue banks in Mexico. Part I. Regulation and organization].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-San Martín, R

    2012-01-01

    Although Tissue Banks and their activities are not new in Mexico, the specific regulations for the activities of tissue banks and musculoskeletal tissues considered as health supplies are still under development. This review paper intends to provide information on the national situation of musculoskeletal tissue banks, major aspects concerning their regulation and organization, and the recognition of the national instances pertaining to the Coordination for Organ and Tissue Donation for Transplant Purposes for the obtention of (musculoskeletal) tissues from deceased donors.

  12. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters.

  13. Down-regulation of phosphoglucose isomerase/autocrine motility factor expression sensitizes human fibrosarcoma cells to oxidative stress leading to cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Hu, Huankai; Hogan, Victor; Raz, Avraham

    2007-12-14

    Phosphoglucose isomerase/autocrine motility factor (PGI/AMF) is a housekeeping gene product present in all cells, is an essential enzyme of catabolic glycolysis and anabolic gluconeogenesis, and regulates tumor cell growth and metastasis. Because glycolytic enzyme up-regulation of expression contributes to glycolytic flux, leading to increased of cell growth and a resistance to cellular stress of normal fibroblasts whereas down-regulation of PGI/AMF leads to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition in tumor cells, we examined the involvement of PGI/AMF in overcoming cellular senescence in cancer cells. PGI/AMF cellular expression in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma was down-regulated by small interfering RNA methodology, which resulted in an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and oxidative stress-induced cellular senescence. Signaling analysis revealed that the senescence pathway involving p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor was up-regulated in PGI/AMF knockdown cells and that superoxide dismutase is the upstream regulator protein of p21-mediated cellular senescence. A specific inhibitor of PGI/AMF induced cellular senescence and p21 expression in tumor cells exposed to an oxidative stress environment. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that PGI/AMF is involved in oxidative stress-induced cellular senescence and should bring novel insights into the control of cellular growth leading to a new methodology for cancer treatment.

  14. 21 CFR 579.12 - Incorporation of regulations in part 179.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF ANIMAL FEED AND PET FOOD General Provisions § 579.12 Incorporation of regulations in part 179... labeling of animal feed and pet food, except where specifically provided for in this part. [51 FR 5993, Feb...

  15. Cellular and chemokine-mediated regulation in schistosome-induced hepatic pathology.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Candy; Jones, Malcolm K; Burke, Melissa L; McManus, Donald P; Gobert, Geoffrey N

    2014-03-01

    In hepatic schistosomiasis, pathology arises when schistosome eggs become lodged in the host liver, evoking an interleukin 4 (IL-4)- and IL-13-mediated dominant CD4(+) Th2 immune response. This response leads to the development of granulomas and fibrosis, with eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages, hepatic stellate cells, and lymphocytes all identified as major cellular contributors to these events. This review outlines the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hepatic schistosomiasis, with an emphasis on the major cellular components and their release of chemokines. The differences between Schistosoma mansoni- and Schistosoma japonicum-induced hepatic granuloma are also discussed. This comprehensive overview of the processes associated with hepatic schistosomiasis may provide new insights into improved treatment for both schistosomiasis and other granulofibrotic diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of BACE1 by miR-29a/b in a cellular model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia 17.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Reema; Ghosh, Tanay; Gadgil, Mugdha; Pillai, Beena

    2012-06-01

    Polyglutamine diseases are a class of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by expansion of polyglutamine repeats, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in specific regions of the brain. The expansion of a polyglutamine repeat in the TATA binding protein (TBP) causes a neurodegenerative disease, Spinocerebellar Ataxia 17 (SCA17). This disease is characterized by intranuclear protein aggregates and selective loss of cerebellar neurons, including Purkinje cells. MicroRNAs are small, endogenous, regulatory non-coding RNA molecules that bind to messenger RNAs with partial complementarity and interfere in their expression. Here, we used a cellular model of SCA17 where we expressed TBP with 16 (normal) or 59 (pathogenic) polyglutamines and found differential expression of several microRNAs. Specifically, we found two microRNAs, miR-29a/b, were down-regulated. With miR-29a/b down regulation, we found an increased expression of targets of miR-29a/b -beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and BAK, increased cytochrome c release and apoptosis. Restoration of miR-29a/b in the pathogenic polyglutamine background reduced the BACE1expression. While, antagomiRs against miR-29a/b resulted in an increase in BACE1 levels and neuronal apoptosis. In spite of the elevation of BACE1 in Alzhemiers disease, its role in neuronal cell death has not been established. Here, we show that increased BACE1 expression is not sufficient to cause apoptosis. However restoring level of BACE1 to normal in polyglutamine cells partially reduced neuronal apoptosis. We show a role for the miR-29a/b-BACE1 regulatory interaction in SCA17, suggesting that this microRNA could be part of a common molecular mechanism leading to neuronal cell death in multiple neurodegenerative disorders. The identification of a common mechanism of microRNA mediated neurodegeneration not only improves our understanding of the process, but also

  17. Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins.

    PubMed

    Ringrose, Leonie; Paro, Renato

    2004-01-01

    During the development of multicellular organisms, cells become different from one another by changing their genetic program in response to transient stimuli. Long after the stimulus is gone, "cellular memory" mechanisms enable cells to remember their chosen fate over many cell divisions. The Polycomb and Trithorax groups of proteins, respectively, work to maintain repressed or active transcription states of developmentally important genes through many rounds of cell division. Here we review current ideas on the protein and DNA components of this transcriptional memory system and how they interact dynamically with each other to orchestrate cellular memory for several hundred genes.

  18. MicroRNAs Regulate Cellular ATP Levels by Targeting Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism Genes during C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Siengdee, Puntita; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we identified an miRNA regulatory network involved in energy metabolism in porcine muscle. To better understand the involvement of miRNAs in cellular ATP production and energy metabolism, here we used C2C12 myoblasts, in which ATP levels increase during differentiation, to identify miRNAs modulating these processes. ATP level, miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles during C2C12 differentiation into myotubes were assessed. The results suggest 14 miRNAs (miR-423-3p, miR-17, miR-130b, miR-301a/b, miR-345, miR-15a, miR-16a, miR-128, miR-615, miR-1968, miR-1a/b, and miR-194) as cellular ATP regulators targeting genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism (Cox4i2, Cox6a2, Ndufb7, Ndufs4, Ndufs5, and Ndufv1) during C2C12 differentiation. Among these, miR-423-3p showed a high inverse correlation with increasing ATP levels. Besides having implications in promoting cell growth and cell cycle progression, its function in cellular ATP regulation is yet unknown. Therefore, miR-423-3p was selected and validated for the function together with its potential target, Cox6a2. Overexpression of miR-423-3p in C2C12 myogenic differentiation lead to decreased cellular ATP level and decreased expression of Cox6a2 compared to the negative control. These results suggest miR-423-3p as a novel regulator of ATP/energy metabolism by targeting Cox6a2.

  19. MicroRNAs Regulate Cellular ATP Levels by Targeting Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism Genes during C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Siengdee, Puntita; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we identified an miRNA regulatory network involved in energy metabolism in porcine muscle. To better understand the involvement of miRNAs in cellular ATP production and energy metabolism, here we used C2C12 myoblasts, in which ATP levels increase during differentiation, to identify miRNAs modulating these processes. ATP level, miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles during C2C12 differentiation into myotubes were assessed. The results suggest 14 miRNAs (miR-423-3p, miR-17, miR-130b, miR-301a/b, miR-345, miR-15a, miR-16a, miR-128, miR-615, miR-1968, miR-1a/b, and miR-194) as cellular ATP regulators targeting genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism (Cox4i2, Cox6a2, Ndufb7, Ndufs4, Ndufs5, and Ndufv1) during C2C12 differentiation. Among these, miR-423-3p showed a high inverse correlation with increasing ATP levels. Besides having implications in promoting cell growth and cell cycle progression, its function in cellular ATP regulation is yet unknown. Therefore, miR-423-3p was selected and validated for the function together with its potential target, Cox6a2. Overexpression of miR-423-3p in C2C12 myogenic differentiation lead to decreased cellular ATP level and decreased expression of Cox6a2 compared to the negative control. These results suggest miR-423-3p as a novel regulator of ATP/energy metabolism by targeting Cox6a2. PMID:26010876

  20. 10 CFR 603.125 - Applicability of other parts of the DOE Assistance Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) TIAs are explicitly covered in this part and 10 CFR part 600, subpart A—General. 10 CFR part 600... the DOE Assistance Regulations apply to TIAs, although they do not mention a TIA explicitly. They are: (1) 10 CFR part 601—lobbying restrictions apply by law (31 U.S.C. 1352) to a TIA that is a...

  1. 10 CFR 603.125 - Applicability of other parts of the DOE Assistance Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) TIAs are explicitly covered in this part and 10 CFR part 600, subpart A—General. 10 CFR part 600... the DOE Assistance Regulations apply to TIAs, although they do not mention a TIA explicitly. They are: (1) 10 CFR part 601—lobbying restrictions apply by law (31 U.S.C. 1352) to a TIA that is a...

  2. 10 CFR 603.125 - Applicability of other parts of the DOE Assistance Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) TIAs are explicitly covered in this part and 10 CFR part 600, subpart A—General. 10 CFR part 600... the DOE Assistance Regulations apply to TIAs, although they do not mention a TIA explicitly. They are: (1) 10 CFR part 601—lobbying restrictions apply by law (31 U.S.C. 1352) to a TIA that is a...

  3. 10 CFR 603.125 - Applicability of other parts of the DOE Assistance Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) TIAs are explicitly covered in this part and 10 CFR part 600, subpart A—General. 10 CFR part 600... the DOE Assistance Regulations apply to TIAs, although they do not mention a TIA explicitly. They are: (1) 10 CFR part 601—lobbying restrictions apply by law (31 U.S.C. 1352) to a TIA that is a...

  4. 10 CFR 603.125 - Applicability of other parts of the DOE Assistance Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) TIAs are explicitly covered in this part and 10 CFR part 600, subpart A—General. 10 CFR part 600... the DOE Assistance Regulations apply to TIAs, although they do not mention a TIA explicitly. They are: (1) 10 CFR part 601—lobbying restrictions apply by law (31 U.S.C. 1352) to a TIA that is a...

  5. Bone remodeling in the context of cellular and systemic regulation: the role of osteocytes and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Niedźwiedzki, Tadeusz; Filipowska, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that undergoes constant remodeling. The appropriate course of this process determines development and regeneration of the skeleton. Tight molecular control of bone remodeling is vital for the maintenance of appropriate physiology and microarchitecture of the bone, providing homeostasis, also at the systemic level. The process of remodeling is regulated by a rich innervation of the skeleton, being the source of various growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones regulating function of the bone. Although the course of bone remodeling at the cellular level is mainly associated with the activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, recently also osteocytes have gained a growing interest as the principal regulators of bone turnover. Osteocytes play a significant role in the regulation of osteogenesis, releasing sclerostin (SOST), an inhibitor of bone formation. The process of bone turnover, especially osteogenesis, is also modulated by extra-skeletal molecules. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts are promoted by the brain-derived serotonin and hypothetically inhibited by its intestinal equivalent. The activity of SOST and serotonin is either directly or indirectly associated with the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, the main regulatory pathway of osteoblasts function. The impairment of bone remodeling may lead to many skeletal diseases, such as high bone mass syndrome or osteoporosis. In this paper, we review the most recent data on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling control, with particular emphasis on the role of osteocytes and the nervous system in this process.

  6. Rapid aquaporin translocation regulates cellular water flow: mechanism of hypotonicity-induced subcellular localization of aquaporin 1 water channel.

    PubMed

    Conner, Matthew T; Conner, Alex C; Bland, Charlotte E; Taylor, Luke H J; Brown, James E P; Parri, H Rheinallt; Bill, Roslyn M

    2012-03-30

    The control of cellular water flow is mediated by the aquaporin (AQP) family of membrane proteins. The structural features of the family and the mechanism of selective water passage through the AQP pore are established, but there remains a gap in our knowledge of how water transport is regulated. Two broad possibilities exist. One is controlling the passage of water through the AQP pore, but this only has been observed as a phenomenon in some plant and microbial AQPs. An alternative is controlling the number of AQPs in the cell membrane. Here, we describe a novel pathway in mammalian cells whereby a hypotonic stimulus directly induces intracellular calcium elevations through transient receptor potential channels, which trigger AQP1 translocation. This translocation, which has a direct role in cell volume regulation, occurs within 30 s and is dependent on calmodulin activation and phosphorylation of AQP1 at two threonine residues by protein kinase C. This direct mechanism provides a rationale for the changes in water transport that are required in response to constantly changing local cellular water availability. Moreover, because calcium is a pluripotent and ubiquitous second messenger in biological systems, the discovery of its role in the regulation of AQP translocation has ramifications for diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes, as well as providing an explanation for the rapid regulation of water flow that is necessary for cell homeostasis.

  7. AMPK: Regulating Energy Balance at the Cellular and Whole Body Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, D. Grahame; Ashford, Michael L. J.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes as an adenine nucleotide sensor that maintains energy homeostasis at the cellular level. However, during evolution of more complex multicellular organisms, the system has adapted to interact with hormones so that it also plays a key role in balancing energy intake and expenditure at the whole body level. PMID:24583766

  8. Cellular regulation of basal and FSH-stimulated cyclic AMP production in irradiated rat testes

    SciTech Connect

    Kangasniemi, M.; Kaipia, A.; Toppari, J.; Mali, P.; Huhtaniemi, I.; Parvinen, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Basal and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) productions by seminiferous tubular segments from irradiated adult rats were investigated at defined stages of the epithelial cycle when specific spermatogenic cells were low in number. Seven days post-irradiation, depletion of spermatogonia did not influence the basal cAMP production, but FSH response increased in stages II-VIII. Seventeen days post-irradiation when spermatocytes were low in number, there was a small increase in basal cAMP level in stages VII-VIII and FSH-stimulated cAMP production increased in stages VII-XII and XIII-I. At 38 days when pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids (steps 1-6) were low in number, a decreased basal cAMP production was measured in stages II-VI and IX-XII. FSH-stimulated cAMP output increased in stages VII-XII but decreased in stages II-VI. At 52 days when all spermatids were low in number, basal cAMP levels decreased in all stages of the cycle, whereas FSH response was elevated only in stages VII-XII. All spermatogenic cell types seem to have an effect on cAMP production by the seminiferous tubule in a stage-specific fashion. Germ cells appear to regulate Sertoli cell FSH response in a paracrine way, and a part of cAMP may originate from spermatids stimulated by an unknown FSH-dependent Sertoli cell factor. The FSH-dependent functions may control such phenomena as spermatogonial proliferation, final maturation of spermatids, and onset of meiosis.

  9. JMJD8 Regulates Angiogenic Sprouting and Cellular Metabolism by Interacting With Pyruvate Kinase M2 in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Derlet, Anja; Glaser, Simone F; Luczak, Annika; Lucas, Tina; Heumüller, Andreas W; Krüger, Marcus; Zehendner, Christoph M; Kaluza, David; Doddaballapur, Anuradha; Ohtani, Kisho; Treguer, Karine; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins modify histone and nonhistone proteins thereby controlling cellular functions. However, the role of JmjC proteins in angiogenesis is largely unknown. Here, we characterize the expression of JmjC domain-containing proteins after inducing endothelial differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells and study the function of JmjC domain-only proteins in endothelial cell (EC) functions. We identified a large number of JmjC domain-containing proteins regulated by endothelial differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells. Among the family of JmjC domain-only proteins, Jmjd8 was significantly upregulated on endothelial differentiation. Knockdown of Jmjd8 in ECs significantly decreased in vitro network formation and sprouting in the spheroid assay. JMJD8 is exclusively detectable in the cytoplasm, excluding a function as a histone-modifying enzyme. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed JMJD8-interacting proteins with known functions in cellular metabolism like pyruvate kinase M2. Accordingly, knockdown of pyruvate kinase M2 in human umbilical vein ECs decreased endothelial sprouting in the spheroid assay. Knockdown of JMJD8 caused a reduction of EC metabolism as measured by Seahorse Bioscience extracellular flux analysis. Conversely, overexpression of JMJD8 enhanced cellular oxygen consumption rate of ECs, reflecting an increased mitochondrial respiration. Jmjd8 is upregulated during endothelial differentiation and regulates endothelial sprouting and metabolism by interacting with pyruvate kinase M2. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Herpes simplex virus 1 VP22 regulates translocation of multiple viral and cellular proteins and promotes neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Michiko; Kato, Akihisa; Satoh, Yuko; Ide, Takahiro; Sagou, Ken; Kimura, Kayo; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein VP22, encoded by the UL49 gene, is a major virion tegument protein. In the present study, we showed that VP22 was required for efficient redistribution of viral proteins VP16, VP26, ICP0, ICP4, and ICP27 and of cellular protein Hsc-70 to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that two dileucine motifs in VP22, at amino acids 235 and 236 and amino acids 251 and 252, were necessary for VP22 regulation of the proper cytoplasmic localization of these viral and cellular proteins. The dileucine motifs were also required for proper cytoplasmic localization of VP22 itself and for optimal expression of viral proteins VP16, VP22, ICP0, UL41, and glycoprotein B. Interestingly, a recombinant mutant virus with alanines substituted for the dileucines at amino acids 251 and 252 had a 50% lethal dose (LD(50)) for neurovirulence in mice following intracerebral inoculation about 10(3)-fold lower than the LD(50) of the repaired virus. Furthermore, the replication and spread of this mutant virus in the brains of mice following intracerebral inoculation were significantly impaired relative to those of the repaired virus. The ability of VP22 to regulate the localization and expression of various viral and cellular proteins, as shown in this study, was correlated with an increase in viral replication and neurovirulence in the experimental murine model. Thus, HSV-1 VP22 is a significant neurovirulence factor in vivo.

  11. Gas1 is a pleiotropic regulator of cellular functions: from embryonic development to molecular actions in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Segovia, José; Zarco, Natanael

    2014-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis is governed by a precise regulation of the molecular mechanisms of action of several proteins in a given time. There is a group of proteins that have a particular role depending on the cellular context in which they are present and are known as pleiotropic proteins. The Gas1 (Growth Arrest Specific 1) gene was isolated from a subtraction library from serum arrested versus growing NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast. Gas1 is a member of the alpha receptors (GFRα) for the family of GDNF ligands (GFL), we have previously shown that Gas1 acts as a negative modulator of the GDNF-induced intracellular signaling and induces cell arrest and apoptosis. This modulating activity is the cause of the capacity of Gas1 to act as a tumor suppressor. On the other hand, several studies have shown the interaction between Gas1 and Hh (Hedgehog) proteins to potentiate the positive regulation of this pathway, which is involved in the development of the nervous system, and in both the origin and progression of different tumors. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of Gas1 and the molecular mechanism of action in different cellular functions, both during embryonic development, in the adult and its effects inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis of cancer cells.

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid signaling via LPA1 and LPA3 regulates cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kaori; Takahashi, Kaede; Yamasaki, Eri; Onishi, Yuka; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2017-03-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors exhibits a variety of biological effects, such as cell proliferation, motility and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of LPA1 and LPA3 in cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells. LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown cells were generated from PANC-1 cells. The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells were inhibited by LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown. In gelatin zymography, LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown cells indicated the low activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the presence of LPA. Next, to assess whether LPA1 and LPA3 regulate cellular functions induced by anticancer drug, PANC-1 cells were treated with cisplatin (CDDP) for approximately 6 months. The cell motile and invasive activities of long-term CDDP treated cells were markedly higher than those of PANC-1 cells, correlating with the expression levels of LPAR1 and LPAR3 genes. In soft agar assay, the long-term CDDP treated cells formed markedly large sized colonies. In addition, the cell motile and invasive activities enhanced by CDDP were significantly suppressed by LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown as well as colony formation. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA1 and LPA3 play an important role in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in PANC-1 cells.

  13. 47 CFR 90.672 - Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 900 MHz Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. 90.672 Section 90.672 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. (a) Definition. Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k... 22 of this chapter, Cellular Radiotelephone systems and within the 900 MHz Business/Industrial Land...

  14. A chemical biology approach to interrogate quorum-sensing regulated behaviors at the molecular and cellular level.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Colin A; Matamouros, Susana; Niessen, Sherry; Zhu, Jie; Scolnick, Jonathan; Lively, Jenny M; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Miller, Samuel I; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2013-07-25

    Small molecule probes have been used extensively to explore biologic systems and elucidate cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we use an inhibitor of bacterial communication to monitor changes in the proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with the aim of discovering unrecognized processes regulated by AI-2-based quorum-sensing (QS), a mechanism of bacterial intercellular communication that allows for the coordination of gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. In S. typhimurium, this system regulates the uptake and catabolism of intercellular signals and has been implicated in pathogenesis, including the invasion of host epithelial cells. We demonstrate that our QS antagonist is capable of selectively inhibiting the expression of known QS-regulated proteins in S. typhimurium, thus attesting that QS inhibitors may be used to confirm proposed and elucidate previously unidentified QS pathways without relying on genetic manipulation.

  15. 10 CFR 1016.41 - Continued applicability of the regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continued applicability of the regulations in this part. 1016.41 Section 1016.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.41 Continued applicability of the regulations in this part. The...

  16. 31 CFR 539.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE CONTROL REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Laws and Regulations § 539.101 Relation...

  17. 31 CFR 539.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE CONTROL REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Laws and Regulations § 539.101 Relation...

  18. 31 CFR 539.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE CONTROL REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Laws and Regulations § 539.101 Relation...

  19. 31 CFR 539.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE CONTROL REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Laws and Regulations § 539.101 Relation...

  20. 31 CFR 539.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE CONTROL REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Laws and Regulations § 539.101 Relation...

  1. 19 CFR Annex V to Part 351 - Comparison of Prior and New Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparison of Prior and New Regulations V Annex V to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex V Annex V to Part 351—Comparison of Prior and New Regulations Prior...

  2. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 217 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 217—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply 1. Grants... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 217 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT...

  3. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 217 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 217—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply 1. Grants... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 217 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT...

  4. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 217 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 217—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply 1. Grants... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 217 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT...

  5. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 217 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 217—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply 1. Grants... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 217 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT...

  6. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 217 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 217—Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply 1. Grants... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 217 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT...

  7. 24 CFR 2002.1 - Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... DEVELOPMENT AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC § 2002.1 Scope of the part and applicability of other...

  8. 24 CFR 2002.1 - Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... DEVELOPMENT AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC § 2002.1 Scope of the part and applicability of other...

  9. 24 CFR 2002.1 - Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... DEVELOPMENT AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC § 2002.1 Scope of the part and applicability of other...

  10. 24 CFR 2002.1 - Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... DEVELOPMENT AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC § 2002.1 Scope of the part and applicability of other...

  11. 19 CFR Annex V to Part 351 - Comparison of Prior and New Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Comparison of Prior and New Regulations V Annex V to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex V Annex V to Part 351—Comparison of Prior and New Regulations Prior...

  12. 19 CFR Annex V to Part 351 - Comparison of Prior and New Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Comparison of Prior and New Regulations V Annex V to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex V Annex V to Part 351—Comparison of Prior and New Regulations Prior...

  13. 19 CFR Annex V to Part 351 - Comparison of Prior and New Regulations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Comparison of Prior and New Regulations V Annex V to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex V Annex V to Part 351—Comparison of Prior and New Regulations Prior...

  14. p53 suppresses stress-induced cellular senescence via regulation of autophagy under the deprivation of serum.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xinbing; Fang, Yong; Lou, Haizhou; Wang, Kaifeng; Zheng, Yu; Lou, Fang; Jin, Wei; Xu, Yinghua; Chen, Wei; Pan, Hongming; Wang, Xian; Han, Weidong

    2015-02-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is widely known for its ability to induce cell cycle arrest or cell death, therefore preventing neoplastic progression. Previous studies have demonstrated novel roles for p53 in the regulation of autophagy and senescence. p53 can not only exert cell cycle‑arresting and senescence‑promoting or suppressing functions, but can also induce autophagic flux, particularly under conditions of nutrient deprivation. The present study demonstrated that p53 was capable of activating autophagy, which permits cell survival under conditions of serum starvation, and suppresses cellular senescence through inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These results suggest that active autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which p53 suppresses cellular senescence, in response to serum starvation. The findings of the present study provide a potential mechanism for suppression of senescence by p53.

  15. Genome-wide association study using cellular traits identifies a new regulator of root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Meijón, Mónica; Satbhai, Santosh B; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Busch, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    With the increased availability of high-resolution sequence information, genome-wide association (GWA) studies have become feasible in a number of species. The vast majority of these studies are conducted in human populations, where it is difficult to provide strong evidence for the functional involvement of unknown genes that are identified using GWA. Here we used the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana to combine high-throughput confocal microscopy imaging of traits at the cellular level, GWA and expression analyses to identify genomic regions that are associated with developmental cell-type traits. We identify and characterize a new F-box gene, KUK, that regulates meristem and cell length. We further show that polymorphisms in the coding sequence are the major causes of KUK allele-dependent natural variation in root development. This work demonstrates the feasibility of GWA using cellular traits to identify causal genes for basic biological processes such as development.

  16. [Melatonin: its role in the system of neurohumoral regulation in man. Part 2].

    PubMed

    Baksheev, V I; Kolomoets, N M

    2011-01-01

    Part 2 of this review concerns the application of melatonin (Mt) to the treatment of aged patients with cardiovascular diseases and other pathology with reference to its genoprotective and anticarcinogenic action. Effects of Mt on the cardiovascular system are underlain by its antioxidative, vasodilating, and sedative activities, the ability to regulate the heart rate and inhibit platelet aggregation. Certain authors report negative correlation between Mt production and blood cholesterol level. Mt was shown to protect from cardiac lesions associated with ischemia and reperfusion. Mt inhibits carcinogenesis and is active at systemic, tissue, cellular and subcellular levels. At the systemic level, Mt decreases hormonal production, stimulates immune activity, and prevents the development of metabolic syndrome. It inhibits cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis of tumour cells but suppresses it the nervous tissue. Mt activates telomerase. It decreases expression of oncogens and interferes with the action of mutagens and clastogens at the genetic level. Extensive studies of Mt protective action in nervous diseases are underway with special reference to spinal cord, brain, neuron and glial cell lesions; experimental cerebral stroke, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Similar studies concern the role of Mt in the protection against ionizing radiation, the development of renal pathology, and ophthalmology (glaucoma, cataract). Mt is shown to influence practically all organ systems by inhibiting mutagenesis and maintaining correlation between circadian rhythms of different biological processes throughout human evolution.

  17. Myocardial Gene Transfer: Routes and Devices for Regulation of Transgene Expression by Modulation of Cellular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heart diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality in Western society. Gene therapy approaches are becoming promising therapeutic modalities to improve underlying molecular processes affecting failing cardiomyocytes. Numerous cardiac clinical gene therapy trials have yet to demonstrate strong positive results and advantages over current pharmacotherapy. The success of gene therapy depends largely on the creation of a reliable and efficient delivery method. The establishment of such a system is determined by its ability to overcome the existing biological barriers, including cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking as well as modulation of cellular permeability. In this article, we describe a variety of physical and mechanical methods, based on the transient disruption of the cell membrane, which are applied in nonviral gene transfer. In addition, we focus on the use of different physiological techniques and devices and pharmacological agents to enhance endothelial permeability. Development of these methods will undoubtedly help solve major problems facing gene therapy. PMID:23427834

  18. 76 FR 36095 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... and response to comments received in connection with the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3) Phase.../part-iv/phaseiii.cfm . All identified changes have been incorporated into the final dS2 and NTS... (DPS) Phase III programming projected for FY15 (dS2) and FY16 (NTS). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  19. 29 CFR 528.1 - Applicability of the regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RETAIL OR SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS AT SPECIAL MINIMUM WAGE RATES § 528.1 Applicability of the regulations... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of the regulations in this part. 528.1 Section 528.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  20. 5 CFR 210.101 - Applicability of various parts of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... regulations. 210.101 Section 210.101 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS BASIC CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS (GENERAL) Applicability of Regulations; Definitions § 210.101... through 339. Parts 315 through 339 of this chapter apply to all positions in the competitive service...

  1. 29 CFR 528.1 - Applicability of the regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RETAIL OR SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS AT SPECIAL MINIMUM WAGE RATES § 528.1 Applicability of the regulations... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability of the regulations in this part. 528.1 Section 528.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  2. 29 CFR 528.1 - Applicability of the regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RETAIL OR SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS AT SPECIAL MINIMUM WAGE RATES § 528.1 Applicability of the regulations... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability of the regulations in this part. 528.1 Section 528.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  3. 29 CFR 528.1 - Applicability of the regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RETAIL OR SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS AT SPECIAL MINIMUM WAGE RATES § 528.1 Applicability of the regulations... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability of the regulations in this part. 528.1 Section 528.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  4. 29 CFR 528.1 - Applicability of the regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RETAIL OR SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS AT SPECIAL MINIMUM WAGE RATES § 528.1 Applicability of the regulations... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability of the regulations in this part. 528.1 Section 528.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  5. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation. PMID:24563857

  6. Three Decades of Research on O-GlcNAcylation - A Major Nutrient Sensor That Regulates Signaling, Transcription and Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hart, Gerald W

    2014-01-01

    Even though the dynamic modification of polypeptides by the monosaccharide, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAcylation) was discovered over 30 years ago, its physiological significance as a major nutrient sensor that regulates myriad cellular processes has only recently been more widely appreciated. O-GlcNAcylation, either on its own or by its interplay with other post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and others, modulates the activities of signaling proteins, regulates most components of the transcription machinery, affects cell cycle progression and regulates the targeting/turnover or functions of myriad other regulatory proteins, in response to nutrients. Acute increases in O-GlcNAcylation protect cells from stress-induced injury, while chronic deregulation of O-GlcNAc cycling contributes to the etiology of major human diseases of aging, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. Recent advances in tools to study O-GlcNAcylation at the individual site level and specific inhibitors of O-GlcNAc cycling have allowed more rapid progress toward elucidating the specific functions of O-GlcNAcylation in essential cellular processes.

  7. Regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetic function by hydrogen sulfide. Part II. Pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Módis, Katalin; Bos, Eelke M; Calzia, Enrico; van Goor, Harry; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R; Radermacher, Peter; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Emerging work demonstrates the dual regulation of mitochondrial function by hydrogen sulfide (H2S), including, at lower concentrations, a stimulatory effect as an electron donor, and, at higher concentrations, an inhibitory effect on cytochrome C oxidase. In the current article, we overview the pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of these processes. During cellular hypoxia/acidosis, the inhibitory effect of H2S on complex IV is enhanced, which may shift the balance of H2S from protective to deleterious. Several pathophysiological conditions are associated with an overproduction of H2S (e.g. sepsis), while in other disease states H2S levels and H2S bioavailability are reduced and its therapeutic replacement is warranted (e.g. diabetic vascular complications). Moreover, recent studies demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells up-regulate the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), and utilize its product, H2S, as a metabolic fuel and tumour-cell survival factor; pharmacological CBS inhibition or genetic CBS silencing suppresses cancer cell bioenergetics and suppresses cell proliferation and cell chemotaxis. In the last chapter of the current article, we overview the field of H2S-induced therapeutic ‘suspended animation’, a concept in which a temporary pharmacological reduction in cell metabolism is achieved, producing a decreased oxygen demand for the experimental therapy of critical illness and/or organ transplantation. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:23991749

  8. Code of Federal Regulations 32. Parts 1000 to End.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    proceed with award. § 1202.104 Types of contracts. For economic price adjustment PART 1202-PROCUREMENT BY policy applicable to formally adver - FORMAL...Logistics Agency § 1203.303-50 detail to explain clearly the necessity Secretarial signature in accordance for purchasing without formal adver - with the...showing: bid prices received after formal adver - (a) The actions being taken (1) to tising are unreasonable as to all or avoid subsequent Aoncompetitlve

  9. Professional regulation in nursing. Part 2: Political change.

    PubMed

    Fullbrook, Suzanne

    The current Government came to power in 1997. In their manifesto, changes in ideology towards the provision of health and the place of those who provided health care were evident. As well as the issue of acceptable standards of healthcare provision, the issue of the regulation of nurses and other health workers was perused. This article reviews the political manifestos of 1997 and 2001, and reflects on the changes averred to in the context of the effects to the nursing profession in respect of professional regulation and central control by the Government of the profession as a whole. A conclusion is reached that political changes, not based on theoretical models of care, but rather on reports commissioned by Government, have resulted in far reaching consequences for nursing. This includes the replacement of the regulatory body (United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting) with a new body (Nursing and Midwifery Council) and the inclusion of public persons into the management of nurses to the extent that for the first time, lay persons would have an influence in the outcomes of professional disciplinary hearings and sanctions.

  10. Differential redox regulation of ORAI ion channels: a mechanism to tune cellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Al-Ansary, Dalia; Schwarz, Eva C; Koehler, Richard; Kozai, Daisuke; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Peinelt, Christine; Griesemer, Desiree; Bozem, Monika; Mori, Yasuo; Hoth, Markus; Niemeyer, Barbara A

    2010-03-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological cellular processes. We used lymphocytes, which are exposed to highly oxidizing environments during inflammation, to study the influence of ROS on cellular function. Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) influx through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels composed of proteins of the ORAI family is essential for the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of T lymphocytes, but whether and how ROS affect ORAI channel function have been unclear. Here, we combined Ca(2+) imaging, patch-clamp recordings, and measurements of cell proliferation and cytokine secretion to determine the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on ORAI channel activity and human T helper lymphocyte (T(H) cell) function. ORAI1, but not ORAI3, channels were inhibited by oxidation by H(2)O(2). The differential redox sensitivity of ORAI1 and ORAI3 channels depended mainly on an extracellularly located reactive cysteine, which is absent in ORAI3. T(H) cells became progressively less redox-sensitive after differentiation into effector cells, a shift that would allow them to proliferate, differentiate, and secrete cytokines in oxidizing environments. The decreased redox sensitivity of effector T(H) cells correlated with increased expression of Orai3 and increased abundance of several cytosolic antioxidants. Knockdown of ORAI3 with small-interfering RNA rendered effector T(H) cells more redox-sensitive. The differential expression of Orai isoforms between naïve and effector T(H) cells may tune cellular responses under oxidative stress.

  11. Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly (CIA) System: Factors, Mechanism, and Relevance to Cellular Iron Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anil K.; Pallesen, Leif J.; Spang, Robert J.; Walden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    FeS cluster biogenesis is an essential process in virtually all forms of life. Complex protein machineries that are conserved from bacteria through higher eukaryotes facilitate assembly of the FeS cofactor in proteins. In the last several years, significant strides have been made in our understanding of FeS cluster assembly and the functional overlap of this process with cellular iron homeostasis. This minireview summarizes the present understanding of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system in eukaryotes, with a focus on information gained from studies in budding yeast and mammalian systems. PMID:20522543

  12. Cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system: factors, mechanism, and relevance to cellular iron regulation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anil K; Pallesen, Leif J; Spang, Robert J; Walden, William E

    2010-08-27

    FeS cluster biogenesis is an essential process in virtually all forms of life. Complex protein machineries that are conserved from bacteria through higher eukaryotes facilitate assembly of the FeS cofactor in proteins. In the last several years, significant strides have been made in our understanding of FeS cluster assembly and the functional overlap of this process with cellular iron homeostasis. This minireview summarizes the present understanding of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system in eukaryotes, with a focus on information gained from studies in budding yeast and mammalian systems.

  13. 16 CFR 312.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part implements the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998, (15 U.S.C. 6501, et seq.,) which prohibits... personal information from and about children on the Internet. The effective date of this part is April 21...

  14. 16 CFR 312.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part implements the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998, (15 U.S.C. 6501, et seq.,) which prohibits... personal information from and about children on the Internet. The effective date of this part is April 21...

  15. 16 CFR 312.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part implements the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998, (15 U.S.C. 6501, et seq.,) which prohibits... personal information from and about children on the Internet. The effective date of this part is April 21...

  16. A cellular defense pathway regulating transcription through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Vispé, Stéphane; Yung, Tetsu M. C.; Ritchot, Janelle; Serizawa, Hiroaki; Satoh, Masahiko S.

    2000-01-01

    DNA damage is known to trigger key cellular defense pathways such as those involved in DNA repair. Here we provide evidence for a previously unrecognized pathway regulating transcription in response to DNA damage and show that this regulation is mediated by the abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reduced the rate of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase negatively regulates transcription, possibly through the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase–RNA complexes. In damaged cells, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase binds to DNA breaks and automodifies itself in the presence of NAD+, resulting in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inactivation. We found that automodification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in response to DNA damage resulted in the up-regulation of transcription, presumably because automodified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase molecules were released from transcripts, thereby relieving the block on transcription. Because agents that damage DNA damage RNA as well, up-regulation of RNA synthesis in response to DNA damage may provide cells with a mechanism to compensate for the loss of damaged transcripts and may be critical for cell survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:10944198

  17. A cellular defense pathway regulating transcription through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Vispe, S; Yung, T M; Ritchot, J; Serizawa, H; Satoh, M S

    2000-08-29

    DNA damage is known to trigger key cellular defense pathways such as those involved in DNA repair. Here we provide evidence for a previously unrecognized pathway regulating transcription in response to DNA damage and show that this regulation is mediated by the abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reduced the rate of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase negatively regulates transcription, possibly through the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-RNA complexes. In damaged cells, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase binds to DNA breaks and automodifies itself in the presence of NAD(+), resulting in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inactivation. We found that automodification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in response to DNA damage resulted in the up-regulation of transcription, presumably because automodified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase molecules were released from transcripts, thereby relieving the block on transcription. Because agents that damage DNA damage RNA as well, up-regulation of RNA synthesis in response to DNA damage may provide cells with a mechanism to compensate for the loss of damaged transcripts and may be critical for cell survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

  18. Cellular targets and mechanistic strategies of remyelination-promoting IgMs as part of the naturally occurring autoantibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Wootla, Bharath; Painter, Meghan M; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2013-09-01

    Immunoglobulins with germline sequences occur in invertebrates and vertebrates and are named naturally occurring autoantibodies (NAbs). NAbs may target foreign antigens, self- or altered self-components and are part of the normal immunoglobulin repertoire. Accumulating evidence indicates that naturally occurring antibodies can act as systemic surveillance molecules, which tag, damaged or stressed cells, invading pathogens and toxic cellular debris for elimination by the immune system. In addition to acting as detecting molecules, certain types of NAbs actively signal in different cell types with a broad range of responses from induction of apoptosis in cancer cells to stimulation of remyelination in glial cells. This review emphasizes functions and characteristics of NAbs with focus on remyelination-promoting mouse and human antibodies. Human remyelination-promoting NAbs are potential therapeutics to combat a wide spectrum of disease processes including demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. We will highlight the identified glycosphingolipid (SL) antigens of polyreactive remyelination-promoting antibodies and their proposed mechanism(s) of action. The nature of the identified antigens suggests a lipid raft-based mechanism for remyelination-promoting antibodies with SLs as most essential raft components. However, accumulating evidence also suggests involvement of other antigens in stimulation of remyelination, which will be discussed in the text.

  19. Cellular targets and mechanistic strategies of remyelination-promoting IgMs as part of the naturally occurring autoantibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Wootla, Bharath; Painter, Meghan M; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins with germline sequences occur in invertebrates and vertebrates and are named naturally occurring autoantibodies (NAbs). NAbs may target foreign antigens, self- or altered self-components and are part of the normal immunoglobulin repertoire. Accumulating evidence indicates that naturally occurring antibodies can act as systemic surveillance molecules, which tag, damaged or stressed cells, invading pathogens and toxic cellular debris for elimination by the immune system. In addition to acting as detecting molecules, certain types of NAbs actively signal in different cell types with a broad range of responses from induction of apoptosis in cancer cells to stimulation of remyelination in glial cells. This review emphasizes functions and characteristics of NAbs with focus on remyelination-promoting mouse and human antibodies. Human remyelination-promoting NAbs are potential therapeutics to combat a wide spectrum of disease processes including demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. We will highlight the identified glycosphingolipid (SL) antigens of polyreactive remyelination-promoting antibodies and their proposed mechanism(s) of action. The nature of the identified antigens suggests a lipid raft-based mechanism for remyelination-promoting antibodies with SLs as most essential raft components. However, accumulating evidence also suggests involvement of other antigens in stimulation of remyelination, which will be discussed in the text. PMID:24053345

  20. Fluid Flow Regulation of Revascularization and Cellular Organization in a Bioengineered Liver Platform

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Emma C.; Vyas, Dipen; Ribeiro, Maria H.; Atala, Anthony; Sparks, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Modeling of human liver development, especially cellular organization and the mechanisms underlying it, is fundamental for studying liver organogenesis and congenital diseases, yet there are no reliable models that mimic these processes ex vivo. Design: Using an organ engineering approach and relevant cell lines, we designed a perfusion system that delivers discrete mechanical forces inside an acellular liver extracellular matrix scaffold to study the effects of mechanical stimulation in hepatic tissue organization. Results: We observed a fluid flow rate-dependent response in cell distribution within the liver scaffold. Next, we determined the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a mediator of fluid flow effects on endothelial cells. We observed impairment of both neovascularization and liver tissue organization in the presence of selective inhibition of endothelial NO synthase. Similar results were observed in bioengineered livers grown under static conditions. Conclusion: Overall, we were able to unveil the potential central role of discrete mechanical stimulation through the NO pathway in the revascularization and cellular organization of a bioengineered liver. Last, we propose that this organ bioengineering platform can contribute significantly to the identification of physiological mechanisms of liver organogenesis and regeneration and improve our ability to bioengineer livers for transplantation. PMID:26772270

  1. Regulation of metallothionein gene expression and cellular zinc accumulation in a rat small intestinal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.M.; Cousins, R.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The effects of extracellular zinc concentration on metallothionein gene expression and cellular zinc accumulation were studied in IRD-98 cells. This is a non-transformed clonal line established by Negrel, et al. from fetal rat small intestine which possess characteristics of small bowel epithelial cells. Cells were maintained in DMEM and grown to confluent monolayers. The response to media zinc concentrations over the range of 5-150 {mu}mol/L was assessed. After 24 h in culture, cell zinc and metallothionein protein concentrations were significantly increased in cells provided higher levels of media zinc. Subsequent time course experiments showed that cells exposed to higher zinc levels had significant elevations in both metallothionein mRNA, peaking at 24 h, and metallothionein protein increasing through 48 h. Furthermore, cell zinc concentrations were significantly increased. At 48 h of culture, greater than 50% of the additional cellular zinc accumulated could be attributed to elevated metallothionein protein levels. These cells represent a zinc-responsive model to examine the mechanism of zinc uptake and transcellular transport by intestinal cells and the regulatory factors involved.

  2. Rrp1, a cyclic-di-GMP-producing response regulator, is an important regulator of Borrelia burgdorferi core cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Elizabeth A.; Terekhova, Darya; Zhang, Hong-Ming; Hovis, Kelley M.; Schwartz, Ira; Marconi, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Two-component systems (TCS) are universal among bacteria and play critical roles in gene regulation. Our understanding of the contributions of TCS in the biology of the Borrelia is just now beginning to develop. Borrelia burgdorferi, a causative agent of Lyme disease, harbours a TCS comprised of open reading frames (ORFs) BB0419 and BB0420. BB0419 encodes a response regulator designated Rrp1, and BB0420 encodes a hybrid histidine kinase–response regulator designated Hpk1. Rrp1, which contains a conserved GGDEF domain, undergoes phosphorylation and produces the secondary messenger, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), a critical signaling molecule in numerous organisms. However, the regulatory role of the Rrp1–Hpk1 TCS and c-di-GMP signaling in Borrelia biology are unexplored. In this study, the distribution, conservation, expression and potential global regulatory capability of Rrp1 were assessed. rrp1 was found to be universal and highly conserved among isolates, co-transcribed with hpk1, constitutively expressed during in vitro cultivation, and significantly upregulated upon tick feeding. Allelic exchange replacement and microarray analyses revealed that the Rrp1 regulon consists of a large number of genes encoded by the core Borrelia genome (linear chromosome, linear plasmid 54 and circular plasmid 26) that encode for proteins involved in central metabolic processes and virulence mechanisms including immune evasion. PMID:19210621

  3. An intramolecular interaction within the lipid kinase Fab1 regulates cellular phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michael J; Strunk, Bethany S; Azad, Nadia; Petersen, Jason L; Weisman, Lois S

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorylated phosphoinositide lipids (PPIs) are low-abundance signaling molecules that control signal transduction pathways and are necessary for cellular homeostasis. The PPI phosphatidylinositol (3,5)-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) is essential in multiple organ systems. PI(3,5)P2 is generated from PI3P by the conserved lipid kinase Fab1/PIKfyve. Defects in the dynamic regulation of PI(3,5)P2 are linked to human diseases. However, few mechanisms that regulate PI(3,5)P2 have been identified. Here we report an intramolecular interaction between the yeast Fab1 kinase region and an upstream conserved cysteine-rich (CCR) domain. We identify mutations in the kinase domain that lead to elevated levels of PI(3,5)P2 and impair the interaction between the kinase and CCR domain. We also identify mutations in the CCR domain that lead to elevated levels of PI(3,5)P2 Together these findings reveal a regulatory mechanism that involves the CCR domain of Fab1 and contributes to dynamic control of cellular PI(3,5)P2 synthesis.

  4. Ankyrin-based Cellular Pathways for Cardiac Ion Channel and Transporter Targeting and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Shane R.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The coordinate activities of ion channels and transporters regulate myocyte membrane excitability and normal cardiac function. Dysfunction in cardiac ion channel and transporter function may result in cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. While the past fifteen years have linked defects in ion channel biophysical properties with human disease, more recent findings illustrate that ion channel and transporter localization within cardiomyocytes is equally critical for normal membrane excitability and tissue function. Ankyrins are a family of multifunctional adapter proteins required for the expression, membrane localization, and regulation of select cardiac ion channels and transporters. Notably, loss of ankyrin expression in mice, and ankyrin loss-of-function in humans is now associated with defects in myocyte excitability and cardiac physiology. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of ankyrin polypeptides in cardiac physiology, as well as review other recently identified pathways required for the membrane expression and regulation of key cardiac ion channels and transporters. PMID:20934528

  5. Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics of anaerobic and aerobic yeast cultures reveals post-transcriptional regulation of key cellular processes.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Marco J L; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; van Breukelen, Bas; Knijnenburg, Theo A; de Hulster, Erik A F; Reinders, Marcel J T; Pronk, Jack T; Heck, Albert J R; Slijper, Monique

    2007-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unique among yeasts in its ability to grow rapidly in the complete absence of oxygen. S. cerevisiae is therefore an ideal eukaryotic model to study physiological adaptation to anaerobiosis. Recent transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of genes that are transcriptionally regulated by oxygen availability but the relevance of this cellular response has not been systematically investigated at the key control level of the proteome. Therefore, the proteomic response of S. cerevisiae to anaerobiosis was investigated using metabolic stable-isotope labelling in aerobic and anaerobic glucose-limited chemostat cultures, followed by relative quantification of protein expression. Using independent replicate cultures and stringent statistical filtering, a robust dataset of 474 quantified proteins was generated, of which 249 showed differential expression levels. While some of these changes were consistent with previous transcriptome studies, many of the responses of S. cerevisiae to oxygen availability were, to our knowledge, previously unreported. Comparison of transcriptomes and proteomes from identical cultivations yielded strong evidence for post-transcriptional regulation of key cellular processes, including glycolysis, amino-acyl-tRNA synthesis, purine nucleotide synthesis and amino acid biosynthesis. The use of chemostat cultures provided well-controlled and reproducible culture conditions, which are essential for generating robust datasets at different cellular information levels. Integration of transcriptome and proteome data led to new insights into the physiology of anaerobically growing yeast that would not have been apparent from differential analyses at either the mRNA or protein level alone, thus illustrating the power of multi-level studies in yeast systems biology.

  6. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  7. p53 dependent Nestin regulation links tumor suppression to cellular plasticity in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Xue, Wen; Calvisi, Diego F; Evert, Matthias; Michurina, Tatyana V; Dow, Lukas E; Banito, Ana; Katz, Sarah F; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Weissmueller, Susann; Huang, Chun-Hao; Lechel, Andre; Andersen, Jesper B; Capper, David; Zender, Lars; Longerich, Thomas; Enikolopov, Grigori; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    Summary The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of anti-proliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells and, as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor cell-associated protein nestin in an Sp1/3 transcription factor-dependent manner and that nestin is required for tumor initiation in vivo. Moreover, loss of p53 facilitates dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes into nestin-positive progenitor-like cells, which are poised to differentiate into hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) or cholangiocarcinomas (CCs) in response to lineage-specific mutations that target Wnt and Notch signaling, respectively. Many human HCCs and CCs show elevated nestin expression, which correlates with p53 loss of function and is associated with decreased patient survival. Therefore, transcriptional repression of Nestin by p53 restricts cellular plasticity and tumorigenesis in liver cancer. PMID:25083869

  8. Introns and gene expression: Cellular constraints, transcriptional regulation, and evolutionary consequences

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Patricia; Kalinka, Alex T; Tomancak, Pavel; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2015-01-01

    A gene's “expression profile” denotes the number of transcripts present relative to all other transcripts. The overall rate of transcript production is determined by transcription and RNA processing rates. While the speed of elongating RNA polymerase II has been characterized for many different genes and organisms, gene-architectural features – primarily the number and length of exons and introns – have recently emerged as important regulatory players. Several new studies indicate that rapidly cycling cells constrain gene-architecture toward short genes with a few introns, allowing efficient expression during short cell cycles. In contrast, longer genes with long introns exhibit delayed expression, which can serve as timing mechanisms for patterning processes. These findings indicate that cell cycle constraints drive the evolution of gene-architecture and shape the transcriptome of a given cell type. Furthermore, a tendency for short genes to be evolutionarily young hints at links between cellular constraints and the evolution of animal ontogeny. PMID:25400101

  9. Selenoprotein H Suppresses Cellular Senescence through Genome Maintenance and Redox Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ryan T. Y.; Cao, Lei; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and persistent DNA damage response contribute to cellular senescence, a degeneration process critically involving ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and p53. Selenoprotein H (SelH), a nuclear selenoprotein, is proposed to carry redox and transactivation domains. To determine the role of SelH in genome maintenance, shRNA knockdown was employed in human normal and immortalized cell lines. SelH shRNA MRC-5 diploid fibroblasts under ambient O2 displayed a distinct profile of senescence including β-galactosidase expression, autofluorescence, growth inhibition, and ATM pathway activation. Such senescence phenotypes were alleviated in the presence of ATM kinase inhibitors, by p53 shRNA knockdown, or by maintaining the cells under 3% O2. During the course of 5-day recovery, the induction of phospho-ATM on Ser-1981 and γH2AX by H2O2 treatment (20 μm) subsided in scrambled shRNA but exacerbated in SelH shRNA MRC-5 cells. Results from clonogenic assays demonstrated hypersensitivity of SelH shRNA HeLa cells to paraquat and H2O2, but not to hydroxyurea, neocarzinostatin, or camptothecin. While SelH mRNA expression was induced by H2O2 treatment, SelH-GFP did not mobilize to sites of oxidative DNA damage. The glutathione level was lower in SelH shRNA than scrambled shRNA HeLa cells, and the H2O2-induced cell death was rescued in the presence of N-acetylcysteine, a glutathione precursor. Altogether, SelH protects against cellular senescence to oxidative stress through a genome maintenance pathway involving ATM and p53. PMID:25336634

  10. Regulation of cellular proliferation and intimal formation following balloon injury in atherosclerotic rabbit arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Simari, R D; San, H; Rekhter, M; Ohno, T; Gordon, D; Nabel, G J; Nabel, E G

    1996-01-01

    Injury to atherosclerotic arteries induces the expression of growth regulatory genes that stimulate cellular proliferation and intimal formation. Intimal expansion has been reduced in vivo in nonatherosclerotic balloon-injured arteries by transfer of genes that inhibit cell proliferation. It is not known, however, whether vascular cell proliferation can be inhibited after injury in more extensively diseased atherosclerotic arteries. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether expression of recombinant genes in atherosclerotic arteries after balloon injury could inhibit intimal cell proliferation. To test this hypothesis, we examined the response to balloon injury in atherosclerotic rabbit arteries after gene transfer of herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) and administration of ganciclovir. Smooth muscle cells from hyperlipidemic rabbit arteries infected with adenoviral vectors encoding tk were sensitive to ganciclovir, and bystander killing was observed in vitro. In atherosclerotic arteries, a human placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene was expressed in intimal and medial smooth muscle cells and macrophages, identifying these cells as targets for gene transfer. Expression of tk in balloon-injured hyperlipidemic rabbit arteries followed by ganciclovir treatment resulted in a 64% reduction in intimal cell proliferation 7 d after gene transfer (P = 0.004), and a 35-49% reduction in internal area 21 d after gene transfer, compared with five different control groups (P < 0.05). Replication of smooth muscle cells and macrophages was inhibited by tk expression and ganciclovir treatment. These findings indicate that transfer of a gene that inhibits cellular proliferation limits the intimal area in balloon-injured atherosclerotic arteries. Molecular approaches to the inhibition of cell proliferation in atherosclerotic arteries constitute a possible treatment for vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:8690797

  11. Autoinducer AI-2 is involved in regulating a variety of cellular processes in Salmonella Typhimurium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    LuxS/AI-2 mediated cell signaling is a known strategy that modulates a variety of bacterial processes in prokaryotes. Salmonella Typhimurium is known to possess LuxS/AI-2 mediated cell signaling. Until now, the Lsr- ABC transporter system (LuxS- regulated) is the only known process controlled by t...

  12. Nutrient-induced modulation of gene expression and cellular functions: modeling epigenetic regulation in bovine cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA), especially butyrate, participate in metabolism both as nutrients and as regulators of histone deacetylation. The major biochemical change that occurs in cells treated with butyrate is the global hyperacetylation of histones. One paradigmatic example of the nutrient-epige...

  13. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  14. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  15. A review of reagents for fluorescence microscopy of cellular compartments and structures, Part III: reagents for actin, tubulin, cellular membranes, and whole cell and cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Jason A; Dolman, Nick J; Davidson, Michael W

    2014-01-02

    Non-antibody commercial fluorescent reagents for imaging of cytoskeletal structures have been limited primarily to tubulin and actin, with the main factor in choice based mainly on whether cells are live or fixed and permeabilized. A wider range of options exist for cell membrane dyes, and the choice of reagent primarily depends on the preferred localization in the cell (i.e., all membranes or only the plasma membrane) and usage (i.e., whether the protocol involves fixation and permeabilization). For whole-cell or cytoplasmic imaging, the choice of reagent is determined mostly by the length of time that the cells need to be visualized (hours or days) and by fixation status. Presented here is a discussion on choosing commercially available reagents for these cellular structures, with an emphasis on use for microscopic imaging, with a featured reagent for each structure, a recommended protocol, troubleshooting guide, and example image.

  16. Evidence for direct cellular protective effect of PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of body protection compound, BPC) and their specificity to gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Németh, P; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The direct gastric mucosal cellular effect of four PL-10 substances (a synthesized part of human body protection compound, BPC containing 14 or 15 amino acids) was studied on freshly isolated rat gastric mucosal cells and on a mouse myeloma cell line (Sp2/0-Ag14) in an ethanol-induced cell injury model. The examined substances were not toxic for the cells. Two of them proved to be significantly protective against the direct cellular damaging effect of ethanol (PL 10.1.15AK-3 in 5 microg/ml dose and PL 10.1.AK14-2 dose-dependently, ED50=50 ng/ml) on gastric mucosal cells. This cytoprotective effect was failured on mouse myeloma cells. Based on these results a part of the in vivo protection induced by BPC seems to be a direct cellular protective effect to gastric mucosal cells.

  17. MYC interaction with the tumor suppressive SWI/SNF complex member INI1 regulates transcription and cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Stojanova, Angelina; Tu, William B.; Ponzielli, Romina; Kotlyar, Max; Chan, Pak-Kei; Boutros, Paul C.; Khosravi, Fereshteh; Jurisica, Igor; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MYC is a key driver of cellular transformation and is deregulated in most human cancers. Studies of MYC and its interactors have provided mechanistic insight into its role as a regulator of gene transcription. MYC has been previously linked to chromatin regulation through its interaction with INI1 (SMARCB1/hSNF5/BAF47), a core member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. INI1 is a potent tumor suppressor that is inactivated in several types of cancers, most prominently as the hallmark alteration in pediatric malignant rhabdoid tumors. However, the molecular and functional interaction of MYC and INI1 remains unclear. Here, we characterize the MYC-INI1 interaction in mammalian cells, mapping their minimal binding domains to functionally significant regions of MYC (leucine zipper) and INI1 (repeat motifs), and demonstrating that the interaction does not interfere with MYC-MAX interaction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis expands the MYC-INI1 interaction to the SWI/SNF complex and a larger network of chromatin regulatory complexes. Genome-wide analysis reveals that the DNA-binding regions and target genes of INI1 significantly overlap with those of MYC. In an INI1-deficient rhabdoid tumor system, we observe that with re-expression of INI1, MYC and INI1 bind to common target genes and have opposing effects on gene expression. Functionally, INI1 re-expression suppresses cell proliferation and MYC-potentiated transformation. Our findings thus establish the antagonistic roles of the INI1 and MYC transcriptional regulators in mediating cellular and oncogenic functions. PMID:27267444

  18. Expression of Arabidopsis FCS-Like Zinc finger genes is differentially regulated by sugars, cellular energy level, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer K, Muhammed; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Cellular energy status is an important regulator of plant growth, development, and stress mitigation. Environmental stresses ultimately lead to energy deficit in the cell which activates the SNF1-RELATED KINASE 1 (SnRK1) signaling cascade which eventually triggering a massive reprogramming of transcription to enable the plant to survive under low-energy conditions. The role of Arabidopsis thaliana FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) gene family in energy and stress signaling is recently come to highlight after their interaction with kinase subunits of SnRK1 were identified. In a detailed expression analysis in different sugars, energy starvation, and replenishment series, we identified that the expression of most of the FLZ genes is differentially modulated by cellular energy level. It was found that FLZ gene family contains genes which are both positively and negatively regulated by energy deficit as well as energy-rich conditions. Genetic and pharmacological studies identified the role of HEXOKINASE 1- dependent and energy signaling pathways in the sugar-induced expression of FLZ genes. Further, these genes were also found to be highly responsive to different stresses as well as abscisic acid. In over-expression of kinase subunit of SnRK1, FLZ genes were found to be differentially regulated in accordance with their response toward energy fluctuation suggesting that these genes may work downstream to the established SnRK1 signaling under low-energy stress. Taken together, the present study provides a conceptual framework for further studies related to SnRK1-FLZ interaction in relation to sugar and energy signaling and stress response.

  19. miR-122-SOCS1-JAK2 axis regulates allergic inflammation and allergic inflammation-promoted cellular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanearl; Kim, Hyuna; Byun, Jaehwan; Park, Yeongseo; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Yun Sil; Choe, Jongseon; Kim, Young Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2017-01-01

    The regulatory role of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) in inflammation has been reported. However, its role in allergic inflammation has not been previously reported. SOCS1 mediated in vitro and in vivo allergic inflammation. Histone deacetylase-3 (HDAC3), a mediator of allergic inflammation, interacted with SOCS1, and miR-384 inhibitor, a positive regulator of HDAC3, induced features of allergic inflammation in an SOCS1-dependent manner. miRNA array analysis showed that the expression of miR-122 was decreased by antigen-stimulation. TargetScan analysis predicted the binding of miR-122 to the 3′-UTR of SOCS1. miR-122 inhibitor induced in vitro and in vivo allergic features in SOCS1-dependent manner. SOCS1 was necessary for allergic inflammation-promoted enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic potential of cancer cells. SOCS1 and miR-122 regulated cellular interactions involving cancer cells, mast cells and macrophages during allergic inflammation. SOCS1 mimetic peptide, D-T-H-F-R-T-F-R-S-H-S-D-Y-R-R-I, inhibited in vitro and in vivo allergic inflammation, allergic inflammation-promoted enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic potential of cancer cells, and cellular interactions during allergic inflammation. Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) exhibited binding to SOCS1 mimetic peptide and mediated allergic inflammation. Transforming growth factor- Δ1 (TGF-Δ1) was decreased during allergic inflammation and showed an anti-allergic effect. SOCS1 and JAK2 regulated the production of anti-allergic TGF-Δ1. Taken together, our results show that miR-122-SOCS1 feedback loop can be employed as a target for the development of anti-allergic and anti-cancer drugs. PMID:28968979

  20. MYC interaction with the tumor suppressive SWI/SNF complex member INI1 regulates transcription and cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Angelina; Tu, William B; Ponzielli, Romina; Kotlyar, Max; Chan, Pak-Kei; Boutros, Paul C; Khosravi, Fereshteh; Jurisica, Igor; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z

    2016-07-02

    MYC is a key driver of cellular transformation and is deregulated in most human cancers. Studies of MYC and its interactors have provided mechanistic insight into its role as a regulator of gene transcription. MYC has been previously linked to chromatin regulation through its interaction with INI1 (SMARCB1/hSNF5/BAF47), a core member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. INI1 is a potent tumor suppressor that is inactivated in several types of cancers, most prominently as the hallmark alteration in pediatric malignant rhabdoid tumors. However, the molecular and functional interaction of MYC and INI1 remains unclear. Here, we characterize the MYC-INI1 interaction in mammalian cells, mapping their minimal binding domains to functionally significant regions of MYC (leucine zipper) and INI1 (repeat motifs), and demonstrating that the interaction does not interfere with MYC-MAX interaction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis expands the MYC-INI1 interaction to the SWI/SNF complex and a larger network of chromatin regulatory complexes. Genome-wide analysis reveals that the DNA-binding regions and target genes of INI1 significantly overlap with those of MYC. In an INI1-deficient rhabdoid tumor system, we observe that with re-expression of INI1, MYC and INI1 bind to common target genes and have opposing effects on gene expression. Functionally, INI1 re-expression suppresses cell proliferation and MYC-potentiated transformation. Our findings thus establish the antagonistic roles of the INI1 and MYC transcriptional regulators in mediating cellular and oncogenic functions.

  1. 31 CFR 598.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN... chapter, including part 536 of this chapter, “Narcotics Trafficking Sanctions Regulations,” with the...

  2. 31 CFR 598.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN... chapter, including part 536 of this chapter, “Narcotics Trafficking Sanctions Regulations,” with the...

  3. 31 CFR 598.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN... chapter, including part 536 of this chapter, “Narcotics Trafficking Sanctions Regulations,” with the...

  4. 31 CFR 598.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN... chapter, including part 536 of this chapter, “Narcotics Trafficking Sanctions Regulations,” with the...

  5. 31 CFR 598.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN... chapter, including part 536 of this chapter, “Narcotics Trafficking Sanctions Regulations,” with the...

  6. 14 CFR 91.803 - Part 125 operators: Designation of applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.803 Part 125 operators: Designation of applicable regulations. For...

  7. 14 CFR 91.803 - Part 125 operators: Designation of applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.803 Part 125 operators: Designation of applicable regulations. For...

  8. Sensitivity control through attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by negative regulation of cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yu; Kakuda, Hiroaki; Fujita, Kazuhiro A; Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2012-03-13

    Sensitivity is one of the hallmarks of biological and pharmacological responses. However, the principle of controlling sensitivity remains unclear. Here we theoretically analyse a simple biochemical reaction and find that the signal transfer efficiency of the transient peak amplitude attenuates depending on the strength of negative regulation. We experimentally find that many signalling pathways in various cell lines, including the Akt and ERK pathways, can be approximated by simple biochemical reactions and that the same property of the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency was observed for such pathways. Because of this property, a downstream molecule should show higher sensitivity to an activator and lower sensitivity to an inhibitor than an upstream molecule. Indeed, we experimentally verify that S6, which lies downstream of Akt, shows lower sensitivity to an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor than Akt. Thus, cells can control downstream sensitivity through the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by changing the expression level of negative regulators.

  9. Cellular mechanisms of MR regulation of adipose tissue physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Armani, Andrea; Marzolla, Vincenzo; Fabbri, Andrea; Caprio, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    In addition to the well-documented expression and activity of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the kidney, in the last decade research on MR has also revealed its important role in regulating functions of extrarenal tissues, including adipose tissue, where MR is involved in adipocyte fundamental processes such as differentiation, autophagy and adipokine secretion. MR expression is increased in adipose tissue of murine models of obesity and in obese human subjects, suggesting that over-activation of the mineralocorticoid signaling leads to dysfunctional adipocyte and associated metabolic disorders. Notably, pharmacological blockade of MR prevents metabolic dysfunctions observed in obese mice and suggests a potential therapeutic use of MR antagonists in the treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, the molecular pathways affected by MR blockade have been poorly investigated. This review summarizes the functions of MR in the adipocyte, discusses potential signaling pathways mediating MR action, and describes post-translational modifications regulating its activity. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses.

    PubMed

    Saha, Rajib; Liu, Deng; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Liberton, Michelle; Yu, Jingjie; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Balassy, Andrea; Zhang, Fuzhong; Moon, Tae Seok; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-05-03

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper) were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H), and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP(+) showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes that use energy from sunlight and CO2 as feedstock. Certain cyanobacterial strains are amenable to facile genetic manipulation, thus enabling

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus Promotes Survival of Infected Monocytes via a Distinct Temporal Regulation of Cellular Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Collins-McMillen, Donna; Kim, Jung Heon; Nogalski, Maciej T.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Caskey, Joshua R.; Cieply, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytes play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to target organ systems. To infect monocytes and reprogram them to deliver infectious virus, HCMV must overcome biological obstacles, including the short life span of monocytes and their antiviral proapoptotic response to infection. We have shown that virally induced upregulation of cellular Mcl-1 promotes early survival of HCMV-infected monocytes, allowing cells to overcome an early apoptotic checkpoint at around 48 h postinfection (hpi). Here, we demonstrate an HCMV-dependent shift from Mcl-1 as the primary antiapoptotic player to the related protein, Bcl-2, later during infection. Bcl-2 was upregulated in HCMV-infected monocytes beginning at 48 hpi. Treatment with the Bcl-2 antagonist ABT-199 only reduced the prosurvival effects of HCMV in target monocytes beginning at 48 hpi, suggesting that Mcl-1 controls survival prior to 48 hpi, while Bcl-2 promotes survival after 48 hpi. Although Bcl-2 was upregulated following viral binding/signaling through cellular integrins (compared to Mcl-1, which is upregulated through binding/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]), it functioned similarly to Mcl-1, adopting the early role of Mcl-1 in preventing caspase-3 cleavage/activation. This distinct, HCMV-induced shift from Mcl-1 to Bcl-2 occurs in response to a cellular upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, as small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Bax reduced the upregulation of Bcl-2 in infected monocytes and rescued the cells from the apoptotic effects of Bcl-2 inhibition. Our data demonstrate a distinct survival strategy whereby HCMV induces a biphasic regulation of cellular Bcl-2 proteins to promote host cell survival, leading to viral dissemination and the establishment of persistent HCMV infection. IMPORTANCE Hematogenous dissemination of HCMV via infected monocytes is a crucial component of the viral survival strategy and is required for the

  12. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID.

    PubMed

    Le, Quy; Maizels, Nancy

    2015-09-01

    AID (Activation Induced Deaminase) deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome.

  13. Cellular and subcellular immunolocalization of vasopressin-regulated water channel in rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, S; DiGiovanni, S R; Christensen, E I; Knepper, M A; Harris, H W

    1993-01-01

    Vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) regulates body water balance by controlling water permeability of the renal collecting ducts. The control mechanisms may involve alterations in the number or unit conductance of water channels in the apical plasma membrane of collecting-duct cells. How this occurs is unknown, but indirect evidence exists for the "shuttle" hypothesis, which states that vasopressin causes exocytic insertion of water channel-laden vesicles from the apical cytosol. To test key aspects of the shuttle hypothesis, we have prepared polyclonal antisera against the recently cloned collecting-duct water channel protein and used the antisera in immunolocalization studies (light and electron microscopic levels) in thin and ultrathin cryosections from rat kidney. Labeling was seen exclusively in collecting-duct principal cells and inner medullary collecting-duct cells. Apical membrane labeling was intense. There was heavy labeling of abundant small subapical vesicles and of membrane structures within multivesicular bodies. In addition, labeling of basolateral plasma membranes in inner medullary collecting ducts was present. Depriving rats of water for 24 or 48 hr markedly increased collecting-duct water-channel protein expression determined by immunoblotting and immunolabeling. These results are compatible with at least two complementary modes of water-channel regulation in collecting-duct cells: (i) control of channel distribution between the apical membrane and a reservoir in subapical vesicles (shuttle hypothesis) and (ii) regulation of the absolute level of expression of water-channel protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8265605

  14. Molecular and cellular aspects and regulation of intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Naim, H Y

    2001-04-01

    Carbohydrates are hydrolyzed in the intestinal lumen by specific enzymes to monosaccharides before transport across the brush border membrane of epithelial cells into the cell interior. The enzymes implicated in the digestion of carbohydrates in the intestinal lumen are membrane-bound glycoproteins that are expressed at the apical domain of the enterocytes. Absent or reduced activity of one of these enzymes is the cause of disaccharide intolerance and malabsorption, the symptoms of which are abdominal pain, cramps or distention, flatulence, nausea and osmotic diarrhea. Lactose intolerance is the most common intestinal disorder that is associated with an absence or drastically reduced levels of an intestinal enzyme, in this case lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH). The pattern of reduction of activity has been termed late onset of lactase deficiency or adult type hypolactasia. It was thought that the regulation of LPH was post-translational and was associated with altered structural features of the enzyme. Recent studies, however, suggest that the major mechanism of regulation of LPH is transcriptional. Other forms of lactose intolerance include the rare congenital lactase deficiency and secondary forms, such as those caused by mucosal injury, due to infectious gastroenteritis, celiac disease, parasitic infection, drug-induced enteritis and Crohn's disease. This review will shed light on important strucural and biosynthetic aspects of LPH, the role played by particular regions of the LPH protein in its transport, polarized sorting, and function, as well as on the gene expession and regulation of the activity of the enzyme.

  15. Tetraspanin15 regulates cellular trafficking and activity of the ectodomain sheddase ADAM10.

    PubMed

    Prox, Johannes; Willenbrock, Michael; Weber, Silvio; Lehmann, Tobias; Schmidt-Arras, Dirk; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Saftig, Paul; Schwake, Michael

    2012-09-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase10 (ADAM10) has been implicated as a major sheddase responsible for the ectodomain shedding of a number of important surface molecules including the amyloid precursor protein and cadherins. Despite a well-documented role of ADAM10 in health and disease, little is known about the regulation of this protease. To address this issue we conducted a split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen to identify membrane proteins that interact with ADAM10. The yeast experiments and co-immunoprecipitation studies in mammalian cell lines revealed tetraspanin15 (TSPAN15) to specifically associate with ADAM10. Overexpression of TSPAN15 or RNAi-mediated knockdown of TSPAN15 led to significant changes in the maturation process and surface expression of ADAM10. Expression of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention mutant of TSPAN15 demonstrated an interaction with ADAM10 already in the ER. Pulse-chase experiments confirmed that TSPAN15 accelerates the ER-exit of the ADAM10-TSPAN15 complex and stabilizes the active form of ADAM10 at the cell surface. Importantly, TSPAN15 also showed the ability to mediate the regulation of ADAM10 protease activity exemplified by an increased shedding of N-cadherin and the amyloid precursor protein. In conclusion, our data show that TSPAN15 is a central modulator of ADAM10-mediated ectodomain shedding. Therapeutic manipulation of its expression levels may be an additional approach to specifically regulate the activity of the amyloid precursor protein alpha-secretase ADAM10.

  16. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quy; Maizels, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    AID (Activation Induced Deaminase) deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome. PMID:26355458

  17. New perspectives on the regulation of iron absorption via cellular zinc concentrations in humans.

    PubMed

    Knez, Marija; Graham, Robin D; Welch, Ross M; Stangoulis, James C R

    2017-07-03

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency, affecting more than 30% of the total world's population. It is a major public health problem in many countries around the world. Over the years various methods have been used with an effort to try and control iron-deficiency anemia. However, there has only been a marginal reduction in the global prevalence of anemia. Why is this so? Iron and zinc are essential trace elements for humans. These metals influence the transport and absorption of one another across the enterocytes and hepatocytes, due to similar ionic properties. This paper describes the structure and roles of major iron and zinc transport proteins, clarifies iron-zinc interactions at these sites, and provides a model for the mechanism of these interactions both at the local and systemic level. This review provides evidence that much of the massive extent of iron deficiency anemia in the world may be due to an underlying deficiency of zinc. It explains the reasons for predominance of cellular zinc status in determination of iron/zinc interactions and for the first time thoroughly explains mechanisms by which zinc brings about these changes.

  18. Cellular and molecular regulation of muscle growth and development in meat animals.

    PubMed

    Dayton, W R; White, M E

    2008-04-01

    Although in vivo and in vitro studies have established that anabolic steroids, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and myostatin affect muscle growth in meat-producing animals, their mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Anabolic steroids have been widely used as growth promoters in feedlot cattle for over 50 yr. A growing body of evidence suggests that increased muscle levels of IGF-I and increased muscle satellite cell numbers play a role in anabolic steroid enhanced muscle growth. In contrast to anabolic steroids, the members of the TGF-beta-myostatin family suppress muscle growth in vivo and suppress both proliferation and differentiation of cultured myogenic cells. Recent evidence suggests that IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 play a role in mediating the proliferation-suppressing actions of both TGF-beta and myostatin on cultured myogenic cells. Consequently, this review will focus on the roles of IGF-I and IGFBP in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of anabolic steroids and TGF-beta and myostatin, respectively.

  19. Modulating cellular recombination potential through alterations in RecA structure and regulation.

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, Irina V; Dudkina, Alexandra V; Baitin, Dima M; Knight, Kendall L; Cox, Michael M; Lanzov, Vladislav A

    2010-12-01

    The wild-type Escherichia coli RecA protein is a recombinase platform with unrealized recombination potential. We have explored the factors affecting recombination during conjugation with a quantitative assay. Regulatory proteins that affect RecA function have the capacity to increase or decrease recombination frequencies by factors up to sixfold. Autoinhibition by the RecA C-terminus can affect recombination frequency by factors up to fourfold. The greatest changes in recombination frequency measured here are brought about by point mutations in the recA gene. RecA variants can increase recombination frequencies by more than 50-fold. The RecA protein thus possesses an inherently broad functional range. The RecA protein of E. coli (EcRecA) is not optimized for recombination function. Instead, much of the recombination potential of EcRecA is structurally suppressed, probably reflecting cellular requirements. One point mutation in EcRecA with a particularly dramatic effect on recombination frequency, D112R, exhibits an enhanced capacity to load onto SSB-coated ssDNA, overcome the effects of regulatory proteins such as PsiB and RecX, and to pair homologous DNAs. Comparisons of key RecA protein mutants reveal two components to RecA recombination function - filament formation and the inherent DNA pairing activity of the formed filaments.

  20. Multiplexed mass cytometry profiling of cellular states perturbed by small-molecule regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmiller, Bernd; Zunder, Eli R.; Finck, Rachel; Chen, Tiffany J.; Savig, Erica S.; Bruggner, Robert V.; Simonds, Erin F.; Bendall, Sean C.; Sachs, Karen; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to comprehensively explore the impact of bio-active molecules on human samples at the single-cell level can provide great insight for biomedical research. Mass cytometry enables quantitative single-cell analysis with deep dimensionality, but currently lacks high-throughput capability. Here we report a method termed mass-tag cellular barcoding (MCB) that increases mass cytometry throughput by sample multiplexing. 96-well format MCB was used to characterize human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) signaling dynamics, cell-to-cell communication, the signaling variability between 8 donors, and to define the impact of 27 inhibitors on this system. For each compound, 14 phosphorylation sites were measured in 14 PBMC types, resulting in 18,816 quantified phosphorylation levels from each multiplexed sample. This high-dimensional systems-level inquiry allowed analysis across cell-type and signaling space, reclassified inhibitors, and revealed off-target effects. MCB enables high-content, high-throughput screening, with potential applications for drug discovery, pre-clinical testing, and mechanistic investigation of human disease. PMID:22902532

  1. MATE1 regulates cellular uptake and sensitivity to imatinib in CML patients

    PubMed Central

    Harrach, S; Schmidt-Lauber, C; Pap, T; Pavenstädt, H; Schlatter, E; Schmidt, E; Berdel, W E; Schulze, U; Edemir, B; Jeromin, S; Haferlach, T; Ciarimboli, G; Bertrand, J

    2016-01-01

    Although imatinib is highly effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), 25–30% patients do not respond or relapse after initial response. Imatinib uptake into targeted cells is crucial for its molecular response and clinical effectiveness. The organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) has been proposed to be responsible for this process, but its relevance has been discussed controversially in recent times. Here we found that the multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) transports imatinib with a manifold higher affinity. MATE1 mainly mediates the cellular uptake of imatinib into targeted cells and thereby controls the intracellular effectiveness of imatinib. Importantly, MATE1 but not OCT1 expression is reduced in total bone marrow cells of imatinib-non-responding CML patients compared with imatinib-responding patients, indicating that MATE1 but not OCT1 determines the therapeutic success of imatinib. We thus propose that imatinib non-responders could be identified early before starting therapy by measuring MATE1 expression levels. PMID:27635733

  2. Molecular Biomechanics: The Molecular Basis of How Forces Regulate Cellular Function

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Gang; Kamm, Roger D.; Thomas, Wendy; Hwang, Wonmuk; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Zhu, Cheng; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have led to the emergence of molecular biomechanics as an essential element of modern biology. These efforts focus on theoretical and experimental studies of the mechanics of proteins and nucleic acids, and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress transmission, mechanosensing and mechanotransduction in living cells. In particular, single-molecule biomechanics studies of proteins and DNA, and mechanochemical coupling in biomolecular motors have demonstrated the critical importance of molecular mechanics as a new frontier in bioengineering and life sciences. To stimulate a more systematic study of the basic issues in molecular biomechanics, and attract a broader range of researchers to enter this emerging field, here we discuss its significance and relevance, describe the important issues to be addressed and the most critical questions to be answered, summarize both experimental and theoretical/computational challenges, and identify some short-term and long-term goals for the field. The needs to train young researchers in molecular biomechanics with a broader knowledge base, and to bridge and integrate molecular, subcellular and cellular level studies of biomechanics are articulated. PMID:20700472

  3. Molecular Biomechanics: The Molecular Basis of How Forces Regulate Cellular Function.

    PubMed

    Bao, Gang; Kamm, Roger D; Thomas, Wendy; Hwang, Wonmuk; Fletcher, Daniel A; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Zhu, Cheng; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2010-03-02

    Recent advances have led to the emergence of molecular biomechanics as an essential element of modern biology. These efforts focus on theoretical and experimental studies of the mechanics of proteins and nucleic acids, and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress transmission, mechanosensing and mechanotransduction in living cells. In particular, single-molecule biomechanics studies of proteins and DNA, and mechanochemical coupling in biomolecular motors have demonstrated the critical importance of molecular mechanics as a new frontier in bioengineering and life sciences. To stimulate a more systematic study of the basic issues in molecular biomechanics, and attract a broader range of researchers to enter this emerging field, here we discuss its significance and relevance, describe the important issues to be addressed and the most critical questions to be answered, summarize both experimental and theoretical/computational challenges, and identify some short-term and long-term goals for the field. The needs to train young researchers in molecular biomechanics with a broader knowledge base, and to bridge and integrate molecular, subcellular and cellular level studies of biomechanics are articulated.

  4. Exploring key cellular processes and candidate genes regulating the primary thickening growth of Moso underground shoots.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Jiao, Chen; Guo, Lin; Ding, Yulong; Cao, Junjie; Feng, Jianyuan; Dong, Xiaobo; Mao, Linyong; Sun, Honghe; Yu, Fen; Yang, Guangyao; Shi, Peijian; Ren, Guodong; Fei, Zhangjun

    2017-04-01

    The primary thickening growth of Moso (Phyllostachys edulis) underground shoots largely determines the culm circumference. However, its developmental mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using an integrated anatomy, mathematics and genomics approach, we systematically studied cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the growth of Moso underground shoots. We discovered that the growth displayed a spiral pattern and pith played an important role in promoting the primary thickening process of Moso underground shoots and driving the evolution of culms with different sizes among different bamboo species. Different with model plants, the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of Moso is composed of six layers of cells. Comparative transcriptome analysis identified a large number of genes related to the vascular tissue formation that were significantly upregulated in a thick wall variant with narrow pith cavity, mildly spiral growth, and flat and enlarged SAM, including those related to plant hormones and those involved in cell wall development. These results provide a systematic perspective on the primary thickening growth of Moso underground shoots, and support a plausible mechanism resulting in the narrow pith cavity, weak spiral growth but increased vascular bundle of the thick wall Moso. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. 24 CFR 2003.1 - Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations. 2003.1 Section 2003.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  6. 24 CFR 2002.1 - Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scope of the part and applicability of other HUD regulations. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  7. 31 CFR 542.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 542.101 Section 542.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN...

  8. 31 CFR 542.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 542.101 Section 542.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN...

  9. 31 CFR 542.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 542.101 Section 542.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN...

  10. 31 CFR 542.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  11. 31 CFR 542.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 542.101 Section 542.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN...

  12. 31 CFR 548.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 548.101 Section 548.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS...

  13. 31 CFR 548.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 548.101 Section 548.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS...

  14. 31 CFR 548.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 548.101 Section 548.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS...

  15. 31 CFR 548.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 548.101 Section 548.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS...

  16. 31 CFR 548.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 548.101 Section 548.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS...

  17. 31 CFR 549.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 549.101 Section 549.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 592.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 592.101 Section 592.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS...

  19. 31 CFR 592.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 592.101 Section 592.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS...

  20. 31 CFR 592.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 592.101 Section 592.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS...

  1. 31 CFR 592.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 592.101 Section 592.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS...

  2. 31 CFR 592.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 592.101 Section 592.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS...

  3. 31 CFR 543.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 543.101 Section 543.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CôTE D'IVOIRE...

  4. 31 CFR 536.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 536.101 Section 536.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING...

  5. 31 CFR 536.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 536.101 Section 536.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING...

  6. 31 CFR 536.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 536.101 Section 536.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING...

  7. 31 CFR 536.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 536.101 Section 536.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING...

  8. 31 CFR 536.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 536.101 Section 536.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING...

  9. 31 CFR 596.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 596.101 Section 596.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM...

  10. 31 CFR 558.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 558.101 Section 558.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOUTH SUDAN...

  11. 31 CFR 594.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 594.101 Section 594.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM...

  12. 31 CFR 594.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 594.101 Section 594.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM...

  13. 7 CFR 4290.1940 - Integration of this part with other regulations applicable to USDA's programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Integration of this part with other regulations applicable to USDA's programs. 4290.1940 Section 4290.1940 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 4290.1940 Integration of...

  14. 25 CFR 900.140 - Can any provision of the regulations under this part be waived?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the contract, or is consistent with the policies of the Act and is not contrary to statutory law. ... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND... provision of these regulations, including any cost principles adopted by the regulations under this part, if...

  15. 31 CFR 552.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 552.101 Section 552.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 552.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 552.101 Section 552.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS...

  17. 31 CFR 545.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 545.101 Section 545.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN...

  18. 31 CFR 562.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 562.101 Section 562.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN...

  19. 31 CFR 562.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 562.101 Section 562.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN...

  20. 31 CFR 562.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 562.101 Section 562.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN...

  1. 31 CFR 562.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 562.101 Section 562.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN...

  2. 31 CFR 510.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 510.101 Section 510.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 510.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 510.101 Section 510.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 510.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 510.101 Section 510.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 510.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 510.101 Section 510.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 535.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 535.101 Section 535.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN ASSETS...

  7. 31 CFR 551.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 551.101 Section 551.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA...

  8. 31 CFR 551.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 551.101 Section 551.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA...

  9. 31 CFR 551.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 551.101 Section 551.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA...

  10. 31 CFR 551.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 551.101 Section 551.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA...

  11. 31 CFR 551.101 - Relation of this part to other laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. 551.101 Section 551.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA...

  12. Cellular differentiation regulated by gibberellin in the Arabidopsis thaliana pickle mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ogas, J.; Somerville, C.; Cheng, Jin-Chen; Sung, R.

    1997-07-04

    The plant growth regulator gibberellin (GA) has a profound effect on shoot development and promotes developmental transitions such as flowering. Little is known about any analogous effect GA might have on root development. In a screen for mutants, Arabi-dopsis plants carrying a mutation designated pickle (pkl) were isolated in which the primary root meristem retained characteristics of embryonic tissue. Expression of this aberrant differentiation state was suppressed by GA. Root tissue from plants carrying the pkl mutation spontaneously regenerated new embryos and plants. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Desmosomes: regulators of cellular signaling and adhesion in epidermal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jodi L; Najor, Nicole A; Green, Kathleen J

    2014-11-03

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that mediate cell-cell adhesion and anchor the intermediate filament network to the plasma membrane, providing mechanical resilience to tissues such as the epidermis and heart. In addition to their critical roles in adhesion, desmosomal proteins are emerging as mediators of cell signaling important for proper cell and tissue functions. In this review we highlight what is known about desmosomal proteins regulating adhesion and signaling in healthy skin-in morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis, wound healing, and protection against environmental damage. We also discuss how human diseases that target desmosome molecules directly or interfere indirectly with these mechanical and signaling functions to contribute to pathogenesis.

  14. Desmosomes: Regulators of Cellular Signaling and Adhesion in Epidermal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jodi L.; Najor, Nicole A.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that mediate cell–cell adhesion and anchor the intermediate filament network to the plasma membrane, providing mechanical resilience to tissues such as the epidermis and heart. In addition to their critical roles in adhesion, desmosomal proteins are emerging as mediators of cell signaling important for proper cell and tissue functions. In this review we highlight what is known about desmosomal proteins regulating adhesion and signaling in healthy skin—in morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis, wound healing, and protection against environmental damage. We also discuss how human diseases that target desmosome molecules directly or interfere indirectly with these mechanical and signaling functions to contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25368015

  15. Cyclic Di-GMP Regulates Multiple Cellular Functions in the Symbiotic Alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Schäper, Simon; Krol, Elizaveta; Skotnicka, Dorota; Kaever, Volkhard; Hilker, Rolf; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sinorhizobium meliloti undergoes major lifestyle changes between planktonic states, biofilm formation, and symbiosis with leguminous plant hosts. In many bacteria, the second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) promotes a sessile lifestyle by regulating a plethora of processes involved in biofilm formation, including motility and biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides (EPS). Here, we systematically investigated the role of cdG in S. meliloti Rm2011 encoding 22 proteins putatively associated with cdG synthesis, degradation, or binding. Single mutations in 21 of these genes did not cause evident changes in biofilm formation, motility, or EPS biosynthesis. In contrast, manipulation of cdG levels by overproducing endogenous or heterologous diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) or phosphodiesterases (PDEs) affected these processes and accumulation of N-Acyl-homoserine lactones in the culture supernatant. Specifically, individual overexpression of the S. meliloti genes pleD, SMb20523, SMb20447, SMc01464, and SMc03178 encoding putative DGCs and of SMb21517 encoding a single-domain PDE protein had an impact and resulted in increased levels of cdG. Compared to the wild type, an S. meliloti strain that did not produce detectable levels of cdG (cdG0) was more sensitive to acid stress. However, it was symbiotically potent, unaffected in motility, and only slightly reduced in biofilm formation. The SMc01790-SMc01796 locus, homologous to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens uppABCDEF cluster governing biosynthesis of a unipolarly localized polysaccharide, was found to be required for cdG-stimulated biofilm formation, while the single-domain PilZ protein McrA was identified as a cdG receptor protein involved in regulation of motility. IMPORTANCE We present the first systematic genome-wide investigation of the role of 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) in regulation of motility, biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and symbiosis in a

  16. Extracellular Matrix Components Regulate Cellular Polarity and Tissue Structure in the Developing and Mature Retina.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Shweta; Hunter, Dale D; Brunken, William J

    2015-01-01

    While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  17. Npr2 regulates cellular utilization of glutamine for biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing metabolites through TORC1

    PubMed Central

    Laxman, Sunil; Sutter, Benjamin M.; Shi, Lei; Tu, Benjamin P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells must be capable of switching between growth and autophagy in unpredictable nutrient environments. Yeast cells lacking the conserved Iml1/Npr2/Npr3 complex (also called SEACIT), a negative regulator of TORC1, can bypass autophagy and proliferate during specific nutrient limitations. We determined that Npr2-deficient cells exhibit a metabolic state that is very distinct from WT cells under such limitations that demand oxidative metabolism. Instead of accumulating glutamine, npr2Δ cells consumed substantial amounts of glutamine to satisfy their demands for nitrogen, and maintained high S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) concentrations to fuel growth. Moreover, in normal cells, methionine addition stimulated glutamine consumption for synthesis of nitrogenous metabolites, showing how a sulfur amino acid cue is integrated with nitrogen utilization. These data reveal the metabolic basis by which the Iml1/Npr2/Npr3 complex regulates cellular homeostasis and demonstrate a key function for TORC1 in regulating the synthesis and utilization of glutamine as a nitrogen source. PMID:25515537

  18. Suppression in PHLPP2 induction by morin promotes Nrf2-regulated cellular defenses against oxidative injury to primary rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Fatima; Mathur, Alpana; Krishna, Shagun; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Kakkar, Poonam

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances indicate a possible role of phytochemicals as modulatory factors in signaling pathways. We have previously demonstrated PHLPP2-mediated suppression of Nrf2 responses during oxidant attack. The present study was designed to explore Nrf2-potentiating mechanism of morin, a flavonol, via its possible role in intervening PHLPP2-regulated Akt/GSK3β/Fyn kinase axis. Efficacy of morin was evaluated against oxidative stress-mediated damage to primary hepatocytes by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) and acetaminophen. The anti-cytotoxic effects of morin were found to be a consequence of fortification of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant defenses since morin failed to sustain activities of redox enzyme in Nrf2 silenced hepatocytes. Morin promoted Nrf2 stability and its nuclear retention by possibly modulating PHLPP2 activity which subdues cellular Nrf2 responses by activating Fyn kinase. Pull-down assay using morin-conjugated beads indicated the binding affinity of morin towards PHLPP2. Molecular docking also revealed the propensity of morin to occupy the active site of PHLPP2 enzyme. Thus, dietary phytochemical morin was observed to counteract oxidant-induced hepatocellular damage by promoting Nrf2-regulated transcriptional induction. The findings support the novel role of morin in potentiating Nrf2 responses by limiting PHLPP2 and hence Fyn kinase activation. Therefore, morin may be exploited in developing novel therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing Nrf2 responses. PMID:26513344

  19. Suppression in PHLPP2 induction by morin promotes Nrf2-regulated cellular defenses against oxidative injury to primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Fatima; Mathur, Alpana; Krishna, Shagun; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Kakkar, Poonam

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances indicate a possible role of phytochemicals as modulatory factors in signaling pathways. We have previously demonstrated PHLPP2-mediated suppression of Nrf2 responses during oxidant attack. The present study was designed to explore Nrf2-potentiating mechanism of morin, a flavonol, via its possible role in intervening PHLPP2-regulated Akt/GSK3β/Fyn kinase axis. Efficacy of morin was evaluated against oxidative stress-mediated damage to primary hepatocytes by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) and acetaminophen. The anti-cytotoxic effects of morin were found to be a consequence of fortification of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant defenses since morin failed to sustain activities of redox enzyme in Nrf2 silenced hepatocytes. Morin promoted Nrf2 stability and its nuclear retention by possibly modulating PHLPP2 activity which subdues cellular Nrf2 responses by activating Fyn kinase. Pull-down assay using morin-conjugated beads indicated the binding affinity of morin towards PHLPP2. Molecular docking also revealed the propensity of morin to occupy the active site of PHLPP2 enzyme. Thus, dietary phytochemical morin was observed to counteract oxidant-induced hepatocellular damage by promoting Nrf2-regulated transcriptional induction. The findings support the novel role of morin in potentiating Nrf2 responses by limiting PHLPP2 and hence Fyn kinase activation. Therefore, morin may be exploited in developing novel therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing Nrf2 responses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Distinct Redox Regulation in Sub-Cellular Compartments in Response to Various Stress Conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Anita; Sanwald, Julia; Pillay, Bethany A.; Meyer, Andreas J.; Perrone, Gabriel G.; Dawes, Ian W.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (EGSH) was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. EGSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (−340 to −350 mV) were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H+/2GSH) and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H+/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions. PMID:23762325

  1. Distinct redox regulation in sub-cellular compartments in response to various stress conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Sanwald, Julia; Pillay, Bethany A; Meyer, Andreas J; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2013-01-01

    Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (E GSH) was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. E GSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (-340 to -350 mV) were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH) and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions.

  2. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajib; Liu, Deng; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison; Liberton, Michelle; Yu, Jingjie; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Balassy, Andrea; Zhang, Fuzhong; Maranas, Costas D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper) were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H), and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium. PMID:27143387

  3. Copper transporters regulate the cellular pharmacology and sensitivity to Pt drugs.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Roohangiz; Howell, Stephen B

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the major Cu influx transporter CTR1 regulates tumor cell uptake of cisplatin (DDP), carboplatin (CBDCA) and oxaliplatin (L-OHP), and that the two Cu efflux transporters ATP7A and ATP7B regulate the efflux of these drugs. Evidence for the concept that these platinum (Pt) drugs enter cells and are distributed to various subcellular compartments via transporters that have evolved to manage Cu homeostasis includes the demonstration of: (1) bidirectional cross-resistance between cells selected for resistance to either the Pt drugs or Cu; (2) parallel changes in the transport of Pt and Cu drugs in resistant cells; (3) altered cytotoxic sensitivity and Pt drug accumulation in cells transfected with Cu transporters; and (4) altered expression of Cu transporters in Pt drug-resistant tumors. Appreciation of the role of the Cu transporters in the development of resistance to DDP, CBDCA, and L-OHP offers novel insights into strategies for preventing or reversing resistance to this very important family of anticancer drugs.

  4. Molecular and cellular mechanisms for the regulation of ovarian follicular function in cows

    PubMed Central

    SHIMIZU, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ovary is an important organ that houses the oocytes (reproductive cell). Oocyte growth depends on the function of follicular cells such as the granulosa and theca cells. Two-cell two gonadotropin systems are associated with oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. In addition to these systems, it is also known that several growth factors regulate oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in thecal vasculature during follicular development and the suppression of granulosa cell apoptosis. Metabolic factors such as insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) also play critical roles in the process of follicular development and growth. These factors are associated not only with follicular development, but also with follicular cell function. Steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progestins) that are secreted from follicular cells influence the function of the female genital tract and its affect the susceptibility to bacterial infection. This review covers our current understanding of the mechanisms by which gonadotrophins and/or steroid hormones regulate the growth factors in the follicular cells of the bovine ovary. In addition, this review describes the effect of endotoxin on the function of follicular cells. PMID:27097851

  5. Cellular Cholesterol Regulates Ubiquitination and Degradation of the Cholesterol Export Proteins ABCA1 and ABCG1*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Victar; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Gelissen, Ingrid C.; Brown, Andrew J.; Sandoval, Cecilia; Hallab, Jeannette C.; Kockx, Maaike; Traini, Mathew; Jessup, Wendy; Kritharides, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of cholesterol in post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein expression. Using CHO cell lines stably expressing human ABCA1 or ABCG1, we observed that the abundance of these proteins is increased by cell cholesterol loading. The response to increased cholesterol is rapid, is independent of transcription, and appears to be specific for these membrane proteins. The effect is mediated through cholesterol-dependent inhibition of transporter protein degradation. Cell cholesterol loading similarly regulates degradation of endogenously expressed ABCA1 and ABCG1 in human THP-1 macrophages. Turnover of ABCA1 and ABCG1 is strongly inhibited by proteasomal inhibitors and is unresponsive to inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis. Furthermore, cell cholesterol loading inhibits ubiquitination of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Our findings provide evidence for a rapid, cholesterol-dependent, post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein levels, mediated through a specific and sterol-sensitive mechanism for suppression of transporter protein ubiquitination, which in turn decreases proteasomal degradation. This provides a mechanism for acute fine-tuning of cholesterol transporter activity in response to fluctuations in cell cholesterol levels, in addition to the longer term cholesterol-dependent transcriptional regulation of these genes. PMID:24500716

  6. Lipid rafts regulate cellular CD40 receptor localization in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Min; Wang Qing; Zhu Huilian; Ma Jing; Hou Mengjun; Tang Zhihong; Li Juanjuan; Ling Wenhua

    2007-09-28

    Cholesterol enriched lipid rafts are considered to function as platforms involved in the regulation of membrane receptor signaling complex through the clustering of signaling molecules. In this study, we tested whether these specialized membrane microdomains affect CD40 localization in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that upon CD40 ligand stimulation, endogenous and exogenous CD40 receptor is rapidly mobilized into lipid rafts compared with unstimulated HAECs. Efficient binding between CD40L and CD40 receptor also increases amounts of CD40 protein levels in lipid rafts. Deficiency of intracellular conserved C terminus of the CD40 cytoplasmic tail impairs CD40 partitioning in raft. Raft disorganization after methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin treatment diminishes CD40 localization into rafts. In vivo studies show that elevation of circulating cholesterol in high-cholesterol fed rabbits increases the cholesterol content and CD40 receptor localization in lipid rafts. These findings identify a physiological role for membrane lipid rafts as a critical regulator of CD40-mediated signal transduction and raise the possibility that certain pathologic conditions may be treated by altering CD40 signaling with drugs affecting its raft localization.

  7. Intra-cellular mechanism of Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in regulation of follicular development.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Emily; Kushnir, Vitaly; Ma, Xiaoting; Biswas, Anindita; Prizant, Hen; Gleicher, Norbert; Sen, Aritro

    2016-09-15

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and plays a crucial role in testicular and ovarian functions. In clinical practice, AMH is used as a diagnostic and/or prognostic marker in women in association with ovulation induction and in various pathophysiological conditions. Despite widespread clinical use of AMH, our mechanistic understanding of AMH actions in regulating follicular development is limited. Using a mouse model, we in this study report that in vivo AMH treatment while stalls follicular development and inhibits ovulation, also prevents follicular atresia. We further show that these AMH actions are mediated through induction of two miRNAs, miR-181a and miR-181b, which regulate various aspects of FSH signaling and follicular growth, ultimately affecting downstream gene expression and folliculogenesis. We also report that in this mouse model AMH pre-treatment prior to superovulation improves oocyte yield. These studies, therefore, offer new mechanistic insight into AMH actions in folliculogenesis and point toward potential utilization of AMH as a therapeutic agent.

  8. A novel role for Bcl-2 in regulation of cellular calcium extrusion.

    PubMed

    Ferdek, Pawel E; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Peng, Shuang; Tepikin, Alexei V; Petersen, Ole H; Gerasimenko, Oleg V

    2012-07-10

    The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 plays important roles in Ca(2+) signaling by influencing inositol triphosphate receptors and regulating Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Here we investigated whether Bcl-2 affects Ca(2+) extrusion in pancreatic acinar cells. We specifically blocked the Ca(2+) pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum and assessed the rate at which the cells reduced an elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration after a period of enhanced Ca(2+) entry. Because external Ca(2+) was removed and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pumps were blocked, Ca(2+) extrusion was the only process responsible for recovery. Cells lacking Bcl-2 restored the basal cytosolic Ca(2+) level much faster than control cells. The enhanced Ca(2+) extrusion in cells from Bcl-2 knockout (Bcl-2 KO) mice was not due to increased Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange activity, because removal of external Na(+) did not influence the Ca(2+) extrusion rate. Overexpression of Bcl-2 in the pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J decreased Ca(2+) extrusion, whereas silencing Bcl-2 expression (siRNA) had the opposite effect. Loss of Bcl-2, while increasing Ca(2+) extrusion, dramatically decreased necrosis and promoted apoptosis induced by oxidative stress, whereas specific inhibition of Ca(2+) pumps in the plasma membrane (PMCA) with caloxin 3A1 reduced Ca(2+) extrusion and increased necrosis. Bcl-2 regulates PMCA function in pancreatic acinar cells and thereby influences cell fate.

  9. The dynamics of Turing patterns for morphogen-regulated growing domains with cellular response delays.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, S; Gaffney, E A; Baker, R E

    2011-11-01

    Since its conception in 1952, the Turing paradigm for pattern formation has been the subject of numerous theoretical investigations. Experimentally, this mechanism was first demonstrated in chemical reactions over 20 years ago and, more recently, several examples of biological self-organisation have also been implicated as Turing systems. One criticism of the Turing model is its lack of robustness, not only with respect to fluctuations in the initial conditions, but also with respect to the inclusion of delays in critical feedback processes such as gene expression. In this work we investigate the possibilities for Turing patterns on growing domains where the morphogens additionally regulate domain growth, incorporating delays in the feedback between signalling and domain growth, as well as gene expression. We present results for the proto-typical Schnakenberg and Gierer-Meinhardt systems: exploring the dynamics of these systems suggests a reconsideration of the basic Turing mechanism for pattern formation on morphogen-regulated growing domains as well as highlighting when feedback delays on domain growth are important for pattern formation.

  10. Apportionment for Prekindergarten Programs. Amendment to the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, Part 151.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Parent Education, Student and Child Development and Community School Programs.

    The purpose of Part 151 of the regulations of the New York Commissioner of Education is to carry out the legislative intent to provide financial assistance to school districts. This assistance is provided for the operation of experimental prekindergarten programs for children with educational needs associated with poverty. Section 2 of Part 151…

  11. 45 CFR 2506.3 - What definitions apply to the regulations in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... delinquent non-tax debt. Agency means a department, agency, court, court administrative office, or... cancellation, remission, forgiveness, or non-recovery of a debt. Withholding order means any order for... apply to the regulations in this part? As used in this part: Administrative offset means...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix L to Part 51 - Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes L Appendix L to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Pt. 51, App. L Appendix L to Part 51—Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution... air pollution from reaching levels that would cause imminent and substantial endangerment to...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix L to Part 51 - Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes L Appendix L to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Pt. 51, App. L Appendix L to Part 51—Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution... air pollution from reaching levels that would cause imminent and substantial endangerment to...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix L to Part 51 - Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes L Appendix L to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Pt. 51, App. L Appendix L to Part 51—Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution... air pollution from reaching levels that would cause imminent and substantial endangerment to...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix L to Part 51 - Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes L Appendix L to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Pt. 51, App. L Appendix L to Part 51—Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution... air pollution from reaching levels that would cause imminent and substantial endangerment to...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix L to Part 51 - Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes L Appendix L to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Pt. 51, App. L Appendix L to Part 51—Example Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution... air pollution from reaching levels that would cause imminent and substantial endangerment to...

  17. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 209 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies A Appendix A to Part 209 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NON... VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 209, App. A Appendix A to Part 209—Federal Financial...

  18. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 209 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies A Appendix A to Part 209 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NON... VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 209, App. A Appendix A to Part 209—Federal Financial...

  19. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 209 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies A Appendix A to Part 209 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NON... VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 209, App. A Appendix A to Part 209—Federal Financial...

  20. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 209 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Regulation Applies A Appendix A to Part 209 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NON... VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 209, App. A Appendix A to Part 209—Federal Financial...

  1. 40 CFR 1036.15 - Do any other regulation parts apply to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for controlling evaporative emissions and greenhouse gas emissions from heavy-duty vehicles, whether... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HEAVY-DUTY HIGHWAY ENGINES Overview and... references portions of 40 CFR part 86. For example, the regulations of part 86 specify emission standards and...

  2. 40 CFR 1036.15 - Do any other regulation parts apply to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for controlling evaporative emissions and greenhouse gas emissions from heavy-duty vehicles, whether... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HEAVY-DUTY HIGHWAY ENGINES Overview and... references portions of 40 CFR part 86. For example, the regulations of part 86 specify emission standards and...

  3. 40 CFR 1036.15 - Do any other regulation parts apply to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for controlling evaporative emissions and greenhouse gas emissions from heavy-duty vehicles, whether... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HEAVY-DUTY HIGHWAY ENGINES Overview and... references portions of 40 CFR part 86. For example, the regulations of part 86 specify emission standards and...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix L to Part 121 - Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Previously Effective L Appendix L to Part 121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. L Appendix L to Part 121—Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective Appendix L...

  5. 14 CFR 39.13 - Are airworthiness directives part of the Code of Federal Regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Are airworthiness directives part of the Code of Federal Regulations? 39.13 Section 39.13 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES § 39.13 Are airworthiness directives part...

  6. 34 CFR 222.19 - What other statutes and regulations apply to this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the basis of sex), and the implementing regulations (34 CFR part 106). (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1681-1683... for federally connected children with disabilities), 8007 (construction), and 8008 (school facilities... children with disabilities), 8007 (construction), and 8008 (school facilities). (4) 34 CFR part 82 (New...

  7. 16 CFR 312.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part implements the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998, (15 U.S.C. 6501, et seq.,) which prohibits... personal information from and about children on the Internet. ...

  8. 16 CFR 315.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part, which shall be called the “Contact Lens Rule,” implements the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, codified at 15 U.S.C. 7601-7610, which requires that rules be issued to address the release, verification, and sale of contact...

  9. 16 CFR 315.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part, which shall be called the “Contact Lens Rule,” implements the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, codified at 15 U.S.C. 7601-7610, which requires that rules be issued to address the release, verification, and sale of contact...

  10. 16 CFR 315.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part, which shall be called the “Contact Lens Rule,” implements the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, codified at 15 U.S.C. 7601-7610, which requires that rules be issued to address the release, verification, and sale of contact...

  11. 16 CFR 315.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part, which shall be called the “Contact Lens Rule,” implements the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, codified at 15 U.S.C. 7601-7610, which requires that rules be issued to address the release, verification, and sale of contact...

  12. 16 CFR 315.1 - Scope of regulations in this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.1 Scope of regulations in this part. This part, which shall be called the “Contact Lens Rule,” implements the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, codified at 15 U.S.C. 7601-7610, which requires that rules be issued to address the release, verification, and sale of contact...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix L to Part 121 - Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Previously Effective L Appendix L to Part 121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. L Appendix L to Part 121—Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective Appendix L lists...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix L to Part 121 - Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Previously Effective L Appendix L to Part 121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. L Appendix L to Part 121—Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective Appendix L lists...

  15. 14 CFR Appendix L to Part 121 - Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Previously Effective L Appendix L to Part 121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. L Appendix L to Part 121—Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective Appendix L lists...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix L to Part 121 - Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Previously Effective L Appendix L to Part 121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. L Appendix L to Part 121—Type Certification Regulations Made Previously Effective Appendix L lists...

  17. P-TEFb Kinase Complex Phosphorylates Histone H1 to Regulate Expression of Cellular and HIV-1 Genes*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Siobhan K.; Cao, Hong; Nathans, Robin; Ali, Akbar; Rana, Tariq M.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription of HIV-1 genes depends on the RNA polymerase II kinase and elongation factor positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), the complex of cyclin T1 and CDK9. Recent evidence suggests that regulation of transcription by P-TEFb involves chromatin binding and modifying factors. To determine how P-TEFb may connect chromatin remodeling to transcription, we investigated the relationship between P-TEFb and histone H1. We identify histone H1 as a substrate for P-TEFb involved in cellular and HIV-1 transcription. We show that P-TEFb interacts with H1 and that P-TEFb inhibition by RNAi, flavopiridol, or dominant negative CDK9 expression correlates with loss of phosphorylation and mobility of H1 in vivo. Importantly, P-TEFb directs H1 phosphorylation in response to wild-type HIV-1 infection, but not Tat-mutant HIV-1 infection. Our results show that P-TEFb phosphorylates histone H1 at a specific C-terminal phosphorylation site. Expression of a mutant H1.1 that cannot be phosphorylated by P-TEFb also disrupts Tat transactivation in an HIV reporter cell line as well as transcription of the c-fos and hsp70 genes in HeLa cells. We identify histone H1 as a novel P-TEFb substrate, and our results suggest new roles for P-TEFb in both cellular and HIV-1 transcription. PMID:20551309

  18. Sub-cellular mRNA localization modulates the regulation of gene expression by small RNAs in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Korkmazhan, Elgin; Stavans, Joel; Levine, Erel

    2017-10-01

    Small non-coding RNAs can exert significant regulatory activity on gene expression in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding bacterial gene expression by sRNAs. However, recent findings that demonstrate that families of mRNAs show non-trivial sub-cellular distributions raise the question of how localization may affect the regulatory activity of sRNAs. Here we address this question within a simple mathematical model. We show that the non-uniform spatial distributions of mRNA can alter the threshold-linear response that characterizes sRNAs that act stoichiometrically, and modulate the hierarchy among targets co-regulated by the same sRNA. We also identify conditions where the sub-cellular organization of cofactors in the sRNA pathway can induce spatial heterogeneity on sRNA targets. Our results suggest that under certain conditions, interpretation and modeling of natural and synthetic gene regulatory circuits need to take into account the spatial organization of the transcripts of participating genes.

  19. Regulation of Cellular Diacylglycerol through Lipid Phosphate Phosphatases Is Required for Pathogenesis of the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Choi, Jaeyoung; Choi, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Considering implication of diacylglycerol in both metabolism and signaling pathways, maintaining proper levels of diacylglycerol (DAG) is critical to cellular homeostasis and development. Except the PIP2-PLC mediated pathway, metabolic pathways leading to generation of DAG converge on dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid catalyzed by lipid phosphate phosphatases. Here we report the role of such enzymes in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. We identified five genes encoding putative lipid phosphate phosphatases (MoLPP1 to MoLPP5). Targeted disruption of four genes (except MoLPP4) showed that MoLPP3 and MoLPP5 are required for normal progression of infection-specific development and proliferation within host plants, whereas MoLPP1 and MoLPP2 are indispensable for fungal pathogenicity. Reintroduction of MoLPP3 and MoLPP5 into individual deletion mutants restored all the defects. Furthermore, exogenous addition of saturated DAG not only restored defect in appressorium formation but also complemented reduced virulence in both mutants. Taken together, our data indicate differential roles of lipid phosphate phosphatase genes and requirement of proper regulation of cellular DAGs for fungal development and pathogenesis. PMID:24959955

  20. Dysregulation of REST-regulated coding and non-coding RNAs in a cellular model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Bithell, Angela; Johnston, Caroline; Wong, Kee-Yew; Stanton, Lawrence W; Buckley, Noel J

    2013-02-01

    Huntingtin (Htt) protein interacts with many transcriptional regulators, with widespread disruption to the transcriptome in Huntington's disease (HD) brought about by altered interactions with the mutant Htt (muHtt) protein. Repressor Element-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) is a repressor whose association with Htt in the cytoplasm is disrupted in HD, leading to increased nuclear REST and concomitant repression of several neuronal-specific genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). Here, we explored a wide set of HD dysregulated genes to identify direct REST targets whose expression is altered in a cellular model of HD but that can be rescued by knock-down of REST activity. We found many direct REST target genes encoding proteins important for nervous system development, including a cohort involved in synaptic transmission, at least two of which can be rescued at the protein level by REST knock-down. We also identified several microRNAs (miRNAs) whose aberrant repression is directly mediated by REST, including miR-137, which has not previously been shown to be a direct REST target in mouse. These data provide evidence of the contribution of inappropriate REST-mediated transcriptional repression to the widespread changes in coding and non-coding gene expression in a cellular model of HD that may affect normal neuronal function and survival.