Science.gov

Sample records for cellular resolution volumetric

  1. Optical reconstruction of murine colorectal mucosa at cellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cambrian Y.; Dubé, Philip E.; Girish, Nandini; Reddy, Ajay T.

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal layer of the colon is a unique and dynamic site where host cells interface with one another and the microbiome, with major implications for physiology and disease. However, the cellular mechanisms mediating colonic regeneration, inflammation, dysplasia, and dysbiosis remain undercharacterized, partly because the use of thin tissue sections in many studies removes important volumetric context. To address these challenges in visualization, we have developed the deep mucosal imaging (DMI) method to reconstruct continuous extended volumes of mouse colorectal mucosa at cellular resolution. Use of ScaleA2 and SeeDB clearing agents enabled full visualization of the colonic crypt, the fundamental unit of adult colon. Confocal imaging of large colorectal expanses revealed epithelial structures involved in repair, inflammation, tumorigenesis, and stem cell function, in fluorescent protein-labeled, immunostained, paraffin-embedded, or human biopsy samples. We provide freely available software to reconstruct and explore on computers with standard memory allocations the large DMI datasets containing in toto representations of distal colonic mucosal volume. Extended-volume imaging of colonic mucosa through the novel, extensible, and readily adopted DMI approach will expedite mechanistic investigations of intestinal physiology and pathophysiology at intracrypt to multicrypt length scales. PMID:25721303

  2. 3D surface reconstruction and visualization of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc at cellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linge; Widmann, Thomas; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian; Breen, David

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying and visualizing the shape of developing biological tissues provide information about the morphogenetic processes in multicellular organisms. The size and shape of biological tissues depend on the number, size, shape, and arrangement of the constituting cells. To better understand the mechanisms that guide tissues into their final shape, it is important to investigate the cellular arrangement within tissues. Here we present a data processing pipeline to generate 3D volumetric surface models of epithelial tissues, as well as geometric descriptions of the tissues' apical cell cross-sections. The data processing pipeline includes image acquisition, editing, processing and analysis, 2D cell mesh generation, 3D contourbased surface reconstruction, cell mesh projection, followed by geometric calculations and color-based visualization of morphological parameters. In their first utilization we have applied these procedures to construct a 3D volumetric surface model at cellular resolution of the wing imaginal disc of Drosophila melanogaster. The ultimate goal of the reported effort is to produce tools for the creation of detailed 3D geometric models of the individual cells in epithelial tissues. To date, 3D volumetric surface models of the whole wing imaginal disc have been created, and the apicolateral cell boundaries have been identified, allowing for the calculation and visualization of cell parameters, e.g. apical cross-sectional area of cells. The calculation and visualization of morphological parameters show position-dependent patterns of cell shape in the wing imaginal disc. Our procedures should offer a general data processing pipeline for the construction of 3D volumetric surface models of a wide variety of epithelial tissues.

  3. In vivo volumetric imaging of the human upper eyelid with ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizheva, Kostadinka; Lee, Patrick; Sorbara, Luigina; Hutchings, Natalie; Simpson, Trefford

    2010-07-01

    The upper eyelid is a biological tissue with complex structure, essential for the maintenance of an optically clear ocular surface due to its physical (blinking) effect. The Meibomian glands (MGs) are structures that lie beneath the surface of the inner eyelid and are partially responsible for the production of the superficial oily layer of the tear film. The MGs are only superficially visible under magnification when the eyelid is everted. We present for the first time in vivo 3-D images of healthy and inflamed human MGs. Tomograms were acquired from the tarsal plate of everted human eyelids with a 1060-nm ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHOCT) system, with ~3 μm×10 μm (axial×lateral) resolution in biological tissue at the rate of 91,911 A-scans/s. Comparison with histology shows that the UHOCT images reveal a spatial distribution of structures that appear to correspond with the MGs' acini and ducts (in healthy subjects), and accumulation of heterogeneous, highly scattering biological material and clear fluids in the visibly blocked glands. Noninvasive, volumetric high-resolution morphological imaging of the human tarsal area could have a significant impact in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory and noninflammatory lid pathologies.

  4. Mapping brain structure and function: cellular resolution, global perspective.

    PubMed

    Zupanc, Günther K H

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the brain requires analysis, although from a global perspective, with cellular, and even subcellular, resolution. An important step towards this goal involves the establishment of three-dimensional high-resolution brain maps, incorporating brain-wide information about the cells and their connections, as well as the chemical architecture. The progress made in such anatomical brain mapping in recent years has been paralleled by the development of physiological techniques that enable investigators to generate global neural activity maps, also with cellular resolution, while simultaneously recording the organism's behavioral activity. Combination of the high-resolution anatomical and physiological maps, followed by theoretical systems analysis of the deduced network, will offer unprecedented opportunities for a better understanding of how the brain, as a whole, processes sensory information and generates behavior.

  5. Protocol for volumetric segmentation of medial temporal structures using high-resolution 3-D magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Eliane; Cendes, Fernando; Min Li, Li

    2004-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of brain structures in normal subjects and in different neurological conditions can be carried out in vivo through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric studies. The use of high-resolution MRI combined with image post-processing that allows simultaneous multiplanar view may facilitate volumetric segmentation of temporal lobe structures. We define a protocol for volumetric studies of medial temporal lobe structures using high-resolution MR images and we studied 30 healthy subjects (19 women; mean age, 33 years; age range, 21-55 years). Images underwent field non-homogeneity correction and linear stereotaxic transformation into a standard space. Structures of interest comprised temporopolar, entorhinal, perirhinal, parahippocampal cortices, hippocampus, and the amygdala. Segmentation was carried out with multiplanar assessment. There was no statistically significant left/right-sided asymmetry concerning any structure analyzed. Neither gender nor age influenced the volumes obtained. The coefficient of repeatability showed no significant difference of intra- and interobserver measurements. Imaging post-processing and simultaneous multiplanar view of high-resolution MRI facilitates volumetric assessment of the medial portion of the temporal lobe with strict adherence to anatomic landmarks. This protocol shows no significant inter- and intraobserver variations and thus is reliable for longitudinal studies.

  6. Automated volumetric segmentation method for growth consistency of nonsolid pulmonary nodules in high-resolution CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browder, William A.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apananosovich, Tatiyana V.; Cham, Matthew D.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2007-03-01

    There is widespread clinical interest in the study of pulmonary nodules for early diagnosis of lung cancer. These nodules can be broadly classified into one of three types, solid, nonsolid and part-solid. Solid nodules have been extensively studied, while little research has focused on the characterization of nonsolid and part-solid nodules. Nonsolid nodules have an appearance in high-resolution CT consisting of voxels only slightly more dense than that of the surrounding lung parenchyma. For the solid nodule, robust techniques are available to estimate growth rate and this is commonly used to distinguish benign from malignant. For the nonsolid types, these techniques are less well developed. In this research, we propose an automated volumetric segmentation method for nonsolid nodules that accurately determines a nonsolid nodule's growth rate. Our method starts with an initial noise-filtering stage in the parenchyma region. Each voxel is then classified into one of three tissue types; lung parenchyma, nonsolid and solid. Removal of vessel attachments to the lesion is achieved with the use of a filter that focuses on vessel characteristics. Our results indicate that the automated method is more consistent than the radiologist with a median growth consistency of 1.87 compared to 3.12 for the radiologist on a database of 25 cases.

  7. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution analysis of four dimensional digital subtraction angiography (4D-DSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian; Oberstar, Erick; Royalty, Kevin; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Mistretta, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Static C-Arm CT 3D FDK baseline reconstructions (3D-DSA) are unable to provide temporal information to radiologists. 4D-DSA provides a time series of 3D volumes implementing a constrained image, thresholded 3D-DSA, reconstruction utilizing temporal dynamics in the 2D projections. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution (VLSR) of 4DDSA is quantified and compared to a 3D-DSA reconstruction using the same 3D-DSA parameters. Investigated were the effects of varying over significant ranges the 4D-DSA parameters of 2D blurring kernel size applied to the projection and threshold applied to the 3D-DSA when generating the constraining image of a scanned phantom (SPH) and an electronic phantom (EPH). The SPH consisted of a 76 micron tungsten wire encased in a 47 mm O.D. plastic radially concentric thin walled support structure. An 8-second/248-frame/198° scan protocol acquired the raw projection data. VLSR was determined from averaged MTF curves generated from each 2D transverse slice of every (248) 4D temporal frame (3D). 4D results for SPH and EPH were compared to the 3D-DSA. Analysis of the 3D-DSA resulted in a VLSR of 2.28 and 1.69 lp/mm for the EPH and SPH respectively. Kernel (2D) sizes of either 10x10 or 20x20 pixels with a threshold of 10% of the 3D-DSA as a constraining image provided 4D-DSA VLSR nearest to the 3D-DSA. 4D-DSA algorithms yielded 2.21 and 1.67 lp/mm with a percent error of 3.1% and 1.2% for the EPH and SPH respectively as compared to the 3D-DSA. This research indicates 4D-DSA is capable of retaining the resolution of the 3D-DSA.

  8. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Shipley, Frederick B; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

    2016-02-23

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal's head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion.

  9. Multiplexed Intact-Tissue Transcriptional Analysis at Cellular Resolution.

    PubMed

    Sylwestrak, Emily Lauren; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Wright, Matthew Arnot; Jaffe, Anna; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-02-11

    In recently developed approaches for high-resolution imaging within intact tissue, molecular characterization over large volumes has been largely restricted to labeling of proteins. But volumetric nucleic acid labeling may represent a far greater scientific and clinical opportunity, enabling detection of not only diverse coding RNA variants but also non-coding RNAs. Moreover, scaling immunohistochemical detection to large tissue volumes has limitations due to high cost, limited renewability/availability, and restricted multiplexing capability of antibody labels. With the goal of versatile, high-content, and scalable molecular phenotyping of intact tissues, we developed a method using carbodiimide-based chemistry to stably retain RNAs in clarified tissue, coupled with amplification tools for multiplexed detection. The resulting technology enables robust measurement of activity-dependent transcriptional signatures, cell-identity markers, and diverse non-coding RNAs in rodent and human tissue volumes. The growing set of validated probes is deposited in an online resource for nucleating related developments from across the scientific community.

  10. Cellular-resolution connectomics: challenges of dense neural circuit reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal networks are high-dimensional graphs that are packed into three-dimensional nervous tissue at extremely high density. Comprehensively mapping these networks is therefore a major challenge. Although recent developments in volume electron microscopy imaging have made data acquisition feasible for circuits comprising a few hundreds to a few thousands of neurons, data analysis is massively lagging behind. The aim of this perspective is to summarize and quantify the challenges for data analysis in cellular-resolution connectomics and describe current solutions involving online crowd-sourcing and machine-learning approaches.

  11. Resolution scalable image coding with reversible cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Lorenzo; Milani, Simone; Cruz-Reyes, Carlos; Calvagno, Giancarlo

    2011-05-01

    In a resolution scalable image coding algorithm, a multiresolution representation of the data is often obtained using a linear filter bank. Reversible cellular automata have been recently proposed as simpler, nonlinear filter banks that produce a similar representation. The original image is decomposed into four subbands, such that one of them retains most of the features of the original image at a reduced scale. In this paper, we discuss the utilization of reversible cellular automata and arithmetic coding for scalable compression of binary and grayscale images. In the binary case, the proposed algorithm that uses simple local rules compares well with the JBIG compression standard, in particular for images where the foreground is made of a simple connected region. For complex images, more efficient local rules based upon the lifting principle have been designed. They provide compression performances very close to or even better than JBIG, depending upon the image characteristics. In the grayscale case, and in particular for smooth images such as depth maps, the proposed algorithm outperforms both the JBIG and the JPEG2000 standards under most coding conditions.

  12. Automated Classification of Usual Interstitial Pneumonia using Regional Volumetric Texture Analysis in High-Resolution CT

    PubMed Central

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Chin, Anne S.; Leung, Ann N.; Terrone, Donato; Bristow, Michael; Rosen, Glenn; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We propose a novel computational approach for the automated classification of classic versus atypical usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Materials and Methods 33 patients with UIP were enrolled in this study. They were classified as classic versus atypical UIP by a consensus of two thoracic radiologists with more than 15 years of experience using the American Thoracic Society evidence–based guidelines for CT diagnosis of UIP. Two cardiothoracic fellows with one year of subspecialty training provided independent readings. The system is based on regional characterization of the morphological tissue properties of lung using volumetric texture analysis of multiple detector CT images. A simple digital atlas with 36 lung subregions is used to locate texture properties, from which the responses of multi-directional Riesz wavelets are obtained. Machine learning is used to aggregate and to map the regional texture attributes to a simple score that can be used to stratify patients with UIP into classic and atypical subtypes. Results We compared the predictions based on regional volumetric texture analysis with the ground truth established by expert consensus. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the proposed score was estimated to be 0.81 using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with high specificity for classic UIP. The performance of our automated method was found to be similar to that of the two fellows and to the agreement between experienced chest radiologists reported in the literature. However, the errors of our method and the fellows occurred on different cases, which suggests that combining human and computerized evaluations may be synergistic. Conclusions Our results are encouraging and suggest that an automated system may be useful in routine clinical practice as a diagnostic aid for identifying patients with complex lung disease such as classic UIP, obviating the need for invasive surgical lung biopsy and its

  13. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey; Shipley, Frederick; Linder, Ashley; Plummer, George; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. Acquiring this data, however, is challenging because it is difficult to track and image individual neurons as an animal deforms its posture and moves many body lengths. Here, we present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s are recorded at 6 head-volumes/s using spinning disk confocal microscopy. At the same time, we record low magnification images of the animal to measure the animals behavior and track its head as it moves. We develop a time independent neuronal matching algorithm that uses non-rigid point set registration and machine learning to correctly match neurons across time. Using this method, we are able to observe calcium transients from up to 90 neurons for over 4 min and correlate the neural activity with the animal's behavior.

  14. Assessment of volumetric noise and resolution performance for linear and nonlinear CT reconstruction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu; Christianson, Olav; Wilson, Joshua M.; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: For nonlinear iterative image reconstructions (IR), the computed tomography (CT) noise and resolution properties can depend on the specific imaging conditions, such as lesion contrast and image noise level. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a reliable method to measure the noise and resolution properties under clinically relevant conditions. This study aimed to develop a robust methodology to measure the three-dimensional CT noise and resolution properties under such conditions and to provide guidelines to achieve desirable levels of accuracy and precision. Methods: The methodology was developed based on a previously reported CT image quality phantom. In this methodology, CT noise properties are measured in the uniform region of the phantom in terms of a task-based 3D noise-power spectrum (NPS{sub task}). The in-plane resolution properties are measured in terms of the task transfer function (TTF) by applying a radial edge technique to the rod inserts in the phantom. The z-direction resolution properties are measured from a supplemental phantom, also in terms of the TTF. To account for the possible nonlinearity of IR, the NPS{sub task} is measured with respect to the noise magnitude, and the TTF with respect to noise magnitude and edge contrast. To determine the accuracy and precision of the methodology, images of known noise and resolution properties were simulated. The NPS{sub task} and TTF were measured on the simulated images and compared to the truth, with criteria established to achieve NPS{sub task} and TTF measurements with <10% error. To demonstrate the utility of this methodology, measurements were performed on a commercial CT system using five dose levels, two slice thicknesses, and three reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 5, SAFIRE5). Results: To achieve NPS{sub task} measurements with <10% error, the

  15. Video-rate volumetric functional imaging of the brain at synaptic resolution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongwen; Sun, Wenzhi; Liang, Yajie; Kerlin, Aaron; Bierfeld, Jens; Seelig, Johannes D; Wilson, Daniel E; Scholl, Benjamin; Mohar, Boaz; Tanimoto, Masashi; Koyama, Minoru; Fitzpatrick, David; Orger, Michael B; Ji, Na

    2017-04-01

    Neurons and neural networks often extend hundreds of micrometers in three dimensions. Capturing the calcium transients associated with their activity requires volume imaging methods with subsecond temporal resolution. Such speed is a challenge for conventional two-photon laser-scanning microscopy, because it depends on serial focal scanning in 3D and indicators with limited brightness. Here we present an optical module that is easily integrated into standard two-photon laser-scanning microscopes to generate an axially elongated Bessel focus, which when scanned in 2D turns frame rate into volume rate. We demonstrated the power of this approach in enabling discoveries for neurobiology by imaging the calcium dynamics of volumes of neurons and synapses in fruit flies, zebrafish larvae, mice and ferrets in vivo. Calcium signals in objects as small as dendritic spines could be resolved at video rates, provided that the samples were sparsely labeled to limit overlap in their axially projected images.

  16. Localization-Based Super-Resolution Imaging of Cellular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows direct visualization of fluorescently tagged proteins within cells. However, the spatial resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopes is limited by diffraction to ~250 nm, prompting the development of super-resolution microscopy which offers resolution approaching the scale of single proteins, i.e., ~20 nm. Here, we describe protocols for single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging, using focal adhesion proteins as an example and employing either photoswitchable fluorophores or photoactivatable fluorescent proteins. These protocols should also be easily adaptable to imaging a broad array of macromolecular assemblies in cells whose components can be fluorescently tagged and assemble into high density structures. PMID:23868582

  17. Validation of the relative insensitivity of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan quality to gantry space resolution.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Cora, Stefania; Khan, Ehsan Ullah

    2016-12-14

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is an efficient form of radiotherapy used to deliver intensity-modulated radiotherapy beams. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative insensitivity of VMAT plan quality to gantry angle spacing (GS). Most previous VMAT planning and dosimetric work for GS resolution has been conducted for single arc VMAT. In this work, a quantitative comparison of dose-volume indices (DIs) was made for partial-, single- and double-arc VMAT plans optimized at 2°, 3° and 4° GS, representing a large variation in deliverable multileaf collimator segments. VMAT plans of six prostate cancer and six head-and-neck cancer patients were simulated for an Elekta SynergyS® Linac (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK), using the SmartArc™ module of Pinnacle³ TPS, (version 9.2, Philips Healthcare). All optimization techniques generated clinically acceptable VMAT plans, except for the single-arc for the head-and-neck cancer patients. Plan quality was assessed by comparing the DIs for the planning target volume, organs at risk and normal tissue. A GS of 2°, with finest resolution and consequently highest intensity modulation, was considered to be the reference, and this was compared with GS 3° and 4°. The differences between the majority of reference DIs and compared DIs were <2%. The metrics, such as treatment plan optimization time and pretreatment (phantom) dosimetric calculation time, supported the use of a GS of 4°. The ArcCHECK™ phantom-measured dosimetric agreement verifications resulted in a >95.0% passing rate, using the criteria for γ (3%, 3 mm). In conclusion, a GS of 4° is an optimal choice for minimal usage of planning resources without compromise of plan quality.

  18. Astroglia in Thick Tissue with Super Resolution and Cellular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sean J.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    We utilized the recently published method of passive CLARITY to explore brain astrocytes for the first time with our optimized method. Astrocytes are the fundamental cells in the brain that act to maintain the synaptic activity of neurons, support metabolism of all neurons, and communicate through extensive networks throughout the CNS. They are the defining cell that differentiates lower organisms from humans. From a disease vantage point they are the principal cause of brain tumors and the propagator of neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. New methods to study these cells is paramount. Our modified use of CLARITY provides a new way to study these brain cells. To reduce cost, speed up tissue clearing process, reduce human handling error, and to retrieve quantifiable data from single confocal and pseudo-super resolution microscopy we modified and optimized the original protocol. PMID:27494718

  19. Direct high-resolution label-free imaging of cellular nanostructure dynamics in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Chaejeong; Lee, Sohee; Lee, Si Young; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2013-06-01

    We report the application of an optical microscope equipped with a high-resolution dark-field condenser for detecting dynamic responses of cellular nanostructures in real time. Our system provides an easy-to-use technique to visualize biological specimens without any staining. This system can visualize the dynamic behavior of nanospheres and nanofibers, such as F-actin, at the leading edges of adjacent neuronal cells. We confirmed that the nanofibers imaged with this high-resolution optical microscopic technique are F-actin by using fluorescence microscopy after immunostaining the F-actin of fixed cells. Furthermore, cellular dynamics are enhanced by applying noncontact electric field stimulation through a transparent graphene electric field stimulator. High-resolution label-free optical microscopy enables the visualization of nanofiber dynamics initiated by filopodial nanofiber contacts. In conclusion, our optical microscopy system allows the visualization of nanoscale cellular dynamics under various external stimuli in real time without specific staining.

  20. High Resolution Quantification of Cellular Forces for Rigidity Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuaimin

    density of CUs decrease with time after spreading on stiff substrate. However addition of EGF dramatically increased local contraction activity such that about 30% of the total contractility was in the contraction units. This stimulatory effect was only observed on stiff substrate not on soft. Moreover, we find that in the early interactions of cells with rigid substrates that EGFR activity is needed for normal spreading and the assembly of local contraction units in media lacking serum and any soluble EGF. In Chapter 5, we performed high temporal- and spatial-resolution tracking of contractile forces exerted by cells on sub-micron elastomeric pillars. We found that actomyosin-based sarcomere-like CUs simultaneously moved opposing pillars in net steps of ˜2.5 nm, independent of rigidity. What correlated with rigidity was the number of steps taken to reach a force level that activated recruitment of alpha-actinin to the CUs. When we removed actomyosin restriction by depleting tropomyosin 2.1, we observed larger steps and higher forces that resulted in aberrant rigidity sensing and growth of non-transformed cells on soft matrices. Thus, we conclude that tropomyosin 2.1 acts as a suppressor of growth on soft matrices by supporting proper rigidity sensing.

  1. Super-Resolution Microscopy: Shedding Light on the Cellular Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-02-17

    Lipids and the membranes they form are fundamental building blocks of cellular life, and their geometry and chemical properties distinguish membranes from other cellular environments. Collective processes occurring within membranes strongly impact cellular behavior and biochemistry, and understanding these processes presents unique challenges due to the often complex and myriad interactions between membrane components. Super-resolution microscopy offers a significant gain in resolution over traditional optical microscopy, enabling the localization of individual molecules even in densely labeled samples and in cellular and tissue environments. These microscopy techniques have been used to examine the organization and dynamics of plasma membrane components, providing insight into the fundamental interactions that determine membrane functions. Here, we broadly introduce the structure and organization of the mammalian plasma membrane and review recent applications of super-resolution microscopy to the study of membranes. We then highlight some inherent challenges faced when using super-resolution microscopy to study membranes, and we discuss recent technical advancements that promise further improvements to super-resolution microscopy and its application to the plasma membrane.

  2. Cellular resolution multiplexed FLIM tomography with dual-color Bessel beam

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongli; Zhou, Weibin; Peng, Leilei

    2017-01-01

    Fourier multiplexed FLIM (FmFLIM) tomography enables multiplexed 3D lifetime imaging of whole embryos. In our previous FmFLIM system, the spatial resolution was limited to 25 μm because of the trade-off between the spatial resolution and the imaging depth. In order to achieve cellular resolution imaging of thick specimens, we built a tomography system with dual-color Bessel beam. In combination with FmFLIM, the Bessel FmFLIM tomography system can perform parallel 3D lifetime imaging on multiple excitation-emission channels at a cellular resolution of 2.8 μm. The image capability of the Bessel FmFLIM tomography system was demonstrated by 3D lifetime imaging of dual-labeled transgenic zebrafish embryos. PMID:28270968

  3. One-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in vivo for cellular level imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Dongyao; Liu, Xinyu; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Xiaojun; Sun, Ding; Luo, Yuemei; Gu, Jun; Shum, Ping; Liu, Linbo

    2015-03-01

    We developed a spectral domain OCT system combining two NIR, CW light sources of different spectral range. Its resolving power is validated by visualizing the cellular structures of zebra fish larvae in vivo. An NIR extended illumination from 755-1100 nm is achieved. The axial resolution is 1.27 μm in air, corresponding to 0.93μm in tissue (n=1.36), which is the highest axial resolution using NIR, CW laser sources up to date to the best of our knowledge. In vivo imaging is conducted to demonstrate the resolving power of proposed one-micron resolution OCT system. The top and bottom surfaces of individual disk-like red blood cell is reliably visualized, as well as flat, spindle shaped endothelial cells lining along the luminal surface of the blood vessel wall. This study provides a viable solution for cellular and subcellular level OCT imaging system which is also very competitive in cost.

  4. Cellular resolution functional imaging in behaving rats using voluntary head restraint

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Benjamin B.; Brody, Carlos D.; Tank, David W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY High-throughput operant conditioning systems for rodents provide efficient training on sophisticated behavioral tasks. Combining these systems with technologies for cellular resolution functional imaging would provide a powerful approach to study neural dynamics during behavior. Here we describe an integrated two-photon microscope and behavioral apparatus that allows cellular resolution functional imaging of cortical regions during epochs of voluntary head restraint. Rats were trained to initiate periods of restraint up to 8 seconds in duration, which provided the mechanical stability necessary for in vivo imaging while allowing free movement between behavioral trials. A mechanical registration system repositioned the head to within a few microns, allowing the same neuronal populations to be imaged on each trial. In proof-of-principle experiments, calcium dependent fluorescence transients were recorded from GCaMP-labeled cortical neurons. In contrast to previous methods for head restraint, this system can also be incorporated into high-throughput operant conditioning systems. PMID:24055015

  5. Sub-cellular resolution imaging with Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meemon, P.; Lee, K. S.; Murali, S.; Kaya, I.; Thompson, K. P.; Rolland, J. P.

    2010-02-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) utilizes a high NA microscope objective in the sample arm to achieve an axially and laterally high resolution OCT image. An increase in NA, however, leads to a dramatically decreased depth of focus (DOF), and hence shortens the imaging depth range so that high lateral resolution is maintained only within a small depth region around the focal plane. One solution to increase the depth of imaging while keeping a high lateral resolution is dynamic-focusing. Utilizing the voltage controlled refocus capability of a liquid lens, we have recently presented a solution for invariant high resolution imaging using the liquid lens embedded within a fixed optics hand-held custom microscope designed specifically for optical imaging systems using a broadband light source at 800 nm center wavelength. Subsequently, we have developed a Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy (GD-OCM) that utilizes the high speed imaging of spectral domain OCT, the high lateral resolution of OCM, and the ability of real time refocusing of our custom design variable focus objective. In this paper we demonstrate in detail how portions of the infocus cross-sectional images can be extracted and fused to form an invariant lateral resolution image with multiple crosssectional images acquired corresponding to a discrete refocusing step along depth enabled by the varifocal probe. We demonstrate sub-cellular resolution imaging of an African frog tadpole (Xenopus Laevis) taken from a 500 μm x 500 μm cross-section.

  6. Label-free imaging of cellular malformation using high resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongjiang; Li, Bingbing; Yang, Sihua

    2014-09-01

    A label-free high resolution photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system for imaging cellular malformation is presented. The carbon fibers were used to testify the lateral resolution of the PAM. Currently, the lateral resolution is better than 2.7 μm. The human normal red blood cells (RBCs) were used to prove the imaging capability of the system, and a single red blood cell was mapped with high contrast. Moreover, the iron deficiency anemia RBCs were clearly distinguished from the cell morphology by using the PAM. The experimental results demonstrate that the photoacoustic microscopy system can accomplish label-free photoacoustic imaging and that it has clinical potential for use in the detection of erythrocytes and blood vessels malformation.

  7. Aptamers provide superior stainings of cellular receptors studied under super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Höbartner, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Continuous improvements in imaging techniques are challenging biologists to search for more accurate methods to label cellular elements. This is particularly relevant for diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging, where the perceived resolution is affected by the size of the affinity probes. This is evident when antibodies, which are 10–15 nm in size, are used. Previously it has been suggested that RNA aptamers (~3 nm) can be used to detect cellular proteins under super-resolution imaging. However, a direct comparison between several aptamers and antibodies is needed, to clearly show the advantages and/or disadvantages of the different probes. Here we have conducted such a comparative study, by testing several aptamers and antibodies using stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). We have targeted three membrane receptors, EGFR, ErbB2 and Epha2, which are relevant to human health, and recycle between plasma membrane and intracellular organelles. Our results suggest that the aptamers can reveal more epitopes than most antibodies, thus providing a denser labeling of the stained structures. Moreover, this improves the overall quality of the information that can be extracted from the images. We conclude that aptamers could become useful fluorescent labeling tools for light microscopy and super-resolution imaging, and that their development for novel targets is imperative. PMID:28235049

  8. Three-dimensional super-resolution protein localization correlated with vitrified cellular context

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bei; Xue, Yanhong; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Yan; Fan, Chunyan; Gu, Lusheng; Zhang, Yongdeng; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Lei; Huang, Xiaojun; Ding, Wei; Sun, Fei; Ji, Wei; Xu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of cryogenic super-resolution correlative light and electron microscopy (csCLEM) to precisely determine the spatial relationship between proteins and their native cellular structures. Several fluorescent proteins (FPs) were found to be photoswitchable and emitted far more photons under our cryogenic imaging condition, resulting in higher localization precision which is comparable to ambient super-resolution imaging. Vitrified specimens were prepared by high pressure freezing and cryo-sectioning to maintain a near-native state with better fluorescence preservation. A 2-3-fold improvement of resolution over the recent reports was achieved due to the photon budget performance of screening out Dronpa and optimized imaging conditions, even with thin sections which is at a disadvantage when calculate the structure resolution from label density. We extended csCLEM to mammalian cells by introducing cryo-sectioning and observed good correlation of a mitochondrial protein with the mitochondrial outer membrane at nanometer resolution in three dimensions. PMID:26462878

  9. Building quantitative, three dimensional atlases of gene expression and morphology at cellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Animals comprise dynamic three-dimensional arrays of cells that express gene products in intricate spatial and temporal patterns that determine cellular differentiation and morphogenesis. A rigorous understanding of these developmental processes requires automated methods that quantitatively record and analyze complex morphologies and their associated patterns of gene expression at cellular resolution. Here we summarize light microscopy based approaches to establish permanent, quantitative datasets—atlases—that record this information. We focus on experiments that capture data for whole embryos or large areas of tissue in three dimensions, often at multiple time points. We compare and contrast the advantages and limitations of different methods and highlight some of the discoveries made. We emphasize the need for interdisciplinary collaborations and integrated experimental pipelines that link sample preparation, image acquisition, image analysis, database design, visualization and quantitative analysis. PMID:24123936

  10. High-resolution Fiber-optic Microendoscopy for in situ Cellular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Mark; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Many biological and clinical studies require the longitudinal study and analysis of morphology and function with cellular level resolution. Traditionally, multiple experiments are run in parallel, with individual samples removed from the study at sequential time points for evaluation by light microscopy. Several intravital techniques have been developed, with confocal, multiphoton, and second harmonic microscopy all demonstrating their ability to be used for imaging in situ 1. With these systems, however, the required infrastructure is complex and expensive, involving scanning laser systems and complex light sources. Here we present a protocol for the design and assembly of a high-resolution microendoscope which can be built in a day using off-the-shelf components for under US$5,000. The platform offers flexibility in terms of image resolution, field-of-view, and operating wavelength, and we describe how these parameters can be easily modified to meet the specific needs of the end user. We and others have explored the use of the high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) in in vitro cell culture 2-5, in excised 6 and living animal tissues 2,5, and in human tissues in vivo 2,7. Users have reported the use of several different fluorescent contrast agents, including proflavine 2-4, benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA) 5, and fluoroscein 6,7, all of which have received full, or investigational approval from the FDA for use in human subjects. High-resolution microendoscopy, in the form described here, may appeal to a wide range of researchers working in the basic and clinical sciences. The technique offers an effective and economical approach which complements traditional benchtop microscopy, by enabling the user to perform high-resolution, longitudinal imaging in situ. PMID:21248707

  11. Spatial Mapping of Lipids at Cellular Resolution in Embryos of Cotton[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick J.; Korte, Andrew R.; Neogi, Purnima B.; Love, Ebony; Fuchs, Johannes; Strupat, Kerstin; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Shulaev, Vladimir; Lee, Young-Jin; Chapman, Kent D.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have made comprehensive lipidomics analysis of complex tissues relatively commonplace. These compositional analyses, although able to resolve hundreds of molecular species of lipids in single extracts, lose the original cellular context from which these lipids are derived. Recently, high-resolution MS of individual lipid droplets from seed tissues indicated organelle-to-organelle variation in lipid composition, suggesting that heterogeneity of lipid distributions at the cellular level may be prevalent. Here, we employed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–MS imaging (MALDI-MSI) approaches to visualize lipid species directly in seed tissues of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). MS imaging of cryosections of mature cotton embryos revealed a distinct, heterogeneous distribution of molecular species of triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines, the major storage and membrane lipid classes in cotton embryos. Other lipids were imaged, including phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidic acids, sterols, and gossypol, indicating the broad range of metabolites and applications for this chemical visualization approach. We conclude that comprehensive lipidomics images generated by MALDI-MSI report accurate, relative amounts of lipid species in plant tissues and reveal previously unseen differences in spatial distributions providing for a new level of understanding in cellular biochemistry. PMID:22337917

  12. Investigating spatial and volumetric trends in silicic volcanism along the Yellowstone hotspot track using high-resolution thermomechanical numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, D.; Bindeman, I. N.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Roughly 2 Ma gaps exist between the Picabo and Heise (from ~8.4 to 6.6Ma) and the Heise and Yellowstone (4.40 to 2.1 Ma) centers along the Yellowstone hotspot track, each of which experienced magmatic activity for several million years. We employ high-resolution magmatic-thermomechanical models of the interaction between a mantle plume and thick continental crust to investigate the causes of the spatial and temporal jumps that occur between these eruptive centers, using a stress implementation of magmatic processes, nonlinear temperature-dependent melting, and progressive depletion the rocks from which magmas are extracted. We investigate two possible mechanisms of these jumps in active centers. First, the spacing between eruptive centers is a function of the longevity of amagma conduit in beneath each eruptive center, which must be abandoned when the crust moves too far away from the center of the hotspot, with the distance traveled by the plate in this time determining the spacing between eruptive centers. Alternatively, the cessation of activity at a given eruptive center is controlled by the formation of geochemically depleted "dead zones" which force any new silicic volcanism to occur in a new area of less depleted crust, with the spacing between centers controlled by the size of these dead zones. By varying the speed of the crust over the hotspot, the thickness and composition of the crust, we can determine the relative importance of these two processes for volcanism along the Yellowstone hotspot track has likely changed over time, with implications for changes in average eruptive volumes and repose times between large eruptions over the last 12 Ma. Early results suggest that heating of the crust causes areas of melt accumulation to move upward with time before resetting to a deeper level as the crust moves over the hotspot, a possible additional source of discrete behavior along the hotspot track. We check our results using existing geochemical constraints.

  13. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    PubMed Central

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  14. The functional micro-organization of grid cells revealed by cellular-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Heys, James G; Rangarajan, Krsna V; Dombeck, Daniel A

    2014-12-03

    Establishing how grid cells are anatomically arranged, on a microscopic scale, in relation to their firing patterns in the environment would facilitate a greater microcircuit-level understanding of the brain's representation of space. However, all previous grid cell recordings used electrode techniques that provide limited descriptions of fine-scale organization. We therefore developed a technique for cellular-resolution functional imaging of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) neurons in mice navigating a virtual linear track, enabling a new experimental approach to study MEC. Using these methods, we show that grid cells are physically clustered in MEC compared to nongrid cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that grid cells are functionally micro-organized: the similarity between the environment firing locations of grid cell pairs varies as a function of the distance between them according to a "Mexican hat"-shaped profile. This suggests that, on average, nearby grid cells have more similar spatial firing phases than those further apart.

  15. Multi-resolution 3D visualization of the early stages of cellular uptake of peptide-coated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Welsher, Kevin; Yang, Haw

    2014-02-23

    A detailed understanding of the cellular uptake process is essential to the development of cellular delivery strategies and to the study of viral trafficking. However, visualization of the entire process, encompassing the fast dynamics (local to the freely diffusing nanoparticle) as well the state of the larger-scale cellular environment, remains challenging. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional multi-resolution method to capture, in real time, the transient events leading to cellular binding and uptake of peptide (HIV1-Tat)-modified nanoparticles. Applying this new method to observe the landing of nanoparticles on the cellular contour in three dimensions revealed long-range deceleration of the delivery particle, possibly due to interactions with cellular receptors. Furthermore, by using the nanoparticle as a nanoscale ‘dynamics pen’, we discovered an unexpected correlation between small membrane terrain structures and local nanoparticle dynamics. This approach could help to reveal the hidden mechanistic steps in a variety of multiscale processes.

  16. Micropatterned silicone elastomer substrates for high resolution analysis of cellular force patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesa, Claudia M.; Kirchgeßner, Norbert; Mayer, Dirk; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    Cellular forces are closely related to many physiological processes, including cell migration, growth, division, and differentiation. Here, we describe newly developed techniques to measure these forces with high spatial resolution. Our approach is based on ultrasoft silicone elastomer films with a regular microstructure molded into the surface. Mechanical forces applied by living cells to such films result in elastomer deformation which can be quantified by video microscopy and digital image processing. From this deformation field forces can be calculated. Here we give detailed accounts of the following issues: (1) the preparation of silicon wafers as molds for the microstructures, (2) the fabrication of microstructured elastomer substrates, (3) the in-depth characterization of the mechanical properties of these elastomers, (4) the image processing algorithms for the extraction of cellular deformation fields, and (5) the generalized first moment tensor as a robust mathematical tool to characterize whole cell activity. We present prototype experiments on living myocytes as well as on cardiac fibroblasts and discuss the characteristics and performance of our force measurement technique.

  17. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy detects pigmentary changes in melasma at a cellular level resolution.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Young; Bahadoran, Philippe; Suzuki, Itaru; Zugaj, Didier; Khemis, Abdallah; Passeron, Thierry; Andres, Philippe; Ortonne, Jean-Paul

    2010-08-01

    Melasma is a frequent pigmentary disorder caused by abnormal melanin deposits in the skin. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a repetitive imaging tool that provides real-time images of the skin at nearly histological resolution. As melanin is the strongest endogenous contrast in human skin, pigmentary disorders are the most suitable candidates for RCM examination but RCM features of melasma have never been reported. This study investigates the pilot use of RCM in melasma to provide a set of well-described morphological criteria with histological correlations. RCM images were acquired from melasma skin and compared to adjacent control skin in 26 patients. Skin biopsies were obtained from eight patients. In the epidermis, RCM showed in all patients a significant increase in hyperrefractile cobblestoning cells. These cells corresponded to hyperpigmented basal keratinocytes in histology. In six patients, dendritic cells corresponding to activated melanocytes were also found in the epidermis. In the dermis, RCM identified in nine patients plump bright cells corresponding to melanophages. Interestingly, for a given patient, the topographic distribution of melanophages in melasma lesions was very heterogeneous. RCM also showed a significant increase in solar elastosis and blood vessels in the dermis. RCM is a non-invasive technique that detects pigmentary changes in melasma at a cellular level resolution. Therefore, RCM provides an innovative way to classify melasma by pigment changes.

  18. An Adaptive Control Method for Ros-Drill Cellular Microinjector with Low-Resolution Encoder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Olgac, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    A novel control methodology which uses a low-resolution encoder is presented for a cellular microinjection technology called the Ros-Drill (rotationally oscillating drill). It is developed primarily for ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) operations, with the objective of generating a desired oscillatory motion at the tip of a micro glass pipette. It is an inexpensive setup, which creates high-frequency (higher than 500 Hz) and small-amplitude (around 0.2 deg) rotational oscillations at the tip of an injection pipette. These rotational oscillations enable the pipette to drill into cell membranes with minimum biological damage. Such a motion control procedure presents no particular difficulty when it uses sufficiently precise motion sensors. However, size, costs, and accessibility of technology to the hardware components severely constrain the sensory capabilities. Consequently, the control mission and the trajectory tracking are adversely affected. This paper presents two contributions: (a) a dedicated novel adaptive feedback control method to achieve a satisfactory trajectory tracking capability. We demonstrate via experiments that the tracking of the harmonic rotational motion is achieved with desirable fidelity; (b) some important analytical features and related observations associated with the controlled harmonic motion which is created by the low-resolution feedback control structure. PMID:27006914

  19. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) functionalized carbon nano-onions for high resolution cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmess, Juergen; de Luca, Elisa; Signorelli, Angelo; Baldrighi, Michele; Becce, Michele; Brescia, Rosaria; Nardone, Valentina; Parisini, Emilio; Echegoyen, Luis; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Giordani, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical studies due to their low toxicity, efficient cellular uptake and low fluorescence quenching of attached probes.Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical

  20. High resolution simulations of energy absorption in dynamically loaded cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Eakins, D. E.; McShane, G.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular materials have potential application as absorbers of energy generated by high velocity impact. CTH, a Sandia National Laboratories Code which allows very severe strains to be simulated, has been used to perform very high resolution simulations showing the dynamic crushing of a series of two-dimensional, stainless steel metal structures with varying architectures. The structures are positioned to provide a cushion between a solid stainless steel flyer plate with velocities ranging from 300 to 900 m/s, and an initially stationary stainless steel target. Each of the alternative architectures under consideration was formed by an array of identical cells each of which had a constant volume and a constant density. The resolution of the simulations was maximised by choosing a configuration in which one-dimensional conditions persisted for the full period over which the specimen densified, a condition which is most readily met by impacting high density specimens at high velocity. It was found that the total plastic flow and, therefore, the irreversible energy dissipated in the fully densified energy absorbing cell, increase (a) as the structure becomes more rodlike and less platelike and (b) as the impact velocity increases. Sequential CTH images of the deformation processes show that the flow of the cell material may be broadly divided into macroscopic flow perpendicular to the compression direction and jetting-type processes (microkinetic flow) which tend to predominate in rod and rodlike configurations and also tend to play an increasing role at increased strain rates. A very simple analysis of a configuration in which a solid flyer impacts a solid target provides a baseline against which to compare and explain features seen in the simulations. The work provides a basis for the development of energy absorbing structures for application in the 200-1000 m/s impact regime.

  1. High resolution simulations of energy absorption in dynamically loaded cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Eakins, D. E.; McShane, G.

    2017-03-01

    Cellular materials have potential application as absorbers of energy generated by high velocity impact. CTH, a Sandia National Laboratories Code which allows very severe strains to be simulated, has been used to perform very high resolution simulations showing the dynamic crushing of a series of two-dimensional, stainless steel metal structures with varying architectures. The structures are positioned to provide a cushion between a solid stainless steel flyer plate with velocities ranging from 300 to 900 m/s, and an initially stationary stainless steel target. Each of the alternative architectures under consideration was formed by an array of identical cells each of which had a constant volume and a constant density. The resolution of the simulations was maximised by choosing a configuration in which one-dimensional conditions persisted for the full period over which the specimen densified, a condition which is most readily met by impacting high density specimens at high velocity. It was found that the total plastic flow and, therefore, the irreversible energy dissipated in the fully densified energy absorbing cell, increase (a) as the structure becomes more rodlike and less platelike and (b) as the impact velocity increases. Sequential CTH images of the deformation processes show that the flow of the cell material may be broadly divided into macroscopic flow perpendicular to the compression direction and jetting-type processes (microkinetic flow) which tend to predominate in rod and rodlike configurations and also tend to play an increasing role at increased strain rates. A very simple analysis of a configuration in which a solid flyer impacts a solid target provides a baseline against which to compare and explain features seen in the simulations. The work provides a basis for the development of energy absorbing structures for application in the 200-1000 m/s impact regime.

  2. Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Matus N.; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

    2014-11-18

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  3. High-resolution CMOS MEA platform to study neurons at subcellular, cellular, and network levels.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jan; Ballini, Marco; Livi, Paolo; Chen, Yihui; Radivojevic, Milos; Shadmani, Amir; Viswam, Vijay; Jones, Ian L; Fiscella, Michele; Diggelmann, Roland; Stettler, Alexander; Frey, Urs; Bakkum, Douglas J; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-07-07

    Studies on information processing and learning properties of neuronal networks would benefit from simultaneous and parallel access to the activity of a large fraction of all neurons in such networks. Here, we present a CMOS-based device, capable of simultaneously recording the electrical activity of over a thousand cells in in vitro neuronal networks. The device provides sufficiently high spatiotemporal resolution to enable, at the same time, access to neuronal preparations on subcellular, cellular, and network level. The key feature is a rapidly reconfigurable array of 26 400 microelectrodes arranged at low pitch (17.5 μm) within a large overall sensing area (3.85 × 2.10 mm(2)). An arbitrary subset of the electrodes can be simultaneously connected to 1024 low-noise readout channels as well as 32 stimulation units. Each electrode or electrode subset can be used to electrically stimulate or record the signals of virtually any neuron on the array. We demonstrate the applicability and potential of this device for various different experimental paradigms: large-scale recordings from whole networks of neurons as well as investigations of axonal properties of individual neurons.

  4. Functional clustering of neurons in motor cortex determined by cellular resolution imaging in awake behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Dombeck, Daniel A.; Graziano, Michael S.; Tank, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Macroscopic (millimeter scale) functional clustering is a hallmark characteristic of motor cortex spatial organization in awake behaving mammals; however, almost no information is known about the functional micro-organization (~100 microns scale). Here, we optically recorded intracellular calcium transients of layer 2/3 neurons with cellular resolution over ~200 micron diameter fields in the forelimb motor cortex of mobile, head-restrained mice during two distinct movements (running and grooming). We showed that the temporal correlation between neurons was statistically larger the closer the neurons were to each other. We further explored this correlation by using two separate methods to spatially segment the neurons within each imaging field: K-means clustering and correlations between single neuron activity and mouse movements. The two methods segmented the neurons similarly and led to the conclusion that the origin of the inverse relationship between correlation and distance seen statistically was two-fold: clusters of highly temporally correlated neurons were often spatially distinct from one another and (even when the clusters were spatially intermingled) within the clusters, the more correlated the neurons were to each other, the shorter the distance between them. Our results represent a direct observation of functional clustering within the micro-circuitry of the awake mouse motor cortex. PMID:19889987

  5. The functional micro-organization of grid cells revealed by cellular-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heys, James G.; Rangarajan, Krsna V.; Dombeck, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Establishing how grid cells are anatomically arranged, on a microscopic scale, in relation to their firing patterns in the environment would facilitate a greater micro-circuit level understanding of the brain’s representation of space. However, all previous grid cell recordings used electrode techniques that provide limited descriptions of fine-scale organization. We therefore developed a technique for cellular-resolution functional imaging of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) neurons in mice navigating a virtual linear track, enabling a new experimental approach to study MEC. Using these methods, we show that grid cells are physically clustered in MEC compared to non-grid cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that grid cells are functionally micro-organized: The similarity between the environment firing locations of grid cell pairs varies as a function of the distance between them according to a “Mexican Hat” shaped profile. This suggests that, on average, nearby grid cells have more similar spatial firing phases than those further apart. PMID:25467986

  6. Cellular resolution models for even skipped regulation in the entire Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Ilsley, Garth R; Fisher, Jasmin; Apweiler, Rolf; DePace, Angela H; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional control ensures genes are expressed in the right amounts at the correct times and locations. Understanding quantitatively how regulatory systems convert input signals to appropriate outputs remains a challenge. For the first time, we successfully model even skipped (eve) stripes 2 and 3+7 across the entire fly embryo at cellular resolution. A straightforward statistical relationship explains how transcription factor (TF) concentrations define eve’s complex spatial expression, without the need for pairwise interactions or cross-regulatory dynamics. Simulating thousands of TF combinations, we recover known regulators and suggest new candidates. Finally, we accurately predict the intricate effects of perturbations including TF mutations and misexpression. Our approach imposes minimal assumptions about regulatory function; instead we infer underlying mechanisms from models that best fit the data, like the lack of TF-specific thresholds and the positional value of homotypic interactions. Our study provides a general and quantitative method for elucidating the regulation of diverse biological systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00522.001 PMID:23930223

  7. Cellular resolution models for even skipped regulation in the entire Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Ilsley, Garth R; Fisher, Jasmin; Apweiler, Rolf; De Pace, Angela H; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2013-08-06

    Transcriptional control ensures genes are expressed in the right amounts at the correct times and locations. Understanding quantitatively how regulatory systems convert input signals to appropriate outputs remains a challenge. For the first time, we successfully model even skipped (eve) stripes 2 and 3+7 across the entire fly embryo at cellular resolution. A straightforward statistical relationship explains how transcription factor (TF) concentrations define eve's complex spatial expression, without the need for pairwise interactions or cross-regulatory dynamics. Simulating thousands of TF combinations, we recover known regulators and suggest new candidates. Finally, we accurately predict the intricate effects of perturbations including TF mutations and misexpression. Our approach imposes minimal assumptions about regulatory function; instead we infer underlying mechanisms from models that best fit the data, like the lack of TF-specific thresholds and the positional value of homotypic interactions. Our study provides a general and quantitative method for elucidating the regulation of diverse biological systems. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00522.001.

  8. Multi-resolution 3D visualization of the early stages of cellular uptake of peptide-coated nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Welsher, Kevin; Yang, Haw

    2014-02-23

    A detailed understanding of the cellular uptake process is essential to the development of cellular delivery strategies and to the study of viral trafficking. However, visualization of the entire process, encompassing the fast dynamics (local to the freely diffusing nanoparticle) as well the state of the larger-scale cellular environment, remains challenging. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional multi-resolution method to capture, in real time, the transient events leading to cellular binding and uptake of peptide (HIV1-Tat)-modified nanoparticles. Applying this new method to observe the landing of nanoparticles on the cellular contour in three dimensions revealed long-range deceleration of the delivery particle,more » possibly due to interactions with cellular receptors. Furthermore, by using the nanoparticle as a nanoscale ‘dynamics pen’, we discovered an unexpected correlation between small membrane terrain structures and local nanoparticle dynamics. This approach could help to reveal the hidden mechanistic steps in a variety of multiscale processes.« less

  9. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  10. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  11. Slow Growing Volumetric Subdivision for 3D Volumetric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, V; Kahn, S; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C; Porter, F; Wargelin, B

    2004-12-16

    In recent years subdivision methods have been successfully applied to the multi-resolution representation and compression of surface meshes. Unfortunately their use in the volumetric case has remained impractical because of the use of tensor-product generalizations that induce an excessive growth of the mesh size before sufficient number is preformed. This technical sketch presents a new subdivision technique that refines volumetric (and higher-dimensional) meshes at the same rate of surface meshes. The scheme builds adaptive refinements of a mesh without using special decompositions of the cells connecting different levels of resolution. Lower dimensional ''sharp'' features are also handled directly in a natural way. The averaging rules allow to reproduce the same smoothness of the two best known previous tensor product refinement methods.

  12. Three-dimensional morphology and gene expression in the Drosophila blastoderm at cellular resolution I: data acquisition pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Keränen, Soile VE; Fowlkes, Charless C; Simirenko, Lisa; Weber, Gunther H; DePace, Angela H; Henriquez, Clara; Kaszuba, David W; Hamann, Bernd; Eisen, Michael B; Malik, Jitendra; Sudar, Damir; Biggin, Mark D; Knowles, David W

    2006-01-01

    Background To model and thoroughly understand animal transcription networks, it is essential to derive accurate spatial and temporal descriptions of developing gene expression patterns with cellular resolution. Results Here we describe a suite of methods that provide the first quantitative three-dimensional description of gene expression and morphology at cellular resolution in whole embryos. A database containing information derived from 1,282 embryos is released that describes the mRNA expression of 22 genes at multiple time points in the Drosophila blastoderm. We demonstrate that our methods are sufficiently accurate to detect previously undescribed features of morphology and gene expression. The cellular blastoderm is shown to have an intricate morphology of nuclear density patterns and apical/basal displacements that correlate with later well-known morphological features. Pair rule gene expression stripes, generally considered to specify patterning only along the anterior/posterior body axis, are shown to have complex changes in stripe location, stripe curvature, and expression level along the dorsal/ventral axis. Pair rule genes are also found to not always maintain the same register to each other. Conclusion The application of these quantitative methods to other developmental systems will likely reveal many other previously unknown features and provide a more rigorous understanding of developmental regulatory networks. PMID:17184546

  13. The Limit of Resolution and Detectability of the ArcCHECK QA Phantom in small field Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Quality Assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Tara

    Purpose: To determine the limit of detectability and resolution of the ArcCheck QA Phantom (Sun Nuclear, Inc.) for quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery procedures when used in small field sizes. Methods: Eight different square field sizes (0.6x0.6, 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 5x5, 7x7, 10x10, 15x15 cm2) were measured on the ArcCheck QA phantom at three different gantry angles: 0, 90, and 270 degrees, using a 6 MV beam at its maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a dose computed from a 200 MU beam from the Varian Edge linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) at the University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center. Four different types of errors were introduced into quality-assurance analysis procedures. Measured square field sizes were compared against the same measured square field sizes with induced collimator and MLC errors. Induced collimator errors were defined by an expansion of the jaw-defined field size by 1 mm on all axes, a collimator shift of 1 mm on the X2 and Y2 axes, a table shift by 1 mm vertically and longitudinally at 270 and 90 degrees and a table shift of 1mm laterally and longitudinally for angles of 0 and 180 degrees. MLC induced errors included the addition of one and subsequently two opposing MLC leaves in the center of each square field. Dose distributions for the normal square fields and square fields with induced errors were imported into SNC patient software (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in the form of DICOM RT dose files and measured dose distributions were compared between the normally measured square fields and fields containing induced errors. Percent pass rates were computed using gamma analysis criteria of 2 mm/2% with a threshold value of 20%. Point dose ratios were also analyzed for fields with induced MLC errors and output factors were calculated in order to determine the magnitude of the effect that these induced errors had on output measurements as compared with the ability of

  14. A novel optical microscope for imaging large embryos and tissue volumes with sub-cellular resolution throughout

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Gail; Trägårdh, Johanna; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Reid, Es; Amos, William Bradshaw

    2016-01-01

    Current optical microscope objectives of low magnification have low numerical aperture and therefore have too little depth resolution and discrimination to perform well in confocal and nonlinear microscopy. This is a serious limitation in important areas, including the phenotypic screening of human genes in transgenic mice by study of embryos undergoing advanced organogenesis. We have built an optical lens system for 3D imaging of objects up to 6 mm wide and 3 mm thick with depth resolution of only a few microns instead of the tens of microns currently attained, allowing sub-cellular detail to be resolved throughout the volume. We present this lens, called the Mesolens, with performance data and images from biological specimens including confocal images of whole fixed and intact fluorescently-stained 12.5-day old mouse embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18659.001 PMID:27661778

  15. Revealing the cellular localization of STAT1 during the cell cycle by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2015-03-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) can transduce cytokine signals and regulate gene expression. The cellular localization and nuclear trafficking of STAT1, a representative of the STAT family with multiple transcriptional functions, is tightly related with transcription process, which usually happens in the interphase of the cell cycle. However, these priority questions regarding STAT1 distribution and localization at the different cell-cycle stages remain unclear. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we found that the nuclear expression level of STAT1 increased gradually as the cell cycle carried out, especially after EGF stimulation. Furthermore, STAT1 formed clusters in the whole cell during the cell cycle, with the size and the number of clusters also increasing significantly from G1 to G2 phase, suggesting that transcription and other cell-cycle related activities can promote STAT1 to form more and larger clusters for fast response to signals. Our work reveals that the cellular localization and clustering distribution of STAT1 are associated with the cell cycle, and further provides an insight into the mechanism of cell-cycle regulated STAT1 signal transduction.

  16. Cellular resolution circuit mapping with temporal-focused excitation of soma-targeted channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher A; Elyada, Yishai M; Parra, Andres; Bolton, M McLean

    2016-01-01

    We describe refinements in optogenetic methods for circuit mapping that enable measurements of functional synaptic connectivity with single-neuron resolution. By expanding a two-photon beam in the imaging plane using the temporal focusing method and restricting channelrhodopsin to the soma and proximal dendrites, we are able to reliably evoke action potentials in individual neurons, verify spike generation with GCaMP6s, and determine the presence or absence of synaptic connections with patch-clamp electrophysiological recording. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14193.001 PMID:27525487

  17. In vivo near-realtime volumetric optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a high-repetition-rate nanosecond fiber-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Shao, Peng; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is capable of achieving optical-absorption-contrast images with micron-scale spatial resolution. Previous OR-PAM systems have been frame-rate limited by mechanical scanning speeds and laser pulse repetition rate (PRR). We demonstrate OR-PAM imaging using a diode-pumped nanosecond-pulsed Ytterbium-doped 532-nm fiber laser with PRR up to 600 kHz. Combined with fast-scanning mirrors, our proposed system provides C-scan and 3D images with acquisition frame rate of 4 frames per second (fps) or higher, two orders of magnitude faster than previously published systems. High-contrast images of capillary-scale microvasculature in a live Swiss Webster mouse ear with ~6-μm optical lateral spatial resolution are demonstrated.

  18. Cellular resolution optical access to brain regions in fissures: imaging medial prefrontal cortex and grid cells in entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Low, Ryan J; Gu, Yi; Tank, David W

    2014-12-30

    In vivo two-photon microscopy provides the foundation for an array of powerful techniques for optically measuring and perturbing neural circuits. However, challenging tissue properties and geometry have prevented high-resolution optical access to regions situated within deep fissures. These regions include the medial prefrontal and medial entorhinal cortex (mPFC and MEC), which are of broad scientific and clinical interest. Here, we present a method for in vivo, subcellular resolution optical access to the mPFC and MEC using microprisms inserted into the fissures. We chronically imaged the mPFC and MEC in mice running on a spherical treadmill, using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy and genetically encoded calcium indicators to measure network activity. In the MEC, we imaged grid cells, a widely studied cell type essential to memory and spatial information processing. These cells exhibited spatially modulated activity during navigation in a virtual reality environment. This method should be extendable to other brain regions situated within deep fissures, and opens up these regions for study at cellular resolution in behaving animals using a rapidly expanding palette of optical tools for perturbing and measuring network structure and function.

  19. Functional imaging with cellular resolution reveals precise micro-architecture in visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Kenichi; Chung, Sooyoung; Ch'ng, Yeang H.; Kara, Prakash; Reid, R. Clay

    2005-02-01

    Neurons in the cerebral cortex are organized into anatomical columns, with ensembles of cells arranged from the surface to the white matter. Within a column, neurons often share functional properties, such as selectivity for stimulus orientation; columns with distinct properties, such as different preferred orientations, tile the cortical surface in orderly patterns. This functional architecture was discovered with the relatively sparse sampling of microelectrode recordings. Optical imaging of membrane voltage or metabolic activity elucidated the overall geometry of functional maps, but is averaged over many cells (resolution >100µm). Consequently, the purity of functional domains and the precision of the borders between them could not be resolved. Here, we labelled thousands of neurons of the visual cortex with a calcium-sensitive indicator in vivo. We then imaged the activity of neuronal populations at single-cell resolution with two-photon microscopy up to a depth of 400µm. In rat primary visual cortex, neurons had robust orientation selectivity but there was no discernible local structure; neighbouring neurons often responded to different orientations. In area 18 of cat visual cortex, functional maps were organized at a fine scale. Neurons with opposite preferences for stimulus direction were segregated with extraordinary spatial precision in three dimensions, with columnar borders one to two cells wide. These results indicate that cortical maps can be built with single-cell precision.

  20. Fully automated cellular-resolution vertebrate screening platform with parallel animal processing

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Pardo-Martin, Carlos; Allalou, Amin; Wählby, Carolina; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The zebrafish larva is an optically-transparent vertebrate model with complex organs that is widely used to study genetics, developmental biology, and to model various human diseases. In this article, we present a set of novel technologies that significantly increase the throughput and capabilities of previously described vertebrate automated screening technology (VAST). We developed a robust multi-thread system that can simultaneously process multiple animals. System throughput is limited only by the image acquisition speed rather than by the fluidic or mechanical processes. We developed image recognition algorithms that fully automate manipulation of animals, including orienting and positioning regions of interest within the microscope’s field of view. We also identified the optimal capillary materials for high-resolution, distortion-free, low-background imaging of zebrafish larvae. PMID:22159032

  1. Single-view volumetric PIV via high-resolution scanning, isotropic voxel restructuring and 3D least-squares matching (3D-LSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, C.; Hess, D.; Kitzhofer, J.

    2013-02-01

    Scanning PIV as introduced by Brücker (1995 Exp. Fluids 19 255-63, 1996a Appl. Sci. Res. 56 157-79) has been successfully applied in the last 20 years to different flow problems where the frame rate was sufficient to ensure a ‘frozen’ field condition. The limited number of parallel planes however leads typically to an under-sampling in the scan direction in depth; therefore, the spatial resolution in depth is typically considerably lower than the spatial resolution in the plane of the laser sheet (depth resolution = scan shift Δz ≫ pixel unit in object space). In addition, a partial volume averaging effect due to the thickness of the light sheet must be taken into account. Herein, the method is further developed using a high-resolution scanning in combination with a Gaussian regression technique to achieve an isotropic representation of the tracer particles in a voxel-based volume reconstruction with cuboidal voxels. This eliminates the partial volume averaging effect due to light sheet thickness and leads to comparable spatial resolution of the particle field reconstructions in x-, y- and z-axes. In addition, advantage of voxel-based processing with estimations of translation, rotation and shear/strain is taken by using a 3D least-squares matching method, well suited for reconstruction of grey-level pattern fields. The method is discussed in this paper and used to investigate the ring vortex instability at Re = 2500 within a measurement volume of roughly 75 × 75 × 50 mm3 with a spatial resolution of 100 µm/voxel (750 × 750 × 500 voxel elements). The volume has been scanned with a number of 100 light sheets and scan rates of 10 kHz. The results show the growth of the Tsai-Widnall azimuthal instabilities accompanied with a precession of the axis of the vortex ring. Prior to breakdown, secondary instabilities evolve along the core with streamwise oriented striations. The front stagnation point's streamwise distance to the core starts to decrease while

  2. Sponge grade body fossil with cellular resolution dating 60 Myr before the Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zongjun; Zhu, Maoyan; Davidson, Eric H; Bottjer, David J; Zhao, Fangchen; Tafforeau, Paul

    2015-03-24

    An extraordinarily well preserved, 600-million-year (Myr)-old, three-dimensionally phosphatized fossil displaying multiple independent characters of modern adult sponges has been analyzed by SEM and synchrotron X-ray tomography. The fossilized animal (Eocyathispongia qiania gen. et sp. nov.) is slightly more than 1.2 mm wide and 1.1 mm tall, is composed of hundreds of thousands of cells, and has a gross structure consisting of three adjacent hollow tubes sharing a common base. The main tube is crowned with a large open funnel, and the others end in osculum-like openings to the exterior. The external surface is densely covered with flat tile-like cells closely resembling sponge pinacocytes, and this layer is punctuated with smaller pores. A dense patch of external structures that display the form of a lawn of sponge papillae has also survived. Within the main funnel, an area where features of the inner surface are preserved displays a regular pattern of uniform pits. Many of them are surrounded individually by distinct collars, mounted in a supporting reticulum. The possibility cannot be excluded that these pits are the remains of a field of choanocytes. The character set evinced by this specimen, ranging from general anatomy to cell type, uniquely indicates that this specimen is a fossil of probable poriferan affinity. So far, we have only this single specimen, and although its organized and complex cellular structure precludes any reasonable interpretation that its origin is abiogenic, confirmation that it is indeed a fossilized sponge will clearly require discovery of additional specimens.

  3. Sponge grade body fossil with cellular resolution dating 60 Myr before the Cambrian

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zongjun; Zhu, Maoyan; Davidson, Eric H.; Bottjer, David J.; Zhao, Fangchen; Tafforeau, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An extraordinarily well preserved, 600-million-year (Myr)-old, three-dimensionally phosphatized fossil displaying multiple independent characters of modern adult sponges has been analyzed by SEM and synchrotron X-ray tomography. The fossilized animal (Eocyathispongia qiania gen. et sp. nov.) is slightly more than 1.2 mm wide and 1.1 mm tall, is composed of hundreds of thousands of cells, and has a gross structure consisting of three adjacent hollow tubes sharing a common base. The main tube is crowned with a large open funnel, and the others end in osculum-like openings to the exterior. The external surface is densely covered with flat tile-like cells closely resembling sponge pinacocytes, and this layer is punctuated with smaller pores. A dense patch of external structures that display the form of a lawn of sponge papillae has also survived. Within the main funnel, an area where features of the inner surface are preserved displays a regular pattern of uniform pits. Many of them are surrounded individually by distinct collars, mounted in a supporting reticulum. The possibility cannot be excluded that these pits are the remains of a field of choanocytes. The character set evinced by this specimen, ranging from general anatomy to cell type, uniquely indicates that this specimen is a fossil of probable poriferan affinity. So far, we have only this single specimen, and although its organized and complex cellular structure precludes any reasonable interpretation that its origin is abiogenic, confirmation that it is indeed a fossilized sponge will clearly require discovery of additional specimens. PMID:25775601

  4. Fabrication and analysis of microfiber array platform for optogenetics with cellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Hong; Chou, Ming-Yi; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Lon A.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has emerged as a revolutionary technology especially for neuroscience and has advanced continuously over the past decade. Conventional approaches for patterned in vivo optical illumination have a limitation on the implanted device size and achievable spatio-temporal resolution. In this work, we developed a fabrication process for a microfiber array platform. Arrayed poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfibers were drawn from a polymer solution and packaged with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The exposed end face of a packaged microfiber was tuned to have a size corresponding to a single cell. To demonstrate its capability for single cell optogenetics, HEK293T cells expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) were cultured on the platform and excited with UV laser. We could then observe an elevation in the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations due to the influx of Ca2+ through the activated ChR2 into the cytosol. The statistical and simulation results indicate that the proposed microfiber array platform can be used for single cell optogenetic applications. PMID:27895984

  5. Sub-micrometer axial resolution OCT for in-vivo imaging of the cellular structure of healthy and keratoconic human corneas

    PubMed Central

    Bizheva, Kostadinka; Tan, Bingyao; MacLelan, Benjamin; Kralj, Olivera; Hajialamdari, Mojtaba; Hileeto, Denise; Sorbara, Luigina

    2017-01-01

    Corneal degenerative conditions such as keratoconus (KC) cause progressive damage to the anterior corneal tissue and eventually severely compromise visual acuity. The ability to visualize corneal tissue damage in-vivo at cellular or sub-cellular level at different stages of development of KC and other corneal diseases, can aid the early diagnostics as well as the development of more effective treatment approaches for various corneal pathologies, including keratoconus. Here, we present the optical design of an optical coherence tomography system that can achieve 0.95 µm axial resolution in biological tissue and provide test results for the system’s spatial resolution and sensitivity. Corneal images acquired in-vivo with this system from healthy and keratoconic human subjects reveal the cellular and sub-cellular structure of the corneal epithelium, as well as the normal and abnormal structure of the Bowman’s membrane and the anterior corneal stroma. PMID:28270986

  6. Volumetric structured illumination microscopy enabled by tunable focus lens (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Malik, Bilal; Olsovsky, Cory; Jo, Javier A.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a volumetric imaging method for biological tissue that is free of mechanically scanning components. The optical sectioning in the system is obtained by structured illumination microscopy (SIM) with the depth of focus being varied by the use of an electronic tunable-focus lens (ETL). The performance of the axial scanning mechanism was evaluated and characterized in conjunction with SIM to ensure volumetric images could be recorded and reconstructed without significant losses in optical section thickness and lateral resolution over the full desired scan range. It was demonstrated that sub-cellular image resolutions were obtainable in both microsphere films and in ex vivo oral mucosa, spanning multiple cell layers, without significant losses in image quality. The mechanism proposed here has the ability to be integrated into any wide-field microscopy system to convert it into a three-dimensional imaging platform without the need for axial scanning of the sample or imaging optics. The ability to axially scan independent of mechanical movement also provides the opportunity for the development of endoscopic systems which can create volumetric images of tissue in vivo.

  7. Mapping whole-brain activity with cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Paciscopi, Marco; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Frasconi, Paolo; Hyman, Bradley T.; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Mapping neuronal activity patterns across the whole brain with cellular resolution is a challenging task for state-of-the-art imaging methods. Indeed, despite a number of technological efforts, quantitative cellular-resolution activation maps of the whole brain have not yet been obtained. Many techniques are limited by coarse resolution or by a narrow field of view. High-throughput imaging methods, such as light sheet microscopy, can be used to image large specimens with high resolution and in reasonable times. However, the bottleneck is then moved from image acquisition to image analysis, since many TeraBytes of data have to be processed to extract meaningful information. Here, we present a full experimental pipeline to quantify neuronal activity in the entire mouse brain with cellular resolution, based on a combination of genetics, optics and computer science. We used a transgenic mouse strain (Arc-dVenus mouse) in which neurons which have been active in the last hours before brain fixation are fluorescently labelled. Samples were cleared with CLARITY and imaged with a custom-made confocal light sheet microscope. To perform an automatic localization of fluorescent cells on the large images produced, we used a novel computational approach called semantic deconvolution. The combined approach presented here allows quantifying the amount of Arc-expressing neurons throughout the whole mouse brain. When applied to cohorts of mice subject to different stimuli and/or environmental conditions, this method helps finding correlations in activity between different neuronal populations, opening the possibility to infer a sort of brain-wide 'functional connectivity' with cellular resolution.

  8. An effective assay for high cellular resolution time-lapse imaging of sensory placode formation and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The vertebrate peripheral nervous system contains sensory neurons that arise from ectodermal placodes. Placodal cells ingress to move inside the head to form sensory neurons of the cranial ganglia. To date, however, the process of placodal cell ingression and underlying cellular behavior are poorly understood as studies have relied upon static analyses on fixed tissues. Visualizing placodal cell behavior requires an ability to distinguish the surface ectoderm from the underlying mesenchyme. This necessitates high resolution imaging along the z-plane which is difficult to accomplish in whole embryos. To address this issue, we have developed an imaging system using cranial slices that allows direct visualization of placode formation. Results We demonstrate an effective imaging assay for capturing placode development at single cell resolution using chick embryonic tissue ex vivo. This provides the first time-lapse imaging of mitoses in the trigeminal placodal ectoderm, ingression, and intercellular contacts of placodal cells. Cell divisions with varied orientations were found in the placodal ectoderm all along the apical-basal axis. Placodal cells initially have short cytoplasmic processes during ingression as young neurons and mature over time to elaborate long axonal processes in the mesenchyme. Interestingly, the time-lapse imaging data reveal that these delaminating placodal neurons begin ingression early on from within the ectoderm, where they start to move and continue on to exit as individual or strings of neurons through common openings on the basal side of the epithelium. Furthermore, dynamic intercellular contacts are abundant among the delaminating placodal neurons, between these and the already delaminated cells, as well as among cells in the forming ganglion. Conclusions This new imaging assay provides a powerful method to analyze directly development of placode-derived sensory neurons and subsequent ganglia formation for the first time in

  9. Flexible Volumetric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Schlecht, Robin W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A flexible volumetric structure has a first spring that defines a three-dimensional volume and includes a serpentine structure elongatable and compressible along a length thereof. A second spring is coupled to at least one outboard edge region of the first spring. The second spring is a sheet-like structure capable of elongation along an in-plane dimension thereof. The second spring is oriented such that its in-plane dimension is aligned with the length of the first spring's serpentine structure.

  10. Ultrahigh resolution photoacoustic microscopy via transient absorption

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a novel, hybrid imaging modality, Transient Absorption Ultrasonic Microscopy (TAUM), which takes advantage of the optical nonlinearities afforded by transient absorption to achieve ultrahigh-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. The theoretical point spread function for TAUM is functionally equivalent to confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy, potentially enabling cellular/subcellular photoacoustic imaging. A prototype TAUM system was designed, built, and used to image a cross-section through several capillaries in the excised cheek pouch of a Syrian Hamster. The well-resolved capillaries in the TAUM image provided experimental evidence of the spatial resolution. These results suggest that TAUM has excellent potential for producing volumetric images with cellular/subcellular resolution in three dimensions deep inside living tissue. PMID:21258499

  11. JPEG2000 Part 10: volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkens, Peter; Brislawn, Christopher M.; Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Cornelis, Jan P.

    2003-11-01

    Recently, the JPEG2000 committee (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29/WG1) decided to start up a new standardization activity to support the encoding of volumetric and floating-point data sets: Part 10 - Coding Volumetric and Floating-point Data (JP3D). This future standard will support functionalities like resolution and quality scalability and region-of-interest coding, while exploiting the entropy in the additional third dimension to improve the rate-distortion performance. In this paper, we give an overview of the markets and application areas targeted by JP3D, the imposed requirements and the considered algorithms with a specific focus on the realization of the region-of-interest functionality.

  12. Dinuclear osmium(II) probes for high-resolution visualisation of cellular DNA structure using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; Hill, Christopher J; Su, Xiaodi; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Smythe, Carl; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-12-04

    Two dinuclear osmium polypyridyl complexes function as convenient, easy to handle TEM contrast agents and facilitate the high-resolution visualisation of intracellular structure, particularly sub-nuclear detail.

  13. VOLUMETRIC TANK TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the technical findings of an EPA study on volumetric tank testing. It describes the results of the EPA study, which evaluated the viability of volumetric tank tests as a means of detecting leaks in underground storage tanks. It explains the accuracy requi...

  14. VOLUMETRIC TANK TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the technical findings of an EPA study on volumetric tank testing. The results of this study, which evaluated the viability of volumetric tank tests as a means of detecting leaks in underground storage tanks, are described. Also, the accuracy requirements s...

  15. GPU-based computational adaptive optics for volumetric optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Han; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Untracht, Gavrielle R.; Zhang, Xihao; Adie, Steven G.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that measures reflectance from within biological tissues. Current higher-NA optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technologies with near cellular resolution have limitations on volumetric imaging capabilities due to the trade-offs between resolution vs. depth-of-field and sensitivity to aberrations. Such trade-offs can be addressed using computational adaptive optics (CAO), which corrects aberration computationally for all depths based on the complex optical field measured by OCT. However, due to the large size of datasets plus the computational complexity of CAO and OCT algorithms, it is a challenge to achieve high-resolution 3D-OCM reconstructions at speeds suitable for clinical and research OCM imaging. In recent years, real-time OCT reconstruction incorporating both dispersion and defocus correction has been achieved through parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). We add to these methods by implementing depth-dependent aberration correction for volumetric OCM using plane-by-plane phase deconvolution. Following both defocus and aberration correction, our reconstruction algorithm achieved depth-independent transverse resolution of 2.8 um, equal to the diffraction-limited focal plane resolution. We have translated the CAO algorithm to a CUDA code implementation and tested the speed of the software in real-time using two GPUs - NVIDIA Quadro K600 and Geforce TITAN Z. For a data volume containing 4096×256×256 voxels, our system's processing speed can keep up with the 60 kHz acquisition rate of the line-scan camera, and takes 1.09 seconds to simultaneously update the CAO correction for 3 en face planes at user-selectable depths.

  16. Fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for cellular resolution in vivo mouse retinal imaging: benefits and drawbacks of implementing adaptive optics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a very important imaging tool in ophthalmology research. By combing with Adaptive Optics (AO) technique, AO-SLO can correct for ocular aberrations resulting in cellular level resolution, allowing longitudinal studies of single cells morphology in the living eyes. The numerical aperture (NA) sets the optical resolution that can be achieve in the "classical" imaging systems. Mouse eye has more than twice NA of the human eye, thus offering theoretically higher resolution. However, in most SLO based imaging systems the imaging beam size at mouse pupil sets the NA of that instrument, while most of the AO-SLO systems use almost the full NA of the mouse eye. In this report, we first simulated the theoretical resolution that can be achieved in vivo for different imaging beam sizes (different NA), assumingtwo cases: no aberrations and aberrations based on published mouse ocular wavefront data. Then we imaged mouse retinas with our custom build SLO system using different beam sizes to compare these results with theory. Further experiments include comparison of the SLO and AO-SLO systems for imaging different type of fluorescently labeled cells (microglia, ganglion, photoreceptors, etc.). By comparing those results and taking into account systems complexity and ease of use, the benefits and drawbacks of two imaging systems will be discussed.

  17. Volumetric Stress-Strain Analysis of Optohydrodynamically Suspended Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Saha, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing investigations are exploring the biomechanical properties of isolated and suspended biological cells in pursuit of understanding single-cell mechanobiology. An optical tweezer with minimal applied laser power has positioned biologic cells at the geometric center of a microfluidic cross-junction, creating a novel optohydrodynamic trap. The resulting fluid flow environment facilitates unique multiaxial loading of single cells with site-specific normal and shear stresses resulting in a physical albeit extensional state. A recent two-dimensional analysis has explored the cytoskeletal strain response due to these fluid-induced stresses [Wilson and Kohles, 2010, “Two-Dimensional Modeling of Nanomechanical Stresses-Strains in Healthy and Diseased Single-Cells During Microfluidic Manipulation,” J Nanotechnol Eng Med, 1(2), p. 021005]. Results described a microfluidic environment having controlled nanometer and piconewton resolution. In this present study, computational fluid dynamics combined with multiphysics modeling has further characterized the applied fluid stress environment and the solid cellular strain response in three dimensions to accompany experimental cell stimulation. A volumetric stress-strain analysis was applied to representative living cell biomechanical data. The presented normal and shear stress surface maps will guide future microfluidic experiments as well as provide a framework for characterizing cytoskeletal structure influencing the stress to strain response. PMID:21186894

  18. Integral volumetric imaging using decentered elemental lenses.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shimpei; Kakeya, Hideki

    2012-11-05

    This paper proposes a high resolution integral imaging system using a lens array composed of non-uniform decentered elemental lenses. One of the problems of integral imaging is the trade-off relationship between the resolution and the number of views. When the number of views is small, motion parallax becomes strongly discrete to maintain the viewing angle. In order to overcome this trade-off, the proposed method uses the elemental lenses whose size is smaller than that of the elemental images. To keep the images generated by the elemental lenses at constant depth, the lens array is designed so that the optical centers of elemental lenses may be located in the centers of elemental images, not in the centers of elemental lenses. To compensate optical distortion, new image rendering algorithm is developed so that undistorted 3D image may be presented with a non-uniform lens array. The proposed design of lens array can be applied to integral volumetric imaging, where display panels are layered to show volumetric images in the scheme of integral imaging.

  19. Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, John; Jacobsen, Jerrold J.

    1996-12-01

    Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis is a visual library of techniques used in making volumetric measurements. This 40-minute VHS videotape is designed as a resource for introducing students to proper volumetric methods and procedures. The entire tape, or relevant segments of the tape, can also be used to review procedures used in subsequent experiments that rely on the traditional art of quantitative analysis laboratory practice. The techniques included are: Quantitative transfer of a solid with a weighing spoon Quantitative transfer of a solid with a finger held weighing bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a paper strap held bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a spatula Examples of common quantitative weighing errors Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to beaker to volumetric flask Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to volumetric flask Volumetric transfer pipet A complete acid-base titration Hand technique variations The conventional view of contemporary quantitative chemical measurement tends to focus on instrumental systems, computers, and robotics. In this view, the analyst is relegated to placing standards and samples on a tray. A robotic arm delivers a sample to the analysis center, while a computer controls the analysis conditions and records the results. In spite of this, it is rare to find an analysis process that does not rely on some aspect of more traditional quantitative analysis techniques, such as careful dilution to the mark of a volumetric flask. Figure 2. Transfer of a solid with a spatula. Clearly, errors in a classical step will affect the quality of the final analysis. Because of this, it is still important for students to master the key elements of the traditional art of quantitative chemical analysis laboratory practice. Some aspects of chemical analysis, like careful rinsing to insure quantitative transfer, are often an automated part of an instrumental process that must be understood by the

  20. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Syncytial-Type Cell Plates during Endosperm Cellularization Visualized by High Resolution Electron Tomography W⃞

    PubMed Central

    Otegui, Marisa S.; Mastronarde, David N.; Kang, Byung-Ho; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of syncytial-type cell plates in the endosperm of Arabidopsis has been analyzed at ∼6-nm resolution by means of dual-axis high-voltage electron tomography of high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted samples. Mini-phragmoplasts consisting of microtubule clusters assemble between sister and nonsister nuclei. Most Golgi-derived vesicles appear connected to these microtubules by two molecules that resemble kinesin-like motor proteins. These vesicles fuse with each other to form hourglass-shaped intermediates, which become wide (∼45 nm in diameter) tubules, the building blocks of wide tubular networks. New mini-phragmoplasts also are generated de novo around the margins of expanding wide tubular networks, giving rise to new foci of cell plate growth, which later become integrated into the main cell plate. Spiral-shaped rings of the dynamin-like protein ADL1A constrict but do not fission the wide tubules at irregular intervals. These rings appear to maintain the tubular geometry of the network. The wide tubular network matures into a convoluted fenestrated sheet in a process that involves increases of 45 and 130% in relative membrane surface area and volume, respectively. The proportionally larger increase in volume appears to reflect callose synthesis. Upon fusion with the parental plasma membrane, the convoluted fenestrated sheet is transformed into a planar fenestrated sheet. This transformation involves clathrin-coated vesicles that reduce the relative membrane surface area and volume by ∼70%. A ribosome-excluding matrix encompasses the cell plate membranes from the fusion of the first vesicles until the onset of the planar fenestrated sheet formation. We postulate that this matrix contains the molecules that mediate cell plate assembly. PMID:11549762

  1. Rapid mapping of volumetric errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.; Hale, L.; Yordy, D.

    1995-09-13

    This paper describes a relatively inexpensive, fast, and easy to execute approach to mapping the volumetric errors of a machine tool, coordinate measuring machine, or robot. An error map is used to characterize a machine or to improve its accuracy by compensating for the systematic errors. The method consists of three steps: (1) modeling the relationship between the volumetric error and the current state of the machine; (2) acquiring error data based on length measurements throughout the work volume; and (3) optimizing the model to the particular machine.

  2. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  3. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis. PMID:27683065

  4. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis.

  5. Volumetric Geophysical Retrievals in Precipitating Cloud Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, S. M.; North, K. W.; Jensen, M. P.; Kollias, P.; Williams, C. R.; Bharadwaj, N.; Fridlind, A. M.; Widener, K.; Giangrande, S.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud and climate modeling efforts focused around the Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) require the retrieval of high quality geophysical parameters pertinent to storm microphysical and dynamical properties. The installation of high resolution polarimetric X- and C-Band scanning radars have greatly enhanced measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plain site, however, the volumetric data collected by these sensors is only indirectly related to storm properties. This presentation will outline efforts towards creating a suite of model-like Value Added Products (VAPs) for MC3E derived using existing and new retrieval techniques. Particular focus will be on retrieval of storm dynamics, precipitation microphysics and rainfall accumulations from the scanning radar measurements. Algorithm details and verification efforts will be showcased as well as a timetable for data availability.

  6. Hierarchical band-target entropy minimization curve resolution and Pearson VII curve-fitting analysis of cellular protein infrared imaging spectra.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiyin; Chen, Kejia; Liang, Dayang; Chew, Wee

    2009-04-01

    A soft-modeling multivariate numerical approach that combines self-modeling curve resolution (SMCR) and mixed Lorentzian-Gaussian curve fitting was successfully implemented for the first time to elucidate spatially and spectroscopically resolved spectral information from infrared imaging data of oral mucosa cells. A novel variant form of the robust band-target entropy minimization (BTEM) SMCR technique, coined as hierarchical BTEM (hBTEM), was introduced to first cluster similar cellular infrared spectra using the unsupervised hierarchical leader-follower cluster analysis (LFCA) and subsequently apply BTEM to clustered subsets of data to reconstruct three protein secondary structure (PSS) pure component spectra-alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and ambiguous structures-that associate with spatially differentiated regions of the cell infrared image. The Pearson VII curve-fitting procedure, which approximates a mixed Lorentzian-Gaussian model for spectral band shape, was used to optimally curve fit the resolved amide I and II bands of various hBTEM reconstructed PSS pure component spectra. The optimized Pearson VII band-shape parameters and peak center positions serve as means to characterize amide bands of PSS spectra found in various cell locations and for approximating their actual amide I/II intensity ratios. The new hBTEM methodology can also be potentially applied to vibrational spectroscopic datasets with dynamic or spatial variations arising from chemical reactions, physical perturbations, pathological states, and the like.

  7. Volumetric imaging of fish locomotion.

    PubMed

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V; Troolin, Daniel R; Strand, Tyson E

    2011-10-23

    Fishes use multiple flexible fins in order to move and maintain stability in a complex fluid environment. We used a new approach, a volumetric velocimetry imaging system, to provide the first instantaneous three-dimensional views of wake structures as they are produced by freely swimming fishes. This new technology allowed us to demonstrate conclusively the linked ring vortex wake pattern that is produced by the symmetrical (homocercal) tail of fishes, and to visualize for the first time the three-dimensional vortex wake interaction between the dorsal and anal fins and the tail. We found that the dorsal and anal fin wakes were rapidly (within one tail beat) assimilated into the caudal fin vortex wake. These results show that volumetric imaging of biologically generated flow patterns can reveal new features of locomotor dynamics, and provides an avenue for future investigations of the diversity of fish swimming patterns and their hydrodynamic consequences.

  8. Volumetric direct nuclear pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.; Hohl, F.; Deyoung, R. J.; Williams, M. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A volumetric direct nuclear pumped laser was developed in which the gas is a mixture of He-3 and a minority gas from the group of argon, krypton, xenon, chlorine and fluorine. The mixture of He-3 and the minority gas produces lasing with a minority gas concentration of from 0.01 to 10 percent argon, 1 percent krypton, 0.01 to 5 percent xenon and small concentrations of chlorine or fluorine.

  9. PSF engineering in multifocus microscopy for increased depth volumetric imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Bassam; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Dahan, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Imaging and localizing single molecules with high accuracy in a 3D volume is a challenging task. Here we combine multifocal microscopy, a recently developed volumetric imaging technique, with point spread function engineering to achieve an increased depth for single molecule imaging. Applications in 3D single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging is shown over an axial depth of 4 µm as well as for the tracking of diffusing beads in a fluid environment over 8 µm. PMID:27231584

  10. Skuller: A volumetric shape registration algorithm for modeling skull deformities.

    PubMed

    Sahillioğlu, Yusuf; Kavan, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    We present an algorithm for volumetric registration of 3D solid shapes. In comparison to previous work on image based registration, our technique achieves higher efficiency by leveraging a template tetrahedral mesh. In contrast to point- and surface-based registration techniques, our method better captures volumetric nature of the data, such as bone thickness. We apply our algorithm to study pathological skull deformities caused by a particular condition, i.e., craniosynostosis. The input to our system is a pair of volumetric 3D shapes: a tetrahedral mesh and a voxelized object represented by a set of voxel cells segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans. Our general framework first performs a global registration and then launches a novel elastic registration process that uses as much volumetric information as possible while deforming the generic template tetrahedral mesh of a healthy human skull towards the underlying geometry of the voxel cells. Both data are high-resolution and differ by large non-rigid deformations. Our fully-automatic solution is fast and accurate, as compared with the state of the arts from the reconstruction and medical image registration fields. We use the resulting registration to match the ground-truth surfaces extracted from the medical data as well as to quantify the severity of the anatomical deformity.

  11. An automatic algorithm for detecting stent endothelialization from volumetric optical coherence tomography datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnema, Garret T.; O'Halloran Cardinal, Kristen; Williams, Stuart K.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2008-06-01

    Recent research has suggested that endothelialization of vascular stents is crucial to reducing the risk of late stent thrombosis. With a resolution of approximately 10 µm, optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be an appropriate imaging modality for visualizing the vascular response to a stent and measuring the percentage of struts covered with an anti-thrombogenic cellular lining. We developed an image analysis program to locate covered and uncovered stent struts in OCT images of tissue-engineered blood vessels. The struts were found by exploiting the highly reflective and shadowing characteristics of the metallic stent material. Coverage was evaluated by comparing the luminal surface with the depth of the strut reflection. Strut coverage calculations were compared to manual assessment of OCT images and epi-fluorescence analysis of the stented grafts. Based on the manual assessment, the strut identification algorithm operated with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 99%. The strut coverage algorithm was 81% sensitive and 96% specific. The present study indicates that the program can automatically determine percent cellular coverage from volumetric OCT datasets of blood vessel mimics. The program could potentially be extended to assessments of stent endothelialization in native stented arteries.

  12. Continuous volumetric imaging via an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Little, Justin P.; Yu, Yang; Lämmermann, Tim; Lin, Charles P.; Germain, Ronald N.; Cui, Meng

    2015-01-01

    In vivo imaging at high spatiotemporal resolution holds the key to the fundamental understanding of complex biological systems. Integrating an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a conventional two-photon fluorescence microscope, we achieved microsecond scale axial scanning, which enabled high-speed volumetric imaging. We applied this system to multicolor volumetric imaging of fast processes, including calcium dynamics in the cerebral cortex of behaving mice, and transient morphology changes and trafficking of immune cells. PMID:26167641

  13. Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.; Schwarz, Adam J.

    2000-03-01

    A comprehensive study of approaches to three-dimensional visualization by volumetric display systems This groundbreaking volume provides an unbiased and in-depth discussion on a broad range of volumetric three-dimensional display systems. It examines the history, development, design, and future of these displays, and considers their potential for application to key areas in which visualization plays a major role. Drawing substantially on material that was previously unpublished or available only in patent form, the authors establish the first comprehensive technical and mathematical formalization of the field, and examine a number of different volumetric architectures. System level design strategies are presented, from which proposals for the next generation of high-definition predictable volumetric systems are developed. To ensure that researchers will benefit from work already completed, they provide: * Descriptions of several recent volumetric display systems prepared from material supplied by the teams that created them * An abstract volumetric display system design paradigm * An historical summary of 90 years of development in volumetric display system technology * An assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of many of the systems proposed to date * A unified presentation of the underlying principles of volumetric display systems * A comprehensive bibliography Beautifully supplemented with 17 color plates that illustrate volumetric images and prototype displays, Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems is an indispensable resource for professionals in imaging systems development, scientific visualization, medical imaging, computer graphics, aerospace, military planning, and CAD/CAE.

  14. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance.

  15. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    PubMed

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  16. In vivo real-time volumetric synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten F.; Brandt, Andreas H.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological. This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° × 90° field-of-view was achieved. data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 × 32 elements 2-D phased array transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak-temporal-average intensity for parallel beam-forming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details perceivable in the beam-formed images. The comparison was against PB based on the in vivo data. The feedback from the domain experts indicates that volumetric SA images internal body structures with a better contrast resolution compared to PB at all positions in the entire imaged volume. Furthermore, the autocovariance of a homogeneous area in the in vivo SA data, had 23.5% smaller width at the half of its maximum value compared to PB.

  17. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  18. Volumetric apparel for visible female

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongke; Goh, Shuang R.; Kluenkaew, Orapan; Tang, Ming L.; Prakash, Edmond C.

    2000-03-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for apparel modeling based on voxel specifications that characterize control vertices and patch specifications. Our specification language is geared for robust apparel modeling by enforcing a strict control vertex coding via a combination of a static cross sectional slice and dynamic control polyhedron checking. Unlike most previous approach for apparel are not hard coded into the system. Instead we simply add suitable type definitions to the specification and define patterns to these types. We compile these specifications into a high performance volumetric apparel design system. Important components of our approach include efficient algorithms, for extraction of control vertices form slices of the volume and transformation of these vertices on sequences of such slices. Our system has been tested with the visible female system and we show a couple of examples generated using our approach.

  19. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot was constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors were found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  20. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  1. Volumetric Video Compression for Interactive Playback★

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Bong-Soo; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Siddavanahalli, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    We develop a volumetric video system which supports interactive browsing of compressed time-varying volumetric features (significant isosurfaces and interval volumes). Since the size of even one volumetric frame in a time-varying 3D data set is very large, transmission and on-line reconstruction are the main bottlenecks for interactive remote visualization of time-varying volume and surface data. We describe a compression scheme for encoding time-varying volumetric features in a unified way, which allows for on-line reconstruction and rendering. To increase the run-time decompression speed and compression ratio, we decompose the volume into small blocks and encode only the significant blocks that contribute to the isosurfaces and interval volumes. The results show that our compression scheme achieves high compression ratio with fast reconstruction, which is effective for client-side rendering of time-varying volumetric features. PMID:20072724

  2. Volumetric optoacoustic monitoring of endovenous laser treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehm, Thomas F.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Schaur, Peter; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is one of the most common medical conditions with reported prevalence estimates as high as 30% in the adult population. Although conservative management with compression therapy may improve the symptoms associated with CVI, healing often demands invasive procedures. Besides established surgical methods like vein stripping or bypassing, endovenous laser therapy (ELT) emerged as a promising novel treatment option during the last 15 years offering multiple advantages such as less pain and faster recovery. Much of the treatment success hereby depends on monitoring of the treatment progression using clinical imaging modalities such as Doppler ultrasound. The latter however do not provide sufficient contrast, spatial resolution and three-dimensional imaging capacity which is necessary for accurate online lesion assessment during treatment. As a consequence, incidence of recanalization, lack of vessel occlusion and collateral damage remains highly variable among patients. In this study, we examined the capacity of volumetric optoacoustic tomography (VOT) for real-time monitoring of ELT using an ex-vivo ox foot model. ELT was performed on subcutaneous veins while optoacoustic signals were acquired and reconstructed in real-time and at a spatial resolution in the order of 200μm. VOT images showed spatio-temporal maps of the lesion progression, characteristics of the vessel wall, and position of the ablation fiber's tip during the pull back. It was also possible to correlate the images with the temperature elevation measured in the area adjacent to the ablation spot. We conclude that VOT is a promising tool for providing online feedback during endovenous laser therapy.

  3. Extended Kalman filtering for continuous volumetric MR-temperature imaging.

    PubMed

    Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Roujol, Sébastien; Hey, Silke; Moonen, Chrit; Ries, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Real time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry has evolved into the method of choice for the guidance of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) interventions. For this role, MR-thermometry should preferably have a high temporal and spatial resolution and allow observing the temperature over the entire targeted area and its vicinity with a high accuracy. In addition, the precision of real time MR-thermometry for therapy guidance is generally limited by the available signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the influence of physiological noise. MR-guided HIFU would benefit of the large coverage volumetric temperature maps, including characterization of volumetric heating trajectories as well as near- and far-field heating. In this paper, continuous volumetric MR-temperature monitoring was obtained as follows. The targeted area was continuously scanned during the heating process by a multi-slice sequence. Measured data and a priori knowledge of 3-D data derived from a forecast based on a physical model were combined using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The proposed reconstruction improved the temperature measurement resolution and precision while maintaining guaranteed output accuracy. The method was evaluated experimentally ex vivo on a phantom, and in vivo on a porcine kidney, using HIFU heating. On the in vivo experiment, it allowed the reconstruction from a spatio-temporally under-sampled data set (with an update rate for each voxel of 1.143 s) to a 3-D dataset covering a field of view of 142.5×285×54 mm(3) with a voxel size of 3×3×6 mm(3) and a temporal resolution of 0.127 s. The method also provided noise reduction, while having a minimal impact on accuracy and latency.

  4. Volumetric assessment of cerebral asymmetries in dogs.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Franchini, Delia; Pepe, Anna M; Sasso, Raffaella; Dimatteo, Salvatore; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Quaranta, Angelo

    2011-09-01

    In the present study we quantified volumetric brain asymmetries from computed tomography (CT) scans in 12 healthy dogs, using a semi-automated technique for assessing in vivo structure asymmetry. Volumetric assessment of asymmetrical cerebral lateral ventricle (ALV) was also investigated. Our results showed that seven dogs exhibited a right hemisphere significantly greater than the left, two dogs had a left-greater-than-right hemisphere asymmetry, and finally two dogs displayed no significant brain volumetric asymmetry. This right-biased hemispheric asymmetry supports data reported previously using post-mortem morphological studies in both dogs and other mammalian species.

  5. [A new volumetric infusion pump (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Radke, J; Wencker, K H

    1977-06-01

    Our experience with a new volumetric infusion pump "Tekmar T 92" is reported. Over a period of months the reported advantages of the instrument were investigated on three separate units. Some few disadvantages for routine use were observed.

  6. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  7. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  8. Real-time volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddar, S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this brief review is to review the current status of real-time 3D scintillation dosimetry and what has been done so far in this area. The basic concept is to use a large volume of a scintillator material (liquid or solid) to measure or image the dose distributions from external radiation therapy (RT) beams in three dimensions. In this configuration, the scintillator material fulfills the dual role of being the detector and the phantom material in which the measurements are being performed. In this case, dose perturbations caused by the introduction of a detector within a phantom will not be at issue. All the detector configurations that have been conceived to date used a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera to measure the light produced within the scintillator. In order to accurately measure the scintillation light, one must correct for various optical artefacts that arise as the light propagates from the scintillating centers through the optical chain to the CCD chip. Quenching, defined in its simplest form as a nonlinear response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) charged particles, is one of the disadvantages when such systems are used to measure the absorbed dose from high-LET particles such protons. However, correction methods that restore the linear dose response through the whole proton range have been proven to be effective for both liquid and plastic scintillators. Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution and accurate 3D imaging of RT dose distributions. Further research is warranted to optimize the necessary image reconstruction methods and optical corrections needed to achieve its full potential.

  9. In vivo volumetric imaging of subcutaneous microvasculature by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao F.; Maslov, Konstantin; Li, Meng-Lin; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-10-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy was developed to achieve volumetric imaging of the anatomy and functions of the subcutaneous microvasculature in both small animals and humans in vivo with high spatial resolution and high signal-to-background ratio. By following the skin contour in raster scanning, the ultrasonic transducer maintains focusing in the region of interest. Furthermore, off-focus lateral resolution is improved by using a synthetic-aperture focusing technique based on the virtual point detector concept. Structural images are acquired in both rats and humans, whereas functional images representing hemoglobin oxygen saturation are acquired in rats. After multiscale vesselness filtering, arterioles and venules in the image are separated based on the imaged oxygen saturation levels. Detailed structural information, such as vessel depth and spatial orientation, are revealed by volume rendering.

  10. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2013-11-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy.

  11. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  12. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kallepitis, Charalambos; Bergholt, Mads S.; Mazo, Manuel M.; Leonardo, Vincent; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell–material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy. PMID:28327660

  13. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallepitis, Charalambos; Bergholt, Mads S.; Mazo, Manuel M.; Leonardo, Vincent; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell-material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  14. Temporal Coding of Volumetric Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llull, Patrick Ryan

    'Image volumes' refer to realizations of images in other dimensions such as time, spectrum, and focus. Recent advances in scientific, medical, and consumer applications demand improvements in image volume capture. Though image volume acquisition continues to advance, it maintains the same sampling mechanisms that have been used for decades; every voxel must be scanned and is presumed independent of its neighbors. Under these conditions, improving performance comes at the cost of increased system complexity, data rates, and power consumption. This dissertation explores systems and methods capable of efficiently improving sensitivity and performance for image volume cameras, and specifically proposes several sampling strategies that utilize temporal coding to improve imaging system performance and enhance our awareness for a variety of dynamic applications. Video cameras and camcorders sample the video volume (x,y,t) at fixed intervals to gain understanding of the volume's temporal evolution. Conventionally, one must reduce the spatial resolution to increase the framerate of such cameras. Using temporal coding via physical translation of an optical element known as a coded aperture, the compressive temporal imaging (CACTI) camera emonstrates a method which which to embed the temporal dimension of the video volume into spatial (x,y) measurements, thereby greatly improving temporal resolution with minimal loss of spatial resolution. This technique, which is among a family of compressive sampling strategies developed at Duke University, temporally codes the exposure readout functions at the pixel level. Since video cameras nominally integrate the remaining image volume dimensions (e.g. spectrum and focus) at capture time, spectral (x,y,t,lambda) and focal (x,y,t,z) image volumes are traditionally captured via sequential changes to the spectral and focal state of the system, respectively. The CACTI camera's ability to embed video volumes into images leads to exploration

  15. Motion correction for cellular-resolution multi-photon fluorescence microscopy imaging of awake head-restrained mice using speed embedded HMM.

    PubMed

    Chen, Taoyi; Xue, Zhong; Wang, Changhong; Qu, Zhenshen; Wong, Kelvin K; Wong, Stephen T C

    2012-04-01

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MFM) captures high-resolution fluorescence image sequences and can be used for the intact brain imaging of small animals. Recently, it has been extended from anesthetized and head-stabilized mice to awake and head-restrained ones for in vivo neurological study. In these applications, motion correction is an important pre-processing step since brain pulsation and body movement can cause motion artifact and prevent stable serial image acquisition at such high spatial resolution. This paper proposes a speed embedded Hidden Markov model (SEHMM) for motion correction in MFM imaging of awake head-restrained mice. The algorithm extends the traditional Hidden Markov model (HMM) method by embedding a motion prediction model to better estimate the state transition probability. The novelty of the method lies in using adaptive probability to estimate the linear motion, while the state-of-the-art method assumes that the highest probability is assigned to the case with no motion. In experiments we demonstrated that SEHMM is more accurate than the traditional HMM using both simulated and real MFM image sequences.

  16. High resolution respirometry analysis of polyethylenimine-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis and cellular stress: Mitochondrial proton leak and inhibition of the electron transport system.

    PubMed

    Hall, Arnaldur; Larsen, Anna K; Parhamifar, Ladan; Meyle, Kathrine D; Wu, Lin-Ping; Moghimi, S Moein

    2013-10-01

    Polyethylenimines (PEIs) are highly efficient non-viral transfectants, but can induce cell death through poorly understood necrotic and apoptotic processes as well as autophagy. Through high resolution respirometry studies in H1299 cells we demonstrate that the 25kDa branched polyethylenimine (25k-PEI-B), in a concentration and time-dependent manner, facilitates mitochondrial proton leak and inhibits the electron transport system. These events were associated with gradual reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. The intracellular ATP levels further declined as a consequence of PEI-mediated plasma membrane damage and subsequent ATP leakage to the extracellular medium. Studies with freshly isolated mouse liver mitochondria corroborated with bioenergetic findings and demonstrated parallel polycation concentration- and time-dependent changes in state 2 and state 4o oxygen flux as well as lowered ADP phosphorylation (state 3) and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Polycation-mediated reduction of electron transport system activity was further demonstrated in 'broken mitochondria' (freeze-thawed mitochondrial preparations). Moreover, by using both high-resolution respirometry and spectrophotometry analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activity we were able to identify complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) as a likely specific site of PEI mediated inhibition within the electron transport system. Unraveling the mechanisms of PEI-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis is central for combinatorial design of safer polymeric non-viral gene delivery systems.

  17. Whole-Organism Cellular Pathology: A Systems Approach to Phenomics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K C; Katz, S R; Lin, A Y; Xin, X; Ding, Y

    2016-01-01

    Phenotype is defined as the state of an organism resulting from interactions between genes, environment, disease, molecular mechanisms, and chance. The purpose of the emerging field of phenomics is to systematically determine and measure phenotypes across biology for the sake of understanding. Phenotypes can affect more than one cell type and life stage, so ideal phenotyping would include the state of every cell type within the context of both tissue architecture and the whole organism at each life stage. In medicine, high-resolution anatomic assessment of phenotype is obtained from histology. Histology's interpretative power, codified by Virchow as cellular pathology, is derived from its ability to discern diagnostic and characteristic cellular changes in diseased tissues. Cellular pathology is observed in every major human disease and relies on the ability of histology to detect cellular change in any cell type due to unbiased pan-cellular staining, even in optically opaque tissues. Our laboratory has shown that histology is far more sensitive than stereomicroscopy for detecting phenotypes in zebrafish mutants. Those studies have also shown that more complete sampling, greater consistency in sample orientation, and the inclusion of phenotypes extending over longer length scales would provide greater coverage of common phenotypes. We are developing technical approaches to achieve an ideal detection of cellular pathology using an improved form of X-ray microtomography that retains the strengths and addresses the weaknesses of histology as a screening tool. We are using zebrafish as a vertebrate model based on the overlaps between zebrafish and mammalian tissue architecture, and a body size small enough to allow whole-organism, volumetric imaging at cellular resolution. Automation of whole-organism phenotyping would greatly increase the value of phenomics. Potential societal benefits would include reduction in the cost of drug development, a reduction in the

  18. Nonequilibrium volumetric response of shocked polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B E

    2009-01-01

    Polymers are well known for their non-equilibrium deviatoric behavior. However, investigations involving both high rate shock experiments and equilibrium measured thermodynamic quantities remind us that the volumetric behavior also exhibits a non-equilibrium response. Experiments supporting the notion of a non-equilibrium volumetric behavior will be summarized. Following that discussion, a continuum-level theory is proposed that will account for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium response. Upon finding agreement with experiment, the theory is used to study the relaxation of a shocked polymer back towards its shocked equilibrium state.

  19. A volumetric flask as a projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limsuwan, P.; Asanithi, P.; Thongpool, V.; Piriyawong, V.; Limsuwan, S.

    2012-03-01

    A lens based on liquid in the confined volume of a volumetric flask was presented as a potential projector to observe microscopic floating organisms or materials. In this experiment, a mosquito larva from a natural pond was selected as a demonstration sample. By shining a light beam from a laser pointer of any visible wavelength through the volumetric flask filled with liquid, the movements of floating objects were clearly observed on a screen. The magnification was simply controlled by changing either the volume of the flask or the distance of the screen from the flask.

  20. Volumetric three-dimensional display system with rasterization hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalora, Gregg E.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Giovinco, Michael; Napoli, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    An 8-color multiplanar volumetric display is being developed by Actuality Systems, Inc. It will be capable of utilizing an image volume greater than 90 million voxels, which we believe is the greatest utilizable voxel set of any volumetric display constructed to date. The display is designed to be used for molecular visualization, mechanical CAD, e-commerce, entertainment, and medical imaging. As such, it contains a new graphics processing architecture, novel high-performance line- drawing algorithms, and an API similar to a current standard. Three-dimensional imagery is created by projecting a series of 2-D bitmaps ('image slices') onto a diffuse screen that rotates at 600 rpm. Persistence of vision fuses the slices into a volume-filling 3-D image. A modified three-panel Texas Instruments projector provides slices at approximately 4 kHz, resulting in 8-color 3-D imagery comprised of roughly 200 radially-disposed slices which are updated at 20 Hz. Each slice has a resolution of 768 by 768 pixels, subtending 10 inches. An unusual off-axis projection scheme incorporating tilted rotating optics is used to maintain good focus across the projection screen. The display electronics includes a custom rasterization architecture which converts the user's 3- D geometry data into image slices, as well as 6 Gbits of DDR SDRAM graphics memory.

  1. A Volumetric Flask as a Projector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limsuwan, P.; Asanithi, P.; Thongpool, V.; Piriyawong, V.; Limsuwan, S.

    2012-01-01

    A lens based on liquid in the confined volume of a volumetric flask was presented as a potential projector to observe microscopic floating organisms or materials. In this experiment, a mosquito larva from a natural pond was selected as a demonstration sample. By shining a light beam from a laser pointer of any visible wavelength through the…

  2. Uncertainty quantification in volumetric Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sayantan; Charonko, John; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) uncertainty quantification is challenging due to coupled sources of elemental uncertainty and complex data reduction procedures in the measurement chain. Recent developments in this field have led to uncertainty estimation methods for planar PIV. However, no framework exists for three-dimensional volumetric PIV. In volumetric PIV the measurement uncertainty is a function of reconstructed three-dimensional particle location that in turn is very sensitive to the accuracy of the calibration mapping function. Furthermore, the iterative correction to the camera mapping function using triangulated particle locations in space (volumetric self-calibration) has its own associated uncertainty due to image noise and ghost particle reconstructions. Here we first quantify the uncertainty in the triangulated particle position which is a function of particle detection and mapping function uncertainty. The location uncertainty is then combined with the three-dimensional cross-correlation uncertainty that is estimated as an extension of the 2D PIV uncertainty framework. Finally the overall measurement uncertainty is quantified using an uncertainty propagation equation. The framework is tested with both simulated and experimental cases. For the simulated cases the variation of estimated uncertainty with the elemental volumetric PIV error sources are also evaluated. The results show reasonable prediction of standard uncertainty with good coverage.

  3. Integrated adaptive optics optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope system for simultaneous cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Jones, Steven M; Pilli, Suman; Balderas-Mata, Sandra; Kim, Dae Yu; Olivier, Scot S; Werner, John S

    2011-06-01

    We describe an ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) retinal imaging system that combines adaptive optics Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) to allow simultaneous data acquisition by the two modalities. The AO-SLO subsystem was integrated into the previously described AO-UHR OCT instrument with minimal changes to the latter. This was done in order to ensure optimal performance and image quality of the AO- UHR OCT. In this design both imaging modalities share most of the optical components including a common AO-subsystem and vertical scanner. One of the benefits of combining Fd-OCT with SLO includes automatic co-registration between two acquisition channels for direct comparison between retinal structures imaged by both modalities (e.g., photoreceptor mosaics or microvasculature maps). Because of differences in the detection scheme of the two systems, this dual imaging modality instrument can provide insight into retinal morphology and potentially function, that could not be accessed easily by a single system. In this paper we describe details of the components and parameters of the combined instrument, including incorporation of a novel membrane magnetic deformable mirror with increased stroke and actuator count used as a single wavefront corrector. We also discuss laser safety calculations for this multimodal system. Finally, retinal images acquired in vivo with this system are presented.

  4. Volumetric sub-surface imaging using spectrally encoded endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yelin, D; Bouma, B E; Tearney, G J

    2008-02-04

    Endoscopic imaging below tissue surfaces and through turbid media may provide improved diagnostic capabilities and visibility in surgical settings. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a recently developed method that utilizes a single optical fiber, miniature optics and a diffractive grating for high-speed imaging through small diameter, flexible endoscopic probes. SEE has also been shown to provide three-dimensional topological imaging capabilities. In this paper, we have configured SEE to additionally image beneath tissue surfaces, by increasing the system's sensitivity and acquiring the complex spectral density for each spectrally resolved point on the sample. In order to demonstrate the capability of SEE to obtain subsurface information, we have utilized the system to image a resolution target through intralipid solution, and conduct volumetric imaging of a mouse embryo and excised human middle-ear ossicles. Our results demonstrate that real-time subsurface imaging is possible with this miniature endoscopy technique.

  5. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering: strategies for volumetric constructs

    PubMed Central

    Cittadella Vigodarzere, Giorgio; Mantero, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by high metabolic requirements, defined structure and high regenerative potential. As such, it constitutes an appealing platform for tissue engineering to address volumetric defects, as proven by recent works in this field. Several issues common to all engineered constructs constrain the variety of tissues that can be realized in vitro, principal among them the lack of a vascular system and the absence of reliable cell sources; as it is, the only successful tissue engineering constructs are not characterized by active function, present limited cellular survival at implantation and possess low metabolic requirements. Recently, functionally competent constructs have been engineered, with vascular structures supporting their metabolic requirements. In addition to the use of biochemical cues, physical means, mechanical stimulation and the application of electric tension have proven effective in stimulating the differentiation of cells and the maturation of the constructs; while the use of co-cultures provided fine control of cellular developments through paracrine activity. This review will provide a brief analysis of some of the most promising improvements in the field, with particular attention to the techniques that could prove easily transferable to other branches of tissue engineering. PMID:25295011

  6. VOLUMETRIC POLYMERIZATION SHRINKAGE OF CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Nagem, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire) to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (á=0.05) was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01) and Definite (1.89±0.01) shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06), Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03), and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02) presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation. PMID:19089177

  7. Volumetric imaging of erythrocytes using label-free multiphoton photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Ryan L; Mattison, Scott P; Applegate, Brian E

    2014-10-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is an imaging modality well suited to mapping vasculature and other strong absorbers in tissue. However, one of the primary drawbacks to PAM when used for high-resolution imaging is the relatively poor axial resolution due to the inverse dependence on the transducer bandwidth. While submicron lateral resolution PAM can be achieved by tightly focusing the excitation light, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited to 10s of microns for typical transducer frequencies. Here we present a multiphoton PAM technique called transient absorption ultrasonic microscopy (TAUM), which results in a completely optically resolved voxel with an experimentally measured axial resolution of 1.5 microns. This technique is demonstrated by imaging individual red blood cells in three dimensions in blood smear and ex vivo tissues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fully resolved, volumetric photoacoustic imaging of erythrocytes.

  8. 3D volumetric radar using 94-GHz millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Barnabás

    2006-05-01

    This article describes a novel approach to the real-time visualization of 3D imagery obtained from a 3D millimeter wave scanning radar. The MMW radar system employs a spinning antenna to generate a fan-shaped scanning pattern of the entire scene. The beams formed this way provide all weather 3D distance measurements (range/azimuth display) of objects as they appear on the ground. The beam width of the antenna and its side lobes are optimized to produce the best possible resolution even at distances of up to 15 Kms. To create a full 3D data set the fan-pattern is tilted up and down with the help of a controlled stepper motor. For our experiments we collected data at 0.1 degrees increments while using both bi-static as well as a mono-static antennas in our arrangement. The data collected formed a stack of range-azimuth images in the shape of a cone. This information is displayed using our high-end 3D visualization engine capable of displaying high-resolution volumetric models with 30 frames per second. The resulting 3D scenes can then be viewed from any angle and subsequently processed to integrate, fuse or match them against real-life sensor imagery or 3D model data stored in a synthetic database.

  9. Volumetric Near-Field Microwave Plasma Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2003-01-01

    A periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids is generated using the outgoing wave from a microwave horn and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to a standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an effective focusing in the near field of the horn (Fresnel region) as a result of a diffractive narrowing. Optical imaging, electron density, and rotational temperature measurements characterize the near field plasma region. Volumetric microwave discharges may have application to combustion ignition in scramjet engines.

  10. Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-18

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2014-0020 Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude Dario Rodriquez, MSc1; Tyler Britton, RRT2...the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-12-2-6B012 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...volumetric diffusive respirator is a pneumatic ventilator used by the U.S. Army Burn Team and the U.S. Air Force Lung Team for patients with hypoxemic

  11. Volumetric Measurements of Amnioserosa Cells in Developing Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, David; Jayasinghe, Aroshan; Hutson, Shane

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of cells in tissue in developing Drosophila melanogaster has become increasingly clearer over the past few decades, in large part due to advances in imaging techniques, genetic markers, predictive modeling, and micromanipulation (notably laser microsurgery). We now know apical contractions in amnioserosa cells are a significant factor in large scale processes like germ band retraction and dorsal closure. Also, laser microsurgery induces cellular recoil that strongly mimics a 2D elastic sheet. Still, what we know about these processes comes entirely from the apical surface where the standard fluorescent markers like cadherin are located, but many open questions exist concerning the remaining ``dark'' portion of cells. Does cell volume remain constant during contraction or do cells leak? Also, what shape changes do cells undergo? Do they bulge, wedge, contract prismatically, or something else? By using a marker that labels the entire membrane of amnioserosa cells (Resille, 117) and adapting our watershed segmentation routines for 4D datasets, we have been able to quantify the entire volumetric region of cells in tissue through time and compare changes in apical area and volume. Preliminary results suggest a fairly constant volume over the course of a contraction cycle.

  12. BOREAS HYD-1 Volumetric Soil Moisture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Kelly, Shaun F.; Stangel, David E.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-1 team made measurements of volumetric soil moisture at the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA) tower flux sites in 1994 and at selected tower flux sites in 1995-97. Different methods were used to collect these measurements, including neutron probe and manual and automated Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). In 1994, the measurements were made every other day at the NSA-OJP (Old Jack Pine), NSA-YJP (Young Jack Pine), NSA-OBS (Old Black Spruce), NSA-Fen, SSA-OJP, SSA-YJP, SSA-Fen, SSA-YA (Young Aspen), and SSA-OBS sites. In 1995-97, when automated equipment was deployed at NSA-OJP, NSA-YJP, NSA-OBS, SSA-OBS, and SSA-OA (Old Aspen), the measurements were made as often as every hour. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The volumetric soil moisture data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. Volumetric display with holographic multi-photon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Yoshio; Kumagai, Kota

    2016-10-01

    We developed a volumetric display with holographic two- and multi-photon excitations using a computer-generated hologram displayed on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The holographic technique has advantages of increasing the number of voxels of the volumetric graphics per unit time, increasing the total input energy to the volumetric display because the maximum energy incident at a point in the display material is limited by the damage threshold, and controlling the size, shape and spatial position of voxels. We demonstrated a volumetric display with stacked multi-color fluorescence plates.

  14. Widespread Volumetric Brain Changes following Tooth Loss in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Avivi-Arber, Limor; Seltzer, Ze'ev; Friedel, Miriam; Lerch, Jason P.; Moayedi, Massieh; Davis, Karen D.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Tooth loss is associated with altered sensory, motor, cognitive and emotional functions. These changes vary highly in the population and are accompanied by structural and functional changes in brain regions mediating these functions. It is unclear to what extent this variability in behavior and function is caused by genetic and/or environmental determinants and which brain regions undergo structural plasticity that mediates these changes. Thus, the overall goal of our research program is to identify genetic variants that control structural and functional plasticity following tooth loss. As a step toward this goal, here our aim was to determine whether structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) is sensitive to detect quantifiable volumetric differences in the brains of mice of different genetic background receiving tooth extraction or sham operation. We used 67 adult female mice of 7 strains, comprising the A/J (A) and C57BL/6J (B) strains and a randomly selected sample of 5 of the 23 AXB-BXA strains (AXB1, AXB4, AXB24, BXA14, BXA24) that were produced from the A and B parental mice by recombinations and inbreeding. This panel of 25 inbred strains of genetically diverse inbred strains of mice is used for mapping chromosomal intervals throughout the genome that harbor candidate genes controlling the phenotypic variance of any trait under study. Under general anesthesia, 39 mice received extraction of 3 right maxillary molar teeth and 28 mice received sham operation. On post-extraction day 21, post-mortem whole-brain high-resolution sMRI was used to quantify the volume of 160 brain regions. Compared to sham operation, tooth extraction was associated with a significantly reduced regional and voxel-wise volumes of cortical brain regions involved in processing somatosensory, motor, cognitive and emotional functions, and increased volumes in subcortical sensorimotor and temporal limbic forebrain regions including the amygdala. Additionally, comparison of the 10 BXA14

  15. In vivo volumetric fluorescence sectioning microscopy with mechanical-scan-free hybrid illumination imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Yen; Lin, Wei-Hsin; Chien, Ju-Hsuan; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Luo, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Optical sectioning microscopy in wide-field fashion has been widely used to obtain three-dimensional images of biological samples; however, it requires scanning in depth and considerable time to acquire multiple depth information of a volumetric sample. In this paper, in vivo optical sectioning microscopy with volumetric hybrid illumination, with no mechanical moving parts, is presented. The proposed system is configured such that the optical sectioning is provided by hybrid illumination using a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) for uniform and non-uniform pattern projection, while the depth of imaging planes is varied by using an electrically tunable-focus lens with invariant magnification and resolution. We present and characterize the design, implementation, and experimentally demonstrate the proposed system’s ability through 3D imaging of in vivo Canenorhabditis elegans’ growth cones. PMID:27867708

  16. Selective-plane illumination microscopy for high-content volumetric biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGorty, Ryan; Huang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Light-sheet microscopy, also named selective-plane illumination microscopy, enables optical sectioning with minimal light delivered to the sample. Therefore, it allows one to gather volumetric datasets of developing embryos and other light-sensitive samples over extended times. We have configured a light-sheet microscope that, unlike most previous designs, can image samples in formats compatible with high-content imaging. Our microscope can be used with multi-well plates or with microfluidic devices. In designing our optical system to accommodate these types of sample holders we encounter large optical aberrations. We counter these aberrations with both static optical components in the imaging path and with adaptive optics. Potential applications of this microscope include studying the development of a large number of embryos in parallel and over long times with subcellular resolution and doing high-throughput screens on organisms or cells where volumetric data is necessary.

  17. GPU-based Scalable Volumetric Reconstruction for Multi-view Stereo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Duchaineau, M; Max, N

    2011-09-21

    We present a new scalable volumetric reconstruction algorithm for multi-view stereo using a graphics processing unit (GPU). It is an effectively parallelized GPU algorithm that simultaneously uses a large number of GPU threads, each of which performs voxel carving, in order to integrate depth maps with images from multiple views. Each depth map, triangulated from pair-wise semi-dense correspondences, represents a view-dependent surface of the scene. This algorithm also provides scalability for large-scale scene reconstruction in a high resolution voxel grid by utilizing streaming and parallel computation. The output is a photo-realistic 3D scene model in a volumetric or point-based representation. We demonstrate the effectiveness and the speed of our algorithm with a synthetic scene and real urban/outdoor scenes. Our method can also be integrated with existing multi-view stereo algorithms such as PMVS2 to fill holes or gaps in textureless regions.

  18. Volumetric Properties of Lithium-Lead Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairulin, R. A.; Abdullaev, R. N.; Stankus, S. V.; Agazhanov, A. S.; Savchenko, I. V.

    2017-02-01

    The density of liquid lithium and lithium-lead alloys (10.02 at.% Pb, 14.98 at.% Pb, 18.06 at.% Pb, 20.02 at.% Pb, 22.24 at.% Pb, 23.09 at.% Pb, 25.10 at.% Pb, 30.15 at.% Pb, 38.21 at.% Pb, 40.11 at.% Pb, 43.08 at.% Pb, 46.65 at.% Pb, 50.15 at.% Pb, 60.23 at.% Pb, 70.01 at.% Pb, 83.00 at.% Pb, and 84.30 at.% Pb) has been measured using the gamma-ray attenuation technique over the temperature range from the liquidus line to 1050 K. The position of the liquidus curve in the Li-Pb phase diagram has been clarified. The compositional dependencies of molar volume and volumetric thermal expansion coefficient of the Li-Pb liquid system have been constructed and discussed.

  19. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face – tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor. PMID:25610354

  20. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling.

    PubMed

    Macierzyńska, Arleta; Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face - tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor.

  1. Disentangling volumetric and hydrational properties of proteins.

    PubMed

    Voloshin, Vladimir P; Medvedev, Nikolai N; Smolin, Nikolai; Geiger, Alfons; Winter, Roland

    2015-02-05

    We used molecular dynamics simulations of a typical monomeric protein, SNase, in combination with Voronoi-Delaunay tessellation to study and analyze the temperature dependence of the apparent volume, Vapp, of the solute. We show that the void volume, VB, created in the boundary region between solute and solvent, determines the temperature dependence of Vapp to a major extent. The less pronounced but still significant temperature dependence of the molecular volume of the solute, VM, is essentially the result of the expansivity of its internal voids, as the van der Waals contribution to VM is practically independent of temperature. Results for polypeptides of different chemical nature feature a similar temperature behavior, suggesting that the boundary/hydration contribution seems to be a universal part of the temperature dependence of Vapp. The results presented here shine new light on the discussion surrounding the physical basis for understanding and decomposing the volumetric properties of proteins and biomolecules in general.

  2. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Treatment Planning for Superficial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-10-01

    The physician's planning objective is often a uniform dose distribution throughout the planning target volume (PTV), including superficial PTVs on or near the surface of a patient's body. Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system uses a progressive resolution optimizer (PRO), version 8.2.23, for RapidArc dynamic multileaf collimator volumetric modulated arc therapy planning. Because the PRO is a fast optimizer, optimization convergence errors (OCEs) produce dose nonuniformity in the superficial area of the PTV. We present a postsurgical cranial case demonstrating the recursive method our clinic uses to produce RapidArc treatment plans. The initial RapidArc treatment plan generated using one 360{sup o} arc resulted in substantial dose nonuniformity in the superficial section of the PTV. We demonstrate the use of multiple arcs to produce improved dose uniformity in this region. We also compare the results of this superficial dose compensation method to the results of a recursive method of dose correction that we developed in-house to correct optimization convergence errors in static intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The results show that up to 4 arcs may be necessary to provide uniform dose to the surface of the PTV with the current version of the PRO.

  3. A volumetric flow sensor for automotive injection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, U.; Krötz, G.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2008-04-01

    For further optimization of the automotive power train of diesel engines, advanced combustion processes require a highly flexible injection system, provided e.g. by the common rail (CR) injection technique. In the past, the feasibility to implement injection nozzle volumetric flow sensors based on the thermo-resistive measurement principle has been demonstrated up to injection pressures of 135 MPa (1350 bar). To evaluate the transient behaviour of the system-integrated flow sensors as well as an injection amount indicator used as a reference method, hydraulic simulations on the system level are performed for a CR injection system. Experimentally determined injection timings were found to be in good agreement with calculated values, especially for the novel sensing element which is directly implemented into the hydraulic system. For the first time pressure oscillations occurring after termination of the injection pulse, predicted theoretically, could be verified directly in the nozzle. In addition, the injected amount of fuel is monitored with the highest resolution ever reported in the literature.

  4. Volumetric Real-Time Imaging Using a CMUT Ring Array

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N.; O’Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2012-01-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device. This paper presents simulated and experimental imaging results for the described CMUT ring array. Three different imaging methods—flash, classic phased array (CPA), and synthetic phased array (SPA)—were used in the study. For SPA imaging, two techniques to improve the image quality—Hadamard coding and aperture weighting—were also applied. The results show that SPA with Hadamard coding and aperture weighting is a good option for ring-array imaging. Compared with CPA, it achieves better image resolution and comparable signal-to-noise ratio at a much faster image acquisition rate. Using this method, a fast frame rate of up to 463 volumes per second is achievable if limited only by the ultrasound time of flight; with the described system we reconstructed three cross-sectional images in real-time at 10 frames per second, which was limited by the computation time in synthetic beamforming. PMID:22718870

  5. Cortical thickness and brain volumetric analysis in body dysmorphic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Sarah K.; Zai, Alex; Pirnia, Tara; Arienzo, Donatello; Zhan, Liang; Moody, Teena D.; Thompson, Paul M.; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) suffer from preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance, causing severe distress and disability. Although BDD affects 1-2% of the population, the neurobiology is not understood. Discrepant results in previous volumetric studies may be due to small sample sizes, and no study has investigated cortical thickness in BDD. The current study is the largest neuroimaging analysis of BDD. Participants included 49 medication-free, right-handed individuals with DSM-IV BDD and 44 healthy controls matched by age, sex, and education. Using high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we computed vertex-wise gray matter (GM) thickness on the cortical surface and GM volume using voxel-based morphometry. We also computed volumes in cortical and subcortical regions of interest. In addition to group comparisons, we investigated associations with symptom severity, insight, and anxiety within the BDD group. In BDD, greater anxiety was significantly associated with thinner GM in the left superior temporal cortex and greater GM volume in the right caudate nucleus. There were no significant differences in cortical thickness, GM volume, or volumes in regions of interest between BDD and control subjects. Subtle associations with clinical symptoms may characterize brain morphometric patterns in BDD, rather than large group differences in brain structure. PMID:25797401

  6. Automatic coregistration of volumetric images based on implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Koch, Martin; Maltz, Jonathan S; Belongie, Serge J; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bose, Supratik; Shukla, Himanshu; Bani-Hashemi, Ali R

    2008-10-01

    The accurate delivery of external beam radiation therapy is often facilitated through the implantation of radio-opaque fiducial markers (gold seeds). Before the delivery of each treatment fraction, seed positions can be determined via low dose volumetric imaging. By registering these seed locations with the corresponding locations in the previously acquired treatment planning computed tomographic (CT) scan, it is possible to adjust the patient position so that seed displacement is accommodated. The authors present an unsupervised automatic algorithm that identifies seeds in both planning and pretreatment images and subsequently determines a rigid geometric transformation between the two sets. The algorithm is applied to the imaging series of ten prostate cancer patients. Each test series is comprised of a single multislice planning CT and multiple megavoltage conebeam (MVCB) images. Each MVCB dataset is obtained immediately prior to a subsequent treatment session. Seed locations were determined to within 1 mm with an accuracy of 97 +/- 6.1% for datasets obtained by application of a mean imaging dose of 3.5 cGy per study. False positives occurred in three separate instances, but only when datasets were obtained at imaging doses too low to enable fiducial resolution by a human operator, or when the prostate gland had undergone large displacement or significant deformation. The registration procedure requires under nine seconds of computation time on a typical contemporary computer workstation.

  7. Volumetric Analysis of Regional Cerebral Development in Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Kesler, Shelli R.; Ment, Laura R.; Vohr, Betty; Pajot, Sarah K.; Schneider, Karen C.; Katz, Karol H.; Ebbitt, Timothy B.; Duncan, Charles C.; Makuch, Robert W.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2011-01-01

    Preterm birth is frequently associated with both neuropathologic and cognitive sequelae. This study examined cortical lobe, subcortical, and lateral ventricle development in association with perinatal variables and cognitive outcome. High-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired and quantified using advanced image processing techniques. Seventy-three preterm and 33 term control children ages 7.3-11.4 years were included in the study. Results indicated disproportionately enlarged parietal and frontal gray matter, occipital horn, and ventricular body, as well as reduced temporal and subcortical gray volumes in preterm children compared with control subjects. Birth weight was negatively correlated with parietal and frontal gray, as well as occipital horn volumes. Intraventricular hemorrhage was associated with reduced subcortical gray matter. Ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was negatively correlated with subcortical gray matter volumes but not with white matter volumes. Maternal education was the strongest predictor of cognitive function in the preterm group. Preterm birth appears to be associated with disorganized cortical development, possibly involving disrupted synaptic pruning and neural migration. Lower birth weight and the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage may increase the risk for neuroanatomic abnormality. PMID:15519112

  8. A Trimodality Comparison of Volumetric Bone Imaging Technologies. Part III: SD, SEE, LSC Association With Fragility Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andy K. O.; Beattie, Karen A.; Min, Kevin K. H.; Merali, Zamir; Webber, Colin E.; Gordon, Christopher L.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Cheung, Angela M. W.; Adachi, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Part II of this 3-part series demonstrated 1-yr precision, standard error of the estimate, and 1-yr least significant change for volumetric bone outcomes determined using peripheral (p) quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and peripheral magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) modalities in vivo. However, no clinically relevant outcomes have been linked to these measures of change. This study examined 97 women with mean age of 75 ± 9 yr and body mass index of 26.84 ± 4.77 kg/m2, demonstrating a lack of association between fragility fractures and standard deviation, least significant change and standard error of the estimate-based unit differences in volumetric bone outcomes derived from both pMRI and pQCT. Only cortical volumetric bone mineral density and cortical thickness derived from high-resolution pQCT images were associated with an increased odds for fractures. The same measures obtained by pQCT erred toward significance. Despite the smaller 1-yr and short-term precision error for measures at the tibia vs the radius, the associations with fractures observed at the radius were larger than at the tibia for high-resolution pQCT. Unit differences in cortical thickness and cortical volumetric bone mineral density able to yield a 50% increase in odds for fractures were quantified here and suggested as a reference for future power computations. PMID:25129407

  9. Quantification of volumetric cerebral blood flow using hybrid laser speckle contract and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valim, Niksa; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2016-03-01

    Studying neurovascular blood flow function in cerebrovascular activities requires accurate visualization and characterization of blood flow volume as well as the dynamics of blood cells in microcirculation. In this study, we present a novel integration of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for rapid volumetric imaging of blood flow in cortical capillaries. LSCI uses the illumination of wide-field near infrared light (NIR) and monitors back scattered light to characterize the relative dynamics of blood flow in microcirculation. Absolute measurement of blood cells and blood volume requires high-resolution volumetric structural information. SD-OCT system uses coherence gating to measure scattered light from a small volume within high structural resolution. The structural imaging system rapidly assesses large number of capillaries for spatio-temporal tracking of red blood cells (RBC). A very fast-ultra resolution SD-OCT system was developed for imaging high-resolution volumetric samples. The system employed an ultra wideband light source (1310 ± 200 nm in wavelength) corresponding to an axial resolution of 3 micrometers in tissue. The spectrometer of the SD-OCT was customized for a maximum scanning rate of 147,000 line/s. We demonstrated a fast volumetric OCT angiography algorithm to visualize large numbers of vessels in a 2-mm deep sample volume. A LSCI system that has been developed previously in our group was integrated to the imaging system for the characterization of dynamic blood cells. The conjunction data from LSCI and SD-OCT systems imply the feasibility of accurate quantification of absolute cortical blood flow.

  10. A new contrast-assisted method in microcirculation volumetric flow assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Yung-Sheng; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2007-03-01

    Microcirculation volumetric flow rate is a significant index in diseases diagnosis and treatment such as diabetes and cancer. In this study, we propose an integrated algorithm to assess microcirculation volumetric flow rate including estimation of blood perfused area and corresponding flow velocity maps based on high frequency destruction/contrast replenishment imaging technique. The perfused area indicates the blood flow regions including capillaries, arterioles and venules. Due to the echo variance changes between ultrasonic contrast agents (UCAs) pre- and post-destruction two images, the perfused area can be estimated by the correlation-based approach. The flow velocity distribution within the perfused area can be estimated by refilling time-intensity curves (TICs) after UCAs destruction. Most studies introduced the rising exponential model proposed by Wei (1998) to fit the TICs. Nevertheless, we found the TICs profile has a great resemblance to sigmoid function in simulations and in vitro experiments results. Good fitting correlation reveals that sigmoid model was more close to actual fact in describing destruction/contrast replenishment phenomenon. We derived that the saddle point of sigmoid model is proportional to blood flow velocity. A strong linear relationship (R = 0.97) between the actual flow velocities (0.4-2.1 mm/s) and the estimated saddle constants was found in M-mode and B-mode flow phantom experiments. Potential applications of this technique include high-resolution volumetric flow rate assessment in small animal tumor and the evaluation of superficial vasculature in clinical studies.

  11. Bulk volumetric liquid water content in a seasonal snowpack: modeling its dynamics in different climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    We focus on the dynamics of volumetric liquid water content in seasonal snow covers. This is a key variable describing the fate of snowpacks during the melting season. However, its measurement and/or prediction by means of models at high spatial and temporal resolutions is still difficult due to both practical and theoretical reasons. To overcome these limitations in operational applications, we test the capability of a one-dimensional model to predict the dynamics of bulk volumetric liquid water content during a snow season. Multi-year data collected in three experimental sites in Japan are used as an evaluation. These sites are subjected to different climatic conditions. The model requires the calibration of one or two parameters, according to the degree of detail used. Either a simple temperature-index or a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach are considered to predict melting and/or melt-freeze dynamics of liquid water. Results show that, if melt-freeze dynamics are modeled, median absolute differences between data and predictions are consistently lower than 1 vol% at the sites where data of liquid water content are available. In addition, we find also that the model predicts correctly a dry condition in 80% of the observed cases at a site where calibration data are scarce. At the same site, observed isothermal conditions of the snow cover at 0 °C correspond to predictions of bulk volumetric liquid water content that are greater than 0.

  12. Event-related single-shot volumetric functional magnetic resonance inverse imaging of visual processing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Witzel, Thomas; Mandeville, Joseph B; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Greve, Douglas N; Wiggins, Graham; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W

    2008-08-01

    Developments in multi-channel radio-frequency (RF) coil array technology have enabled functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with higher degrees of spatial and temporal resolution. While modest improvement in temporal acceleration has been achieved by increasing the number of RF coils, the maximum attainable acceleration in parallel MRI acquisition is intrinsically limited only by the amount of independent spatial information in the combined array channels. Since the geometric configuration of a large-n MRI head coil array is similar to that used in EEG electrode or MEG SQUID sensor arrays, the source localization algorithms used in MEG or EEG source imaging can be extended to also process MRI coil array data, resulting in greatly improved temporal resolution by minimizing k-space traversal during signal acquisition. Using a novel approach, we acquire multi-channel MRI head coil array data and then apply inverse reconstruction methods to obtain volumetric fMRI estimates of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast at unprecedented whole-brain acquisition rates of 100 ms. We call this combination of techniques magnetic resonance Inverse Imaging (InI), a method that provides estimates of dynamic spatially-resolved signal change that can be used to construct statistical maps of task-related brain activity. We demonstrate the sensitivity and inter-subject reliability of volumetric InI using an event-related design to probe the hemodynamic signal modulations in primary visual cortex. Robust results from both single subject and group analyses demonstrate the sensitivity and feasibility of using volumetric InI in high temporal resolution investigations of human brain function.

  13. Event-related Single-shot Volumetric Functional Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging of Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Witzel, Thomas; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Wiggins, Graham; Wald, Lawrence L.; Belliveau, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Developments in multi-channel radio-frequency (RF) coil array technology have enabled functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with higher degrees of spatial and temporal resolution. While modest improvement in temporal acceleration has been achieved by increasing the number of RF coils, in parallel data acquisition techniques, the maximum attainable acceleration is intrinsically limited only by the amount of independent spatial information in the combined array channels. Since the geometric configuration of a large-n MRI head coil array is similar to that used in EEG electrode or MEG SQUID sensor arrays, the source localization algorithms used in MEG or EEG source imaging can be extended to also process MRI coil array data, resulting in greatly improved temporal resolution by minimizing k-space traversal during signal acquisition. Using a novel approach, we acquire multi-channel MRI head coil array data and then apply inverse reconstruction methods to obtain volumetric fMRI estimates of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast at unprecedented whole-brain acquisition rates of 100 ms per sample. We call this combination of techniques magnetic resonance Inverse Imaging (InI), a method that provides estimates of dynamic spatially-resolved signal change that can be used to construct statistical maps of task-related brain activity. We demonstrate the sensitivity and inter-subject reliability of volumetric InI using an event-related design to probe the hemodynamic signal modulations in primary visual cortex. Robust results from both single subject and group analyses demonstrate the sensitivity and feasibility of using volumetric InI in high temporal resolution investigations of human brain function. PMID:18538587

  14. Volumetric structured illumination microscopy enabled by a tunable-focus lens.

    PubMed

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Malik, Bilal H; Olsovsky, Cory; Jo, Javier A; Maitland, Kristen C

    2015-11-01

    We present a mechanical-scan-free method for volumetric imaging of biological tissue. The optical sectioning is provided by structured illumination, and the depth of the imaging plane is varied using an electrically tunable-focus lens. We characterize and evaluate the ability of this axial-scanning mechanism in structured illumination microscopy and demonstrate its ability to perform subcellular resolution imaging in oral mucosa ex vivo. The proposed mechanism can potentially convert any wide-field microscope to a 3D-imaging platform without the need for mechanical scanning of imaging optics and/or sample.

  15. Dual Frequency Band Annular Probe for Volumetric Pulse-echo Optoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkhoran, Mohammad Azizian; Varray, François; Vray, Didier

    Optoacoustic (OA) pulse echo (PE) imaging is a hybridized modality that is capable of providing physiological information on the basis of anatomical structure. In this work, we propose a dual frequency band annular probe for backward mode volumetric PE/OA imaging. The performance of this design is evaluated based on the spatio-temporal impulse response, three dimensional steerability of the transducer and point spread function. Optimum settings for number of elements in each ring and maximum steering are suggested. The transducer design and synthetic array beamforming simulation are presented. The resolution performance and reconstruction capabilities are shown with the in-silico measurements.

  16. Constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation of 3D volumetric MRI images.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Aleš; Salvado, Olivier; Acosta, Oscar; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen

    2012-03-01

    Due to physical limitations inherent in magnetic resonance imaging scanners, three dimensional volumetric scans are often acquired with anisotropic voxel resolution. We investigate several interpolation approaches to reduce the anisotropy and present a novel approach - constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation. This technique was compared to common methods: linear and cubic B-Spline interpolation and a technique based on non-rigid registration of neighboring slices. The methods were evaluated on artificial MR phantoms and real MR scans of human brain. The constrained reverse diffusion approach delivered promising results and provides an alternative for thick slice interpolation, especially for higher anisotropy factors.

  17. Rapidly-steered single-element ultrasound for real-time volumetric imaging and guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, Mark; Western, Craig; Solek, Roman; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dmitre; Schlosser, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric ultrasound (US) imaging has the potential to provide real-time anatomical imaging with high soft-tissue contrast in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic guidance applications. However, existing volumetric US machines utilize "wobbling" linear phased array or matrix phased array transducers which are costly to manufacture and necessitate bulky external processing units. To drastically reduce cost, improve portability, and reduce footprint, we propose a rapidly-steered single-element volumetric US imaging system. In this paper we explore the feasibility of this system with a proof-of-concept single-element volumetric US imaging device. The device uses a multi-directional raster-scan technique to generate a series of two-dimensional (2D) slices that were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) volumes. At 15 cm depth, 90° lateral field of view (FOV), and 20° elevation FOV, the device produced 20-slice volumes at a rate of 0.8 Hz. Imaging performance was evaluated using an US phantom. Spatial resolution was 2.0 mm, 4.7 mm, and 5.0 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions at 7.5 cm. Relative motion of phantom targets were automatically tracked within US volumes with a mean error of -0.3+/-0.3 mm, -0.3+/-0.3 mm, and -0.1+/-0.5 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions, respectively. The device exhibited a mean spatial distortion error of 0.3+/-0.9 mm, 0.4+/-0.7 mm, and -0.3+/-1.9 in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions. With a production cost near $1000, the performance characteristics of the proposed system make it an ideal candidate for diagnostic and image-guided therapy applications where form factor and low cost are paramount.

  18. Three-dimensional volumetric analysis and reconstruction of amygdala and hippocampal head, body and tail.

    PubMed

    Malykhin, Nikolai V; Bouchard, Thomas P; Ogilvie, Catherine J; Coupland, Nicholas J; Seres, Peter; Camicioli, Richard

    2007-07-15

    Volumetric changes in the amygdala and hippocampus are relevant to many disorders, but their close proximity makes it difficult to separate these structures by magnetic resonance imaging, leading many volumetric protocols to exclude problematic slices from analysis, or to analyze the amygdalo-hippocampal complex conjointly. The hippocampus tail is also often excluded, because of the difficulty in separating it from the thalamus. We have developed a reliable protocol for volumetric analysis and 3-D reconstruction of the amygdala and hippocampus (as a whole and in its anatomical parts). Twenty volunteers from clinical and healthy populations were recruited. T1-weighted images were acquired at 1.5 Tesla with native spatial resolution of 1.5 mm x 1.0 mm x 1.0 mm. Volumetric analyses were performed blind to diagnosis, using the interactive software package DISPLAY. Inter-rater (intrarater) intraclass correlations for the method were: 0.95 (0.88) for hippocampus tail, 0.83 (0.93) for hippocampus body, 0.95 (0.92) for hippocampus head, 0.96 (0.86) for total hippocampus and 0.86 (0.94) for amygdala. Volumes (mean+/-S.D.) corrected for intracranial volume for this mixed group were for the hippocampal tail: 0.325+/-0.087 cm(3); hippocampal body: 0.662+/-0.120 cm(3); hippocampal head: 1.23+/-0.174 cm(3); total hippocampus: 2.218+/-0.217 cm(3), and amygdala: 0.808+/-0.185 cm(3). In conclusion, the study demonstrates that the amygdala and hippocampal parts can be quantified reliably.

  19. A hand-held immaterial volumetric display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, Antti; Rakkolainen, Ismo

    2014-03-01

    We have created an ultralight, movable, "immaterial" fogscreen. It is based on the fogscreen mid-air imaging technology. The hand-held unit is roughly the size and weight of an ordinary toaster. If the screen is tracked, it can be swept in the air to create mid-air slices of volumetric objects, or to show augmented reality (AR) content on top of real objects. Interfacing devices and methodologies, such as hand and gesture trackers, camera-based trackers and object recognition, can make the screen interactive. The user can easily interact with any physical object or virtual information, as the screen is permeable. Any real objects can be seen through the screen, instead of e.g., through a video-based augmented reality screen. It creates a mixed reality setup where both the real world object and the augmented reality content can be viewed and interacted with simultaneously. The hand-held mid-air screen can be used e.g., as a novel collaborating or classroom tool for individual students or small groups.

  20. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Spielman, Daniel; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds allows the real time measurement of metabolic activity and can be useful in distinguishing between normal and diseased tissues. This work extends a fast 2D under-sampled spiral magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to provide volumetric coverage, acquiring a 16×16×12 matrix with a nominal 5 mm isotropic resolution in 4.5 s. The rapid acquisition enables a high temporal resolution for dynamic imaging. This dynamic 3D MRSI method was used to investigate hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolism modulated by the administration of ethanol in rat liver. A significant increase in the pyruvate to lactate conversion was observed in the liver due to the greater availability of NADH from ethanol metabolism. PMID:22331837

  1. Volumetric expansion of gutta-percha in contact with eugenol.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Rick A; Burgess, John; Barfield, Robert D; Cakir, Deniz; McNeal, Sandre F; Eleazer, Paul D

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the volumetric expansion of gutta-percha in the presence of eugenol or physiologic saline over time. Sections of gutta-percha cones were scanned to determine their total volume and surface area. They were then placed in sealed test tubes with either 2 microL eugenol or 2 microL saline and allowed to soak for 24 hours, 7 days, or 30 days. The results were scanned again to determine the volumetric changes in the material after placement in the test solutions. The results were statistically analyzed by using t tests and analysis of variance. Specimens soaked in eugenol showed a dramatic increase in volumetric expansion versus the saline group at all time periods. Sealers that incorporate eugenol could be attributed to gutta-percha volumetric expansion over time, thereby creating a better seal of the obturation material.

  2. Hyperspectral image classification based on volumetric texture and dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hongjun; Sheng, Yehua; Du, Peijun; Chen, Chen; Liu, Kui

    2015-06-01

    A novel approach using volumetric texture and reduced-spectral features is presented for hyperspectral image classification. Using this approach, the volumetric textural features were extracted by volumetric gray-level co-occurrence matrices (VGLCM). The spectral features were extracted by minimum estimated abundance covariance (MEAC) and linear prediction (LP)-based band selection, and a semi-supervised k-means (SKM) clustering method with deleting the worst cluster (SKMd) bandclustering algorithms. Moreover, four feature combination schemes were designed for hyperspectral image classification by using spectral and textural features. It has been proven that the proposed method using VGLCM outperforms the gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) method, and the experimental results indicate that the combination of spectral information with volumetric textural features leads to an improved classification performance in hyperspectral imagery.

  3. Increasing the volumetric efficiency of Diesel engines by intake pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    List, Hans

    1933-01-01

    Development of a method for calculating the volumetric efficiency of piston engines with intake pipes. Application of this method to the scavenging pumps of two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging and to four-stroke-cycle engines. The utility of the method is demonstrated by volumetric-efficiency tests of the two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging. Its practical application to the calculation of intake pipes is illustrated by example.

  4. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J. Meijer, Otto W.M.; Hoorn, Elles A.P. van der; Verbakel, Wilko; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc [RA]), a novel approach allowing for rapid treatment delivery, for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods and Materials: The RA plans were generated for a small (0.5 cm{sup 3}), intermediate (2.8 cm{sup 3}), and large (14.8 cm{sup 3}) VS. The prescription dose was 12.5 Gy to the encompassing 80% isodose. The RA plans were compared with conventional radiosurgery plans using both a single dynamic conformal arc (1DCA) and five noncoplanar dynamic conformal arcs (5DCA). Conformity indices (CI) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared. The RA plan for the medium-sized VS was measured in a phantom using Gafchromic EBT films and compared with calculated dose distributions. Results: The RA planning was completed within 30 min in all cases, and calculated treatment delivery time (after patient setup) was 5 min vs. 20 min for 5DCA. A superior CI was achieved with RA, with a substantial decrease in low-dose irradiation of the normal brain achieved relative to 5DCA plans. Maximum doses to critical organs were similar for RA and 5DCA but were higher for 1DCA. Film measurements showed the differences between calculated and measured doses to be smaller than 1.5% in the high-dose area and smaller than 3% in the low-dose area. Conclusion: The RA plans consistently achieved a higher CI and decrease in areas of low-dose irradiation. This, together with shorter treatment delivery times, has led to RA replacing our conventional five-arc radiosurgery technique for VS.

  5. Subcortical volumetric abnormalities in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, D P; Westlye, L T; van Erp, T G M; Rasmussen, J; Leonardo, C D; Faskowitz, J; Haukvik, U K; Hartberg, C B; Doan, N T; Agartz, I; Dale, A M; Gruber, O; Krämer, B; Trost, S; Liberg, B; Abé, C; Ekman, C J; Ingvar, M; Landén, M; Fears, S C; Freimer, N B; Bearden, C E; Sprooten, E; Glahn, D C; Pearlson, G D; Emsell, L; Kenney, J; Scanlon, C; McDonald, C; Cannon, D M; Almeida, J; Versace, A; Caseras, X; Lawrence, N S; Phillips, M L; Dima, D; Delvecchio, G; Frangou, S; Satterthwaite, T D; Wolf, D; Houenou, J; Henry, C; Malt, U F; Bøen, E; Elvsåshagen, T; Young, A H; Lloyd, A J; Goodwin, G M; Mackay, C E; Bourne, C; Bilderbeck, A; Abramovic, L; Boks, M P; van Haren, N E M; Ophoff, R A; Kahn, R S; Bauer, M; Pfennig, A; Alda, M; Hajek, T; Mwangi, B; Soares, J C; Nickson, T; Dimitrova, R; Sussmann, J E; Hagenaars, S; Whalley, H C; McIntosh, A M; Thompson, P M; Andreassen, O A

    2016-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty exists about the defining brain changes associated with bipolar disorder (BD). Understanding and quantifying the sources of uncertainty can help generate novel clinical hypotheses about etiology and assist in the development of biomarkers for indexing disease progression and prognosis. Here we were interested in quantifying case–control differences in intracranial volume (ICV) and each of eight subcortical brain measures: nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, lateral ventricles. In a large study of 1710 BD patients and 2594 healthy controls, we found consistent volumetric reductions in BD patients for mean hippocampus (Cohen's d=−0.232; P=3.50 × 10−7) and thalamus (d=−0.148; P=4.27 × 10−3) and enlarged lateral ventricles (d=−0.260; P=3.93 × 10−5) in patients. No significant effect of age at illness onset was detected. Stratifying patients based on clinical subtype (BD type I or type II) revealed that BDI patients had significantly larger lateral ventricles and smaller hippocampus and amygdala than controls. However, when comparing BDI and BDII patients directly, we did not detect any significant differences in brain volume. This likely represents similar etiology between BD subtype classifications. Exploratory analyses revealed significantly larger thalamic volumes in patients taking lithium compared with patients not taking lithium. We detected no significant differences between BDII patients and controls in the largest such comparison to date. Findings in this study should be interpreted with caution and with careful consideration of the limitations inherent to meta-analyzed neuroimaging comparisons. PMID:26857596

  6. Visualization and volumetric structures from MR images of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Parvin, B.; Johnston, W.; Robertson, D.

    1994-03-01

    Pinta is a system for segmentation and visualization of anatomical structures obtained from serial sections reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging. The system approaches the segmentation problem by assigning each volumetric region to an anatomical structure. This is accomplished by satisfying constraints at the pixel level, slice level, and volumetric level. Each slice is represented by an attributed graph, where nodes correspond to regions and links correspond to the relations between regions. These regions are obtained by grouping pixels based on similarity and proximity. The slice level attributed graphs are then coerced to form a volumetric attributed graph, where volumetric consistency can be verified. The main novelty of our approach is in the use of the volumetric graph to ensure consistency from symbolic representations obtained from individual slices. In this fashion, the system allows errors to be made at the slice level, yet removes them when the volumetric consistency cannot be verified. Once the segmentation is complete, the 3D surfaces of the brain can be constructed and visualized.

  7. In vivo volumetric imaging of the human corneo-scleral limbus with spectral domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Bizheva, Kostadinka; Hutchings, Natalie; Sorbara, Luigina; Moayed, Alireza A.; Simpson, Trefford

    2011-01-01

    The limbus is the structurally rich transitional region of tissue between the cornea on one side, and the sclera and conjunctiva on the other. This zone, among other things, contains nerves passing to the cornea, blood and lymph vasculature for oxygen and nutrient delivery and for waste, CO2 removal and drainage of the aqueous humour. In addition, the limbus contains stem cells responsible for the existence and healing of the corneal epithelium. Here we present 3D images of the healthy human limbus, acquired in vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system operating at 1060nm. Cross-sectional and volumetric images were acquired from temporal and nasal locations in the human limbus with ~3µm x 18µm (axial x lateral) resolution in biological tissue at the rate of 92,000 A-scans/s. The imaging enabled detailed mapping of the corneo-scleral tissue morphology, and visualization of structural details such as the Vogt palisades, the blood and lymph vasculature including the Schlemm’s canal and the trabecular meshwork, as well as corneal nerve fiber bundles. Non-invasive, volumetric, high resolution imaging reveals fine details of the normal human limbal structure, and promises to provide invaluable information about its changes in health and disease as well as during and after corneal surgery. PMID:21750758

  8. Ultra-high resolution polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy for brain imaging at 6 um, 3.4 um and 1.3 um resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Akkin, Taner; Magnain, Caroline V.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Cramer, Avilash; Wang, Ruopeng; Sakadžic, Sava; Boas, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Neuroanatomical pathways form the basis for functional activity of brain circuits. In the past, we developed a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography with serial scanning to achieve large-scale brain imaging. The system was able to visualize 3D fiber tracts of ~20 um in diameter. To investigate the neuroanatomical pathways at finer scales, we have now built a polarization-maintaining fiber based ultra-high resolution polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscope (PS-OCM) at 1300 nm. The PS-OCM has an axial resolution of 3.5 um in tissue. The detection setup consists of two spectrometers, acquiring spectral interference on orthogonal polarization channels. With a single measurement, the setup generates four contrasts: reflectivity, cross-polarization, retardance and optic axis orientation. To investigate the capability of PS-OCM at different resolutions, we used three microscope objectives that yield lateral resolutions of 6.0 um, 3.4 um and 1.3 um. Blocks of formalin fixed mouse brain and human brain were scanned. The cross-polarization and retardance images clearly depict the neuronal fiber structures, which are comparable with that generated by the maximum projection of volumetric reflectivity data. The optic axis orientation quantifies the in-plane fiber orientation. With the lateral resolution of 1.3 um, the retardance contrast is weak in white matter due to the shallow depth of focus. Overall, the ultra-high resolution PS-OCM provides a new tool to reveal neuroanatomical maps in the brain at cellular resolution.

  9. Volumetric Forest Change Detection Through Vhr Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Devrim; Stylianidis, Efstratios; Smagas, Konstantinos; Hofer, Martin; Poli, Daniela; Gruen, Armin; Sanchez Martin, Victor; Altan, Orhan; Walli, Andreas; Jimeno, Elisa; Garcia, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Quick and economical ways of detecting of planimetric and volumetric changes of forest areas are in high demand. A research platform, called FORSAT (A satellite processing platform for high resolution forest assessment), was developed for the extraction of 3D geometric information from VHR (very-high resolution) imagery from satellite optical sensors and automatic change detection. This 3D forest information solution was developed during a Eurostars project. FORSAT includes two main units. The first one is dedicated to the geometric and radiometric processing of satellite optical imagery and 2D/3D information extraction. This includes: image radiometric pre-processing, image and ground point measurement, improvement of geometric sensor orientation, quasiepipolar image generation for stereo measurements, digital surface model (DSM) extraction by using a precise and robust image matching approach specially designed for VHR satellite imagery, generation of orthoimages, and 3D measurements in single images using mono-plotting and in stereo images as well as triplets. FORSAT supports most of the VHR optically imagery commonly used for civil applications: IKONOS, OrbView - 3, SPOT - 5 HRS, SPOT - 5 HRG, QuickBird, GeoEye-1, WorldView-1/2, Pléiades 1A/1B, SPOT 6/7, and sensors of similar type to be expected in the future. The second unit of FORSAT is dedicated to 3D surface comparison for change detection. It allows users to import digital elevation models (DEMs), align them using an advanced 3D surface matching approach and calculate the 3D differences and volume changes between epochs. To this end our 3D surface matching method LS3D is being used. FORSAT is a single source and flexible forest information solution with a very competitive price/quality ratio, allowing expert and non-expert remote sensing users to monitor forests in three and four dimensions from VHR optical imagery for many forest information needs. The capacity and benefits of FORSAT have been tested in

  10. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan; Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan

    2012-04-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  11. Hybrid Multiphoton Volumetric Functional Imaging of Large Scale Bioengineered Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Paluch, Shir; Dvorkin, Roman; Brosh, Inbar; Shoham, Shy

    2014-01-01

    Planar neural networks and interfaces serve as versatile in vitro models of central nervous system physiology, but adaptations of related methods to three dimensions (3D) have met with limited success. Here, we demonstrate for the first time volumetric functional imaging in a bio-engineered neural tissue growing in a transparent hydrogel with cortical cellular and synaptic densities, by introducing complementary new developments in nonlinear microscopy and neural tissue engineering. Our system uses a novel hybrid multiphoton microscope design combining a 3D scanning-line temporal-focusing subsystem and a conventional laser-scanning multiphoton microscope to provide functional and structural volumetric imaging capabilities: dense microscopic 3D sampling at tens of volumes/sec of structures with mm-scale dimensions containing a network of over 1000 developing cells with complex spontaneous activity patterns. These developments open new opportunities for large-scale neuronal interfacing and for applications of 3D engineered networks ranging from basic neuroscience to the screening of neuroactive substances. PMID:24898000

  12. Hybrid multiphoton volumetric functional imaging of large-scale bioengineered neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Hod; Marom, Anat; Paluch, Shir; Dvorkin, Roman; Brosh, Inbar; Shoham, Shy

    2014-06-01

    Planar neural networks and interfaces serve as versatile in vitro models of central nervous system physiology, but adaptations of related methods to three dimensions (3D) have met with limited success. Here, we demonstrate for the first time volumetric functional imaging in a bioengineered neural tissue growing in a transparent hydrogel with cortical cellular and synaptic densities, by introducing complementary new developments in nonlinear microscopy and neural tissue engineering. Our system uses a novel hybrid multiphoton microscope design combining a 3D scanning-line temporal-focusing subsystem and a conventional laser-scanning multiphoton microscope to provide functional and structural volumetric imaging capabilities: dense microscopic 3D sampling at tens of volumes per second of structures with mm-scale dimensions containing a network of over 1,000 developing cells with complex spontaneous activity patterns. These developments open new opportunities for large-scale neuronal interfacing and for applications of 3D engineered networks ranging from basic neuroscience to the screening of neuroactive substances.

  13. Volumetric loss quantification using ultrasonic inductively coupled transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Hay, Thomas R.; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2015-03-01

    The pulse-echo method is widely used for plate and pipe thickness measurement. However, the pulse echo method does not work well for detecting localized volumetric loss in thick-wall tubes, as created by erosion damage, when the morphology of volumetric loss is irregular and can reflect ultrasonic pulses away from the transducer, making it difficult to detect an echo. In this paper, we propose a novel method using an inductively coupled transducer to generate longitudinal waves propagating in a thick-wall aluminum tube for the volumetric loss quantification. In the experiment, longitudinal waves exhibit diffraction effects during the propagation which can be explained by the Huygens-Fresnel principle. The diffractive waves are also shown to be significantly delayed by the machined volumetric loss on the inside surface of the thick-wall aluminum tube. It is also shown that the inductively coupled transducers can generate and receive similar ultrasonic waves to those from wired transducers, and the inductively coupled transducers perform as well as the wired transducers in the volumetric loss quantification when other conditions are the same.

  14. Volumetric image display for complex 3D data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Che-Chih; Chen, Jyh Shing

    2000-05-01

    A volumetric image display is a new display technology capable of displaying computer generated 3D images in a volumetric space. Many viewers can walk around the display and see the image from omni-directions simultaneously without wearing any glasses. The image is real and possesses all major elements in both physiological and psychological depth cues. Due to the volumetric nature of its image, the VID can provide the most natural human-machine interface in operations involving 3D data manipulation and 3D targets monitoring. The technology creates volumetric 3D images by projecting a series of profiling images distributed in the space form a volumetric image because of the after-image effect of human eyes. Exemplary applications in biomedical image visualization were tested on a prototype display, using different methods to display a data set from Ct-scans. The features of this display technology make it most suitable for applications that require quick understanding of the 3D relations, need frequent spatial interactions with the 3D images, or involve time-varying 3D data. It can also be useful for group discussion and decision making.

  15. A prototype table-top inverse-geometry volumetric CT system.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Star-Lack, Josh; Bennett, N Robert; Mazin, Samuel R; Solomon, Edward G; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pelc, Norbert J

    2006-06-01

    A table-top volumetric CT system has been implemented that is able to image a 5-cm-thick volume in one circular scan with no cone-beam artifacts. The prototype inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) scanner consists of a large-area, scanned x-ray source and a detector array that is smaller in the transverse direction. The IGCT geometry provides sufficient volumetric sampling because the source and detector have the same axial, or slice direction, extent. This paper describes the implementation of the table-top IGCT scanner, which is based on the NexRay Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray system (NexRay, Inc., Los Gatos, CA) and an investigation of the system performance. The alignment and flat-field calibration procedures are described, along with a summary of the reconstruction algorithm. The resolution and noise performance of the prototype IGCT system are studied through experiments and further supported by analytical predictions and simulations. To study the presence of cone-beam artifacts, a "Defrise" phantom was scanned on both the prototype IGCT scanner and a micro CT system with a +/-5 cone angle for a 4.5-cm volume thickness. Images of inner ear specimens are presented and compared to those from clinical CT systems. Results showed that the prototype IGCT system has a 0.25-mm isotropic resolution and that noise comparable to that from a clinical scanner with equivalent spatial resolution is achievable. The measured MTF and noise values agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions and computer simulations. The IGCT system was able to faithfully reconstruct the laminated pattern of the Defrise phantom while the micro CT system suffered severe cone-beam artifacts for the same object. The inner ear acquisition verified that the IGCT system can image a complex anatomical object, and the resulting images exhibited more high-resolution details than the clinical CT acquisition. Overall, the successful implementation of the prototype system supports the IGCT concept for single

  16. On the use of volumetric strain meters to infer additional characteristics of short-period seismic radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, R.D.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Glassmoyer, G.

    1989-01-01

    Volumetric strain meters (Sacks-Evertson design) are installed at 15 sites along the San Andreas fault system, to monitor long-term strain changes for earthquake prediction. Deployment of portable broadband, high-resolution digital recorders (GEOS) at several of the sites extends the detection band for volumetric strain to periods shorter than 5 ?? 10-2 sec and permits the simultaneous observation of seismic radiation fields using conventional short-period pendulum seismometers. Recordings of local and regional earthquakes indicate that dilatometers respond to P energy but not direct shear energy and that straingrams can be used to resolve superimposed reflect P and S waves for inference of wave characteristics not permitted by either sensor alone. Simultaneous measurements of incident P- and S-wave amplitudes are used to introduce a technique for single-station estimates of wave field inhomogeneity, free-surface reflection coefficients and local material P velocity. -from Authors

  17. A high volume, high throughput volumetric sorption analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Y. C.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.; Buckley, P.; Clement, J.

    2011-03-01

    In this talk we will present an overview of our new Hydrogen Test Fixture (HTF) constructed by the Midwest Research Institute for The Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology to test activated carbon monoliths for hydrogen gas storage. The HTF is an automated, computer-controlled volumetric instrument for rapid screening and manipulation of monoliths under an inert atmosphere (to exclude degradation of carbon from exposure to oxygen). The HTF allows us to measure large quantity (up to 500 g) of sample in a 0.5 l test tank, making our results less sensitive to sample inhomogeneity. The HTF can measure isotherms at pressures ranging from 1 to 300 bar at room temperature. For comparison, other volumetric instruments such as Hiden Isochema's HTP-1 Volumetric Analyser can only measure carbon samples up to 150 mg at pressures up to 200 bar. Work supported by the US DOD Contract # N00164-08-C-GS37.

  18. Automated Segmentation and Shape Characterization of Volumetric Data

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Vitaly L.; Frank, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of complex shapes embedded within volumetric data is an important step in a wide range of applications. Standard approaches to this problem employ surface based methods that require inefficient, time consuming, and error prone steps of surface segmentation and inflation to satisfy the uniqueness or stability of subsequent surface fitting algorithms. Here we present a novel method based on a spherical wave decomposition (SWD) of the data that overcomes several of these limitations by directly analyzing the entire data volume, obviating the segmentation, inflation, and surface fitting steps, significantly reducing the computational time and eliminating topological errors while providing a more detailed quantitative description based upon a more complete theoretical framework of volumetric data. The method is demonstrated and compared to the current state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods for segmentation and characterization of volumetric magnetic resonance imaging data of the human brain. PMID:24521852

  19. Modelling volumetric growth in a thick walled fibre reinforced artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, T. S. E.; Watton, P. N.; Luo, X. Y.; Ventikos, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A novel framework for simulating growth and remodelling (G&R) of a fibre-reinforced artery, including volumetric adaption, is proposed. We show how to implement this model into a finite element framework and propose and examine two underlying assumptions for modelling growth, namely constant individual density (CID) or adaptive individual density (AID). Moreover, we formulate a novel approach which utilises a combination of both AID and CID to simulate volumetric G&R for a tissue composed of several different constituents. We consider a special case of the G&R of an artery subjected to prescribed elastin degradation and we theorise on the assumptions and suitability of CID, AID and the mixed approach for modelling arterial biology. For simulating the volumetric changes that occur during aneurysm enlargement, we observe that it is advantageous to describe the growth of collagen using CID whilst it is preferable to model the atrophy of elastin using AID.

  20. Evaluation of feature-based 3-d registration of probabilistic volumetric scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Maria I.; Ulusoy, Ali O.; Mundy, Joseph L.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic estimation of the world surfaces from aerial images has seen much attention and progress in recent years. Among current modeling technologies, probabilistic volumetric models (PVMs) have evolved as an alternative representation that can learn geometry and appearance in a dense and probabilistic manner. Recent progress, in terms of storage and speed, achieved in the area of volumetric modeling, opens the opportunity to develop new frameworks that make use of the PVM to pursue the ultimate goal of creating an entire map of the earth, where one can reason about the semantics and dynamics of the 3-d world. Aligning 3-d models collected at different time-instances constitutes an important step for successful fusion of large spatio-temporal information. This paper evaluates how effectively probabilistic volumetric models can be aligned using robust feature-matching techniques, while considering different scenarios that reflect the kind of variability observed across aerial video collections from different time instances. More precisely, this work investigates variability in terms of discretization, resolution and sampling density, errors in the camera orientation, and changes in illumination and geographic characteristics. All results are given for large-scale, outdoor sites. In order to facilitate the comparison of the registration performance of PVMs to that of other 3-d reconstruction techniques, the registration pipeline is also carried out using Patch-based Multi-View Stereo (PMVS) algorithm. Registration performance is similar for scenes that have favorable geometry and the appearance characteristics necessary for high quality reconstruction. In scenes containing trees, such as a park, or many buildings, such as a city center, registration performance is significantly more accurate when using the PVM.

  1. Multiple sparse volumetric priors for distributed EEG source reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Strobbe, Gregor; van Mierlo, Pieter; De Vos, Maarten; Mijović, Bogdan; Hallez, Hans; Van Huffel, Sabine; López, José David; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2014-10-15

    We revisit the multiple sparse priors (MSP) algorithm implemented in the statistical parametric mapping software (SPM) for distributed EEG source reconstruction (Friston et al., 2008). In the present implementation, multiple cortical patches are introduced as source priors based on a dipole source space restricted to a cortical surface mesh. In this note, we present a technique to construct volumetric cortical regions to introduce as source priors by restricting the dipole source space to a segmented gray matter layer and using a region growing approach. This extension allows to reconstruct brain structures besides the cortical surface and facilitates the use of more realistic volumetric head models including more layers, such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), compared to the standard 3-layered scalp-skull-brain head models. We illustrated the technique with ERP data and anatomical MR images in 12 subjects. Based on the segmented gray matter for each of the subjects, cortical regions were created and introduced as source priors for MSP-inversion assuming two types of head models. The standard 3-layered scalp-skull-brain head models and extended 4-layered head models including CSF. We compared these models with the current implementation by assessing the free energy corresponding with each of the reconstructions using Bayesian model selection for group studies. Strong evidence was found in favor of the volumetric MSP approach compared to the MSP approach based on cortical patches for both types of head models. Overall, the strongest evidence was found in favor of the volumetric MSP reconstructions based on the extended head models including CSF. These results were verified by comparing the reconstructed activity. The use of volumetric cortical regions as source priors is a useful complement to the present implementation as it allows to introduce more complex head models and volumetric source priors in future studies.

  2. CMUT-based Volumetric Ultrasonic Imaging Array Design for Forward Looking ICE and IVUS Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Rashid, Muhammad W.; Satir, Sarp; Gurun, Gokce; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Designing a mechanically flexible catheter based volumetric ultrasonic imaging device for intravascular and intracardiac imaging is challenging due to small transducer area and limited number of cables. With a few parallel channels, synthetic phased array processing is necessary to acquire data from a large number of transducer elements. This increases the data collection time and hence reduces frame rate and causes artifacts due to tissue-transducer motion. Some of these drawbacks can be resolved by different array designs offered by CMUT-on-CMOS approach. We recently implemented a 2.1-mm diameter single chip 10 MHz dual ring CMUT-on-CMOS array for forward looking ICE with 64-transmit and 56-receive elements along with associated electronics. These volumetric arrays have the small element size required by high operating frequencies and achieve sub mm resolution, but the system would be susceptible to motion artifacts. To enable real time imaging with high SNR, we designed novel arrays consisting of multiple defocused annular rings for transmit aperture and a single ring receive array. The annular transmit rings are utilized to act as a high power element by focusing to a virtual ring shaped line behind the aperture. In this case, image reconstruction is performed by only receive beamforming, reducing total required firing steps from 896 to 14 with a trade-off in image resolution. The SNR of system is improved more than 5 dB for the same frequency and frame rate as compared to the dual ring array, which can be utilized to achieve the same resolution by increasing the operating frequency. PMID:23366605

  3. CMUT-based volumetric ultrasonic imaging array design for forward looking ICE and IVUS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Rashid, Muhammad W.; Satir, Sarp; Gurun, Gokce; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. L.

    2013-03-01

    Designing a mechanically flexible catheter based volumetric ultrasonic imaging device for intravascular and intracardiac imaging is challenging due to small transducer area and limited number of cables. With a few parallel channels, synthetic phased array processing is necessary to acquire data from a large number of transducer elements. This increases the data collection time and hence reduces frame rate and causes artifacts due to tissue-transducer motion. Some of these drawbacks can be resolved by different array designs offered by CMUT-on-CMOS approach. We recently implemented a 2.1-mm diameter single chip 10 MHz dual ring CMUT-on-CMOS array for forward looking ICE with 64-transmit and 56-receive elements along with associated electronics. These volumetric arrays have the small element size required by high operating frequencies and achieve sub mm resolution, but the system would be susceptible to motion artifacts. To enable real time imaging with high SNR, we designed novel arrays consisting of multiple defocused annular rings for transmit aperture and a single ring receive array. The annular transmit rings are utilized to act as a high power element by focusing to a virtual ring shaped line behind the aperture. In this case, image reconstruction is performed by only receive beamforming, reducing total required firing steps from 896 to 14 with a trade-off in image resolution. The SNR of system is improved more than 5 dB for the same frequency and frame rate as compared to the dual ring array, which can be utilized to achieve the same resolution by increasing the operating frequency.

  4. Multi-atlas multi-shape segmentation of fetal brain MRI for volumetric and morphometric analysis of ventriculomegaly.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Ali; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2012-04-15

    The recent development of motion robust super-resolution fetal brain MRI holds out the potential for dramatic new advances in volumetric and morphometric analysis. Volumetric analysis based on volumetric and morphometric biomarkers of the developing fetal brain must include segmentation. Automatic segmentation of fetal brain MRI is challenging, however, due to the highly variable size and shape of the developing brain; possible structural abnormalities; and the relatively poor resolution of fetal MRI scans. To overcome these limitations, we present a novel, constrained, multi-atlas, multi-shape automatic segmentation method that specifically addresses the challenge of segmenting multiple structures with similar intensity values in subjects with strong anatomic variability. Accordingly, we have applied this method to shape segmentation of normal, dilated, or fused lateral ventricles for quantitative analysis of ventriculomegaly (VM), which is a pivotal finding in the earliest stages of fetal brain development, and warrants further investigation. Utilizing these innovative techniques, we introduce novel volumetric and morphometric biomarkers of VM comparing these values to those that are generated by standard methods of VM analysis, i.e., by measuring the ventricular atrial diameter (AD) on manually selected sections of 2D ultrasound or 2D MRI. To this end, we studied 25 normal and abnormal fetuses in the gestation age (GA) range of 19 to 39 weeks (mean=28.26, stdev=6.56). This heterogeneous dataset was essentially used to 1) validate our segmentation method for normal and abnormal ventricles; and 2) show that the proposed biomarkers may provide improved detection of VM as compared to the AD measurement.

  5. Volumetric Pricing of Agricultural Water Supplies: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Ronald C.; Perry, Gregory M.

    1985-07-01

    Models of water consumption by rice producers are conceptualized and then estimated using cross-sectional time series data obtained from 16 Texas canal operators for the years 1977-1982. Two alternative econometric models demonstrate that both volumetric and flat rate water charges are strongly and inversely related to agricultural water consumption. Nonprice conservation incentives accompanying flat rates are hypothesized to explain the negative correlation of flat rate charges and water consumption. Application of these results suggests that water supply organizations in the sample population converting to volumetric pricing will generally reduce water consumption.

  6. Volumetric Hall effect tomography--a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wen, H

    1999-07-01

    Hall effect imaging is an ultrasound-based method of mapping spatial variations in the dielectric constants of an acoustically-uniform sample. This paper presents three-dimensional Hall effect images of phantoms obtained by scanning a single transducer across a two-dimensional grid, effectively simulating two-dimensional phased-array signal reception. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of volumetric Hall effect tomography and show the advantage of volumetric scans over planar scans. The images reflect several limitations of the current scanning method and point to directions for further hardware development. The inherent limitations of Hall effect imaging are also discussed in light of these results.

  7. Subcortical and cerebellar volumetric deficits in paediatric sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Clayden, Jonathan D; Kirkham, Fenella J; Cox, Timothy C; Saunders, Dawn E; Clark, Chris A

    2013-11-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is associated with silent cerebral infarction (SCI), affecting white and cortical grey matter, but there are few data on subcortical volumes. We analysed retrospective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 26 SCA patients and 20 controls, comparing mean subcortical volumes between three groups: controls, SCA with SCI (n = 13) and SCA without visible abnormality (n = 13). Specific volumetric differences were found in the hippocampus, amygdala, pallidum, caudate, putamen, thalamus, and cerebellum. This is the first study to demonstrate subcortical volume change in SCA, with the most severe volumetric deficits occurring in children with SCI seen on MRI.

  8. Neurologic applications of whole-brain volumetric multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kenneth V; Mokin, Maxim; Bates, Vernice E

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of computed tomography (CT) scanning in the 1970s revolutionized the way clinicians could diagnose and treat stroke. Subsequent advances in CT technology significantly reduced radiation dose, reduced metallic artifact, and achieved speeds that enable dynamic functional studies. The recent addition of whole-brain volumetric CT perfusion technology has given clinicians a powerful tool to assess parenchymal perfusion parameters as well as visualize dynamic changes in blood vessel flow throughout the brain during a single cardiac cycle. This article reviews clinical applications of volumetric multimodal CT that helped to guide and manage care.

  9. Volumetric Hall Effect Tomography – A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    Hall effect imaging is an ultrasound-based method of mapping spatial variations in the dielectric constants of an acoustically-uniform sample. This paper presents three-dimensional Hall effect images of phantoms obtained by scanning a single transducer across a two-dimensional grid, effectively simulating two-dimensional phased-array signal reception. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of volumetric Hall effect tomography and show the advantage of volumetric scans over planar scans. The images reflect several limitations of the current scanning method and point to directions for further hardware development. The inherent limitations of Hall effect imaging are also discussed in light of these results. PMID:10604800

  10. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  11. Controlling the light distribution through turbid media with wavefront shaping based on volumetric optoacoustic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Estrada, Héctor; Özbek, Ali; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront shaping based on optoacoustic (photoacoustic) feedback has recently emerged as a promising tool to control the light distribution in optically-scattering media. In this approach, the phase of a short-pulsed light beam is spatially-modulated to create constructive light interference (focusing) at specific locations in the speckle pattern of the scattered wavefield. The optoacoustic signals generated by light absorption provide a convenient feedback mechanism to optimize the phase mask of the spatial light modulator in order to achieve the desired light intensity distribution. The optimization procedure can be done by directly considering the acquired signals or the reconstructed images of the light absorption distribution. Recently, our group has introduced a volumetric (three-dimensional) optoacoustic wavefront shaping platform that enables monitoring the distribution of light absorption in an entire volume with frame rates of tens of Hz. With this approach, it is possible to simultaneously control the volumetric light distribution through turbid media. Experiments performed with absorbing microparticles distributed in a three-dimensional region showcase the feasibility of enhancing the light intensity at specific points, where the size of particles is also essential to maximize the signal enhancement. The advantages provided by optoacoustic imaging in terms of spatial and temporal resolution anticipate new capabilities of wavefront shaping techniques in biomedical optics.

  12. Deep learning for automatic localization, identification, and segmentation of vertebral bodies in volumetric MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzani, Amin; Rasoulian, Abtin; Seitel, Alexander; Fels, Sidney; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an automatic method for vertebra localization, labeling, and segmentation in multi-slice Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Prior work in this area on MR images mostly requires user interaction while our method is fully automatic. Cubic intensity-based features are extracted from image voxels. A deep learning approach is used for simultaneous localization and identification of vertebrae. The localized points are refined by local thresholding in the region of the detected vertebral column. Thereafter, a statistical multi-vertebrae model is initialized on the localized vertebrae. An iterative Expectation Maximization technique is used to register the vertebral body of the model to the image edges and obtain a segmentation of the lumbar vertebral bodies. The method is evaluated by applying to nine volumetric MR images of the spine. The results demonstrate 100% vertebra identification and a mean surface error of below 2.8 mm for 3D segmentation. Computation time is less than three minutes per high-resolution volumetric image.

  13. Volumetric synthetic aperture imaging with a piezoelectric 2D row-column probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Beers, Christopher; Lei, Anders; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row-column addressed transducer array. Utilizing single element transmit events, a volume rate of 90 Hz down to 14 cm deep is achieved. Data are obtained using the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS with a 70 MHz sampling frequency and beamformed using a delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. A signal-to-noise ratio of up to 32 dB is measured on the beamformed images of a tissue mimicking phantom with attenuation of 0.5 dB cm-1 MHz-1, from the surface of the probe to the penetration depth of 300λ. Measured lateral resolution as Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) is between 4λ and 10λ for 18% to 65% of the penetration depth from the surface of the probe. The averaged contrast is 13 dB for the same range. The imaging performance assessment results may represent a reference guide for possible applications of such an array in different medical fields.

  14. Multitracer: a Java-based tool for anatomic delineation of grayscale volumetric images.

    PubMed

    Woods, Roger P

    2003-08-01

    A Java-based tool for delineating anatomic boundaries in 8- and 16- bit grayscale volumetric images is described. Modern features implemented by the tool include the ability to simultaneously view the current cursor position and the previously delineated boundaries on three orthogonal planes, the ability to magnify images during delineation using high-quality interpolation, the ability to encode and save boundaries with subvoxel resolution, and the ability to utilize coregistered images interchangeably during delineation. Additional features facilitate use of the tool in a multiuser, multiplatform environment and provide support for the documentation of anatomic delineation protocols. In addition to providing direct estimates of structure volumes, areas, and lengths, the tool allows contoured boundaries to be exported for more sophisticated analyses. The tool also provides support for manual editing of image volumes to remove confounding structures and for manual correction of image volumes that have been inaccurately edited. In addition to its research utility, the tool also has potential value in education, allowing students to interact with volumetric data and structural boundaries in three dimensions.

  15. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, C.; Breen, S.; Purdie, T. G.; Owrangi, A.; Publicover, J.; Bartolac, S.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods: The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as ''volume'' and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Results: Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE{sub 160mm}=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Conclusions: Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for

  16. Obscuring surface anatomy in volumetric imaging data.

    PubMed

    Milchenko, Mikhail; Marcus, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The identifying or sensitive anatomical features in MR and CT images used in research raise patient privacy concerns when such data are shared. In order to protect human subject privacy, we developed a method of anatomical surface modification and investigated the effects of such modification on image statistics and common neuroimaging processing tools. Common approaches to obscuring facial features typically remove large portions of the voxels. The approach described here focuses on blurring the anatomical surface instead, to avoid impinging on areas of interest and hard edges that can confuse processing tools. The algorithm proceeds by extracting a thin boundary layer containing surface anatomy from a region of interest. This layer is then "stretched" and "flattened" to fit into a thin "box" volume. After smoothing along a plane roughly parallel to anatomy surface, this volume is transformed back onto the boundary layer of the original data. The above method, named normalized anterior filtering, was coded in MATLAB and applied on a number of high resolution MR and CT scans. To test its effect on automated tools, we compared the output of selected common skull stripping and MR gain field correction methods used on unmodified and obscured data. With this paper, we hope to improve the understanding of the effect of surface deformation approaches on the quality of de-identified data and to provide a useful de-identification tool for MR and CT acquisitions.

  17. VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION IN LARGE UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of experiments was conducted to determine whether volumetric leak detection system presently used to test underground storage tanks (USTs) up to 38,000 L (10,000 gal) in capacity could meet EPA's regulatory standards for tank tightness and automatic tank gauging systems whe...

  18. Uptake and Loss of Carbon Dioxide in Volumetric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macca, Carlo

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of ratio diagrams, which plot the calculations of equilibrium concentrations of the species of the carbonate system. Provides examples to describe how these diagrams can be used to illustrate the behavior systems of interest in volumetric analysis, where absorption or loss of carbon dioxide takes place. (TW)

  19. Space-Time Transfinite Interpolation of Volumetric Material Properties.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Mathieu; Fryazinov, Oleg; Adzhiev, Valery; Comninos, Peter; Pasko, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents a novel technique based on extension of a general mathematical method of transfinite interpolation to solve an actual problem in the context of a heterogeneous volume modelling area. It deals with time-dependent changes to the volumetric material properties (material density, colour, and others) as a transformation of the volumetric material distributions in space-time accompanying geometric shape transformations such as metamorphosis. The main idea is to represent the geometry of both objects by scalar fields with distance properties, to establish in a higher-dimensional space a time gap during which the geometric transformation takes place, and to use these scalar fields to apply the new space-time transfinite interpolation to volumetric material attributes within this time gap. The proposed solution is analytical in its nature, does not require heavy numerical computations and can be used in real-time applications. Applications of this technique also include texturing and displacement mapping of time-variant surfaces, and parametric design of volumetric microstructures.

  20. Video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography-based microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Wei, Wei; Xu, Jingjiang; Qi, Xiaoli; Davis, Wyatt O.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-04-01

    Video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography (vOCT) is relatively young in the field of OCT imaging but has great potential in biomedical applications. Due to the recent development of the MHz range swept laser sources, vOCT has started to gain attention in the community. Here, we report the first in vivo video-rate volumetric OCT-based microangiography (vOMAG) system by integrating an 18-kHz resonant microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror with a 1.6-MHz FDML swept source operating at ˜1.3 μm wavelength. Because the MEMS scanner can offer an effective B-frame rate of 36 kHz, we are able to engineer vOMAG with a video rate up to 25 Hz. This system was utilized for real-time volumetric in vivo visualization of cerebral microvasculature in mice. Moreover, we monitored the blood perfusion dynamics during stimulation within mouse ear in vivo. We also discussed this system's limitations. Prospective MEMS-enabled OCT probes with a real-time volumetric functional imaging capability can have a significant impact on endoscopic imaging and image-guided surgery applications.

  1. Combination Gravimetric/Volumetric Sorption Instrument for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethea, Donald; Burress, Jacob

    The use of gaseous fuels such as hydrogen and methane (natural gas) will reduce emissions. Unfortunately, the storage of hydrogen and methane at room temperature is difficult because they are both supercritical gases, making the adoption of these fuels cumbersome. One means of overcoming the storage problem is to use physisorption-based systems which exploit the van der Waals interaction between the gas and a nanoporous material to compress the gases to near liquid densities. To measure the amount of gas in these materials, gravimetric or volumetric methods are employed. Gravimetric weighs the amount of gas and volumetric uses differences in gas pressures. Gravimetric systems typically have problems with buoyancy corrections. Volumetric systems normally have larger uncertainties that propagate through the isotherm. A modified system will be presented which allows for both gravimetric and volumetric gas sorption measurements. Additionally, the buoyancy corrections for the gravimetric measurements are significantly small and less than the uncertainties in the measurement. This apparatus can take measurements of most gases at room temperature and up to 200 bar.

  2. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  3. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  4. Analysis of Changing Swarm Rate using Volumetric Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, T.; Ogata, Y.; Kimura, K.; Maeda, K.; Kobayashi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Near the eastern coast of Izu peninsula is an active submarine volcanic region in Japan, where magma intrusions have been observed many times. The forecast of earthquake swarm activities and eruptions are serious concern particularly in nearby hot spring resort areas. It is well known that temporal durations of the swarm activities have been correlated with early volumetric strain changes at a certain observation station of about 20 km distance apart. Therefore the Earthquake Research Committee (2010) investigated some empirical statistical relations to predict sizes of the swarm activity. Here we looked at the background seismicity rate changes during these swarm periods using the non-stationary ETAS model (Kumazawa and Ogata, 2013, 2014), and have found the followings. The modified volumetric strain data, by removing the effect of earth tides, precipitation and coseismic jumps, have significantly higher cross-correlations to the estimated background rates of the ETAS model than to the swarm rate-changes. Specifically, the background seismicity rate synchronizes clearer to the strain change by the lags around a half day. These relations suggest an enhanced prediction of earthquakes in this region using volumetric strain measurements. Hence we propose an extended ETAS model where the background rate is modulated by the volumetric strain data. We have also found that the response function to the strain data can be well approximated by an exponential functions with the same decay rate, but that their intersects are inversely proportional to the distances between the volumetric strain-meter and the onset location of the swarm. Our numerical results by the same proposed model show consistent outcomes for the various major swarms in this region.

  5. Aberration-free volumetric high-speed imaging of in vivo retina

    PubMed Central

    Hillmann, Dierck; Spahr, Hendrik; Hain, Carola; Sudkamp, Helge; Franke, Gesa; Pfäffle, Clara; Winter, Christian; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2016-01-01

    Certain topics in research and advancements in medical diagnostics may benefit from improved temporal and spatial resolution during non-invasive optical imaging of living tissue. However, so far no imaging technique can generate entirely diffraction-limited tomographic volumes with a single data acquisition, if the target moves or changes rapidly, such as the human retina. Additionally, the presence of aberrations may represent further difficulties. We show that a simple interferometric setup–based on parallelized optical coherence tomography–acquires volumetric data with 10 billion voxels per second, exceeding previous imaging speeds by an order of magnitude. This allows us to computationally obtain and correct defocus and aberrations resulting in entirely diffraction-limited volumes. As demonstration, we imaged living human retina with clearly visible nerve fiber layer, small capillary networks, and photoreceptor cells. Furthermore, the technique can also obtain phase-sensitive volumes of other scattering structures at unprecedented acquisition speeds. PMID:27762314

  6. Aberration-free volumetric high-speed imaging of in vivo retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmann, Dierck; Spahr, Hendrik; Hain, Carola; Sudkamp, Helge; Franke, Gesa; Pfäffle, Clara; Winter, Christian; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2016-10-01

    Certain topics in research and advancements in medical diagnostics may benefit from improved temporal and spatial resolution during non-invasive optical imaging of living tissue. However, so far no imaging technique can generate entirely diffraction-limited tomographic volumes with a single data acquisition, if the target moves or changes rapidly, such as the human retina. Additionally, the presence of aberrations may represent further difficulties. We show that a simple interferometric setup–based on parallelized optical coherence tomography–acquires volumetric data with 10 billion voxels per second, exceeding previous imaging speeds by an order of magnitude. This allows us to computationally obtain and correct defocus and aberrations resulting in entirely diffraction-limited volumes. As demonstration, we imaged living human retina with clearly visible nerve fiber layer, small capillary networks, and photoreceptor cells. Furthermore, the technique can also obtain phase-sensitive volumes of other scattering structures at unprecedented acquisition speeds.

  7. Quantification of pulmonary arterial wall distensibility using parameters extracted from volumetric micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    1999-09-01

    Stiffening, or loss of distensibility, of arterial vessel walls is among the manifestations of a number of vascular diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension. We are attempting to quantify the mechanical properties of vessel walls of the pulmonary arterial tree using parameters derived from high-resolution volumetric x-ray CT images of rat lungs. The pulmonary arterial trees of the excised lungs are filled with a contrast agent. The lungs are imaged with arterial pressures spanning the physiological range. Vessel segment diameters are measured from the inlet to the periphery, and distensibilities calculated from diameters as a function of pressure. The method shows promise as an adjunct to other morphometric techniques such as histology and corrosion casting. It possesses the advantages of being nondestructive, characterizing the vascular structures while the lungs are imaged rapidly and in a near-physiological state, and providing the ability to associate mechanical properties with vessel location in the intact tree hierarchy.

  8. Accuracy of model-based tracking of knee kinematics and cartilage contact measured by dynamic volumetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jarred; Monawer, Arezu; Chaudhary, Rajeev; Johnson, Kevin M; Wieben, Oliver; Kijowski, Richard; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of knee kinematics and cartilage contact measured by volumetric dynamic MRI. A motor-actuated phantom drove femoral and tibial bone segments through cyclic 3D motion patterns. Volumetric images were continuously acquired using a 3D radially undersampled cine spoiled gradient echo sequence (SPGR-VIPR). Image data was binned based on position measured via a MRI-compatible rotary encoder. High-resolution static images were segmented to create bone models. Model-based tracking was performed by optimally registering the bone models to the volumetric images at each frame of the SPGR-VIPR series. 3D tibiofemoral translations and orientations were reconstructed, and compared to kinematics obtained by tracking fiducial markers. Imaging was repeated on a healthy subject who performed cyclic knee flexion-extension. Cartilage contact for the subject was assessed by measuring the overlap between articular cartilage surfaces. Model-based tracking was able to track tibiofemoral angles and translations with precisions less than 0.8° and 0.5mm. These precisions resulted in an uncertainty of less than 0.5mm in cartilage contact location. Dynamic SPGR-VIPR imaging can accurately assess in vivo knee kinematics and cartilage contact during voluntary knee motion performed in a MRI scanner. This technology could facilitate the quantitative investigation of links between joint mechanics and the development of osteoarthritis.

  9. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  10. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-07-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels.

  11. Volumetric index of Tl-201 uptake in symptomatic patients after high - dose radiation treatment for high-grade gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P.A.; Garada, B.M.; Loeffler, J.S. |

    1995-05-01

    To verify the utility of a volumetric estimation of Tl-201 uptake in the context of possible astrocytoma recurrence after surgery, radiotherapy plus stereotactic boost (radiosurgery/brachitherapy), we analyzed sequential Tl-201/Tc99m-HMPAO brain SPECT studies of 28 patients (18 m/10 f). These were categorized as having tumor mass recurrence (TM), infiltrating tumor cells but no definite tumor mass (IT), or radiation changes and necrosis (RCN) after stereotactic biopsy and/or craniotomy. SPECT studies were obtained with a high-resolution dedicated gamma camera (CERASPECT, Digital Scinitgraphics, Inc.) and image acquisition was performed after intravenous Tl-201 (18.5 MBq) and Tc-99m HMPAO (740 MBq). In order to include relevant information about tumor burden, a volumetric index of Tl-201 uptake was expressed in cm{sup 3} related to voxel size (4.6 x 10{sup -3} cc) within an elliptical ROI that included the tumor area. Only voxels with a threshold {ge} 2 in relation to the average scalp Tl-201 uptake were included and this total number of voxels expressed in cc was compared to previously established maximal tumor/scalp Tl-201 uptake ratios (T/S) and histopathology. Results are presented as the median (min-max) and differences were considered significant for p<0.05. Differences were significant between all groups for both ratios and volume indices and correlation between the two variables was 0.90. In conclusion, the volumetric index of Tl-201 is similar to the maximal Tl-201 T/S ratios in discriminating tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis, suggesting a future role for the volumetric index estimation in the evaluation of treatment efficacy and patient follow-up.

  12. Initialization of a Numerical Mesoscale Model with ALEXI-derived Volumetric Soil Moisture: Case Results and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Hain, C. R.; Anderson, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Soil moisture plays a vital role in the portioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface energy budget, although high spatial-resolution observations of it are quite rare. The ALEXI model contains the two-source land-surface representation of Norman et al. (1995), which partitions surface fluxes and radiometric temperature into canopy and soil contributions based on the fraction of vegetation cover within the scene. Anderson et al. (1997) and Mecikalski (1999) detail the implementation of ALEXI as a regional-scale application over the continental United States. This model relies on remote sensing data to operate, including GOES-derived surface brightness temperature changes, AVHRR-derived land cover properties, as well as synoptic weather data to operate (Mecikalski, 1999). This version of the ALEXI algorithm has been run daily on a 10 km resolution grid from the years 2002 to present. ALEXI diagnoses a fraction of potential evapotranspiration (fPET) for both the surface layer (0-5 cm) and root-zone (5-200 cm), given a calculation of the potential ET for each pixel. In current mesoscale modeling the fraction of potential ET can be directly related to a fraction of available water, which in turn can be used to calculate volumetric soil moisture for a given soil texture. Soil moisture conditions of the surface and root-zone yield a distinctive thermal signature, where moisture deficiency will lead to surfaces warming more quickly. Current land-surface models (LDAS, NLDAS) such as those used in the North American Mesoscale Model (NAM) use antecedent precipitation as the primary component to the calculation of volumetric soil moisture. These models use four layers in their soil model (0-10, 10-40, 40-100, and 100-200 cm), while ALEXI provides derived volumetric soil moisture for only two layers within the 0-200 cm depth. This discrepancy can be solved with a blending of the two layers from ALEXI to provide a reasonable representation of the observed

  13. A Cellular Biophysics Textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Alan Joseph

    2011-12-01

    In the past two decades, great advances have been made in understanding of the biophysical mechanisms of the protein machines that carry out the fundamental processes of the cell. It is now known that all major eukaryotic cellular processes require a complicated assemblage of proteins acting via a series of concerted motions. In order to grasp current understanding of cellular mechanisms, the new generation of cell biologists needs to be trained in the general characteristics of these cellular properties and the methods with which to study them. This cellular biophysics textbook, to be used in conjunction with the cellular biophysics course (MCB143) at UC-Davis, provides a great tool in the instruction of the new generation of cellular biologists. It provides a hierarchical view of the cell, from atoms to protein machines and explains in depth the mechanisms of cytoskeletal force generators as an example of these principles.

  14. Volumetric characterization of delamination fields via angle longitudinal wave ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, John; Wallentine, Sarah; Welter, John; Dierken, Josiah; Aldrin, John

    2017-02-01

    The volumetric characterization of delaminations necessarily precedes rigorous composite damage progression modeling. Yet, inspection of composite structures for subsurface damage remains largely focused on detection, resulting in a capability gap. In response to this need, angle longitudinal wave ultrasound was employed to characterize a composite surrogate containing a simulated three-dimensional delamination field with distinct regions of occluded features (shadow regions). Simple analytical models of the specimen were developed to guide subsequent experimentation through identification of optimal scanning parameters. The ensuing experiments provided visual evidence of the complete delamination field, including indications of features within the shadow regions. The results of this study demonstrate proof-of-principle for the use of angle longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection for volumetric characterization of three-dimensional delamination fields. Furthermore, the techniques developed herein form the foundation of succeeding efforts to characterize impact delaminations within inhomogeneous laminar materials such as polymer matrix composites.

  15. Volumetric hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yang, Q. H.; Tong, Y.; Cong, H. T.; Cheng, H. M.

    2002-04-01

    Macroscopically long ropes of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), synthesized by a hydrogen and argon arc discharge method, were cold pressed into tablets without any binder for measurements of their volumetric hydrogen storage capacity. The typical apparent density of the tablets was measured to be around 1.7 g/cm3 with respect to a molding pressure of 0.75 Gpa. A volumetric and mass hydrogen storage capacity of 68 kg H2/m3 and 4.0 wt %, respectively, was achieved at room temperature under a pressure of 11 MPa for suitably pretreated SWNT tablets, and more than 70% of the hydrogen adsorbed can be released under ambient pressure at room temperature. Pore structure analysis indicated that the molding process diminished the mesopore volume of the SWNT ropes, but exerts little influence on their intrinsic pore textures.

  16. COMPARISON OF VOLUMETRIC REGISTRATION ALGORITHMS FOR TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Villalon, Julio; Joshi, Anand A.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear registration of brain MRI scans is often used to quantify morphological differences associated with disease or genetic factors. Recently, surface-guided fully 3D volumetric registrations have been developed that combine intensity-guided volume registrations with cortical surface constraints. In this paper, we compare one such algorithm to two popular high-dimensional volumetric registration methods: large-deformation viscous fluid registration, formulated in a Riemannian framework, and the diffeomorphic “Demons” algorithm. We performed an objective morphometric comparison, by using a large MRI dataset from 340 young adult twin subjects to examine 3D patterns of correlations in anatomical volumes. Surface-constrained volume registration gave greater effect sizes for detecting morphometric associations near the cortex, while the other two approaches gave greater effects sizes subcortically. These findings suggest novel ways to combine the advantages of multiple methods in the future. PMID:26925198

  17. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an "oxygen depletion design" whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm⁻²) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm⁻³). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells.

  18. A quality assurance phantom for the performance evaluation of volumetric micro-CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Umoh, Joseph; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Pollmann, Steven I.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2007-12-01

    Small-animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. As a result, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems are becoming more common in research laboratories, due to their ability to achieve spatial resolution as high as 10 µm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. Most recently, a volumetric cone-beam micro-CT system using a flat-panel detector (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare, London, ON) has been developed that combines the high resolution of micro-CT and the fast scanning speed of clinical CT, so that dynamic perfusion imaging can be performed in mice and rats, providing functional physiological information in addition to anatomical information. This and other commercially available micro-CT systems all promise to deliver precise and accurate high-resolution measurements in small animals. However, no comprehensive quality assurance phantom has been developed to evaluate the performance of these micro-CT systems on a routine basis. We have designed and fabricated a single comprehensive device for the purpose of performance evaluation of micro-CT systems. This quality assurance phantom was applied to assess multiple image-quality parameters of a current flat-panel cone-beam micro-CT system accurately and quantitatively, in terms of spatial resolution, geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.5 mm-1 and noise of ±35 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 s at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  19. A quality assurance phantom for the performance evaluation of volumetric micro-CT systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Louise Y; Umoh, Joseph; Nikolov, Hristo N; Pollmann, Steven I; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W

    2007-12-07

    Small-animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. As a result, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems are becoming more common in research laboratories, due to their ability to achieve spatial resolution as high as 10 microm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. Most recently, a volumetric cone-beam micro-CT system using a flat-panel detector (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare, London, ON) has been developed that combines the high resolution of micro-CT and the fast scanning speed of clinical CT, so that dynamic perfusion imaging can be performed in mice and rats, providing functional physiological information in addition to anatomical information. This and other commercially available micro-CT systems all promise to deliver precise and accurate high-resolution measurements in small animals. However, no comprehensive quality assurance phantom has been developed to evaluate the performance of these micro-CT systems on a routine basis. We have designed and fabricated a single comprehensive device for the purpose of performance evaluation of micro-CT systems. This quality assurance phantom was applied to assess multiple image-quality parameters of a current flat-panel cone-beam micro-CT system accurately and quantitatively, in terms of spatial resolution, geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.5 mm(-1) and noise of +/-35 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 s at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  20. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOEpatents

    Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

    1994-04-26

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

  1. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

  2. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  3. Volumetric Collection Efficiency and Droplet Sizing Accuracy of Rotary Impactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Transactions of the ASABE Vol. 54(1): 57-63 2011 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers ISSN 2151-0032 57 VOLUMETRIC COLLECTION...commonly associated with drift from agrochemical applications, another less com‐ mon application is vector control, which relies on the movement of...droplet sizes are commonly less than 40 m (Mount, 1998). With potential increases in overall exposure levels from agrochemical ap‐ plication as well as

  4. Reducing uncertainties in volumetric image based deformable organ registration.

    PubMed

    Liang, J; Yan, D

    2003-08-01

    Applying volumetric image feedback in radiotherapy requires image based deformable organ registration. The foundation of this registration is the ability of tracking subvolume displacement in organs of interest. Subvolume displacement can be calculated by applying biomechanics model and the finite element method to human organs manifested on the multiple volumetric images. The calculation accuracy, however, is highly dependent on the determination of the corresponding organ boundary points. Lacking sufficient information for such determination, uncertainties are inevitable-thus diminishing the registration accuracy. In this paper, a method of consuming energy minimization was developed to reduce these uncertainties. Starting from an initial selection of organ boundary point correspondence on volumetric image sets, the subvolume displacement and stress distribution of the whole organ are calculated and the consumed energy due to the subvolume displacements is computed accordingly. The corresponding positions of the initially selected boundary points are then iteratively optimized to minimize the consuming energy under geometry and stress constraints. In this study, a rectal wall delineated from patient CT image was artificially deformed using a computer simulation and utilized to test the optimization. Subvolume displacements calculated based on the optimized boundary point correspondence were compared to the true displacements, and the calculation accuracy was thereby evaluated. Results demonstrate that a significant improvement on the accuracy of the deformable organ registration can be achieved by applying the consuming energy minimization in the organ deformation calculation.

  5. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C; Sheridan, John T; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-06

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale.

  6. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C.; Sheridan, John T.; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale. PMID:28059149

  7. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C.; Sheridan, John T.; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale.

  8. Quality Multi-domain Meshing for Volumetric Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin; Subramanian, Bharadwaj; Xu, Guoliang; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-domain meshing from volumetric data is of great importance in many fields like medicine, biology and geology. This paper proposes a new approach to produce a high quality mesh with separated multiple domains. A point cloud is generated from a preliminary mesh representing the boundary between different domains from the discrete volumetric representation used as input. A higher-order level-set method is employed to produce a quality sub-mesh from this point cloud and geometric flow is used as smoothing mechanism. A new approach to detect and curate intersections within an assembly of these 2-manifold sub-meshes by utilizing the intermediate volumetric representation is developed. The separation between sub-meshes can be controlled by the user using a gap threshold parameter. The resulting high quality multi-domain mesh is free from self- and inter-domain intersections and can be further utilized in finite element and boundary element computations. The proposed pipeline has been efficiently implemented and sample meshes have been provided for visualization. PMID:21544233

  9. Volumetric lattice Boltzmann simulation for blood flow in aorta arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Debanjan; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Teague, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Complicated moving boundaries pose a major challenge in computational fluid dynamics for complex flows, especially in the biomechanics of both blood flow in the cardiovascular system and air flow in the respiratory system where the compliant nature of the vessels can have significant effects on the flow rate and wall shear stress. We develop a computation approach to treat arbitrarily moving boundaries using a volumetric representation of lattice Boltzmann method, which distributes fluid particles inside lattice cells. A volumetric bounce-back procedure is applied in the streaming step while momentum exchange between the fluid and moving solid boundary are accounted for in the collision sub-step. Additional boundary-induced migration is introduced to conserve fluid mass as the boundary moves across fluid cells. The volumetric LBM (VLBM) is used to simulate blood flow in both normal and dilated aorta arteries. We first compare flow structure and pressure distribution in steady state with results from Navier-Stokes based solver and good agreements are achieved. Then we focus on wall stress within the aorta for different heart pumping condition and present quantitative measurement of wall shear and normal stress.

  10. Volumetric Echocardiographic Particle Image Velocimetry (V-Echo-PIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of 3D flow field inside the cardiac chambers has proven to be a challenging task. Current laser-based 3D PIV methods estimate the third component of the velocity rather than directly measuring it and also cannot be used to image the opaque heart chambers. Modern echocardiography systems are equipped with 3D probes that enable imaging the entire 3D opaque field. However, this feature has not yet been employed for 3D vector characterization of blood flow. For the first time, we introduce a method that generates velocity vector field in 4D based on volumetric echocardiographic images. By assuming the conservation of brightness in 3D, blood speckles are tracked. A hierarchical 3D PIV method is used to account for large particle displacement. The discretized brightness transport equation is solved in a least square sense in interrogation windows of size 163 voxels. We successfully validate the method in analytical and experimental cases. Volumetric echo data of a left ventricle is then processed in the systolic phase. The expected velocity fields were successfully predicted by V-Echo-PIV. In this work, we showed a method to image blood flow in 3D based on volumetric images of human heart using no contrast agent.

  11. A Nanocrystal Sensor for Luminescence Detection of Cellular Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina; Chou, Jonathan; Lutker, Katie; Werb, Zena; Alivisatos, Paul

    2011-09-29

    Quantum dots have been used as bright fluorescent tags with high photostability to probe numerous biological systems. In this work we present the tetrapod quantum dot as a dynamic, next-generation nanocrystal probe that fluorescently reports cellular forces with spatial and temporal resolution. Its small size and colloidal state suggest that the tetrapod may be further developed as a tool to measure cellular forces in vivo and with macromolecular spatial resolution.

  12. Cell biology of the future: Nanometer-scale cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Taraska, Justin W

    2015-10-26

    Understanding cellular structure is key to understanding cellular regulation. New developments in super-resolution fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, and quantitative image analysis methods are now providing some of the first three-dimensional dynamic maps of biomolecules at the nanometer scale. These new maps--comprehensive nanometer-scale cellular cartographies--will reveal how the molecular organization of cells influences their diverse and changeable activities.

  13. Ultrahigh Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Chen, Yu; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Považay, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Fujimoto, James G.

    Since its invention in the late 1980s [1-4] and early 1990s [5-7], the original idea of OCT was to enable noninvasive optical biopsy, i.e., the in situ imaging of tissue microstructure with a resolution approaching that of histology, but without the need for tissue excision and post-processing. An important advance toward this goal was the introduction of ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT). By improving axial OCT resolution by one order of magnitude from the 10 to 15 μm to the sub-μm region [8-11], UHR OCT enables superior visualization of tissue microstructure, including all major intraretinal layers in ophthalmic applications as well as cellular resolution OCT imaging in nontransparent tissue. This chapter reviews state-of-the-art technology that enables ultrahigh-resolution OCT covering the entire wavelength region from 500 to 1,600 nm and discusses fundamental limitations of OCT image resolution.

  14. Brain volumetric abnormalities in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Caroppo, Paola; D'Agata, Federico; Spalatro, Angela; Lavagnino, Luca; Caglio, Marcella; Righi, Dorico; Bergui, Mauro; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Rigardetto, Roberto; Mortara, Paolo; Fassino, Secondo

    2013-09-30

    Recent studies focussing on neuroimaging features of eating disorders have observed that anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by significant grey matter (GM) atrophy in many brain regions, especially in the cerebellum and anterior cingulate cortex. To date, no studies have found GM atrophy in bulimia nervosa (BN) or have directly compared patients with AN and BN. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to characterize brain abnormalities in AN and BN patients, comparing them with each other and with a control group, and correlating brain volume with clinical features. We recruited 17 AN, 13 BN and 14 healthy controls. All subjects underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1-weighted 3D image. VBM analysis was carried out with the FSL-VBM 4.1 tool. We found no global atrophy, but regional GM reduction in AN with respect to controls and BN in the cerebellum, fusiform area, supplementary motor area, and occipital cortex, and in the caudate in BN compared to AN and controls. Both groups of patients had a volumetric increase bilaterally in somatosensory regions with respect to controls, in areas that are typically involved in the sensory-motor integration of body stimuli and in mental representation of the body image. Our VBM study documented, for the first time in BN patients, the presence of volumetric alterations and replicated previous findings in AN patients. We evidenced morphological differences between AN and BN, demonstrating in the latter atrophy of the caudate nucleus, a region involved in reward mechanisms and processes of self-regulation, perhaps involved in the genesis of the binge-eating behaviors of this disorder.

  15. Flat-panel volumetric computed tomography in cerebral perfusion: evaluation of three rat stroke models.

    PubMed

    Juenemann, Martin; Goegel, Sinja; Obert, Martin; Schleicher, Nadine; Ritschel, Nouha; Doenges, Simone; Eitenmueller, Inka; Schwarz, Niko; Kastaun, Sabrina; Yeniguen, Mesut; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Gerriets, Tibo

    2013-09-30

    Flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) is a non-invasive approach to three-dimensional small animal imaging. The capability of volumetric scanning and a high resolution in time and space enables whole organ perfusion studies. We aimed to assess feasibility and validity of fpVCT in cerebral perfusion measurement with impaired hemodynamics by evaluation of three well-established rat stroke models for temporary and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to temporary (group I: suture model) and permanent (group II: suture model; III: macrosphere model) MCAO and to a control group. Perfusion scans with respect to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV) were performed 24h post intervention by fpVCT, using a Gantry rotation time of 1s and a total scanning time of 30s. Postmortem analysis included infarct-size calculation by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Infarct volumes did not differ significantly throughout intervention groups. After permanent MCAO, CBF significantly decreased in subcortical regions to 78.2% (group II, p=0.005) and 79.9% (group III, p=0.012) and in total hemisphere to 77.4% (group II, p=0.010) and 82.0% (group III, p=0.049). CBF was less impaired with temporary vessel occlusion. CBV measurement revealed no significant differences. Results demonstrate feasibility of cerebral perfusion quantification in rats with the fpVCT, which can be a useful tool for non-invasive dynamic imaging of cerebral perfusion in rodent stroke models. In addition to methodological advantages, CBF data confirm the macrosphere model as a useful alternative to the suture model for permanent experimental MCAO.

  16. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters)

    PubMed Central

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Xu, J; Taguchi, K; Fredenberg, E; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm × 25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40% reduction in the

  17. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Taguchi, K.; Fredenberg, E.; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm  ×  25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40

  18. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters).

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Xu, J; Taguchi, K; Fredenberg, E; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-07

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm  ×  25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40

  19. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  20. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  1. Cellular Mechanisms of Central Nervous Modulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-30

    achieve selective disruption of the neuroglia in the central nervous system 4 of our experimental animal, the cockroach (Periplaneta americana). Such...RD-A147 878 CELLULAR MECHANISMIS OF CENTRAL NERVOUS MODULATION(U) i/i I CAMBRIDGE UNIV (ENGLAND) DEPT OF ZOOLOGY J E TRENERNE 30 JUN 83 DHJA37-8i-C...BOOBI UNCLASSFE F/G 6/16 NL bi L& 2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONA BUJREAUJ OF STANDOW-S1963-A [.1 PI CELLULAR MECHANISMIS OF CENTRAL NERVOUS

  2. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  3. Volumetric measurements of pulmonary nodules: variability in automated analysis tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juluru, Krishna; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William; King, Tara; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    Over the past decade, several computerized tools have been developed for detection of lung nodules and for providing volumetric analysis. Incidentally detected lung nodules have traditionally been followed over time by measurements of their axial dimensions on CT scans to ensure stability or document progression. A recently published article by the Fleischner Society offers guidelines on the management of incidentally detected nodules based on size criteria. For this reason, differences in measurements obtained by automated tools from various vendors may have significant implications on management, yet the degree of variability in these measurements is not well understood. The goal of this study is to quantify the differences in nodule maximum diameter and volume among different automated analysis software. Using a dataset of lung scans obtained with both "ultra-low" and conventional doses, we identified a subset of nodules in each of five size-based categories. Using automated analysis tools provided by three different vendors, we obtained size and volumetric measurements on these nodules, and compared these data using descriptive as well as ANOVA and t-test analysis. Results showed significant differences in nodule maximum diameter measurements among the various automated lung nodule analysis tools but no significant differences in nodule volume measurements. These data suggest that when using automated commercial software, volume measurements may be a more reliable marker of tumor progression than maximum diameter. The data also suggest that volumetric nodule measurements may be relatively reproducible among various commercial workstations, in contrast to the variability documented when performing human mark-ups, as is seen in the LIDC (lung imaging database consortium) study.

  4. Synoptic volumetric variations and flushing of the Tampa Bay estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M.; Meyers, S. D.; Luther, M. E.

    2014-03-01

    Two types of analyses are used to investigate the synoptic wind-driven flushing of Tampa Bay in response to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle from 1950 to 2007. Hourly sea level elevations from the St. Petersburg tide gauge, and wind speed and direction from three different sites around Tampa Bay are used for the study. The zonal (u) and meridional (v) wind components are rotated clockwise by 40° to obtain axial and co-axial components according to the layout of the bay. First, we use the subtidal observed water level as a proxy for mean tidal height to estimate the rate of volumetric bay outflow. Second, we use wavelet analysis to bandpass sea level and wind data in the time-frequency domain to isolate the synoptic sea level and surface wind variance. For both analyses the long-term monthly climatology is removed and we focus on the volumetric and wavelet variance anomalies. The overall correlation between the Oceanic Niño Index and volumetric analysis is small due to the seasonal dependence of the ENSO response. The mean monthly climatology between the synoptic wavelet variance of elevation and axial winds are in close agreement. During the winter, El Niño (La Niña) increases (decreases) the synoptic variability, but decreases (increases) it during the summer. The difference in winter El Niño/La Niña wavelet variances is about 20 % of the climatological value, meaning that ENSO can swing the synoptic flushing of the bay by 0.22 bay volumes per month. These changes in circulation associated with synoptic variability have the potential to impact mixing and transport within the bay.

  5. Two-Photon Laser Scanning Stereomicroscopy for Fast Volumetric Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanlong; Yao, Baoli; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Li, Runze; Horn, Mark Van; Chen, Xun; Li, Yang; Ye, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Bessel beams have been successfully used in two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy to extend the depth of field (EDF), which makes it possible to observe fast events volumetrically. However, the depth information is lost due to integration of fluorescence signals along the propagation direction. We describe the design and implementation of two-photon lasers scanning stereomicroscopy, which allows viewing dynamic processes in three-dimensional (3D) space stereoscopically in real-time with shutter glasses at the speed of 1.4 volumes per second. The depth information can be appreciated by human visual system or be recovered with correspondence algorithms for some cases. PMID:27997624

  6. Volumetric hemispheric ratio as a useful tool in personality psychology.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Wagner, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Markett, Sebastian; Weber, Bernd; Quesada, Carlos M

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigates the link between volumetric hemispheric ratios (VHRs) and personality measures in N=267 healthy participants using Eysenck's Personality Inventory-Revised (EPQ-R) and the BIS/BAS scales. A robust association between extraversion and VHRs was observed for gray matter in males but not females. Higher gray matter volume in the left than in the right hemisphere was associated with higher extraversion in males. The results are discussed in the context of positive emotionality and laterality of the human brain.

  7. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A.; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction. PMID:24701150

  8. Mucosal wrinkling in animal antra induced by volumetric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Surface wrinkling of animal mucosas is crucial for the biological functions of some tissues, and the change in their surface patterns is a phenotypic characteristic of certain diseases. Here we develop a biomechanical model to study the relationship between morphogenesis and volumetric growth, either physiological or pathological, of mucosas. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are performed to unravel the critical characteristics of mucosal wrinkling in a spherical antrum. It is shown that the thicknesses and elastic moduli of mucosal and submucosal layers dictate the surface buckling morphology. The results hold clinical relevance for such diseases as inflammation and gastritis.

  9. Basic Characteristics and Predicted Lifetime of Stacked Volumetric Optical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Akira; Ido, Hiroshi; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Yamanaka, Hideaki; Osawa, Seigo; Tani, Manabu; Uchida, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Arai, Shinichi; Yoshihiro, Masafumi; Iida, Tamotsu; Awano, Hiroyuki; Ota, Norio; Yoshida, Takashi; Abe, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Kazushi

    2008-07-01

    A stacked volumetric optical disks (SVOD) system has been developed to achieve an over 1 Tbytes cartridge capacity using a commercialized drive and conventional recording layers. To confirm the reliability of thin optical disks in SVOD, several feasibility tests were conducted. The recording power margin, tilt margin and read stability of the thin optical disks were measured, and the lifetime of the thin optical disks was estimated. The results were similar to those of conventional 1.2-mm-thick optical disks regardless of the disk thickness.

  10. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  11. Marginal Space Deep Learning: Efficient Architecture for Volumetric Image Parsing.

    PubMed

    Ghesu, Florin C; Krubasik, Edward; Georgescu, Bogdan; Singh, Vivek; Zheng, Yefeng; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-03-07

    Robust and fast solutions for anatomical object detection and segmentation support the entire clinical workflow from diagnosis, patient stratification, therapy planning, intervention and follow-up. Current state-of-the-art techniques for parsing volumetric medical image data are typically based on machine learning methods that exploit large annotated image databases. There are two main challenges that need to be addressed, these are the efficiency in processing large volumetric input images and the need for strong, representative image features. When the object of interest is parametrized in a high dimensional space, standard volume scanning techniques do not scale up to the enormous number of potential hypotheses and representative image features are subject to significant efforts of manual engineering. We propose a pipeline for object detection and segmentation in the context of volumetric image parsing, solving a two-step learning problem: anatomical pose estimation and boundary delineation. For this task we introduce Marginal Space Deep Learning (MSDL), a novel framework exploiting both the strengths of efficient object parametrization in hierarchical marginal spaces and the automated feature design of Deep Learning (DL) network architectures. Deep learning systems automatically identify, disentangle and learn explanatory attributes directly from low-level image data, however their application in the volumetric setting is limited by the very high complexity of the parametrization. More specifically 9 parameters are necessary to describe a restricted affine transformation in 3D (3 for each location, orientation, and scale) resulting in a prohibitive number of scanning hypotheses, in the order of billions for typical sampling. The mechanism of marginal space learning provides excellent run-time performance by learning classifiers in clustered, high-probability regions in spaces of gradually increasing dimensionality, for example starting from location only (3D

  12. No volumetric differences in the anterior cingulate of psychopathic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Andrea L.; Yang, Yaling; Raine, Adrian; Colletti, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Functional imaging studies of psychopathy have demonstrated reduced activity in the anterior cingulate, yet it is unclear whether this region is structurally impaired. In this study, we used structural MRI to examine whether volumetric differences exist in the anterior cingulate between psychopathic (n=24) and control (n=24) male participants. We found no group differences in the volume of the anterior cingulate or its dorsal and ventral subregions. Our findings call into question whether the anterior cingulate is impaired in psychopathy, or whether previous findings of reduced activity may result from reduced input from other deficient regions. PMID:20630717

  13. Application of the sonic volumetric scan log to cement evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Broding, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The imaging process of a volumetric scan presentation produces a sonic image that gives a pictorial display of the cement in place. The cemented zone can be further evaluated from transmittance and velocity scans. The image can be selected to include the casing to cement bond, the full cemented zone or the cement to formation bond. Sectoring, tilting and rotation of the image allows one to quickly make a first interpretation for any suspect areas. A more detailed study from transmittance and velocity data permits a reliable qualification of the physical properties of the cement in place.

  14. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  15. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system.

  16. CBCT-based volumetric and dosimetric variation evaluation of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anatomic and dosimetric variations of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients based on weekly cone beam CT (CBCT). Materials and methods Ten NPC patients treated by VMAT with weekly CBCT for setup corrections were reviewed retrospectively. Deformed volumes of targets and organs at risk (OARs) in the CBCT were compared with those in the planning CT. Delivered doses were recalculated based on weekly CBCT and compared with the planned doses. Results No significant volumetric changes on targets, brainstem, and spinal cord were observed. The average volumes of right and left parotid measured from the fifth CBCT were about 4.4 and 4.5 cm3 less than those from the first CBCT, respectively. There were no significant dose differences between average planned and delivered doses for targets, brainstem and spinal cord. For right parotid, the delivered mean dose was 10.5 cGy higher (p = 0.004) than the planned value per fraction, and the V26 and V32 increased by 7.5% (p = 0.002) and 7.4% (p = 0.01), respectively. For the left parotid, the D50 (dose to the 50% volume) was 8.8 cGy higher (p = 0.03) than the planned values per fraction, and the V26 increased by 8.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusion Weekly CBCTs were applied directly to study the continuous volume changes and resulting dosimetric variations of targets and OARs for NPC patients undergoing VMAT. Significant volumetric and dosimetric variations were observed for parotids. Replanning after 30 Gy will benefit the protection on parotids. PMID:24289312

  17. Volumetric verification of multiaxis machine tool using laser tracker.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Sergio; Samper, David; Santolaria, Jorge; Aguilar, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present a method of volumetric verification in machine tools with linear and rotary axes using a laser tracker. Beyond a method for a particular machine, it presents a methodology that can be used in any machine type. Along this paper, the schema and kinematic model of a machine with three axes of movement, two linear and one rotational axes, including the measurement system and the nominal rotation matrix of the rotational axis are presented. Using this, the machine tool volumetric error is obtained and nonlinear optimization techniques are employed to improve the accuracy of the machine tool. The verification provides a mathematical, not physical, compensation, in less time than other methods of verification by means of the indirect measurement of geometric errors of the machine from the linear and rotary axes. This paper presents an extensive study about the appropriateness and drawbacks of the regression function employed depending on the types of movement of the axes of any machine. In the same way, strengths and weaknesses of measurement methods and optimization techniques depending on the space available to place the measurement system are presented. These studies provide the most appropriate strategies to verify each machine tool taking into consideration its configuration and its available work space.

  18. Scanners and drillers: Characterizing expert visual search through volumetric images

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Trafton; Vo, Melissa Le-Hoa; Olwal, Alex; Jacobson, Francine; Seltzer, Steven E.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    Modern imaging methods like computed tomography (CT) generate 3-D volumes of image data. How do radiologists search through such images? Are certain strategies more efficient? Although there is a large literature devoted to understanding search in 2-D, relatively little is known about search in volumetric space. In recent years, with the ever-increasing popularity of volumetric medical imaging, this question has taken on increased importance as we try to understand, and ultimately reduce, errors in diagnostic radiology. In the current study, we asked 24 radiologists to search chest CTs for lung nodules that could indicate lung cancer. To search, radiologists scrolled up and down through a “stack” of 2-D chest CT “slices.” At each moment, we tracked eye movements in the 2-D image plane and coregistered eye position with the current slice. We used these data to create a 3-D representation of the eye movements through the image volume. Radiologists tended to follow one of two dominant search strategies: “drilling” and “scanning.” Drillers restrict eye movements to a small region of the lung while quickly scrolling through depth. Scanners move more slowly through depth and search an entire level of the lung before moving on to the next level in depth. Driller performance was superior to the scanners on a variety of metrics, including lung nodule detection rate, percentage of the lung covered, and the percentage of search errors where a nodule was never fixated. PMID:23922445

  19. Volumetric Flow Measurement Using an Implantable CMUT Array.

    PubMed

    Mengli Wang; Jingkuang Chen

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes volumetric-flow velocity measurement using an implantable capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array. The array is comprised of multiple-concentric CMUT rings for ultrasound transmission and an outmost annular CMUT array for ultrasound reception. Microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) fabrication technology allows reception CMUT on this flowmeter to be implemented with a different membrane thickness and gap height than that of transmission CMUTs, optimizing the performance of these two different kinds of devices. The silicon substrate of this 2-mm-diameter CMUT ring array was bulk micromachined to approximately 80 to 100 μm thick, minimizing tissue disruption. The blood-flow velocity was detected using pulse ultrasound Doppler by comparing the demodulated echo ultrasound with the incident ultrasound. The demodulated ultrasound signal was sampled by a pulse delayed in time domain from the transmitted burst, which corresponds to detecting the signal at a specific distance. The flow tube/vessel diameter was detected through the time-flight delay difference from near and far wall reflections, which was measured from the ultrasound pulse echo. The angle between the ultrasound beam and the flow was found by using the cross-correlation from consecutive ultrasound echoes. Artificial blood flowing through three different polymer tubes was experimented with, while keeping the same volumetric flow rate. The discrepancy in flow measurement results between this CMUT meter and a calibrated laser Doppler flowmeter is less than 5%.

  20. Evolution of a turbulent jet subjected to volumetric heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Amit; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this study is to understand the effect of latent heat release on entrainment in cumulus clouds by employing a laboratory analogue consisting of a volumetrically heated turbulent axisymmetric jet. The jet fluid is volumetrically heated in an off-source manner to simulate condensation heat release in clouds. The experimental set-up is similar to Bhat & Narasimha (1996), and the current application of wholefield velocimetry and thermometry has allowed us to probe in detail the velocity and temperature fields within the heat injection zone (HIZ) for the first time, leading to several new results. We are able to demarcate three distinct zones within the HIZ based primarily on the nature of the cross-stream velocity profile, and we present sharp differences in flow properties in these zones. Thermochromic liquid crystal-based temperature visualizations have revealed details about the complex interplay of velocity, local concentration and temperature leading to a physically coherent understanding of this flow. We also provide evidence using linear stochastic estimates (LSE) to show that large eddies are disrupted in the latter part of the HIZ; the disruption of large eddies is linked to the change in the nature of the cross-stream velocity profile. While our results have confirmed certain previously reported observations such as a reduction in scalar width, we have measured significantly larger r.m.s. values within the HIZ than previously reported, which is corroborated by direct numerical simulation results.

  1. Scanners and drillers: characterizing expert visual search through volumetric images.

    PubMed

    Drew, Trafton; Vo, Melissa Le-Hoa; Olwal, Alex; Jacobson, Francine; Seltzer, Steven E; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2013-08-06

    Modern imaging methods like computed tomography (CT) generate 3-D volumes of image data. How do radiologists search through such images? Are certain strategies more efficient? Although there is a large literature devoted to understanding search in 2-D, relatively little is known about search in volumetric space. In recent years, with the ever-increasing popularity of volumetric medical imaging, this question has taken on increased importance as we try to understand, and ultimately reduce, errors in diagnostic radiology. In the current study, we asked 24 radiologists to search chest CTs for lung nodules that could indicate lung cancer. To search, radiologists scrolled up and down through a "stack" of 2-D chest CT "slices." At each moment, we tracked eye movements in the 2-D image plane and coregistered eye position with the current slice. We used these data to create a 3-D representation of the eye movements through the image volume. Radiologists tended to follow one of two dominant search strategies: "drilling" and "scanning." Drillers restrict eye movements to a small region of the lung while quickly scrolling through depth. Scanners move more slowly through depth and search an entire level of the lung before moving on to the next level in depth. Driller performance was superior to the scanners on a variety of metrics, including lung nodule detection rate, percentage of the lung covered, and the percentage of search errors where a nodule was never fixated.

  2. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an “oxygen depletion design” whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm−2) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm−3). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells. PMID:23390576

  3. Investigation of Volumetric Sources in Airframe Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay H.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Streett, Craig L.

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid methods for the prediction of airframe noise involve a simulation of the near field flow that is used as input to an acoustic propagation formula. The acoustic formulations discussed herein are those based on the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. Some questions have arisen in the published literature in regard to an apparently significant dependence of radiated noise predictions on the location of the integration surface used in the solution of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. These differences in radiated noise levels are most pronounced between solid-body surface integrals and off-body, permeable surface integrals. Such differences suggest that either a non-negligible volumetric source is contributing to the total radiation or the input flow simulation is suspect. The focus of the current work is the issue of internal consistency of the flow calculations that are currently used as input to airframe noise predictions. The case study for this research is a computer simulation for a three-element, high-lift wing profile during landing conditions. The noise radiated from this flow is predicted by a two-dimensional, frequency-domain formulation of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. Radiated sound from volumetric sources is assessed by comparison of a permeable surface integration with the sum of a solid-body surface integral and a volume integral. The separate noise predictions are found in good agreement.

  4. Multi-sensor 3D volumetric reconstruction using CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbarpour, Hadi; Almeida, Luis; Menezes, Paulo; Dias, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a full-body volumetric reconstruction of a person in a scene using a sensor network, where some of them can be mobile. The sensor network is comprised of couples of camera and inertial sensor (IS). Taking advantage of IS, the 3D reconstruction is performed using no planar ground assumption. Moreover, IS in each couple is used to define a virtual camera whose image plane is horizontal and aligned with the earth cardinal directions. The IS is furthermore used to define a set of inertial planes in the scene. The image plane of each virtual camera is projected onto this set of parallel-horizontal inertial-planes, using some adapted homography functions. A parallel processing architecture is proposed in order to perform human real-time volumetric reconstruction. The real-time characteristic is obtained by implementing the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In order to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, a variety of the gestures of a person acting in the scene is reconstructed and demonstrated. Some analyses have been carried out to measure the performance of the algorithm in terms of processing time. The proposed framework has potential to be used by different applications such as smart-room, human behavior analysis and 3D teleconference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Photoacoustic analysis of proteins: volumetric signals and fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G; Small, J R

    1997-01-01

    A series of proteins has been examined using time-resolved, pulsed-laser volumetric photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoacoustic waveforms were collected to measure heat release for calculation of fluorescence quantum yields, and to explore the possibility of photoinduced nonthermal volume changes occurring in these protein samples. The proteins studied were the green fluorescent protein (GFP); intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP), and adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP), each labeled noncovalently with 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) and covalently with 6-acryloyl-2-(dimethylamino)naphthalene (acrylodan); and acrylodan-labeled IFABP and ALBP with added oleic acid. Of this group of proteins, only the ALBP labeled with 1,8-ANS showed significant nonthermal volume changes at the beta = 0 temperature (approximately 3.8 degrees C) for the buffer used (10 mM Tris-HCI, pH 7.5) (beta is the thermal cubic volumetric expansion coefficient). For all of the proteins except for acrylodan-labeled IFABP, the fluorescence quantum yields calculated assuming simple energy conservation were anomalously high, i.e., the apparent heat signals were lower than those predicted from independent fluorescence measurements. The consistent anomalies suggest that the low photoacoustic signals may be characteristic of fluorophores buried in proteins, and that photoacoustic signals derive in part from the microenvironment of the absorbing chromophore. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199809

  6. Computational assessment of visual search strategies in volumetric medical images

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Gezheng; Aizenman, Avigael; Drew, Trafton; Wolfe, Jeremy M.; Haygood, Tamara Miner; Markey, Mia K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. When searching through volumetric images [e.g., computed tomography (CT)], radiologists appear to use two different search strategies: “drilling” (restrict eye movements to a small region of the image while quickly scrolling through slices), or “scanning” (search over large areas at a given depth before moving on to the next slice). To computationally identify the type of image information that is used in these two strategies, 23 naïve observers were instructed with either “drilling” or “scanning” when searching for target T’s in 20 volumes of faux lung CTs. We computed saliency maps using both classical two-dimensional (2-D) saliency, and a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamic saliency that captures the characteristics of scrolling through slices. Comparing observers’ gaze distributions with the saliency maps showed that search strategy alters the type of saliency that attracts fixations. Drillers’ fixations aligned better with dynamic saliency and scanners with 2-D saliency. The computed saliency was greater for detected targets than for missed targets. Similar results were observed in data from 19 radiologists who searched five stacks of clinical chest CTs for lung nodules. Dynamic saliency may be superior to the 2-D saliency for detecting targets embedded in volumetric images, and thus “drilling” may be more efficient than “scanning.” PMID:26759815

  7. Volumetric capnography and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease staging

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Pablo V; Rodriguez, Benigno; de Oliveira, Daniela; Blanch, L; Manresa, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Spirometry is difficult for some COPD patient to perform. Volumetric capnography could be a second choice test to evaluate the severity of functional disturbances. The aim of this work is to test this hypothesis. A total number of 98 subjects were classified either as normal ex-smokers (N = 14) or COPD patients. The latter were staged following GOLD recommendations. Spirometry and volumetric capnography recordings were obtained from each patient. Spirometry parameters, Bohr Dead Space (VD Bohr), Airways Dead Space from the pre-interface expirate corrected curve (VD aw), Phase III slope (SlIII) and Volume of alveolar ejection (VAE) were measured. Index of Ventilatory Efficiency (IVE), and Index of Airways Heterogeneity (IAH) were calculated as: IVE = VAE/(VT – VD aw) and IAH = 1 – [(VT – VD Bohr)/(VT – VD aw)]. In ANOCOVA analysis IAH showed the greatest association with stage (F > 40), with no significant covariant dependence on VT. A receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed values of the area under the curve greater than 0.9 for IAH and IVE at all stage levels, with a sensitivity = specificity value greater than 80%. We conclude that IAH and IVE can be used when spirometry cannot be reliably performed, as an alternative test to evaluate the degree of functional involvement in COPD patients. PMID:18229577

  8. Volumetric Velocity Fields Downstream of a 2-Bladed Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices of axial-flow turbines are important in understanding the mean and turbulent characteristics of the wake. Volumetric 3-component velocimetry (V3V) was used to examine the flow downstream of a model two-bladed turbine in air. The turbine had a diameter of 177.8 mm and was powered by a motor operating at approximately 150 rpm. The measurement volume (50 × 50 × 20 mm) was positioned approximately 5 mm downstream of the blade tip, in order to examine the tip vortex structure. The V3V system utilized three 4MP cameras with 85 mm lenses positioned in a fixed triangular frame located at a distance of 450 mm from the back of the measurement volume. The illumination source was a 200 mJ dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 7.25 Hz and illuminating 1 micron olive oil droplets as tracer particles. The particle images were then analyzed to produce volumetric vector fields. The focus was placed on visualizing the complex interaction between the turbine tip vortices. Insights on the tip vortex dynamics and three dimensional characteristics of the wake flow will be discussed.

  9. Volumetric properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Brovchenko, I; Andrews, M N; Oleinikova, A

    2010-04-28

    The volumetric properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in water were studied in a wide temperature range by computer simulations. The intrinsic density rho(p) and the intrinsic thermal expansion coefficient alpha(p) of hIAPP were evaluated by taking into account the difference between the volumetric properties of hydration and bulk water. The density of hydration water rho(h) was found to decrease almost linearly with temperature upon heating and its thermal expansion coefficient was found to be notably higher than that of bulk water. The peptide surface exposed to water is more hydrophobic and its rho(h) is smaller in conformation with a larger number of intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The two hIAPP peptides studied (with and without disulfide bridge) show negative alpha(p), which is close to zero at 250 K and decreases to approximately -1.5 x 10(-3) K(-1) upon heating to 450 K. The analysis of various structural properties of peptides shows a correlation between the intrinsic peptide volumes and the number of intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The obtained negative values of alpha(p) can be attributed to the shrinkage of the inner voids of the peptides upon heating.

  10. Volumetric display containing multiple two-dimensional color motion pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, R.; Shiraki, A.; Nakayama, H.; Kakue, T.; Shimobaba, T.; Ito, T.

    2014-06-01

    We have developed an algorithm which can record multiple two-dimensional (2-D) gradated projection patterns in a single three-dimensional (3-D) object. Each recorded pattern has the individual projected direction and can only be seen from the direction. The proposed algorithm has two important features: the number of recorded patterns is theoretically infinite and no meaningful pattern can be seen outside of the projected directions. In this paper, we expanded the algorithm to record multiple 2-D projection patterns in color. There are two popular ways of color mixing: additive one and subtractive one. Additive color mixing used to mix light is based on RGB colors and subtractive color mixing used to mix inks is based on CMY colors. We made two coloring methods based on the additive mixing and subtractive mixing. We performed numerical simulations of the coloring methods, and confirmed their effectiveness. We also fabricated two types of volumetric display and applied the proposed algorithm to them. One is a cubic displays constructed by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in 8×8×8 array. Lighting patterns of LEDs are controlled by a microcomputer board. The other one is made of 7×7 array of threads. Each thread is illuminated by a projector connected with PC. As a result of the implementation, we succeeded in recording multiple 2-D color motion pictures in the volumetric displays. Our algorithm can be applied to digital signage, media art and so forth.

  11. Volumetric Intraoperative Brain Deformation Compensation: Model Development and Phantom Validation

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2012-01-01

    During neurosurgery, nonrigid brain deformation may affect the reliability of tissue localization based on preoperative images. To provide accurate surgical guidance in these cases, preoperative images must be updated to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished by warping these preoperative images using a biomechanical model. Due to the possible complexity of this deformation, intraoperative information is often required to guide the model solution. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed to infer volumetric brain deformation associated with measured intraoperative cortical surface displacement. The developed model relies on known material properties of brain tissue, and does not require further knowledge about intraoperative conditions. To provide an initial estimation of volumetric model accuracy, as well as determine the model’s sensitivity to the specified material parameters and surface displacements, a realistic brain phantom was developed. Phantom results indicate that the linear elastic model significantly reduced localization error due to brain shift, from >16 mm to under 5 mm, on average. In addition, though in vivo quantitative validation is necessary, preliminary application of this approach to images acquired during neocortical epilepsy cases confirms the feasibility of applying the developed model to in vivo data. PMID:22562728

  12. Histology-derived volumetric annotation of the human hippocampal subfields in postmortem MRI.

    PubMed

    Adler, Daniel H; Pluta, John; Kadivar, Salmon; Craige, Caryne; Gee, James C; Avants, Brian B; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing effort to analyze the morphometry of hippocampal subfields using both in vivo and postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, given that boundaries between subregions of the hippocampal formation (HF) are conventionally defined on the basis of microscopic features that often lack discernible signature in MRI, subfield delineation in MRI literature has largely relied on heuristic geometric rules, the validity of which with respect to the underlying anatomy is largely unknown. The development and evaluation of such rules are challenged by the limited availability of data linking MRI appearance to microscopic hippocampal anatomy, particularly in three dimensions (3D). The present paper, for the first time, demonstrates the feasibility of labeling hippocampal subfields in a high resolution volumetric MRI dataset based directly on microscopic features extracted from histology. It uses a combination of computational techniques and manual post-processing to map subfield boundaries from a stack of histology images (obtained with 200μm spacing and 5μm slice thickness; stained using the Kluver-Barrera method) onto a postmortem 9.4Tesla MRI scan of the intact, whole hippocampal formation acquired with 160μm isotropic resolution. The histology reconstruction procedure consists of sequential application of a graph-theoretic slice stacking algorithm that mitigates the effects of distorted slices, followed by iterative affine and diffeomorphic co-registration to postmortem MRI scans of approximately 1cm-thick tissue sub-blocks acquired with 200μm isotropic resolution. These 1cm blocks are subsequently co-registered to the MRI of the whole HF. Reconstruction accuracy is evaluated as the average displacement error between boundaries manually delineated in both the histology and MRI following the sequential stages of reconstruction. The methods presented and evaluated in this single-subject study can potentially be applied to multiple

  13. Histology-derived volumetric annotation of the human hippocampal subfields in postmortem MRI

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Daniel H.; Pluta, John; Kadivar, Salmon; Craige, Caryne; Gee, James C.; Avants, Brian B.; Yushkevich, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing effort to analyze the morphometry of hippocampal subfields using both in vivo and postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, given that boundaries between subregions of the hippocampal formation (HF) are conventionally defined on the basis of microscopic features that often lack discernible signature in MRI, subfield delineation in MRI literature has largely relied on heuristic geometric rules, the validity of which with respect to the underlying anatomy is largely unknown. The development and evaluation of such rules is challenged by the limited availability of data linking MRI appearance to microscopic hippocampal anatomy, particularly in three dimensions (3D). The present paper, for the first time, demonstrates the feasibility of labeling hippocampal subfields in a high resolution volumetric MRI dataset based directly on microscopic features extracted from histology. It uses a combination of computational techniques and manual post-processing to map subfield boundaries from a stack of histology images (obtained with 200 μm spacing and 5 μm slice thickness; stained using the Kluver-Barrera method) onto a postmortem 9.4 Tesla MRI scan of the intact, whole hippocampal formation acquired with 160 μm isotropic resolution. The histology reconstruction procedure consists of sequential application of a graph-theoretic slice stacking algorithm that mitigates the effects of distorted slices, followed by iterative affine and diffeomorphic co-registration to postmortem MRI scans of approximately 1 cm-thick tissue sub-blocks acquired with 200 μm isotropic resolution. These 1 cm blocks are subsequently co-registered to the MRI of the whole HF. Reconstruction accuracy is evaluated as the average displacement error between boundaries manually delineated in both the histology and MRI following the sequential stages of reconstruction. The methods presented and evaluated in this single-subject study can potentially be applied to

  14. 47 CFR 22.972 - Interference resolution procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cell parameters that may need to be adjusted is left to the discretion of the Cellular Radiotelephone... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.972 Interference resolution procedures. (a) Initial notification. (1) Cellular Radiotelephone licensees may receive initial notification...

  15. Fatigue of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of cellular materials is analyzed using dimensional arguments. When the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip fails after some cycles of loading, the macrocrack advances one cell diameter, giving the macrocrack growth rate of cellular materials. Paris law for microcrack propagation, Basquin law for high cycle fatigue and Coffin-Manson law for low cycle fatigue are employed in calculating the number of cycles to failure of the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip. It is found that fatigue of cellular materials depends on cyclic stress intensity range, cell size, relative density and the fatigue parameters of the solid from which they are made. Theoretical modelling of fatigue of foams is compared to data in polymer foams; agreement is good.

  16. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found.

  17. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  18. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  19. Rapid mapping of volumetric machine errors using distance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.A.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a relatively inexpensive, fast, and easy to execute approach to maping the volumetric errors of a machine tool, coordinate measuring machine, or robot. An error map is used to characterize a machine or to improve its accuracy by compensating for the systematic errors. The method consists of three steps: (1) models the relationship between volumetric error and the current state of the machine, (2) acquiring error data based on distance measurements throughout the work volume; and (3)fitting the error model using the nonlinear equation for the distance. The error model is formulated from the kinematic relationship among the six degrees of freedom of error an each moving axis. Expressing each parametric error as function of position each is combined to predict the error between the functional point and workpiece, also as a function of position. A series of distances between several fixed base locations and various functional points in the work volume is measured using a Laser Ball Bar (LBB). Each measured distance is a non-linear function dependent on the commanded location of the machine, the machine error, and the location of the base locations. Using the error model, the non-linear equation is solved producing a fit for the error model Also note that, given approximate distances between each pair of base locations, the exact base locations in the machine coordinate system determined during the non-linear filling procedure. Furthermore, with the use of 2048 more than three base locations, bias error in the measuring instrument can be removed The volumetric errors of three-axis commercial machining center have been mapped using this procedure. In this study, only errors associated with the nominal position of the machine were considered Other errors such as thermally induced and load induced errors were not considered although the mathematical model has the ability to account for these errors. Due to the proprietary nature of the projects we are

  20. A Combined Random Forests and Active Contour Model Approach for Fully Automatic Segmentation of the Left Atrium in Volumetric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gongning

    2017-01-01

    Segmentation of the left atrium (LA) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is of great importance for image guided atrial fibrillation ablation, LA fibrosis quantification, and cardiac biophysical modelling. However, automated LA segmentation from cardiac MRI is challenging due to limited image resolution, considerable variability in anatomical structures across subjects, and dynamic motion of the heart. In this work, we propose a combined random forests (RFs) and active contour model (ACM) approach for fully automatic segmentation of the LA from cardiac volumetric MRI. Specifically, we employ the RFs within an autocontext scheme to effectively integrate contextual and appearance information from multisource images together for LA shape inferring. The inferred shape is then incorporated into a volume-scalable ACM for further improving the segmentation accuracy. We validated the proposed method on the cardiac volumetric MRI datasets from the STACOM 2013 and HVSMR 2016 databases and showed that it outperforms other latest automated LA segmentation methods. Validation metrics, average Dice coefficient (DC) and average surface-to-surface distance (S2S), were computed as 0.9227 ± 0.0598 and 1.14 ± 1.205 mm, versus those of 0.6222–0.878 and 1.34–8.72 mm, obtained by other methods, respectively. PMID:28316992

  1. A challenge problem for 2D/3D imaging of targets from a volumetric data set in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteel, Curtis H., Jr.; Gorham, LeRoy A.; Minardi, Michael J.; Scarborough, Steven M.; Naidu, Kiranmai D.; Majumder, Uttam K.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a challenge problem whose scope is the 2D/3D imaging of stationary targets from a volumetric data set of X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data collected in an urban environment. The data for this problem was collected at a scene consisting of numerous civilian vehicles and calibration targets. The radar operated in circular SAR mode and completed 8 circular flight paths around the scene with varying altitudes. Data consists of phase history data, auxiliary data, processing algorithms, processed images, as well as ground truth data. Interest is focused on mitigating the large side lobes in the point spread function. Due to the sparse nature of the elevation aperture, traditional imaging techniques introduce excessive artifacts in the processed images. Further interests include the formation of highresolution 3D SAR images with single pass data and feature extraction for 3D SAR automatic target recognition applications. The purpose of releasing the Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set is to provide the community with X-band SAR data that supports the development of new algorithms for high-resolution 2D/3D imaging.

  2. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Unkelbach, Jan Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David; Alber, Markus; Bangert, Mark; Bokrantz, Rasmus; Chen, Danny; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Men, Chunhua; Nill, Simeon; Papp, Dávid; Romeijn, Edwin; Salari, Ehsan

    2015-03-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  3. Electrothermal energy conversion using electron gas volumetric change inside semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyze an electrothermal energy converter using volumetric changes in non-equilibrium electron gas inside semiconductors. The geometric concentration of electron gas under an electric field increases the effective pressure of the electrons, and then a barrier filters out cold electrons, acting like a valve. Nano- and micro-scale features enable hot electrons to arrive at the contact in a short enough time to avoid thermalization with the lattice. Key length and time scales, preliminary device geometry, and anticipated efficiency are estimated for electronic analogs of Otto and Brayton power generators and Joule-Thomson micro refrigerators on a chip. The power generators convert the energy of incident photons from the heat source to electrical current, and the refrigerator can reduce the temperature of electrons in a semiconductor device. The analytic calculations show that a large energy conversion efficiency or coefficient of performance may be possible.

  4. Volumetric leak detection in large underground storage tanks. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, J.W.; Wise, R.F.; Maresca, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    A set of experiments was conducted to determine whether volumetric leak detection system presently used to test underground storage tanks (USTs) up to 38,000 L (10,000 gal) in capacity could meet EPA's regulatory standards for tank tightness and automatic tank gauging systems when used to test tanks up to 190,000 L (50,000 gal) in capacity. The experiments, conducted on two partially filled 190,000-L (50,000-gal) USTs at Griffiss Air Force Base in upstate New York during late August 1990, showed that a system's performance in large tanks depends primarily on the accuracy of the temperature compensation, which is inversely proportional to the volume of product in the tank. Errors in temperature compensation that were negligible in tests in small tanks were important in large tanks. The experiments further suggest that a multiple-test strategy is also required.

  5. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David; Alber, Markus; Bangert, Mark; Bokrantz, Rasmus; Chen, Danny; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Men, Chunhua; Nill, Simeon; Papp, Dávid; Romeijn, Edwin; Salari, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  6. Volumetric properties of water/AOT/isooctane microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Du, Changfei; He, Wei; Yin, Tianxiang; Shen, Weiguo

    2014-12-23

    The densities of AOT/isooctane micelles and water/AOT/isooctane microemulsions with the molar ratios R of water to AOT being 2, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18, 20, 25, 30, and 40 were measured at 303.15 K. The apparent specific volumes of AOT and the quasi-component water/AOT at various concentrations were calculated and used to estimate the volumetric properties of AOT and water in the droplets and in the continuous oil phase, to discuss the interaction between the droplets, and to determine the critical micelle concentration and the critical microemulsion concentrations. A thermodynamic model was proposed to analysis the stability boundary of the microemulsion droplets, which confirms the maximum value of R being about 65 for the stable AOT/water/isooctane microemulsion droplets.

  7. Three-Dimensional Volumetric Restoration by Structural Fat Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Luigi C.; Consorti, Giuseppe; Elia, Giovanni; Galié, Manlio; Tieghi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The use of adipose tissue transfer for correction of maxillofacial defects was reported for the first time at the end of the 19th century. Structural fat grafting (SFG) was introduced as a way to improve facial esthetics and in recent years has evolved into applications in craniomaxillofacial reconstructive surgery. Several techniques have been proposed for harvesting and grafting the fat. However, owing to the damage of many adipocytes during these maneuvers, the results have not been satisfactory and have required several fat injection procedures for small corrections. The author's (L.C.) overview the application of SFG in the management of volumetric deficit in the craniomaxillofacial in patients treated with a long-term follow-up. PMID:24624259

  8. Semi-automatic volumetrics system to parcellate ROI on neocortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ou; Ichimiya, Tetsuya; Yasuno, Fumihiko; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2002-05-01

    A template-based and semi-automatic volumetrics system--BrainVol is build to divide the any given patient brain to neo-cortical and sub-cortical regions. The standard region is given as standard ROI drawn on a standard brain volume. After normalization between the standard MR image and the patient MR image, the sub-cortical ROIs' boundary are refined based on gray matter. The neo-cortical ROIs are refined by sulcus information that is semi-automatically marked on the patient brain. Then the segmentation is applied to 4D PET image of same patient for calculation of TAC (Time Activity Curve) by co-registration between MR and PET.

  9. Volumetric-driven flows on the Plasma Couette Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Ken; Clark, M. M.; Lynn, J.; Siller, R.; Tabbutt, M.; Wallace, J.; Xu, Y.; Forest, C. B.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments for driving Keplerian-like flow profiles with the goal of exciting the magnetorotational instability (MRI) on the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U) are described. Instead of driving flow at the boundaries as is typical in many liquid metal Couette experiments, a global drive is implemented. A large (20+ A) radial current is drawn across a small (1-3 G) axial field generating torque across the whole profile. This volumetric-driven flow (VDF) is capable of producing profiles similar to Keplerian flow with Alfvén Mach numbers of order unity-ideal for MRI studies. Experimental measurements will be compared to numerical calculations that show that at sufficiently high magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers, VDF can drive the MRI. This work is supported by the NSF.

  10. Volumetric dispenser for small particles from plural sources

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, R.A.; Miller, W.H.; Sease, J.D.

    1975-12-16

    Apparatus is described for rapidly and accurately dispensing measured volumes of small particles from a supply hopper. The apparatus includes an adjustable, vertically oriented measuring tube and orifice member defining the volume to be dispensed, a ball plug valve for selectively closing the bottom end of the orifice member, and a compression valve for selectively closing the top end of the measuring tube. A supply hopper is disposed above and in gravity flow communication with the measuring tube. Properly sequenced opening and closing of the two valves provides accurate volumetric discharge through the ball plug valve. A dispensing system is described wherein several appropriately sized measuring tubes, orifice members, and associated valves are arranged to operate contemporaneously to facilitate blending of different particles.

  11. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  12. Cellular genetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, F; Filareto, A; Spitalieri, P; Sangiuolo, F; Novelli, G

    2005-01-01

    Cellular genetic therapy is the ultimate frontier for those pathologies that are consequent to a specific nonfunctional cellular type. A viable cure for there kinds of diseases is the replacement of sick cells with healthy ones, which can be obtained from the same patient or a different donor. In fact, structures can be corrected and strengthened with the introduction of undifferentiated cells within specific target tissues, where they will specialize into the desired cellular types. Furthermore, consequent to the recent results obtained with the transdifferentiation experiments, a process that allows the in vitro differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells, it has also became clear that many advantages may be obtained from the use of stem cells to produce drugs, vaccines, and therapeutic molecules. Since stem cells can sustain lineage potentials, the capacity for differentiation, and better tolerance for the introduction of exogenous genes, they are also considered as feasible therapeutic vehicles for gene therapy. In fact, it is strongly believed that the combination of cellular genetic and gene therapy approaches will definitely allow the development of new therapeutic strategies as well as the production of totipotent cell lines to be used as experimental models for the cure of genetic disorders.

  13. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  14. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  15. A miniature real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, Ira O.; Yeh, David T.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, Arif S.; Karaman, Mustafa; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2005-04-01

    Progress made in the development of a miniature real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging system is presented. This system is targeted for use in a 5-mm endoscopic channel and will provide real-time, 30-mm deep, volumetric images. It is being developed as a clinically useful device, to demonstrate a means of integrating the front-end electronics with the transducer array, and to demonstrate the advantages of the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology for medical imaging. Presented here is the progress made towards the initial implementation of this system, which is based on a two-dimensional, 16x16 CMUT array. Each CMUT element is 250 um by 250 um and has a 5 MHz center frequency. The elements are connected to bond pads on the back side of the array with 400-um long through-wafer interconnects. The transducer array is flip-chip bonded to a custom-designed integrated circuit that comprises the front-end electronics. The result is that each transducer element is connected to a dedicated pulser and low-noise preamplifier. The pulser generates 25-V, 100-ns wide, unipolar pulses. The preamplifier has an approximate transimpedance gain of 500 kOhm and 3-dB bandwidth of 10 MHz. In the first implementation of the system, one element at a time can be selected for transmit and receive and thus synthetic aperture images can be generated. In future implementations, 16 channels will be active at a given time. These channels will connect to an FPGA-based data acquisition system for real-time image reconstruction.

  16. Quantitative volumetric breast density estimation using phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Phase contrast mammography using a grating interferometer is an emerging technology for breast imaging. It provides complementary information to the conventional absorption-based methods. Additional diagnostic values could be further obtained by retrieving quantitative information from the three physical signals (absorption, differential phase and small-angle scattering) yielded simultaneously. We report a non-parametric quantitative volumetric breast density estimation method by exploiting the ratio (dubbed the R value) of the absorption signal to the small-angle scattering signal. The R value is used to determine breast composition and the volumetric breast density (VBD) of the whole breast is obtained analytically by deducing the relationship between the R value and the pixel-wise breast density. The proposed method is tested by a phantom study and a group of 27 mastectomy samples. In the clinical evaluation, the estimated VBD values from both cranio-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) views are compared with the ACR scores given by radiologists to the pre-surgical mammograms. The results show that the estimated VBD results using the proposed method are consistent with the pre-surgical ACR scores, indicating the effectiveness of this method in breast density estimation. A positive correlation is found between the estimated VBD and the diagnostic ACR score for both the CC view (p=0.033 ) and AP view (p=0.001 ). A linear regression between the results of the CC view and AP view showed a correlation coefficient γ = 0.77, which indicates the robustness of the proposed method and the quantitative character of the additional information obtained with our approach.

  17. The volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae at z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajs, S.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, M.; Levan, A.; Karpenka, N. V.; Edwards, T. D. P.; Walker, C. R.; Wolf, W. M.; Balland, C.; Carlberg, R.; Howell, D. A.; Lidman, C.; Pain, R.; Pritchet, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) at z ˜ 1.0, measured using archival data from the first four years of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We develop a method for the photometric classification of SLSNe to construct our sample. Our sample includes two previously spectroscopically identified objects, and a further new candidate selected using our classification technique. We use the point-source recovery efficiencies from Perrett et al. and a Monte Carlo approach to calculate the rate based on our SLSN sample. We find that the three identified SLSNe from SNLS give a rate of 91^{+76}_{-36} SNe yr-1 Gpc-3 at a volume-weighted redshift of z = 1.13. This is equivalent to 2.2^{+1.8}_{-0.9}× 10^{-4} of the volumetric core-collapse supernova rate at the same redshift. When combined with other rate measurements from the literature, we show that the rate of SLSNe increases with redshift in a manner consistent with that of the cosmic star formation history. We also estimate the rate of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts based on the events discovered by the Swift satellite, and show that it is comparable to the rate of SLSNe, providing further evidence of a possible connection between these two classes of events. We also examine the host galaxies of the SLSNe discovered in SNLS, and find them to be consistent with the stellar-mass distribution of other published samples of SLSNe.

  18. Marginal Space Deep Learning: Efficient Architecture for Volumetric Image Parsing.

    PubMed

    Ghesu, Florin C; Krubasik, Edward; Georgescu, Bogdan; Singh, Vivek; Yefeng Zheng; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-05-01

    Robust and fast solutions for anatomical object detection and segmentation support the entire clinical workflow from diagnosis, patient stratification, therapy planning, intervention and follow-up. Current state-of-the-art techniques for parsing volumetric medical image data are typically based on machine learning methods that exploit large annotated image databases. Two main challenges need to be addressed, these are the efficiency in scanning high-dimensional parametric spaces and the need for representative image features which require significant efforts of manual engineering. We propose a pipeline for object detection and segmentation in the context of volumetric image parsing, solving a two-step learning problem: anatomical pose estimation and boundary delineation. For this task we introduce Marginal Space Deep Learning (MSDL), a novel framework exploiting both the strengths of efficient object parametrization in hierarchical marginal spaces and the automated feature design of Deep Learning (DL) network architectures. In the 3D context, the application of deep learning systems is limited by the very high complexity of the parametrization. More specifically 9 parameters are necessary to describe a restricted affine transformation in 3D, resulting in a prohibitive amount of billions of scanning hypotheses. The mechanism of marginal space learning provides excellent run-time performance by learning classifiers in clustered, high-probability regions in spaces of gradually increasing dimensionality. To further increase computational efficiency and robustness, in our system we learn sparse adaptive data sampling patterns that automatically capture the structure of the input. Given the object localization, we propose a DL-based active shape model to estimate the non-rigid object boundary. Experimental results are presented on the aortic valve in ultrasound using an extensive dataset of 2891 volumes from 869 patients, showing significant improvements of up to 45

  19. Volumetric three-dimensional reconstruction and segmentation of spectral-domain OCT.

    PubMed

    Aaker, Grant D; Gracia, Luis; Myung, Jane S; Borcherding, Vanessa; Banfelder, Jason R; D'Amico, Donald J; Kiss, Szilárd

    2011-07-01

    Despite advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT), three-dimensional (3D) renderings of OCT images remain limited to scanning consecutive two-dimensional (2D) OCT slices. The authors describe a method of reconstructing 2D OCT data for 3D retinal analysis and visualization in a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment (CAVE). Using customized signal processing software, raw data from 2D slice-based spectral-domain OCT images were rendered into high-resolution 3D images for segmentation and quantification analysis. Reconstructed OCT images were projected onto a four-walled space and viewed through stereoscopic glasses, resulting in a virtual reality perception of the retina. These 3D retinal renderings offer a novel method for segmentation and isolation of volumetric images. The ability to manipulate the images in a virtual reality environment allows visualization of complex spatial relationships that may aid our understanding of retinal pathology. More importantly, these 3D retinal renderings can be viewed, manipulated, and analyzed on traditional 2D monitors independent of the CAVE.

  20. Potential applications of flat-panel volumetric CT in morphologic and functional small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Greschus, Susanne; Kiessling, Fabian; Lichy, Matthias P; Moll, Jens; Mueller, Margareta M; Savai, Rajkumar; Rose, Frank; Ruppert, Clemens; Günther, Andreas; Luecke, Marcus; Fusenig, Norbert E; Semmler, Wolfhard; Traupe, Horst

    2005-08-01

    Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic and preclinical research for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, and brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model and the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, and kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion and tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  1. Sub-Nyquist Sampling and Fourier Domain Beamforming in Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Burshtein, Amir; Birk, Michael; Chernyakova, Tanya; Eilam, Alon; Kempinski, Arcady; Eldar, Yonina C

    2016-05-01

    A key step in ultrasound image formation is digital beamforming of signals sampled by several transducer elements placed upon an array. High-resolution digital beamforming introduces the demand for sampling rates significantly higher than the signals' Nyquist rate, which greatly increases the volume of data that must be transmitted from the system's front end. In 3-D ultrasound imaging, 2-D transducer arrays rather than 1-D arrays are used, and more scan lines are needed. This implies that the amount of sampled data is vastly increased with respect to 2-D imaging. In this work, we show that a considerable reduction in data rate can be achieved by applying the ideas of Xampling and frequency domain beamforming (FDBF), leading to a sub-Nyquist sampling rate, which uses only a portion of the bandwidth of the ultrasound signals to reconstruct the image. We extend previous work on FDBF for 2-D ultrasound imaging to accommodate the geometry imposed by volumetric scanning and a 2-D grid of transducer elements. High image quality from low-rate samples is demonstrated by simulation of a phantom image composed of several small reflectors. Our technique is then applied to raw data of a heart ventricle phantom obtained by a commercial 3-D ultrasound system. We show that by performing 3-D beamforming in the frequency domain, sub-Nyquist sampling and low processing rate are achievable, while maintaining adequate image quality.

  2. Assessment of smoke inhalation injury using volumetric optical frequency domain imaging in sheep models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Hariri, Lida P.; Beagle, John; Tan, Khay Ming; Chee, Chunmin; Hales, Charles A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2012-02-01

    Smoke inhalation injury is a serious threat to victims of fires and explosions, however accurate diagnosis of patients remains problematic. Current evaluation techniques are highly subjective, often involving the integration of clinical findings with bronchoscopic assessment. It is apparent that new quantitative methods for evaluating the airways of patients at risk of inhalation injury are needed. Optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is a high resolution optical imaging modality that enables volumetric microscopy of the trachea and upper airways in vivo. We anticipate that OFDI may be a useful tool in accurately assessing the airways of patients at risk of smoke inhalation injury by detecting injury prior to the onset of symptoms, and therefore guiding patient management. To demonstrate the potential of OFDI for evaluating smoke inhalation injury, we conducted a preclinical study in which we imaged the trachea/upper airways of 4 sheep prior to, and up to 60 minutes post exposure to cooled cotton smoke. OFDI enabled the visualization of increased mucus accumulation, mucosal thickening, epithelial disruption and sloughing, and increased submucosal signal intensity attributed to polymorphonuclear infiltrates. These results were consistent with histopathology findings. Bronchoscopic inspection of the upper airways appeared relatively normal with only mild accumulation of mucus visible within the airway lumen. The ability of OFDI to not only accurately detect smoke inhalation injury, but to quantitatively assess and monitor the progression or healing of the injury over time may provide new insights into the management of patients such as guiding clinical decisions regarding the need for intubation and ventilator support.

  3. Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry: A New Approach to Volumetric PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Dan; Boomsma, Aaron; Lai, Wing; Pothos, Stamatios; Fluid Mechanics Research Instruments Team

    2016-11-01

    Volumetric velocity fields are useful in a wide variety of fluid mechanics applications. Several types of three-dimensional imaging methods have been used in the past to varying degrees of success, for example, 3D PTV (Maas et al., 1993), DDPIV (Peireira et al., 2006), Tomographic PIV (Elsinga, 2006), and V3V (Troolin and Longmire, 2009), among others. Each of these techniques has shown advantages and disadvantages in different areas. With the advent of higher resolution and lower noise cameras with higher stability levels, new techniques are emerging that combine the advantages of the existing techniques. This talk describes a new technique called Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry (TAPTV), in which segmented triangulation and diameter tolerance are used to achieve three-dimensional particle tracking with extremely high particle densities (on the order of ppp = 0.2 or higher) without the drawbacks normally associated with ghost particles (for example in TomoPIV). The results are highly spatially-resolved data with very fast processing times. A detailed explanation of the technique as well as plots, movies, and experimental considerations will be discussed.

  4. The investigation of data voxelization for a three-dimensional volumetric display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xu; Lin, Yuanfang

    2009-04-01

    A high resolution three-dimensional (3D) volumetric display system utilizing a rotating light-emitting diode (LED) array is presented, which provides viewers with true depth cues, binocular parallax, accommodation and convergence, etc, and can be observed from any direction without the need for any special viewing aids. The data voxelization method for the system is presented. The evaluation of texture distortion due to the deviations of the voxel positions caused in voxelization is introduced. 3D models with two types of texture are built: one in which the gray scale is nearly invariant in the background, and the other in which the gray scale varies in the whole picture. The texture distortion of models with the two types of texture is evaluated and a numerical analysis is given. The relationship between texture distortion and voxelization precision is studied. Voxelization precision can be improved by shortening the voxelization step length. Experiments show that models with textures in which gray scale varies gradually in the whole picture need higher voxelization precision than textures with an invariant gray scale background. In order to obtain similar display quality, the ratio of the voxelization step length of models with the two types of texture is about 5/2. This project was supported by the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (2007AA01Z339).

  5. Enhanced volumetric visualization for real time 4D intraoperative ophthalmic swept-source OCT

    PubMed Central

    Viehland, Christian; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M.; Nankivil, Derek; Shen, Liangbo; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Viet, Du Tran; Kuo, Anthony N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Current-generation software for rendering volumetric OCT data sets based on ray casting results in volume visualizations with indistinct tissue features and sub-optimal depth perception. Recent developments in hand-held and microscope-integrated intrasurgical OCT designed for real-time volumetric imaging motivate development of rendering algorithms which are both visually appealing and fast enough to support real time rendering, potentially from multiple viewpoints for stereoscopic visualization. We report on an enhanced, real time, integrated volumetric rendering pipeline which incorporates high performance volumetric median and Gaussian filtering, boundary and feature enhancement, depth encoding, and lighting into a ray casting volume rendering model. We demonstrate this improved model implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU) hardware for real-time volumetric rendering of OCT data during tissue phantom and live human surgical imaging. We show that this rendering produces enhanced 3D visualizations of pathology and intraoperative maneuvers compared to standard ray casting. PMID:27231623

  6. Design, implementation and characterization of a quantum-dot-based volumetric display.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Naruse, Makoto; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Tate, Naoya; Shiraki, Atsushi; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-16

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a volumetric display system based on quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a polymer substrate. Unlike conventional volumetric displays, our system does not require electrical wiring; thus, the heretofore unavoidable issue of occlusion is resolved because irradiation by external light supplies the energy to the light-emitting voxels formed by the QDs. By exploiting the intrinsic attributes of the QDs, the system offers ultrahigh definition and a wide range of colours for volumetric displays. In this paper, we discuss the design, implementation and characterization of the proposed volumetric display's first prototype. We developed an 8 × 8 × 8 display comprising two types of QDs. This display provides multicolour three-type two-dimensional patterns when viewed from different angles. The QD-based volumetric display provides a new way to represent images and could be applied in leisure and advertising industries, among others.

  7. Design, Implementation and Characterization of a Quantum-Dot-Based Volumetric Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Naruse, Makoto; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Tate, Naoya; Shiraki, Atsushi; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a volumetric display system based on quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a polymer substrate. Unlike conventional volumetric displays, our system does not require electrical wiring; thus, the heretofore unavoidable issue of occlusion is resolved because irradiation by external light supplies the energy to the light-emitting voxels formed by the QDs. By exploiting the intrinsic attributes of the QDs, the system offers ultrahigh definition and a wide range of colours for volumetric displays. In this paper, we discuss the design, implementation and characterization of the proposed volumetric display's first prototype. We developed an 8 × 8 × 8 display comprising two types of QDs. This display provides multicolour three-type two-dimensional patterns when viewed from different angles. The QD-based volumetric display provides a new way to represent images and could be applied in leisure and advertising industries, among others.

  8. Global segmentation and curvature analysis of volumetric data sets using trivariate B-spline functions.

    PubMed

    Soldea, Octavian; Elber, Gershon; Rivlin, Ehud

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a method to globally segment volumetric images into regions that contain convex or concave (elliptic) iso-surfaces, planar or cylindrical (parabolic) iso-surfaces, and volumetric regions with saddle-like (hyperbolic) iso-surfaces, regardless of the value of the iso-surface level. The proposed scheme relies on a novel approach to globally compute, bound, and analyze the Gaussian and mean curvatures of an entire volumetric data set, using a trivariate B-spline volumetric representation. This scheme derives a new differential scalar field for a given volumetric scalar field, which could easily be adapted to other differential properties. Moreover, this scheme can set the basis for more precise and accurate segmentation of data sets targeting the identification of primitive parts. Since the proposed scheme employs piecewise continuous functions, it is precise and insensitive to aliasing.

  9. Progressive Muscle Cell Delivery as a Solution for Volumetric Muscle Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing functional volumetric tissue in vivo following implantation remains a critical challenge facing cell-based approaches. Several pre-vascularization approaches have been developed to increase cell viability following implantation. Structural and functional restoration was achieved in a preclinical rodent tissue defect; however, the approach used in this model fails to repair larger (>mm) defects as observed in a clinical setting. We propose an effective cell delivery system utilizing appropriate vascularization at the site of cell implantation that results in volumetric and functional tissue reconstruction. Our method of multiple cell injections in a progressive manner yielded improved cell survival and formed volumetric muscle tissues in an ectopic muscle site. In addition, this strategy supported the reconstruction of functional skeletal muscle tissue in a rodent volumetric muscle loss injury model. Results from our study suggest that our method may be used to repair volumetric tissue defects by overcoming diffusion limitations and facilitating adequate vascularization. PMID:27924941

  10. NCAI Resolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Five Major Policy Resolutions were adopted, without objection, at the 33rd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 1976. The issues involved were: Treaties and Trust Responsibilities, Tribal Government, Jurisdiction, Federal Administration and Structure of Indian Affairs, and…

  11. Quantitative rainfall metrics for comparing volumetric rainfall retrievals to fine scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, Scott; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Giangrande, Scott; Fridlind, Ann; Theisen, Adam; Jensen, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation processes play a significant role in the energy balance of convective systems for example, through latent heating and evaporative cooling. Heavy precipitation "cores" can also be a proxy for vigorous convection and vertical motions. However, comparisons between rainfall rate retrievals from volumetric remote sensors with forecast rain fields from high-resolution numerical weather prediction simulations are complicated by differences in the location and timing of storm morphological features. This presentation will outline a series of metrics for diagnosing the spatial variability and statistical properties of precipitation maps produced both from models and retrievals. We include existing metrics such as Contoured by Frequency Altitude Diagrams (Yuter and Houze 1995) and Statistical Coverage Products (May and Lane 2009) and propose new metrics based on morphology, cell and feature based statistics. Work presented focuses on observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains radar network consisting of three agile X-Band radar systems with a very dense coverage pattern and a C Band system providing site wide coverage. By combining multiple sensors resolutions of 250m2 can be achieved, allowing improved characterization of fine-scale features. Analyses compare data collected during the Midlattitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) with simulations of observed systems using the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting model. May, P. T., and T. P. Lane, 2009: A method for using weather radar data to test cloud resolving models. Meteorological Applications, 16, 425-425, doi:10.1002/met.150, 10.1002/met.150. Yuter, S. E., and R. A. Houze, 1995: Three-Dimensional Kinematic and Microphysical Evolution of Florida Cumulonimbus. Part II: Frequency Distributions of Vertical Velocity, Reflectivity, and Differential Reflectivity. Mon. Wea. Rev., 123, 1941-1963, doi:10.1175/1520-0493(1995)123<1941:TDKAME>2.0.CO;2.

  12. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Arvind J; Smith, Michael S; Pleskow, Douglas K

    2016-05-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett's esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett's esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus.

  13. Single-shot, volumetrically illuminated, three-dimensional, tomographic laser-induced-fluorescence imaging in a gaseous free jet.

    PubMed

    Halls, Benjamin R; Thul, Daniel J; Michaelis, Dirk; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R; Gord, James R

    2016-05-02

    Single-shot, tomographic imaging of the three-dimensional concentration field is demonstrated in a turbulent gaseous free jet in co-flow using volumetrically illuminated laser-induced fluorescence. The fourth-harmonic output of an Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm is formed into a collimated 15 × 20 mm2 beam to excite the ground singlet state of acetone seeded into the central jet. Subsequent fluorescence is collected along eight lines of sight for tomographic reconstruction using a combination of stereoscopes optically coupled to four two-stage intensified CMOS cameras. The performance of the imaging system is evaluated and shown to be sufficient for recording instantaneous three-dimensional features with high signal-to-noise (130:1) and nominal spatial resolution of 0.6-1.5 mm at x/D = 7-15.5.

  14. Shaping volumetric light distribution through turbid media using real-time three-dimensional opto-acoustic feedback.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, X Luís; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-02-15

    Focusing light through turbid media represents a highly fascinating challenge in modern biophotonics. The unique capability of opto-acoustics for high-resolution imaging of light absorption contrast in deep tissues can provide a natural and efficient feedback to control light delivery in a scattering medium. While the basic feasibility of using opto-acoustic readings as a feedback mechanism for wavefront shaping has been recently reported, the suggested approaches may require long acquisition times, making them challenging to be translated into realistic tissue environments. In an attempt to significantly accelerate dynamic wavefront shaping capabilities, we present here a feedback-based approach using real-time three-dimensional opto-acoustic imaging assisted with genetic-algorithm-based optimization. The new technique offers robust performance in the presence of noisy measurements and can simultaneously control the scattered wave field in an entire volumetric region.

  15. Predictability in cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case.

  16. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata.

  17. Semi-Quantitative vs. Volumetric Determination of Endolymphatic Space in Menière’s Disease Using Endolymphatic Hydrops 3T-HR-MRI after Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Georg; Vieth, Volker; Weiss, Daniel; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Heindel, Walter; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Böckenfeld, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging enhances the clinical diagnosis of Menière's disease. This is accomplished by in vivo detection of endolymphatic hydrops, which are graded using different semi-quantitative grading systems. We evaluated an established, semi-quantitative endolymphatic hydrops score and with a quantitative method for volumetric assessment of the endolymphatic size. 11 patients with Menière's disease and 2 healthy subjects underwent high resolution endolymphatic hydrops 3 Tesla MRI with highly T2 weighted FLAIR and T2DRIVE sequences. The degree of endolymphatic hydrops was rated semi-quantitatively and compared to the results of 3D-volumetry. Moreover, the grade of endolymphatic hydrops was correlated with pure tone audiometry. Semi-quantitative grading and volumetric evaluation of the endolymphatic hydrops are in accordance (r = 0.92) and the grade of endolymphatic hydrops correlates with pure tone audiometry. Patients with a sickness duration of ≥ 30 months showed a significant higher total labyrinth fluid volume (p = 0.03). Fast, semi-quantitative evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops is highly reliable compared to quantitative/volumetric assessment. Endolymphatic space is significantly higher in patients with longer sickness duration. PMID:25768940

  18. Using remote sensing for volumetric analyses of soil degradation by erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlacilova, Marketa; Krasa, Josef; Kavka, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Soil degradation by erosion can be effectively monitored or quantified by modern tools of remote sensing with variable level of detail accessible. The presented study deals with rill erosion assessment using stereoscopic images and orthophotos obtained by UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle). Advantages of UAVs are data in high resolution (1-10 cm/pixel), flexibility of data acquisition and price in comparison with standard aerial photography. Location attacked by intensive rainfall event in the spring 2013 was selected for this study of volumetric assessment of soil degradation by erosion. After the storm, rills and ephemeral gullies in different scales were detected on several fields in the target area. The study was focused on a single parcel catchment (12.5 ha) which attach to the main ephemeral gully in the monitored field. DEM of the location was obtained from UAV stereo images and official LIDAR data. At the same time, in-situ monitoring was effected for comparison and validation of methodology. The field measurement consisted of soil sampling and taking detailed stereo photographs of erosion rills. The photographs were processed by PhotoModeler Scanner software to obtain detailed surface data (TIN) of particular rills. The model for automatic and precise volumetric assessment of single rills was developed within ArcGIS. The whole study area DEM obtained from UAV was also analysed in ArcGIS using similar methodology for computation of rill volumes. The UAV DEM detected most rill bottoms and shapes however the level of detail was too low for actual sediment transport volume estimate. Therefore the volume obtained from UAV DEM was calibrated by the detailed models of single rills acquired by field measurement. Prior the calibration the UAV DEM volume was underestimated by 40-85% based on the rill size. Afterwards the target area was split into twelve separated regions defined by intensity and form of soil degradation (orthophoto-classified rill density). Equally, at

  19. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, N. Andres; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris; Walker, Gail R.; Padgett, Kyle; Roy, Bhaswati; Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold; Stoyanova, Radka

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  20. Volumetric lean percentage measurement using dual energy mammography

    PubMed Central

    Ducote, Justin L.; Klopfer, Michael J.; Molloi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography, which has demonstrated accurate measurement in phantoms, has been proposed as one possible method. To examine the use of chemical analysis as a possible means to validate breast density measurements from dual energy mammography, a bovine tissue model was investigated. Known quantities of lean and adipose tissue were compared with composition values measured from dual energy images and chemical analysis. Methods: Theoretical simulations were performed to assess the impact variations in breast composition would have on measurement of breast density from a single calibration. Fourteen ex-vivo tissue samples composed of varying amounts of pure lean tissue and pure adipose tissue (lean percentage) from 0 to 100%, in increments of 10%, were imaged using dual energy mammography. This was followed by chemical analysis based on desiccation, trituration, and fat extraction with petroleum ether to determine water, lipid, and protein content. The volumetric lean percentage (VLP) as measured from images (VLPI) and as derived from chemical analysis data (VLPCA) were compared with the VLP calculated from measurements of sample mass with a scale (VLPM). Finally, data from the bovine tissue model in this study were compared to compositional data from a previous report of human tissue composition. Results: The results from simulation suggest a substantial impact on measuring breast density is likely due to changes in anatomical breast composition. VLPI was related to the VLPM by VLPI = 1.53 VLPM + 10.0 (r2>0.99). VLPCA was related to VLPM by VLPCA = 0.76 VLPM + 22.8 (r2>0.99). VLPI was related to VLPCA by VLPI = 2.00 VLPCA − 35.6 (r2>0.99). Bovine adipose tissue was shown to be very similar to human adipose tissue in terms of water, lipid, and protein content with RMS differences of 1.2%. Bovine lean tissue was shown to be very similar to human skeletal

  1. A synthetic diamond diode in volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zani, Margherita; Bucciolini, Marta; Casati, Marta; Talamonti, Cinzia; Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, Giuseppe; Tonnetti, Alessia; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the behavior of a single crystal diamond diode (SCDD) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose verifications. This delivery technique is one of the most severe test of a dosimeter performance due to the modulation of the dose rate achieved by simultaneously changing the velocity of the gantry and the position of the collimator leaves. The performed measurements with VMAT photon beams can therefore contribute to an overall global validation of the device to be used in dose distribution verifications.Methods: The SCDD response to 6 MVRX has been tested and compared with reference ionization chambers and treatment planning system (TPS) calculations in different experiments: (a) measurements of output factors for small field sizes (square fields of side ranging between 8 mm and 104 mm) by SCDD and A1SL ionization chamber; (b) angular dependence evaluation of the entire experimental set-up by SCDD, A1SL, and Farmer ionization chambers; and (c) acquisition of dose profiles for a VMAT treatment of a pulmonary disease in latero-lateral and gantry-target directions by SCDD and A1SL ionization chamber.Results: The output factors measured by SCDD favorably compare with the ones obtained by A1SL, whose response is affected by the lack of charged particle equilibrium and by averaging effect when small fields are involved. From the experiment on angular dependence, a good agreement is observed among the diamond diode, the ion chambers, and the TPS. In VMAT profiles, the absorbed doses measured by SCDD and A1SL compare well with the TPS calculated ones. An overall better agreement is observed in the case of the diamond dosimeter, which is also showing a better accuracy in terms of distance to agreement in the high gradient regions.Conclusions: Synthetic diamond diodes, whose performance were previously studied for conformal and IMRT radiotherapy techniques, were found to be suitable detectors also for dosimetric measurements

  2. Volumetric imaging of oral epithelial neoplasia by MPM-SHGM: epithelial connective tissue interface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; Resto, Vicente; McCammon, Susan; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    The majority of oral cancers are comprised of oral squamous cell carcinoma in which neoplastic epithelial cells invade across the epithelial connective tissue interface (ECTI). Invasion is preceded by a multi-component process including epithelial hyperproliferation, loss of cell polarity, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia. In particular, volumetric imaging by these methods can reveal aspects of the 3D microstructure that are not possible by other methods and which could both further our understanding of neoplastic transformation and be explored for development of diagnostic approaches in this disease having only 55% 5-year survival rate. MPAM-SHG were applied to reveal the 3D structure of the critical ECTI interface that plays an integral part toward invasion. Epithelial dysplasia was induced in an established hamster model. MPAM-SHGM was applied to lesion sites, using 780 nm excitation (450-600nm emission) for autofluroescence of cellular and extracellular components; 840 nm using 420 nm bandpass filter for SHG. The ECTI surface was identified as the interface at which SHG signal began following the epithelium and was modeled as a 3D surface using Matlab. ECTI surface area and cell features at sites of epithelial expansion where ECTI was altered were measured; Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology. ROC analysis using ECTI image metrics indicated the ability to delineate normal from neoplasia with high sensitivity and specificity and it is noteworthy that inflammation did not significantly alter diagnostic potential of MPAM-SHGM .

  3. In vivo volumetric imaging of biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Biological systems undergo dynamical changes continuously which span multiple spatial and temporal scales. To study these complex biological dynamics in vivo, high-speed volumetric imaging that can work at large imaging depth is highly desired. However, deep tissue imaging suffers from wavefront distortion, resulting in reduced Strehl ratio and image quality. Here we combine the two wavefront engineering methods developed in our lab, namely the optical phase-locked ultrasound lens based volumetric imaging and the iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique, and demonstrate in vivo volumetric imaging of microglial and mitochondrial dynamics at large depth in mouse brain cortex and lymph node, respectively. PMID:26832504

  4. Is there a role for the use of volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics?

    PubMed

    du Bois, A H; Kardachi, B; Bartold, P M

    2012-03-01

    Volumetric computed cone beam tomography offers a number of significant advantages over conventional intraoral and extraoral panoramic radiography, as well as computed tomography. To date, periodontal diagnosis has relied heavily on the assessment of both intraoral radiographs and extraoral panoramic radiographs. With emerging technology in radiology there has been considerable interest in the role that volumetric cone beam computed tomography might play in periodontal diagnostics. This narrative reviews the current evidence and considers whether there is a role for volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics.

  5. In vivo volumetric imaging of biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-01-25

    Biological systems undergo dynamical changes continuously which span multiple spatial and temporal scales. To study these complex biological dynamics in vivo, high-speed volumetric imaging that can work at large imaging depth is highly desired. However, deep tissue imaging suffers from wavefront distortion, resulting in reduced Strehl ratio and image quality. Here we combine the two wavefront engineering methods developed in our lab, namely the optical phase-locked ultrasound lens based volumetric imaging and the iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique, and demonstrate in vivo volumetric imaging of microglial and mitochondrial dynamics at large depth in mouse brain cortex and lymph node, respectively.

  6. Illustration-inspired depth enhanced volumetric medical visualization.

    PubMed

    Svakhine, Nikolai A; Ebert, David S; Andrews, William M

    2009-01-01

    Volume illustration can be used to provide insight into source data from CT/MRI scanners in much the same way as medical illustration depicts the important details of anatomical structures. As such, proven techniques used in medical illustration should be transferable to volume illustration, providing scientists with new tools to visualize their data. In recent years, a number of techniques have been developed to enhance the rendering pipeline and create illustrative effects similar to the ones found in medical textbooks and surgery manuals. Such effects usually highlight important features of the subject while subjugating its context and providing depth cues for correct perception. Inspired by traditional visual and line-drawing techniques found in medical illustration, we have developed a collection of fast algorithms for more effective emphasis/de-emphasis of data as well as conveyance of spatial relationships. Our techniques utilize effective outlining techniques and selective depth enhancement to provide perceptual cues of object importance as well as spatial relationships in volumetric datasets. Moreover, we have used illustration principles to effectively combine and adapt basic techniques so that they work together to provide consistent visual information and a uniform style.

  7. Volumetric modulated arc therapy planning for distal oesophageal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, M A; Bedford, J L; Warrington, A P; Tait, D M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel form of intensity-modulated radiation therapy that allows the radiation dose to be delivered in a single gantry rotation using conformal or modulated fields. The capability of VMAT to reduce heart and cord dose, while maintaining lung receiving 20 Gy <20%, was evaluated for chemoradiation for oesophageal cancer. Methods An optimised forward-planned four-field arrangement was compared with inverse-planned coplanar VMAT arcs with 35 control points for 10 patients with lower gastro-oesophageal tumours prescribed 54 Gy in 30 fractions. Conformal (cARC) and intensity-modulated (VMATi) arcs were considered. Plans were assessed and compared using the planning target volume (PTV) irradiated to 95% of the prescription dose (V95), volumes of lung irradiated to 20 Gy (V20), heart irradiated to 30 Gy (V30), spinal cord maximum dose and van't Riet conformation number (CN). The monitor units per fraction and delivery time were recorded for a single representative plan. Results VMATi provided a significant reduction in the heart V30 (31% vs 55%; p=0.02) with better CN (0.72 vs 0.65; p=0.01) than the conformal plan. The treatment delivery was 1 min 28 s for VMAT compared with 3 min 15 s. Conclusion For similar PTV coverage, VMATi delivers a lower dose to organs at risk than conformal plans in a shorter time, and this has warranted clinical implementation. PMID:21427179

  8. Volumetric applications for spiral CT in the thorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy; Leung, Ann N.

    1994-05-01

    Spiral computed tomography (CT) is a new technique for rapidly acquiring volumetric data within the body. By combining a continuous gantry rotation and table feed, it is possible to image the entire thorax within a single breath-hold. This eliminates the ventilatory misregistration seen with conventional thoracic CT, which can result in small pulmonary lesions being undetected. An additional advantage of a continuous data set is that axial sections can be reconstructed at arbitrary intervals along the spiral path, resulting in the generation of overlapping sections which diminish partial volume effects resulting from lesions that straddle adjacent sections. The rapid acquisition of spiral CT enables up to a 50% reduction in the total iodinated contrast dose required for routine thoracic CT scanning. This can be very important for imaging patients with cardiac and renal diseases and could reduce the cost of thoracic CT scanning. Alternatively, by combining a high flow peripheral intravenous iodinated contrast injection with a spiral CT acquisition, it is possible to obtain images of the vasculature, which demonstrate pulmonary arterial thrombi, aortic aneurysms and dissections, and congenital vascular anomalies in detail previously unattainable without direct arterial access.

  9. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillation detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts. PMID:24321820

  10. Volumetric Survey Speed: A Figure of Merit for Transient Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric C.

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain surveys can exchange sky coverage for revisit frequency, complicating the comparison of their relative capabilities. By using different revisit intervals, a specific camera may execute surveys optimized for discovery of different classes of transient objects. We propose a new figure of merit, the instantaneous volumetric survey speed, for evaluating transient surveys. This metric defines the trade between cadence interval and snapshot survey volume and so provides a natural means of comparing survey capability. The related metric of areal survey speed imposes a constraint on the range of possible revisit times: we show that many modern time-domain surveys are limited by the amount of fresh sky available each night. We introduce the concept of “spectroscopic accessibility” and discuss its importance for transient science goals requiring followup observing. We present an extension of the control time algorithm for cases where multiple consecutive detections are required. Finally, we explore how survey speed and choice of cadence interval determine the detection rate of transients in the peak absolute magnitude-decay timescale phase space.

  11. Quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy using Elekta Synergy.

    PubMed

    Haga, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Itoh, Saori; Terahara, Atsuro; Yamashita, Hideomi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Saegusa, Shigeki; Imae, Toshikazu; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Pellegrini, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. Recently, Elekta has supplied volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in which multi-leaf collimator (MLC) shape, jaw position, collimator angle, and gantry speed vary continuously during gantry rotation. A quality assurance procedure for VMAT delivery is described. METHODS AND MATERIALS. A single-arc VMAT plan with 73 control points (CPs) and 5-degree gantry angle spacing for a prostate cancer patient has been created by ERGO + + treatment planning system (TPS), where MLC shapes are given by anatomic relationship between a target and organs at risk and the monitor unit for each CP is optimized based on given dose prescriptions. Actual leaf and jaw positions, gantry angles and dose rates during prostate VMAT delivery were recorded in every 0.25 seconds, and the errors between planned and actual values were evaluated. The dose re-calculation using these recorded data has been performed and compared with the original TPS plan using the gamma index. RESULTS. Typical peak errors of gantry angles, leaf positions, and jaw positions were 3 degrees, 0.6 mm, and 1 mm, respectively. The dose distribution obtained by the TPS plan and the recalculated one agreed well under 2%-2 mm gamma index criteria. CONCLUSIONS. Quality assurance for prostate VMAT delivery has been performed with a satisfied result.

  12. Solenoidal filtering of volumetric velocity measurements using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azijli, Iliass; Dwight, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    Volumetric velocity measurements of incompressible flows contain spurious divergence due to measurement noise, despite mass conservation dictating that the velocity field must be divergence-free (solenoidal). We investigate the use of Gaussian process regression to filter spurious divergence, returning analytically solenoidal velocity fields. We denote the filter solenoidal Gaussian process regression (SGPR) and formulate it within the Bayesian framework to allow a natural inclusion of measurement uncertainty. To enable efficient handling of large data sets on regular and near-regular grids, we propose a solution procedure that exploits the Toeplitz structure of the system matrix. We apply SGPR to two synthetic and two experimental test cases and compare it with two other recently proposed solenoidal filters. For the synthetic test cases, we find that SGPR consistently returns more accurate velocity, vorticity and pressure fields. From the experimental test cases, we draw two important conclusions. Firstly, it is found that including an accurate model for the local measurement uncertainty further improves the accuracy of the velocity field reconstructed with SGPR. Secondly, it is found that all solenoidal filters result in an improved reconstruction of the pressure field, as verified with microphone measurements. The results obtained with SGPR are insensitive to correlation length, demonstrating the robustness of the filter to its parameters.

  13. Volumetric PIV in Patient-Specific Cerebral Aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindise, Melissa; Dickerhoff, Ben; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysms impose a unique challenge in which neurosurgeons must assess and decide between the risk of rupture and risk of treatment for each patient. Risk of rupture is often difficult to determine and most commonly assessed using geometric data including the size and shape of the aneurysm and parent vessel. Hemodynamics is thought to play a major role in the growth and rupture of a cerebral aneurysm, but its specific influence is largely unknown due to the inability of in vivo modalities to characterize detailed flow fields and limited in vitro studies. In this work, we use a patient-specific basilar tip aneurysm model and volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV). In vivo, 4-D PC-MRI measurements were obtained for this aneurysm and the extracted pulsatile waveform was used for the in vitro study. Clinically relevant metrics including wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), relative residence time (RRT), 3-D pressure contours, and pressure wave speed were subsequently computed. This is the first study to investigate in vitro 3-D pressure fields within a cerebral aneurysm. The results of this study demonstrate how these metrics influence the biomechanics of the aneurysm and ultimately their affect on the risk of rupture.

  14. Laser beam steering via wave mixing in volumetric thermal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, David W.

    1992-06-01

    A volumetric thermal grating (VTG) is a spatially periodic refractive index variation in a volume of gas or liquid, generated by imaging interference fringes into the medium. The fringes can be created and varied by steering laser write beams electronically with acousto- optic (A-O) cells. While the wavelength of the write beams is chosen to be absorbed by a dopant in the VTG medium, a read beam at an off-resonance wavelength can be manipulated by diffraction from the resulting index grating. Potential applications include resonator and amplifier optical isolation prepulse suppression in high-gain amplifiers, noninertial steering of large-diameter laser beams, transfer of phase information between beams to facilitate adaptive optics, Q-switching of chemical lasers, and line selection in broadband lasers. In this paper, we present a preliminary assessment of VTG utility for these optical systems applications by quantitative analysis of the medium density dynamics. In Section 2, we derive a relation between A-O acoustic frequency uncertainty and VTG pointing/steering uncertainty, which also scales desired steering range to required A-O frequency modulation bandwidth. In Section 3, we discuss the temporal response of a doped rare-gas VTG medium. Section 4 is an assessment of VTG beam-steering performance potential using available technology.

  15. Surface-Constrained Volumetric Brain Registration Using Harmonic Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anand A.; Shattuck, David W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to compare anatomical and functional brain imaging data across subjects, the images must first be registered to a common coordinate system in which anatomical features are aligned. Intensity-based volume registration methods can align subcortical structures well, but the variability in sulcal folding patterns typically results in misalignment of the cortical surface. Conversely, surface-based registration using sulcal features can produce excellent cortical alignment but the mapping between brains is restricted to the cortical surface. Here we describe a method for volumetric registration that also produces an accurate one-to-one point correspondence between cortical surfaces. This is achieved by first parameterizing and aligning the cortical surfaces using sulcal landmarks. We then use a constrained harmonic mapping to extend this surface correspondence to the entire cortical volume. Finally, this mapping is refined using an intensity-based warp. We demonstrate the utility of the method by applying it to T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI). We evaluate the performance of our proposed method relative to existing methods that use only intensity information; for this comparison we compute the inter-subject alignment of expert-labeled sub-cortical structures after registration. PMID:18092736

  16. Volumetric microscale particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Aramideh, Soroush; Ardekani, Arezoo M.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2016-11-01

    The steady-state flow through refractive-index-matched glass bead microchannels is measured using microscopic particle tracking velocimetry (μPTV). A novel technique is developed to volumetrically reconstruct particles from oversampled two-dimensional microscopic images of fluorescent particles. Fast oversampling of the quasi-steady-state flow field in the lateral direction is realized by a nano-positioning piezo stage synchronized with a fast CMOS camera. Experiments at different Reynolds numbers are carried out for flows through a series of both monodispersed and bidispersed glass bead microchannels with various porosities. The obtained velocity fields at pore-scale (on the order of 10 μm) are compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS) conducted in the exact same geometries reconstructed from micro-CT scans of the glass bead microchannels. The developed experimental method would serve as a new approach for exploring the flow physics at pore-scale in porous media, and also provide benchmark measurements for validation of numerical simulations.

  17. Whole-cell, multicolor superresolution imaging using volumetric multifocus microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Bassam; Wisniewski, Jan; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Chen, Jiji; Revyakin, Andrey; Wu, Carl; Dahan, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule-based superresolution imaging has become an essential tool in modern cell biology. Because of the limited depth of field of optical imaging systems, one of the major challenges in superresolution imaging resides in capturing the 3D nanoscale morphology of the whole cell. Despite many previous attempts to extend the application of photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) techniques into three dimensions, effective localization depths do not typically exceed 1.2 µm. Thus, 3D imaging of whole cells (or even large organelles) still demands sequential acquisition at different axial positions and, therefore, suffers from the combined effects of out-of-focus molecule activation (increased background) and bleaching (loss of detections). Here, we present the use of multifocus microscopy for volumetric multicolor superresolution imaging. By simultaneously imaging nine different focal planes, the multifocus microscope instantaneously captures the distribution of single molecules (either fluorescent proteins or synthetic dyes) throughout an ∼4-µm-deep volume, with lateral and axial localization precisions of ∼20 and 50 nm, respectively. The capabilities of multifocus microscopy to rapidly image the 3D organization of intracellular structures are illustrated by superresolution imaging of the mammalian mitochondrial network and yeast microtubules during cell division. PMID:25422417

  18. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillator detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts.

  19. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  20. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  1. Oral Cellular Neurothekeoma

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Nader; Zawawi, Faisal; Ywakim, Rania; Daniel, Sam J.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular neurothekeoma is known as a cutaneous tumor with uncertain histogenesis. Very little involvement of mucosal membrane has been reported in the literature so far. This is a case report of an intraoral lesion in a 15-years-old girl. Histopathologic evaluation showed a tumor-consists of spindle to epitheloid cells forming micronodules in a concentric whorled shape pattern. Tumor cells were positive for CD63, vimentin, and NKI-C3. Total excision was performed and no recurrence happened after 16-month followup. PMID:23691398

  2. Revisiting Cardiac Cellular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Alexander R.; Ilinykh, Alexei; Ivey, Malina J.; Kuwabara, Jill T.; D'Antoni, Michelle L.; Debuque, Ryan; Chandran, Anjana; Wang, Lina; Arora, Komal; Rosenthal, Nadia; Tallquist, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Accurate knowledge of the cellular composition of the heart is essential to fully understand the changes that occur during pathogenesis and to devise strategies for tissue engineering and regeneration. Objective To examine the relative frequency of cardiac endothelial cells, hematopoietic-derived cells and fibroblasts in the mouse and human heart. Methods and Results Using a combination of genetic tools and cellular markers, we examined the occurrence of the most prominent cell types in the adult mouse heart. Immunohistochemistry revealed that endothelial cells constitute over 60%, hematopoietic-derived cells 5–10%, and fibroblasts under 20% of the non-myocytes in the heart. A refined cell isolation protocol and an improved flow cytometry approach provided an independent means of determining the relative abundance of non-myocytes. High dimensional analysis and unsupervised clustering of cell populations confirmed that endothelial cells are the most abundant cell population. Interestingly, fibroblast numbers are smaller than previously estimated, and two commonly assigned fibroblast markers, Sca-1 and CD90, underrepresent fibroblast numbers. We also describe an alternative fibroblast surface marker that more accurately identifies the resident cardiac fibroblast population. Conclusions This new perspective on the abundance of different cell types in the heart demonstrates that fibroblasts comprise a relatively minor population. By contrast, endothelial cells constitute the majority of non-cardiomyocytes and are likely to play a greater role in physiologic function and response to injury than previously appreciated. PMID:26635390

  3. Multifunctional periodic cellular metals.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Haydn N G

    2006-01-15

    Periodic cellular metals with honeycomb and corrugated topologies are widely used for the cores of light weight sandwich panel structures. Honeycombs have closed cell pores and are well suited for thermal protection while also providing efficient load support. Corrugated core structures provide less efficient and highly anisotropic load support, but enable cross flow heat exchange opportunities because their pores are continuous in one direction. Recent advances in topology design and fabrication have led to the emergence of lattice truss structures with open cell structures. These three classes of periodic cellular metals can now be fabricated from a wide variety of structural alloys. Many topologies are found to provide adequate stiffness and strength for structural load support when configured as the cores of sandwich panels. Sandwich panels with core relative densities of 2-10% and cell sizes in the millimetre range are being assessed for use as multifunctional structures. The open, three-dimensional interconnected pore networks of lattice truss topologies provide opportunities for simultaneously supporting high stresses while also enabling cross flow heat exchange. These highly compressible structures also provide opportunities for the mitigation of high intensity dynamic loads created by impacts and shock waves in air or water. By filling the voids with polymers and hard ceramics, these structures have also been found to offer significant resistance to penetration by projectiles.

  4. Cellular Array Processing Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harry C.; Preston, Earl W.

    1981-11-01

    The Cellular Array Processing Simulation (CAPS) system is a high-level image language that runs on a multiprocessor configuration. CAPS is interpretively decoded on a conventional minicomputer with all image operation instructions executed on an array processor. The synergistic environment that exists between the minicomputer and the array processor gives CAPS its high-speed throughput, while maintaining a convenient conversational user language. CAPS was designed to be both modular and table driven so that it can be easily maintained and modified. CAPS uses the image convolution operator as one of its primitives and performs this cellular operation by decomposing it into parallel image steps that are scheduled to be executed on the array processor. Among its features is the ability to observe the imagery in real time as a user's algorithm is executed. This feature reduces the need for image storage space, since it is feasible to retain only original images and produce resultant images when needed. CAPS also contains a language processor that permits users to develop re-entrant image processing subroutines or algorithms.

  5. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  6. The Internet Brain Volume Database: A Public Resource for Storage and Retrieval of Volumetric Data

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Steven M.; Gao, Yong; Frazier, Jean A.; Haselgrove, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Every month, numerous publications appear that include neuroanatomic volumetric observations. The current and past literature that includes volumetric measurements is vast, but variable with respect to specific species, structures, and subject characteristics (such as gender, age, pathology, etc.). In this report we introduce the Internet Brain Volume Database (IBVD), www.nitrc.org/projects/ibvd, a site devoted to facilitating access to and utilization of neuroanatomic volumetric observations as published in the literature. We review the design and functionality of the site. The IBVD is the first database dedicated to integrating, exposing and sharing brain volumetric observations across species and disease. It offers valuable functionality for quality assurance assessment of results as well as support for meta-analysis across large segments of the published literature that are obscured from traditional text-based search engines. PMID:21931990

  7. Local hull-based surface construction of volumetric data from silhouettes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongjoe; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    2008-08-01

    The marching cubes (MC) is a general method which can construct a surface of an object from its volumetric data generated using a shape from silhouette method. Although MC is efficient and straightforward to implement, a MC surface may have discontinuity even though the volumetric data is continuous. This is because surface construction is more sensitive to image noise than the construction of volumetric data. To address this problem, we propose a surface construction algorithm which aggregates local surfaces constructed by the 3-D convex hull algorithm. Thus, the proposed method initially classifies local convexities from imperfect MC vertices based on sliced volumetric data. Experimental results show that continuous surfaces are obtained from imperfect silhouette images of both convex and nonconvex objects.

  8. On the Uncertain Future of the Volumetric 3D Display Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2017-06-01

    Volumetric displays permit electronically processed images to be depicted within a transparent physical volume and enable a range of cues to depth to be inherently associated with image content. Further, images can be viewed directly by multiple simultaneous observers who are able to change vantage positions in a natural way. On the basis of research to date, we assume that the technologies needed to implement useful volumetric displays able to support translucent image formation are available. Consequently, in this paper we review aspects of the volumetric paradigm and identify important issues which have, to date, precluded their successful commercialization. Potentially advantageous characteristics are outlined and demonstrate that significant research is still needed in order to overcome barriers which continue to hamper the effective exploitation of this display modality. Given the recent resurgence of interest in developing commercially viable general purpose volumetric systems, this discussion is of particular relevance.

  9. Diverging results of areal and volumetric bone mineral density in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-Hoyos, M; García-Unzueta, M T; de Luis, D; Valero, C; Riancho, J A

    2017-03-01

    Population with Down syndrome (DS) has lower areal BMD, in association with their smaller skeletal size. However, volumetric BMD and other indices of bone microarchitecture, such as trabecular bone score (TBS) and calcaneal ultrasound (QUS), were normal.

  10. Review of prospects and challenges of eye tracking in volumetric imaging

    PubMed Central

    Venjakob, Antje C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. While eye tracking research in conventional radiography has flourished over the past decades, the number of eye tracking studies that looked at multislice images lags behind. A possible reason for the lack of studies in this area might be that the eye tracking methodology used in the context of conventional radiography cannot be applied one-on-one to volumetric imaging material. Challenges associated with eye tracking in volumetric imaging are particularly associated with the selection of stimulus material, the detection of events in the eye tracking data, the calculation of meaningful eye tracking parameters, and the reporting of abnormalities. However, all of these challenges can be addressed in the design of the experiment. If this is done, eye tracking studies using volumetric imaging material offer almost unlimited opportunity for perception research and are highly relevant as the number of volumetric images that are acquired and interpreted is rising. PMID:27081663

  11. The Effect of Volumetric Porosity on Roughness Element Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John; Nickling, William; Nikolich, George; Etyemezian, Vicken

    2016-04-01

    Much attention has been given to understanding how the porosity of two dimensional structures affects the drag force exerted by boundary-layer flow on these flow obstructions. Porous structures such as wind breaks and fences are typically used to control the sedimentation of sand and snow particles or create micro-habitats in their lee. Vegetation in drylands also exerts control on sediment transport by wind due to aerodynamic effects and interaction with particles in transport. Recent research has also demonstrated that large spatial arrays of solid three dimensional roughness elements can be used to reduce sand transport to specified targets for control of wind erosion through the effect of drag partitioning and interaction of the moving sand with the large (>0.3 m high) roughness elements, but porous elements may improve the effectiveness of this approach. A thorough understanding of the role porosity plays in affecting the drag force on three-dimensional forms is lacking. To provide basic understanding of the relationship between the porosity of roughness elements and the force of drag exerted on them by fluid flow, we undertook a wind tunnel study that systematically altered the porosity of roughness elements of defined geometry (cubes, rectangular cylinders, and round cylinders) and measured the associated change in the drag force on the elements under similar Reynolds number conditions. The elements tested were of four basic forms: 1) same sized cubes with tubes of known diameter milled through them creating three volumetric porosity values and increasing connectivity between the tubes, 2) cubes and rectangular cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other, and 3) round cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other. The two-dimensional porosity, defined as the ratio of total surface area of the empty space to the solid surface area of the side of the element presented to the fluid flow was conserved at 0.519 for

  12. The power-proportion method for intracranial volume correction in volumetric imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Johnson, Hans J; Long, Jeffrey D; Magnotta, Vincent A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-01-01

    In volumetric brain imaging analysis, volumes of brain structures are typically assumed to be proportional or linearly related to intracranial volume (ICV). However, evidence abounds that many brain structures have power law relationships with ICV. To take this relationship into account in volumetric imaging analysis, we propose a power law based method-the power-proportion method-for ICV correction. The performance of the new method is demonstrated using data from the PREDICT-HD study.

  13. Evaluation of Femoral Head Necrosis Using a Volumetric Method Based on MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    hip hemi - arthroplasty . The specimens were trimmed and rounded-up with wax, to take the shape of a sphere. In order to simulate the affected...106 hips with osteonecrosis before treatment with vascularized fibular grafting. The hips were evaluated using the volumetric method. The follow up...Osteonecrosis, MRI, Volumetric Feature Extraction, Automated Diagnosis I.INTRODUCTION Femoral head osteonecrosis is responsible for a large number of hip

  14. The use of a volumetric infusion pump for the intra-arterial infusion of drugs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A M; Lilliman, M

    1985-01-01

    Volumetric infusion pumps are widely used for intravenous infusions. We have extended their use to the intra-arterial infusion of drugs. An in vitro evaluation of the performance of such devices, under experimental conditions comparable to an intra-arterial infusion, was carried out. The results obtained confirmed the accuracy of volumetric infusion pumps for intra-arterial infusions. The system was found to be safe, reliable and simple in clinical practice.

  15. Systematic Parameterization, Storage, and Representation of Volumetric DICOM Data.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Felix; Selver, M Alper; Gezer, Sinem; Dicle, Oğuz; Hillen, Walter

    Tomographic medical imaging systems produce hundreds to thousands of slices, enabling three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Radiologists process these images through various tools and techniques in order to generate 3D renderings for various applications, such as surgical planning, medical education, and volumetric measurements. To save and store these visualizations, current systems use snapshots or video exporting, which prevents further optimizations and requires the storage of significant additional data. The Grayscale Softcopy Presentation State extension of the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard resolves this issue for two-dimensional (2D) data by introducing an extensive set of parameters, namely 2D Presentation States (2DPR), that describe how an image should be displayed. 2DPR allows storing these parameters instead of storing parameter applied images, which cause unnecessary duplication of the image data. Since there is currently no corresponding extension for 3D data, in this study, a DICOM-compliant object called 3D presentation states (3DPR) is proposed for the parameterization and storage of 3D medical volumes. To accomplish this, the 3D medical visualization process is divided into four tasks, namely pre-processing, segmentation, post-processing, and rendering. The important parameters of each task are determined. Special focus is given to the compression of segmented data, parameterization of the rendering process, and DICOM-compliant implementation of the 3DPR object. The use of 3DPR was tested in a radiology department on three clinical cases, which require multiple segmentations and visualizations during the workflow of radiologists. The results show that 3DPR can effectively simplify the workload of physicians by directly regenerating 3D renderings without repeating intermediate tasks, increase efficiency by preserving all user interactions, and provide efficient storage as well as transfer of visualized data.

  16. Ultrafast treatment plan optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Men Chunhua; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Jia Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel aperture-based algorithm for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plan optimization with high quality and high efficiency. Methods: The VMAT optimization problem is formulated as a large-scale convex programming problem solved by a column generation approach. The authors consider a cost function consisting two terms, the first enforcing a desired dose distribution and the second guaranteeing a smooth dose rate variation between successive gantry angles. A gantry rotation is discretized into 180 beam angles and for each beam angle, only one MLC aperture is allowed. The apertures are generated one by one in a sequential way. At each iteration of the column generation method, a deliverable MLC aperture is generated for one of the unoccupied beam angles by solving a subproblem with the consideration of MLC mechanic constraints. A subsequent master problem is then solved to determine the dose rate at all currently generated apertures by minimizing the cost function. When all 180 beam angles are occupied, the optimization completes, yielding a set of deliverable apertures and associated dose rates that produce a high quality plan. Results: The algorithm was preliminarily tested on five prostate and five head-and-neck clinical cases, each with one full gantry rotation without any couch/collimator rotations. High quality VMAT plans have been generated for all ten cases with extremely high efficiency. It takes only 5-8 min on CPU (MATLAB code on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz CPU) and 18-31 s on GPU (CUDA code on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card) to generate such plans. Conclusions: The authors have developed an aperture-based VMAT optimization algorithm which can generate clinically deliverable high quality treatment plans at very high efficiency.

  17. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates

    PubMed Central

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A.; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A.; Moutoussis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information‐gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel‐based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision‐making deficits. PMID:25678093

  18. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates.

    PubMed

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A; Moutoussis, Michael; Voon, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information-gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel-based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision-making deficits.

  19. Optimization of volumetric breast density estimation in digital mammograms.

    PubMed

    Holland, Katharina; Gubern-Merida, Albert; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-02-23

    Fibroglandular tissue volume and percent density can be estimated in unprocessed mammograms using a physics-based method, which relies on an internal reference value representing the projection of fat only. However, pixels representing fat only may not be present in dense breasts, causing an underestimation of density measurements. In this work, we investigate alternative approaches for obtaining a tissue reference value to improve density estimations, particularly in dense breasts. Two of three investigated reference values (F1, F2) are percentiles of the pixel value distribution in the breast interior (the contact area of breast and compression paddle). F1 is determined in a small breast interior, which minimizes the risk that peripheral pixels are included in the measurement at the cost of increasing the chance that no proper reference can be found. F2 is obtained using a larger breast interior. The new approach which is developed for very dense breasts does not require the presence of a fatty tissue region. As reference region we select the densest region in the mammogram and assume that this represents a projection of entirely dense tissue embedded between the subcutaneous fatty tissue layers. By measuring the thickness of the fat layers a reference (F3) can be computed. To obtain accurate breast density estimates irrespective of breast composition we investigated a combination of the results of the three reference values. We collected 202 pairs of MRI's and digital mammograms from 119 women. We compared the percent dense volume estimates based on both modalities and calculated Pearson's correlation coefficients. With the references F1-F3 we found respectively a correlation of R=0.80, R=0.89 and R=0.74. Best results were obtained with the combination of the density estimations (R=0.90). Results show that better volumetric density estimates can be obtained with the hybrid method, in particular for dense breasts, when algorithms are combined to obtain a fatty

  20. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Radiofrequency volumetric inferior turbinate reduction: long-term clinical results.

    PubMed

    De Corso, E; Bastanza, G; Di Donfrancesco, V; Guidi, M L; Morelli Sbarra, G; Passali, G C; Poscia, A; de Waure, C; Paludetti, G; Galli, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess long-term results of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinates (RVTR). We performed a prospective long-term longitudinal evaluation of 305 patients affected by rhinitis (114 allergic and 191 non-allergic) who were unresponsive to medical treatment and underwent RVTR (January 2004 - December 2010). Subjects were followed for a mean period of 39.70 ± 19.41 months (range 24-60). Patients completed the NOSE-scale questionnaire pre- and post-operatively after 1 month and yearly for 5-years. Recurrence was assumed if the post-operative total NOSE score increased by at least 75% during follow-up and the patient restarted medical treatments. Estimation of relapse over time was performed by Kaplan-Meyer analyses. We documented overall good satisfaction of patients regarding the procedure, with a good rate of pain control and a low rate of complications. Post-operatively there was a significant improvement in nasal stuffiness, nasal obstruction and mouth breathing (p < 0.05). We observed a worsening trend for symptoms after 36 months with progressive increasing rate of recurrences that were significantly higher in allergic than non-allergic patients (p < 0.05). We also observed a slight worsening trend of global satisfaction of patients. Our study confirms the minor discomfort and low risk of side effects of RVTR. Our data showed good efficacy of the procedure in the majority of patients for at least 36 months after surgery, and in fact in this time period the cumulative probability to remain relapse-free was up to 0.8. In the following 2 years, we observed a worse temporal trend in term of recurrence rate, and in particular in allergic patients with a significant difference vs non-allergic individuals (p < 0.05).

  2. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  3. 3D volumetric modeling of grapevine biomass using Tripod LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keightley, K.E.; Bawden, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Tripod mounted laser scanning provides the means to generate high-resolution volumetric measures of vegetation structure and perennial woody tissue for the calculation of standing biomass in agronomic and natural ecosystems. Other than costly destructive harvest methods, no technique exists to rapidly and accurately measure above-ground perennial tissue for woody plants such as Vitis vinifera (common grape vine). Data collected from grapevine trunks and cordons were used to study the accuracy of wood volume derived from laser scanning as compared with volume derived from analog measurements. A set of 10 laser scan datasets were collected for each of 36 vines from which volume was calculated using combinations of two, three, four, six and 10 scans. Likewise, analog volume measurements were made by submerging the vine trunks and cordons in water and capturing the displaced water. A regression analysis examined the relationship between digital and non-digital techniques among the 36 vines and found that the standard error drops rapidly as additional scans are added to the volume calculation process and stabilizes at the four-view geometry with an average Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient of 0.93. Estimates of digital volumes are systematically greater than those of analog volumes and can be explained by the manner in which each technique interacts with the vine tissue. This laser scanning technique yields a highly linear relationship between vine volume and tissue mass revealing a new, rapid and non-destructive method to remotely measure standing biomass. This application shows promise for use in other ecosystems such as orchards and forests. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  4. [Senescence and cellular immortality].

    PubMed

    Trentesaux, C; Riou, J-F

    2010-11-01

    Senescence was originally described from the observation of the limited ability of normal cells to grow in culture, and may be generated by telomere erosion, accumulation of DNA damages, oxidative stress and modulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Senescence corresponds to a cellular response aiming to control tumor progression by limiting cell proliferation and thus constitutes an anticancer barrier. Senescence is observed in pre-malignant tumor stages and disappears from malignant tumors. Agents used in standard chemotherapy also have the potential to induce senescence, which may partly explain their therapeutic activities. It is possible to restore senescence in tumors using targeted therapies that triggers telomere dysfunction or reactivates suppressor genes functions, which are essential for the onset of senescence.

  5. Single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS front-end system for real-time volumetric IVUS and ICE imaging.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-μm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-μm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single- chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 μm and 251 μm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex vivo chicken heart at 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce realtime volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter-based clinical applications.

  6. Single-Chip CMUT-on-CMOS Front-End System for Real-Time Volumetric IVUS and ICE Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of CMUT arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-µm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-µm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single-chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex-vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 µm and 251 µm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex-vivo chicken heart with 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce real-time volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter based clinical applications. PMID:24474131

  7. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  8. a Geometric Processing Workflow for Transforming Reality-Based 3d Models in Volumetric Meshes Suitable for Fea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonizzi Barsanti, S.; Guidi, G.

    2017-02-01

    Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a key issue and structural changes and damages can influence the mechanical behaviour of artefacts and buildings. The use of Finite Elements Methods (FEM) for mechanical analysis is largely used in modelling stress behaviour. The typical workflow involves the use of CAD 3D models made by Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) surfaces, representing the ideal shape of the object to be simulated. Nowadays, 3D documentation of CH has been widely developed through reality-based approaches, but the models are not suitable for a direct use in FEA: the mesh has in fact to be converted to volumetric, and the density has to be reduced since the computational complexity of a FEA grows exponentially with the number of nodes. The focus of this paper is to present a new method aiming at generate the most accurate 3D representation of a real artefact from highly accurate 3D digital models derived from reality-based techniques, maintaining the accuracy of the high-resolution polygonal models in the solid ones. The approach proposed is based on a wise use of retopology procedures and a transformation of this model to a mathematical one made by NURBS surfaces suitable for being processed by volumetric meshers typically embedded in standard FEM packages. The strong simplification with little loss of consistency possible with the retopology step is used for maintaining as much coherence as possible between the original acquired mesh and the simplified model, creating in the meantime a topology that is more favourable for the automatic NURBS conversion.

  9. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis guided Near Infrared Spectroscopy: Volumetric estimates of fibroglandular fraction and breast density from tomosynthesis reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Michaelsen, Kelly E; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Pogue, Brian W; Poplack, Steven P; Karellas, Andrew; Paulsen, Keith D

    A multimodality system combining a clinical prototype digital breast tomosynthesis with its imaging geometry modified to facilitate near-infrared spectroscopic imaging has been developed. The accuracy of parameters recovered from near-infrared spectroscopy is dependent on fibroglandular tissue content. Hence, in this study, volumetric estimates of fibroglandular tissue from tomosynthesis reconstructions were determined. A kernel-based fuzzy c-means algorithm was implemented to segment tomosynthesis reconstructed slices in order to estimate fibroglandular content and to provide anatomic priors for near-infrared spectroscopy. This algorithm was used to determine volumetric breast density (VBD), defined as the ratio of fibroglandular tissue volume to the total breast volume, expressed as percentage, from 62 tomosynthesis reconstructions of 34 study participants. For a subset of study participants who subsequently underwent mammography, VBD from mammography matched for subject, breast laterality and mammographic view was quantified using commercial software and statistically analyzed to determine if it differed from tomosynthesis. Summary statistics of the VBD from all study participants were compared with prior independent studies. The fibroglandular volume from tomosynthesis and mammography were not statistically different (p=0.211, paired t-test). After accounting for the compressed breast thickness, which were different between tomosynthesis and mammography, the VBD from tomosynthesis was correlated with (r =0.809, p<0.001), did not statistically differ from (p>0.99, paired t-test), and was linearly related to, the VBD from mammography. Summary statistics of the VBD from tomosynthesis were not statistically different from prior studies using high-resolution dedicated breast computed tomography. The observation of correlation and linear association in VBD between mammography and tomosynthesis suggests that breast density associated risk measures determined for

  10. Design, operation and applications of a visible-light confocal scanning Fourier transform Raman microscope for volumetric Raman spectrochemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin John Herbert

    A new type of confocal Raman microscope called a Fourier transform confocal Raman microscope (FT-CRM) was designed, built and characterized with respect to its spatio-spectral imaging properties. Several different applications of the FT-CRM are presented that take advantage of its unique spectral and spatial imaging characteristics. The instrument combines focused illumination with spatially-filtered detection in a confocal optical configuration to collect photons scattered from a diffraction-limited volume in the sample (typically [<]5×10-18/ m3) and reject photons from outside that region. The molecular vibrational information encoded in the inelastic, or Raman, spectral component of light scattered from the confocal volume is measured with a visible light Fourier transform Raman spectrometer. By scanning the sample relative to the confocal volume, a volumetric Raman spectrochemical image of the sample can be constructed. Raman scattering is an inherently inefficient process; hence an optimal radius pinhole must be found that balances the FT-CRM optical throughput against the microscope spatial resolution and image contrast. Detailed experimental measurements mapped out the FT-CRM spatial response (axial and lateral), optical throughput and image signal-to-background and signal-to-noise ratios as a function of pinhole radius. Excellent agreement was found between these measurements and the predictions of a theoretical microscope model also developed as part of this thesis. Several applications of the FT-CRM included volumetric compositional imaging of three-dimensional chemically inhomogeneous materials such as cellulose and polyester fibers in water or two immiscible optically- similar liquids, water and trichloroehthylene, in a porous quartz sandstone matrix. The potential of the FT- CRM for non-invasive spectrochemical detection and imaging through a turbid tissue-like medium was demonstrated and a new spectral estimator, Fast Orthogonal Search, was evaluated

  11. On Utilization of NEXRAD Scan Strategy Information to Infer Discrepancies Associated With Radar and Rain Gauge Surface Volumetric Rainfall Accumulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Biswadev; Datta, Saswati; Jones, W. Linwood; Kasparis, Takis; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) monthly Ground Validation (GV) rain map, 42 quality controlled tipping bucket rain gauge data (1 minute interpolated rain rates) were utilized. We have compared the gauge data to the surface volumetric rainfall accumulation of NEXRAD reflectivity field, (converting to rain rates using a 0.5 dB resolution smooth Z-R table). The comparison was carried out from data collected at Melbourne, Florida during the month of July 98. GV operational level 3 (L3 monthly) accumulation algorithm was used to obtain surface volumetric accumulations for the radar. The gauge records were accumulated using the 1 minute interpolated rain rates while the radar Volume Scan (VOS) intervals remain less than or equal to 75 minutes. The correlation coefficient for the radar and gauge totals for the monthly time-scale remain at 0.93, however, a large difference was noted between the gauge and radar derived rain accumulation when the radar data interval is either 9 minute, or 10 minute. This difference in radar and gauge accumulation is being explained in terms of the radar scan strategy information. The discrepancy in terms of the Volume Coverage Pattern (VCP) of the NEXRAD is being reported where VCP mode is ascertained using the radar tilt angle information. Hourly radar and gauge accumulations have been computed using the present operational L3 method supplemented with a threshold period of +/- 5 minutes (based on a sensitivity analysis). These radar and gauge accumulations are subsequently improved using a radar hourly scan weighting factor (taking ratio of the radar scan frequency within a time bin to the 7436 total radar scans for the month). This GV procedure is further being improved by introducing a spatial smoothing method to yield reasonable bulk radar to gauge ratio for the hourly and daily scales.

  12. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  13. Bone lead (Pb) content at the tibia is associated with thinner distal tibia cortices and lower volumetric bone density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andy K O; Beattie, Karen A; Bhargava, Aakash; Cheung, Marco; Webber, Colin E; Chettle, David R; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2015-10-01

    Conflicting evidence suggests that bone lead or blood lead may reduce areal bone mineral density (BMD). Little is known about how lead at either compartment affects bone structure. This study examined postmenopausal women (N=38, mean age 76 ± 8, body mass index (BMI): 26.74 ± 4.26 kg/m(2)) within the Hamilton cohort of the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), measuring bone lead at 66% of the non-dominant leg and at the calcaneus using (109)Cadmium X-ray fluorescence. Volumetric BMD and structural parameters were obtained from peripheral quantitative computed tomography images (200 μm in-plane resolution, 2.3 ± 0.5mm slice thickness) of the same 66% site and of the distal 4% site of the tibia length. Blood lead was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry and blood-to-bone lead partition coefficients (PBB, log ratio) were computed. Multivariable linear regression examined each of bone lead at the 66% tibia, calcaneus, blood lead and PBB as related to each of volumetric BMD and structural parameters, adjusting for age and BMI, diabetes or antiresorptive therapy. Regression coefficients were reported along with 95% confidence intervals. Higher amounts of bone lead at the tibia were associated with thinner distal tibia cortices (-0.972 (-1.882, -0.061) per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral) and integral volumetric BMD (-3.05 (-6.05, -0.05) per μg Pb/g of bone mineral). A higher PBB was associated with larger trabecular separation (0.115 (0.053, 0.178)), lower trabecular volumetric BMD (-26.83 (-50.37, -3.29)) and trabecular number (-0.08 (-0.14, -0.02)), per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral after adjusting for age and BMI, and remained significant while accounting for diabetes or use of antiresorptives. Total lead exposure activities related to bone lead at the calcaneus (8.29 (0.11, 16.48)) and remained significant after age and antiresorptives-adjustment. Lead accumulated in bone can have a mild insult on bone structure; but greater partitioning of lead

  14. Transcriptome transfer produces a predictable cellular phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Jai-Yoon; Wu, Chia-wen K.; Zeng, Fanyi; Jochems, Jeanine; Lee, Miler T.; Kim, Tae Kyung; Peritz, Tiina; Buckley, Peter; Cappelleri, David J.; Maronski, Margaret; Kim, Minsun; Kumar, Vijay; Meaney, David; Kim, Junhyong; Eberwine, James

    2009-01-01

    Cellular phenotype is the conglomerate of multiple cellular processes involving gene and protein expression that result in the elaboration of a cell's particular morphology and function. It has been thought that differentiated postmitotic cells have their genomes hard wired, with little ability for phenotypic plasticity. Here we show that transfer of the transcriptome from differentiated rat astrocytes into a nondividing differentiated rat neuron resulted in the conversion of the neuron into a functional astrocyte-like cell in a time-dependent manner. This single-cell study permits high resolution of molecular and functional components that underlie phenotype identity. The RNA population from astrocytes contains RNAs in the appropriate relative abundances that give rise to regulatory RNAs and translated proteins that enable astrocyte identity. When transferred into the postmitotic neuron, the astrocyte RNA population converts 44% of the neuronal host cells into the destination astrocyte-like phenotype. In support of this observation, quantitative measures of cellular morphology, single-cell PCR, single-cell microarray, and single-cell functional analyses have been performed. The host-cell phenotypic changes develop over many weeks and are persistent. We call this process of RNA-induced phenotype changes, transcriptome-induced phenotype remodeling. PMID:19380745

  15. Robust Radiomics Feature Quantification Using Semiautomatic Volumetric Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Leijenaar, Ralph; Jermoumi, Mohammed; Carvalho, Sara; Mak, Raymond H.; Mitra, Sushmita; Shankar, B. Uma; Kikinis, Ron; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Lambin, Philippe; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Due to advances in the acquisition and analysis of medical imaging, it is currently possible to quantify the tumor phenotype. The emerging field of Radiomics addresses this issue by converting medical images into minable data by extracting a large number of quantitative imaging features. One of the main challenges of Radiomics is tumor segmentation. Where manual delineation is time consuming and prone to inter-observer variability, it has been shown that semi-automated approaches are fast and reduce inter-observer variability. In this study, a semiautomatic region growing volumetric segmentation algorithm, implemented in the free and publicly available 3D-Slicer platform, was investigated in terms of its robustness for quantitative imaging feature extraction. Fifty-six 3D-radiomic features, quantifying phenotypic differences based on tumor intensity, shape and texture, were extracted from the computed tomography images of twenty lung cancer patients. These radiomic features were derived from the 3D-tumor volumes defined by three independent observers twice using 3D-Slicer, and compared to manual slice-by-slice delineations of five independent physicians in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and feature range. Radiomic features extracted from 3D-Slicer segmentations had significantly higher reproducibility (ICC = 0.85±0.15, p = 0.0009) compared to the features extracted from the manual segmentations (ICC = 0.77±0.17). Furthermore, we found that features extracted from 3D-Slicer segmentations were more robust, as the range was significantly smaller across observers (p = 3.819e-07), and overlapping with the feature ranges extracted from manual contouring (boundary lower: p = 0.007, higher: p = 5.863e-06). Our results show that 3D-Slicer segmented tumor volumes provide a better alternative to the manual delineation for feature quantification, as they yield more reproducible imaging descriptors. Therefore, 3D-Slicer can be

  16. Dose verification for respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jianguo; Xing, Lei; Liu, Wu; Luxton, Gary

    2011-08-01

    A novel commercial medical linac system (TrueBeam™, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) allows respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a new modality for treating moving tumors with high precision and improved accuracy by allowing for regular motion associated with a patient's breathing during VMAT delivery. The purpose of this work is to adapt a previously-developed dose reconstruction technique to evaluate the fidelity of VMAT treatment during gated delivery under clinic-relevant periodic motion related to patient breathing. A Varian TrueBeam system was used in this study. VMAT plans were created for three patients with lung or pancreas tumors. Conventional 6 and 15 MV beams with flattening filter and high-dose-rate 10 MV beams with no flattening filter were used in these plans. Each patient plan was delivered to a phantom first without gating and then with gating for three simulated respiratory periods (3, 4.5 and 6 s). Using the adapted log-file-based dose reconstruction procedure supplemented with ion chamber array (Seven29™, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) measurements, the delivered dose was used to evaluate the fidelity of gated VMAT delivery. Comparison of Seven29 measurements with and without gating showed good agreement with gamma-index passing rates above 99% for 1%/1 mm dose accuracy/distance-to-agreement criteria. With original plans as reference, gamma-index passing rates were 100% for the reconstituted plans (1%/1 mm criteria) and 93.5-100% for gated Seven29 measurements (3%/3 mm criteria). In the presence of leaf error deliberately introduced into the gated delivery of a pancreas patient plan, both dose reconstruction and Seven29 measurement consistently indicated substantial dosimetric differences from the original plan. In summary, a dose reconstruction procedure was demonstrated for evaluating the accuracy of respiratory-gated VMAT delivery. This technique showed that under clinical operation, the TrueBeam system faithfully

  17. Choreographing Couch and Collimator in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yingli; Zhang Pengpeng; Happersett, Laura; Xiong Jianping; Yang Jie; Chan, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Mageras, Gig; Hunt, Margie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To design and optimize trajectory-based, noncoplanar subarcs for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) deliverable on both Varian TrueBEAM system and traditional accelerators; and to investigate their potential advantages for treating central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: To guide the computerized selection of beam trajectories consisting of simultaneous couch, gantry, and collimator motion, a score function was implemented to estimate the geometric overlap between targets and organs at risk for each couch/gantry angle combination. An initial set of beam orientations is obtained as a function of couch and gantry angle, according to a minimum search of the score function excluding zones of collision. This set is grouped into multiple continuous and extended subarcs subject to mechanical limitations using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. After determination of couch/gantry trajectories, a principal component analysis finds the collimator angle at each beam orientation that minimizes residual target-organ at risk overlaps. An in-house VMAT optimization algorithm determines the optimal multileaf collimator position and monitor units for control points within each subarc. A retrospective study of 10 CNS patients compares the proposed method of VMAT trajectory with dynamic gantry, leaves, couch, and collimator motion (Tra-VMAT); a standard noncoplanar VMAT with no couch/collimator motion within subarcs (Std-VMAT); and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans that were clinically used. Results: Tra-VMAT provided improved target dose conformality and lowered maximum dose to brainstem, optic nerves, and chiasm by 7.7%, 1.1%, 2.3%, and 1.7%, respectively, compared with Std-VMAT. Tra-VMAT provided higher planning target volume minimum dose and reduced maximum dose to chiasm, optic nerves, and cochlea by 6.2%, 1.3%, 6.3%, and 8.4%, respectively, and reduced cochlea mean dose by 8.7%, compared with IMRT. Tra-VMAT averaged

  18. Long-Term Volumetric Eruption Rates and Magma Budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M. White Dept. Geological Sciences University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208; Joy A. Crisp Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109; Frank J. Spera Dept. Earth Science University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106

    2005-01-01

    A global compilation of 170 time-averaged volumetric volcanic output rates (Qe) is evaluated in terms of composition and petrotectonic setting to advance the understanding of long-term rates of magma generation and eruption on Earth. Repose periods between successive eruptions at a given site and intrusive:extrusive ratios were compiled for selected volcanic centers where long-term (>104 years) data were available. More silicic compositions, rhyolites and andesites, have a more limited range of eruption rates than basalts. Even when high Qe values contributed by flood basalts (9 ± 2 Å~ 10-1 km3/yr) are removed, there is a trend in decreasing average Qe with lava composition from basaltic eruptions (2.6 ± 1.0 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr) to andesites (2.3 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr) and rhyolites (4.0 ± 1.4 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr). This trend is also seen in the difference between oceanic and continental settings, as eruptions on oceanic crust tend to be predominately basaltic. All of the volcanoes occurring in oceanic settings fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 2.8 ± 0.4 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr, excluding flood basalts. Likewise, all of the volcanoes on continental crust also fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 4.4 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr. Flood basalts also form a distinctive class with an average Qe nearly two orders of magnitude higher than any other class. However, we have found no systematic evidence linking increased intrusive:extrusive ratios with lower volcanic rates. A simple heat balance analysis suggests that the preponderance of volcanic systems must be open magmatic systems with respect to heat and matter transport in order to maintain eruptible magma at shallow depth throughout the observed lifetime of the volcano. The empirical upper limit of Å`10-2 km3/yr for magma eruption rate in systems with relatively high intrusive:extrusive ratios may be a consequence of the fundamental parameters

  19. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, Bulent; Yeginer, Mete; Kavak, Gulbin O.; Fan, John; Radosevich, James A.; Gwe-Ya, Kim

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330{sup o} arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of {>=}12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  20. Robust Radiomics feature quantification using semiautomatic volumetric segmentation.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Chintan; Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Leijenaar, Ralph; Jermoumi, Mohammed; Carvalho, Sara; Mak, Raymond H; Mitra, Sushmita; Shankar, B Uma; Kikinis, Ron; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Lambin, Philippe; Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2014-01-01

    Due to advances in the acquisition and analysis of medical imaging, it is currently possible to quantify the tumor phenotype. The emerging field of Radiomics addresses this issue by converting medical images into minable data by extracting a large number of quantitative imaging features. One of the main challenges of Radiomics is tumor segmentation. Where manual delineation is time consuming and prone to inter-observer variability, it has been shown that semi-automated approaches are fast and reduce inter-observer variability. In this study, a semiautomatic region growing volumetric segmentation algorithm, implemented in the free and publicly available 3D-Slicer platform, was investigated in terms of its robustness for quantitative imaging feature extraction. Fifty-six 3D-radiomic features, quantifying phenotypic differences based on tumor intensity, shape and texture, were extracted from the computed tomography images of twenty lung cancer patients. These radiomic features were derived from the 3D-tumor volumes defined by three independent observers twice using 3D-Slicer, and compared to manual slice-by-slice delineations of five independent physicians in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and feature range. Radiomic features extracted from 3D-Slicer segmentations had significantly higher reproducibility (ICC = 0.85±0.15, p = 0.0009) compared to the features extracted from the manual segmentations (ICC = 0.77±0.17). Furthermore, we found that features extracted from 3D-Slicer segmentations were more robust, as the range was significantly smaller across observers (p = 3.819e-07), and overlapping with the feature ranges extracted from manual contouring (boundary lower: p = 0.007, higher: p = 5.863e-06). Our results show that 3D-Slicer segmented tumor volumes provide a better alternative to the manual delineation for feature quantification, as they yield more reproducible imaging descriptors. Therefore, 3D-Slicer can be

  1. On the interpolation of volumetric water content in research catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Phesheya; Chaplot, Vincent

    Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) is widely used in the environmental sciences because of its accuracy and efficiency in producing soil maps compared to the traditional soil mapping. Numerous studies have investigated how the sampling density and the interpolation process of data points affect the prediction quality. While, the interpolation process is straight forward for primary attributes such as soil gravimetric water content (θg) and soil bulk density (ρb), the DSM of volumetric water content (θv), the product of θg by ρb, may either involve direct interpolations of θv (approach 1) or independent interpolation of ρb and θg data points and subsequent multiplication of ρb and θg maps (approach 2). The main objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of these two mapping approaches for θv. A 23 ha grassland catchment in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa was selected for this study. A total of 317 data points were randomly selected and sampled during the dry season in the topsoil (0-0.05 m) for θg by ρb estimation. Data points were interpolated following approaches 1 and 2, and using inverse distance weighting with 3 or 12 neighboring points (IDW3; IDW12), regular spline with tension (RST) and ordinary kriging (OK). Based on an independent validation set of 70 data points, OK was the best interpolator for ρb (mean absolute error, MAE of 0.081 g cm-3), while θg was best estimated using IDW12 (MAE = 1.697%) and θv by IDW3 (MAE = 1.814%). It was found that approach 1 underestimated θv. Approach 2 tended to overestimate θv, but reduced the prediction bias by an average of 37% and only improved the prediction accuracy by 1.3% compared to approach 1. Such a great benefit of approach 2 (i.e., the subsequent multiplication of interpolated maps of primary variables) was unexpected considering that a higher sampling density (∼14 data point ha-1 in the present study) tends to minimize the differences between interpolations techniques and approaches. In the

  2. Fibre based cellular transfection.

    PubMed

    Tsampoula, X; Taguchi, K; Cizmár, T; Garces-Chavez, V; Ma, N; Mohanty, S; Mohanty, K; Gunn-Moore, F; Dholakia, K

    2008-10-13

    Optically assisted transfection is emerging as a powerful and versatile method for the delivery of foreign therapeutic agents to cells at will. In particular the use of ultrashort pulse lasers has proved an important route to transiently permeating the cell membrane through a multiphoton process. Though optical transfection has been gaining wider usage to date, all incarnations of this technique have employed free space light beams. In this paper we demonstrate the first system to use fibre delivery for the optical transfection of cells. We engineer a standard optical fibre to generate an axicon tip with an enhanced intensity of the remote output field that delivers ultrashort (~ 800 fs) pulses without requiring the fibre to be placed in very close proximity to the cell sample. A theoretical model is also developed in order to predict the light propagation from axicon tipped and bare fibres, in both air and water environments. The model proves to be in good agreement with the experimental findings and can be used to establish the optimum fibre parameters for successful cellular transfection. We readily obtain efficiencies of up to 57 % which are comparable with free space transfection. This advance paves the way for optical transfection of tissue samples and endoscopic embodiments of this technique.

  3. Resolution of inflammation: an integrated view

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Gómez, Almudena; Perretti, Mauro; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is a coordinated and active process aimed at restoration of tissue integrity and function. This review integrates the key molecular and cellular mechanisms of resolution. We describe how abrogation of chemokine signalling blocks continued neutrophil tissue infiltration and how apoptotic neutrophils attract monocytes and macrophages to induce their clearance. Uptake of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages reprograms macrophages towards a resolving phenotype, a key event to restore tissue homeostasis. Finally, we highlight the therapeutic potential that derives from understanding the mechanisms of resolution. PMID:23592557

  4. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  5. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  6. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  7. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  8. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  9. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  10. Effect of elevation resolution on evapotranspiration simulations using MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Kambhammettu, B V N P; Schmid, Wolfgang; King, James P; Creel, Bobby J

    2012-01-01

    Surface elevations represented in MODFLOW head-dependent packages are usually derived from digital elevation models (DEMs) that are available at much high resolution. Conventional grid refinement techniques to simulate the model at DEM resolution increases computational time, input file size, and in many cases are not feasible for regional applications. This research aims at utilizing the increasingly available high resolution DEMs for effective simulation of evapotranspiration (ET) in MODFLOW as an alternative to grid refinement techniques. The source code of the evapotranspiration package is modified by considering for a fixed MODFLOW grid resolution and for different DEM resolutions, the effect of variability in elevation data on ET estimates. Piezometric head at each DEM cell location is corrected by considering the gradient along row and column directions. Applicability of the research is tested for the lower Rio Grande (LRG) Basin in southern New Mexico. The DEM at 10 m resolution is aggregated to resampled DEM grid resolutions which are integer multiples of MODFLOW grid resolution. Cumulative outflows and ET rates are compared at different coarse resolution grids. Results of the analysis conclude that variability in depth-to-groundwater within the MODFLOW cell is a major contributing parameter to ET outflows in shallow groundwater regions. DEM aggregation methods for the LRG Basin have resulted in decreased volumetric outflow due to the formation of a smoothing error, which lowered the position of water table to a level below the extinction depth.

  11. Volumetric leak detection in large underground storage tanks. Volume 2. Appendices a through e

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, J.W.; Wise, R.F.; Maresca, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    The program of experiments conducted at Griffiss Air Force Base was devised to expand the understanding of large underground storage tank behavior as it impacts the performance of volumetric leak detection testing. The report addresses three important questions about testing the larger underground storage tanks for leaks. First, can the EPA regulatory standards be met when volumetric methods are used to test tanks up to 190,000 L (50,000 gal) in capacity. Second, what is the precision required of the temperature and level sensors and what is the minimum duration of the data collection period in order for a volumetric system to accurately test larger tanks, particularly those that are partially filled. Third, what are the important features of a volumetric system that meets or exceeds the regulatory performance standards. The document presents the results of experiments conducted on 190,000-L (50,000-gal) underground storage tanks (USTs) to determine how to test large tanks for leaks with volumetric leak detection systems. The work reported in the document has applications to the UST release detection technical standards in CFR 280 Subpart D.

  12. Effect of cup inclination on predicted contact stress-induced volumetric wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, B; Košak, R; Daniel, M; Kralj-Iglič, V; Dolinar, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the lifetime of the total hip endoprosthesis, it is necessary to understand mechanisms leading to its failure. In this work, we address volumetric wear of the artificial cup, in particular the effect of its inclination with respect to the vertical. Volumetric wear was calculated by using mathematical models for resultant hip force, contact stress and penetration of the prosthesis head into the cup. Relevance of the dependence of volumetric wear on inclination of the cup (its abduction angle ϑA) was assessed by the results of 95 hips with implanted endoprosthesis. Geometrical parameters obtained from standard antero-posterior radiographs were taken as input data. Volumetric wear decreases with increasing cup abduction angle ϑA. The correlation within the population of 95 hips was statistically significant (P = 0.006). Large cup abduction angle minimises predicted volumetric wear but may increase the risk for dislocation of the artificial head from the cup in the one-legged stance. Cup abduction angle and direction of the resultant hip force may compensate each other to achieve optimal position of the cup with respect to wear and dislocation in the one-legged stance for a particular patient.

  13. High-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2014-03-15

    An ultracompact high-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscope with a femtosecond near infrared fiber laser has been utilized to study the cellular autofluorescence during freezing and thawing of cells. Cooling resulted in an increase of the intracellular fluorescence intensity followed by morphological modifications at temperatures below -10 °C, depending on the application of the cryoprotectant DMSO and the cooling rate. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed an increase of the mean lifetime with a decrease in temperature. Non-destructive, label-free optical biopsies of biomaterial in ice can be obtained with sub-20 mW mean powers.

  14. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  15. Flat panel CT detectors for sub-second volumetric scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeth, Richard E.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Roos, Pieter G.; Shapiro, Edward G.

    2005-04-01

    This paper explores the potential of flat panel detectors in sub-second CT scanning applications. Using a PaxScan 4030CB with 600um thick CsI(Tl), a central section of the panel (16 to 32 rows), was scanned at frame rates up to 1000fps. Using this platform, fundamental issues related to high speed scanning were characterized. The offset drift of the imager over 60 seconds was found to be less than 0.014 ppm/sec relative to full scale. The gain stability over a 10 hour period is better than +/- .45%, which is at the resolution limit of the measurement. Two different types of lag measurements were performed in order to separate the photodiode array lag from the CsI afterglow. The panel lag was found to be 0.41% 1st frame and 0.054% 25th frame at 1000fps. The CsI(Tl) afterglow, however, is roughly an order of magnitude higher, dominating the lag for sub-second scans. At 1000fps the 1st frame lag due to afterglow was 3.3% and the 25th frame lag was 0.34%. Both the lag and afterglow are independent of signal level and each follows a simple power law evolution versus time. Reconstructions of anatomical phantoms and the CATPHAN 500 phantom are presented. With a 2 second, 1200 projection scan of the CATPHAN phantom at 600fps in 32 slice mode, using 120kVp and CTDI100 of 43.2mGy, 0.3% contrast resolution for a 6mm diameter target, can be visualized. In addition, 15lp/cm spatial resolution was achieved with a 2mm slice and a central CTDI100 of 10.8mGy.

  16. Feasibility of Multi-Plane-Transmit Beamforming for Real-time Volumetric Cardiac Imaging: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinran; Tong, Ling; Ortega, Alejandra; Luo, Jianwen; D'hooge, Jan

    2017-01-10

    Today's three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac ultrasound imaging systems suffer from relatively low spatial and temporal resolution, limiting their applicability in daily clinical practice. To address this problem, 3-D diverging wave imaging with spatial coherent compounding (DWC) as well as 3-D multi-line-transmit (MLT) imaging have recently been proposed. Currently, the former improves the temporal resolution significantly at the expense of image quality and the risk of introducing motion artifacts whereas the latter only provides a moderate gain in volume rate but mostly preserves quality. In this study, a new technique for real-time volumetric cardiac imaging is proposed by combining the strengths of both approaches. Hereto, multiple planar (i.e., 2-D) diverging waves are simultaneously transmitted in order to scan the 3-D volume, i.e., multi-plane-transmit (MPT) beamforming. The performance of a 3MPT imaging system was contrasted to that of a 3-D DWC system and that of a 3-D MLT system by computer simulations during both static and moving conditions of the target structures while operating at similar volume rate. It was demonstrated that for stationary targets, the 3MPT imaging system was competitive with both the 3-D DWC and 3-D MLT systems in terms of spatial resolution and side lobe levels (i.e., image quality). However, for moving targets, the image quality quickly deteriorated for the 3-D DWC systems while it remained stable for the 3MPT system while operating at twice the volume rate of the 3D-MLT system. The proposed MPT beamforming approach was thus demonstrated to be feasible and competitive to state-of-the-art methodologies.

  17. Volumetric Radioactivity Viewed as Surface Radioactivity for Free Release Assessment Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1998-07-08

    As a part of the SRS Beneficial Reuse Program, stainless steel radioactive scrap metal is melted, pour into ingots, and roll into sheets. The sheets are then fabricated into boxes and barrels for beneficial reuse. The melting activity is a partial decontamination process. Certain isotopes separate from the melted steel, while others stay in solution. Cobalt-60 is the primary constituent, which remains in solution, and becomes the major contributor to the volumetric radioactivity of the finished products (boxes and barrels). There is currently no ``de minimis`` free release level for volumetrically radioactive material. However, under certain circumstances, pathway analysis can be used (and have been used) to free release volumetrically radioactive material. This paper presents an analysis using empirical data derived from over sixty ``melts``, to demonstrate that the implied surface radioactivity for specific beneficial reuse products is within free release limit. The approach can be applied to other recycled metal products.

  18. The effect of volumetric (3D) tactile symbols within inclusive tactile maps.

    PubMed

    Gual, Jaume; Puyuelo, Marina; Lloveras, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Point, linear and areal elements, which are two-dimensional and of a graphic nature, are the morphological elements employed when designing tactile maps and symbols for visually impaired users. However, beyond the two-dimensional domain, there is a fourth group of elements - volumetric elements - which mapmakers do not take sufficiently into account when it comes to designing tactile maps and symbols. This study analyses the effect of including volumetric, or 3D, symbols within a tactile map. In order to do so, the researchers compared two tactile maps. One of them uses only two-dimensional elements and is produced using thermoforming, one of the most popular systems in this field, while the other includes volumetric symbols, thus highlighting the possibilities opened up by 3D printing, a new area of production. The results of the study show that including 3D symbols improves the efficiency and autonomous use of these products.

  19. Ultrahigh volumetric capacitance and cyclic stability of fluorine and nitrogen co-doped carbon microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junshuang; Lian, Jie; Hou, Li; Zhang, Junchuan; Gou, Huiyang; Xia, Meirong; Zhao, Yufeng; Strobel, Timothy A; Tao, Lu; Gao, Faming

    2015-09-29

    Highly porous nanostructures with large surface areas are typically employed for electrical double-layer capacitors to improve gravimetric energy storage capacity; however, high surface area carbon-based electrodes result in poor volumetric capacitance because of the low packing density of porous materials. Here, we demonstrate ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of 521 F cm(-3) in aqueous electrolytes for non-porous carbon microsphere electrodes co-doped with fluorine and nitrogen synthesized by low-temperature solvothermal route, rivaling expensive RuO2 or MnO2 pseudo-capacitors. The new electrodes also exhibit excellent cyclic stability without capacitance loss after 10,000 cycles in both acidic and basic electrolytes at a high charge current of 5 A g(-1). This work provides a new approach for designing high-performance electrodes with exceptional volumetric capacitance with high mass loadings and charge rates for long-lived electrochemical energy storage systems.

  20. Ultrahigh volumetric capacitance and cyclic stability of fluorine and nitrogen co-doped carbon microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junshuang; Lian, Jie; Hou, Li; Zhang, Junchuan; Gou, Huiyang; Xia, Meirong; Zhao, Yufeng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Tao, Lu; Gao, Faming

    2015-09-01

    Highly porous nanostructures with large surface areas are typically employed for electrical double-layer capacitors to improve gravimetric energy storage capacity; however, high surface area carbon-based electrodes result in poor volumetric capacitance because of the low packing density of porous materials. Here, we demonstrate ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of 521 F cm-3 in aqueous electrolytes for non-porous carbon microsphere electrodes co-doped with fluorine and nitrogen synthesized by low-temperature solvothermal route, rivaling expensive RuO2 or MnO2 pseudo-capacitors. The new electrodes also exhibit excellent cyclic stability without capacitance loss after 10,000 cycles in both acidic and basic electrolytes at a high charge current of 5 A g-1. This work provides a new approach for designing high-performance electrodes with exceptional volumetric capacitance with high mass loadings and charge rates for long-lived electrochemical energy storage systems.

  1. Single step full volumetric reconstruction optical coherence tomography utilizing compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luoyang; Liu, Jiansheng; cheng, Jiangtao; Liu, Haitao; Zhou, Hongwen

    2017-03-01

    3D optical coherence tomography imaging (OCT) combined with compressive sensing (CS) has been proved to be an attractive and effective tool in a variety of fields, such as medicine and biology. To achieve high quality imaging while using as less CS sampling rate as possible is the goal of this approach. Here we present an innovative single step fully 3D CS-OCT volumetric image recovery method, in which 3D OCT volumetric image of the object is compressively sampled via our proposed CS coding strategies in all three dimensions while its sparsity is simultaneously taken into consideration in every direction. The object can be directly recovered as the whole volume reconstruction via our advanced full 3D CS reconstruction algorithm. The numerical simulations of a human retina OCT volumetric image reconstruction by our method demonstrate a PSNR of as high as 38dB at a sampling rate of less than 10%.

  2. Ultrahigh volumetric capacitance and cyclic stability of fluorine and nitrogen co-doped carbon microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junshuang; Lian, Jie; Hou, Li; Zhang, Junchuan; Gou, Huiyang; Xia, Meirong; Zhao, Yufeng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Tao, Lu; Gao, Faming

    2015-01-01

    Highly porous nanostructures with large surface areas are typically employed for electrical double-layer capacitors to improve gravimetric energy storage capacity; however, high surface area carbon-based electrodes result in poor volumetric capacitance because of the low packing density of porous materials. Here, we demonstrate ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of 521 F cm−3 in aqueous electrolytes for non-porous carbon microsphere electrodes co-doped with fluorine and nitrogen synthesized by low-temperature solvothermal route, rivaling expensive RuO2 or MnO2 pseudo-capacitors. The new electrodes also exhibit excellent cyclic stability without capacitance loss after 10,000 cycles in both acidic and basic electrolytes at a high charge current of 5 A g−1. This work provides a new approach for designing high-performance electrodes with exceptional volumetric capacitance with high mass loadings and charge rates for long-lived electrochemical energy storage systems. PMID:26415838

  3. The analysis of colour uniformity for a volumetric display based on a rotating LED array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Liu, Xu; Yan, Caijie; Xia, XinXing; Li, Haifeng

    2011-05-01

    There is a colour nonuniformity zone existing in three-dimensional (3D) volumetric displays which is based on the rotating colour light-emitting diode (LED) array. We analyse the reason for the colour nonuniformity zone by measuring the light intensity distribution and chromaticity coordinates of the LED in the volumetric display. Two boundaries of the colour nonuniformity zone are calculated. We measure the colour uniformities for a single cuboid of 3*3*4 voxels to display red, green, blue and white colour in different horizontal viewing angles, and for 64 cuboids distributed in the whole cylindrical image space with a fixed viewpoint. To evaluate the colour uniformity of a 3D image, we propose three evaluation indices of colour uniformity: the average of colour difference, the maximum colour difference and the variance of colour difference. The measurement results show that the character of colour uniformity is different for the 3D volumetric display and the two-dimensional display.

  4. Volumetric studies of aeroallergen prevalence. I. Pollens of weedy forbs at a midwestern station.

    PubMed

    Solomon, W R

    1976-04-01

    Volumetric levels of pollens derived from broad-leaved herbaceous plant species heve been determined at a midwestern urban site with suction and rotating arm samplers. The resulting data confirm an abundance of ragweed and nettle emanations but suggest that those of plantains, chenopods, and amaranths achieve modest levels, at best, despite their prominence in gravity slide recoveries. Regular seasonal occurrence periods for pollens, including those of entemophilous composites, the hophemp group, wilg grape, and the mustard and pea families, were evident in volumetric recoveries. In general, prevalence peaks of the most prominent pollen types correlated with intermediate, rather than extreme, values for air speed and relative humidity.

  5. Rapid volumetric temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy of neural activity: theory, image processing, and experimental realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Hod; Marom, Anat; Kruger, Nimrod; Ellman, Aviv; Shoham, Shy

    2012-03-01

    The development of rapid volumetric imaging systems for functional multiphoton microscopy is essential for dynamical imaging of large-scale neuronal network activity. Here, we introduce a line-illuminating temporal-focusing microscope capable of rapid three-dimensional imaging at 10-20 volumes/sec, and study the system's characteristics both theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate that our system is capable of functional volumetric calcium imaging of distributed neuronal activity patterns, and introduce a computational strategy for activity reconstruction in strongly scattering media.

  6. Four faces of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an important mechanism for preventing the proliferation of potential cancer cells. Recently, however, it has become apparent that this process entails more than a simple cessation of cell growth. In addition to suppressing tumorigenesis, cellular senescence might also promote tissue repair and fuel inflammation associated with aging and cancer progression. Thus, cellular senescence might participate in four complex biological processes (tumor suppression, tumor promotion, aging, and tissue repair), some of which have apparently opposing effects. The challenge now is to understand the senescence response well enough to harness its benefits while suppressing its drawbacks. PMID:21321098

  7. Effects of atmospheric stability on the evolution of wind turbine wakes: Volumetric LiDAR scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Aerodynamic optimization of wind farm layout is a fundamental task to reduce wake effects on downstream wind turbines, thus to maximize wind power harvesting. However, downstream evolution and recovery of wind turbine wakes are strongly affected by the characteristics of the incoming atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow, like the vertical profiles of the mean wind velocity and the turbulence intensity, which are in turn affected by the ABL stability regime. Therefore, the characterization of the variability of wind turbine wakes under different ABL stability regimes becomes fundamental to better predict wind power harvesting and improve wind farm efficiency. To this aim, wind velocity measurements of the wake produced by a 2 MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed with three scanning Doppler wind Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) instruments. One LiDAR was typically devoted to the characterization of the incoming wind, in particular wind velocity, shear and turbulence intensity at the height of the rotor disc. The other two LiDARs performed scans in order to characterize the wake velocity field produced by the tested wind turbine. The main challenge in performing field measurements of wind turbine wakes is represented by the varying wind conditions, and by the consequent adjustments of the turbine yaw angle needed to maximize power production. Consequently, taking into account possible variations of the relative position between LiDAR measurement volume and wake location, different LiDAR measurement procedures were carried out in order to perform 2-D and 3-D characterizations of the mean wake velocity field. However, larger measurement volumes and higher spatial resolution require longer sampling periods; thus, to investigate wake turbulence tests were also performed by staring the LiDAR laser beam over fixed directions and with the maximum sampling frequency. Furthermore, volumetric scans of the wind turbine wake were performed under different wind

  8. Cardiac Chamber Volumetric Assessment Using 3D Ultrasound - A Review.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, João; Barbosa, Daniel; Almeida, Nuno; Bernard, Olivier; Bosch, Johan; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-01-01

    When designing clinical trials for testing novel cardiovascular therapies, it is highly relevant to understand what a given technology can provide in terms of information on the physiologic status of the heart and vessels. Ultrasound imaging has traditionally been the modality of choice to study the cardiovascular system as it has an excellent temporal resolution; it operates in real-time; it is very widespread and - not unimportant - it is cheap. Although this modality is mostly known clinically as a two-dimensional technology, it has recently matured into a true three-dimensional imaging technique. In this review paper, an overview is given of the available ultrasound technology for cardiac chamber quantification in terms of volume and function and evidence is given why these parameters are of value when testing the effect of new cardiovascular therapies.

  9. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kenneth C.; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-09-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis.

  10. A Course in Cellular Bioengineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    Gives an overview of a course in chemical engineering entitled "Cellular Bioengineering," dealing with how chemical engineering principles can be applied to molecular cell biology. Topics used are listed and some key references are discussed. Listed are 85 references. (YP)

  11. High resolution pipette

    DOEpatents

    Beroz, Justin Douglas; Hart, Anastasios John

    2016-06-07

    A pipette includes a movable piston and a diaphragm that at least partly defines a fluid chamber enclosing a volume of working fluid. The piston displaces a volumetric amount of the working fluid in the chamber when moved. In response, the diaphragm displaces a smaller volumetric amount of fluid outside the chamber. A deamplification ratio is defined by the ratio of the volume displaced by the diaphragm to the volume displaced by the piston. The deamplification ratio is adjustable by adjusting or changing the diaphragm and/or by adjusting the size of the fluid chamber. The deamplifying pipette enables measuring and dispensing of very small volumes of liquid and is easily adapted to commercially available pipette components. Pipette components such as a pipette tip or adaptor may include a diaphragm to enable deamplification of the nominal volume capacity of a given pipette device.

  12. Ultra-high resolution flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, design architecture, and system characterization.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Grasruck, Michael; Suess, Christoph; Bartling, Soenke H; Schmidt, Bernhard; Stierstorfer, Karl; Popescu, Stefan; Brady, Tom; Flohr, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Digital flat-panel-based volume CT (VCT) represents a unique design capable of ultra-high spatial resolution, direct volumetric imaging, and dynamic CT scanning. This innovation, when fully developed, has the promise of opening a unique window on human anatomy and physiology. For example, the volumetric coverage offered by this technology enables us to observe the perfusion of an entire organ, such as the brain, liver, or kidney, tomographically (e.g., after a transplant or ischemic event). By virtue of its higher resolution, one can directly visualize the trabecular structure of bone. This paper describes the basic design architecture of VCT. Three key technical challenges, viz., scatter correction, dynamic range extension, and temporal resolution improvement, must be addressed for successful implementation of a VCT scanner. How these issues are solved in a VCT prototype and the modifications necessary to enable ultra-high resolution volumetric scanning are described. The fundamental principles of scatter correction and dose reduction are illustrated with the help of an actual prototype. The image quality metrics of this prototype are characterized and compared with a multi-detector CT (MDCT).

  13. Novel ultrahigh resolution optical fibre temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Leen, Gabriel

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a novel patent pending high resolution optical fibre temperature sensor, based on an optical fibre pressure and temperature sensor (OFTPS), which is surrounded by an oil filled chamber, is presented. The OFPTS is based on a Fabry Perot interferometer (FPI) which has an embedded fibre Bragg grating (FBG). The high ratio between the volume of the oil filled outer cavity and the FPIs air filled cavity, results in a highly sensitive temperature sensor. The FBG element of the device can be used for wide range temperature measurements, and combining this capability with the high resolution capability of the FPI/oil cavity results in a wide range and high resolution temperature sensing device. The outer diameter of the sensor is less than 1mm in diameter and can be designed to be even smaller. The sensors temperature response was measured in a range of ΔT = 7K and resulted in a shift in the optical spectrum of ΔλF = 61.42nm. Therefore the Q-point of the reflected optical FPI spectrum is shifting with a sensitivity of sot = 8.77 nm/K . The sensitivity can easily be further increased by changing the oil/air volumetric ratio and therefore adapt the sensor to a wide variety of applications.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  15. Developing a Near-Continuous Estimation of Volumetric Fluctuations in Tropical Lakes and Reservoirs Using Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, T.; Scott, D.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes and reservoirs play an integral role in water resources management by storing large quantities of water commonly used for irrigation, hydroelectric power, water supply, and flood mitigation. Knowing the exact quantity of stored water and necessary water for each of these usages is a critical component of sustainable water resources management. However, limited amounts of hydrologic data in developing nations, most of which are located in the tropics, hinders the accurate monitoring of water storage and allocation. Recent improvements in remote sensing have greatly enhanced the ability to calculate volumetric fluctuations of lakes and reservoirs at given points through time but are limited by temporal resolution as well as the computational time required for image processing. This study utilizes the newly developed MODISTools package for the programming language R in conjunction with satellite altimetry from three different altimetry databases to estimate lake and reservoir volumes at eight day intervals over a 15 year period. The study specifically examines three large lakes and reservoirs: Balbina Reservoir in the Amazon River Basin, Lake Tana in the Nile River Basin, and Tonle Sap Lake in the Mekong River Basin. Altimetry-based water level estimations are validated by in situ water level data from monitoring stations while surface area estimations are validated by Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) generated bathymetric maps with corresponding stage-area relationships. Preliminary results indicate that both remotely sensed water levels and surface areas agree well with in situ measurements, supporting the appropriateness of this methodology.

  16. Planimetric and volumetric analysis of channel change in the post-hydraulic mining period (1906-2009) in the Central Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Subhajit

    Advances in remote sensing technologies can facilitate acquisition of topographical and planimetric information in fluvial environments and can produce spatial data with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Measuring planimetric and volumetric change in fluvial sediment budgets and geomorphic change detection was used for long-term monitoring of a fluvial system. Channel and floodplain changes caused by hydraulic gold mining sediment in this system are a major example of anthropogenic impacts on a fluvial system. This study uses remote sensing change-detection techniques to examine spatial and temporal patterns of HMS redistribution at a centennial time scale, and to measure and evaluate the magnitude and processes of a major channel and floodplain metamorphosis. Five reach-scale sites along the lower Yuba River and two sites on the Feather River were chosen for detailed analysis of planimetric and volumetric changes over a period of ~100 years. Volumetric changes were measured using DEM differencing and soft-copy photogrammetry methods, and planimetric changes were recorded from rectified maps and aerial photographs. This study indicates significant changes in channel morphology and sediment storage over the last 100 years. Large deposits of historical sediment remaining in the bed, banks and terraces of the lower Yuba River were remobilized by floods. The volumetric analysis shows the results of dredging of ditches, deposition in natural levees, and net erosion of high-water channels from 1906 or 1909 to 1999. Over the last century, channels incised up to ~13 m into mining sediment deposits. Systematic uncertainty analysis reveals vertical errors are mostly dependent on the topographical slopes and maximum errors are concentrated on the steep channel banks and scarps. The planimetric analysis shows significant reworking of sediment occurred throughout the 72-year period from 1937 to 2009. Substantial amounts of HMS remobilization occurred during major flood

  17. Segmentation of volumetric tissue images using constrained active contour models.

    PubMed

    Adiga, P S Umesh

    2003-06-01

    In this article we describe an application of active contour model for the segmentation of 3D histo-pathological images. The 3D images of a thick tissue specimen are obtained as a stack of optical sections using confocal laser beam scanning microscope (CLSM). We have applied noise reduction and feature enhancement methods so that a smooth and slowly varying potential surface is obtained for proper convergence. To increase the capture range of the potential surface, we use a combination of distance potential and the diffused gradient potential as external forces. It has been shown that the region-based information obtained from low-level segmentation can be applied to reduce the adverse influence of the neighbouring nucleus having a strong boundary feature. We have also shown that, by increasing the axial resolution of the image stack, we can automatically propagate the optimum active contour of one image slice to its neighbouring image slices as an appropriate initial model. Results on images of prostate tissue section are presented.

  18. A coarse-grained model for the simulations of biomolecular interactions in cellular environments

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2014-02-07

    The interactions of bio-molecules constitute the key steps of cellular functions. However, in vivo binding properties differ significantly from their in vitro measurements due to the heterogeneity of cellular environments. Here we introduce a coarse-grained model based on rigid-body representation to study how factors such as cellular crowding and membrane confinement affect molecular binding. The macroscopic parameters such as the equilibrium constant and the kinetic rate constant are calibrated by adjusting the microscopic coefficients used in the numerical simulations. By changing these model parameters that are experimentally approachable, we are able to study the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of molecular binding, as well as the effects caused by specific cellular environments. We investigate the volumetric effects of crowded intracellular space on bio-molecular diffusion and diffusion-limited reactions. Furthermore, the binding constants of membrane proteins are currently difficult to measure. We provide quantitative estimations about how the binding of membrane proteins deviates from soluble proteins under different degrees of membrane confinements. The simulation results provide biological insights to the functions of membrane receptors on cell surfaces. Overall, our studies establish a connection between the details of molecular interactions and the heterogeneity of cellular environments.

  19. A complete CAD system for pulmonary nodule detection in high resolution CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangwei; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to detect small-sized (from 2mm to 10mm) pulmonary nodules in high resolution helical CT scans. A new CAD system is proposed to locate both juxtapleural nodules and non-pleural nodules. Isotropic resampling and lung segmentation are performed as preprocessing steps. Morphological closing was utilized to smooth the lung contours to include the indented possible juxtapleural locations, thresholding and 3D component analysis were used to obtain 3D volumetric nodule candidates; furthermore, gray level and geometric features were extracted, and analyzed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. Leave one case out method was used to evaluate the LDA. To deal with non-pleural nodules, a discrete-time cellular neural network (DTCNN) based on local shape features was developed. This scheme employed the local shape property to perform voxel classification. The shape index feature successfully captured the local shape difference between nodules and non-nodules, especially vessels. To tailor it for lung nodule detection, this DTCNN was trained using genetic algorithms (GAs) to derive the shape index variation pattern of nodules. Nonoverlapping training and testing sets were utilized in the non-pleural nodule detection. 19 clinical thoracic CT cases involving a total of 4838 sectional images were used in this work. The juxtapleural nodule detection method was able to obtain sensitivity 81.25% with an average of 8.29 FPs per case. The non-pleural nodule finding scheme attained sensitivity of 83.9% with an average 3.47 FPs/case. Combining the two subsystems together, an overall performance of 82.98% sensitivity with 11.76 FPs/case can be obtained.

  20. A cellular perspective on brain energy metabolism and functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Magistretti, Pierre J; Allaman, Igor

    2015-05-20

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body's energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and point at a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales.

  1. High Volumetric Capacity Three-Dimensionally Sphere-Caged Secondary Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Xi; Kim, Jinwoo; Zheng, Qiye; Ning, Hailong; Sun, Pengcheng; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Niu, Junjie; Braun, Paul V

    2016-07-13

    High volumetric energy density secondary batteries are important for many applications, which has led to considerable efforts to replace the low volumetric capacity graphite-based anode common to most Li-ion batteries with a higher energy density anode. Because most high capacity anode materials expand significantly during charging, such anodes must contain sufficient porosity in the discharged state to enable the expansion, yet not excess porosity, which lowers the overall energy density. Here, we present a high volumetric capacity anode consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite formed in only a few steps which includes both a 3D structured Sn scaffold and a hollow Sn sphere within each cavity where all the free Sn surfaces are coated with carbon. The anode exhibits a high volumetric capacity of ∼1700 mA h cm(-3) over 200 cycles at 0.5C, and a capacity greater than 1200 mA h cm(-3) at 10C. Importantly, the anode can even be formed into a commercially relevant ∼100 μm thick form. When assembled into a full cell the anode shows a good compatibility with a commercial LiMn2O4 cathode. In situ TEM observations confirm the electrode design accommodates the necessary volume expansion during lithiation.

  2. Nonlocal transform-domain filter for volumetric data denoising and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Matteo; Katkovnik, Vladimir; Egiazarian, Karen; Foi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We present an extension of the BM3D filter to volumetric data. The proposed algorithm, BM4D, implements the grouping and collaborative filtering paradigm, where mutually similar d-dimensional patches are stacked together in a (d+1)-dimensional array and jointly filtered in transform domain. While in BM3D the basic data patches are blocks of pixels, in BM4D we utilize cubes of voxels, which are stacked into a 4-D "group." The 4-D transform applied on the group simultaneously exploits the local correlation present among voxels in each cube and the nonlocal correlation between the corresponding voxels of different cubes. Thus, the spectrum of the group is highly sparse, leading to very effective separation of signal and noise through coefficient shrinkage. After inverse transformation, we obtain estimates of each grouped cube, which are then adaptively aggregated at their original locations. We evaluate the algorithm on denoising of volumetric data corrupted by Gaussian and Rician noise, as well as on reconstruction of volumetric phantom data with non-zero phase from noisy and incomplete Fourier-domain (k-space) measurements. Experimental results demonstrate the state-of-the-art denoising performance of BM4D, and its effectiveness when exploited as a regularizer in volumetric data reconstruction.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetric Analysis of the Putamen in Children with ADHD: Combined Type versus Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Tasha McMahon; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Gregory, Amanda Louise; Murphy, Jennifer Mary; Lancaster, Jack Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Volumetric differences in the putamen of boys with ADHD combined subtype with psychopathic traits and controls are investigated. Method: The putamen in 24 archival magnetic resonance imaging scans of 12 boys in residential treatment with symptoms of ADHD and psychopathic traits and 12 community control boys are analyzed using Display…

  4. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  5. VASP: A Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties Yields Insights into Protein-Ligand Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian Y.; Honig, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP), a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-related lipid transfer (START) domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity. PMID:20814581

  6. Theory of volumetric capacitance of an electric double-layer supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Brian; Chen, Tianran; Loth, M S; Shklovskii, B I

    2011-05-01

    Electric double-layer supercapacitors are a fast-rising class of high-power energy storage devices based on porous electrodes immersed in a concentrated electrolyte or ionic liquid. As yet there is no microscopic theory to describe their surprisingly large capacitance per unit volume (volumetric capacitance) of ~100 F/cm(3), nor is there a good understanding of the fundamental limits on volumetric capacitance. In this paper we present a non-mean-field theory of the volumetric capacitance of a supercapacitor that captures the discrete nature of the ions and the exponential screening of their repulsive interaction by the electrode. We consider analytically and via Monte Carlo simulations the case of an electrode made from a good metal and show that in this case the volumetric capacitance can reach the record values. We also study how the capacitance is reduced when the electrode is an imperfect metal characterized by some finite screening radius. Finally, we argue that a carbon electrode, despite its relatively large linear screening radius, can be approximated as a perfect metal because of its strong nonlinear screening. In this way the experimentally measured capacitance values of ~100 F/cm(3) may be understood.

  7. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human–computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment.

  8. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human–computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment. PMID:27526780

  9. Effect of compression paddle tilt correction on volumetric breast density estimation.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Michiel G J; van Gils, Carla H; Lokate, Mariëtte; den Heeten, Gerard J; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2012-08-21

    For the acquisition of a mammogram, a breast is compressed between a compression paddle and a support table. When compression is applied with a flexible compression paddle, the upper plate may be tilted, which results in variation in breast thickness from the chest wall to the breast margin. Paddle tilt has been recognized as a major problem in volumetric breast density estimation methods. In previous work, we developed a fully automatic method to correct the image for the effect of compression paddle tilt. In this study, we investigated in three experiments the effect of paddle tilt and its correction on volumetric breast density estimation. Results showed that paddle tilt considerably affected accuracy of volumetric breast density estimation, but that effect could be reduced by tilt correction. By applying tilt correction, a significant increase in correspondence between mammographic density estimates and measurements on MRI was established. We argue that in volumetric breast density estimation, tilt correction is both feasible and essential when mammographic images are acquired with a flexible compression paddle.

  10. Tunneling holes in microparticles to facilitate the transport of lithium ions for high volumetric density batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Ng, K Y Simon; Deng, Da

    2015-09-14

    Microscale materials generally have a higher tap density than that of random nanoparticles. Therefore, microparticles have been attracting much attention for application as high volumetric density electrodes for lithium ion batteries. However, microparticles have much longer electrolyte diffusion and Li-ion migration length and less accessibility to the electrolyte than that of nanoparticles. Therefore, it will be interesting to tunnel-holes in the high volumetric density microparticles to facilitate the reversible storage of lithium ions. Here, tunnel-like holes were generated in microparticles to dramatically increase the accessibility of the active materials to facilitate the lithium ion transfer. A plausible formation mechanism to explain the generation of tunnel-like holes was proposed based on time-course experiments and intensive characterization. Impressively, the as-prepared microbeads with tunnels demonstrated dramatically improved performance compared to the solid microbeads without tunnels in lithium ion storage. The microparticles with tunnels could achieve comparable electrochemical performances to those nanoparticles reported in the literature, suggesting that microparticles, properly tuned, could be promising candidates as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries and worthy of further studies. We also directly measured the volumetric density of the microparticles. We would like to highlight that a superior volumetric capacity of 514 mA h cm(-3) has been achieved. We hope to promote more frequent use of the unit mA h cm(-3) in addition to the conventional unit mA h g(-1) in the battery community.

  11. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  12. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  13. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  14. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  15. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K.; Rainsberger, R.

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  16. An economic approach that links volumetric estimates of resources with cost and price information

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, D.M. )

    1993-01-01

    For many years, organizations such as the US Geological Survey have assembled volumetric estimates of gas and oil in place. It is legitimate for people in industry to ask: [open quotes]What do such estimates mean to me What do they mean to my business What do they mean for commodity prices [close quotes] In a world of ideal, efficient markets, such estimates would have little relevance; the best use of one's time would be to merely survey the various markets. In reality, markets are not completely efficient, and methods other than market observations are required. Volumetric estimates can contribute to better decisionmaking if they can be associated with cost and price information and if their implications in the market can thereby be determined. Until the generalized equilibrium approach, volumetric information has never been linked with the market. It has never entered the decision process of private companies the United States, Canada, or the rest of the world. With the approach outlined, the US Geological Survey volumetric estimates can be used to support such decisionmaking and lead to better industry profits, more enlightened regulation and Government administration, and more efficient use of resources. 66 refs., 28 figs.

  17. Development, Construction, and Operation of a Multisample Volumetric Apparatus for the Study of Gas Adsorption Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Rui P. P. L.; Silva, Ricardo J. S.; Esteves, Isabel A. A. C.; Mota, Jose´ P. B.

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a simple volumetric adsorption apparatus is highlighted. The setup is inexpensive and provides a clear demonstration of gas phase adsorption concepts. The topic is suitable for undergraduate chemistry and chemical engineering students. Moreover, this unit can also provide quantitative data that can be used by young researchers…

  18. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  19. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-16

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human-computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment.

  20. Super-resolution imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Over the last twenty years super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has gone from proof-of-concept experiments to commercial systems being available in many labs, improving the resolution achievable by up to a factor of 10 or more. There are three major approaches to super-resolution, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and localisation microscopy, which have all produced stunning images of cellular structures. A major current challenge is optimising performance of each technique so that the same sort of data can be routinely taken in live cells. There are several major challenges, particularly phototoxicity and the speed with which images of whole cells, or groups of cells, can be acquired. In this review we discuss the various approaches which can be successfully used in live cells, the tradeoffs in resolution, speed, and ease of implementation which one must make for each approach, and the quality of results that one might expect from each technique.

  1. Optical super-resolution microscopy in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Stephan J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the highly plastic nature of neurons requires the dynamic visualization of their molecular and cellular organization in a native context. However, due to the limited resolution of standard light microscopy, many of the structural specializations of neurons cannot be resolved. A recent revolution in light microscopy has given rise to several super-resolution light microscopy methods yielding 2-10-fold higher resolution than conventional microscopy. We here describe the principles behind these techniques as well as their application to the analysis of the molecular architecture of the synapse. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for continued development of super-resolution microscopy as necessary for live imaging of neuronal structure and function in the brain.

  2. Water-level oscillations caused by volumetric and deviatoric dynamic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Kurzon, Ittai; Doan, Mai-Linh; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    Travelling seismic waves and Earth tides are known to cause oscillations in well water levels due to the volumetric strain characteristics of the ground motion. Although the response of well water levels to S and Love waves has been reported, it has not yet been quantified. In this paper we describe and explain the behaviour of a closed artesian water well (Gomè 1) in response to teleseismic earthquakes. This well is located within a major fault zone and screened at a highly damaged (cracked) sandstone layer. We adopt the original Skempton approach where both volumetric and deviatoric stresses (and strains) affect pore pressure. Skempton's coefficients < tex - mathid = "IM0001" > B and < tex - mathid = "IM0002" > A couple the volumetric and deviatoric stresses respectively with pore pressure and < tex - mathid = "IM0003" > BKu and < tex - mathid = "IM0004" > N are the equivalent coupling terms to volumetric and deviatoric strains. The water level in this well responds dramatically to volumetric strain (P and Rayleigh waves) as well as to deviatoric strain (S and Love waves). This response is explained by the nonlinear elastic behaviour of the highly damaged rocks. The water level response to deviatoric strain depends on the damage in the rock; deviatoric strain loading on damaged rock results in high water level amplitudes, and no response in undamaged rock. We find high values of < tex - mathid = "IM0005" > N= 8.5 GPa that corresponds to -0.5 < A < -0.25 expected at highly damaged rocks. We propose that the Gomè 1 well is located within fractured rocks, and therefore, dilatency is high, and the response of water pressure to deviatoric deformation is high. This analysis is supported by the agreement between the estimated compressibility of the aquifer, independently calculated from Earth tides, seismic response of the water pressure and other published data.

  3. Evaluation of volumetric measurements on CBCT images using stafne bone cavities as an example

    PubMed Central

    Y?lmaz, Selmi; Misirlioglu, Melda; Atil, Fethi

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of CBCT in volume measuring using Stafne Bone Cavities (SBC) as an example. Material and Methods The study was conducted with 14 subjects with SBC detected on panoramic radiographs. In order to evaluate lesions volumetric dimensions, CBCT images for each patient were captured. Files in Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format were transferred into a medical image processing program (ITK-SNAP 2.4.0) and volume in mm3 of the cavities were measured using semi-automatic segmentation procedure by 2 observers blinded to each other over a one-month period. Inter-reliability of volumetric measurements between observers was compared. SBCs relation to mandibular canal was also examined and three types of relation were observed; type 1: mandibular canal is separated from the SBC, type 2: mandibular canal is in contact with SBC, type 3: mandibular canal goes through the SBC. Results There were 12 males and 2 females who had SBC in this study (age range: 37-73, mean age: 55.3 years). The total volume of SBC in patients ranged from 160 mm3 to 520 mm3 (mean: 361.7 mm3). There was no significant difference between observers for volume measurements (p>0.05). According to relationship of SBC with mandibular canal, most SBCs were Type 1 (64.3 %) followed by type 3 (21.4 %) and type 2 (14.3 %). Pearson correlation coefficient shows a positive correlation between lesions volumetric size and relation with mandibular canal (pearson correlation = 0.54, sig < 0.05). Conclusions Based on the results of this preliminary study, CBCT was considered to be an effective radiographic technic for measuring volumetric sizes of SBCs. However further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to prove the usefulness of CBCT in volume measurements. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, CBCT, volumetric measurements, image segmentation. PMID:26116844

  4. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  5. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, M. K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics, and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  6. Classifying cellular automata using grossone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alotto, Louis

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes an application of the Infinite Unit Axiom and grossone, introduced by Yaroslav Sergeyev (see [7] - [12]), to the development and classification of one and two-dimensional cellular automata. By the application of grossone, new and more precise nonarchimedean metrics on the space of definition for one and two-dimensional cellular automata are established. These new metrics allow us to do computations with infinitesimals. Hence configurations in the domain space of cellular automata can be infinitesimally close (but not equal). That is, they can agree at infinitely many places. Using the new metrics, open disks are defined and the number of points in each disk computed. The forward dynamics of a cellular automaton map are also studied by defined sets. It is also shown that using the Infinite Unit Axiom, the number of configurations that follow a given configuration, under the forward iterations of cellular automaton maps, can now be computed and hence a classification scheme developed based on this computation.

  7. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  8. Nanoscale distribution of mitochondrial import receptor Tom20 is adjusted to cellular conditions and exhibits an inner-cellular gradient.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Harke, Benjamin; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2011-08-16

    The translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM) complex is the main import pore for nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, yet little is known about its spatial distribution within the outer membrane. Super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to determine quantitatively the nanoscale distribution of Tom20, a subunit of the TOM complex, in more than 1,000 cells. We demonstrate that Tom20 is located in clusters whose nanoscale distribution is finely adjusted to the cellular growth conditions as well as to the specific position of a cell within a microcolony. The density of the clusters correlates to the mitochondrial membrane potential. The distributions of clusters of Tom20 and of Tom22 follow an inner-cellular gradient from the perinuclear to the peripheral mitochondria. We conclude that the nanoscale distribution of the TOM complex is finely adjusted to the cellular conditions, resulting in distribution gradients both within single cells and between adjacent cells.

  9. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  10. Cellular-based preemption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  11. Ct Anatomy of Buccal Fat Pad and its Role in Volumetric Alterations of Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryanov, R. A.; Guryanov, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our study is the revision of the anatomy of buccal fat pad and its role in a volumetric pattern of face. Bichat fat pad is a fatty anatomical structure with body and numerous process enclosed between the bony and muscular structures in temporal, pterygopalatine fossae and extents to the cheek area. Nevertheless, the opinion about its structure and role in forming of volume pattern of face sometimes could be controversial. The Bichat fat pad consists on predominately hormone insensitive fat tissue with underdeveloped stroma, this leads to the stability of the fat pad volume and lesser radiodensity in contrast to the subcutaneous fat. Moreover, the buccal fat pad is delimited from the subcutaneous fat of cheek area by the strong capsule. This feature allows us to use CT to divide the Bichat fat pad from the surrounding tissues. The thorough embryological data provide the distinction of Bichat fat pad from the subcutaneous fat of cheek area even at the stage of development. On the other hand, the border between the masticatory muscles and the processes of the fat pad is not evident and resembles cellular spaces in the other anatomical areas. To elicit the role of the buccal fat pad in volume pattern of face and its function we have performed the several experiments, analyzed the postoperative results after Bichat fat pad resection using surface scanner and CT data. At first, we have performed the gravity test: the patient's face photogrammetry scanning in horizontal and vertical position of head and it revealed the excess of volume in temporal area in horizontal position. To exclude mechanism of overflowing of the skin and subcutaneous fat over the zygomatic arch we have placed the markers on the skin surface at the different areas of face including the projection of ligaments and found out that the migration of soft tissue over the zygomatic arch is about 3-5 mm and almost the same in temporal area. However, the acquired result was unsatisfying because

  12. Cellular models for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Falkenburger, Björn H; Saridaki, Theodora; Dinter, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    Developing new therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease requires cellular models. Current models reproduce the two most salient changes found in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease: The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of protein aggregates consisting mainly of α-synuclein. Cultured cells offer many advantages over studying Parkinson's disease directly in patients or in animal models. At the same time, the choice of a specific cellular model entails the requirement to focus on one aspect of the disease while ignoring others. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. It might also be helpful for researchers from other fields consulting literature on cellular models of Parkinson's disease. Important models for the study of dopaminergic neuron degeneration include Lund human mesencephalic cells and primary neurons, and a case is made for the use of non-dopaminergic cells to model pathogenesis of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. With regard to α-synuclein aggregates, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. Cellular models reproduce the two most salient changes of Parkinson's disease, the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of α-synuclein aggregates. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types and treatments the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  13. Multibeam Bathymetry to Measure Volumetric Change and Particle Size Distributions in the Snake River through Hells Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Morehead, M. D.; Anderson, K.; Wilson, T.; Butler, M.; Conner, J. T.; Hocker, B.

    2011-12-01

    -bound section of the Snake River. Since 2008, Idaho Power has been collecting high-resolution multibeam bathymetry to generate a continuous bathymetric surface through Hells Canyon to use as a baseline. Data were collected using RTK-GPS positioning and a MBB sonar unit mounted to a 9 m long jetboat during spring high water conditions. Areas of survey overlap within and between years have shown limited areas of dramatic changes in storage (meters of change over a few days to years). Data collected during the MBB surveys (elevation, backscatter, snippets, and derivative data products) have been used to create preliminary maps of particle size distribution after calibration with point measurements of the bed surface D50 from historic underwater imagery. This baseline survey will be compared to future surveys in selected reaches to measure volumetric changes of sediment stored on the riverbed. Future work will focus on statistical differencing of bathymetric surfaces to categorize areas of accumulation, deposition, and no measurable change and improved particle size mapping with calibration with current underwater video images to be collected in the fall of 2011.

  14. Cellular automata for traffic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Dietrich E.

    1999-02-01

    Traffic phenomena such as the transition from free to congested flow, lane inversion and platoon formation can be accurately reproduced using cellular automata. Being computationally extremely efficient, they simulate large traffic systems many times faster than real time so that predictions become feasible. A riview of recent results is given. The presence of metastable states at the jamming transition is discussed in detail. A simple new cellular automation is introduced, in which the interaction between cars is Galilei-invariant. It is shown that this type of interaction accounts for metastable states in a very natural way.

  15. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  16. Synthetic biology in cellular immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W.

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. Here, we first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  17. Cellular basis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD.

  18. Gas sorption and the consequent volumetric and permeability change of coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenjuan

    Experimental and numerical investigations of gas sorption on coal, and the subsequent volumetric and permeability changes of the coal were conducted. The goals of the study were to investigate the magnitude of permeability change caused by gas sorption, and develop an algorithm to simulate numerically gas sorption and sorption-induced permeability change. The amount of gas sorption and the subsequent volumetric and permeability change of coal samples as a function of pore pressure and injection gas composition were measured in the laboratory. A constant effective confining pressure (difference between the confining pressure and pore pressure) was maintained in the process of the experiments; therefore, the role of effective stress on permeability was eliminated. Several gases, including pure CO2, pure N2, and binary mixtures of CO2 and N2 of various compositions were used as the injection gas. The coal sample was first allowed to adsorb an injection gas fully at a particular pressure. The total amount (moles) of adsorption was calculated based on a volumetric method. After adsorption equilibrium was reached, gas samples were taken from the equilibrium gaseous phase and analyzed afterwards. The composition of the gaseous phase prior to and after the adsorption was used to calculate the composition of the adsorbed phase based on material balance. Permeability of the sample was then measured by flowing the injection gas through the core at varying pressure gradient or varying flow rate, and an average permeability was obtained based on Darcy's law for compressible systems. The change of the total volume of the core was monitored and recorded in the whole process of the experiment. Volumetric strain was thereby calculated. Experimental results showed that the greater the pressure the greater the amount of adsorption for all tested gases. At the same pressure, the amount of adsorption was greater for CO2 than N2. For the binary mixtures, the greater the fraction of CO 2

  19. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    SciTech Connect

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto Z.

    2008-12-15

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 {mu}m has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

  20. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging: in vivo quantification of arterial volumetric flow rate in a single heartbeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-12-01

    We present herein 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging, a novel ultrasound-based volumetric imaging technique for the quantitative mapping of blood flow. Complete volumetric blood flow distribution imaging was achieved through 2D tilted plane-wave insonification, 2D multi-angle cross-beam beamforming, and 3D vector Doppler velocity components estimation by least-squares fitting. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging was performed in large volumetric fields of view at very high volume rate (>4000 volumes s-1) using a 1024-channel 4D ultrafast ultrasound scanner and a 2D matrix-array transducer. The precision of the technique was evaluated in vitro by using 3D velocity vector maps to estimate volumetric flow rates in a vessel phantom. Volumetric Flow rate errors of less than 5% were found when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were respectively less than 360 ml min-1 and 100 cm s-1. The average volumetric flow rate error increased to 18.3% when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were up to 490 ml min-1 and 1.3 m s-1, respectively. The in vivo feasibility of the technique was shown in the carotid arteries of two healthy volunteers. The 3D blood flow velocity distribution was assessed during one cardiac cycle in a full volume and it was used to quantify volumetric flow rates (375  ±  57 ml min-1 and 275  ±  43 ml min-1). Finally, the formation of 3D vortices at the carotid artery bifurcation was imaged at high volume rates.

  1. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging: in vivo quantification of arterial volumetric flow rate in a single heartbeat.

    PubMed

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-12-07

    We present herein 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging, a novel ultrasound-based volumetric imaging technique for the quantitative mapping of blood flow. Complete volumetric blood flow distribution imaging was achieved through 2D tilted plane-wave insonification, 2D multi-angle cross-beam beamforming, and 3D vector Doppler velocity components estimation by least-squares fitting. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging was performed in large volumetric fields of view at very high volume rate (>4000 volumes s(-1)) using a 1024-channel 4D ultrafast ultrasound scanner and a 2D matrix-array transducer. The precision of the technique was evaluated in vitro by using 3D velocity vector maps to estimate volumetric flow rates in a vessel phantom. Volumetric Flow rate errors of less than 5% were found when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were respectively less than 360 ml min(-1) and 100 cm s(-1). The average volumetric flow rate error increased to 18.3% when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were up to 490 ml min(-1) and 1.3 m s(-1), respectively. The in vivo feasibility of the technique was shown in the carotid arteries of two healthy volunteers. The 3D blood flow velocity distribution was assessed during one cardiac cycle in a full volume and it was used to quantify volumetric flow rates (375  ±  57 ml min(-1) and 275  ±  43 ml min(-1)). Finally, the formation of 3D vortices at the carotid artery bifurcation was imaged at high volume rates.

  2. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

    1981-02-01

    Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  3. Cellular Automata and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Ernest

    1994-01-01

    The use of cellular automata to analyze several pre-Socratic hypotheses about the evolution of the physical world is discussed. These hypotheses combine characteristics of both rigorous and metaphoric language. Since the computer demands explicit instructions for each step in the evolution of the automaton, such models can reveal conceptual…

  4. A combinatorial sample-preparation robot system using the volumetric-weighing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suehara, S.; Konishi, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Takeda, T.; Fukuda, M.; Koike, M.; Inoue, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new automatic sample-preparation robot system with use of the volumetric-weighing method. In this system, slurries, aqueous solutions, and other wet reagents are employed as starting materials and 64 ( 8×8) samples at the maximum are prepared on a library plate of 35 mm × 35 mm size. Volumetric-weighing and mixing of the starting materials and distributing reaction mixtures to the library plate are automatically performed by computer-controlled mechanisms with an easy-to-use programming software interface. While this robot is designed in terms of space saving and portability, it is able to equip with an atmosphere-controlled furnace to sinter the samples on the library plate. Typical preparation time for a library plate of 36 ( 6×6) samples is less than 40 min. This robot system is promising in enhancing throughput of wet-chemically synthesized materials researches.

  5. Volumetric imaging using single chip integrated CMUT-on-CMOS IVUS array.

    PubMed

    Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Gurun, Gokce; Satir, Sarp; Xu, Toby; Hochman, Michael; Degertekin, F Levent

    2012-01-01

    An intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheter that can provide forward viewing volumetric ultrasound images would be an invaluable clinical tool for guiding interventions. Single chip integration of front-end electronics with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is highly desirable to reduce the interconnection complexity and enable miniaturization in IVUS catheters. For this purpose we use the monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS integration where CMUTs are fabricated directly on top of pre-processed CMOS wafers. This minimizes parasitic capacitances associated with connection lines. We have recently implemented a system design including all the required electronics using 0.35-µm CMOS process integrated with a 1.4-mm diameter CMUT array. In this study, we present the experimental volumetric imaging results from an ex-vivo chicken heart phantom. The imaging results demonstrate that the single-chip forward looking IVUS (FL-IVUS) system with monolithically integrated electronics has potential to visualize the front view of coronary arteries.

  6. Towards ultrahigh volumetric capacitance: graphene derived highly dense but porous carbons for supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ying; Xie, Xiaoying; Lv, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Kong, Debin; Huang, Zhenghong; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Ishii, Takafumi; Li, Baohua; Golberg, Dmitri; Kang, Feiyu; Kyotani, Takashi; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    A small volumetric capacitance resulting from a low packing density is one of the major limitations for novel nanocarbons finding real applications in commercial electrochemical energy storage devices. Here we report a carbon with a density of 1.58 g cm−3, 70% of the density of graphite, constructed of compactly interlinked graphene nanosheets, which is produced by an evaporation-induced drying of a graphene hydrogel. Such a carbon balances two seemingly incompatible characteristics: a porous microstructure and a high density, and therefore has a volumetric capacitance for electrochemical capacitors (ECs) up to 376 F cm−3, which is the highest value so far reported for carbon materials in an aqueous electrolyte. More promising, the carbon is conductive and moldable, and thus could be used directly as a well-shaped electrode sheet for the assembly of a supercapacitor device free of any additives, resulting in device-level high energy density ECs. PMID:24131954

  7. Volumetric measurements of the cerebrospinal fluid spaces in demented subjects and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Gado, M.; Hughes, C.P.; Danziger, W.; Chi, D.; Jost, G.; Berg, L.

    1982-08-01

    Forty-seven subjects 65 to 80 years of age, of whom 20 were demented and 27 were normal, were studied by computed tomography. Volumetric indices of ventricular (V%) and sulcal size (S%) were determined by pixel counts without knowledge of clinical status. V% was 5.30 (+/-1.92) for the controls and 10.46 (+/-4.78) for the demented subjects. S% was 6.14 (+/-2.51) for the controls and 10.61 (+/-3.32) for the demented subjects. In each case, differences between the two groups were significant (p <0.0001). When a subsample of 29 scans was analyzed using linear and volumetric measurements, the linear measurements showed less pronounced differences between the demented subjects and the controls. These findings explain the conflicting results of different investigators concerning variations in ventricular and sulcal size in dementia and normal aging.

  8. Numerical evaluation of an innovative cup layout for open volumetric solar air receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, Mattia; Savoldi, Laura; Zanino, Roberto; Zaversky, Fritz

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes an innovative volumetric solar absorber design to be used in high-temperature air receivers of solar power tower plants. The innovative absorber, a so-called CPC-stacked-plate configuration, applies the well-known principle of a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for the first time in a volumetric solar receiver, heating air to high temperatures. The proposed absorber configuration is analyzed numerically, applying first the open-source ray-tracing software Tonatiuh in order to obtain the solar flux distribution on the absorber's surfaces. Next, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of a representative single channel of the innovative receiver is performed, using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent. The solution of the conjugate heat transfer problem shows that the behavior of the new absorber concept is promising, however further optimization of the geometry will be necessary in order to exceed the performance of the classical absorber designs.

  9. Development of a Diver-Operated Single Camera Volumetric Velocimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, Valerie; Dabiri, John

    2016-11-01

    The capabilities of a single camera, volumetric velocimetry system for in situ measurement in marine environments are demonstrated by imaging a well-characterized flow in a laboratory environment. This work represents the first stages in the design of a SCUBA-diver operated system to study organisms and biological processes under the natural light in the water column. This system is primarily composed of a volumetric particle tracking diagnostic to investigate fluid-animal interactions. A target domain size of a 20 cm sided cube is sought as a key design feature for the capability of capturing the flow around a variety of benthic and freely swimming organisms. The integration of the particle tracking system with additional diagnostics will be discussed.

  10. Experiments and simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with measured,volumetric initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Everest; Ferguson, Kevin; Jacobs, Jeffrey; Greenough, Jeff; Krivets, Vitaliy

    2016-11-01

    We describe experiments of single-shock Richtmyer-Meskhov Instability (RMI) performed on the shock tube apparatus at the University of Arizona in which the initial conditions are volumetrically imaged prior to shock wave arrival. Initial perturbations play a major role in the evolution of RMI, and previous experimental efforts only capture a single plane of the initial condition. The method presented uses a rastered laser sheet to capture additional images throughout the depth of the initial condition immediately before the shock arrival time. These images are then used to reconstruct a volumetric approximation of the experimental perturbation. Analysis of the initial perturbations is performed, and then used as initial conditions in simulations using the hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Experiments are presented and comparisons are made with simulation results.

  11. Volumetric optical mapping in early embryonic hearts using light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pei; Chan, Dennis C.; Gu, Shi; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Optical mapping (OM) of electrical activity using voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes is a powerful tool for the investigation of embryonic cardiac electrophysiology. However, because conventional OM integrates the signal in depth and projects it to a two-dimensional plane, information acquired is incomplete and dependent upon the orientation of the sample. This complicates interpretation of data, especially when comparing one heart to another. To overcome this limitation, we present volumetric OM using light-sheet microscopy, which enables high-speed capture of optically sectioned slices. Voltage-sensitive fluorescence images from multiple planes across entire early embryonic quail hearts were acquired, and complete, orientation-independent, four-dimensional maps of transmembrane potential are demonstrated. Volumetric OM data were collected while using optical pacing to control the heart rate, paving the way for physiological measurements and precise manipulation of the heartbeat in the future. PMID:28018729

  12. Towards ultrahigh volumetric capacitance: graphene derived highly dense but porous carbons for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ying; Xie, Xiaoying; Lv, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Kong, Debin; Huang, Zhenghong; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Ishii, Takafumi; Li, Baohua; Golberg, Dmitri; Kang, Feiyu; Kyotani, Takashi; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2013-10-17

    A small volumetric capacitance resulting from a low packing density is one of the major limitations for novel nanocarbons finding real applications in commercial electrochemical energy storage devices. Here we report a carbon with a density of 1.58 g cm(-3), 70% of the density of graphite, constructed of compactly interlinked graphene nanosheets, which is produced by an evaporation-induced drying of a graphene hydrogel. Such a carbon balances two seemingly incompatible characteristics: a porous microstructure and a high density, and therefore has a volumetric capacitance for electrochemical capacitors (ECs) up to 376 F cm(-3), which is the highest value so far reported for carbon materials in an aqueous electrolyte. More promising, the carbon is conductive and moldable, and thus could be used directly as a well-shaped electrode sheet for the assembly of a supercapacitor device free of any additives, resulting in device-level high energy density ECs.

  13. Towards ultrahigh volumetric capacitance: graphene derived highly dense but porous carbons for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ying; Xie, Xiaoying; Lv, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Kong, Debin; Huang, Zhenghong; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Ishii, Takafumi; Li, Baohua; Golberg, Dmitri; Kang, Feiyu; Kyotani, Takashi; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2013-10-01

    A small volumetric capacitance resulting from a low packing density is one of the major limitations for novel nanocarbons finding real applications in commercial electrochemical energy storage devices. Here we report a carbon with a density of 1.58 g cm-3, 70% of the density of graphite, constructed of compactly interlinked graphene nanosheets, which is produced by an evaporation-induced drying of a graphene hydrogel. Such a carbon balances two seemingly incompatible characteristics: a porous microstructure and a high density, and therefore has a volumetric capacitance for electrochemical capacitors (ECs) up to 376 F cm-3, which is the highest value so far reported for carbon materials in an aqueous electrolyte. More promising, the carbon is conductive and moldable, and thus could be used directly as a well-shaped electrode sheet for the assembly of a supercapacitor device free of any additives, resulting in device-level high energy density ECs.

  14. Very high frame rate volumetric integration of depth images on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Kähler, Olaf; Adrian Prisacariu, Victor; Yuheng Ren, Carl; Sun, Xin; Torr, Philip; Murray, David

    2015-11-01

    Volumetric methods provide efficient, flexible and simple ways of integrating multiple depth images into a full 3D model. They provide dense and photorealistic 3D reconstructions, and parallelised implementations on GPUs achieve real-time performance on modern graphics hardware. To run such methods on mobile devices, providing users with freedom of movement and instantaneous reconstruction feedback, remains challenging however. In this paper we present a range of modifications to existing volumetric integration methods based on voxel block hashing, considerably improving their performance and making them applicable to tablet computer applications. We present (i) optimisations for the basic data structure, and its allocation and integration; (ii) a highly optimised raycasting pipeline; and (iii) extensions to the camera tracker to incorporate IMU data. In total, our system thus achieves frame rates up 47 Hz on a Nvidia Shield Tablet and 910 Hz on a Nvidia GTX Titan XGPU, or even beyond 1.1 kHz without visualisation.

  15. Nanocellulose coupled flexible polypyrrole@graphene oxide composite paper electrodes with high volumetric capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Tammela, Petter; Strømme, Maria; Nyholm, Leif

    2015-02-01

    A robust and compact freestanding conducting polymer-based electrode material based on nanocellulose coupled polypyrrole@graphene oxide paper is straightforwardly prepared via in situ polymerization for use in high-performance paper-based charge storage devices, exhibiting stable cycling over 16 000 cycles at 5 A g-1 as well as the largest specific volumetric capacitance (198 F cm-3) so far reported for flexible polymer-based electrodes.A robust and compact freestanding conducting polymer-based electrode material based on nanocellulose coupled polypyrrole@graphene oxide paper is straightforwardly prepared via in situ polymerization for use in high-performance paper-based charge storage devices, exhibiting stable cycling over 16 000 cycles at 5 A g-1 as well as the largest specific volumetric capacitance (198 F cm-3) so far reported for flexible polymer-based electrodes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07251k

  16. Light-Curing Volumetric Shrinkage in Dimethacrylate-Based Dental Composites by Nanoindentation and PAL Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, Olha; Adamiak, Stanislaw; Bezvushko, Elvira; Cebulski, Jozef; Iskiv, Maryana; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Balitska, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Light-curing volumetric shrinkage in dimethacrylate-based dental resin composites Dipol® is examined through comprehensive kinetics research employing nanoindentation measurements and nanoscale atomic-deficient study with lifetime spectroscopy of annihilating positrons. Photopolymerization kinetics determined through nanoindentation testing is shown to be described via single-exponential relaxation function with character time constants reaching respectively 15.0 and 18.7 s for nanohardness and elastic modulus. Atomic-deficient characteristics of composites are extracted from positron lifetime spectra parameterized employing unconstrained x3-term fitting. The tested photopolymerization kinetics can be adequately reflected in time-dependent changes observed in average positron lifetime (with 17.9 s time constant) and fractional free volume of positronium traps (with 18.6 s time constant). This correlation proves that fragmentation of free-volume positronium-trapping sites accompanied by partial positronium-to-positron traps conversion determines the light-curing volumetric shrinkage in the studied composites.

  17. Validation of Simultaneous Volumetric and HPLC Methods for the Determination of Pridinol Mesylate in Raw Material

    PubMed Central

    Simionato, Laura D.; Ferello, Leonardo; Stamer, Sebastián; Zubata, Patricia D.; Segall, Adriana I.

    2013-01-01

    Simple, sensitive, and economical simultaneous volumetric and HPLC methods for the determination of pridinol mesylate in raw material have been developed. The volumetric method is based on the reaction of pridinol with sodium lauryl sulphate in diluted sulphuric acid. Dimethyl yellow was used as indicator to detect the end point of the titration in aqueous/organic layer. The HPLC method for the determination of pridinol mesylate employs a reverse phase C18 column at ambient temperature with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile: 0.05 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH adjusted to 5.0 (1 : 2, v/v). The flow rate was 0.8 mL/min. Quantitation was achieved with UV detection at 258 nm based on peak area. Both methods were found to be suitable for the quality control of pridinol mesylate in raw material. PMID:24224103

  18. Optimal Surface Segmentation in Volumetric Images—A Graph-Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Wu, Xiaodong; Chen, Danny Z.; Sonka, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Efficient segmentation of globally optimal surfaces representing object boundaries in volumetric data sets is important and challenging in many medical image analysis applications. We have developed an optimal surface detection method capable of simultaneously detecting multiple interacting surfaces, in which the optimality is controlled by the cost functions designed for individual surfaces and by several geometric constraints defining the surface smoothness and interrelations. The method solves the surface segmentation problem by transforming it into computing a minimum s-t cut in a derived arc-weighted directed graph. The proposed algorithm has a low-order polynomial time complexity and is computationally efficient. It has been extensively validated on more than 300 computer-synthetic volumetric images, 72 CT-scanned data sets of different-sized plexiglas tubes, and tens of medical images spanning various imaging modalities. In all cases, the approach yielded highly accurate results. Our approach can be readily extended to higher-dimensional image segmentation. PMID:16402624

  19. Prospects for using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Farrell, W.; Ma, Q.

    1997-09-01

    Third-generation, high-intensity, x-ray synchrotron radiation sources are capable of producing high heat-flux x-ray beams. In many applications finding ways to handle these powers is viewed as a burden. However, there are some technological applications where the deep penetration length of the x-rays may find beneficial uses as a volumetric heat source. In this paper the authors discuss the prospects for using high power x-rays for volumetric heating and report some recent experimental results. The particular applications they focus on are welding and surface heat treatment. The radiation source is an undulator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Results of preliminary tests on aluminum, aluminum metal matrix composites, and steel will be presented.

  20. Tunneling holes in microparticles to facilitate the transport of lithium ions for high volumetric density batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Ng, K. Y. Simon; Deng, Da

    2015-08-01

    Microscale materials generally have a higher tap density than that of random nanoparticles. Therefore, microparticles have been attracting much attention for application as high volumetric density electrodes for lithium ion batteries. However, microparticles have much longer electrolyte diffusion and Li-ion migration length and less accessibility to the electrolyte than that of nanoparticles. Therefore, it will be interesting to tunnel-holes in the high volumetric density microparticles to facilitate the reversible storage of lithium ions. Here, tunnel-like holes were generated in microparticles to dramatically increase the accessibility of the active materials to facilitate the lithium ion transfer. A plausible formation mechanism to explain the generation of tunnel-like holes was proposed based on time-course experiments and intensive characterization. Impressively, the as-prepared microbeads with tunnels demonstrated dramatically improved performance compared to the solid microbeads without tunnels in lithium ion storage. The microparticles with tunnels could achieve comparable electrochemical performances to those nanoparticles reported in the literature, suggesting that microparticles, properly tuned, could be promising candidates as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries and worthy of further studies. We also directly measured the volumetric density of the microparticles. We would like to highlight that a superior volumetric capacity of 514 mA h cm-3 has been achieved. We hope to promote more frequent use of the unit mA h cm-3 in addition to the conventional unit mA h g-1 in the battery community.Microscale materials generally have a higher tap density than that of random nanoparticles. Therefore, microparticles have been attracting much attention for application as high volumetric density electrodes for lithium ion batteries. However, microparticles have much longer electrolyte diffusion and Li-ion migration length and less accessibility to the

  1. JP3D compressed-domain watermarking of volumetric medical data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouled Zaid, Azza; Makhloufi, Achraf; Olivier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Increasing transmission of medical data across multiple user systems raises concerns for medical image watermarking. Additionaly, the use of volumetric images triggers the need for efficient compression techniques in picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), or telemedicine applications. This paper describes an hybrid data hiding/compression system, adapted to volumetric medical imaging. The central contribution is to integrate blind watermarking, based on turbo trellis-coded quantization (TCQ), to JP3D encoder. Results of our method applied to Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Computed Tomography (CT) medical images have shown that our watermarking scheme is robust to JP3D compression attacks and can provide relative high data embedding rate whereas keep a relative lower distortion.

  2. Real-Time Volumetric Phase Monitoring: Advancing Chemical Analysis by Countercurrent Separation.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Pro, Samuel M; Chadwick, Lucas R; Burdick, Thomas; Pro, Luke; Friedl, Warren; Novak, Nick; Maltby, John; Qiu, Feng; Friesen, J Brent

    2015-07-21

    Countercurrent separation (CCS) utilizes the differential partitioning behavior of analytes between two immiscible liquid phases. We introduce the first platform ("CherryOne") capable of real-time monitoring, metering, and control of the dynamic liquid-liquid CCS process. Automated phase monitoring and volumetrics are made possible with an array of sensors, including the new permittivity-based phase metering apparatus (PMA). Volumetric data for each liquid phase are converted into a dynamic real-time display of stationary phase retention (Sf) and eluent partition coefficients (K), which represent critical parameters of CCS reproducibility. When coupled with the elution-extrusion operational mode (EECCC), automated Sf and K determination empowers untargeted and targeted applications ranging from metabolomic analysis to preparative purifications.

  3. Volumetric display system based on three-dimensional scanning of inclined optical image.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Shiba, Kensuke; Sotsuka, Koji; Matsushita, Kenji

    2006-12-25

    A volumetric display system based on three-dimensional (3D) scanning of an inclined image is reported. An optical image of a two-dimensional (2D) display, which is a vector-scan display monitor placed obliquely in an optical imaging system, is moved laterally by a galvanometric mirror scanner. Inclined cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed on the 2D display in accordance with the position of the image plane to form a 3D image. Three-dimensional images formed by this display system satisfy all the criteria for stereoscopic vision because they are real images formed in a 3D space. Experimental results of volumetric imaging from computed-tomography images and 3D animated images are presented.

  4. A Murine Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss and a Regenerative Medicine Approach for Tissue Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sicari, Brian M.; Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Medberry, Christopher J.; Dearth, Christopher L.; Turner, Neill J.

    2012-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) resulting from traumatic accidents, tumor ablation, or degenerative disease is associated with limited treatment options and high morbidity. The lack of a reliable and reproducible animal model of VML has hindered the development of effective therapeutic strategies. The present study describes a critical-sized excisional defect within the mouse quadriceps muscle that results in an irrecoverable volumetric defect. This model of VML was used to evaluate the efficacy of a surgically placed inductive biologic scaffold material composed of porcine small intestinal submucosa–extracellular matrix (SIS-ECM). The targeted placement of an SIS-ECM scaffold within the defect was associated with constructive tissue remodeling including the formation of site-appropriate skeletal muscle tissue. The present study provides a reproducible animal model with which to study VML and shows the therapeutic potential of a bioscaffold-based regenerative medicine approach to VML. PMID:22906411

  5. Toward building an anatomically correct solid eye model with volumetric representation of retinal morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Rowe, T. Scott; Fuller, Alfred R.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2010-02-01

    An accurate solid eye model (with volumetric retinal morphology) has many applications in the field of ophthalmology, including evaluation of ophthalmic instruments and optometry/ophthalmology training. We present a method that uses volumetric OCT retinal data sets to produce an anatomically correct representation of three-dimensional (3D) retinal layers. This information is exported to a laser scan system to re-create it within solid eye retinal morphology of the eye used in OCT testing. The solid optical model eye is constructed from PMMA acrylic, with equivalent optical power to that of the human eye (~58D). Additionally we tested a water bath eye model from Eyetech Ltd. with a customized retina consisting of five layers of ~60 μm thick biaxial polypropylene film and hot melt rubber adhesive.

  6. Validation of volumetric flow measurements by means of a Doppler-tipped coronary angioplasty guide wire.

    PubMed

    Labovitz, A J; Anthonis, D M; Cravens, T L; Kern, M J

    1993-12-01

    We used an in vitro model to validate volumetric flow measurements obtained with an 0.018-inch angioplasty guidewire with a 12 MHz transducer mounted on its tip. By using a modified two-head roller pump device, flow was adjusted incrementally from a minimum of 90 ml/min to a maximum of 550 ml/min. Flow was measured with the Doppler guide wire in tubing ranging from 1.9 mm to 6.0 mm internal diameter, as the product of the spectral Doppler velocity integral and the cross-sectional area of the tubing, over a 1-minute period. It was an excellent correlation between the Doppler calculated flow rates and actual flow, regardless of tubing diameter (r = 0.99). These results suggest that the Doppler spectral output of this device might be accurately applied to estimates of volumetric flow in human coronary arteries.

  7. Water content influence on thermal and volumetric properties of wheat starch gelatinization under 10 MPa.

    PubMed

    Orlowska, Marta; Randzio, Stanislaw L

    2010-02-01

    A transitiometric in situ analysis of wheat starch aqueous suspensions heated over a temperature range from 285 K to 415 K under isobaric conditions of 10 MPa is presented. Measurements were performed at four selected water concentrations: 56.0%, 64.7%, 73.5%, and 82.4% weight/water. Thermal and volumetric properties and their water content dependencies have been determined for three successive starch phase transformations occurred during wheat starch gelatinization.

  8. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  9. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  10. Bone turnover predicts change in volumetric bone density and bone geometry at the radius in men.

    PubMed

    Pye, S R; Ward, K A; Cook, M J; Laurent, M R; Gielen, E; Borghs, H; Adams, J E; Boonen, S; Vanderschueren, D; Wu, F C; O'Neill, T W

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the distal and midshaft radius were performed in 514 European men aged 40-79 years at baseline and a median of 4.3 years later. Age-related changes in volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and bone geometry were greater in men with higher biochemical markers of bone turnover at baseline.

  11. The Dynamic Tumor Bed: Volumetric Changes in the Lumpectomy Cavity During Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, Brendan; Indelicato, Daniel J. Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Snead, Felicia E.; Morris, Christopher G.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude of volume change in the postoperative tumor bed before and during radiotherapy, and to identify any factors associated with large volumetric change. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six consecutive patients with early-stage or preinvasive breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy at our institution between June 2006 and October 2007. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the breast were obtained shortly after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy (RT) for treatment planning, and, if applicable, before the tumor bed boost. Postoperative changes, seroma, and surgical clips were used to define the tumor bed through consensus agreement of 3 observers (B.P., D.I., and J.L.). Multiple variables were examined for correlation with volumetric change. Results: Between the first and last scan obtained (median time, 7.2 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased at least 20% in 86% of patients (n = 31) and at least 50% in 64% of patients (n = 23). From the postoperative scan to the planning scan (median time, 3 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased by an average of 49.9%, or approximately 2.1% per postoperative day. From planning scan to boost scan (median interval, 7 weeks), the median tumor bed volume decreased by 44.6%, at an average rate of 0.95% per postoperative day. No single factor was significantly associated with a change in tumor bed volume greater than 20%. Conclusions: The average postlumpectomy cavity undergoes dramatic volumetric change after surgery and continues this change during RT. The rate of change is inversely proportional to the duration from surgery. In this study no factors studied predicted large volumetric change.

  12. Simultaneously high gravimetric and volumetric methane uptake characteristics of the metal-organic framework NU-111

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y; Srinivas, G; Wilmer, CE; Eryazici, I; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK

    2013-01-01

    We show that the MOF NU-111 exhibits equally high volumetric and gravimetric methane uptake values, both within approximate to 75% of the DOE targets at 300 K. Upon reducing the temperature to 270 K, the uptake increases to 0.5 g g(-1) and 284 cc(STP) per cc at 65 bar. Adsorption of CO2 and H-2 is also reported. Simulated isotherms are in excellent agreement with those obtained from experiments.

  13. Predicting Offshore Swarm Rate Changes by Volumetric Strain Changes in Izu Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, T.; Ogata, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Maeda, K.; Kobayashi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern offshore of Izu peninsula is one of the well known volcanic active regions in Japan, where magma intrusions have been observed several times since 1980s monitored by strain-meters located nearby. Major swarm activities have been synchronously associated with coseismic and preseismic significant sizes of a volumetric strain changes (Earthquake Research Committee, 2010). We investigated the background seismicity changes during these earthquake swarms using the nonstationary ETAS model (Kumazawa and Ogata, 2013), and have found the followings. The modified volumetric strain change data by removing the effect of earth tides and precipitation as well as removing coseismic jumps have much higher cross-correlations to the background rates of the ETAS model than to the whole seismicity rate change of the ETAS, and further the strain changes precede the background seismicity by lag of about a day. This relation suggests an enhanced prediction of earthquakes in this region using volumetric strain measurements. Thus we propose an extended ETAS model where the background seismicity rate is predicted by the time series of preceding volumetric strain changes. Our numerical results for Izu region show consistent outcomes throughout the major swarms in this region. References Earthquake Research Committee (2010). Report on "Prediction of seismic activity in the Izu Eastern Region" (in Japanese), http://www.jishin.go.jp/main/yosoku/izu/index.htm Kumazawa, T. and Ogata, Y. (2013). Quantitative description of induced seismic activity before and after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake by nonstationary ETAS model, J Geophys.Res. 118, 6165-6182.

  14. Case Resolution Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Case Resolution Manual (CRM) is intended to provide procedural guidance to ECRCO case managers to ensure EPA’s prompt, effective, and efficient resolution of civil rights cases consistent with science and the civil rights laws.

  15. Super-resolution Imaging of Chemical Synapses in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Adish; Huang, Bo; Bergan, Joseph; Dulac, Catherine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Determination of the molecular architecture of synapses requires nanoscopic image resolution and specific molecular recognition, a task that has so far defied many conventional imaging approaches. Here we present a super-resolution fluorescence imaging method to visualize the molecular architecture of synapses in the brain. Using multicolor, three-dimensional stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, the distributions of synaptic proteins can be measured with nanometer precision. Furthermore, the wide-field, volumetric imaging method enables high-throughput, quantitative analysis of a large number of synapses from different brain regions. To demonstrate the capabilities of this approach, we have determined the organization of ten protein components of the presynaptic active zone and the postsynaptic density. Variations in synapse morphology, neurotransmitter receptor composition, and receptor distribution were observed both among synapses and across different brain regions. Combination with optogenetics further allowed molecular events associated with synaptic plasticity to be resolved at the single-synapse level. PMID:21144999

  16. One year postoperative hard and soft tissue volumetric changes after a BSSO mandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Maal, T J J; de Koning, M J J; Plooij, J M; Verhamme, L M; Rangel, F A; Bergé, S J; Borstlap, W A

    2012-09-01

    In this study, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and three dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry are used to compare the 3D skeletal and soft tissue changes caused by a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) 1 year after a mandibular advancement. Eighteen consecutive patients with a hypoplastic mandible were treated with a BSSO according to the Hunsuck modification. Preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively, a CBCT scan was acquired and a 3D photograph. The pre- and postoperative CBCT scans were matched using voxel based registration. After registration, the mandible could be segmented in the pre- and postoperative scans. The preoperative scan was subtracted from the postoperative scan, resulting in the hard tissue difference. To investigate the soft tissue changes, the pre- and postoperative 3D photographs were registered using surface based registration. After registration the preoperative surface could be subtracted from the postoperative surface, resulting in the overall volumetric difference. As expected, a correlation between mandibular advancent and volumetric changes of the hard tissues was found. The correlation between advancement and soft tissues was weak. The labial mental fold stretched after surgery. This study proved that using 3D imaging techniques it is possible to document volumetric surgical changes accurately and objectively.

  17. COD removal efficiency and mechanism of HMBR in high volumetric loading for ship domestic sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linan; He, Hailing; Wang, Chunli

    2016-10-01

    The hybrid membrane bioreactor (HMBR) has been applied in ship domestic sewage treatment under high volumetric loading for ship space saving. The mechanism and influence factors on the efficiency, including hydraulic retention time (HRT), dissolved oxygen (DO) of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were investigated. The HMBR's average COD removal rate was up to 95.13% on volumetric loading of 2.4 kgCOD/(m(3)•d) and the COD concentration in the effluent was 48.5 mg/L, far below the International Maritime Organization (IMO) discharge standard of 125 mg/L. DO had a more remarkable effect on the COD removal efficiency than HRT. In addition, HMBR revealed an excellent capability of resisting organics loading impact. Within the range of volumetric loading of 0.72 to 4.8 kg COD/(m(3)•d), the effluent COD concentration satisfied the discharge requirement of IMO. It was found that the organics degradation in the aeration tank followed the first-order reaction, with obtained kinetic parameters of vmax (2.79 d(-1)) and Ks (395 mg/L). The original finding of this study had shown the effectiveness of HMBR in organic contaminant degradation at high substrate concentration, which can be used as guidance in the full scale of the design, operation and maintenance of ship domestic sewage treatment devices.

  18. Characterization of aerobic granular sludge treating high strength agro-based wastewater at different volumetric loadings.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Curtis, Thomas P; Yahya, Adibah; Ujang, Zaini

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between microbial community and mechanism of aerobic granulation could enable wider applications of granules for high-strength wastewater treatment. The majority of granulation studies principally determine the engineering aspects of granules formation with little emphasis on the microbial diversity. In this study, three identical reactors namely R1, R2 and R3 were operated using POME at volumetric loadings of 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), respectively. Aeration was provided at a volumetric flow rate of 2.5 cms(-1). Aerobic granules were successfully developed in R2 and R3 while bioflocs dominated R1 until the end of experiments. Fractal dimension (D(f)) averaged at 1.90 suggesting good compactness of granules. The PCR-DGGE results indicated microbial evolutionary shift throughout granulation despite different operating OLRs based on decreased Raup and Crick similarity indices upon mature granule formation. The characteristics of aerobic granules treating high strength agro-based wastewater are determined at different volumetric loadings.

  19. Volumetric two-photon imaging of neurons using stereoscopy (vTwINS).

    PubMed

    Song, Alexander; Charles, Adam S; Koay, Sue Ann; Gauthier, Jeff L; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Pillow, Jonathan W; Tank, David W

    2017-04-01

    Two-photon laser scanning microscopy of calcium dynamics using fluorescent indicators is a widely used imaging method for large-scale recording of neural activity in vivo. Here, we introduce volumetric two-photon imaging of neurons using stereoscopy (vTwINS), a volumetric calcium imaging method that uses an elongated, V-shaped point spread function to image a 3D brain volume. Single neurons project to spatially displaced 'image pairs' in the resulting 2D image, and the separation distance between projections is proportional to depth in the volume. To demix the fluorescence time series of individual neurons, we introduce a modified orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm that also infers source locations within the 3D volume. We illustrated vTwINS by imaging neural population activity in the mouse primary visual cortex and hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that vTwINS provides an effective method for volumetric two-photon calcium imaging that increases the number of neurons recorded while maintaining a high frame rate.

  20. [Change in condylar and mandibular morphology in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: cone beam volumetric imaging].

    PubMed

    Garagiola, Umberto; Mercatali, Lorenzo; Bellintani, Claudio; Fodor, Attila; Farronato, Giampietro; Lőrincz, Adám

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to show the importance of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography to volumetrically quantify TMJ damage in patients with JIA, measuring condylar and mandibular real volumes. 34 children with temporomandibular involvement by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were observed by Cone Beam Computerized Tomography. 4 were excluded because of several imaging noises. The mandible was isolated from others craniofacial structures; the whole mandibular volume and its components' volumes (condyle, ramus, hemibody, hemisymphysis on right side and on left side) has been calculated by a 3D volume rendering technique. The results show a highly significant statistical difference between affected side volumetric values versus normal side volumetric values above all on condyle region (P < 0.01), while they don't show any statistical differences between right side versus left side. The Cone Beam Computerized Tomography represents a huge improvement in understanding of the condyle and mandibular morphological changes, even in the early stages of the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. The JIA can lead in children to temporomandibular joint damage with facial development and growth alterations.