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Sample records for cement based bonded

  1. Bonding effectiveness of a self-adhesive resin-based luting cement to dentin after provisional cement contamination.

    PubMed

    Bagis, Bora; Bagis, Yildirim H; Hasanreisoğlu, Ufuk

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of provisional luting cements on the bonding performance of a resin-based self-adhesive luting cement to dentin vs that of currently used resin-based luting agents with different adhesion strategies. Forty-five prepared human molars were randomly and equally divided into three main groups according to the type of provisional luting cement applied: eugenol-containing provisional cement (Temp Bond, Kerr), eugenol-free provisional cement (Temp Bond NE, Kerr), and control where the provisionalization step was omitted. Each group was further subdivided into 3 groups based on the category of adhesive systems/ luting materials used: a two-step etch-and-rinse system (Single Bond/RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE) (RX), a two-step self-etching system (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/ Panavia F; Kuraray) (PF), and a self-adhesive luting cement (Rely X Unicem; 3M ESPE) (RU). Finally, 9 groups of 5 teeth each were prepared for the microtensile test. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Bonferroni tests revealed that definitive luting cement, provisional luting cement, and the interactions of these two factors had significant influences on dentin bond strength. The highest bond strength was obtained for PF (32.05 MPa), followed by RX (26.57 MPa) and RU (16.56 MPa) for the controls. Contamination with either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free provisional cement significantly decreased the bonding effectiveness of RX (19.08 and 19.69 MPa, respectively) and PF (14.21 and 16.67 MPa respectively) to dentin (p < 0.05). RU showed comparable bond strength values before and after provisional cement (13.93 and 14.49 MPa, respectively) application (p > 0.05). Eugenol in provisional luting cement did not produce material-related alterations in the bonding performance of the resin luting cements tested (p > 0.05). Based on these results, the self-adhesive cement which was not influenced by the provisional cement application may be promising. However, long-term laboratory and

  2. Bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental cements.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The most appropriate luting agent for restoring cement-retained implant restorations has yet to be determined. Leachable chemicals from some types of cement designed for teeth may affect metal surfaces. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental luting agents. Eight dental luting agents representative of 4 different compositional classes (resin, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and zinc oxide-based cements) were used to evaluate their effect on machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy surfaces. Ninety-six paired disks were cemented together (n=12). After incubation in a 37°C water bath for 7 days, the shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine (Instron) and a custom fixture with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Differences were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). The debonded surfaces of the Ti alloy disks were examined under a light microscope at ×10 magnification to record the failure pattern, and the representative specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The mean ±SD of shear failure loads ranged from 3.4 ±0.5 to 15.2 ±2.6 MPa. The retention provided by both polycarboxylate cements was significantly greater than that of all other groups (P<.05). The scanning electron microscope examination revealed surface pits only on the bonded surface cemented with the polycarboxylate cements. Cementation with polycarboxylate cement obtained higher shear bond strength. Some chemical interactions occurred between the machined Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface and polycarboxylate cements during cementation. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Noble and Base Metal Alloys with Different Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Raeisosadat, Farkhondeh; Ghavam, Maryam; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Arami, Sakineh; Sedaghati, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen. Materials and Method: Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to “Degubond 4” (Au Pd) and “Verabond” (Ni Cr) alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021) and Verabond (P< 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291) and Verabond (P=0.899). Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003). The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011). The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59). RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035). Conclusion: The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2. PMID:25628687

  4. Comparison of microleakage of three acid-base luting cements versus one resin-bonded cement for Class V direct composite inlays.

    PubMed

    Piemjai, Morakot; Miyasaka, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2002-12-01

    Demineralized dentin beneath set cement may adversely affect microleakage under fixed restorations. Microleakage of direct composite inlays cemented with acid-base cements and a methyl methacrylate resin cement were evaluated to determine their effect on the integrity of the underlying hybridized dentin. Sixty Class V box preparations (3 mm x 3 mm x 1.5 mm) were precisely prepared in previously frozen bovine teeth with one margin in enamel and another margin in dentin. Direct composite inlays (EPIC-TMPT) for each preparation were divided into 4 groups of 15 specimens each and cemented with 3 acid-base cements (control group): Elite, Ketac-Cem, Hy-Bond Carbo-Cem, and 1 adhesive resin cement: C&B Metabond. All specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37 degrees C before immersion in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours. The dye penetration was measured on the sectioned specimens at the tooth-cement interface of enamel and cementum margins and recorded with graded criteria under light microscopy (Olympus Vanox-T) at original magnification x 50, 100, and 200. A Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney test at P<.05 were used to analyze leakage score. All cementum margins of the 3 acid-base cements tested demonstrated significantly higher leakage scores than cementum margins for inlays cemented with the resin cement tested(P<.01). No leakage along the tooth-cement interface was found for inlays retained with the adhesive resin cement. Within the limitations of this study, the 3 acid-base cements tested exhibited greater microleakage at the cementum margins than did the adhesive resin cement that was tested.

  5. Effect of artificial saliva and pH on shear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramic.

    PubMed

    Geramipanah, F; Majidpour, M; Sadighpour, L; Fard, M J Kharazi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of media with different pH on shear and strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramics. Sixty rectangularly shaped specimens made of a zirconia based ceramic (Cercon, Dentsply) were prepared, air-blasted with 110 microm aluminum oxide particles (Al203) and randomly assigned into three groups (n = 30). A universal resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M/ESPE) was bonded to each specimen using one of the following three cements: Calibra (Dentsply), Panavia F2 (kurary) and Unicem (3M/ESPE). Specimens were thermal cycled and stored in one of the following three media for two weeks: water at pH = 7, saliva at pH = 7 and saliva at pH = 3.5. The mean shear bond strength of each group was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (alpha = 0.05). The modes of failure were recorded using a streomicroscope. All specimens in the Calibra groups showed premature debonding. No significant difference was found between the two other cements or different media. The failure modes in the two latter cements were predominantly adhesive. Despite the adverse effect of acidic media on the properties of restorative materials, the media did not significantly influence the bond strength of MDP-containing resin cement and a self-adhesive cement to a zirconia- based ceramic.

  6. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    PubMed

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100).

  7. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®).

    PubMed

    Cantekin, Kenan; Avci, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. The highest (17.7 ± 6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8 ± 3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7 ± 6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9 ± 5.7) (p < 0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA = 7.4 ± 3.3; SB and Biodentine® = 8.0 ± 3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA = 5.8 ± 3.2; GIC and Biodentine = 6.7 ± 2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p = 0.73 and p = 0.38, respectively). The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  8. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®)

    PubMed Central

    CANTEKİN, Kenan; AVCİ, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Material and Methods Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7) (p<0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively). Conclusions The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite. PMID:25141202

  9. Bond mechanisms in fiber-reinforced cement-based composites. Final report, 1 July 1987-30 August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Naaman, A.E.; Namur, G.; Najm, H.; Alwan, J.

    1989-08-01

    This report presents a comprehensive investigation of the mechanisms of bond in steel-fiber-reinforced-cement-based composites. Following a state-of-the-art review on bond in reinforced and prestressed concrete as well as fiber reinforced concrete, the results of an experimental and an analytical program are described. The experimental program focuses primarily on the behavior of fibers under pull-out conditions. Pull-out load versus end-slip behavior and bond shear stress versus slip relationship are studied extensively.

  10. Push-out bond strength of MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emmanuel Jnl; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Zanon, Mayara; Senna, Plínio Mendes; DE-Deus, Gustavo; Zuolo, Mário Luis; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2016-06-14

    This study was designed to investigate the resistance to dislodgment provided by MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement. Biodentine and White MTA Angelus were used as reference materials for comparison. Three discs 1 ± 0.1 mm thick were obtained from the middle third of the roots of 5 maxillary canines. Three 0.8-mm-wide holes were drilled on the axial surface of each root disc. Standardized irrigation was performed. Then the holes were dried with paper points and filled with one of the three tested cements. The filled dental slices were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 7.2) for 7 days before the push-out assessment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to assess the effect of each endodontic cement on the push-out bond strength. Mann-Whitney with Bonferroni correction was used to isolate the differences. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05. All specimens had measurable push-out values and no premature failure occurred. There were significant differences among the materials (p <0.05). The Biodentine specimens had the highest push-out bond strength values (p < 0.05). MTA HP had significantly higher bond strength than White MTA (p < 0.05). MTA HP showed better push-out bond strength than its predecessor, White MTA; however, Biodentine had higher dislodgment resistance than both MTA formulations.

  11. Understanding acoustic methods for cement bond logging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Tao, Guo; Shang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    Well cementation is important for oil/gas production, underground gas storage, and CO2 storage, since it isolates the reservoir layers from aquifers to increase well integrity and reduce environmental footprint. This paper analyzes wave modes of different sonic/ultrasonic methods for cement bonding evaluation. A Two dimensional finite difference method is then used to simulate the wavefield for the ultrasonic methods in the cased-hole models. Waveforms of pulse-echo method from different interfaces in a good bonded well are analyzed. Wavefield of the pitch-catch method for free casing, partial or full bonded models with ultra-low density cement are studied. Based on the studies, the modes in different methods are considered as follows: the zero-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S0) for sonic method, the first-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S1) for the pulse-echo method, and the zero-order anti-symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (A0) for the pitch-catch method. For the sonic method, a directional transmitter in both the azimuth and axial directions can generate energy with a large incidence angle and azimuth resolution, which can effectively generate S0 and break out the azimuth limitation of the conventional sonic method. Although combination of pulse-echo and pitch-catch methods can determine the bonding condition of the third interface for the ultra-low density cement case, the pitch-catch cannot tell the fluid annulus thickness behind casing for the partial bonded cased-hole.

  12. Microshear Bond Strength of Tri-Calcium Silicate-based Cements to Different Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Esra; Ulusoy, Nuran

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of tri-calcium silicate-based materials to different restorative materials. Thirty-five disks of TheraCal LC and Biodentine were fabricated using teflon molds according to manufacturers' instructions. Then the specimens were randomly divided into 7 groups according to the materials applied: Fuji IX, Fuji II, Equia Fil, Vertise Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative, Filtek Z250 with Prime&Bond NT and with Clearfil SE Bond. All restorative materials were placed onto the disks using tygon tubes. Following a storage period, the specimens underwent microshear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine, and fracture modes were analyzed. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. For all restorative materials, TheraCal LC showed significantly higher μSBS values compared to Biodentine. GIC based materials showed the lowest μSBS for TheraCal and Biodentine. For Biodentine, Filtek Z250 applied with Prime&Bond NT and Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative applied with Scotchbond Universal Adhesive exhibited the highest μSBS, while Filtek Z250 applied with Clearfil SE Bond revealed the highest bond strength to TheraCal LC. For all restorative materials tested in this study, TheraCal LC showed higher μSBS compared to Biodentine. For both TheraCal LC and Biodentine, the placement of GIC-based materials prior to composite resin restorations might decrease the bond strength. Composite resins applied with self-etching adhesives increased the bond strength of TheraCal LC; however, for Biodentine, application of etch-and-rinse adhesives may improve the adhesion of composite resins.

  13. The evaluation of dual cement resins in orthodontic bonding.

    PubMed

    Smith, R T; Shivapuja, P K

    1993-05-01

    Dual-cement resins are composite resins that are both light activated and chemically cured. They can be cured completely with a visible light source or by the catalyst and base reaction of the material. With the control of setting time, dual cements appear to offer clinicians advantages in orthodontic bonding. The purposes of the present research are to compare various dual cements in regard to orthodontic bonding and to evaluate them in relation to currently used chemically cured and light-cured composite resins for bonding stainless steel mesh-backed orthodontic brackets. Seven currently available orthodontic bonding systems (three light cured and four chemically cured) and three dual cements were evaluated. Each of the 10 groups contained 15 noncarious mandibular incisors. Mandibular incisor brackets were bonded to the teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendation. After bonding, the teeth were stored for 5 days in water at 37 degrees C. An Instron machine (Instron Corp., Canton, Mass.) was used to test samples. All samples were compared with Concise orthodontic bonding composite (3M, St. Paul, Minn.). The results of this investigation show that it is possible to bond solid, mesh-backed metal orthodontic brackets to teeth with a dual cement. The shear bond strengths of the dual cements, as tested in the laboratory, should be adequate to withstand normal orthodontic forces. Increased control of the setting time of the dual cements will allow the clinician more time to correctly position brackets and to remove excess resin before curing. In addition, the clinician can be assured of complete polymerization with the chemical properties of the dual cement resins.

  14. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  15. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  16. Effect of temporary cements on the shear bond strength of luting cements

    PubMed Central

    FIORI-JÚNIOR, Marco; MATSUMOTO, Wilson; SILVA, Raquel Assed Bezerra; PORTO-NETO, Sizenando Toledo; SILVA, Jaciara Miranda Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate, by shear bond strength (SBS) testing, the influence of different types of temporary cements on the final cementation using conventional and self-etching resin-based luting cements. Material and Methods Forty human teeth divided in two halves were assigned to 8 groups (n=10): I and V (no temporary cementation); II and VI: Ca(OH)2-based cement; III and VII: zinc oxide (ZO)based cement; IV and VIII: ZO-eugenol (ZOE)-based cement. Final cementation was done with RelyX ARC cement (groups I to IV) and RelyX Unicem cement (groups V to VIII). Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Results Means were (MPa): I - 3.80 (±1.481); II - 5.24 (±2.297); III - 6.98 (±1.885); IV - 6.54 (±1.459); V - 5.22 (±2.465); VI - 4.48 (±1.705); VII - 6.29 (±2.280); VIII - 2.47 (±2.076). Comparison of the groups that had the same temporary cementation (Groups II and VI; III and VII; IV and VIII) showed statistically significant difference (p<0.001) only between Groups IV and VIII, in which ZOE-based cements were used. The use of either Ca(OH)2 based (Groups II and VI) or ZO-based (Groups III and VII) cements showed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) for the different luting cements (RelyXTM ARC and RelyXTM Unicem). The groups that had no temporary cementation (Groups I and V) did not differ significantly from each other either (p>0.05). Conclusion When temporary cementation was done with ZO- or ZOE-based cements and final cementation was done with RelyX ARC, there was an increase in the SBS compared to the control. In the groups cemented with RelyX Unicem, however, the use of a ZOE-based temporary cement affected negatively the SBS of the luting agent used for final cementation. PMID:20379679

  17. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  18. Bond degradation behavior of self-adhesive cement and conventional resin cements bonded to silanized ceramic.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Meng, Xiangfeng; Yoshida, Keiichi; Luo, Xiaoping

    2011-03-01

    Self-adhesive resin cement with the characteristics of glass ionomer cement is more susceptible to water than conventional resin cements. It is unknown if there is a higher risk of bond degradation at the interface with silanized ceramic in an oral environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond degradation behavior of self-adhesive cement under simulated oral conditions, by comparing it with the behavior of 3 conventional resin cements. Three conventional resin cements, Linkamx HV (LMHV), Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC), and SuperBond (SB), were bonded to silanized ceramic (ProCAD) with the manufacturer's recommended silane coupler (GC Ceramic Primer (GCCP), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CCP), and Porcelain Liner M (PLM), respectively), while a self-adhesive cement (G-CEM) was bonded with each of the 3 silane couplers. Maximum water sorption and solubility of the resin cements were measured according to the ISO 4049 standard during 6 weeks of water storage. The microshear bond strength of each silane/cement group (n=10 per thermal cycling subgroup) was tested after 0, 10,000, and 30,000 thermal cycles (TC), and bond failure types were counted. One- and two-way ANOVAs and the Tukey multiple comparisons test (α=.05) were used to evaluate the bond strength data. G-CEM had significantly higher water sorption (P<.001) and solubility than conventional resin cements. Statistical analysis showed that the bond strength of all silane/cement groups was reduced significantly by thermal cycling (P=.01 for CCP/G-CEM, P=.003 for GCCP/LMHV, P<.001 for other groups). The bond strength of G-CEM with the 3 silane couplers was significantly degraded from TC 0 to 10,000 (P<.001 for GCCP/G-CEM and PLM/G-CEM, P=.01 for CCP/G-CEM); however, the bond strength appeared to stabilize with no significant degradation from TC 10,000 to 30,000. This behavior was different from that of conventional resin cements, which demonstrated bond degradation throughout TC 0-30,000. After TC 30

  19. The fluid-compensated cement bond log

    SciTech Connect

    Nayfeh, T.H.; Leslie, H.D.; Wheelis, W.B.

    1984-09-01

    An experimental and numerical wave mechanics study of cement bond logs demonstrated that wellsite computer processing can now segregate wellbore fluid effects from the sonic signal response to changing cement strength. Traditionally, cement logs have been interpreted as if water were in the wellbore, without consideration of wellbore fluid effects. These effects were assumed to be negligible. However, with the increasing number of logs being run in completion fluids such as CaCl/sub 2/, ZnBr/sub 2/, and CaBr/sub 2/, large variations in cement bond logs became apparent. A Schlumberger internal paper showing that bond log amplitude is related to the acoustic impedance of the fluid in which the tool is run led to a comprehensive study of wellbore fluid effects. Numerical and experimental models were developed simulating wellbore geometry. Measurements were conducted in 5-, 7-, and 95/8-in. casings by varying the wellbore fluid densities, viscosities, and fluid types (acoustic impedance). Parallel numerical modeling was undertaken using similar parameters. The results showed that the bond log amplitude varied dramatically with the wellbore fluid's acoustic impedance; for example, there was a 70 percent increase in the signal amplitude for 11.5-lb/ gal CaCl/sub 2/ over the signal amplitude in water. This led to the development of a Fluid-Compensated Bond log that corrects the amplitude for acoustic impedance of varying wellbore fluids, thereby making the measurements more directly related to the cement quality.

  20. A study of self-adhesive resin cements for bonding to silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy -- effect of including primer components in cement base.

    PubMed

    Muraguchi, Koichi; Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacies of adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, G-CEM, RelyX Unicem Clicker, Vitremer Paste) for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy not surface-pretreated with metal primer. For control, Panavia F 2.0 -developed for use with a proprietary metal primer, Alloy Primer- was tested with and without metal primer application. Pairs of alloy disks (10.0 and 8.0 mm in diameters, 3.0 mm thickness) were air-abraded with alumina and bonded with one of the cements. Shear bond strengths (SBSs) were measured before and after 50,000 times of thermocycling. Among Maxcem, RelyX Unicem Clicker and the control, there were no statistical differences in SBS before and after thermocycling. After thermocycling, Clearfil SA Luting exhibited the highest SBS among all the cements. Results showed that Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, and RelyX Unicem Clicker were efficacious for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy after air abrasion surface treatment for the latter.

  1. Cement design based on cement mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Thiercelin, M.J.; Dargaud, B.; Baret, J.F.; Rodriquez, W.J.

    1998-12-01

    The disappearance of cement bond log response as a result of variations of downhole conditions has been observed in numerous wells. This observation has led to concern about the loss of proper zonal isolation. Stresses induced in the cement, through deformation of the cemented casing resulting from the variation of downhole conditions, are the cause of this damage. The authors present an analysis of the mechanical response of set cement in a cased wellbore to quantify this damage and determine the key controlling parameters. The results show that the thermo-elastic properties of the casing, cement, and formation play a significant role. The type of failure, either cement debonding or cement cracking, is a function of the nature of the downhole condition variations. This analysis allows one to propose appropriate cement mechanical properties to avoid cement failure and debonding. The authors show that the use of high compressive strength cement is not always the best solution and, in some cases, flexible cements are preferred.

  2. Phosphate based oil well cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  3. Reactive Silicate Coatings for Protecting and Bonding Reinforcing Steel in Cement-Based Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Bentur, Diamond and Mindess , 1985; Wei, Mandel and Said, 1986; Horne, Richardson and Brydson, 2007). Most research have concluded that the...around a steel fiber. (after Bentur, Diamond and Mindess , 1985.) The ITZ is typically on the order of 100µm in thickness and the exact...International, West Conshohocken, PA. Bentur, A. Diamond, S. and Mindess , S., 1985: Cracking Processes in Steel Fibre Reinforced Cement Pastes

  4. Influence of Eugenol-based Sealers on Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post Luted with Resin Cement: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Aline Segatto Pires; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2015-09-01

    It is unclear in the literature if the presence of eugenol in root dentin impairs the retention of a fiber post luted with resin cements. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature and perform meta-analysis on the influence of eugenol on the bond strength of posts luted to root canals. A systematic electronic search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, Lilacs, and Web of Science databases. No language or publication date restrictions were applied. Eligible studies were those that assessed the immediate push-out bond strength of posts cemented to root dentin after the removal of eugenol-based sealer and compared it with a eugenol-free group. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria although 2 were excluded after full-text reading and 1 study was identified by cross-reference. Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. Global analysis showed a significant influence of eugenol, which lowered the bond strength of fiber posts cemented to root canals (P < .001). The subgroup analysis carried out related to the different types of hybridization processes also indicated a negative effect of eugenol on bond strength in all subgroups assessed (P < .001). Eugenol-based sealer reduces the immediate push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted to root canal with resin cement, regardless of the type of adhesive system or resin cement used. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bonding quality of contemporary dental cements to sandblasted esthetic crown copings.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Khalid M; Al-Qahtani, Nasser M; Al-Shehri, Abdulrahman S; Abdelmoneam, Adel M

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength of current luting cements to sandblasted crown-coping substrates. Specimens of nickel-chromium, pressable glass ceramic, and zirconia crown-coping substrates were sandblasted in three groups (n = 30 each) with 50 (group 1), 110 (group 2), and 250 μm (group 3) alumina particles at a pressure of 250 kPa. Cylinders of glass ionomer, universal resin, and self-adhesive resin cements were then built up on the sandblasted substrate surfaces of each group (n = 10). All bonded specimens were stressed to evaluate the cement-substrate shear bond strength. Both the mode and incidence of bond failure were also considered. No difference was noticed between all test groups in terms of cement-substrate bond strength. In comparison to self-adhesive type, the universal resin cement provided lower bond strengths to both metal and glass-ceramic substrates in group 1. The self-adhesive resin cement provided the highest bond strengths to the zirconia substrates in groups 2 and 3. The adhesive type of bond failure was common in the metal and zirconia substrates in all groups. Cement-substrate bonding quality is not affected by the size of sandblasting particles. Resin cements bond better to different coping substrates. Self-adhesive resin cement is the best choice to bond zirconia-based substrates. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The fluid-compensated cement bond log

    SciTech Connect

    Nayfeh, T.H.; Wheelis, W.B. Jr.; Leslie, H.D.

    1986-08-01

    Simulations of cement bond logging (CBL) have shown that wellbore fluid effects can be segregated from sonic-signal response to changing cement strengths. Traditionally, the effects have been considered negligible and the CBL's have been interpreted as if water were in the wellbore. However, large variations in CBL's have become apparent with the increasing number of logs run in completion fluids, such as CaCl/sub 2/, ZnBr/sub 2/, and CaBr/sub 2/. To study wellbore fluid effects, physical and numerical models were developed that simulated the wellbore geometry. Measurements were conducted in 5-, 7-, and 9 5/8-in. casings for a range of wellbore fluid types and for both densities and viscosities. Parallel numerical modeling used similar parameters. Results show that bond-log amplitudes varied dramatically with the wellbore fluid acoustic impedance-i.e., there was a 70% increase in signal amplitudes for 11.5 lbm/gal (1370-kg/m/sup 3/) CaCl/sub 2/ over the signal amplitude in water. This led to the development of a fluid-compensated bond log that corrects the amplitude for acoustic impedance of various wellbore fluids, thereby making the measurements more directly related to the cement quality.

  7. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  8. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  9. Shear bond strength of a novel light cured calcium silicate based-cement to resin composite using different adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin A; Qasrawi, Deema; Burrow, Michael F

    2016-12-01

    The shear bond strength (SBS) of TheraCal LC to resin composite was evaluated in comparison to Mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot MTA) and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) using two adhesive systems. A hole was prepared in 90 acrylic blocks (6 mm diameter, 2 mm deep) then filled with TheraCal LC, MTA or Fuji IX (n=30/group). Each group was bonded with either an etch and rinse or 1-step self-etch adhesive. Filtek Z250 composite was bonded to each capping material. Bond strength was tested in a universal testing machine, and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple range test (p<0.05). TheraCal LC displayed the highest SBS (p<0.001). MTA bonded with the 1-step self-etch adhesive showed the lowest SBS (p<0.001), while SBS of TheraCal LC and Fuji IX did not differ between either adhesive (p>0.05). TheraCal LC is the preferred choice in pulp capping procedures when using resin composite restorations.

  10. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5±1 min. The compressive strength after 24h of incubation was approximately 8.45±1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10±1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16±4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics.

  11. Bonding glass-ionomer cements to chemomechanically-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    McInnes-Ledoux, P M; Weinberg, R; Grogono, A

    1989-05-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the shear bond strengths of two commercially available glass-ionomer cement base materials to remaining dentin: (1) after conventional caries removal and polyacrylic acid conditioning; (2) after chemomechanical caries removal (Caridex); and (3) after chemomechanical caries removal and polyacrylic acid conditioning. Ninety freshly extracted carious teeth were randomly assigned for caries removal with either the chemomechanical technique (N = 60), or with conventional mechanical drilling (N = 30). Caries removal was continued until the remaining dentin surfaces were judged sound. The remaining dentin in 30 of the teeth prepared with the chemomechanical technique, and in all of the teeth prepared with mechanical drilling, was treated with 10% aqueous polyacrylic acid for 10 seconds. Groups of 15 teeth were assigned for bonding with either Ketac-Bond or Shofu Glasionomer Base Cement. All bonded specimens were stored in a humidor at 37 degrees C for 24 hr. Shear bond strength was tested by means of a mechanical testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.05 cm/min. Analysis of variance indicated no significant difference (p greater than 0.05) in the mean bond strength among the groups.

  12. Bond strength of luting cements to core foundation materials.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Sandra; Wadenya, Rose O; Mante, Francis K

    2010-03-01

    The purpose was to compare the shear bond strength of luting cements to foundation materials and to determine the effect of storage in lactate buffer solution. Disks that were 8 mm in diameter and 2-mm thick were fabricated from foundation substrates: amalgam, composite resin, resin-modified glass ionomer, and glass ionomer (n = 20). Cylinders that were 2 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length of resin luting cement, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, and a glass ionomer luting cement were bonded to the foundation substrate materials. Shear bond strength of each foundation substrate material/cement pair was determined with a universal testing machine after 24 hours. A second set of specimens was tested after storage in a 0.01M lactate buffer solution for 24 hours. A three-way analysis of variance followed by pair-wise comparisons was performed to compare bond strengths (P < .05). The resin cement provided the highest (P < .05) bond strengths to amalgam, composite resin, and resin-modified glass ionomer foundation materials while the glass ionomer cement showed the lowest bond strength (P < .05) to composite resin and glass ionomer foundation restoration materials. After immersion in a 0.01M lactate buffer solution, the shear bond strength of all the material combinations was significantly lower (P < .05) than nonimmersed specimens, except the bonds between composite resin foundation and resin luting cement, which significantly increased (P < .05) in strength. The resin cement had the highest bond strength to most foundation substrates investigated. The highest bond was observed between the composite resin foundation and resin cement. This bond was also the most durable on immersion in lactic acid.

  13. [Dentin bonding of cements. The bonding of cements with dentin in combination with various indirect restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Sahafi, Alireza; Flury, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The number of both luting agents and restorative materials available on the market has rapidly increased. This study compared various types of luting agents when used to bond different indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders were produced of six restorative materials (gold alloy, titanium, feldspathic porcelain, leucite-glass ceramic, zirconia, and an indirect resin composite). Following relevant pretreatment, the end surface of the cylinders were luted to ground, human dentin with eight different luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37 °C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens was measured and the fracture mode was examined stereo-microscopically. Restorative material and luting agent both had a significant effect on bond strength and there was a significant interaction between the two variables. The zinc phosphate cement and the glass ionomer cements resulted in the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements.

  14. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    34Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents" Materials Repaired with Composite Resin " 7. Intended publication...incompatibilities with self-curing composite materials. Low bond strength between self-curing composite resins , such as resin cements and core materials...of self-cure composite materials or dual-cure materials that are not adequately light cured (Tay et al., 2003). Most resin cement systems that use

  15. A practical approach to the interpretation of cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.L.

    1985-03-01

    The Cement Bond Log has been controversial since its inception. Despite its potential, it is possibly the most maligned logging service available to the industry. Effective zone isolation between permeable intervals in a well requires a cement sheath over an appreciable vertical interval. It is necessary for the annular cement sheath to provide an effective hydraulic seal in order to withstand subsequent completion and production operations. The oil industry has used wireline well logs to detect the presence or absence of cement behind pipe for more than twenty years. Users have attempted, not always successfully, to evaluate the effectiveness of cement bond to both pipe and formation, ostensibly, with Cement Bond Logs. Cement Bond Logs do not mislead. Poor interpretation habits mislead. Knowledge of the well completion and the inherent physical restraints placed upon the log measurements is needed in order to properly evaluate the log. The purpose here is to dispel some of the myths created by misguided interpretation practices. Examples of Cement Bond Logs which fall into this category are presented.

  16. A practical approach to the interpretation of cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.L.

    1985-07-01

    The cement bond log has been controversial since its inception. Despite its potential, it is possibly the most maligned logging service available to the industry. Effective zone isolation between permeable intervals in a well requires a cement sheath over an appreciable vertical interval. It is necessary for the annular cement sheath to provide an effective hydraulic seal to withstand subsequent completion and production operations. The oil industry has used wireline well logs to detect the presence or absence of cement behind pipe for more than 20 years. Users have attempted, not always successfully, to evaluate the effectiveness of cement bond to both pipe and formation with cement bond logs. Cement bond logs do not mislead. Poor interpretation habits mislead. Knowledge of the well completion and the inherent physical restraints placed on the log measurements is needed to evaluate the log properly. The purpose here is to dispel some of the myths created by misguided interpretation practices. Examples of cement bond logs that fall into this category are be presented.

  17. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  18. Cement bond log evaluation of foam- and synthetic-cemented casings

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckdorfer, R.A.; Jacobs, W.R.; Masson, J.P.

    1984-11-01

    Cement bond log (CBL /SUP TM/ ) studies on foam- and synthetic-cemented wells were initiated to determine the feasibility of, as well as to develop technologies for, evaluating these novel cementing services. Early CBL's on these cementing systems showed little effect on the log amplitude curve. Hence, CBL evaluations were difficult to obtain and interpret. A special sonde with a 1.3-ft (0.4-m) transmitter-toreceiver spacing was developed for this study. Sonic signal amplitudes were determined by using cemented shortcasing test sections. Sonic attenuation rates were correlated to compressive strengths for a range of cement densities. Experimental details of the cementing operation and logging studies are discussed. Data relating attenuation rates to compressive strengths and cement densities also are presented. Field results are discussed.

  19. The effect of surface treatment with a fractional carbon dioxide laser on shear bond strength of resin cement to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Boruziniat, Alireza; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Alirezaei, Mehrnoosh

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the impact of different surface treatments, including fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 72 blocks of IPS e.max CAD ceramic were randomly divided into six groups in terms of treatment (n = 12). Group 1 underwent etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric (HF) acid, whereas group 2 was subjected to air abrasion with aluminum oxide particles. Groups 3 and 4 were treated with a fractional CO2 laser for 10 s using 10 W/14 mJ (group 3) or 20 W/10 mJ (group 4). In groups 5 and 6, the CO2 laser was applied similar to that in groups 3 and 4, respectively; then, the specimens were etched by HF acid. After silane application, luting cement was bonded to the specimens. The SBS was assessed with a universal testing machine, and the type of bond failure was determined. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Duncan, and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Surface conditioning with fractional CO2 laser alone resulted in significantly lower SBS than HF acid treatment (P < 0.05). Bond strengths of the specimens treated with a combination of laser irradiation and acid etching were significantly greater than all the other groups (P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the distribution of failure modes among the groups (P = 0.337). Conclusion: The combination of fractional CO2 laser irradiation and HF acid etching could be recommended when extra retention is required for lithium disilicate-based restorations, whereas laser treatment alone cannot produce sufficient SBS. PMID:28702061

  20. Dentin bonding agents and resin cements--current status.

    PubMed

    Woolsey, G; O'Mahony, A; Hansen, P A

    2000-01-01

    Contemporary restorative dentistry is a rapidly evolving science which challenges the progressive clinician with a plethora of "new and improved" products. Sound product choices should be couched in the prudent consideration of well conducted in vitro and in vivo product research. This review shall list the most recent product developments in dentin bonding agents (fifth generation agents), resin-containing dental cements and the newest generation of dental cements i.e., resin-ionomer dental cements.

  1. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations. PMID:26019653

  2. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-03-04

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations.

  3. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  4. Influence of cement thickness on resin-zirconia microtensile bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Shim, June-Sung; Han, Chong-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of resin cement thickness on the microtensile bond strength between zirconium-oxide ceramic and resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-two freshly extracted molars were transversely sectioned at the deep dentin level and bonded to air-abraded zirconium oxide ceramic disks. The specimens were divided into 8 groups based on the experimental conditions (cement type: Rely X UniCem or Panavia F 2.0, cement thickness: 40 or 160 µm, storage: thermocycled or not). They were cut into microbeams and stored in 37℃ distilled water for 24 h. Microbeams of non-thermocycled specimens were submitted to a microtensile test, whereas those of thermocycled groups were thermally cycled for 18,000 times immediately before the microtensile test. Three-way ANOVA and Sheffe's post hoc tests were used for statistical analysis (α=95%). RESULTS All failures occurred at the resin-zirconia interface. Thermocycled groups showed lower microtensile bond strength than non-thermocycled groups (P<.001). Differences in cement thickness did not influence the resin-zirconia microtensile bond strength given the same resin cement or storage conditions (P>.05). The number of adhesive failures increased after thermocycling in all experimental conditions. No cohesive failure was observed in any experimental group. CONCLUSION When resin cements of adhesive monomers are applied over air-abraded zirconia restorations, the degree of fit does not influence the resin-zirconia microtensile bond strength. PMID:22053241

  5. Evaluation of bonding behavior of silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy to adhesive luting cements.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Kawaguchi, T; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2010-12-01

    The bond strengths of a silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy used with adhesive luting cements were investigated. The metal surfaces were primed with two metal conditioners designed for noble metal alloys or base metal alloys, or prepared using a Rocatec tribochemical coating unit. Two adhesive luting cements (Super-Bond C&B and Panavia F 2.0) were applied. It can be concluded that airborne-particle abrasion with alumina was effective, but the effects on the bond durability of both the metal conditioners and the tribochemical silica coating method were not clear Such bonding behavior seems to be particular to this kind of silver-rich dental casting alloy.

  6. Bond durability of self-adhesive composite cements to dentine.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; de Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Yamada, Toshimoto; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Clinically, the most easy-to-use composite cements are the so-called self-adhesive composite cements (SAC's). Hardly any data is however today available on the long-term bonding effectiveness of such luting composites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond durability of different composite cements used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks onto dentine. Four SAC's (Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray; G-CEM, GC; SmartCem2, Dentsply; Unicem 3M ESPE), one 'self-etch' (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) and one 'etch-and-rinse' (Variolink ll, Ivoclar-Vivadent) multi-step composite cement were used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita) onto dentine surfaces. Teeth were distributed randomly in 24 experimental groups according to two different surface-preparation techniques ('SMEAR-COVERED' versus 'SMEAR-FREE') and storage conditions ('IMMEDIATE' versus 'AGED'). Failure patterns were evaluated with a stereomicroscope, and afterwards imaged using Feg-SEM. Two additional specimens were processed for cement-dentine interfacial analysis using TEM. A linear mixed effects statistical model revealed significant differences for the variables 'composite cement', 'surface preparation' and 'ageing'. All self-adhesive composite cements, except Unicem (3M ESPE), did bond less favourably to fractured dentine. TEM revealed an ultra-structurally different interaction of the composite cements with 'SMEAR-COVERED' and 'SMEAR-FREE' dentine. All SAC's suffered most when luted to 'SMEAR-FREE' (fractured) dentine, fortunately of no clinical relevance and most likely due to enhanced water sorption through the open tubules. When luted to 'SMEAR-COVERED' dentine, all SACs appeared equally effective and durable as the 'etch-and-rinse' and 'self-etch' multi-step composite cements. Solely the SAC SmartCem2 (Dentsply) appeared clearly less favourable and consistent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acoustic logging on ultralow density cement bonded quality evaluation in cased hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Shang, X.; Chen, T.; Tao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Cementing operation after drilling boreholes ensures oil and gas to be extracted effectively and avoids oil spill events such as BP Mexico oil leakage events. However, the loss of cement in deep formation due to its high density happens and raises issues. In order to overcome this problem, ultralow density cement or gas-based cements are used more and more commonly in recent years. Current acoustic evaluation tools, used to determine the cement bond quality, are designed for conventional high density cement. Therefore, they are not capable to image the ultralow density cement, whose acoustic properties are similar to borehole drilling mud. In this paper, a new acoustic technique is developed to image the ultralow density cement behind case. Finite difference method and analytical methods are used to simulate the wave-field of cased borehole which ultralow density cement bonded on. Based on the simulations, the optimal parameters of the evaluation tool design are proposed including spacing (from source to the nearest receiver and between the two neighboring receiver), frequency of source.

  8. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  9. Porous Surface Modified Bioactive Bone Cement for Enhanced Bone Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Dong, Jingjing; Guo, Dagang; Mao, Mengmeng; Kong, Liang; Li, Yang; Wu, Zixiang; Lei, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. Materials and Methods The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant–bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. Results The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect. Conclusions

  10. Toughness, bonding and fluoride-release properties of hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Milanita E; Arita, Kenji; Nishino, Mizuho

    2003-09-01

    Improving the mechanical strength of glass ionomer cement while preserving its favorable clinical properties such as fluoride release, bonding to tooth structure and biocompatibility is desirable. In this study, hydroxyapatite was incorporated into chemically setting glass ionomer cement and its effect on the fracture toughness, bonding to dentin and fluoride release was identified. Commercial glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP((R)) ) was the control and base material. Eight weight percent of hydroxyapatite was added into the glass ionomer powder. Specimens were fabricated and the fracture toughness, shear bond strength and eluted fluoride ion concentration were measured. Adding hydroxyapatite into the glass ionomer cement led to significantly higher fracture toughness after 15min and 24h from mixing. The hydroxyapatite-added cement also exhibited bond strength to dentin similar to that of the control from 15min to 56 days and consistent fluoride release for 13 weeks. SEM findings showed a cohesive type of fracture in the material for all specimens in both groups. These results indicate that hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement has a potential as a reliable restorative material with improved fracture toughness, long-term bonding to dentin and unimpeded ability of sustained fluoride release.

  11. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  12. Effects of cyclic stressing on attachment bond strength using glass ionomer cement and composite resin.

    PubMed

    Moseley, H C; Horrocks, E N; Pearson, G J; Davies, E H

    1995-02-01

    Bonded orthodontic brackets were subjected to cyclic loading in order to simulate the effect of occlusal forces. The subsequent effect on bond strength was determined. Stainless steel, mesh-based brackets were bonded to extracted teeth with either composite resin or glass ionomer cement. A jig was designed to subject each bracket to a preselected loading level and the 24-hour shear/peel bond strength of both stressed and unstressed brackets was subsequently measured. Cyclic loading brought about a comparative decrease in bond strength when using both types of material. The potential implications of selecting these different types of bonding material for clinical use are discussed.

  13. Influence of temporary cement contamination on the surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Masayuki; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    The surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements were examined after the removal of temporary cements. The labial dentine surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit SiC paper. Acrylic resin blocks were luted to the prepared dentine surfaces using HY Bond Temporary Cement Hard (HY), IP Temp Cement (IP), Fuji TEMP (FT) or Freegenol Temporary Cement (TC), and stored for 1 week. After removal of the temporary cements with an ultrasonic tip, the contact angle values of five specimens per test group were determined for the three test liquids, and the surface-energy parameters of the dentine surfaces were calculated. The dentine bond strengths of the self-adhesive cements were measured after removal of the temporary cements in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's HSD test. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component γ(S)(d) (dispersion) was relatively constant at 41.7-43.3 mJm(-2). After removal of the temporary cements, the value of the γ(S)(h) (hydrogen-bonding) component decreased, particularly with FT and TC. The dentine bond strength of the self-adhesive cements was significantly higher for those without temporary cement contamination (8.2-10.6 MPa) than for those with temporary cement contamination (4.3-7.1 MPa). The γ(S) values decreased due to the decrease of γ(S)(h) values for the temporary cement-contaminated dentine. Contamination with temporary cements led to lower dentine bond strength. The presence of temporary cement interferes with the bonding performance of self-adhesive cements to dentine. Care should be taken in the methods of removal of temporary cement when using self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (p<0.05). The combination of Scotchbond Universal surface treatment with Panavia SA cement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond

  15. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material and radioopaque posterior glass ionomer restorative cement in primary and permanent teeth: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Raju, Vignesh Guptha; Venumbaka, Nilaya Reddy; Mungara, Jayanthi; Vijayakumar, Poornima; Rajendran, Sakthivel; Elangovan, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of carious primary molars is still a major concern while treating the young children that too in deep carious lesion which extends below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) where pulp protection and achieving adequate marginal seal are very important to prevent secondary caries. The needs were met with the development of new materials. One such of new bioactive material is tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), recommended for restoring deep lesions. To evaluate and compare shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) and glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in primary and permanent teeth. Occlusal surface of crowns were ground flat. PVC molds were stabilized over flat dentin surface and filled with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained. Shear bond strength was evaluated using universal testing machine (INSTRON). Standardized Class II cavities were prepared on both primary and permanent teeth, and then restored with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained, over which composite resin material was restored using an open sandwich technique. Microleakage was assessed using dye penetration. Microleakage was examined using a stereomicroscope. RESULTS showed that glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited better shear bond strength than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine). Mean microleakage score for glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in permanent teeth was 1.52 and for primary teeth was 1.56. The mean microleakage for tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) in permanent teeth was 0.76 and for primary teeth was 0.60. Glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited more microleakage than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), which was statistically significant

  16. Effects of adhesive liner and provisional cement on the bond strength of nickel/chrome/beryllium alloy cemented to dentin.

    PubMed

    Latta, Mark A; Kelsey, W Patrick; Murdock, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Treating teeth with adhesive agents before placing a provisional restoration can prevent tooth sensitivity. This study evaluated the bond strength of resin cements to dentin treated with 2 adhesive agents and 2 provisional cements. Extracted human molars were prepared by exposing dentin and were treated with either Prime & Bond NT or Clearfil SE Bond. After a simulated impression technique, the teeth were provisionalized with either a eugenol or noneugenol temporary cement. Teeth were cleaned for bonding by either mechanical removal of the cement or use of an acid conditioner. Panavia F and Calibra resin cements were used to cement nickel/chrome/beryllium alloy to the tooth surfaces, and the specimens were debonded. Mean shear bond strengths for each group were calculated. Mean shear bond strengths ranged from 26.6 +/- 5.8 MPa for Calibra bonded to dentin treated with Prime & Bond NT, a noneugenol cement, and mechanically cleaned, to 10.6 +/- 4.4 MPa for Panavia F bonded to unlined (no adhesive) dentin treated with a eugenol cement and mechanically cleaned. Of the 14 groups tested, significant differences were observed related to the adhesives and resin cements. Both temporary cements reduced the bond to dentin not treated with a resin adhesive. Use of an acid conditioner for cleaning the temporary cement also reduced bond strengths in all groups. Placement of a dentin adhesive before provisionalization may prevent the temporary cement from affecting the bond of the final resin cement to the tooth. For the products used in this study, use of phosphoric acid to clean the tooth surface is not recommended.

  17. Effect of polymer admixtures to cement on the bond strength and electrical contact resistivity between steel fiber and cement

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1996-02-01

    The addition of methylcellulose (0.4% by weight of cement) or latex (20% by weight of cement) to cement paste gave similarly significant increases of the shear bond strength between stainless steel fiber and cement paste, in spite of the low concentration of methylcellulose compared to latex. The methylcellulose addition did not affect the contact electrical resistivity between fiber and cement, whereas the latex addition increased this resistivity. Hence, for low cost and low contact resistivity, methylcellulose is preferred to latex. For a given cement paste composition, the bond strength increased linearly with the contact resistivity.

  18. Use of Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (emats) for Cement Bond Logging of Gas Storage Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, A. O.; Domangue, E. J.; Barolak, J. G.; Patterson, D. J.

    2008-02-01

    According to the Department of Energy (DOE), there are approximately 110 operators maintaining more than 17,000 gas storage wells in over 415 underground storage facilities across the USA. In virtually every application, steel casing, cemented into place, serves to isolate the well from the underground formations. The process of cementing wellbore casing provides two major benefits: 1) cement prevents gas migration between the casing and formation; 2) cement transfers stress from the casing to the formation, increasing the effective strength and working pressure of the casing. Current cement evaluation techniques use an acoustic wave generated and received by a logging tool within the wellbore to detect cement placed outside the casing. These techniques rely on fluid in the casing to provide acoustic coupling between the logging tool and the casing and therefore are unable to operate in gas-filled boreholes. This paper details efforts to confirm the validity and applicability of the use of EMATs for evaluating cement in gas-filled boreholes. The methods and techniques proposed for the cement bond logging using EMATs are confirmed and validated based on the results obtained from the numerical modeling and experiments with physical cement models. Partial funding for this investigation was provided by the DOE and Gas Storage Technology Consortium.

  19. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate on bond strength of a glass-fibre post luted with resin or glass-ionomer based cement.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Diana Ferreira Gadelha; Chaves, Larissa Pinceli; Bim, Odair; Pimentel Garcia, Fernanda Cristina; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Honório, Heitor Marques; Wang, Linda

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) on the bond strength (BS) of a glass-fibre post to the root canal, regarding the cements (dual-cured resin or resin-modified glass-ionomer cement), the root thirds and the time of storage. Eighty bovine roots were selected and endodontically treated, before being randomly assigned to the following groups according to the luting protocol: ARC (RelyX ARC); ARC+CHX; RL (RelyX Luting 2); and RL+CHX. After 24 h of luting, the roots were sliced to obtain 1 mm-thick slices. Half of each group was submitted to either 7-day or 6-month storage in artificial saliva (n=10). The specimens were subjected to push-out tests with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analysed with four-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P≤0.05). The failure modes were analysed with a digital microscope (50× and 200×). ARC yielded a significantly higher BS compared to RL (P<0.001). Despite CHX exerted a significant effect; it depends on the interaction with the luting cement and time (P<0.001). Thus, CHX decreased the values of BS to those of ARC after 6 months (P<0.001). On the 7th day of storage, the ARC+CHX presented higher BS to the cervical and middle thirds compared to RL+CHX (P=0.012). Time solely was not a significant factor (P=0.081). Adhesive cement-dentine type and mixed failures were predominant modes for the ARC groups. For the RL groups, the main failures were adhesive cement-post and mixed modes. Glass-fibre posts luted with RelyX ARC dual-cure resin cement exhibited higher BS than those luted with RelyX Luting 2 resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Furthermore, CHX was not effective to improve the BS and negatively affected the BS of RelyX ARC after 6 months of storage. The use of chlorhexidine solution seems not to improve the bond strength of fibre posts to root canals, disregarding the composition of the luting cement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic with different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Usumez, Aslıhan; Hamdemirci, Nermin; Koroglu, Bilge Yuksel; Simsek, Irfan; Parlar, Ozge; Sari, Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatments on the bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Seventy-five plates of Y-TZP ceramic were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 15) according to the surface treatments [airborne particle abrasion, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona; 2 W, 200 mJ, 10 Hz, with two different pulse durations 180 or 320 μs), glaze applied, and then 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid gel conditioned, control]. One specimen from each group was randomly selected, and specimens were evaluated with x-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with its corresponding adhesive components. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strengths were analyzed through one-way ANOVA/Tukey tests. Surface treatments significantly modified the topography of the Y-TZP ceramic. The Nd:YAG laser-irradiated specimens resulted in both increased surface roughness and bond strength of the resin cement. The highest surface roughness and bond strength values were achieved with short pulse duration. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased both surface roughness of Y-TZP surfaces and bond strength of resin cement to the zirconia surface.

  1. Various cements and their effects on bond strength of zirconia ceramic to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Prylinska-Czyzewska, Agata; Piotrowski, Pawel; Prylinski, Mariusz; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Zirconia ceramic disks (Cercon) were fabricated using a computer-aided design/ computer-assisted manufacture system and fitted to hard tooth tissues from freshly extracted bovine mandibular incisors using seven cements (zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, Eco-Link, Panavia F 2.0, Clearfil SA Cement, MaxCem Elite, and GC Fuji Plus) with various physicochemical and bonding properties. Bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine (Hounsfield H5KS) with a 5,000-N head and a cutting knife speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The study showed that the strongest bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tooth tissues was obtained with Panavia F 2.0 adhesive cement based on 10 methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate monomer.

  2. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  4. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  5. UV irradiation improves the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Chen, Li; Li, Deli; Tan, Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the effect of UV irradiation on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Twelve epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (Cont.): No surface treatment. Group 2 (Low-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 10 cm for 10 min. Group 3 (High-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 1 cm for 3 min. A resin cement (CLEARFIL SA LUTING) was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which contained fiber posts in the center. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the mean bond strengths (MPa) were 18.81 for Cont. group, 23.65 for Low-UV group, 34.75 for High-UV group. UV irradiation had a significant effect on the bond strength (p<0.05). UV irradiation demonstrates its capability to improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  6. [H(2)O(2) treatment improves the bond strength between glass fiber posts and resin cement].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhong, Bo; Tan, Jian guo; Zhou, Jian feng; Chen, Li

    2011-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of etching with H2O2 on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Sixteen epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into 4 groups (4 posts in each group) for different surface treatments. Group 1, no surface treatment (Control group); Group 2, treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s; Group 3, immersed in 10% H2O2 for 10 min then treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s; Group 4, immersed in 30% H2O2 for 10 min then treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s. Resin cement was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which were then sectioned and trimmed into dumbbell shape to obtain microtensile specimens. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis of microtensile bond strengths was performed with Kruskal-Wallis test. The microtensile bond strengths (standard deviation) were 18.81 (4.04) MPa for Group 1, 26.70 (9.63) MPa for Group 2, 39.07 (6.47) MPa for Group 3, 46.05 (5.97) MPa for Group 4. Etching with H2O2 followed by silanization could significantly improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  7. Pressable feldspathic inlays in premolars: effect of cementation strategy and mechanical cycling on the adhesive bond between dentin and restoration.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Sabrina Alves; Corazza, Pedro Henrique; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of the cementation strategy and mechanical cycling (MC) on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of feldspathic inlays cemented to premolars. Forty-eight human premolars were prepared and porcelain inlays were produced. Specimens were allocated into 3 groups, based on the cementation strategy: 1) conventional adhesive cementation (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE): application of etch-and-rinse single bottle adhesive to dentin / ceramic surface treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) and silane (S) / cementation with resin cement; 2) simplified cementation using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE); 3) modified simplified cementation using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) with HF+S treatment. Half of the specimens from each group were submitted to MC (2x106 pulses, frequency = 4 Hz, load = 100 N). Each specimen was serially sliced for MTBS and the failures were classified. The stress distribution analysis using FEA was verified. All of the bar-samples from G2 were lost during cutting of the specimens. Mechanical-cycling had no significant effect on bond strength, whereas cementation strategy significant affected MTBS results. The most common type of failure was cohesive of cement. FEA showed that stresses were concentrated mainly at the loading region going up to the root fixation. Porcelain inlays cemented with conventional resin cement or self-adhesive resin cement should be associated with ceramic surface treatment. FEA showed the most critical zone for failure is located in the cement region close to the marginal crest.

  8. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (P<.05). The highest push-out strength results with root location were obtained with Luting and Lining (S3) (19.5 ±4.9 MPa), Ketac Cem (S2) (18.6 ±5.5 MPa), and Luting and Lining (S1) (18.0 ±7.6 MPa). The lowest mean values were recorded with Variolink II (S1) (4.6 ±4.0 MPa), Variolink II (S2) (1.6 ±1.5 MPa), and Rely X ARC (S3) (0.9 ±1.1 MPa). Self-adhesive cements and glass ionomer cements showed significantly higher values compared to dual-polymerizing resin cements. In all root segments, dual-polymerizing resin cements provided significantly lower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of

  9. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  10. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    PubMed Central

    NOVAIS, Veridiana Resende; RAPOSO, Luís Henrique Araújo; de MIRANDA, Rafael Resende; LOPES, Camila de Carvalho Almança; SIMAMOTO, Paulo Cézar; SOARES, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick. PMID:28198977

  11. Bond Strength of Self-adhesive Resin Cement to Different Root Perforation Materials.

    PubMed

    Lemos Martins Sicuro, Stephanie; Gabardo, Marilisa Carneiro Leão; Castiglia Gonzaga, Carla; Dias Morais, Nathaly; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Correr Nolasco, Gisele Maria; Leonardi, Denise Piotto

    2016-12-01

    Different materials have been used for intervening in root perforations. These materials are often in contact with resin cements used for cementation of intraradicular retainers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to different materials used to treat root perforations (mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA], Portland cement [PORT], and glass ionomer cement [GIC]). Four discs (10 × 1 mm) of each material (the MTA, PORT, and GIC groups) were embedded into polyvinyl chloride tubes using acrylic resin, ground, and polished until a flat surface was exposed. Afterward, 4 silicone molds were used to prepare self-adhesive resin cement cylinders (0.7 × 1 mm) on each disc surface (N = 16). The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 24 hours and subjected to a microshear test. Then, the failure modes were examined. Data were submitted to statistical analysis (α = 0.05). The MTA and GIC groups showed significantly higher microshear bond strength values (3.36 ± 1.56 and 2.90 ± 1.49 MPa, respectively) than the PORT group (1.39 ± 0.77 MPa) (P < .05). Only adhesive failure modes were observed. When PORT was used as a root perforation material, GIC should be used as a base over it to improve shear bond strength with self-adhesive resin cement. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Bonding of resin cement to bleached dental enamel].

    PubMed

    Wakami, Masanobu; Masuda, Mikiko; Kato, Hitomi; Tabei, Naoko; Watanabe, Tsukasa; Muramori, Juri; Saikawa, Takahiro; Aida, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2008-07-01

    The effects of bleaching times, types of etching agent and storage period of bleached bovine tooth on the shear bond strength of resin cement to the enamel were examined. Bovine teeth were repeatedly bleached 0, 1, 3, and 5 times then stored in 37 degrees C water for 1 week. The effect of bleaching number of the bovine tooth on the bond strength of resin cement to the enamel was investigated using 40% phosphoric acid (EG) etching technique. Next, the effects of types of etching agent and of storage period of bleached bovine tooth with three times in 37 degrees C water on the bond strength were studied using 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 10% citric acid (10-0) solution. The bleaching of bovine tooth allowed for a dramatic decrease in the bond strength from 18.3 MPa to 9.8 MPa (1 time), and 3.9 MPa (3 times), even though the bovine enamel was etched by EG. However, when 10-3 or 10-0 solution was applied to the three times bleached enamel, bond strengths were 13.9 and 10.0 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, prolonging of the storage period of the three times bleached bovine tooth in water to 2 months resulted in a increase in the bond strength from 3.9 to 10.1 MPa, even if bovine enamel was etched by EG, and close to that obtained from the 10-3 etching. To obtain the expected bond strength to bleached enamel, it is better to wait for 2 months for a restoration and use the 10-3 etching.

  13. A comparison of new ultrasonic cement and casing evaluation logs with standard cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Sheives, T.C.; Tello, L.N.; Maki, V.E. Jr.; Standley, T.E.; Blankinship, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic inspection techniques have been implemented to evaluate cement bond and casing conditions. These techniques, relying on state of the art downhole, high-speed waveform digitization, can successfully determine cement voids and channels and also provide accurate bond information in the presence of a microannulus. The downhole microprocessor controlled electronics transmits the digitized waveforms to the surface for computations and display. The downhole waveforms are then viewed by the operator in real time to insure proper log quality. Numerous log examples showing comparisons with the standard Cement Bond Log (CBL) demonstrate that the accuracy and resolution of the new approach provide much more information. Casing conditions are determined using both acoustic caliper measurements and a new casing thickness measurement technique. The acoustic caliper measurement not only determines accurately the casing inside diameter, but also detects the pipe gap at casing collars. The new measurement determines actual casing thickness variations due to internal or external pipe wear or corrosion. Experimental results along with log examples show the effectiveness and accuracy of measuring the actual casing thickness at the well site in real time.

  14. Comparison of bond stability between dual-cure resin cements and pretreated glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics.

    PubMed

    Oyagüe, Raquel C; Osorio, Raquel; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Toledano, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements used for luting alumina-based all-ceramic dental restorations. Although different pretreatments may be applied on alumina to improve bond strengths, any previous study investigated the bond stability of resin-based cements luted to laser-irradiated alumina. 64 sintered, glass-infiltrated alumina blocks were sandblasted and randomly assigned to the following subgroups: 1. no additional treatment (NT); 2. Rocatec (Roc); 3. Nd:YAG laser (L); and 4. Nd:YAG laser plus Rocatec (LRoc). Composite samples were bonded to conditioned ceramics using two different resin based cements: a self-etching adhesive cement-Panavia F (PF) and a self-adhesive resin cement-RelyX Unicem (RXU). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into microtensile sticks (1 ± 0.1 mm(2)). One-half of the beams were loaded in tension until failure. The remaining one-half was immersed in 10%-NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOCl(aq)) for 12 h before testing. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P < 0.05). Failure mode was recorded. Ceramic topography was SEM-analyzed. After 24 h, L-sticks achieved the highest MTBS despite the cement type, whereas NT-samples recorded the lowest values. After NaOCl(aq) immersion bond strengths decreased except for RXU luted to NT-alumina. PF luted to L- and LRoc-samples, and RXU luted to L-sticks attained the highest bond strength. Nd:YAG laser irradiation improved bond strength between alumina ceramics and resin cements (PF or RXU). Chemical challenging impaired adhesion, mainly through resin matrixes and silane coupling degradation. Laser-treated specimens remained with the highest bond strength.

  15. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p < 0.0003). The presence of temporary cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p < 0.05). Fracture occurred predominantly at the dentin-adhesive interface. The presence of eugenol-containing temporary cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  16. Antimicrobial properties and dentin bonding strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Mestres, G; Abdolhosseini, M; Bowles, W; Huang, S-H; Aparicio, C; Gorr, S-U; Ginebra, M-P

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) when NH4H2PO4 was used or an amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate when NaH2PO4 was used. The MPC had appropriate setting times for hard tissue applications, high early compressive strengths and higher strength of bonding to dentin than commercial mineral trioxide aggregate cement. Bacteriological studies were performed with fresh and aged cements against three bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (planktonic and in biofilm) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. These bacteria have been associated with infected implants, as well as other frequent hard tissue related infections. Extracts of different compositions of MPC had bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties against the three bacterial strains tested. This was associated mainly with a synergistic effect between the high osmolarity and alkaline pH of the MPC. These intrinsic antimicrobial properties make MPC preferential candidates for applications in dentistry, such as root fillers, pulp capping agents and cavity liners.

  17. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P<.001). DMSO did not affect immediate bonding of the two cements. Aging significantly reduced P-OBS in control groups (P<.001), while in DMSO-treated groups, no difference in P-OBS was observed after aging (P>.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements. PMID:27555893

  18. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P<.001). DMSO did not affect immediate bonding of the two cements. Aging significantly reduced P-OBS in control groups (P<.001), while in DMSO-treated groups, no difference in P-OBS was observed after aging (P>.05). DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements.

  19. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2003-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium dioxide reinforced alumina) were used for each test group yielding a total number of 216 specimens. The specimens in each group were randomly assigned to one of the each following treatment conditions: (1) hydrofluoric acid etching, (2) airborne particle abrasion, (3) tribochemical silica coating. The resin composite luting cement was bonded to the conditioned and silanized ceramics using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested at dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of luting cement to ceramics was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). In dry conditions, acid etched glass ceramics exhibited significantly higher results (26.4-29.4 MPa) than those of glass infiltrated alumina ceramics (5.3-18.1 MPa) or zirconium dioxide (8.1 MPa) (ANOVA, P<0.001). Silica coating with silanization increased the bond strength significantly for high-alumina ceramics (8.5-21.8 MPa) and glass infiltrated zirconium dioxide ceramic (17.4 MPa) compared to that of airborne particle abrasion (ANOVA, P<0.001). Thermocycling decreased the bond strengths significantly after all of the conditioning methods tested. Bond strengths of the luting cement tested on the dental ceramics following surface conditioning methods varied in accordance with the ceramic types. Hydrofluoric acid gel was effective mostly on the ceramics having glassy matrix in their structures. Roughening the ceramic surfaces with air particle abrasion provided higher bond strengths for high-alumina ceramics and the values increased more significantly after silica coating/silanization.

  20. Shear stresses in cemented and bonded optics due to temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, P. R.; Vukobratovich, D.

    2015-09-01

    This paper applies analytical means previously published by Chen and Nelson (1979) to estimate the shear stresses developed within the joints between typical cemented optical components and within opto-mechanical subassemblies made of materials with significantly different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) when exposed to extreme ambient temperatures. Two cemented doublet examples, one involving glasses with a large CTE mismatch and another with more equal CTEs, are analyzed. An example involving a prism made of fused silica bonded with epoxy to a titanium base also is considered.

  1. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets cemented with a zinc oxide-polyvinyl cement.

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Garcia-Godoy, F

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths and enamel surface structure after debonding a conventional metal bracket and a polycrystalline ceramic bracket bonded with a bipolar zinc oxide-polyvinyl cement (F-21) or a light-cured resin cement (Transbond). Forty extracted human premolars were used. The buccal enamel surfaces were used, and the teeth randomly divided into four groups of 10 teeth each: group 1: conventional metal bracket (Unitek) bonded with Transbond; group 2: metal bracket bonded with F-21; group 3: ceramic bracket (Transcend 2000) bonded with Transbond; and group 4: ceramic bracket bonded with F-21. The brackets were bonded to the etched enamel surfaces according to manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours and then thermocycled for 300 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The specimens were mounted in dental stone and placed in the Instron at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min with a knife-edged blade. Immediately after debonding, the enamel surface and bracket-enamel interface were evaluated visually and with a stereomicroscope. Representative samples were then examined with the scanning electron microscope. The analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were performed. The results in megapascals were Group 1: 19,6 (+/- 9,6); group 2: 14,3 (+/- 4,6); group 3: 28,8 (+/- 12,6); and group 4: 18,5 (+/- 7,5). Group 3 was statistically significantly different (P < 0.008) from all other groups. Groups 1, 2, and 4 were not significantly different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of phosphate monomer-based cement on zirconia ceramic in dry and aged conditions.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Balducci, Ivan; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the durability of bond strength between a resin cement and aluminous ceramic submitted to various surface conditioning methods. Twenty-four blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm(3)) of a glass-infiltrated zirconia-alumina ceramic (In-Ceram Zirconia Classic) were randomly divided into three surface treatment groups: ST1-Air-abrasion with 110-mum Al2O3 particles + silanization; ST2-Laboratory tribochemical silica coating method (110-microm Al2O3, 110-microm silica) (Rocatec) + silanization; ST3-Chairside tribochemical silica coating method (30-microm SiO(x)) (CoJet) + silanization. Each treated ceramic block was placed in its silicone mold with the treated surface exposed. The resin cement (Panavia F) was prepared and injected into the mold over the treated surface. Specimens were sectioned to achieve nontrimmed bar specimens (14 sp/block) that were randomly divided into two conditions: (a) Dry-microtensile test after sectioning; (b) Thermocycling (TC)-(6,000x, 5-55 degrees C) and water storage (150 days). Thus, six experimental groups were obtained (n = 50): Gr1-ST1 + dry; Gr2-ST1 + TC(;) Gr3-ST2 + dry; Gr4-ST2 + TC; Gr5-ST3 + dry; Gr6-ST3 + TC. After microtensile testing, the failure types were noted. ST2 (25.1 +/- 11) and ST3 (24.1 +/- 7.4) presented statistically higher bond strength (MPa) than that of ST1 (17.5 +/- 8) regardless of aging conditions (p < 0.0001). While Gr2 revealed the lowest results (13.3 +/- 6.4), the other groups (21.7 +/- 7.4-25. 9 +/- 9.1) showed statistically no significant differences (two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test, alpha = 0.05). The majority of the failures were mixed (82%) followed by adhesive failures (18%). Gr2 presented significantly higher incidence of ADHESIVE failures (54%) than those of other groups (p = 0.0001). Both laboratory and chairside silica coating plus silanization showed durable bond strength. After aging, air-abrasion with 110-microm Al(2)O(3) + silanization showed the largest decrease

  3. The Influence of Sonic and Ultrasonic Vibration on the Shear Bond Strength of a Selected Resin Luting Cement.

    PubMed

    Marchan, Shivaughn M; White, Daniel; Smith, William; Dhuru, Virendra

    2015-03-01

    This study determined the effect of sonic and ultrasonic instrumentation on the shear bond strengths of Panavia 21, a popular cement for the luting of resin-bonded restorations. 84 Ni-Cr cylinders were cemented to randomly selected resin composite substrates using Panavia 21 following the manufacturer's instructions. The Ni-Cr-composite specimens were divided into 7 groups of 12 specimens each based upon the procedure used for removing the excess cement. For Group 1 (Co) specimens the excess cement was removed with microbrushes immediately after cementation. Groups 2 through 7 were based on the use of vibrating instrument and the time period after which the excess material was removed. These included the cement, Panavia 21, three vibrating instruments, Sonic with a universal tip (So), Piezoelectric ultrasonic with a USPIS tip (Pu), Magnetorestrive ultrasonic with a FS1-100 tip (Mu) and two different time periods, soon after cementation (9m) and one hour after cementation (1h). Once excess cement REMOVAL WAS COMPLETED, THE SPECIMENS WERE SUBJECTED TO SHEAR TESTING. Mean Shear Bond strengths ranged from 16.03 MPa (Co) to 19.91 MPa (So 1h). Statistical analysis demonstrated that interaction of the main effects were significant (F = 4.27, p = 0.042). Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that the effect of timing was significant in all the instrumented groups. The majority of the tested specimens failed cohesively compared to mainly adhesive failures for the control group. The effect of type of instrumentation immediately following polymerization setting had no effect on the shear bond strengths however a delay of 1 hour for all types of instrumentation had a beneficial effect of improving observed shear bond strengths.

  4. Microshear Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Lithium Disilicate Substrates as a Function of Surface Preparation.

    PubMed

    Lise, D P; Perdigão, J; Van Ende, A; Zidan, O; Lopes, G C

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching, silane solution, and adhesive system application on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LD) to three resin cements. Circular bonding areas were delimited on the lithium disilicate surfaces using a perforated adhesive tape. Specimens were assigned to 18 subgroups (n=12) according to surface treatment: NT = no treatment; HF = 4.8% HF for 20 seconds; silane solution: (1) no silane; (2) Monobond Plus, a silane/10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate solution for 60 seconds; (3) Monobond Plus+ExciTE F DSC, a dual-cure adhesive; and resin cement: (1) Variolink II, a bisphenol A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bis-GMA)-based, hand-mixed, dual-cure resin cement; (2) Multilink Automix, a bis-GMA-based, auto-mixed, dual-cure resin cement; (3) RelyX Unicem 2, a self-adhesive, auto-mixed, dual-cure resin cement. Tygon tubes (Ø=0.8 mm) were used as cylinder matrices for resin cement application. After 24 hours of water storage, the specimens were submitted to the μSBS test. Mode of failure was evaluated under an optical microscope and classified as adhesive, mixed, cohesive in resin cement, or cohesive in ceramic. Data were statistically analyzed with three-way analysis of variance and Dunnett test (p<0.05). When means were pooled for the factor surface treatment, HF resulted in a significantly higher μSBS than did NT (p<0.0001). Regarding the use of a silane solution, the mean μSBS values obtained with Monobond Plus and Monobond Plus+ExciTE F DSC were not significantly different but were higher than those obtained with no silane (p<0.001). Considering the factor resin cement, Variolink II resulted in a significantly higher mean μSBS than did RelyX Unicem 2 (p<0.03). The mean μSBS for Multilink Automix was not significantly different from those of Variolink II and RelyX Unicem 2. According to Dunnett post hoc test (p<0.05), there was no significant difference in

  5. The effect of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of different resin cements to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Ali Can; Atsü, Saadet Sağlam

    2017-02-01

    Cementation failures of restorations are frequently observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of initial and repeated bonding on the bond strengths of different resin cements to enamel and dentin. Ninety human maxillary central incisors were bisected longitudinally. The 180 tooth halves were divided into 2 groups (n = 90) for enamel and dentin bonding. The enamel and dentin groups were further divided into 3 groups (n = 30) for different resin cement types. Composite resin (Filtek Ultimate) cylinders (3 × 3 mm) were prepared and luted to enamel and dentin using Variolink II (Group V), RelyX ARC (Group R), or Panavia F 2.0 (Group P) resin cement. After 24 hours, initial shear bond strengths of the resin cements to enamel and dentin were measured. Using new cylinders, the specimens were de-bonded and re-bonded twice to measure the first and the second bond strengths to enamel and dentin. Failure modes and bonding interfaces were examined. Data were statistically analyzed. Initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel were similar for all the groups. The first (15.3 ± 2.2 MPa) and second (10.4 ± 2.2 MPa) bond strengths to dentin were significantly higher in Group V (P<.0001). Second bond strengths of dentin groups were significantly lower than initial and first bond strengths to dentin (P<.0001). All resin cements have similar initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel. Variolink II has the highest first and second bond strength to dentin. Bond strength to dentin decreases after the first re-bonding for all resin cements.

  6. The effect of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of different resin cements to enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Atsü, Saadet Sağlam

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Cementation failures of restorations are frequently observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of initial and repeated bonding on the bond strengths of different resin cements to enamel and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety human maxillary central incisors were bisected longitudinally. The 180 tooth halves were divided into 2 groups (n = 90) for enamel and dentin bonding. The enamel and dentin groups were further divided into 3 groups (n = 30) for different resin cement types. Composite resin (Filtek Ultimate) cylinders (3 × 3 mm) were prepared and luted to enamel and dentin using Variolink II (Group V), RelyX ARC (Group R), or Panavia F 2.0 (Group P) resin cement. After 24 hours, initial shear bond strengths of the resin cements to enamel and dentin were measured. Using new cylinders, the specimens were de-bonded and re-bonded twice to measure the first and the second bond strengths to enamel and dentin. Failure modes and bonding interfaces were examined. Data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel were similar for all the groups. The first (15.3 ± 2.2 MPa) and second (10.4 ± 2.2 MPa) bond strengths to dentin were significantly higher in Group V (P<.0001). Second bond strengths of dentin groups were significantly lower than initial and first bond strengths to dentin (P<.0001). CONCLUSION All resin cements have similar initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel. Variolink II has the highest first and second bond strength to dentin. Bond strength to dentin decreases after the first re-bonding for all resin cements. PMID:28243393

  7. The effect of resin cement type and cleaning method on the shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing restorations.

    PubMed

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Khakpour Maleki, Amin

    2017-04-01

    This laboratory study assessed the effect of different dentin cleaning procedures on shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing prosthesis. 4 × 4 flat surface was prepared on the labial surface of 52 maxillary central incisors. Metal frames (4 × 4 × 1.5 mm) were cast with nickel-chromium alloy. All specimens were randomly divided into 2 groups to be cemented with either Panavia F2.0 (P) or RelyX Ultimate (U) cement. The initial shear bond strength was recorded by Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Debonded specimens were randomly allocated into 2 subgroups (n = 13) according to the dentin cleaning procedures for recementation. The residual cement on bonded dentin surfaces was eliminated with either pumice slurry (p) or tungsten carbide bur (c). The restorations were rebonded with the same cement and were subjected to shear test. Data failed the normality test (P < .05), thus were analyzed with Mann Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, and two-way ANOVA after logarithmic transformation (α = .05). The initial shear bond strength of group P was significantly higher than group U (P = .001). Pc and Uc groups presented higher bond strength after recementation compared to the initial bond strength. However, it was significant only in Pc group (P = .034). The specimens recemented with Panavia F2.0 provided higher bond strength than RelyX Ultimate cement. Moreover, a tungsten carbide bur was a more efficient method in removing the residual resin cement and increased the bond strength of Panavia F2.0 cement after recementation.

  8. The effect of resin cement type and cleaning method on the shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing restorations

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Khakpour Maleki, Amin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE This laboratory study assessed the effect of different dentin cleaning procedures on shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing prosthesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS 4 × 4 flat surface was prepared on the labial surface of 52 maxillary central incisors. Metal frames (4 × 4 × 1.5 mm) were cast with nickel-chromium alloy. All specimens were randomly divided into 2 groups to be cemented with either Panavia F2.0 (P) or RelyX Ultimate (U) cement. The initial shear bond strength was recorded by Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Debonded specimens were randomly allocated into 2 subgroups (n = 13) according to the dentin cleaning procedures for recementation. The residual cement on bonded dentin surfaces was eliminated with either pumice slurry (p) or tungsten carbide bur (c). The restorations were rebonded with the same cement and were subjected to shear test. Data failed the normality test (P < .05), thus were analyzed with Mann Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, and two-way ANOVA after logarithmic transformation (α = .05). RESULTS The initial shear bond strength of group P was significantly higher than group U (P = .001). Pc and Uc groups presented higher bond strength after recementation compared to the initial bond strength. However, it was significant only in Pc group (P = .034). CONCLUSION The specimens recemented with Panavia F2.0 provided higher bond strength than RelyX Ultimate cement. Moreover, a tungsten carbide bur was a more efficient method in removing the residual resin cement and increased the bond strength of Panavia F2.0 cement after recementation. PMID:28435620

  9. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes.

    PubMed

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Miranda, Rafael Resende de; Lopes, Camila de Carvalho Almança; Simamoto, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  10. Fiber post cementation strategies: effect of mechanical cycling on push-out bond strength and cement polymerization stress.

    PubMed

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Boaro, Leticia Cristina; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling and cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the polymerization stresses produced using three resin cements. Eighty bovine mandibular teeth were sectioned to a length of 16 mm, prepared to 12 mm, and embedded in self-curing acrylic resin. The specimens were then distributed into 8 groups (n = 10): Gr1 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC; Gr2 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC + mechanical cycling; Gr3 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix; Gr4 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix + mechanical cycling; Gr5 - phosphoric acid + RelyX U100 (self-adhesive cement); Gr6 - phosphoric acid+ RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling; Gr7 - RelyX U100; Gr8 - RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling. The values obtained from the push-out bond strength test were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05), while the values obtained from the polymerization stress test were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Mechanical cycling did not affect the bond strength values (p = 0.236), while cementation strategies affected the push-out bond strength (p < 0.001). Luting with RelyX U100 and Scotch Bond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC yielded higher push-out bond strength values. The polymerization stress results were affected by the factor "cement" (p = 0.0104): the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 exhibited the lowest values, RelyX ARC resulted in the highest values, while Multilink Automix presented values statistically similar to the other two cements. The self-adhesive cement appears to be a good alternative for luting fiber posts due to the high push-out bond strengths and lower polymerization stress values.

  11. Chromium speciation in hazardous, cement-based waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. F.; Bajt, S.; Clark, S. B.; Lamble, G. M.; Langton, C. A.; Oji, L.

    1995-02-01

    XANES and EXAFS techniques were used to determine the oxidation states and local structural environment of Cr in cement-based waste forms. Results show that Cr in untreated Portland cement formulations remains as toxic Cr 6+, while slag additives to the cement reduce Cr 6+ to the less toxic, less mobile Cr 3+ species. EXAFS analysis suggests that the Cr 6+ species is surrounded by four nearest oxygen atoms, while the reduced Cr 3+ sp ecies is surrounded by six oxygen atoms. The fitted CrO bond lengths for Cr 6+ and Cr 3+ species are around 1.66 and 1.98 Å, respectively.

  12. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    PubMed Central

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab’ah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistically significant differences were defined at the α = 0.05 level. Bond failures were categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Results The SBS values ranged from 3.76 to 6.81 MPa for cements bonded to enamel and from 4.48 to 5.94 MPa for cements bonded to dentin (p > 0.05 between surfaces). There were no statistically significant differences between the SBS values to enamel versus dentin for any given cement type. All cements exhibited adhesive failure at the resin/tooth interface. Conclusions Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution. PMID:26082572

  13. Effects of distal femoral centralizers on bone-cement in total hip arthroplasty. An experimental analysis of cement-centralizer bonding, cement void formation, and crack propagation.

    PubMed

    Smith, S G; Kabo, J M; Kilgus, D J

    1996-09-01

    Distal femoral centralizers of five different designs were inserted into model femoral stems and cemented into closed-ended tubes simulating a proximal femoral canal. Specimens underwent cyclic loading from 50 to 500 lb. for 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 million cycles. Each specimen was then sectioned transversely at multiple levels to obtain serial cross-sections, beginning at the femoral stem tip and proceeding distally so as to include the full extent of the centralizer. The area of each section occupied by a centralizer and the total amount of porosity present in the cement surrounding the centralizers were measured using an image analyzer. A dye penetrant was then applied to each section to visualize cement cracks and areas of incomplete bonding between cement and centralizers. The number, length, and location of cement cracks were catalogued for each section. No cement cracks or lack of bonding was observed at the interface between cement and centralizers. There was greater porosity in the specimens containing centralizers than in controls without centralizers (P < .05). The cement surrounding two of the centralizer designs had a significantly smaller amount of porosity than the cement surrounding the other three designs (P < .05). The number of cracks did not depend on whether a centralizer was used, the type of centralizer, or the cycling duration. In the control specimens, failure to adequately plug the centralizer receptacle hole in the stem tip resulted in very large cement voids.

  14. 3D micro-CT analysis of void formations and push-out bonding strength of resin cements used for fiber post cementation.

    PubMed

    Uzun, İsmail Hakkı; Malkoç, Meral Arslan; Keleş, Ali; Öğreten, Ayşe Tuba

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the void parameters within the resin cements used for fiber post cementation by micro-CT (µCT) and regional push-out bonding strength. Twenty-one, single and round shaped roots were enlarged with a low-speed drill following by endodontic treatment. The roots were divided into three groups (n=7) and fiber posts were cemented with Maxcem Elite, Multilink N and Superbond C&B resin cements. Specimens were scanned using µCT scanner at resolution of 13.7 µm. The number, area, and volume of voids between dentin and post were evaluated. A method of analysis based on the post segmentation was used, and coronal, middle and apical thirds considered separately. After the µCT analysis, roots were embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned into 2 mm thick slices (63 sections in total). Push-out testing was performed with universal testing device at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=.05). Overall, significant differences between the resin cements and the post level were observed in the void number, area, and volume (P<.05). Super-Bond C&B showed the most void formation (44.86 ± 22.71). Multilink N showed the least void surface (3.51 ± 2.24 mm(2)) and volume (0.01 ± 0.01 mm(3)). Regional push-out bond strength of the cements was not different (P>.05). µCT proved to be a powerful non-destructive 3D analysis tool for visualizing the void parameters. Multilink N had the lowest void parameters. When efficiency of all cements was evaluated, direct relationship between the post region and push-out bonding strength was not observed.

  15. 3D micro-CT analysis of void formations and push-out bonding strength of resin cements used for fiber post cementation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the void parameters within the resin cements used for fiber post cementation by micro-CT (µCT) and regional push-out bonding strength. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-one, single and round shaped roots were enlarged with a low-speed drill following by endodontic treatment. The roots were divided into three groups (n=7) and fiber posts were cemented with Maxcem Elite, Multilink N and Superbond C&B resin cements. Specimens were scanned using µCT scanner at resolution of 13.7 µm. The number, area, and volume of voids between dentin and post were evaluated. A method of analysis based on the post segmentation was used, and coronal, middle and apical thirds considered separately. After the µCT analysis, roots were embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned into 2 mm thick slices (63 sections in total). Push-out testing was performed with universal testing device at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed. Data were analyzed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests (α=.05). RESULTS Overall, significant differences between the resin cements and the post level were observed in the void number, area, and volume (P<.05). Super-Bond C&B showed the most void formation (44.86 ± 22.71). Multilink N showed the least void surface (3.51 ± 2.24 mm2) and volume (0.01 ± 0.01 mm3). Regional push-out bond strength of the cements was not different (P>.05). CONCLUSION µCT proved to be a powerful non-destructive 3D analysis tool for visualizing the void parameters. Multilink N had the lowest void parameters. When efficiency of all cements was evaluated, direct relationship between the post region and push-out bonding strength was not observed. PMID:27141253

  16. [Studies on bond strength and hardness of base materials].

    PubMed

    Suga, T; Chiba, E; Shinya, A; Yokozuka, S

    1989-04-01

    Since base materials are used in the construction of abutment teeth and the cavity walls of the teeth with healthy pulp, they need considerable bonding and mechanical strength depending on the site of application. In the present study we examined bonding strength, Martens-Mayer hardness and Vickers hardness of base materials in comparison with natural dentin in order to reevaluate them in terms of prosthetic materials and to provide assessment criteria for their application to prosthetic treatment. The results were as follows: 1) The bonding test showed the lowest value (4.6kgf/cm2) in calcium hydroxide FR (HFR) and the highest (47.9kgf/cm2) in HY-Bond polycarboxylate cement (CHC), a type of polycarboxylate cement. 2) In the test of bonding strength with various types of cement, calcium hydroxide preparations and zinc phosphate cement showed low values (4.6-23.5kgf/cm2) while polycarboxylate cement and glass-ionomer cement showed relatively high values (17.8-40.5kgf/cm2). 3) The Martens-Mayer hardness test showed the highest value (10.82 x 10(4] in dentin cement (GDE) and the lowest (1.09 x 10(4] in propack (EPR). 4) The Vickers hardness test showed the highest value (82) in neo-protect cement (ZPR) and the lowest (1) in propack (EPR). 5) In both Martens-Mayer and Vickers hardness tests with various types of cement, zinc phosphate cement and glass- ionomer cement showed high values, while low values were obtained in calcium hydroxide preparations and zinc-oxide eugenol cement. 6) Zinc phosphate cement and glass-ionomer cement showed no statistically significant differences from natural dentin in either Martens-Mayer hardness or Vickers hardness.

  17. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed only between Provy (164.44 ± 31.23) and Temp Bond NE (88.48 ± 21.83) after cementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  18. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  19. Flexural strength of glass fibre-reinforced posts bonded to dual-cure composite resin cements.

    PubMed

    Davis, Peter; Melo, Luciana S D; Foxton, Richard M; Sherriff, Martyn; Pilecki, Peter; Mannocci, Francesco; Watson, Timothy F

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the flexural strength of two different types of glass fibre-reinforced posts bonded to dual-cure composite resin cements. Forty glass methacrylate-based fibre posts (GC Fiber Post) and 20 glass fibre inter-polymerizing network posts (everStick POST) were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained 20 GC posts that were bonded to a dual-cure composite cement (UnifilCore). Group 2 contained 20 Stick Tech posts that had adhesive applied (Scotchbond Multipurpose resin) and were bonded to a dual-cure composite resin cement (RelyX Unicem). Group 3 contained 20 GC posts that were pretreated with a silane-coupling agent before being treated with resin and composite, as in group 1. A 4-point bend test was carried out to failure on all of the groups. Failure modes were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Pretreatment of the post surface with the silane-coupling agent did not increase the flexural strength. The flexural strength of the Stick Tech post was significantly lower than the flexural strength of the GC post. The mode of failure for the GC Posts was adhesive, whereas the Stick Tech posts failed cohesively. Different flexural strengths and failure modes were observed among the two fibre post-resin systems.

  20. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  1. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

  2. Bond strength analysis of the bone cement- stem interface of hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan-Feng; Ge, Shi-Rong; Liu, Hong-Tao; Guo, Kai-Jin; Han, Shu-Yang; Qi, Juan-Yan

    2014-02-01

    To study and establish the preliminary linear and modified models for the interface shear mechanics performance between implant and bone cement and to explore its damage significance. The loosening research between artificial hip joint prosthesis stem and bone cement interface performance can be evaluated by the push-in test. Based on the debonding performance test, the analytical expressions of the average load and displacement from the debonding failure and splitting failure process were deduced and determined. The correlations of the expressions of the average load-displacement and statistical experimental data were analyzed. It demonstrated that the interface debonding failure mechanical model could be characterized as interface bond strength mechanical performance. Based on analysis of models and experimental data by the three statistical analysis methods, the results indicated the modified model could be better represented by the interfacial debonding strength properties. The bond stress τ and relative sliding s distribution along the embedment regional were coupling affected by both pressure arch effect and shear lag effect in bone cement. Two stress peaks of implant have been found at the distance from 0.175La loading tip to 0.325La free tip, which also verified the early loosening clinical reports for the proximal and latter region. As the bone cement arch effect, the bond stress peak tend to move to the free tip when the debonding failure would be changed into the splitting failure, which presents a preliminary study on the mechanism of early debonding failure for the stem-cement interface. Functional models of the stem-bone cement interfacial debonding failure are developed to analyze the relevant mechanism. The different locational titanium alloy stress, and the interfacial bond stress and the relative slides are evaluated to acquire a guide of the different positions of interfacial damage. The coupling effect which is original from the pressure arch

  3. Bond strength of composite luting cement to zirconia ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Derand, Tore; Molin, Margareta; Kvam, Ketil

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of dental resin agent to zirconia ceramic after surface pre-treatment with different techniques. Specimens of hot isostatic pressed yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks (ZF) were fabricated (Procera Zircon, Nobel Biocare, Sweden) and compared to glossy dense zirconia blocks (ZG). Four groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. Group I: ZF (n = 5) and ZG (n = 5) without any pre-treatment, Group II: ZF-s (n = 5) and ZG-s (n = 5) treated with silane solution, Group III: ZF-P (n = 10) and ZG-P (n = 10) treated with RF plasma spraying (hexamethyldisiloxane) using a reactor (Plasma Electronic, Germany), Group IV: ZF-p (n = 10) and ZG-p (n = 10) treated with micro pearls of low fusing porcelain (720 degrees C) on the surfaces. Composite cylinders (Charisma, Hereus Kulzer, Dormagen, Germany) were luted with Variolink II (Ivoclar-Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) to the test specimens. The specimens were then stored in air for 1 h before shear loading in a universal testing machine (LRX, Lloyd Instruments, Farnham, England) until failure. No statistical difference was found between the untreated ZF and ZG specimens (Group I) neither between the specimens treated with silane (Group II). Plasma spraying treatment improved bond strength by a factor of three (p < 0.001). Treatment with low fusing porcelain micro pearls increased the bond strength by a factor of 10 compared to untreated surfaces (p < 0.001). No significant difference was seen between the surfaces treated ZF-p and ZG-p specimens. The thickness of the glass pearls layer did not exceed 5 microm. SEM showed dense grain borders of ZF and a flat glossy texture of ZG. Treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces with plasma spraying or a low fusing porcelain pearl layer significantly increased the bond strength of resin cement to the ceramic surface.

  4. Microtensile bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    PubMed

    Zaitter, Suellen; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D; Roperto, Renato C; Silva-Sousa, Yara T; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of glass fiber posts to intraradicular dentin when cemented with self-etching and self-adhesive resin cements. Forty-eight single-rooted human teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post-space prepared and divided into 8 groups (n = 6). The glass fiber posts used were: Exacto (EA) (Angelus) and everStick (ES) (StichTeck), which were cemented with two self-adhesive resin cements: BisCem (BIS) (Bisco) and Rely-X Unicem (UNI) (3M/ESPE), and two self-etching resin cements: Esthetic Cementing System NAC100 (NAC) (Kuraray) and Panavia-F (PAN) (Kuraray). Specimens were thermocycled between 5°C and 55 °C for 1000 cycles and stored in water at 37°C for 1 month. Four 1-mm-thick (in cross section) rods were obtained from the cervical region of the roots. Specimens were then subjected to microtensile testing in a special machine (BISCO; Schaumburg, IL, USA) or a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Means (and SD) of μTBS (MPa) were: EA/PAN: 10.3 (4.1), EA/NAC: 14 (5.1) EA/BIS: 16.4 (4.8), EA/UNI: 19.8 (5.1), ES/PAN: 25.9 (6.1), ES/NAC: 29.1 (7), ES/BIS: 28.9 (6), ES/UNI: 30.5 (6.6). ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p < 0.001). Mean μTBS values obtained with ES post were significantly higher than those obtained with EA (p < 0.001). For EA, Tukey's test indicated that higher μTBS means were obtained with the self-adhesive resin cements (BIS and UNI), which were statistically significantly different (p < 0.05) from values obtained with the self-etching resin cements (PAN and NAC). Different cements had no significant effects on the bond strength values of ES post (p > 0.05). μTBS values obtained with ES post were significantly higher than those obtained with EA post irrespective of the resin cement used. everStick posts resulted in the highest mean μTBS values with all cements. Self-adhesive cements performed well in terms

  5. Influence of Y-TZP ceramic treatment and different resin cements on bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Humberto L; Corazza, Pedro H; Paes-Júnior, Tarcísio de A; Della Bona, Alvaro

    2012-11-01

    Evaluating the bond strength (σ) of resin cement systems (RXA - RelyX ARC; RXU - RelyX U100; and PF - Panavia F) to dentin and yttria-stabilized zirconia-based ceramic (YZ - In-Ceram YZ) after different surface treatments and aging. Occlusal dentin of 54 human molars was exposed and conditioned following manufacturers' instructions. Fifty-four YZ blocks were sintered and divided into two groups according to surface treatment: PA - airborne particle abrasion, and SC - tribochemical silica coating. All treated YZ blocks were cemented to dentin using one of the cement systems (RXA, RXU, and PF) following manufacturers' recommendations, which includes specific silane agents. Teeth-cement-ceramic blocks were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24h before cutting into non-trimming bar-shaped specimens (adhesive area, A=1±0.1mm(2)). Specimens (n≥12) were assigned to one of the following conditions: N - no storage; W - stored in 37°C distilled water for 60days; and TC - thermal cycling (5-55°C; 10,000 cycles). All specimens were loaded in tension (F) to failure using a universal testing machine. The σ (F/A) was calculated and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Fracture surfaces were examined to determine the failure mode. RXA-SC and PF-PA specimens showed the greatest mean σ values after N (13.9 and 13.0MPa, respectively) and TC (12.9 and 14.8MPa, respectively). SC-treated showed greater mean σ values than PA-treated YZ specimens after W. Regardless of the cement used, W and TC did not significantly reduce the σ of SC-treated YZ resin bonded to dentin. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Correlation between the strength of glass ionomer cements and their bond strength to bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Yasushi; Kuramochi, Ken-ichi; Harashima, Atsushi; Honda, Muneaki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Yamaga, Taniichiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the possible correlation between the strength of glass ionomers and their adhesive strength to bovine teeth. The shear bond strengths of three different brands of glass ionomer mixed at four different P/L ratios to bovine teeth were measured 24 hours after the cement specimens were prepared. The correlation between shear bond strength and mechanical strength reported in our previous study was also examined. No significant (p > 0.05) increases in the bond strength to bovine teeth were found in any of the cements when the mixing ratio increased. The present study showed no significant (p > 0.05) correlation between mechanical strength of cement and its bond strength to bovine teeth. Rather than trying to increase the strength of the cement, it would be more effective to enhance the adhesive bond strength through procedures such as surface conditioning or cleaning of the tooth structure when glass ionomers are used as luting agents.

  7. Bonding of resin core materials to lithium disilicate ceramics: the effect of resin cement film thickness.

    PubMed

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Canay, Senay; Sahin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different resin cement film thicknesses on the shear bond strength of resin core materials to lithium disilicate ceramics. Forty IPS Empress 2 ceramic disks were bonded to the core materials (Bis-core and Smile) with resin cement film thicknesses of 50 or 100 μm. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and independent t tests. The core material used and resin cement film thickness had a significant effect on shear bond strength values (P < .001). Greater resin cement film thickness resulted in decreased bond strength of the core materials to lithium disilicate ceramics.

  8. Barnacle cement: a polymerization model based on evolutionary concepts.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Gary H; Vega, Irving E; Wahl, Kathryn J; Orihuela, Beatriz; Beyley, Veronica; Rodriguez, Eva N; Everett, Richard K; Bonaventura, Joseph; Rittschof, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Enzymes and biochemical mechanisms essential to survival are under extreme selective pressure and are highly conserved through evolutionary time. We applied this evolutionary concept to barnacle cement polymerization, a process critical to barnacle fitness that involves aggregation and cross-linking of proteins. The biochemical mechanisms of cement polymerization remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that this process is biochemically similar to blood clotting, a critical physiological response that is also based on aggregation and cross-linking of proteins. Like key elements of vertebrate and invertebrate blood clotting, barnacle cement polymerization was shown to involve proteolytic activation of enzymes and structural precursors, transglutaminase cross-linking and assembly of fibrous proteins. Proteolytic activation of structural proteins maximizes the potential for bonding interactions with other proteins and with the surface. Transglutaminase cross-linking reinforces cement integrity. Remarkably, epitopes and sequences homologous to bovine trypsin and human transglutaminase were identified in barnacle cement with tandem mass spectrometry and/or western blotting. Akin to blood clotting, the peptides generated during proteolytic activation functioned as signal molecules, linking a molecular level event (protein aggregation) to a behavioral response (barnacle larval settlement). Our results draw attention to a highly conserved protein polymerization mechanism and shed light on a long-standing biochemical puzzle. We suggest that barnacle cement polymerization is a specialized form of wound healing. The polymerization mechanism common between barnacle cement and blood may be a theme for many marine animal glues.

  9. Bracket bond strength and cariostatic potential of an experimental resin adhesive system containing Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masanori; Nakagaki, Susumu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kohda, Naohisa; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2012-09-01

    To determine if a new experimental resin-based material containing Portland cement (PC) can help prevent enamel caries while providing adequate shear bond strength (SBS). Brackets were bonded to human premolars with experimental resin-based adhesive pastes composed of three weight rations of resin and PC powder (PC 30, 7:3; PC 50, 5:5; PC 70, 3:7; n  =  7). Self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive (Transbond Plus) and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesive (Fuji Ortho FC Automix) were used for comparison. All of the bonded teeth were subjected to alternating immersion in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 days. The SBS for each sample was examined, and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was calculated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the enamel were determined by a nanoindenter at 20 equidistant depths from the external surface at 100 µm from the bracket edge. Data were compared by one-way analysis of variance and a chi-square test. PC 50 and PC 70 showed significantly greater SBS than Fuji Ortho FC Automix, although Transbond Plus showed significantly greater SBS than other bonding systems. No significant difference in the ARI category was observed among the five groups. For specimens bonded with PC 50 and PC 70, the hardness and elastic modulus values in most locations were equivalent to those of Fuji Ortho FC Automix. Experimental resin-based bonding material containing PC provides adequate SBS and a caries-preventive effect equivalent to that of the RMGIC adhesive system.

  10. The effect of plasma on shear bond strength between resin cement and colored zirconia.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan; Yoo, Seung-Hwan; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Ji, Min-Kyung; Shin, Jin-Ho; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTAPP) treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) between resin cement and colored zirconia made with metal chlorides. 60 zirconia specimens were divided into 3 groups using coloring liquid. Each group was divided again into 2 sub-groups using plasma treatment; the experimental group was treated with plasma, and the control group was untreated. The sub-groups were: N (non-colored), C (0.1 wt% aqueous chromium chloride solution), M (0.1 wt% aqueous molybdenum chloride solution), NP (non-colored with plasma), CP (0.1 wt% aqueous chromium chloride solution with plasma), and MP (0.1 wt% aqueous molybdenum chloride solution with plasma). Composite resin cylinders were bonded to zirconia specimens with MDP-based resin cement, and SBS was measured using a universal testing machine. All data was analyzed statistically using a 2-way ANOVA test and a Tukey test. SBS significantly increased when specimens were treated with NTAPP regardless of coloring (P<.001). Colored zirconia containing molybdenum showed the highest value of SBS, regardless of NTAPP. The molybdenum group showed the highest SBS, whereas the chromium group showed the lowest. NTAPP may increase the SBS of colored zirconia and resin cement. The NTAPP effect on SBS is not influenced by the presence of zirconia coloring.

  11. The effect of plasma on shear bond strength between resin cement and colored zirconia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTAPP) treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) between resin cement and colored zirconia made with metal chlorides. MATERIALS AND METHODS 60 zirconia specimens were divided into 3 groups using coloring liquid. Each group was divided again into 2 sub-groups using plasma treatment; the experimental group was treated with plasma, and the control group was untreated. The sub-groups were: N (non-colored), C (0.1 wt% aqueous chromium chloride solution), M (0.1 wt% aqueous molybdenum chloride solution), NP (non-colored with plasma), CP (0.1 wt% aqueous chromium chloride solution with plasma), and MP (0.1 wt% aqueous molybdenum chloride solution with plasma). Composite resin cylinders were bonded to zirconia specimens with MDP-based resin cement, and SBS was measured using a universal testing machine. All data was analyzed statistically using a 2-way ANOVA test and a Tukey test. RESULTS SBS significantly increased when specimens were treated with NTAPP regardless of coloring (P<.001). Colored zirconia containing molybdenum showed the highest value of SBS, regardless of NTAPP. The molybdenum group showed the highest SBS, whereas the chromium group showed the lowest. CONCLUSION NTAPP may increase the SBS of colored zirconia and resin cement. The NTAPP effect on SBS is not influenced by the presence of zirconia coloring. PMID:28435621

  12. Effect of Steam Autoclaving on the Tensile Strength of Resin Cements Used for Bonding Two-Piece Zirconia Abutments.

    PubMed

    Fadanelli, Marcos Alexandre; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho do; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of steam autoclave sterilization on the tensile strength of two types of resin cements used to bond customized CAD/CAM zirconia abutments onto titanium bases. Forty sets of zirconia abutments cemented to screwed titanium bases of implants analogs were divided into 4 groups (n = 10). Two groups were treated with a conventional chemically activated resin cement (ML, Multilink Ivoclar Vivadent) and the other two groups with a self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). One group from each cement was submitted to steam autoclaving. The autoclave sterilization cycle was performed after 72 hours of cementation for 15 minutes at 121°C and 2.1 Kgf/cm(2). The samples were subjected to tensile strength testing in a universal testing machine (200 Kgf, 0.5 mm/min), from which the means and standard deviations were obtained in Newtons. Results showed (via ANOVA and Tukey's test; α = 0.05) that in the absence of steam autoclaving, no difference was observed in tensile strength between the cements tested: ML: 344.87 (93.79) and U200: 280 (92.42) (P = .314). Steam autoclaving, however, significantly increased tensile strength for the ML: 465.42 (87.87) compared to U200: 289.10 (49.02) (P < .001). Despite the significant increase in the ML samples (P = .013), autoclaving did not affect the tensile strength of the U200 samples (P > 0.05). The authors concluded that steam autoclaving increases the mean tensile strength of the chemically activated cement compared to the dual-cure self-adhesive cement. The performance of both cements evaluated was similar if the sterilization step was disconsidered.

  13. Effect of sulfuric acid etching of polyetheretherketone on the shear bond strength to resin cements.

    PubMed

    Sproesser, Oliver; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-10-01

    To examine the influence of etching duration on the bond strength of PEEK substrate in combination with different resin composite cements. In total, 448 PEEK specimens were fabricated, etched with sulfuric acid for 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 300 s and then luted with two conventional resin cements (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) and one self-adhesive resin cement (Clearfil SA Cement) (n = 18/subgroup). Non-etched specimens served as the control group. Specimens were stored in distilled water for 28 days at 37°C and shear bond strengths were measured. Data were analyzed nonparametrically using Kruskal-Wallis-H (p < 0.05). Non-etched PEEK demonstrated no bond strength to resin composite cements. The optimal etching duration varied with the type of resin composite: 60 s for RelyX ARC (15.3 ± 7.2 MPa), 90 s for Variolink II (15.2 ± 7.2 MPa), and 120 s for Clearfil SA Cement (6.4 ± 5.9 MPa). Regardless of etching duration, however, the self-etching resin composite cement showed significantly lower shear bond strength values when compared to groups luted with the conventional resin composites. Although sulfuric acid seems to be suitable and effective for PEEK surface pre-treatment, further investigations are required to examine the effect of other adhesive systems and cements.

  14. Push-out bond strength of different translucent fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Bazzo, João Fernando; Pedriali, Maria Beatriz Bergonse Pereira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the bond strength of different translucent fiber posts in the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the fiber post used: Reforpost (opaque [control]), exacto, white post, radix, and Macro-Lock Illusion X-RO. The roots were subjected to chemomechanical preparation and cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. The teeth were sectioned into slices of the different root thirds and tested for bond strength (push-out). Two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test were used to verify statistical differences between groups (P < 0.05). Results: No significant difference between the root thirds was detected (P > 0.05). However, the performance of the posts demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05). RDX had a lower performance in the apical third (P < 0.05). The other fiber posts had the same performance irrespective of the root third evaluated. The predominant failure pattern was adhesive between resin cement and root dentin. Conclusion: In general, the different translucent fiber posts showed the same performance. Yet, translucent fiber posts did not show superior bond strength compared with the opaque fiber post in any of the root thirds evaluated. PMID:27994324

  15. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Tomoko; Uno, Shigeru; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Yamada, Toshimoto; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM) and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, P < 0.05). The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found. PMID:22606202

  16. Early bond strength of two resin cements to Y-TZP ceramic using MPS or MPS/4-META silanes.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Cura, Cenk; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    For cementation of yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconium polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramic frameworks, protocols of surface-conditioning methods and available cements vary, resulting in confusion among clinicians regarding selection and effects of different conditioning methods on cement adhesion. This study evaluated the effect of two silanes (3-trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate (MPS) and 3-trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate/4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride methyl methacrylate (MPS/4-META) on the adhesion of two resin-based cements (SuperBond and Panavia F 2.0) to Y-TZP ceramic and compared several protocols with those indicated by the manufacturer of each of these cements. Disks of Y-TZP ceramic (LAVA, 3M ESPE) (n = 60) were divided into six experimental groups (n = 10 per group) and treated as follows: (1) silica coating (SC) + MPS silane + SuperBond; (2) SC + MPS/4-META + silane + SuperBond); (3) SC + MPS silane + Panavia F 2.0); (4) SC + MPS/4-META silane + Panavia F 2.0); (5) no conditioning + MPS/4-META silane + Super-Bond (SuperBond instructions); and (6) 50-μm Al(2)O(3) conditioning + Panavia F 2.0 (Panavia F 2.0 instructions). The specimens were subjected to shear-bond testing after water storage at 37 °C for 3 months in the dark. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD (α = 0.05). After silica coating, the mean bond strength of SuperBond cement was not significantly different between MPS and MPS/4-META silanes (20.2 ± 3.7 and 20.9 ± 1.6 MPa, respectively), but the mean bond strength of Panavia F 2.0 was significantly higher with MPS silane (24.4 ± 5.3 MPa) than with MPS/4-META (12.3 ± 1.4 MPa) (P < 0.001). The SuperBond manufacturer's instructions alone resulted in significantly higher bond strength (9.7 ± 3.1 MPa) than the Panavia F 2.0 manufacturer's instruction (0 MPa) (P < 0.001). When silica coating and silanization were used, both SuperBond and Panavia F 2.0 cements demonstrated higher bond strengths they did when

  17. The effect of sodium hypochlorite and resin cement systems on push-out bond strength of cemented fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad I.; Bin-Shuwaish, Mohammed S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the effect of different endodontic irrigant solutions and resin cement systems on the bond strength of cemented fiber posts. Methods: Sixty human single-rooted anterior teeth were sectioned transversely at 2 mm incisal to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The roots were treated endodontically, and teeth were distributed into six groups: group A, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow Core Build-Up material; group B, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem Self-Adhesive Universal Resin Cement; group C, includes 2.5% NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow; group D, includes 2.5%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem; group E, includes NaCl, irrigant with MultiCore Flow; and group F, includes NaCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem. Universal tapered fiber posts (No. 3 RelyX Fiber Post) were cemented, and roots were sectioned into cervical and apical segments. Samples were then subjected to a push-out bond strength test and failure modes were examined. Results: The mean push-out bond strength for group D showed the highest mean value (20.07 MPa), while the lowest value was found in group A. There was a significant difference between groups with regard to the irrigants used (p<0.001), however, no significant difference was found between groups with regard to resin systems (p>0.05). The total mean push-out bond strength of the cervical segments was found to be significantly higher than the apical segments (p<0.001). Conclusion: The irrigant solution have a clear influence on the push-out bond strength of the fiber posts regardless of the cement used. Both adhesive resin systems showed similar bonding strength. PMID:27648037

  18. Bonding of Resin Cement to Zirconia with High Pressure Primer Coating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-jie; Jiao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Li-juan; Fang, Ming; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiang; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of air-drying pressure during ceramic primer coating on zirconia/resin bonding and the surface characteristics of the primed zirconia. Methods Two ceramic primers (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CCP, Kuraray Medical Inc. and Z-Prime Plus, ZPP, Bisco Inc.) were applied on the surface of air-abraded zirconia (Katana zirconia, Noritake) and dried at 4 different air pressures (0.1–0.4 MPa). The primed zirconia ceramic specimens were bonded with a resin-based luting agent (SA Luting Cement, Kuraray). Micro-shear bond strengths of the bonded specimens were tested after 3 days of water storage or 5,000× thermocycling (n = 12). Failure modes of the fractured specimens were examined with scanning electron miscopy. The effects of air pressure on the thickness of the primer layers and the surface roughness (Sa) of primed zirconia were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (n = 6), optical profilometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (n = 6), respectively. Results Clearfil Ceramic Primer air-dried at 0.3 and 0.4 MPa, yielding significantly higher µSBS than gentle air-drying subgroups (p<0.05). Compared to vigorous drying conditions, Z-Prime Plus air-dried at 0.2 MPa exhibited significantly higher µSBS (p<0.05). Increasing air-drying pressure reduced the film thickness for both primers. Profilometry measurements and ESEM showed rougher surfaces in the high pressure subgroups of CCP and intermediate pressure subgroup of ZPP. Conclusion Air-drying pressure influences resin/zirconia bond strength and durability significantly. Higher air-drying pressure (0.3-0.4 MPa) for CCP and intermediate pressure (0.2 MPa) for ZPP are recommended to produce strong, durable bonds between resin cement and zirconia ceramics. PMID:24992678

  19. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Results: Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (P<.05). Groups that had received light-cured provisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Conclusions: Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable. PMID:21912495

  20. Bonding between CAD/CAM resin and resin composite cements dependent on bonding agents: three different in vitro test methods.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Simona; Keul, Christine; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bonding properties between CAD/CAM resin and three resin composite cements combined with different bonding agents using three test methods. Four hundred twenty CAD/CAM resin substrates were fabricated and divided into three test methods (shear bond strength (SBS, n = 180), tensile bond strength (TBS, n = 180) and work of adhesion (WA, n = 60)), further into four pretreatment methods (VP connect (VP), visio.link (VL), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP) and no pretreatment (CG)) and three cements (RelyX ARC, Variolink II and Clearfil SA Cement). Each subgroup contained 15 specimens. SBS and TBS were measured after 24 h H2O/37 °C + 5000 thermal-cycles (5/55 °C) and failure types were assessed. WA was determined for pretreated CAD/CAM resin and non-polymerized resin composite cements. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Chi(2) and Spearman's Rho tests. Within SBS and TBS tests, CGs and groups pretreated with CP (regardless of resin composite cements), and VP pretreated with Clearfil SA Cement showed no bond. However, CG combined with RelyX ARC showed a TBS of 5.6 ± 1.3 MPa. In general, highest bond strength was observed for groups treated with VL. CG and groups pretreated using VL showed lower WA than the groups treated with VP or CP. Measured TBS values were higher than SBS ones. In general, SBS and TBS showed similar trends for the ranges of the values for the groups. WA results were not comparable with SBS/TBS results and admitted, therefore, no conclusions on it. For a clinical use of XHIP-CAD/CAM resin, the bond surface should be additionally pretreated with visio.link as bonding agent.

  1. Bond strengths of three chemical adhesive cements adhered to a nickel-chromium alloy for direct bonded retainers.

    PubMed

    Atta, M O; Smith, B G; Brown, D

    1990-02-01

    Sandblasted surfaces of a beryllium-free, nickel-chromium alloy were bonded with one of three chemical adhesives. After either immersion in water for up to 6 months or thermal cycling between 5 degrees and 60 degrees C for 500 cycles, the bonded specimens were tested for both shear and tensile strength. The highest values of tensile and shear bond strengths were found with Panavia Ex material, and these values showed no significant changes after thermal cycling. For ABC cement and for Super-Bond C & B material, the strength of the bond was significantly improved with thermal cycling. However, immersion in water for 6 months caused a significant decrease in the strength of the bond of specimens adhered with ABC cement.

  2. Regional bond strengths to root canal dentin of fiber posts luted with three cementation systems.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Reis, Alessandra; Gomes, João Carlos; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Calixto, Abraham Lincoln

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the cementation system on the regional push-out bond strength and failure pattern of fiber posts to radicular dentin. The roots of 48 extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16), according to the cementation system: AdperScotchbond Multi-Purpose + resin cement RelyX ARC (SBMP+ARC); Adper SingleBond 2 + RelyX ARC (SB+ARC) and; RelyX U100 self-adhesive resin cement (U100). The posts were cemented as per manufacturer's instructions for each cementation system. After 1 week, the roots were sectioned transversely into 6 discs. Two discs were obtained from the cervical, middle and apical thirds and the push-out test was carried out. The failure pattern was examined on all debonded specimens. The data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test. When U100 was used, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was observed among the different root regions. Statistically higher push-out bond strength values were detected in the cervical third for SBMP+ARC and SB+ARC (p<0.05). The U100 showed significantly more mixed failures than SBMP+ARC in the apical third (p<0.05). In conclusion, the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 was the only cement not sensitive to the root canal region.

  3. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  4. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond

  5. Dentin bond strength of light-cured glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Hinoura, K; Miyazaki, M; Onose, H

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of surface treatments and irradiation conditions on the bond strength of light-cured glass-ionomer cements to dentin. The light-cured glass-ionomer cements used in this study were Vitrabond, XR Ionomer, and Fuji Lining LC. Three experiments were designed to study the influence of the following factors on bond strength to dentin: (1) effect of the surface treatment of the dentin, (2) effect of the irradiation time, (3) effect of an increase in the interval between mixing of the cement and irradiation. Samples were stored in water for 24 hours, after which shear bond testing was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. For Vitrabond, the Scotchprep and Gluma 2 treatments gave the greatest shear bond strengths. For XR Ionomer and Fuji Lining LC, the Scotchprep treatment gave the greatest shear bond strengths. The bond strengths for all cements increased with prolonged irradiation time. Bond strengths decreased with a longer elapsed time between mixing and light-curing. This means that light-curing should be done soon after the cement is placed. The failure mode was found to be cohesive in the ionomer.

  6. Antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing Galla chinensis extract

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LU-FEI; LUO, FENG; XUE, CHAO-RAN; DENG, MENG; CHEN, CHEN; WU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Galla chinensis extract (GCE), a naturally-derived agent, has a significant inhibitory effect on cariogenic bacteria. The present study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing GCE. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement incorporated GCE at five mass fractions (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8%) to prepare GCE-containing cement for analysis. For the agar diffusion test, cement specimens were placed on agar disk inoculated with Streptococcus mutans (strain ATCC 25175). Following 48 h incubation, the inhibition halo diameter was measured. To assess bacteria colonization susceptibility, S. mutans adhesion to cement specimens was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following 48 h incubation. To evaluate bond strength, a total of 50 metal brackets were bonded on premolar surfaces by using cement (10 teeth/group). Following immersion in an artificial saliva for 3 days, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The results demonstrated that GCE-containing samples exhibited a larger bacterial inhibition halo than control, and the inhibition zone increased as the GCE mass fraction increased. SEM analysis demonstrated that S. mutans presented a weaker adherent capacity to all GCE-containing cements compared with control, but the difference between each GCE-containing group was not significant. SBS values of each GCE-containing group exhibited no difference compared with the control. In conclusion, GCE-containing adhesive cement exhibits a promising inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and adhesion. Without compromising bond strength, adding GCE in adhesive cement may be an attractive option for preventing white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27073642

  7. Micro-tensile bond testing of resin cements to dentin and an indirect resin composite.

    PubMed

    Mak, Yiu-Fai; Lai, Shirley C N; Cheung, Gary S P; Chan, Alex W K; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2002-12-01

    Micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) evaluation and fractographic analysis were used to compare four resin cement systems (AC: All-Bond 2/Choice; RX: Single Bond/RelyX ARC; SB: Super-Bond C & B; and PF: Panavia F) in indirect composite/dentin adhesive joints. Flat dentin surfaces were created on extracted human third molars. The resin cements were used according to the manufacturers' instructions for bonding silanized composite overlays to deep coronal dentin. 0.9x0.9 composite-dentin beams prepared from the luted specimens were stressed to failure in tension. Dentin sides of all fractured specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the failure modes. In group PF, morphologic features that could not be resolved at the SEM level were further validated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the SEM specimens. Statistical analyses revealed significant difference (p<0.05) among microTBS and failure modes in the resin cement groups. The two groups (AC and RX) with highest microTBS failed predominantly along the composite overlay/cement interface. Cohesive failure in resin cement was primarily observed in group SB that exhibited intermediate microTBS values. In group PF with the lowest microTBS, failure occurred mostly along the dentin surface. Globular resin agglomerates seen by SEM on PF-treated dentin were distinguished from silica fillers by TEM. The bond between the processed composite and the luting resin cement was the weak link in indirect composite restorations cemented with AC or RX. Super-Bond C&B exhibited intermediate tensile strength and Panavia F is less reliable when used in conjunction with a self-etching primer for bonding indirect restorations to dentin.

  8. Pullout behavior of steel fibers from cement-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shannag, M.J.; Brincker, R.; Hansen, W.

    1997-06-01

    A comprehensive experimental program on pullout tests of steel fibers from cement based matrices is described. A specially designed single fiber pullout apparatus was used to provide a quantitative determination of interfacial properties that are relevant to toughening brittle materials through fiber reinforcement. The parameters investigated included a specially designed high strength cement based matrix called Densified Small Particles system (DSP), a conventional mortar matrix, fiber embedment length, and the fiber volume fraction. The mediums from which the fiber was pulled included a control mortar mix without fibers, a mortar mix with 3, and 6 percent fibers by volume. The results indicate that: (1) the dense DSP matrix has significantly improved interfacial properties as compared to the conventional mortar matrix. (2) Increasing the fiber embedment length and the fiber volume fraction in the cement matrix increase the peak pullout load and the pullout work. (3) The major bond mechanism in both systems is frictional sliding.

  9. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  10. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    2014-02-01

    Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. COMPOSITE DISCS WERE SUBJECT TO ONE OF SIX DIFFERENT SURFACE PRETREATMENTS: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm(2) diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate.

  11. Tensile bond strength of an adhesive resin cement to different alloys having various surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Amara; Loza, Maria A; Elias, Augusto; Mukhopadhyay, Siuli; Looney, Stephen; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2009-02-01

    The ability of a resin cement to bond to a restorative alloy is critical for maximal crown retention to nonideal preparations. Surface treatment and metal type may have an important role in optimizing resin-to-metal strength. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of surface pretreatment on the tensile strength of base and noble metals bonded using a conventional resin cement. Cylindrical plastic rods (9.5 mm in diameter), cast in base (Rexillium NBF) or noble metal (IPS d.SIGN 53), were divided into rods 10 mm in length (n=10-12). Specimens were heated in a porcelain furnace to create an oxide layer. Test specimens were further subjected to airborne-particle abrasion (50-microm Al(2)O(3) particles) alone or with the application of a metal primer (Alloy Primer). Similarly treated rod ends were joined using resin cement (RelyX ARC), thermocycled (x500, 5 degrees -55 degrees C) and stored (24 hours, 37 degrees C) before debonding using a universal testing machine. Debond strength and failure site were recorded. Rank-based ANOVA for unbalanced designs was used to test for significant interaction (alpha=.050). Each pair of treatments was compared separately for each metal (Bonferroni-adjusted significance level of .0083, overall error rate for comparisons, .05). The 2 metals were compared separately for each of the 3 treatments using an adjusted significance level of .017, maintaining an overall error rate of .05. A multinomial logit model was used to describe the effect of metal type and surface pretreatment on failure site location (alpha=.05). Interaction between metal type and surface pretreatment was significant for stress values (P=.019). Metal type did not significantly affect tensile bond strength for any of the compared surface pretreatments. Metal primer significantly improved tensile bond strength for each metal type. Most failures tended to occur as either adhesive or mixed in nature. Metal primer application significantly enhanced tensile bond

  12. In vitro shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia.

    PubMed

    Qeblawi, Dana M; Campillo-Funollet, Marc; Muñoz, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    Although the use of anatomic-contour zirconia restorations has expanded in the recent past, disagreement still exists as to reliable cementation techniques and materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the immediate and artificially aged shear bond strength of 2 commercially available self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia: one with silica coating and silanation as a zirconia surface treatment and the other contained a phosphate monomer, which eliminated the need for a separate primer. Sixty composite resin rods (2.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length) were fabricated from a nano-optimized composite resin by using a polypropylene mold, then light polymerized with a light-emitting diode. zirconia plates (10×10×4mm) were sectioned from an yttrium-stabilized zirconia puck, sintered, and then mounted in autopolymerizing acrylic resin custom tray material. Composite resin rods were cemented to the zirconia plates with 2 different cements. The surface treatment of zirconia followed the manufacturers' instructions for each cement. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength at 3 aging conditions: immediate, after 24 hours of moist storage, and after 30 days of moist storage with 10000 thermocycles. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, and the data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA (α=.05). Weibull parameters (modulus and characteristic strength) also were calculated for each group. Two-way ANOVA revealed that only the aging condition significantly affected the bond strength to zirconia. The cement and the interaction of the cement and aging did not significantly affect the shear bond strength to zirconia. The highest bond strength for both cements was achieved at 24 hours, whereas the lowest bond strength values were recorded in the immediate groups. No significant differences in bond strength to zirconia were observed between a cement with a silane priming step and an methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate

  13. Cementation of prosthetic restorations: from conventional cementation to dental bonding concept.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marcela Filié; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2011-05-01

    The cementation procedure of metal-free fixed partial dentures exhibits special characteristics about the porcelains and cementation agents, which turns the correct association between these materials necessary. Our purpose in this literature review was to point the main groups of cements associated to metal-free restoration and discuss about the advantages, disadvantages, and recommendations of each one. Our search was confined to the electronic databases PubMed and SciELO and to books about this matter. There are essentially 3 types of hard cement: conventional, resin, or a hybrid of the two. The metal-free restorations can be fixed with conventional or resin cements. The right choice of luting material is of vital importance to the longevity of dental restorative materials. Conventional cements are advantageous when good compressive straight, good film thickness, and water dissolution resistance are necessary. However, they need an ideal preparation, and they are not acid dissolution resistant. Conventional cements are indicated to porcelains that cannot be acid etched. Resin cements represent the choice to metal-free restoration cementation because they present better physical properties and aesthetic than conventional agents.

  14. Effect of eugenol-based endodontic cement on the adhesion of intraradicular posts.

    PubMed

    Alfredo, Edson; de Souza, Emanuel Soares; Marchesan, Melissa Andréia; Paulino, Silvana Maria; Gariba-Silva, Ricardo; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2006-01-01

    The present study evaluated, in vitro, the influence of an eugenol-based endodontic sealer (EndoFill) on the adhesion of intra-radicular posts cemented with a resin-based cement (Enforce) ou a zinc phosphate cement. Twenty-four single-rooted maxillary canines were divided into 2 groups (n=12) and obturated with either gutta-percha points plus EndoFill or gutta-percha points alone (no cement). In each group, half of intracanal posts (n=6) were cemented with Enforce resin-based cement and half with zinc phosphate cement. Specimens were submitted to pull-out test in an Instron machine and tensile force was applied at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement. The maximum forces required for post removal was recorded (N) and means were submitted to statistical analysis by Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.01). Posts cemented with zinc phosphate cement were significantly more retentive (353.4 N) than those cemented with Enforce (134.9 N) (p<0.01). Regarding the influence of the eugenol-based cement (EndoFill) on post retention, there was statistically significant difference (p<0.01) only between the groups cemented with Enforce, i.e., in the canals filled with EndoFill + guta-percha there was lower bond strength than in the canals filled with gutta-percha points alone (101.5 and 168.2 N, respectively). In conclusion, the zinc-phosphate-based cement showed greater post retention than the resin-based cement. The findings of this study suggest that the eugenol-containing sealer interfered with the adhesive properties of the resin-based cement.

  15. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength between resin cements and zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Erdem, A; Akar, G C; Erdem, A; Kose, T

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the bond strength of resin cement and yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic with different surface conditioning methods. Two hundred presintered Y-TZP ceramic specimens were prepared, sintered (4 × 4 × 4 mm), and randomly assigned to four equal groups as control (C, no conditioning); airborne particle abraded (APA, air abrasion with 11 μm Al2O3); tribochemical silica coating/silane coupling system (TSC, Rocatec, air abrasion with 110 μm Al2O3, 30 μm silica-coated Al2O3 and silane); and laser (L, Er:YAG laser irradiation treated at a power setting of 200 mJ). After specimen preparation, composite resin cylinders were prepared and cemented with resin cements (Clearfil Esthetic, Panavia F 2.0, Rely X-U100, Super Bond C&B, and Multilink Automix) on the ceramic surfaces and kept in an incubator at 37°C for 60 days. All specimens were tested for shear bond strength with a universal testing machine, and fractured surfaces were evaluated by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). The bond strengths for C and L groups were not significantly different according to adhesive resin cement. APA and TSC resulted in increased bond strength for Panavia F 2.0 and Rely X-U100 resin cements. Additionally, TSC presented higher bond strength with Multilink Automix. Adhesive fracture between the ceramic and resin cement was the most common failure. Complete cohesive fracture at the ceramic or composite cylinders was not observed. Regardless of the adhesive resin cement used, laser treatment did not improve resin bond strength.

  16. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    GARCIA-CONTRERAS, Rene; SCOUGALL-VILCHIS, Rogelio Jose; CONTRERAS-BULNES, Rosalía; SAKAGAMI, Hiroshi; MORALES-LUCKIE, Raul Alberto; NAKAJIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC) compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w). Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc), Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05). In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05), flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05), and antibacterial activity (p<0.001), without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II) is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force. PMID:26221928

  17. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials.

  18. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Rene; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio Jose; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Morales-Luckie, Raul Alberto; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC) compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w). Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc), Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05). In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05), flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05), and antibacterial activity (p<0.001), without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II) is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force.

  19. A comparison of bond strengths of complete crowns using two types of cements and three cleaning agents.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, L F; Garbin, C A; Bonfante, G; Do Valle, A L

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of three cleaning agents on the bond strength of complete crowns cemented with zinc phosphate and polycarboxylate cements. For the polycarboxylate cement group, three cleaning agents were used: Tergentol; Tergentol + polyacrylic acid; Tergentol + citric acid. Zinc phosphate cement was used as a control group with Tergentol. There were no statistically significant differences of mean retentive force for either cement regardless of the test conditions. The marginal fit after cementation was also evaluated and the results of zinc polycarboxylate were lower than zinc phosphate cement and were statistically significant.

  20. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement.

  1. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin.

    PubMed

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção; Michida, Silvia Masae Araújo; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Oliveira, Simone Helena Gonçalves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured), light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED), and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling). All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h) and sectioned (n = 10): G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC), and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The bond strength values (MPa) were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40)ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59)ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62)ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32)a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90)c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99)bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30)ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98)bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH). There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  2. Bond strength evaluation of three self-adhesive luting systems used for cementing composite and porcelain.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, F; Minnoni, A; Vitalone, L M; Carluccio, F; Vadini, M; Paolantonio, M; D'Arcangelo, C

    2011-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were recently introduced with the purpose of simplifying the cementation technique, as they combine the use of adhesive and cement in a single application, eliminating the need for pretreatment of the tooth. In the present study a microtensile bond strength test (μ-TBS) was used to compare three self-adhesives, an etch-and-rinse and a self-etch luting system, in the cementation of resin-based composite (RBC) and ceramic disks to dentin. Freshly extracted molars were transversally sectioned to expose flat, deep dentin surfaces. Cylindrical specimens (5 mm in diameter and 10 mm in height), consisting of RBC disks and leucite-based glass ceramic disks, were produced. The RBC disks were sandblasted with 50-μm Al2O3. The ceramic disks were conditioned with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid gel and silane application. All of the disks were then bonded to dentin surfaces employing five different luting agents: iCEM Self Adhesive (Heraeus Kulzer), MaxCem (Kerr Corporation), RelyX UniCem (3M ESPE), EnaCem HF (Micerium), and Panavia F2.0 (Kuraray-Dental). The products were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce multiple beams measuring approximately 1 mm2 in cross section. For each experimental group 12 beams were tested. The preterm failures were also taken into account. All of the specimen preparations were performed by the same operator. The beams were tested under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Mean μ-TBS values were calculated for each group. Data were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance, and multiple comparisons were performed using a Tukey test (α=0.05). The UniCem group showed the lowest number of preterm failures among the tested self-adhesive systems. When premature debondings were included in the mean value calculation, bond strength values for the UniCem group were statistically equal to or even higher than those

  3. Effect of resin cement system and root region on the push-out bond strength of a translucent fiber post.

    PubMed

    Calixto, L R; Bandéca, M C; Clavijo, V; Andrade, M F; Vaz, L Geraldo; Campos, E A

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of luting systems for bonding glass fiber posts to root canal dentin. The hypothesis tested was that there are no differences in bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with different cement systems. Forty bovine incisors were randomly assigned to five different resin cement groups (n=8). After endodontic treatment and crown removal, translucent glass fiber posts were bonded into the root canal using five different luting protocols (self-cured cement and etch-and-rinse adhesive system; dual-cured cement and etch-and-rinse adhesive system; self-cured cement and self-etch adhesive system; dual-cured cement and self-etch adhesive system; and dual-cured self-adhesive cement). Push-out bond strength was evaluated at three different radicular levels: cervical, middle, and apical. The interface between resinous cement and the post was observed using a stereoscopic microscope. Analysis of variance showed a statistically significant difference among the cements (p<0.05) and the root canal thirds (p<0.05). The self-adhesive resinous cement had lower values of retention. The resin cements used with etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems seem to be adequate for glass fiber post cementation.

  4. Influence of eugenol-containing temporary cement on efficacy of dentin-bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1999-02-01

    Zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cements are widely used as temporary filling materials. However, eugenol has earlier been shown to have a detrimental effect on both resin composites and dentin-bonding systems. The aim of the present in vitro study was to examine whether ZOE cement would also reduce the efficacy of relatively new dentin-bonding systems. This was done by determination of gap formation around resin composite fillings in dentin cavities and of bond strength of resin composite to enamel and dentin. The tooth surfaces involved were either freshly cut, or had been exposed to a ZOE cement (IRM) or to a non-ZOE cement (Cavit) for 7 d before application of a dentin-bonding system (Gluma CPS or Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) and a resin composite (Z100). Gap formation was assessed in a light microscope on 20-min-old fillings and expressed as wall-to-wall contraction (the width of the maximum marginal gap in % of the cavity diameter). Bond strength was measured in shear on 1-d-old specimens. The mean values of wall-to-wall contraction were 0.06-0.09% with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 0.20-0.24% with Gluma CPS. The mean values of bond strength to enamel were 22-25 MPa for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 20-23 MPa for Gluma CPS, and to dentin were 20-22 MPa for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 13-14 MPa for Gluma CPS. The use of Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus resulted in higher bond strength to dentin and less wall-to-wall contraction than did Gluma CPS. No differences were found in either wall-to-wall contraction or in bond strength between the three groups for either dentin-bonding system. Thus, the ZOE cement did not influence the efficacy of two relatively new dentin-bonding systems.

  5. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test. The posts received surface treatments in three categories: 1) roughening by sandblasting and hydrofluoric acid etching; 2) application of primer by coating with Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II and Silane and 3) a combination treatment in the form of roughening (sandblasting or etching) supplemented by the application of a primer or in the form of the Cojet system. After surface treatment, the post was embedded in a cylinder of resin cement (diameter = 4.0 mm, height = 4.0 mm). The surface-treated post was centered in the resin cement-filled mold with the aid of fixation apparatus. Fifteen minutes from the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding of resin cement to titanium alloy posts was increased by several surface treatments of the post. However, coating with primers as sole treatment had no effect on bonding. With the DTS method applied, none of the surface treatments had an effect on the bonding to glass fiber posts. The bonding of both resin cements to zirconia posts was improved by Cojet treatment, while sandblasting, followed by silane application, improved bonding of Panavia F.

  6. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 μm grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

  7. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  8. Effects of dentin surface treatments on shear bond strength of glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of a conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Materials and methods 80 bovine permanent incisors were used. 40 cylindrical specimens of a GIC (Fuji IX GP Extra) and 40 cylindrical specimens of a RMGIC (Fuji II LC) were attached to the dentin. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 8 groups of equal size (n=10), 4 for every type of glass-ionomer cement, corresponding to type of dentin surface treatments. Group 1: GC Cavity Conditioner; Group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel; Group 3: Clearfil SE Bond; Group 4: no dentin conditioning (control). The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Model 3343, Instron Corp., Canton, Mass., USA) and subsequently tested for shear bond strength (MPa). Results ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups. Post hoc Tukey test showed different values of shear bond strength for Fuji IX GP Extra and for Fuji II LC. The different conditioners variably influence the adhesion of the glass-ionomer cements tested. Conclusions. RMGIC shear bond to dentin was higher than GIC. The use of a Self-etch adhesive system improved the shear bond strength values of RMGIC and lowered the shear bond strength values of GIC significantly. PMID:24753797

  9. Bond strength of orthodontic light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiang Yu; Chen, Chien Hsiu; Li, Chuan Li; Tsai, Hung Huey; Chou, Ta Hsiung; Wang, Wei Nan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths and debonded interfaces achieved with light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and conventional light-cured composite resin. In addition, the effects of acid etching and water contamination were examined. One hundred human premolars were randomly divided into five equal groups. The mini Dyna-lock upper premolar bracket was selected for testing. The first four groups were treated with light-cured RMGIC with or without 15 per cent phosphoric acid-etching treatment and with or without water contamination preceding bracket bonding. The control samples were treated with the conventional light-cured Transbond composite resin under acid etching and without water contamination. Subsequently, the brackets were debonded by tensile force using an Instron machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were assigned to the bracket base of the debonded interfaces using a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and modified ARI scores were determined and analysed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. Under all four conditions, the bond strength of the light-cure RMGIC was equal to or higher than that of the conventional composite resin. The highest bond strength was achieved when using RMGIC with acid etching but without water contamination. The modified ARI scores were 2 for Fuji Ortho LC and 3 for Transbond. No enamel detachment was found in any group. Fifteen per cent phosphoric acid etching without moistening the enamel of Fuji Ortho LC provided the more favourable bond strength. Enamel surfaces, with or without water contamination and with or without acid etching, had the same or a greater bond strength than Transbond.

  10. Nano-scale hydrogen-bond network improves the durability of greener cements

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Johan; Rodrigues, Michelle Santos; Telling, Mark T. F.; Beraldo, Antonio Ludovico; Santos, Sérgio Francisco; Aldridge, Laurence P.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    More than ever before, the world's increasing need for new infrastructure demands the construction of efficient, sustainable and durable buildings, requiring minimal climate-changing gas-generation in their production. Maintenance-free “greener” building materials made from blended cements have advantages over ordinary Portland cements, as they are cheaper, generate less carbon dioxide and are more durable. The key for the improved performance of blends (which substitute fine amorphous silicates for cement) is related to their resistance to water penetration. The mechanism of this water resistance is of great environmental and economical impact but is not yet understood due to the complexity of the cement's hydration reactions. Using neutron spectroscopy, we studied a blend where cement was replaced by ash from sugar cane residuals originating from agricultural waste. Our findings demonstrate that the development of a distinctive hydrogen bond network at the nano-scale is the key to the performance of these greener materials. PMID:24036676

  11. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Bond Strength of Dual-Cured Resin Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Poluri, Ramya Krishna; Nagaraj, Hema; Siddaruju, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the microtensile bond strength of resin cements to enamel and dentin and to determine the type of bond failure using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study 40 teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and divided into two main groups i.e., Group A for enamel and Group B for dentin. Each group is again subdivided into four subgroups, which are as follows; Subgroup 1 for Calibra resin cement, Subgroup 2 for Paracem, Subgroup 3 for Variolink II and Subgroup 4 for Rely X ARC. These resin cements were applied on enamel and dentin according to manufacturer’s instructions followed by incremental build-up of composite resin on the top of resin cements. Each tooth was sectioned perpendicular to the resin-substrate interface with a slow speed diamond saw under water cooling yielding sections of approximately 1 mm2. On an average, three sections from each tooth were used for testing. The beams obtained after sectioning were stressed to failure under tension in a custom made stainless steel forceps held in a universal testing machine (Lloyd) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Results were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, independent t-test, and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test. Results: Cements bonded to enamel substrates showed higher mean bond strength compared to dentin, which is statistically significant. Rely X ARC showed highest mean bond strength to both the substrates. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength to enamel and dentin and, Rely X ARC resin cement showed higher bond strength compared with the other groups. PMID:26225104

  13. Planning and interpreting cement bond logs; Implementation of an expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K.; Wydrinski, R.; Feldman, D.S. )

    1991-07-01

    The Cement Bond Log Advisor is an expert system being developed to assist users in the design, evaluation, and interpretation of cement bond logs (CBL's). CBL's are produced by sonic tools run after the casing is cemented in a well to determine how well the cement is bonded to the casing and formation and whether a cement squeeze jog should be attempted. During the development of program, two particular challenges were encountered and resolved in ways that might be of general interest to developers of expert system applications for the petroleum industry. The first challenge was to find an efficient and effective method for guiding the user in correlating and interpreting the relationships between multiple sources of continuous visual data (the various waveforms making up the log output). Second, the nomographs, which correlate log amplitudes with cement compressive strength and are used in the log interpretation, were derive from empirical data and were not readily reduced to functional relationships through traditional curve-fitting techniques. The use of adductive induction was found to be effective in deriving suitable relationships. The paper focuses on the techniques used to implement the application, with emphasis placed on how the two challenges described above were met.

  14. Influence of adhesive cementation systems on the bond strength of relined fiber posts to root dentin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raquel Viana; Sampaio, Camila Sobral; Pacheco, Rafael Rocha; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    Glass fiber post cementation procedures have undergone significant development. Relining the post with composite resin is a technique that aims to reduce resin cement thickness and consequently problems inherent to polymerization. Evidence is sparse regarding the efficacy of bonding procedures at increasing depths (from cervical to apical) using different adhesive cementation techniques. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength (PBS) of composite resin relined glass fiber posts cemented to bovine root dentin using different adhesive cementation protocols. Eighteen bovine teeth (n=6) were embedded in polystyrene resin blocks, and the crowns were sectioned leaving a root portion of 20 mm in length. Root canals were prepared using rotary instruments provided by the post manufacturer (Whitepost DC #1), resulting in a uniform root canal preparation. The root canals were lubricated with a water-soluble glycerin gel. Silane (Prosil) was applied and the posts relined with a microhybrid composite resin (Filtek Z100) to conform to the root canal anatomy. Three adhesive cementation protocols were evaluated: a 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose) in combination with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC); a universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) associated with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Ultimate); and a self-adhesive dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2). The roots were sectioned, resulting in four 2-mm segments at 4 different depths (cervical to apical) and evaluated by the PBS test, using a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) at 0.5 mm/min, until failure. Interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and failures were classified as cohesive failure in composite resin, cohesive failure in cement, cohesive failure in root dentin, adhesive failure, or mixed. Data were analyzed by 2-way split-plot ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). No

  15. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to different treated indirect composites.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, M Victoria; Ceballos, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-adhesive and a total-etch resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites. Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm(2) were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α = 0.05). A significant influence of the resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-adhesive resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

  16. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coating with 110 µm Al2O3 particles which modified with silica; and, Group 3, tribochemical treatment - silica coating + silanization. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours before testing shear bond strength. Results Silica coating and tribochemical treatment significantly increased the bond strength of the MA, UN, BR, BI, SE and CL to zirconia compared to #600 polishing. For both #600 polished and silica coating treatments, MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement CL had the highest bond strengths to zirconia. Conclusion Applying silica coating and tribochemical treatment improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to zirconia, especially for CL. PMID:20690416

  17. Fracture resistance of zirconia FPDs with adhesive bonding versus conventional cementation.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Hmaidouch, Rim; Behr, Michael; Handel, Gerhard; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of three different zirconia fixed partial dentures (FPDs) with different cementation methods. Forty-eight three-unit FPDs were adhesively bonded (AB) or conventionally cemented (CC). Sixteen glass-infiltrated zirconia FPDs were used as a control. Fracture resistance was determined after aging. The zirconia systems showed no significant different fracture forces with the different bonding methods (CC: Cercon [1,231.5 ± 410.1 N], Ceramill [1,311.3 ± 318.3 N], Vita YZ [1,269.0 ± 317.4 N]; AB: Cercon [1,072.3 ± 516.7 N], Ceramill [1,358.6 ± 176.4 N], Vita YZ [1,270.6 ± 267.6N]) or between the different materials. The control group provided significantly lower fracture strength. Regarding fracture resistance, adhesive bonding or conventional cementation of zirconia FPDs showed no restrictions for posterior application.

  18. Effect of surface treatment and type of cement on push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts.

    PubMed

    Almufleh, Balqees S; Aleisa, Khalil I; Morgano, Steven M

    2014-10-01

    The effect of the surface treatment of zirconium oxide posts on their push-out bond strength is controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 2 surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconium oxide posts cemented with different cements and to assess the failure mode. Seventy extracted human teeth were divided into 7 groups (n=10). Custom zirconium oxide posts (Cercon; Degudent) were fabricated for 6 groups. Posts in 3 groups were airborne-particle abraded (A). Posts in the other 3 groups were tribochemical silica coated (T). Three cements were used. Zinc phosphate cement was used to cement the zirconium oxide posts in groups AZ and TZ, RelyX ARC cement was used in groups ARA and TRA, and RelyX Unicem cement was used in groups ARU and TRU. Group C contained custom metal posts cemented with zinc phosphate cement. Specimens were horizontally sectioned into 3 sections and subjected to a push-out test. A mixed model analysis of variance, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey multiple comparison tests were used for statistical analysis. The highest push-out bond strength was recorded for Group ARU (21.03 MPa), and the lowest was recorded for Group ARA (7.57 MPa). No significant difference in push-out bond strength was found among the different surface treatments and root regions (P>.05). The type of cement had a significant effect on the push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts (P=.049). RelyX Unicem cement recorded (19.57 ±8.83 MPa) significantly higher push-out bond strength compared with zinc phosphate (9.95 ±6.31 MPa) and RelyX ARC cements (9.39 ±5.45 MPa). Adhesive failure at the post-cement interface was recorded for 75% of the posts cemented with zinc phosphate and RelyX ARC cements, while mixed failure was recorded for 75% of the posts cemented with RelyX Unicem cement. The type of cement used resulted in a statistically significant difference in the push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts, while both the surface treatment

  19. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    PubMed

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  20. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    PubMed Central

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (p<0.05). The microscopic analysis revealed a high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed fractures, and cohesive failures in the dentin. Conclusions The use of a previous dentin hybridization protocol is able to increase adhesive bonding resistance of self-adhesive resin cement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  1. Micro-shear bond strength of resin cement to dentin after application of desensitizing toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Goktas, Baris; Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of three desensitizing toothpastes on bonding of resin cements to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of 72 maxillary third molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and then divided into three groups according to three desensitizing toothpastes used: Sensodyne Rapid Relief (GlaxoSmithKline, SmithKline Beecham Ltd., Slough, UK), Signal Sensitive Expert (Unilever Sanayi ve Ticaret Türk A.Ş., Ümraniye, İstanbul, Turkey) and Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (Colgate Palmolive, New York, NY). Following bonding of the resin cement (Clearfil™ SA Cement, Kuraray Co, Osaka, Japan) to dentin, the specimens were light cured for 40 s with a LED (Elipar S10, 3M Espe, St. Paul, MN). The strength measurements were accomplished with a micro-shear testing machine (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL) at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that the application of desensitizing toothpastes had significant effects on bond strength of the resin cement tested to dentin (p < 0.05). Mixed failures were observed in all of the groups. The use of a desensitizing toothpaste before cementation might alter the bond strength of adhesively luted restorations.

  2. [Bonding properties of four different cements to glass fiber posts after different treatments].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Zhao, Sanjun; Shen, Lijuan; Xu, Shuai; Sun, Jiaqi; Chen, Jihua

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effect of four different cements on the bonding effectiveness of root canal dentine and fiber post before and after different treatments. A total of 216 freshly extracted sound single-root-canal mandibular premolars were randomly divided into four groups. After root canal treatment and post space preparation being conducted on the premolars, Fuji I, Fuji Cem, RelyX Unicem, RelyX ARC were used respectively to bond fiber posts and were marked with group A, B, C, and D. Microleakage, micromorphology of the bonded interfaces, and pull-out bond strength were evaluated in the immediate group, thermocycling group and thermomechanical loading group. In the immediate group, samples in group D showed the highest bond strength [(278 ± 26)N], followed by group C[ (219 ± 12) N], B[ (104 ± 23) N] and A[(73 ± 8) N]. Significant differences were found among all groups (P < 0.05) . A significant increase in bond strength was found in group A and B, whereas a decrease tendency was detected in group C and D after different treatments.Scanning electron microscope indicated that some little gaps were observed in group D after treatment, while a more intense bonding interface was found in group A and B. Microleakage scores in group A and B were lower than those in group C and D after aging treatments. Resin cement can achieve a better immediate bond strength, while resin-modified resin cement may acquire a better long-term retention.

  3. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  4. Orthodontic bracket bonding with a plasma-arc light and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Komori, A; Kojima, I; Ando, F

    2001-07-01

    Developments in light-curing technology have led to the introduction of a plasma-arc light-curing unit that delivers high-intensity output for faster curing. The purposes of this study were to determine the shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with a plasma-arc light-curing unit and to evaluate the durability of the resultant bond strength with thermal cycling. Comparisons were made between light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin. Two light-curing units were used in this study: a plasma-arc light-curing unit and a conventional light-curing unit. The mean shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement with the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units were 20.3 MPa and 26.0 MPa, respectively. An analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units. Light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin demonstrated similar bond strengths and exhibited no statistical differences. There was no statistical difference in bond strength between the teeth that were thermal cycled and those that were not. Failure sites for the brackets bonded with light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement appeared to be predominantly at the bracket-adhesive interface. The SDs of light-cured composite resin were high for both light-curing units. Whereas the coefficients of variation for light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement ranged from 20% to 30%, those of light-cured composite resin ranged from 40% to 60%. The bond strength of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with either a conventional light-curing unit or a plasma-arc light-curing unit surpassed the clinically required threshold. The plasma-arc light-curing unit may be an advantageous alternative to the conventional light-curing unit for orthodontic bracket bonding with both

  5. Method and apparatus for combined cement bond and acoustic well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. R. E.

    1985-01-22

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring acoustic signals having amplitudes of widely varying magnitude during one traversal of the borehole corresponding to indications of cement bonding along a casing as well as acoustic travel time through an increment of the formation. Variable attenuators are provided associated with acoustic receivers disposed within the logging sonde wherein attenuation may be automatically adjusted as a function of acoustic transmitter-receiver trigger pulses transmitted downhole, depending upon whether a cement bond or other log of acoustic signal information having a substantially different magnitude is desired.

  6. The influence of different cements on the pull-out bond strength of fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Shiratori, Fábio Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Glass fiber posts are commonly used to provide adequate support and retention for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth, but their resistance to dislodgement depends on their adhesion to root dentin. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of cement type on the pull-out bond strength of fiber posts. Seventy maxillary canines were endodontically treated and then divided into 7 groups according to the cement used for fiber post cementation as follows (n = 10): RelyX Unicem, BisCem, RelyX Luting 2, RelyX ARC, Panavia F, Enforce, and Allcem. The specimens were subjected to a pull-out bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results, in newtons, were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test (α = .05). RelyX Unicem (472.3 ± 8.9 N), BisCem (506.6 ± 9.2 N), RelyX ARC (498.0 ± 8.2 N), Panavia F (502.3 ± 7.0 N), and Allcem (470.0 ± 11.3 N) presented significantly higher bond strength than RelyX Luting 2 (241.8 ± 9.70 N) and Enforce (309.5 ± 6.3 N) cements (mean ± SD; P < .05). Except for Enforce, all resin cements produced pull-out bond strength values twice that of resin modified glass ionomer cement. However, all cements promoted adequate retention to fiber posts to withstand functional loads. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Performance of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement under load-bearing conditions: an in vivo evaluation and FE simulation.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schröder, Christian; Heinemann, Sascha; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2016-09-01

    In the past, bioactive bone cement was investigated in order to improve the durability of cemented arthroplasties by strengthening the bone-cement interface. As direct bone-cement bonding may theoretically lead to higher stresses within the cement, the question arises, whether polymethylmethacrylate features suitable mechanical properties to withstand altered stress conditions? To answer this question, in vivo experiments and finite element simulations were conducted. Twelve rabbits were divided into two groups examining either bioactive polymethylmethacrylate-based cement with unchanged mechanical properties or commercially available polymethylmethacrylate cement. The cements were tested under load-bearing conditions over a period of 7 months, using a spacer prosthesis cemented into the femur. For the finite element analyses, boundary conditions of the rabbit femur were simulated and analyses were performed with respect to different loading scenarios. Calculations of equivalent stress distributions within the cements were applied, with a completely bonded cement surface for the bioactive cement and with a continuously interfering fibrous tissue layer for the reference cement. The bioactive cement revealed good in vivo bioactivity. In the bioactive cement group two failures (33 %), with complete break-out of the prosthesis occurred, while none in the reference group. Finite element analyses of simulated bioactive cement fixation showed an increase in maximal equivalent stress by 49.2 to 109.4 % compared to the simulation of reference cement. The two failures as well as an increase in calculated equivalent stress highlight the importance of fatigue properties of polymethylmethacrylate in general and especially when developing bioactive cements designated for load-bearing conditions.

  8. Bonding self-adhesive resin cements to glass fibre posts: to silanate or not silanate?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A S; Ramalho, E S; Ogliari, F A; Moraes, R R

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) to glass fibre posts with or without a silane coupling agent. The SARCs tested were: Maxcem Elite (MXE; Kerr), RelyX Unicem clicker (UNI; 3M ESPE), seT capsule (SET; SDI), and SmartCem 2 (SC2; Dentsply Caulk). The conventional cement RelyX ARC (ARC; 3M ESPE) was evaluated as a reference. Rectangular-shaped flat posts were obtained (Angelus). After silanizing or not the posts, resin cement cylinders were built on the post surfaces. The cylinders were tested in shear after 24 h. Bond strength data were submitted to two-way anova and Student-Newman-Keuls' test (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification as adhesive failure, mixed failure involving the cement or mixed failure involving the post. For ARC, MXE and SET, the silanated groups had higher bond strengths. For SC2 the silane had no influence, while for UNI silanization decreased the bond strength. The conventional ARC had the lowest bond strength when the posts were not silanated; UNI showed the highest values. When the posts were silanated, SET had the highest values, followed by MXE, ARC and SC2; UNI had the lowest values. A predominance of adhesive failures was detected for all groups, with higher number of mixed failures when the posts were silanated. As the silane impaired or generally had no effect on the bond strength of SARCs to the glass fibre posts, and also as the bond strength of all SARCs was higher than the conventional cement when the posts were not silanated, it seems that silanization of glass fibre posts is not necessary when SARCs are used. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  9. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multi-step adhesive cementation versus one-step adhesive cementation: push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin before and after mechanical cycling.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marina; Rippe, Marilia Pivetta; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Monaco, Carlo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical cycling on resin push-out bond strength to root dentin, using two strategies for fiber post cementation. Forty bovine roots were embedded in acrylic resin after root canal preparation using a custom drill of the fiber post system. The fiber posts were cemented into root canals using two different strategies (N = 20): a conventional adhesive approach using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system combined with a conventional resin cement (ScotchBond Multi Purpose Plus + RelyX ARC ), or a simplified adhesive approach using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). The core was built up with composite resin and half of the specimens from each cementation strategy were submitted to mechanical cycling (45 degree angle; 37 degrees C; 88 N; 4 Hz; 700,000 cycles). Each specimen was cross-sectioned and the disk specimens were pushed-out. The means from every group (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test (P = 0.05). The cementation strategy affected the push-out results (P < 0.001), while mechanical cycling did not (P = 0.3716). The simplified approach (a self-adhesive resin cement) had better bond performance despite the conditioning. The self-adhesive resin cement appears to be a good option for post cementation. Further trials are needed to confirm these results.

  11. The impact of endodontic irrigating solutions on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Pelegrine, Rina Andrea; Silveira, Cláudia Fernandes de Magalhães; Bueno, Vanessa Castro Pestana da Silveira; Alves, Vanessa de Oliveira; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pereira, Gisele Damiana da Silveira; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based restorative materials, widely used to cement posts, may be influenced by irrigants used during endodontic chemical-mechanical preparation. This study evaluated the impact of endodontic irrigating solutions and adhesive cement systems on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. Ninety-six bovine incisors were divided into 12 groups (4 irrigants × 3 resin cements; n = 8). Prepared canals were irrigated with saline solution, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine gel, and posts were cemented with RelyX ARC, Panavia F, or RelyX U100. The bond strength was evaluated by means of the push-out test, and results were subjected to analysis of variance. The mean bond strength observed for the combination of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and RelyX U100 cement was significantly lower (8.82 MPa) than the values found for the other groups (P < 0.05). The other combinations of irrigating solution and resin cement had no adverse effect on the bond strength of the glass fiber posts to dentin.

  12. Effects of curing mode of resin cements on the bond strength of a titanium post: An intraradicular study.

    PubMed

    Reza, Fazal; Lim, Siau Peng

    2012-04-01

    To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post. Dual-cured resin cements have been found to be less polymerized in the absence of light; thus the bond strength of cements would be compromised due to the absence of light with a metallic post. Ten extracted teeth were prepared for cement titanium PARAPOST, of five specimens each, with Panavia F [dual-cured (PF)] and Rely×Luting 2 [self-cured resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement (RL)]; the push-out bond strength (PBS) at three different levels of the sectioned roots was measured. The failure modes were observed and the significance of the differences in bond strength of the two types of cement at each level and at different levels of the same type was analyzed with non-parametric tests. The push-out bond strength of the RL group was greater at all the three levels; with significant differences at the coronal and middle levels (P<0.05). No significant differences in PBS at different levels of the same group were observed. Cement material around the post was obvious in the PF group. The failure mode was mostly adhesive between the post and resin cement in the RL group. Bond strength was greater with self-cured, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, using titanium post.

  13. Bond strength and durability of glass ionomer cements used as bonding agents in the placement of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Klockowski, R; Davis, E L; Joynt, R B; Wieczkowski, G; MacDonald, A

    1989-07-01

    One potential risk of orthodontic treatment is the development of surface decalcification in association with use of brackets and bands. A bonding agent that could render tooth structure more resistant to the caries process clearly would reduce the negative iatrogenic outcomes of orthodontic therapy and thereby benefit the patient. Glass ionomer cement (GIC) bonds chemically to both enamel and dentin. In addition its high fluoride content makes enamel more resistant to caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of GIC when used as a bonding agent in the placement of orthodontic brackets. The materials tested were three GICs (Ketac-Fil, Ketac-Cem, and Chelon) and a standard bonding agent currently in widespread use (Rely-A-Bond). Brackets were attached to the facial surface of 96 premolar specimens and half the specimens for each bonding agent were thermocycled. Bond shear strength was determined with an Instron testing device by applying a load to the occlusal margin of each bracket to the point of failure. A two-way ANOVA indicated a significant bonding agent by thermocycling interaction (F = 4.78, p less than 0.01). Thermocycling decreased bond strength significantly for all materials, but had the greatest impact on Rely-A-Bond. However, Rely-A-Bond provided the strongest bond with and without thermocycling. Although bond strength for the standard orthodontic bonding agent deteriorates significantly under thermal stress, these results suggest that it is still greater than the bond strength provided by GIC materials.

  14. Comparison of Endodontic Medicaments on Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Dentin Using Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Ravanbod, Shirin; Ranjbarian, Parisa; Kousehlar, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Endodontic irrigants and medicaments may affect the bond strength of intracanal posts to root dentin. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX) on bond strength of fiber post cemented with resin cement to root dentin. Materials and Method: This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 36 mandibular premolars. Canals were prepared using the step back technique. After root canal irrigation, the teeth were divided into three groups of 12. Ca(OH)2 paste and CHX gel were used as intracanal medicaments in the first and second groups respectively. No intracanal medicament was used in the third group (control group). Access cavities were then sealed and the teeth were incubated for one week. The root canals were then filled using gutta percha and AH26 sealer and the teeth were incubated for 72 hours. Tooth crowns were then cut at the level of the cementoenamel junction and intracanal posts were placed. The teeth were mounted in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin, and incubated for one week .They were then sectioned into 1.5mm thick slices from their coronal surface using a fully automated cutting machine, and subjected to push-out test until failure. The load at debonding was recorded and data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, post-hoc test and t-test. The coronal margin of the root was at the level of the surface of acrylic resin in the mold. Results: The mean bond strength was 4.45 MPa in the Ca(OH)2, 2.45 MPa in the CHX and 2.48 MPa in the control group. The difference in this regard was statistically significant among groups (p= 0.04). The Ca(OH)2 group had significant differences with the CHX and control groups (p= 0.03 and p= 0.02, respectively). The difference between the CHX and control groups was not significant (p= 0.974). Conclusion: Based on the results, Ca(OH)2 increased the bond strength of fiber post to root dentin but 2% CHX had no effect on bond

  15. Effect of metal conditioners on the adhesive bonding of resin cements to cast titanium.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Sicknan Soares; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Spinola, Sandra Gouve; Fonseca, Renata Garcia; Ferreira, Anelise Rodolfo

    2007-09-01

    To assess the effect of metal conditioners on the bond strength between resin cements and cast titanium. Commercially pure titanium (99.56%) was cast using an arc casting machine. Surfaces were finished with 400-grit silicon carbide paper followed by air abrasion with 50-Microm aluminum oxide. A piece of double-coated tape with a 4-mm circular hole was then positioned on the metal surface to control the area of the bond. The prepared surfaces were then divided into 4 groups (n=10): G1, unprimed Panavia F; G2, Alloy Primer-Panavia F; G3, unprimed Bistite DC; G4, Metaltite-Bistite DC. Forty minutes after insertion of the resin cements, the specimens were detached from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was performed in a testing machine (MTS 810) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test with a .05 significance level. The fractured surfaces were observed through an optical microscope at 103 magnification. The G1 group demonstrated significantly higher shear bond strength (17.95 MPa) than the other groups. G3 (13.79 MPa) and G4 (12.98 MPa) showed similar mean values to each other and were statistically superior to G2 (9.31 MPa). Debonded surfaces generally presented adhesive failure between metal surfaces and resin cements. While the Metaltite conditioner did not influence the bond strength of the Bistite DC cement, the Alloy Primer conditioner significantly decreased the mean bond strength of the Panavia F cement.

  16. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P < 0.05). The Multlink™ showed between RelyX™ ARC and RelyX™ U100 (GI to GIII; GII to GV) ( P < 0.05). The ANOVA showed significant statistical similar ( P > 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC

  17. Effect of ceramic surface treatment on tensile bond strength to a resin cement.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Hood, James A A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treated ceramic surfaces produce the highest tensile bond strength to resin cements, independent of the ceramic microstructure and composition; and (2) the tensile bond strength test is appropriate for analysis of interfacial adhesion for ceramic-bonded-to-resin systems. Ceramic specimens were polished with 1-micron alumina abrasive and divided into four groups of 10 specimens for each of seven ceramic types. One of the following surface treatments was applied: (1) 10% ammonium bifluoride (ABF) for 1 minute; (2) 9.6% HF for 2 minutes; (3) 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 minutes; and (4) a silane coupling agent. The surface-treated areas were coated with an adhesive resin and bonded to a resin cement. Specimens were loaded to failure in tension using a testing machine. Tensile bond strength data were statistically analyzed, and fracture surfaces were examined to determine the mode of failure. Silane-treated surfaces showed statistically higher mean tensile bond strength values than surfaces treated with any etchant (HF, ABF, APF). HF produced statistically higher mean tensile bond strengths than ABF and APF. All failures occurred in the adhesion zone. The tensile bond strength test is adequate for analysis of the adhesive zone of resin-ceramic systems. The chemical adhesion produced by silane promoted higher mean bond strength values than the micromechanical retention produced by any etchant for the resin-ceramic systems used in this study.

  18. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-W<0.001). The worst techniques were Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Rely X; Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Multilink and Lava TM + CoJet + silane + Multilink. Adhesive failure (separation of cement and ceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-W<0.001). Electron microscopy confirmed that the surface treatments modified the zirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  19. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Kasra; Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Kharrazi fard, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr) and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm) were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20), high noble BegoStar (n=50) and gold coin alloys (n=50). Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (BegoStar and gold coin) received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours. Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001) and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01). The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01). In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001) while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001). For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa) was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa) (P<0.01). Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching. PMID:27536326

  20. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Material and Methods: Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Results: Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction “material” vs “root third” was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between “material” vs “application technique” (p<0.05). For ARC, U200, and MAX, significantly lower percentages of bubbles were observed when the Centrix syringe delivered the cements. Equivalent percentages of voids were observed for CSA, irrespective of the application technique (p>0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (p<0.05). Bond strength varied with the root third: cervical>medium>apical (p<0.05). No correlations were found between the bond strength and voids. Conclusions: Bond strength and voids are negatively influenced by the conventional application technique for

  1. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction "material" vs "root third" was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between "material" vs "application technique" (p<0.05). For ARC, U200, and MAX, significantly lower percentages of bubbles were observed when the Centrix syringe delivered the cements. Equivalent percentages of voids were observed for CSA, irrespective of the application technique (p>0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (p<0.05). Bond strength varied with the root third: cervical>medium>apical (p<0.05). No correlations were found between the bond strength and voids. Bond strength and voids are negatively influenced by the conventional application technique for luting fiber posts. The delivery system (Centrix) seems to produce better results

  2. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16). Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure. PMID:25383350

  3. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran; Khalighinejad, Navid

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16). Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure.

  4. Bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Rodrigues, José Roberto; da Silva, João Maurício Ferraz; Pagani, Clovis; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatments and thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cement to human enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were selected. The crowns of 40 teeth were transversally sectioned, exposing the mid-coronal dentin. The buccal surfaces of the other 40 teeth were grinded to obtain a 5 mm2 flat enamel area. Eighty resin blocks were produced and cemented to the dental surfaces with RelyX Unicem, then grouped according to the surface treatment (n=10): UnicemC with no conditioning, UnicemP with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s, and UnicemPA with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2). There were two control groups, one for enamel and the other for dentin: VR with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2) plus Variolink II. The enamel-dentin resin cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens, which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (5,000 x; 5°C/55°C). The samples were submitted to μTBS, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed statistical differences between UnicemC and the others. UnicemPA and VR showed better bond strength to dentin during the period before and after thermocycling, respectively. For the enamel, UnicemP showed better bond strength for both situations. Only for UnicemPA did the thermocycling significantly decrease the bond strength values. Within the limits of this study, it could be concluded that the bond strength is influenced by the surface treatments, and that thermocycling decreases the bond strength of all groups, but significantly only for UnicemPA.

  5. In vitro study of 24-hour and 30-day shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements used to bond orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lippitz, S J; Staley, R N; Jakobsen, J R

    1998-06-01

    Interest in using composite resin-glass ionomer hybrid cements as orthodontic bracket adhesives has grown because of their potential for fluoride release. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements (Advance, Fuji Duet, Fuji Ortho LC) used as bracket adhesives with a composite resin 24 hours and 30 days after bonding. The amount of adhesive remaining on the debonded enamel surface was scored for each adhesive. Mesh-backed stainless-steel brackets were bonded to 100 extracted human premolars, which were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C until being tested to failure in a testing machine. The hybrid cements, with one exception, had bond strengths similar to those of the composite resin at 24 hours and 30 days. Fuji Ortho LC had significantly lower bond strengths (ANOVA p < or = 0.05) than the other adhesives at 24 hours and 30 days when it was bonded to unetched, water-moistened enamel. Adhesive-remnant scores were similar for all cements, except for cement Fuji Ortho LC when it was bonded to unetched enamel. The resin-glass ionomer cements we tested appear to have bond strengths suitable for routine use as orthodontic bracket-bonding adhesives.

  6. The effects of complex glyoxal based modifiers on properties of cement paste and hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakova, A.; Kudyakov, A.; Efremova, V.; Latypov, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the effect of organic and glyoxal containing additives on the properties of cement paste and hardened cement paste. Complex modifying additives based on liquid glyoxal increasing the strength of the cement paste by 35-63% were developed. Physico-chemical investigations showed that hardened cement paste modified by polylactic acid with glyoxal has a homogeneous and fine-grained structure. Developed complex modifying additives containing glyoxal are approved for use in production technology of heavy cement concretes with advanced properties.

  7. Influence of the Cement Film Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Human Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Natália Araújo Silva; Ferreira, Reinaldo de Souza; Maurício, Marcos Henrique de Pinho; Paciornik, Sidnei; de Miranda, Mauro Sayão

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the influence of the cement film thickness on the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts in the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of root canal spaces. Thirty roots were randomly divided into three groups, according to the fiber post system's drills: (G1) #2; (G2) #3; (G3) #4. The posts were cemented using a self-adhesive cement, and a small amount of powdered Rhodamine B was used as a stain. Images of both sides of each slice were obtained before and after the push-out test. To determine the cement thickness, a macro routine was developed using the software KS 400. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test. G2 (14.62 ± 5.15 MPa) showed statistically higher bond strength values than G1 (10.04 ± 5.13 MPa) and G3 (7.68 ± 6.14 MPa). All groups presented higher bond strength values in the apical third. The bur diameter significantly influenced the results of the shear bond strength for the push-out test. The slight increase in the cement thickness allowed an increase in the values of shear bond strength when compared to very thin or very thick cement films. PMID:27143971

  8. Influence of the Cement Film Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Human Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Prado, Natália Araújo Silva; Ferreira, Reinaldo de Souza; Maurício, Marcos Henrique de Pinho; Paciornik, Sidnei; de Miranda, Mauro Sayão

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the influence of the cement film thickness on the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts in the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of root canal spaces. Thirty roots were randomly divided into three groups, according to the fiber post system's drills: (G1) #2; (G2) #3; (G3) #4. The posts were cemented using a self-adhesive cement, and a small amount of powdered Rhodamine B was used as a stain. Images of both sides of each slice were obtained before and after the push-out test. To determine the cement thickness, a macro routine was developed using the software KS 400. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test. G2 (14.62 ± 5.15 MPa) showed statistically higher bond strength values than G1 (10.04 ± 5.13 MPa) and G3 (7.68 ± 6.14 MPa). All groups presented higher bond strength values in the apical third. The bur diameter significantly influenced the results of the shear bond strength for the push-out test. The slight increase in the cement thickness allowed an increase in the values of shear bond strength when compared to very thin or very thick cement films.

  9. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase synthetic inhibitors on dentin microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stape, T H S; Menezes, M S; Barreto, B C F; Aguiar, F H B; Martins, L R; Quagliatto, P S

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or 24% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid gel (EDTA) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements. Composite blocks were luted to superficial noncarious human dentin (n=10) using two resin cements (RelyX ARC [ARC] and RelyX U100 [U100]) and three dentin pretreatments (without pretreatment-control, CHX, and EDTA). CHX was applied for 60 seconds on the acid-etched dentin in the ARC/CHX group, and for the same time on smear layer-covered dentin in the U100/CHX group. EDTA was applied for 45 seconds on smear-covered dentin in the U100/EDTA group, and it replaced phosphoric acid conditioning in the ARC/EDTA group for 60 seconds. After storage in water for 24 hours, specimens were prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. The results were submitted to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. ARC produced significantly higher μTBS (p<0.05) compared to the U100, except when EDTA was used. For ARC, no pretreatment and CHX produced higher μTBS than EDTA. For U100, EDTA produced higher μTBS; no statistical difference occurred between CHX pretreatment and when no pretreatment was performed. While CHX did not affect immediate dentin bond strength of both cements, EDTA improved bond strength of U100, but it reduced dentin bond strength of ARC.

  10. Bonding between oxide ceramics and adhesive cement systems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papia, Evaggelia; Larsson, Christel; du Toit, Madeleine; Vult von Steyern, Per

    2014-02-01

    The following aims were set for this systematic literature review: (a) to make an inventory of existing methods to achieve bondable surfaces on oxide ceramics and (b) to evaluate which methods might provide sufficient bond strength. Current literature of in vitro studies regarding bond strength achieved using different surface treatments on oxide ceramics in combination with adhesive cement systems was selected from PubMed and systematically analyzed and completed with reference tracking. The total number of publications included for aim a was 127 studies, 23 of which were used for aim b. The surface treatments are divided into seven main groups: as-produced, grinding/polishing, airborne particle abrasion, surface coating, laser treatment, acid treatment, and primer treatment. There are large variations, making comparison of the studies difficult. An as-produced surface of oxide ceramic needs to be surface treated to achieve durable bond strength. Abrasive surface treatment and/or silica-coating treatment with the use of primer treatment can provide sufficient bond strength for bonding oxide ceramics. This conclusion, however, needs to be confirmed by clinical studies. There is no universal surface treatment. Consideration should be given to the specific materials to be cemented and to the adhesive cement system to be used.

  11. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    PubMed

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were observed in the laser application group, while the lowest values were observed in the grinding group. Sandblasting and laser application resulted in significantly higher bond strengths than control treatment (P < 0.05). Ultrafast fiber laser treatment and sandblasting may improve the bond strength between resin cement and titanium.

  12. Evaluation of shear bond strength between dual cure resin cement and zirconia ceramic after thermocycling treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Kang, Cheol-Kyun; Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was performed to evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) between three dual-cured resin cements and silica coated zirconia, before and after thermocycling treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty specimens were cut in 15 × 2.75 mm discs using zirconia. After air blasting of 50 µm alumina, samples were prepared by tribochemical silica coating with Rocatec™ plus. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the dual-cure resin cement used: (1) Calibra silane+Calibra®, (2) Monobond S+Multilink® N and (3) ESPN sil+RelyX™ Unicem Clicker. After the resin cement was bonded to the zirconia using a Teflon mold, photopolymerization was carried out. Only 10 specimens in each group were thermocycled 6,000 times. Depending on thermocycling treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10) and SBS was measured by applying force at the speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. To find out the differences in SBS according to the types of cements and thermocycling using the SPSS, two-way ANOVA was conducted and post-hoc analysis was performed by Turkey's test. RESULTS In non-thermal aged groups, SBS of Multilink group (M1) was higher than that of Calibra (C1) and Unicem (U1) group (P<.05). Moreover, even after thermocycling treatment, SBS of Multilink group (M2) was higher than the other groups (C2 and U2). All three cements showed lower SBS after the thermocycling than before the treatments. But Multilink and Unicem had a significant difference (P<.05). CONCLUSION In this experiment, Multilink showed the highest SBS before and after thermocycling. Also, bond strengths of all three cements decreased after thermocycling. PMID:25722830

  13. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p < 0.05). The differences in the bond strengths after thermocycling were not remarkable as compared with the corresponding prethermal cycling groups (p > 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p < 0.05). After 24 hours, the specimens luted with Variolink II (5.3 +/- 2.2 MPa) showed the highest shear bond strength, whereas the specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.6 +/- 0.4 MPa) showed the lowest. After thermocycling, the bond strength values of specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.1 +/- 0.1 MPa) and Super-Bond C&B (1.7 +/- 0.4 MPa) decreased; however, this was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling

  14. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics: the effect of surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Cícero; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Bona, Alvaro Della

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (In-Ceram Zirconia) ceramics. Ten blocks (5 x 6 x 8 mm) of In-Ceram Alumina (AL), In-Ceram Zirconia (ZR), and Procera (PR) ceramics were fabricated according to each manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in composite. The specimens were assigned to one of the two following treatment conditions: (1) airborne particle abrasion with 110-microm Al2O3 particles + silanization, (2) silica coating with 30 microm SiOx particles (CoJet, 3M ESPE) + silanization. Each ceramic block was duplicated in composite resin (W3D-Master, Wilcos, Petrópolis, RJ, Brazil) using a mold made out of silicon impression material. Composite resin layers were incrementally condensed into the mold to fill up the mold and each layer was light polymerized for 40 s. The composite blocks were bonded to the surface-conditioned ceramic blocks using a resin cement system (Panavia F, Kuraray, Okayama, Japan). One composite resin block was fabricated for each ceramic block. The ceramic-composite was stored at 37 degrees C in distilled water for 7 days prior to bond tests. The blocks were cut under water cooling to produce bar specimens (n = 30) with a bonding area of approximately 0.6 mm2. The bond strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min). Bond strength values were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (< or = 0.05). Silica coating with silanization increased the bond strength significantly for all three high-strength ceramics (18.5 to 31.2 MPa) compared to that of airborne particle abrasion with 110-microm Al2O3 (12.7-17.3 MPa) (ANOVA, p < 0.05). PR exhibited the lowest bond strengths after both Al2O3 and silica coating (12.7 and 18.5 MPa, respectively

  15. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink® II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus® (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: Combination of CEREC® Blocs PC and Variolink® II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Conclusion: Variolink® II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used. PMID:26430296

  16. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  17. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  18. Influence of the Resin Cement Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Regina Maria Helen-Cot; Kinder, Gustavo Ross; Alfredo, Edson; Quaranta, Tarcisio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of resin cement thickness on the bond strength of prefabricated and customized glass fiber posts after storage in distilled water. Thirty human uniradicular roots were treated endodontically. The roots were divided into 3 groups: THIN (thin cement layer) - post space preparation with #0.5 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; THICK (thick cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; and CUSTOM (customized cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of a customized post (#0.5 glass fiber posts customized with resin composite). All posts were luted with self-adhesive resin cement. The push-out test was carried out after storage for 24 h and 90 days in distilled water at 37 °C. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05). Bond strengths were significantly higher for CUSTOM (9.37 MPa), than for THIN (7.85 MPa) and THICK (7.07 MPa), which were statistically similar. Considering the thirds, the bond strength varied in the sequence: apical (7.13 MPa) < middle (8.22 MPa) = coronal (8.94 MPa). Bond strength for 24 h storage was significantly higher (8.80 MPa) than for 90-day storage (7.40 MPa). It may be concluded that the thickness of resin cement influenced the bond strength of glass fiber posts. The customized posts presented higher bond strength. Storage in water for 90 days affected negatively the values of bond strength, especially for thick cement layers in the apical third.

  19. Bond Durability of Carbon-Microfiber-Reinforced Alkali-Activated High-Temperature Cement Adhering to Carbon Steel

    DOE PAGES

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    The study aims at evaluating the bond durability of a carbon microfiber (CMF)-reinforced alkali-activating calcium aluminate cement (CAC)/fly ash F (FAF) blend cementitious material adhering to carbon steel (CS) under stresses induced by a 350°C heat-25°Cwater cooling cycle. This cementitious material/CS joint sample was originally prepared in an autoclave at 300°C under a pressure of 8.3 MPa. For comparison, two reference geothermal well cements, Class G modified with silica (G) and calciumaluminum phosphate (CaP), were employed as well reinforced with CMF. In the CAC/FAF blending cement systems, the CAC-derived cementitious reaction products preferentially adhered to CS surfaces, rather than thatmore » of FAF-related reaction products. CMF played a pivotal role in creating tough interfacial bond structure of cement layer adhering to CS. The bond toughness also was supported by the crystalline cementitious reaction products including sodalite, brownmillerite, and hedenbergite as major phases, and aragonite, boehmite, and garronite as minor ones. The brownmillerite as an interfacial reaction product between cement and CS promoted the chemical bonding of the cement to CS, while the other phases served in providing the attractive bonding of the cement to CS. The post-stress-test joint samples revealed the formation of additional brown-millerite, aragonite, and garronite, in particular brownmillerite as the major one. The combination of chemical bonding and self-advancing adherence behavior of the cement was essential for creating a better interfacial bond structure. A similar interfacial bond structure was observed with CaP. The crystalline phase composition of the autoclaved cement revealed apatite, zeolite, and ferrowyllieite as major reaction products, and aragonite and al-katoite as the minor ones. Ferrowyllieite was identified as cement/CS interfacial reaction product contributing to the chemical bond of cement, while the other phases aided in providing the

  20. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PAMIR, Tijen; ŞEN, Bilge Hakan; EVCIN, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. Material and Methods Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM) or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM) glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2) or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM) was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1) no etching, (2) 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3) 30 s of etching, and (4) 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250), the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05). Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p<0.001). No significant differences were determined between the self-etching and etch-rinse & bond adhesives at any etching time (p>0.05). However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. Conclusions The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal. PMID:23329245

  1. Critical surface energy of composite cement containing MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate) and chemical bonding to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Dabsie, Firas; Grégoire, Geneviève; Sharrock, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Self-adhesive composite cements are increasingly used for cementing inlays/onlays, intraradicular posts, crowns and laminate veneers. Wider clinical acceptance is driven by simpler and faster handling procedures, much like observed for self-etching adhesives. 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) is a bi-functional monomer incorporated as the reactive ingredient in a contemporary self-adhesive cement. We have examined the surface free energy parameters of this cement and studied the mode of action of the cement on dentine substrate by contact angle measurements to determine the critical surface energy of the cement. Retention of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the acrylate moieties on the surface of hydroxyapatite particles suggests that MDP contributes to the overall bonding to dentine by forming ionic chemical bonds with surface calcium ions in dentine crystalites.

  2. LEACHING BOUNDARY IN CEMENT-BASED WASTE FORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cement-based fixation systems are among the most commonly employed stabilization/solidification techniques. These cement haste mixtures, however, are vulnerable to ardic leaching solutions. Leaching of cement-based waste forms in acetic acid solutions with different acidic streng...

  3. LEACHING BOUNDARY IN CEMENT-BASED WASTE FORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cement-based fixation systems are among the most commonly employed stabilization/solidification techniques. These cement haste mixtures, however, are vulnerable to ardic leaching solutions. Leaching of cement-based waste forms in acetic acid solutions with different acidic streng...

  4. Effect of pulpal pressure on the microtensile bond strength of luting resin cements to human dentin.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, N; Yiu, C K Y; King, N M; Tay, F R

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of pulpal pressure on the microtensile bond strength (mTBS) of luting resin cements to human dentin and the permeability of dentin surfaces pre-treated with an adhesive and a self-etching primer. Cylindrical composite blocks were luted with resin cements (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE: ARC; Panavia F, Kuraray Medical Inc.: PF; RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE: UN) in the absence or presence of simulated pulpal pressure. The application of Adper Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) and ED primer 2.0 (Kuraray) was performed under 0 cm H(2)O. After each resin cement was applied, the pulpal pressure group was subjected to 20 cm H(2)O of hydrostatic pressure for 10 min during the initial setting period. Testing for mTBS was performed on 0.9 mm x 0.9 mm sectioned beams after 24h water-storage. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to investigate the fractured surfaces after mTBS testing and additional dentin surfaces that were treated by an etchant, ED primer 2.0 and UN. Fluid permeability was measured on dentin surfaces that were applied with Adper Single Bond 2 and ED primer 2.0. Application of pulpal pressure reduced mTBS significantly in groups ARC and PF. Porous bonding interfaces due to water permeability through the cured adhesive were observed on fractured surfaces. Dentin surfaces that were applied with the adhesive and the primer were more permeable than smear layer-covered dentin. The mTBS of UN was significantly lower than ARC and PF regardless of the absence/presence of pulpal pressure. Fluid permeation during the initial setting period deteriorated the bonding quality of resin cements.

  5. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1–10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between other groups (P>0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05). Conclusion: Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC. PMID:25628698

  6. In vitro study of adhesive polymethylmethacrylate bone cement bonding to cortical bone in maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Marx, Rudolf; Kolk, Andreas; Said-Yekta, Sareh; Grosjean, Maurice B; Stoll, Christian; Tinschert, Joachim; Wirtz, Dieter C; Riediger, Dieter; Endres, Kira

    2010-12-01

    In the treatment of midface fractures, the fragments are immobilized using screws and plates for osteosynthesis until reunion has occurred. This method involves drilling holes for the insertion of the screws, which can be associated with additional fracturing of the corresponding bone owing to the complex architecture and thin layers of facial bone. To alleviate this problem, new adhesive techniques for fixing the plates for osteosynthesis have been investigated, mitigating the detrimental effects of screw hole drilling. In the present experimental study, the strength of this adhesive bond and its resistance to hydrolysis were investigated. To determine the adhesive bonding strength, a tension test was implemented. Osteosynthesis plates with screw holes 1.3 mm in diameter were fixed to cortical bone samples of bovine femur using ultraviolet (UV) light-curing polymethylmethacrylate bone cement. To facilitate bonding, the surface of the bone was conditioned with an amphiphilic bonding agent before cementing. UV light curing was implemented using either a conventional UV unit, such as is used in dentistry, or with a specialized UV unit with a limited emission spectrum but high luminosity. Reference control samples were prepared without application of the bone bonding agent. After this procedure, the samples were stored for 1 to 7 days at 37°C submerged in 0.9% saline solution before being subjected to the tension test. Without the bone bonding agent, the bonding strength was 0.2 MPa. The primary average bonding strength at day 0 was 8.5 MPa when cured with the conventional UV unit and 14 MPa for the samples cured with the specialized UV unit. An almost constant average bond strength of 8 and 16 MPa was noted for all samples stored up to 7 days after curing with the conventional and specialized UV unit, respectively. With the development of a new bone bonding agent, a method is now available to promote the bonding between the hydrophilic bone surface and the

  7. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE I REPORT AUGUST 1997 - JULY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.; YAGER,K.A.

    2002-08-05

    In exploring methods to recycle boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS), by-products generated from Keyspan's power plants, into commercially viable materials, we synthesized chemically bonded cements (CBC) offering the following three specific characteristics; (1) immobilization of hazardous heavy metals, such as Pb, Ni, and V, (2) rapid hardening and setting properties, and (3) development of high mechanical strength. The CBCs were prepared through an acid-base reaction between these by-products acting as the solid base reactants and the sodium polyphosphate solution as the cement-forming acid reactant, followed by a hydrating reaction. Furthermore, two additives, the calcium aluminate cements (CAC) and the calcium silicate cements (CSC) were incorporated into the CBC systems to improve their properties. Using a CBC formulation consisting of 53.8 wt% WWTS, 23.1 wt% CSC, and 23.1 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}]{sub 2} the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests showed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, and V metals leached out from the specimens were minimal. This formulation originally contained {approx} 28800 mg/kg of Pb, {approx} 6300 mg/kg of Ni, and {approx} 11130 mg/kg of V; the amounts leaching into the acid extraction fluid were only 0.15 mg/L of Pb, 0.15 mg/L of Ni, and 4.63 mgiL of V. On the other hand, CBC specimens derived from a formulation consisting of 42 wt% BA, 18 wt% CAC and 40 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}] displayed an excellent compressive strength of 10.8 MPa at an early curing age of 2 hours after mixing at room temperature. The reason for its rapid hardening was due to a high exothermic energy evolved by the acid-base reaction. Furthermore, when these specimens were immersed for 28 days in water at 25 C, and exposed for 20 hours to steam at 80 C, a very high compressive strength of 3.32 MPa developed. Two physico-chemical factors played an important role in improving the mechanical strength of

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution.

    PubMed

    Patil, Siddharam M; Kamble, Vikas B; Desai, Raviraj G; Arabbi, Kashinath C; Prakash, Ved

    2015-08-01

    The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 37(0)c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Shear bond strength of RMGIC luting cement was significantly higher than

  10. Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups.

  11. Effect of Coloring-by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement.

    PubMed

    Mahshid, Minoo; Berijani, Naeem; Sadr, Seyed Jalil; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Homayoon, Sepide Sorour

    2015-06-01

    Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin cement. This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored). To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade) and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance. Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001). The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa). Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades.

  12. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Young; Cho, Ga-Young; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Shin, Yooseok

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing modes. Sand-blasted CAD/CAM composite blocks were cemented using conventional resin cement, Rely X Ultimate Clicker (RXC, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) with Single Bond Universal (SB, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) for the control group or two self-adhesive resin cements: Rely X U200 (RXU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) and G-CEM Cerasmart (GC, GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan). RXU and GC groups included different curing modes (light-curing (L) and auto-curing (A)). Shear bond strength (SBS) analyses were performed on all the specimens. The RXC group revealed the highest SBS and the GC A group revealed the lowest SBS. According to Tukey’s post hoc test, the RXC group showed a significant difference compared to the GC A group (p < 0.05). For the curing mode, RXU A and RXU L did not show any significant difference between groups and GC A and GC L did not show any significant difference either. Most of the groups except RXC and RXU L revealed adhesive failure patterns predominantly. The RXC group showed a predominant cohesive failure pattern in their CAD/CAM composite, LavaTM Ultimate (LU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). Within the limitations of this study, no significant difference was found regarding curing modes but more mixed fracture patterns were showed when using the light-curing mode than when using the self-curing mode. PMID:28773334

  13. Effects of post surface conditioning before silanization on bond strength between fiber post and resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbarian, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Post surface conditioning is necessary to expose the glass fibers to enable bonding between fiber post and resin cement. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning on tensile bond strength (TBS) of a glass fiber reinforced post to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this in vitro study, 40 extracted single canal central incisors were endodontically treated and post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into four groups according to the methods of post surface treatment (n=10): 1) Silanization after etching with 20% H2O2, 2) Silanization after airborne-particle abrasion, 3) Silanization, and 4) No conditioning (Control). Adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) was used for cementation of the fiber posts to the root canal dentin. Three slices of 3 mm thick were obtained from each root. A universal testing machine was used with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute for performing the push-out tests. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05). RESULTS It is revealed that different surface treatments and root dentin regions had significant effects on TBS, but the interaction between surface treatments and root canal regions had no significant effect on TBS. There was significant difference among H2O2 + Silane Group and other three groups. CONCLUSION There were significant differences among the mean TBS values of different surface treatments. Application of hydrogen peroxide before silanization increased the bond strength between resin cements and fiber posts. The mean TBS mean values was significantly greater in the coronal region of root canal than the middle and apical thirds. PMID:23755337

  14. Effect of Coloring–by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Mahshid, Minoo; Berijani, Naeem; Sadr, Seyed Jalil; Homayoon, Sepide Sorour

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin cement. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored). To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade) and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance. Results: Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001). The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa). Conclusion: Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades. PMID:26884775

  15. Bond strength of fibre glass and carbon fibre posts to the root canal walls using different resin cements.

    PubMed

    Farina, Ana Paula; Cecchin, Doglas; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Naves, Lucas Zago; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bond strength of fibre glass and carbon fibre posts in the root canal walls cemented with self-adhesive (RelyX-Unicem) and chemical (Cement-Post) resin cements. Forty maxillary canines were divided into four groups according to the cement and post used and submitted to the push-out test (0.5 mm min(-1)). The data were submitted to statistical analysis (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni--P<0.05) and fracture analysis by Scanning Electronic Microscopy. Fibre glass presented the best results when cemented with RelyX-Unicem and Cement-Post (P<0.05). RelyX-Unicem presented the highest bond strength values for both posts (P<0.05). Fracture analysis showed predominance of cohesive fracture of post for RelyX-Unicem and adhesive fracture between dentin/cement and mixed for Cement-Post. The bond strength values were significantly affected by the type of post and cement used and the highest values were found for fibre glass posts and RelyX-Unicem. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  16. Microtensile bond strength of a newly developed resin cement to dentin.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shimpei; Fu, Jiale; Saikaew, Pipop; Chowdhury, Afm Almas; Fukuzawa, Naoyuki; Kadowaki, Yoshitaka; Kakuda, Shinichi; Hoshika, Shuhei; Nakaoki, Yasuko; Ikeda, Takatsumi; Tanaka, Toru; Sano, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of a newly developed resin cement, ECD-89 (ECD, Tokuyama Dental, Tokyo, Japan) to dentin and to observe the interfacial micromorphology by comparing with two commercial resin cements, Multilink Automix (MA, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and Panavia F2.0 (PF, Kuraray Noritake Dental, Tokyo, Japan). Flat dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed using #600 SiC. After application of primer and cement to the dentin surface, each cement was applied and cured with light (light condition) or without light (dark condition). The teeth were sectioned to obtain beams (1 mm×1 mm) after 24 h of water storage. The mean bond strengths and SDs (MPa) were: ECD: 68.6±14.9, MA: 39.2±18.9, PF: 39.4±18.5 and ECD: 54.5±22.4, MA: 36.7±15.6, PF: 13.4±4.46 when cured in light and dark condition, respectively. In both conditions, ECD-89 showed statistically higher µTBS than the others.

  17. Technical assessment of three layered cement-bonded boards produced from wastepaper and sawdust

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwape, Joseph Adeola; Fabiyi, James Sunday Osuntuyi, Edward Olusola

    2007-07-01

    The technical properties of three layered cement-bonded boards (CBBs) made from wastepaper and sawdust were investigated. The CBBs were produced at three density levels of 1000, 1200 and 1300 kg/m{sup 3} and at four cement/particle ratios of 2.0:1, 2.5:1, 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 on a weight to weight basis. The technical properties evaluated were modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS). The MOR values ranged from 4.85 to 11.69 MPa and MOE values ranged from 2.80 to 5.57 GPa. The mean values of WA and TS after 24 h of water soaking of the CBBs ranged from 18.18% to 40.49% and 3.55% to 12.13%, respectively. MOR and MOE of the CBBs increased with increase in board density, but MOR decreased with the increase in cement/particle ratio. On the other hand, WA and TS decreased with increase in board density and cement/particle ratio. CBBs produced from wastepaper and sawdust at cement/particle ratios of 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 are suitable for building construction such as paneling, ceiling and partitioning.

  18. Technical assessment of three layered cement-bonded boards produced from wastepaper and sawdust.

    PubMed

    Fuwape, Joseph Adeola; Fabiyi, James Sunday; Osuntuyi, Edward Olusola

    2007-01-01

    The technical properties of three layered cement-bonded boards (CBBs) made from wastepaper and sawdust were investigated. The CBBs were produced at three density levels of 1000, 1200 and 1300 kg/m3 and at four cement/particle ratios of 2.0:1, 2.5:1, 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 on a weight to weight basis. The technical properties evaluated were modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS). The MOR values ranged from 4.85 to 11.69 MPa and MOE values ranged from 2.80 to 5.57 GPa. The mean values of WA and TS after 24 h of water soaking of the CBBs ranged from 18.18% to 40.49% and 3.55% to 12.13%, respectively. MOR and MOE of the CBBs increased with increase in board density, but MOR decreased with the increase in cement/particle ratio. On the other hand, WA and TS decreased with increase in board density and cement/particle ratio. CBBs produced from wastepaper and sawdust at cement/particle ratios of 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 are suitable for building construction such as paneling, ceiling and partitioning.

  19. Effect of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength between Resin Cement and Ce-TZP/Al2O3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Shim, June-Sung; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Although several studies evaluating the mechanical properties of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 have been published, to date, no study has been published investigating the bonding protocol between Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and resin cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to air-abraded Ce-TZP/Al2O3 when primers and two different cement types were used. Materials and Methods. Two types of zirconia (Y-TZP and Ce-TZP/Al2O3) specimens were further divided into four subgroups according to primer application and the cement used. Shear bond strength was measured after water storage for 3 days or 5,000 times thermocycling for artificial aging. Results. The Y-TZP block showed significantly higher shear bond strength than the Ce-TZP/Al2O3 block generally. Primer application promoted high bond strength and less effect on bond strength reduction after thermocycling, regardless of the type of cement, zirconia block, or aging time. Conclusions. Depending on the type of the primer or resin cement used after air-abrasion, different wettability of the zirconia surface can be observed. Application of primer affected the values of shear bond strength after the thermocycling procedure. In the case of using the same bonding protocol, Y-TZP could obtain significantly higher bond strength compared with Ce-TZP/Al2O3. PMID:27382569

  20. Effect of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength between Resin Cement and Ce-TZP/Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Shim, June-Sung; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Shin, Yooseok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Although several studies evaluating the mechanical properties of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 have been published, to date, no study has been published investigating the bonding protocol between Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and resin cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to air-abraded Ce-TZP/Al2O3 when primers and two different cement types were used. Materials and Methods. Two types of zirconia (Y-TZP and Ce-TZP/Al2O3) specimens were further divided into four subgroups according to primer application and the cement used. Shear bond strength was measured after water storage for 3 days or 5,000 times thermocycling for artificial aging. Results. The Y-TZP block showed significantly higher shear bond strength than the Ce-TZP/Al2O3 block generally. Primer application promoted high bond strength and less effect on bond strength reduction after thermocycling, regardless of the type of cement, zirconia block, or aging time. Conclusions. Depending on the type of the primer or resin cement used after air-abrasion, different wettability of the zirconia surface can be observed. Application of primer affected the values of shear bond strength after the thermocycling procedure. In the case of using the same bonding protocol, Y-TZP could obtain significantly higher bond strength compared with Ce-TZP/Al2O3.

  1. A three-year clinical trial using a glass ionomer cement for the bonding of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Miller, J R; Mancl, L; Arbuckle, G; Baldwin, J; Phillips, R W

    1996-01-01

    Recent clinical studies measuring orthodontic bracket failure, when using glass ionomer cement as an adhesive, have reported a wide range of percentages of bracket failure. The present study recorded bracket failure over a 3-year period, longer than had been previously measured. Seventeen participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, either using glass ionomer cement or composite resin for bonding. In each group, brackets were bonded to incisors, canines, and premolars. Bracket failure was measured over the duration of comprehensive orthodontic treatment for all participants. Brackets bonded with the glass ionomer cement were more likely to fail (log-rank test; P < or = 0.022). This difference was clinically significant. At the present time, the disadvantage of extra bracket failures appears to outweigh potential advantages when considering glass ionomer cement for the routine bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  2. Effect of metal type and surface treatment on shear bond strength of resin cement (in vitro study)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Helou, Hiba; Swed, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures appeared to prevent the excessive preparation of dental tissue. Investigation of surface treatments to improve the bond of resin cements to metals may contribute to the longevity of these restorations. Due to the potential lack of ideal preparation form, the type of alloy and its surface pretreatment may have clinically relevant correlations with the retentive strength of castings to minimally retentive preparations. Aim: The aim of this search is to study the bonding resin cement strength to different types of the metal alloy due to the surface treatment. Purpose: Evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) between a palladium-silver alloy (Pb-Ag) and commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) cast alloy with resin luting cements. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 cylinders having 5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in height were divided into two different main groups of metal type: 60 cylinders cast from CP Ti Grade I (Tritan - Reintitan - Germany-Dentaurum) as a base metal and 60 cylinders cast from Pb-Ag (Status-Yamakin, Japan) as a noble metal. 30 cylinders from each type were embedded in acrylic resin, and the rest were left without embedded in acrylic resin. All of the cylinders were smoothed with silicon carbide papers and sandblasting with 50-μm aluminum oxide. Specimens of each metal type were divided into two subgroups, which received one of the following luting techniques: (1) Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), (2) Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent) plus metal zirconia primer (MZP). Every two cylinders from the same metal type and surface treatment were bonded to each other. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then thermal cycled (500 cycles, 5–55°C). After thermal cycling, the specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for an additional 24 h before being tested in shear strength. Data (MPa) were analyzed using T-s tests to study the significance of

  3. Influence of temporary cement remnant and surface cleaning method on bond strength to dentin of a composite luting system.

    PubMed

    Kanakuri, Katsuhito; Kawamoto, Yoshikazu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the influence of polycarboxylate temporary cement remaining on the dentin surface on the bond strength of a composite luting system. An acrylic resin plate was luted to bovine dentin with a polycarboxylate temporary cement (HY-Bond Temporary Cement Hard, HYB). The temporary cement was not used for the control groups. After removing the temporary cement with an excavator, dentin specimens were divided into five groups; 1) no subsequent treatment, 2) cleaning with a rotational brush (RTB), 3) cleaning with a rotational brush and non-fluoridated flour of pumice, 4) sweeping with an air scaler, and 5) treated with a sonic toothbrush. A silane-treated ceramic disk (IPS Empress) was bonded to each dentin specimen with a composite luting system (Panavia F). Shear testing results showed that the RTB groups exhibited the highest bond strength regardless of the use of temporary cement (P < 0.05). The use of a rotational brush with water coolant is recommended to achieve ideal bond strength between the Panavia F luting system and dentin to which HYB temporary cement was primarily applied.

  4. Effect of 2% chlorhexidine on dentin microtensile bond strengths and nanoleakage of luting cements.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, N; Yiu, C K Y; King, N M; Tay, F R

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pre-treatment by chlorhexidine on the microtensile bond strength (mTBS) of resin cements and nanoleakage at the resin-dentine interfaces. Cylindrical composite blocks were luted to human dentine using resin cements (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE: ARC; Panavia F, Kuraray Medical Inc.: PF; RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE: UN) with/without pre-treatment by 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CAVITY CLEANSER, Bisco, Inc., Schaumburg, IL, USA). CAVITY CLEANSER was applied on the acid etched dentine for 60s in the ARC group, and on smear layer-covered dentine in the PF and UN groups. After storage in water for 24h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 1mm thick slabs and further into 0.9mm x 0.9mm beams. After immersion in water or ammoniacal silver nitrate for 24h, the beams were stressed to failure in tension. The fractured surfaces were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) using backscattered electron mode. The silver-stained slabs were used to examine nanoleakage within the bonded interface by FE-SEM. The resin cement and chlorhexidine treatment had significant effects (p<0.0001) on mTBS; while the storage media had no significant effect (p=0.435). The mTBS of ARC was significantly higher than the other cements. Chlorhexidine reduced mTBS and produced pronounced nanoleakage when PF and UC were luted to dentine. Pre-treatment with chlorhexidine affected the integrity of dentine bonding with PF and UC, while there was no adverse effect on coupling of ARC.

  5. Tensile bond strength of resin luting cement to a porcelain-fusing noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoknorm, R; Isidor, F; Ravnholt, G

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strength of resin composites to a noble alloy for ceramic bonding after various surface treatments. The flat end of bars cast in the alloy were used as test specimens. Eighteen clinically relevant combinations of luting agent, airborne particle abrasion, and surface treatment were applied. After surface treatment, two bars were bonded together. Resin cement, either dual-polymerizing (Twinlook) or chemically polymerizing (Panavia EX, Panavia 21, or RBBC), was used as a luting agent. The specimens were subjected to 1,000 thermal cycles between 15 degrees C and 60 degrees C before tensile bond strength testing. The highest median bond strengths were obtained using the Silicoater MD method/Twinlook (20.6 to 26.1 MPa) or with tin-plating/ Panavia EX (24.0 MPa), but more low values were recorded among the latter specimens. Tin-plating/Panavia 21 gave median tensile bond strengths (18.1 MPa) similar to tin-plating/Panavia EX. The Silicoater MD method resulted in similar bond strengths with or without the addition of a layer of Opaquer. The traditional Silicoater method (8.0 to 12.4 MPa) gave significantly lower median tensile bond strength values, and the lost sugar crystals method resulted in a tensile bond strength of 15.4 MPa.

  6. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted with unfilled resin cement.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Carlos A; Monticelli, Francesca; Cantoro, Amerigo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Ferrari, Marco

    2009-02-01

    The study evaluates the behavior of different adhesive systems and resin cements in fiber post placement, with the intent to clarify the possible role of unfilled resin as a luting material for fiber posts. Two luting agents (Dual-Link and Unfilled Resin) for cementing fiber posts into root canals were applied either with All-Bond 2 or One-Step Plus, or without an adhesive system, and challenged with the push-out test. Slices of roots restored with posts were loaded until post segment extrusion in the apical-coronal direction. Failure modes were analyzed under SEM. Push-out strength was significantly influenced by the luting agent (p < 0.05), but not by the bonding strategy (p > 0.05). The best results were obtained in combination with Unfilled Resin with One-Step Plus. Dual-Link groups failed mainly cohesively within the cement, while Unfilled Resin demonstrated more adhesive fracture at the post interface. The results of this study support the hypothesis that adhesive unfilled resin application is essential for achieving high bond strength to radicular dentin.

  7. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer cement adhesives to caries-affected dentine.

    PubMed

    Hamama, Hhh; Yiu, Cky; Burrow, M F

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of: (1) chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR); (2) dentine surface treatments and (3) dentine substrates on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesives. One hundred and twenty permanent molars exhibiting moderate cavitation on the occlusal surface into dentine were used. Seventy-five carious molars were used for bond strength testing; the remaining 45 for micromorphological evaluation of the bonded interface. Caries was excavated with NaOCl-based CMCR (Carisolv), enzyme-based CMCR (Papacarie), or conventional rotary caries removal methods. Dentine surface treatment was performed using 37% phosphoric acid, 25-30% PAA or 20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 . Three-way ANOVA revealed that all three factors 'caries removal methods', 'dentine surface treatments' and 'dentine substrates' did not significantly affect bond strength (p > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the acid-base resistant layer was thicker in caries-affected dentine compared to sound dentine. NaOCl- and enzyme-based CMCR methods have no adverse effect on adhesion of RMGIC adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentine. Dentine surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid for 5 s has no negative effect on bonding of RMGIC adhesives to dentine compared with using polyacrylic acid for 10 s. RMGIC adhesives bonded well to both sound and caries-affected dentine. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; da ROSA, Ricardo Abreu; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO, Daniele; KUGA, Milton Carlos; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; do VALLE, Accácio Lins; VIDOTTI, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Material and Methods Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Results Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Conclusions Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values. PMID:25004052

  9. Effect of cement type and water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post.

    PubMed

    Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Spyrides, George Miguel; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de; Jnoub, Alexandre Abrão; Dias, Kátia Regina Hostilio Cervantes; Bonfantes, Gerson

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the cement type and the water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post. Glass fiber posts (Fibrekor, Jeneric Pentron) were luted to post spaces using a self-cured resin cement (C&B Cement [CB]), a glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem [KC]) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC FujiCEM [FC]) according to the manufacturers' instructions. For each luting agent, the specimens were exposed to one of the following water storage times (n=5): 1 day (T1), 7 days (T7), 90 days (T90) and 180 days (T180). Push-out tests were performed after the storage times. Control specimens were not exposed to water storage, but subjected to the push-out test 10 min after post cementation. Data (in MPa) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn`s test (α=0.05). Cement type and water storage time had a significant effect (p<0.05) on the push-out bond strength. CB showed significantly higher values of retention (p<0.05) than KC and FC, irrespective of the water storage time. Water storage increased significantly the push-out bond strength in T7 and T90, regardless of the cement type (p<0.05). The results showed that fiber posts luted to post spaces with the self-cured resin cement exhibited the best bonding performance throughout the 180-day water storage period. All cements exhibited a tendency to increase the bond strength after 7 and 90 days of water storage, decreasing thereafter.

  10. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Afonso, Daniele; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Honório, Heitor Marques; Valle, Accácio Lins do; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  11. Effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement.

    PubMed

    Moezzizadeh, Maryam; Nojedehian, Hanieh; Valizadeh Haghi, Haleh

    2017-01-31

    This study aimed to assess the effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement. A total of 120 specimens were used in this in-vitro, experimental study. Zirconia discs measuring 10×7×2 mm were cut from Y-TZP zirconia blocks, sintered, cleaned and received different surface treatments of sandblasting, bioglass powder coating+etching, bioglass powder coating+etching+silanization, bioglass slurry coating+etching, bioglass slurry coating+etching+silanization, silica coating+silanization, silica coating+etching+silanization and no treatment group (control). Then the microshear bond strength testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were done. Data were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U and the Kruskal Wallis tests. Significant differences existed in bond strength of different groups (p<0.001). The sandblasted and bioglass coated groups showed higher and the colloidal silica-coated groups showed lower bond strength compared to the control group.

  12. Bond strengths and patterns of failure of a zinc polycarboxylate cement on surface-treated gold alloys.

    PubMed

    Ogunyinka, A

    2000-08-01

    The study investigated the shear strengths and fracture characteristics of a zinc polycarboxylate cement on three sets of type III gold alloy bars whose surfaces were modified by alumina blasting, heat treatment and tin plating respectively. Each set comprised 20 bars with similarly treated surfaces, cemented in pairs with the polycarboxylate cement and stored in water at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The cement bond was then stressed to failure by application of forces in shear mode and the bond strength was determined. The mean bond strength for each type of treated gold alloy surface was calculated and then compared with the others by way of statistical analysis. The failed surfaces were observed and photographed with a stereophotomicroscope for subjective evaluation of the character of the failed surfaces. The strongest bonds were formed on the alumina-blasted surfaces where 70% of the bonds failed in an adhesive-cohesive fashion. The weakest bonds were formed on the tin-plated surfaces where cement failure was entirely adhesive. Bond strengths on the heat-treated surfaces were intermediate and a cohesive failure pattern was observed on 80% of the specimens. The differences in bond strengths on the three surfaces were statistically significant.

  13. Effect of Sandblasting and Type of Cement on the Bond Strength of Molar Bands on Stainless Steel Crowns.

    PubMed

    Bawazir, Omar A; Elaraby, Alaa; Alshamrani, Hamed; Salama, Fouad S

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the bond strength of molar bands cemented to stainless steel crowns (SSCs) using glass ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or polycarboxylate cement (PXC); and (2) assess the influence of sandblasting molar bands on the mean bond strength between the band and the SSC. Sixty SSCs and 60 molar bands were used. The inner surfaces of 30 molar bands were roughened by sandblasting prior to cementation. The bond strength was measured after dislodging the SSC using a push-out test. In the nonsandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.04). In the sandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.02), while there was only a marginal difference between GIC and RMGIC (P >.05). The sandblasted group exhibited superior bond strength overall. However, the only significant improvement was observed for GIC (P >.03). PXC showed the highest bond strength of molar bands to SSCs, while RMGIC showed the lowest. Sandblasting the inner surface of bands enhanced the bond strength of different cements.

  14. Effect of surface treatments of zirconia ceramics on the bond strength to resin cement.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Guy C; Botelho, Michael G; Matinlinna, Jukka P

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of a resin luting cement to zirconia surfaces that had received two novel surface pretreatment methods: etching of a pre-fired overglaze or paste liner on the zirconia substrate. Fully sintered zirconia disks were assigned to 6 groups according to the surface pretreatment: firing of 2 layers of paste liner which was then etched with hydrofluoric acid and treated with silane (Liner group); firing of 2 layers of overglaze which were then etched with hydrofluoric acid and treated with silane (glaze group); Rocatec treatment and silane application (Rocatec group); Rocatec treatment followed by ultrasonic cleaning and silanization (ultrasonic-Rocatec group); sandblasted with alumina (alumina group); as-sintered with no pretreatment (control group). Twenty composite resin cylinders were bonded to each group with Panavia F 2.0. Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups (n = 10) for 2 different storage conditions: 24 h water storage or 3 weeks water storage plus 6000 thermocycles between 5°C and 55°C. The shear bond strength was then determined. Statistical analyses with two-way ANOVA were conducted; the level of significance was set at p < 0.05. At 24 h, the shear bond strength values of all groups except the control showed no statistically significant difference. After artificial aging, the mean bond strength of all groups dropped, but the decrease in the glaze group was not statistically significant. The glaze group showed the highest shear bond strength. However, that was not statistically different from the liner or the Rocatec group without ultrasonic cleaning (p < 0.05). All the control specimens debonded spontaneously after aging. Ultrasonic cleaning after Rocatec treatment caused a reduction in shear bond strength, but the difference was not statistically significant. Both the fired paste liner and overglazed ceramic treated zirconia surfaces provided a strong and durable bond to resin

  15. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  16. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Curing Process of Polymethylmethacrylate-based Bone Cement Modified with Hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viano, Ann; Auwarter, Julie; Hoffmeister, Brent; Rho, Jae-Young

    2000-03-01

    The use of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based bone cement for implantation of metallic prostheses is becoming increasingly common. Failure of a cemented prosthesis often occurs when there is weak bonding at the bone/cement or cement/metal interface. The addition of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles, a synthetically produced version of the natural mineral in bone, may improve the adhesion by promoting bone growth into the cement itself. The curing time of PMMA bone cement determines the speed of implant insertion, which can affect the mechanical strength of the cement. Pure PMMA has a well-characterized curing time of 9-12 minutes, depending on environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. By measuring the propagation of ultrasonic pulses through a sample of bone cement, the curing process can be monitored. As the material hardens, the velocity of an ultrasonic pulse increases, and the attenuation decreases. These parameters were measured as a function of time for PMMA mixed with 0, 10 and 30investigation of the curing process as a function of hydroxyapatite concentration.

  17. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  18. Bonding all-ceramic restorations with two resins cement techniques: a clinical report of three-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-08-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel.

  19. Effect of dentin surface modification on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Allison C; Pavan, Sabrina; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2013-01-01

    To explore the potential to modify human dentin surface as a means of improving the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cement to dentin. Sound human molars were collected, and their occlusal surfaces were ground flat to expose polished dentin. Indirect composite resin cylinders were cemented to the teeth with RelyX Unicem or G-Cem self-adhesive cements following dentin surface treatments: 6.5% grape-seed extract, 5% glutaraldehyde, or 25% polyacrylic acid and control (no pretreatment). After 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned into beams to produce a cross-sectional area of 1.0 mm(2). Specimens of each group (n = 25) were individually mounted on a jig and placed on a tensile testing machine. A tensile force was applied to failure at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The use of polyacrylic acid on dentin prior to cementation with RelyX Unicem resulted in a statistically significant increase in μTBS compared to the control group (p= 0.0282). Polyacrylic acid (p= 0.0016) or glutaraldehyde (p= 0.0043) resulted in a statistically significant increase in μTBS of G-Cem to dentin when compared to the control group. Treatment with grape-seed extract did not result in a statistically significant increase in μTBS for either cement (p > 0.05). Priming dentin surfaces prior to the use of self-adhesive resin cements may be a promising means of improving μTBS. In addition, it was concluded that the results of this study are material dependent as well as being dependent of the type of dentin primer. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium.

  1. Adhesion of conventional and simplified resin-based luting cements to superficial and deep dentin.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mutlu; Mese, Ayse

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the bond strengths of conventional (chemically and dual-polymerized) and simplified resin-based luting cements with their corresponding adhesives to superficial dentin (SD) and deep dentin (DD). Recently extracted third molars (N = 70, n = 10 per group) were obtained and prepared for testing procedures. After using their corresponding etchants, primers, and/or adhesive systems, the conventional and simplified cements (Variolink II [group A, conventional], Bifix QM [group B, conventional], Panavia F2.0 [group C, conventional], Multilink Automix [group D, simplified], Superbond C&B [group E, conventional], Clearfil Esthetic Cement [group F, simplified], Ketac-Fil [group G, conventional]) were adhered incrementally onto the dentin surfaces using polyethylene molds (inner diameter 3.5 mm, height 5 mm) and polymerized accordingly. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) acted as the control material. Shear bond strengths (1 mm/min) were determined after 500 times of thermocycling. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Bond strength (MPa) results were significantly affected by the cement types and their corresponding adhesive systems (p ≤ 0.05). The shear bond strengths (MPa ± SD) for groups A-G were 14.6 ± 3.8, 18.9 ± 3.9, 5.5 ± 4.5, 3.1 ± 3.6, 1.1 ± 2.5, 15.5 ± 2.6, 7 ± 4.3 and 7.1 ± 5.8, 15.1 ± 7.8, 8.4 ± 7.3, 7.5 ± 7.3, 4.9 ± 5.1, 12.5 ± 2.1, 6 ± 2.6 for SD and DD, respectively. The level of dentin depth did not decrease the bond strength significantly (p > 0.05) for all cements, except for Variolink II (p < 0.05). On the SD, bond strength of resin cements with "etch-and-rinse" adhesive systems (Variolink II, Bifix QM, Super-Bond C&B) showed similar results being higher than those of the simplified ones. Simplified cements and RMGIC as control material showed inferior adhesion to superficial and deep dentin compared to conventional resin cements tested.

  2. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm below the dentine-enamel junction). Resin cements were applied on dentin surfaces and composite blocks were luted under constant seating pressure. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to time intervals. Specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of 1 mm(2) in diameter and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min. Both resin cements showed higher micro-tensile bond strength to superficial dentin than that to deep or cervical dentin (P < 0.001). Micro-tensile bond strengths of Panavia F2.0 were higher than those of Multilink Sprint at different dentin regions (P < 0.001). Immediate micro-tensile bond strengths were higher than those of delayed micro-tensile bond strengths for both resin cements (P < 0.001). It was concluded that resin cements with different chemical formulations and applications yield significantly different micro-tensile bond strengths to different dentin regions.

  3. Push-out bond strengths of fiber-reinforced composite posts with various resin cements according to the root level

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Noh, Young-Sin; Lee, Yoon; Min, Kyung-San

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine whether the push-out bond strengths between the radicular dentin and fiber reinforced-composite (FRC) posts with various resin cements decreased or not, according to the coronal, middle or apical level of the root. MATERIALS AND METHODS FRC posts were cemented with one of five resin cement groups (RelyX Unicem: Uni, Contax with activator & LuxaCore-Dual: LuA, Contax & LuxaCore-Dual: Lu, Panavia F 2.0: PA, Super-Bond C&B: SB) into extracted human mandibular premolars. The roots were sliced into discs at the coronal, middle and apical levels. Push-out bond strength tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and the failure aspect was analyzed. RESULTS There were no significant differences (P>.05) in the bond strengths of the different resin cements at the coronal level, but there were significant differences in the bond strengths at the middle and apical levels (P<.05). Only the Uni and LuA cements did not show any significant decrease in their bond strengths at all the root levels (P>.05); all other groups had a significant decrease in bond strength at the middle or apical level (P<.05). The failure aspect was dominantly cohesive at the coronal level of all resin cements (P<.05), whereas it was dominantly adhesive at the apical level. CONCLUSION All resin cement groups showed decreases in bond strengths at the middle or apical level except LuA and Uni. PMID:24049569

  4. [Curing mode of universal adhesives affects the bond strength of resin cements to dentin].

    PubMed

    Fu, Z R; Tian, F C; Zhang, L; Han, B; Wang, X Y

    2017-02-18

    To determine the effects of curing mode of one-step and two-step universal adhesives on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of different dual-cure resin cements to dentin. One-step universal adhesive Single Bond Universal (SBU), and two-step universal adhesive OptiBond Versa (VSA) were chosen as the subjects, one-step self-etching adhesive OptiBond All in One (AIO) and two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (SEB) were control groups, and two dual-cure resin cements RelyX Ultimate (RLX) and Nexus 3 Universal (NX3) were used in this study. In this study, 80 extracted human molars were selected and the dentin surface was exposed using diamond saw. The teeth were divided into 16 groups according to the adhesives (AIO, SBU, SEB, VSA), cure modes of adhesives (light cure, non-light cure) and resin cements (RLX, NX3). The adhesives were applied on the dentin surface following the instruction and whether light cured or not, then the resin cements were applied on the adhesives with 1 mm thickness and light cured (650 mW/cm(2) for 20 s. A resin was built up (5 mm) on the cements and light cured layer by layer. After water storage for 24 h, the specimens were cut into resin-cement-dentin strips with a cross sectional area of 1 mm×1 mm and the μTBS was measured. Regarding one-step universal adhesive (SBU) light cured, the μTBS with RLX [(35.45±7.04) MPa] or NX3 [(26.84±10.39) MPa] were higher than SBU non-light cured with RLX [(17.93±8.93) MPa)] or NX3 [(10.07±5.89) MPa, P<0.001]. Compared with AIO, light-cured SBU combined with RLX presented higher μTBS than AIO group [(35.45±7.04) MPa vs. (24.86±8.42) MPa, P<0.05]. When SBU was not lighted, the μTBS was lower than AIO [(17.93±8.93) MPa vs. (22.28±7.57) MPa, P<0.05]. For two-step universal adhesive (VSA) and control adhesive (SEB), curing mode did not affect the μTBS when used with either RLX or NX3 (25.98-32.24 MPa, P>0.05). Curing mode of one-step universal adhesive may affect the μTBS between

  5. Analysis of bond strength by pull out test on fiber glass posts cemented in different lengths.

    PubMed

    Webber, Mariana Benedetti Ferreira; Michida, Silvia Masae de Araújo; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; de Oliveira, Giovani Corrêa; Silva, Cleverson de Oliveira E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of pull-out test, the bond strength of fiberglass posts when cemented with different lengths in endodontically treated teeth. Sixty single-rooted bovine roots were cut in the cementoenamel junction with 21 mm length. They were endodontically treated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). Group 1 - Preparation of 2/3 of the remaining roots; Group 2 - Preparation of ½ of the remaining roots and Group 3 - Preparation of ¼ of remaining roots. For all groups it were used posts n = 3 (Exacto, Angelus, Brazil), and cemented with self-etching resin cement (RelyXU200). After cementing posts, the samples were thermocycled (10.000 cycles/5°C and 55°C). The pull-out test was performed on a universal testing machine (EMIC - DL500) and the values obtained were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (one-factor ANOVA) and multiple comparison test of Tukey, with level of significance of 5%. The mean values ± standard deviation in Newtons (N) were: Group 1 = 120.5 (±42.8) A, Group 2 = 103.1 (±31.2) AB, Group 3 = 41.2 (±22.4) C, P < 0.005. The preparation of ½ of remaining root appears to be a viable alternative when 2/3 of the preparation of the remaining root is not possible, but more results are needed for clinical validation.

  6. Bonding of contemporary glass ionomer cements to different tooth substrates; microshear bond strength and scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    El Wakeel, Aliaa Mohamed; Elkassas, Dina Wafik; Yousry, Mai Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) and ultramorphological characterization of glass ionomer (GI) cements; conventional GI cement (Fuji IX, CGI), resin modified GI (Fuji II LC, RMGI) and nano-ionomer (Ketac N100, NI) to enamel, dentin and cementum substrates. Materials and Methods: Forty-five lower molars were sectioned above the cemento-enamel junction. The occlusal surfaces were ground flat to obtain enamel and dentin substrates, meanwhile the cervical one-third of the root portion were utilized to evaluate the bonding efficacy to cementum substrate. Each substrate received microcylinders from the three tested materials; which were applied according to manufacturer instructions. μSBS was assessed using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc test. Modes of failure were examined using stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Interfacial analysis of the bonded specimens was carried out using environmental field emission scanning electron microscope. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that materials, substrates and their interaction had a statistically significant effect on the mean μSBS values at P values; ˂0.0001, 0.0108 and 0.0037 respectively. RMGI showed statistically significant the highest μSBS values to all examined tooth substrates. CGI and RMGI show substrate independent bonding efficiency, meanwhile; NI showed higher μSBS values to dentin and cementum compared to enamel. Conclusion: Despite technological development of GI materials, mainly the nano-particles use, better results have not been achieved for both investigations, when compared to RMGI, independent of tooth substrate. PMID:26038646

  7. Effect of different laser surface treatment on microshear bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin cement.

    PubMed

    Akhavan Zanjani, Vagharaldin; Ahmadi, Hadi; Nateghifard, Afshin; Ghasemi, Amir; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Abdoh Tabrizi, Maryam; Alikhani, Farnaz; Razi, Reza; Nateghifard, Ardalan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sandblasting, carbon dioxide (CO₂), and erbium,chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers on the microshear bond strength of zirconia to resin cement. Sixty-one sintered yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia blocks (10 × 5 × 2 mm) were prepared and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15); one sample was retained as a control. The samples were treated by aluminium oxide air abrasion, CO₂4W, Er,Cr:YSGG 3W, and Er,Cr:YSGG 2W, respectively. One sample from each group and the control sample were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Panavia F2.0 resin microcylinders were prepared and placed on treated surfaces, light cured, and incubated for 48 h. Microshear bond strength testing was done by a microtensile tester machine, and the type of bond failures were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey's test at a significance level of P < 0.05. Air abrasion showed the highest microshear bond strength (P < 0.05) among all groups. CO₂and Er,Cr:YSGG 3W laser showed significantly higher bond strength than Er,Cr:YSGG 2W (P < 0.05). Apparent micromechanical roughening and irregularities were seen in the air abrasion-treated samples, and the bond failure was mostly mixed type. In the laser-treated surfaces, the roughness was much less than the air abrasion-treated surfaces, and the mode of failure was almost pure adhesive. Air abrasion has a greater effect than CO₂and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers in the treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces to enhance the bonding strength of resin cement to zirconia. CO₂laser at 4W and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at only 3-W output power can be regarded as surface treatment options for roughening the zirconia surface to establish better bond strength with resin cements. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Evaluation of self-adhesive resin cement bond strength to yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic (Y-TZP) using four surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Miragaya, Luciana; Maia, Luciane Cople; Sabrosa, Carlos Eduardo; de Goes, Mário Fernando; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of four surface treatments on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to an yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic material (Lava Frame zirconia). Forty plates (8 x 6 x 1 mm) of a Y-TZP ceramic restorative material were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatments: control, no treatment; airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm Al2O3; coating with an MDP-based primer; conditioning with Rocatec System. The ceramic plates treated with each of the four methods were further divided into 2 subgroups according to the resin cement tested: RelyXTM ARC (ARC, conventional) and RelyXTM Unicem (Ucem, self-adhesive). The resin cements were put into PVC tubes (diameter 0.75 mm, 0.5 mm height) placed on the ceramic plate surfaces. After water storage at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were submitted to a microshear bond strength (μSBS) test at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The surface treatments significantly influenced the μSBS (p < 0.05). For the four surface treatments, UCem presented significantly higher μSBS than ARC (p < 0.05). For both resin cements, the best result was produced by the MDP-based primer: ARC 15.9 ± 5.0 MPa and UCem 36.2 ± 2.1 MPa. The highest μSBS values were presented by UCem on ceramic plates treated with the MDP-based primer (36.2 ± 2.1 MPa) and Rocatec system (37.4 ± 2.3 MPa). Irrespective of the surface treatment, the self-adhesive resin cement performed better in terms of bond strength to yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic than did conventional resin cement.

  9. Effect of resin cement type on the microtensile bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramic and dentin using different test assemblies.

    PubMed

    Marocho, Susana María; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of 3 different resin cements to lithium-disilicate ceramic using two assemblies: ceramic-cement-ceramic (CCC) and ceramic-cement-dentin (CCD). The bonding surfaces of lithium disilicate ceramic blocks (5 × 5 × 4 mm) (Nblock = 90) were etched with 4% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silanized. Flat dentin surfaces of human third molars were conditioned according to the respective manufacturer's specifications for three types of resin cements (ML: Multilink, Ivoclar-Vivadent; PF: Panavia F, Kuraray; SB: Super Bond C&B, Sun Medical). While one set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented to another equal set (CCC assembly), another set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented on flat dentin (CCD assembly). The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, and then sectioned along the x- and y-axes to obtain nontrimmed beam specimens. The beam specimens were randomly divided into two conditions: dry condition (DC - immediate testing); and aging condition (AC - thermocycling 12,000 times + water storage for 150 days). The µTBS bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope to categorize the failure types. The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). While the mean µTBS of CCC assemblies were significantly influenced by the cement type (p < 0.05) and aging (p < 0.05), CCD assemblies showed a significant effect of the cement (p < 0.05) but not the aging (p > 0.05). Without aging (DC), the mean µTBS (MPa) of SB (26.9) and PF (26.9) were significantly higher than ML (18.5) (p < 0.05). For CCC after aging (AC), SB (26.6) showed higher mean µTBS than those of PF (16.4) and ML (18.5) (p < 0.05). However, in CCD after AC, no significant difference was found between the groups (p > 0.05). In both CCC and CCD assemblies, pre

  10. An effect of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of resin cement to porcelain restoration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Ho

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine differences in shear bond strength to human dentin using immediate dentin sealing (IDS) technique compared to delayed dentin sealing (DDS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups with 10 teeth each. The control group was light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) and cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. IDS/SE (immediate dentin sealing, Clearfil™ SE Bond) and IDS/SB (immediate dentin sealing, AdapterTM Single Bond 2) were light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Clearfil™ SE Bond and Adapter™ Sing Bond 2, respectively), whereas DDS specimens were not treated with any dentin bonding agent. Specimens were cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. Dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) was left unpolymerized until the application of porcelain restoration. Shear strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a speed of 5 mm/min and evaluated of fracture using an optical microscope. RESULTS The mean shear bond strengths of control group and IDS/SE group were not statistically different from another at 14.86 and 11.18 MPa. Bond strength of IDS/SE group had a significantly higher mean than DDS group (3.14 MPa) (P < .05). There were no significance in the mean shear bond strength between IDS/SB (4.11 MPa) and DDS group. Evaluation of failure patterns indicates that most failures in the control group and IDS/SE groups were mixed, whereas failures in the DDS were interfacial. CONCLUSION When preparing teeth for indirect ceramic restoration, IDS with Clearfil™ SE Bond results in improved shear bond strength compared with DDS. PMID:21165186

  11. Bonding strength of resin cement to silicate glass ceramics for dental CAD/CAM systems is enhanced by combination treatment of the bonding surface.

    PubMed

    Shimakura, Yusuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Fujishima, Akihiro; Kunii, Jun; Miyazaki, Takashi; Kawawa, Tadaharu

    2007-09-01

    To increase the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated, leucite-reinforced glass ceramics with a resin cement, the effects of the following were investigated: surface modification by tribochemical (TBC) treatment, followed by combined application of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer. Bond strength was evaluated by a shear bond test. It was found that a silane coupling agent was useful for all the surfaces, particularly for the TBC-treated surface. This was because of the presence of a silica layer on the modified surface. The combination of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer on the TBC surface allowed marked improvement in bonding, whereby the bonding endured 20,000 cycles of thermal cycling. Therefore, TBC treatment in combination with a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer substantially increased the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated glass ceramics with resin cement, if the treatment conditions were appropriate.

  12. Effect of femtosecond laser beam angle on bond strength of zirconia-resin cement.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Yusuf Z; Kepceoglu, Abdullah; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed A; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Kılıc, Hamdi S; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-11-01

    Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic is widely used as an all-ceramic core material because of its enhanced mechanical and aesthetic properties. The bond strength of Y-TZP restorations affects long-term success; hence, surface treatment is required on ceramic boundaries. This study evaluated the effect of different laser beam angles on Y-TZP-resin cement shear bond strength (SBS). Forty plates of Y-TZP ceramics were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10). A femtosecond amplifier laser pulse was applied on Y-TZP surface with different incidence angles (90°, 75°, 60°, 45°). The resin cement was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces. The SBS of each sample was measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The SBS was analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Tukey tests. The results showed that the degree of laser beam angle affects the SBS of resin cement to Y-TZP. The laser beam was applied to a surface with a 45° angle which resulted in significantly higher SBS (18.2 ± 1.43 MPa) than other groups (at 90° angulation (10.79 ± 1.8 MPa), at 75° (13.48 ± 1.2 MPa) and at 60° (15.85 ± 0.81 MPa); p < 0.001). This study shows that decreasing of the angle between the ceramic surface and the laser beam increased the SBS between the resin cement and the ceramic material, as well as the orifice.

  13. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P<0.001). Rinsing protocol and cement type resulted in similar variations in the mean bond strength in all tests (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium

  14. The influence of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements on bonding to metal.

    PubMed

    Verzijden, C W; Feilzer, A J; Creugers, N H; Davidson, C L

    1992-02-01

    During the setting of a resin composite cement (RCC) used as an adhesive between a resin-bonded bridge and tooth structure, the adhesion may be disrupted by the development of shrinkage stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the shrinkage stress of three different RCCs on their adhesive and cohesive qualities when bonded to metal surfaces in a rigid set-up. Two opposing parallel NiCr discs (Wiron 77) were mounted in a tensilometer at a mutual distance of 200 microns and cemented with Panavia Ex, Clearfil F2, or Microfill Pontic C. The alloy surfaces were treated by either electrolytic etching, sand-blasting, silane-coating, or tin-plating. During setting, the discs were kept at their original mutual distance to simulate the extreme clinical situation of "complete" rigidity, where the casting and the tooth cannot move toward each other. The developing shrinkage stress was recorded continuously. During setting, the adhesive strength of the RCCs to silane-coated surfaces was always higher than their early cohesive strength. Electrolytically-etched surfaces as well as sand-blasted surfaces showed, in almost all cases, adhesive failure. The tin-plated samples showed mainly adhesive failure at the metal/resin interface. The highest bond strength values were found for silane-coated surfaces in combination with Clearfil F2.

  15. Shear Bond Strength of Bracket Bases to Adhesives Based on Bracket Base Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-13

    accepted technique since introduced by Newman in 1965. Bond strength values ranging from 6-8 MPa for composite resin cements were originally reported...bonding orthodontic brackets. Our in vitro study utilized a cured block of Transbond XT TM composite resin with minimal filler particles. This in...the specimen surface area. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was used to assess the amount of resin left on the bracket base after debonding. A

  16. Magnesia-Based Cements: A Journey of 150 Years, and Cements for the Future?

    PubMed

    Walling, Sam A; Provis, John L

    2016-04-13

    This review examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 150 years of work worldwide on magnesium-based inorganic cements, with a focus on both scientific and patent literature. Magnesium carbonate, phosphate, silicate-hydrate, and oxysalt (both chloride and sulfate) cements are all assessed. Many such cements are ideally suited to specialist applications in precast construction, road repair, and other fields including nuclear waste immobilization. The majority of MgO-based cements are more costly to produce than Portland cement because of the relatively high cost of reactive sources of MgO and do not have a sufficiently high internal pH to passivate mild steel reinforcing bars. This precludes MgO-based cements from providing a large-scale replacement for Portland cement in the production of steel-reinforced concretes for civil engineering applications, despite the potential for CO2 emissions reductions offered by some such systems. Nonetheless, in uses that do not require steel reinforcement, and in locations where the MgO can be sourced at a competitive price, a detailed understanding of these systems enables their specification, design, and selection as advanced engineering materials with a strongly defined chemical basis.

  17. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Materials and Methods Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. Results The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time

  18. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time. For the tested cements, the strongest bonds

  19. Influence of different surface conditioning protocols on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    PubMed

    Pisani-Proença, Jatyr; Erhardt, Maria Carolina Guilherme; Amaral, Regina; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Del Castillo-Salmerón, Ramón

    2011-04-01

    According to manufacturers, bonding with self-adhesive resin cements can be achieved without any pretreatment steps such as etching, priming, or bonding. However, the benefit of saving time with these simplified luting systems may be realized at the expense of compromising the bonding capacity. The purpose of this study was to assess whether different dentin conditioning protocols influence the bond performance of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Flat dentin surfaces from 48 human molars were divided into 4 groups (n=12): 1) control, no conditioning; 2) H(3)PO(4), etching with 37% H(3)PO(4) for 15 seconds; 3) SEBond, bonding with self-etching primer adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond); and 4) EDTA, etching with 0.1M EDTA for 60 seconds. The specimens from each dentin pre-treatment were bonded using the self-adhesive cements RelyX Unicem, Maxcem or Multilink Sprint (n=4). The resin-cement-dentin specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 7 days, and serially sectioned to produce beam specimens of 1.0 mm(2) cross-sectional area. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was performed at 1.0 mm/min. Data (MPa) were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparisons test (α=.05). Fractured specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope (x40) and classified as adhesive, mixed, or cohesive. Additional bonded interfaces were evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cement-dentin μTBS was affected by the dentin conditioning approach (P<.001). RelyX Unicem attained statistically similar bond strengths to all pre-treated dentin surfaces. H(3)PO(4)-etching prior to the application of Maxcem resulted in bond strength values that were significantly higher than the other groups. The lowest μTBS were attained when luting Multilink Sprint per manufacturers' recommendations, while H(3)PO(4)-etching produced the highest values followed by Clearfil SE bonding and EDTA. SEM observations disclosed an enhanced potential of the self-adhesive cements to form a hybrid

  20. Microtensile bond strength of glass ionomer cements to artificially created carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyungho; Oshida, Yoshiki; Platt, Jeffrey A; Cochran, Michael A; Matis, Bruce A; Yi, Keewook

    2006-01-01

    In this laboratory study, the microtensile bond strengths of a conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin modified glass ionomer cement (CRMGIC) to artificially created carious dentin and sound dentin were compared, and the ultrastructural morphology of the fractured interface was examined with a low-vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM). The specimens were divided into 4 groups: 1) a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil Plus Aplicap) placed on sound dentin; 2) a conventional GIC placed on artificially created carious dentin; 3) an RMGIC (Photac-Fil Aplicap) placed on sound dentin and 4) an RMGIC placed on artificially created carious dentin. Artificial carious lesions were created using a chemical demineralizing solution of 0.1 M/L lactic acid and 0.2% carbopol. GIC buildups were made on the dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's directions. After storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 1 x 1 x 8-mm beams for the microtensile bond strength test. The microtensile bond strength of each specimen was measured, and failure mode was determined using an optical microscope (40x). The fractured surfaces were further examined with SEM. Two-way analysis of variance showed that the mean microtensile bond strengths of a GIC and an RMGIC to carious dentin were significantly lower than those to sound dentin, and the mean microtensile bond strengths of Photac-Fil to both sound and carious dentin were significantly higher than those of Ketac-Fil Plus. Chi-square tests indicated that there was a significant difference in failure mode between the sound dentin and carious dentin groups. In sound dentin groups, cohesive failure in GIC was pre- dominant; whereas, mixed failure was predominant in carious dentin groups. SEM examination showed that the specimens determined to be cohesive failures under light microscopy in the Photac-Fil/Sound Dentin group were actually mixed failures under high magnification of SEM.

  1. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Heidari, Bijan; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15). In control group (CNT) no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001). The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001). In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples. PMID:25383349

  2. Bonding of Y-TZP to dentin: effects of Y-TZP surface conditioning, resin cement type, and aging.

    PubMed

    Bottino, M A; Bergoli, C; Lima, E G; Marocho, S M S; Souza, R O; Valandro, L F

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of two surface treatments, aging, and two resin cements on shear bond strength between dentin and yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal ceramic (Y-TZP). Eighty human molars were embedded in acrylic resin and sectioned 3 mm below the occlusal plane. These teeth and 80 cylindrical Y-TZP specimens (height, 4 mm; diameter, 3.4 mm) were divided into eight groups (n=10) using the following factors: Y-TZP surface treatment (Vi: low-fusing porcelain [vitrification] + hydrofluoric acid etching + silanization or Si: tribochemical silicatization); cementation strategies (PF: Panavia or CC: Clearfil); and storage (nonaging or aging). Bonding surfaces of 40 Y-TZP specimens received Vi treatment, and the rest received Si treatment. Half of the ceramic-tooth assemblies were cemented with Panavia, the rest with Clearfil. Shear tests were executed using 0.4-mm-thick wire at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). Fractures were analyzed. Y-TZP surface treatments did not affect bond strength (p=0.762, Vi = Si), while resin cements (p<0.001, Panavia > Clearfil) and aging (p=0.006, nonaging > aging) showed a significant effect. Most failures were in adhesive at dentin-cement interfaces; no failure occurred between zirconia and cement. When Y-TZP ceramic is bonded to dentin, the weakest interface is that between dentin and resin cement. The resin cement/Y-TZP interface was less susceptible to failures, owing to Y-TZP surface treatments.

  3. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). RESULTS The dentin cleaning methods did not significantly affect the SBS of ceramic discs to dentin as follows: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. CONCLUSION The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces. PMID:23236570

  4. Bond Strength of Resin Cement and Glass Ionomer to Nd:YAG Laser-Treated Zirconia Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Ghorbanian, Foojan; Ahrary, Farzaneh; Rajati Haghi, Hamidreza; Karamad, Reza; Yari, Amir; Javan, Abdollah

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation on the surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics. Forty-eight zirconia ceramic pieces (4 × 4 × 1 mm(3) ) were divided into four groups according to surface treatment as follows: two control groups (no treatment) for resin bonding (CRC) and glass ionomer (GI) bonding (CGC); two laser treatment groups (Nd:YAG irradiation, 3 W, 200 MJ, 10 Hz, 180 μs) for resin bonding (LRC) and GI bonding (LGC). The ceramics in the control groups and the laser groups were distinguished by the application of different cements (resin cement and GI). Following surface treatments, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement and GI. After bonding, the shear bond strength (SBS) of the ceramic to dentin was measured, and the failure mode of each specimen was analyzed using a stereomicroscope. A one-way ANOVA compared the average bond strength of the four groups. Pairwise comparisons among the groups were performed using the Games-Howell test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The means (± standard deviation) of SBS values in the CRC, CGC, LRC, and LGC groups were 3.98 ± 1.10, 1.66 ± 0.59, 10.24 ± 2.46, and 2.21 ± 0.38 MPa, respectively. Data showed that the application of the Nd:YAG laser resulted in a significantly greater SBS of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramics (p < 0.001). The highest bond strength was recorded in the LRC group. In the CRC group, 75% of the failures were of the adhesive type, compared with 66.7% and 83.3% in the LRC and LGC groups, respectively. In the CGC group, all failures were adhesive. Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via Nd:YAG laser improves the bond strength of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramic. GI cement does not provide sufficient bond strength of zirconia ceramics to dentin. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Is the bonding of self-adhesive cement sensitive to root region and curing mode?

    PubMed Central

    BOING, Thaynara Faelly; GOMES, Giovana Mongruel; GOMES, João Carlos; REIS, Alessandra; GOMES, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To evaluate the influence of two curing techniques on the degree of conversion (DC) of resin cements and on bond strength (BS) of fiber posts in different regions of root dentin. Material and Methods Twenty single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post spaces were prepared. The roots were randomly divided into two groups (n=10), according to the activation mode of the resin cement RelyX™ U200 (3M ESPE Saint Paul, MN, USA): conventional (continuous activation mode) and soft-start activation mode (Ramp). The posts (WhitePost DC/FGM) were cemented according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and, after one week, the roots were cross-sectioned into six discs each of 1-mm thickness, and the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of the root canals were identified. The DC was evaluated under micro-Raman spectroscopy and the BS was evaluated by the push-out test. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results Neither the activation mode nor the root regions affected the DC of the resin cement. Higher BS was achieved in the soft-start group (p=0.036); lower BS was observed in the apical third compared to the other root regions (p<0.001). Irrespective of the activation mode and root region, the mixed failure mode was the most prevalent. Conclusion The BS of fiber posts to root canals can be improved by soft-started polymerization. The DC was not affected by the curing mode. PMID:28198970

  6. Analysis of Bond Strength by Pull Out Test on Fiber Glass Posts Cemented in Different Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Mariana Benedetti Ferreira; Michida, Silvia Masae de Araújo; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; de Oliveira, Giovani Corrêa; Silva, Cleverson de Oliveira e

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of pull-out test, the bond strength of fiberglass posts when cemented with different lengths in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted bovine roots were cut in the cementoenamel junction with 21 mm length. They were endodontically treated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). Group 1 - Preparation of 2/3 of the remaining roots; Group 2 - Preparation of ½ of the remaining roots and Group 3 - Preparation of ¼ of remaining roots. For all groups it were used posts n = 3 (Exacto, Angelus, Brazil), and cemented with self-etching resin cement (RelyXU200). After cementing posts, the samples were thermocycled (10.000 cycles/5°C and 55°C). The pull-out test was performed on a universal testing machine (EMIC - DL500) and the values obtained were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (one-factor ANOVA) and multiple comparison test of Tukey, with level of significance of 5%. Results: The mean values ± standard deviation in Newtons (N) were: Group 1 = 120.5 (±42.8) A, Group 2 = 103.1 (±31.2) AB, Group 3 = 41.2 (±22.4) C, P < 0.005. Conclusion: The preparation of ½ of remaining root appears to be a viable alternative when 2/3 of the preparation of the remaining root is not possible, but more results are needed for clinical validation. PMID:25954063

  7. Development of a ceramic primer with higher bond durability for resin cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui

    2010-07-01

    To increase the bond durability of resin to the CAD/CAM ceramic surface, two types of two-bottle type ceramic primers, consisting of Primer A1 or A2 and Primer B, were designed. Primer A1 was prepared by dissolving 25, 50, or 100 mg of gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane in 1 mL of ethanol. Primer A2 was prepared by dissolving 50 mg of mixed silanes, consisting of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, in 1 mL of ethanol. Mole fractions of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane were 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mol%. Primer B was prepared after dissolving 0.01, 0.05 or 0.1 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid in ethanol by 50 vol%. Ceramic surface was silanated with a mixture of Primers A1 and B or Primers A2 and B for 1 min, and then air-dried. Commercial GC ceramic primer and Porcelain Liner M were utilized. Thereafter, dual-curing type resin cement was bonded to silanated ceramic surface through visible-light irradiation. Shear bond strength of resin to the ceramic surface was measured, before and after thermo-cycling. Addition of 0.01 or 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid to the gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane allowed for significant increases in the bond strength. However, thermo-cycling resulted in significant decreases of approximately 5 MPa in the bond strength. Conversely, when the mixed silane, where 30 mol% of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane dissolved in gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, was utilized with 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid, the reduction in the bond strength decreased to approximately 2 MPa. The designed ceramic primers exhibited higher ceramic bond durability than commercial ceramic primers.

  8. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  9. Effect of Endodontic Retreatment on Push-out Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Postbonding Interface of Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Kato, Augusto Shoji; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of endodontic retreatment on push-out bond strength and dentin interface of two resin cements used for fiber postcementation during endodontic retreatment. The root canals of 40 extracted human canines were prepared, obturated and divided into four groups (n = 10). Gutta-percha was partially removed and fiber posts were immediately cemented in groups 1 and 2 using Panavia F with ED Primer and RelyX™ U200, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, the root canal access was sealed with temporary restorative cement, specimens were stored for 30 days, endodontically retreated, and fiber posts were cemented using the resin cements applied to groups 1 and 2, respectively. Push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy analyses of different areas were performed. Data from push-out bond strengths were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Higher bond strength values were detected in the apical third for group 1 than group 3 (p < 0.05). No differences were observed in other comparisons between the same third of different groups (p > 0.05). Comparisons between different thirds in the same group revealed a higher bond strength in the apical third for group 1. Scanning electron microscopy showed formation of hybrid layer and extensive resin tags in group 1. No hybrid layer was observed in groups 2 and 4. Endodontic retreatment had adverse effects on the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third, but not on RelyX™ U200. A significant interaction was detected between endodontic retreatment and resin cement, which indicated that endodontic retreatment might adversely affect the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third.

  10. Comparison of shear bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture cement and mineral trioxide aggregate to composite resin.

    PubMed

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Bahari, Mahmoud; Motahari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2011-11-01

    Adhesion of composite resin and pulp capping biomaterials remarkably influences treatment outcomes. This in vitro study aimed to compare the shear bond strength of composite resin to calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) with or without acid etching. A total of 90 cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a central hole, measuring 4 mm diameter and 2 mm height were prepared. The blocks were randomly divided into three experimental groups based on being filled with CEM, MTA or RMGI. Samples in each group were then randomly divided into two subgroups, i.e. with or without phosphoric acid etching. Placing composite resin cylinders on the samples, shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. Failure modes of the samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Shear bond strengths in the etched and nonetched samples were not significantly different (p = 0.60). There was a significant difference in shear bond strength values of the three experimental materials (p < 0.001) and RMGI showed the highest strength values (p < 0.001); no significant difference was observed between MTA and CEM (p = 0.51). The interaction of the type of material and surface etching was statistically significant (p < 0.001). All of the samples showed cohesive failure mode. Acid etching of MTA, CEM and RMGI do not improve the shear bond strength of these materials to composite resin. Besides, shear bond strength values of MTA and CEM to composite resin, are favorable due to their cohesive mode of failure. When MTA and CEM biomaterials are used in vital pulp therapy, it is advisable to cover these materials with RMGI. In addition, if it is not possible to use RMGI, the surface etching of MTA and CEM biomaterials is not necessary prior to composite restoration using total-etch adhesive resin.

  11. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). RESULTS Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (P<.05). Heat drying after silanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (P<.05). However, no effect was determined for hydrogen peroxide etching before applying silane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). CONCLUSION Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study. PMID:27141252

  12. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001). All eight experimental means (MPa) were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05) and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3); Tyrian-One Step Plus/Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6); Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9); Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5); Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8) Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2); Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5); Xeno III/Variolink II/ 90 d (33.0±8.9). Conclusions: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  13. Influence of silane heat treatment on bond strength of resin cement to a feldspathic ceramic.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Martins, Maria Elizabeth Marques Nogueira; de Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of heat treatment (HT) of the silane on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a feldspathic ceramic. Ceramic (VITA VM7) and composite blocks (N=32) were divided into four groups (n=6 for bond test, n=2 for SEM) at random and subject to following sequence of conditioning: G1: HF 9.6%+Silane+Panavia F2.0, G2: HF 9.6%+Silane+HT+Panavia F2.0, G3: Silane+HT+Panavia F2.0, and G4: Silane+Panavia F2.0. HT was performed in an oven (100°C, 2 minutes). G1 (17.6±2.3 MPa) and G2 (19±3.2 MPa) showed significantly higher mean bond strength than those of G3 (9.1±2.8 MPa) and G4 (10.9±1.8 MPa). SEM analysis showed exclusively mixed failures. Silane HT did not increase the bond strength.

  14. Tensile Strength of Resin Cements Used with Base Metals in a Simulating Passive Cementation Technique for Implant-Supported Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Hilmo Barreto Leite; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Souza, Raphael Freitas de; Macedo, Ana Paula; Almeida, Rossana Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the tensile strength of two different resin cements used in passive cementation technique for implant-supported prosthesis. Ninety-six plastic cylinders were waxed in standardized forms, cast in commercially pure titanium, nickel-chromium and nickel-chromium-titanium alloys. Specimens were cemented on titanium cylinders using self-adhesive resin cement or conventional dual-cured resin cement. Specimens were divided in 12 groups (n=8) in accordance to metal, cement and ageing process. Specimens were immersed in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and half of them was thermocycled for 5,000 cycles. Specimens were submitted to bond strength test in a universal test machine EMIC-DL2000 at 5 mm/min speed. Statistical analysis evidenced higher tensile strength for self-adhesive resin cement than conventional dual-cured resin cement, whatever the used metal. Self-adhesive resin cement presented higher tensile strength compared to conventional dual-cured resin cement. In conclusion, metal type and ageing process did not influence the tensile strength results.

  15. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  16. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Dicalcium Silicate Based Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, N.; Chatterjee, A.

    2017-06-01

    It is imperative to develop low energy alternative binders considering the large amounts of energy consumed as well as carbon dioxide emissions involved in the manufacturing of ordinary Portland cement. This study is on the synthesis of a dicalcium silicate based binder using a low temperature hydrothermal route.The process consists of synthesizing an intermediate product consisting of a calcium silicate hydrate phase with a Ca:Si ratio of 2:1 and further thermal treatment to produce the β-Ca2SiO4 (C2S) phase.Effect of various synthesis parameters like water to solid ratio, dwell time and temperature on the formation of the desired calcium silicate hydrate phase is reported along with effect of heating conditions for formation of the β-C2S phase. Around 77.45% of β-C2S phase was synthesized by thermal treatment of the intermediate phase at 820°C.

  17. The effect of light-curing access and different resin cements on apical bond strength of fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Daleprane, B; Nemesio de Barros Pereira, C; Oréfice, R L; Bueno, A C; Vaz, R R; Moreira, A N; Magalhães, C S

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of light-curing access on the bond strength of fiber glass posts to the apical area of bovine roots using self-adhesive cement or dual-cured cement with an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. The root canals of 60 bovine teeth were endodontically treated and filled. A 15-mm-length post space was prepared and roots were randomly divided into three groups, simulating the levels of light-curing access: coronal (C), with 15-mm post space; middle (M), in which the coronal thirds of roots were cut out, leaving a 10-mm post space; and apical (A), in which the coronal and middle thirds of roots were cut out, leaving a 5-mm post space. Fiber glass posts (Reforpost # 3, Angelus) were cemented with RelyX U100 (3M ESPE) or RelyX ARC/Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus (SBMP) (3M ESPE) (n=10) and light-cured. After 24 hours, the apical thirds of roots were sectioned perpendicularly to the long axis and submitted to a push-out test (0.5 mm/min, 200 N). The Kruskal-Wallis test compared the three levels of light-curing access, and the Mann-Whitney test compared the cements. The bond strength was significantly higher in the groups C (p=0.028) and M (p=0.016) when U100 was used, whereas it was similar for both cements in group A. The bond strengths of posts cemented with ARC/SBMP were significantly higher in group A compared to group C (p=0.031). The type of cement used and the light-curing access level influenced the bond strength between glass fiber posts and root canals. The bond strength of the RelyX ARC/SBMP cement proved to be more dependent on photoactivation than was the RelyX U100 cement. The light-curing access level did not influence the apical bond strength of RelyX U100.

  18. Effects of Immediate Dentin Sealing and Pulpal Pressure on Resin Cement Bond Strength and Nanoleakage.

    PubMed

    Santana, V B; de Alexandre, R S; Rodrigues, J A; Ely, C; Reis, A F

    2016-01-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the simulated pulpal pressure (SPP) and immediate dentin sealing technique (IDS) effects on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage of interfaces produced by different luting agents. Two self-adhesive luting agents (RelyX Unicem [UC] and Clearfil SA Luting [SA]) and two conventional luting agents (Rely X ARC [RX] and Panavia F [PF]) were evaluated. Eighty human molars were divided in four groups according to luting agents. Each group was subdivided according to SPP (with or without) and dentin sealing (immediate or delayed) using Clearfil SE Bond (n=5). After IDS was performed, specimens were stored in water for seven days before luting procedures. Composite blocks were luted according to the manufacturers' instructions. One half of the specimens were subjected to 15 cm H2O of hydrostatic pressure for 24 hours before cementation procedures and continued for 24 hours afterward. Then, restored teeth were sectioned into beams and tested in tension. Two additional teeth per group were prepared for nanoleakage evaluation with scanning electron microscopy. Bond strength data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and Tukey test. μTBS of RX decreased when it was subjected to SPP without IDS. However, in the same conditions, μTBS of UC increased. The IDS prevented negative influence of SPP on μTBS of RX and PF; however, a decrease in μTBS of SA and UC was observed. Except for RX, IDS increased μTBS for all resin cements. Independent of SPP, the IDS technique obtained higher μTBS for PF, SA, and UC and did not influence RX μTBS.

  19. Evaluation of shear and tensile bond strength between dentin and ceramics using dual-polymerizing resin cements.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gurel; Hekimoglu, Canan

    2009-10-01

    The applications of dual-polymerizing resin cements for all-ceramic restorations have considerably increased. For a successful clinical outcome, the luting agent should have high bond strength, not only to the ceramic surface, but also to the tooth surface. The purpose of this study was to examine shear (S) and tensile (T) bond strengths between 2 all-ceramic systems and human dentin using 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements. The buccal surfaces of 120 freshly extracted human third molars were ground flat, parallel to the long axis. Sixty specimens were prepared from each of 2 all-ceramic systems (IPS Empress 2 (E) and Cergo Pressable Ceramic (C)). Twenty specimens were luted with each of the following resin cements: Nexus 2 (N) with Self-Etch Primer, Duo-Link (D), and Variolink II (V), with their respective bonding systems. All specimens were immersed in water at 37 degrees C for 1 week, before being thermal cycled for 500 cycles in 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C water. Shear (S) and tensile (T) bond strength tests were applied to 10 specimens from each group. Fractured surfaces were inspected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric 1-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis) followed by Duncan's multiple range tests for post hoc comparison and Mann-Whitney U test for 2 ceramic systems (alpha=.05). Significant differences were observed in shear and tensile bond strength values of the adhesive systems used (P<.05). Duo-Link showed the highest mean bond strength values, whereas Nexus 2 revealed lower shear and tensile bond strength values. Fracture modes were hybrid at the dentin interface and/or cohesive in dentin. Cementing agents/adhesive systems may influence the bond to dental hard tissues. Dual-polymerizing activators may have a negative effect on polymerization of the bonding agent.

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  1. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). Results: After 24 h, CEC luted to pre-treated zirconia achieved the highest MTBS. Using RXU, alumina and zirconia registered comparable MTBS. CAL failed prematurely, except when luted to sandblasted zirconia. After NaOClaq storage, CEC significantly lowered MTBS when luted to zirconia or alumina. RXU decreased MTBS only when bonded to silica-coated alumina. CAL recorded 100 % of pre-testing failures. Micromorphological alterations were evident after NaOClaq immersion. Conclusions: Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or

  2. Surface roughness and bond strength between Y-TZP and self-adhesive resin cement after air particle abrasion protocols.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rafael Santiago de; Campos, Fernanda; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Alves, Maria Luiza Lima; Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Gondim, Laísa Daniel; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different air particle abrasion (APA) protocols-with variations in particle types, duration of application, and the distance between the device tip and the ceramic-on the surface roughness (SR) of zirconia-based ceramic (yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal [Y-TZP]) and the shear bond strength (SBS) between Y-TZP and resin cement. In total, 135 sintered Y-TZP blocks were polished and divided into 9 groups according to 3 factors: particle (alumina vs alumina coated with silica), duration (5 vs 10 seconds), and distance (contact vs 10 mm away). All 3 factors significantly influenced the SR values between the experimental groups and the control group. For SBS, only the particle type was a statistically significant factor. Results showed that air particle abrasion with silica-coated alumina resulted in higher SBS, even though the SR values associated with those groups were not the highest.

  3. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  4. Shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements to Er:YAG laser-treated tooth structure.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation of enamel and dentin on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIC). Twenty molars were selected and the roots removed. The crowns were bisected, embedded in polyester resin and ground to plane the enamel or expose the dentin. The bonding site was delimited, and samples were randomly assigned according to the cavity preparation device: I--Er.YAG laser (350mJ/2Hz); II--Carbide bur (control group). They were subdivided according to the restorative material employed: A) Fuji II LC (GC); B) Vitremer (3M). Samples were then fixed to a metallic device where ionomer cylinders were prepared. Sequentially, the molars were stored for 24 hours and subjected to a shear bond strength test (50Kgf at 0.5 mm/minute). Means in MPa were: Enamel--IA) 4.77 (+/- 1.12); IB) 4.36 (+/- 1.50); IIA) 7.70 (+/- 1.53); IIB) 7.34 (+/- 1.52) and Dentin--IA) 3.13 (+/- 1.15); IB) 2.67 (+/- 0.74); IIA) 6.38 (+/- 1.44); IIB) 5.58 (+/-2.09). Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA. Adhesion for enamel was more efficient than for dentin (p < 0.01). The cavities prepared with a conventional bur (control group) presented higher bond strength values than those recorded for Er:YAG laser (p < 0.01). No significant differences were observed between the restorative materials. Based on these results, it was concluded that Er:YAG laser adversely affected the shear bond strength of RMGIC for both enamel and dentin.

  5. Effect of pre-cure temperature on the bonding potential of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Cantoro, Amerigo; Goracci, Cecilia; Papacchini, Federica; Mazzitelli, Claudia; Fadda, Giovanni Maria; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-05-01

    To assess whether the pre-cure temperature of resin cements significantly influenced the bonding potential to dentin. Forty extracted molars were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=5): Groups (1-4) RelyX Unicem (RU, 3 M ESPE) and Groups (5-8) Panavia F 2.0 (PF, Kuraray Co.), at pre-cure temperatures of 4, 24, 37, and 60 degrees C, respectively. Cements were used in dual-cure mode for luting composite overlays (Paradigm MZ100, 3 M ESPE) to dentin. Microtensile bond strength testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of cement-dentin interfaces were performed. Group 4 had to be eliminated as RU at 60 degrees C underwent such an accelerated curing that was already set at the time of dispensing. The bond strengths (MPa) measured at refrigerator, room, and intraoral temperature were, respectively: RU 5.4+/-1.7, 11.4+/-6.1, 10.6+/-4.2; PF 7.4+/-3.7, 13.9+/-6.2, 12+/-5.2. The statistical analysis revealed that both luting agents developed a significantly weaker adhesion when used at refrigerator temperature (p<0.05). No statistically significant differences in bond strength were recorded when either cement was used at 24 or 37 degrees C (p>0.05). Pre-heating of PF to 60 degrees C resulted in a significant increase in bond strength (20.7+/-9.4 MPa; p<0.05). SEM observations disclosed an enhanced potential of PF to form a hybrid layer as the temperature increased over 4 degrees C. RU exhibited a less porous and more homogeneous layer at intraoral than at refrigerated temperature. It is advisable to let refrigerator-stored resin cements warm up to at least room temperature prior to clinical use. Pre-heating to 60 degrees C enhances the bonding potential of PF.

  6. [Effect of different dentin cleaning agents on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jilan; Zeng, Liwei; Zhou, Hao; Deng, Lu; Zhou, Niangou; Chen, Ping; Jiang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to dentin by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and NaClO. Twenty-seven freshly extracted non-carious human premolars were prepared to expose the buccal dentin and randomly divided into three groups: control group (A group), EDTA group (B group) and NaClO group (C group). All teeth were bonded to dentin using a self-adhesive resin cement after the teeth in the A group were processed with distilled water. The B and C group were processed with 3%EDTA and 1%NaClO, respectively. After 24 hours at 37 °C water, the shear bond strengths of the twenty-four specimens were measured. All statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 software package. Each fractured specimen was examined under dental microscope. Three new specimens were cut, and the morphologies of the cement-dentin interface were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The shear bond strength in the A group, B group and C group was (8.55±0.63), (8.47±0.56) and (12.97± 0.59) MPa, respectively. The difference between A group and B group was no statistically significant (P>0.05), whereas the difference between C group and B group (or A group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). SEM observation of the cement-dentin interface in the C group showed good adaptation, but resin tags were not observed. The other two groups showed poor bonding interface. Most of the fractured adhesive dentin surfaces exhibited cohesive failure in the A group and B group. All the fractured adhesive dentin surfaces exhibited cohesive failure in the C group. 1% NaClO can increase the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin, but 3%EDTA has no effect.

  7. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago-Saads; van Amerongen, Willem-Evert; de Gee, Anton; Bönecker, Marcelo; Sampaio, Fábio-Correia

    2011-05-01

    The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and conditioned with polyacrylic acid (25%; 10s). Twenty four specimens of each GIC: Fuji IX (FJ-GC), Ketac Molar Easymix (KM-3M ESPE) and Maxxion (MX-FGM) were prepared according to the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) (12 enamel and 12 dentine), in a bonding area of 4.91 mm² and immersed in water (37°C, 24h). The shear bond strength was tested in a universal testing machine. Non-parametric statistical tests (Friedman and post-hoc Wilcoxon Signed Ranks) were carried out (p=0.05). The mean (±sd) of shear bond strength (MPa), on enamel and dentine, were: KM (6.4±1.4 and 7.6±1.5), FJ (5.9±1.5 and 6.0±1.9) and MX (4.2±1.5 and 4.9±1.5), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the GICs in both groups: enamel (p=0.004) and dentine (p=0.002). The lowest shear bond value for enamel was with MX and the highest for dentine was KM (p<0.05). It is concluded that KM has the best adhesion to both enamel and dentine, followed by FJ and MX.

  8. Effect of Cementation Technique of Individually Formed Fiber-Reinforced Composite Post on Bond Strength and Microleakage

    PubMed Central

    Makarewicz, Dominika; Le Bell-Rönnlöf, Anna-Maria B; Lassila, Lippo V.J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different cementation techniques of individually formed E-glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post on bond strength and microleakage. Methods: The crowns of extracted third molars were removed and post preparation was carried out with parapost drills (diameter 1.5 mm). After application of bonding agents individually formed FRC posts (everStick POST, diameter 1.5 mm) were cemented into the post spaces with either ParaCem®Universal or self-adhesive RelyX™Unicem, using two different cementation techniques: 1) an “indirect (traditional) technique” where the post was prepolymerized prior application of luting cement and insertion into the post space or 2) a “direct technique” where the uncured post was inserted to the post space with luting cement and light-polymerized in situ at the same time. After water storage of 48 hours, the roots (n = 10/group) were cut into discs of thickness of 2 mm. A push-out force was applied until specimen fracture or loosening of the post. A microleakage test was carried out on roots which were not subjected to the loading test (n= 32) to evaluate the sealing capacity of the post-canal interface. The microleakage was measured using dye penetration depth under a stereomicroscope. Results: Higher bond strength values (p<0.05) and less microleakage (p<0.05) were obtained with the “direct technique” compared to the “indirect technique”. None of the FRC posts revealed any dye penetration between the post and the cement. Conclusions: The “direct technique” seems to be beneficial when cementing individually formed FRC posts. PMID:23986792

  9. Effect of marginal sealant on shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement: used as a luting agent.

    PubMed

    Nazirkar, Girish; Singh, Shailendra; Badgujar, Mayura; Gaikwad, Bhushan; Bhanushali, Shilpa; Nalawade, Sumit

    2014-06-01

    Moisture sensitivity and dissolution has been a known drawback of glass ionomer cement (GIC). When used as a luting agent for cementation of casted indirect restoration, the exposed cement at the margins is often a primary factor for marginal leakage and consequent failure of the restoration. The following in vitro study was planned to evaluate the effect of a marginal sealant on GIC used as luting agent. Sixty healthy extracted premolars were selected and prepared to receive metal-ceramic prosthesis. The prepared restorations were cemented using GIC and were divided randomly into two groups. The specimens in Group A were directly immersed in artificial saliva solution without any protection at the margins, while the exposed cement for Group B specimens was protected using a marginal sealant before immersing it in the artificial saliva solution. The specimens were tested after 24 h using a crown pull test on the universal testing machine to measure the shear bond strength of the cement. The specimens in Group B showed statistically significant difference from the specimens in Group A with the mean shear bond strength of 6.60 Mpa and 5.32 respectively. Protection of GIC exposed at the margins of indirect cast restorations with a marginal sealant can significantly increase the longevity of the prosthesis by reducing the marginal leakage and perlocation of fluids. How to cite the article: Nazirkar G, Singh S, Badgujar M, Gaikwad B, Bhanushali S, Nalawade S. Effect of marginal sealant on shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement: Used as a luting agent. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):65-9.

  10. Effect of Marginal Sealant on Shear Bond Strength of Glass Ionomer Cement: Used as A Luting Agent

    PubMed Central

    Nazirkar, Girish; Singh, Shailendra; Badgujar, Mayura; Gaikwad, Bhushan; Bhanushali, Shilpa; Nalawade, Sumit

    2014-01-01

    Background: Moisture sensitivity and dissolution has been a known drawback of glass ionomer cement (GIC). When used as a luting agent for cementation of casted indirect restoration, the exposed cement at the margins is often a primary factor for marginal leakage and consequent failure of the restoration. The following in vitro study was planned to evaluate the effect of a marginal sealant on GIC used as luting agent. Materials and Methods: Sixty healthy extracted premolars were selected and prepared to receive metal-ceramic prosthesis. The prepared restorations were cemented using GIC and were divided randomly into two groups. The specimens in Group A were directly immersed in artificial saliva solution without any protection at the margins, while the exposed cement for Group B specimens was protected using a marginal sealant before immersing it in the artificial saliva solution. The specimens were tested after 24 h using a crown pull test on the universal testing machine to measure the shear bond strength of the cement. Result: The specimens in Group B showed statistically significant difference from the specimens in Group A with the mean shear bond strength of 6.60 Mpa and 5.32 respectively. Conclusion: Protection of GIC exposed at the margins of indirect cast restorations with a marginal sealant can significantly increase the longevity of the prosthesis by reducing the marginal leakage and perlocation of fluids. How to cite the article: Nazirkar G, Singh S, Badgujar M, Gaikwad B, Bhanushali S, Nalawade S. Effect of marginal sealant on shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement: Used as a luting agent. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):65-9 PMID:25083035

  11. Effect of time on tensile bond strength of resin cement bonded to dentine and low-viscosity composite.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rosângela Marques; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassú Resende

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS) of Panavia F resin cement (PF) applied on dentine pre-treated with ED Primer (ED) and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V (CLB) coated with a layer of low-viscosity composite Protect Liner F (PLF) at 10 min, 24 h and 12 months after curing. The labial surfaces of 60 bovine lower incisors were ground to obtain a flat dentine surface, allowing a demarcation of a 4.0 mm-diameter area with adhesive tape. The teeth were randomly divided in six groups; ED was applied in groups A I, A II and A III and CLB was applied, followed by PLF, in groups B I, B II and B III. A resin composite rod with a wire loop was luted directly to the prepared surface of each group with PF. The specimens of groups A I and B I were submitted to TBS test after 10 min. Groups A II and B II were submitted to TBS test after 24 h storage and groups A III and B III were submitted to TBS test after 12 months storage. Each specimen was inspected by SEM and classified according to the failure mode. Additionally, two representative specimens of each failure mode were sectioned for a composite/dentine interface SEM evaluation. No significant statistical differences were observed among the groups at 10 min and 24 h. Groups A III and B III presented the lowest TBS values (p<0.05) after 12 months storage. PF on resin-coated dentin (PLF) showed the highest TBS values and was statistically different to PF on dentine for all the groups. The fracture pattern was generally cohesive on the adhesive/hybrid layer for groups A I, A II and A III and cohesive on composite resin for B I, B II and B III. The use of a less hydrophilic self-etching system to pre-treat dentine, coating with a low-viscosity composite layer prior luting with resin cement, may provide a protection of the hybridised complex, allowing a dentine seal during the 12 months storage period.

  12. Influence of fluoride- or triclosan-based desensitizing agents on adhesion of resin cements to dentin.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Mine; Cal, Ebru; Gökçe, Bülent; Türkün, Murat; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-10-01

    Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of resin cements to dentin was evaluated. Intact premolars (N = 90) were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate; dentin surfaces were exposed, and they were randomly divided into two main groups of cements (Duolink (D), Variolink II (V); n = 45 per group) and then into three desensitizer subgroups (n = 15 per subgroup). Teeth in controls (C) were treated according to cements' adhesion protocols; the other two groups received either fluoride- [Aqua-Prep F (F)] or triclosan-based [Seal&Protect (T)] desensitizers. Ceramic disks (Empress 2) were adhered; specimens were thermocycled (×5,000 cycles, 5-55 ± 1°C, dwell time 30 s) and subjected to shear bond strength test (MPa ± SD) in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Failure types were classified using scanning electron microscope. For V, application of both desensitizers (29.6 ± 7.8 and 22.8 ± 2.8 for F and T, respectively) did not present significantly different results than that of the VC (21.2 ± 2.3; p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). In D, F (20.6 ± 2.4) showed significantly higher results (p < 0.05) than those in T (16.1 ± 3.9) and DC group (15.2 ± 2.3). V showed significantly higher results than D (p < 0.05, Bonferroni). F and T did not negatively affect the bond strength results with D and V. Adhesive failures were more frequent with both T (84%) and F (66%) in D; cohesive failures in the cement (88%) were more commonly observed with F in V. Both F and T desensitizers can be safely used prior to final cementation but F in combination with V seems to be more reliable, considering both the bond strength and the failure types.

  13. [Silicate coating of cemented titanium-based shafts in hip prosthetics reduces high aseptic loosening].

    PubMed

    Marx, R; Faramarzi, R; Jungwirth, F; Kleffner, B V; Mumme, T; Weber, M; Wirtz, D C

    2009-01-01

    For cemented hip prostheses, all requirements can be fulfilled by using forged Co/Cr/Mo stems. Co/Cr/Mo alloys, however, are contraindicated for allergy sufferers. For these patients, a cemented prosthesis made of titanium (alloy) would be indicated. Cemented stems from titanium (alloy), depending on the geometry of the prosthesis and its specific surface texture, however, may have loosening rates which are clinically not tolerable. In comparison to Co/Cr/Mo alloys, the greater roughness in conjunction with lesser abrasion resistance of titanium-based alloys leads to high loosening rates caused by abrasion. On the other hand, the greater surface roughness permits good mechanical retention of bone cement to the surface. Good mechanical retention enhances migration behaviour and reduces micromotions. However, there is no stable hydrolytic bond between bone cement and metallic surface; intermediate-term debonding between metal and bone cement is predictable. This debonding results in relative movements, consequently in wear particles which have their origin both from the rough metallic surface and from the PMMA cement. The roughness of the metallic surface operates as emery and with that, a rubbing wear from the PMMA. For the above reasons, a low or moderate roughness is essential for easily abradable implants such as shafts made of titanium (alloy) because low roughness provides a fail-safe running function in case of debonding. Thus, one must allow for inappropriate migration behaviour accompanied by greater micromotions due to insufficient mechanical retention in the case of low roughness. This can be accomplished by a silicate layer coating applied to the metal shaft surface via electrochemical "ECD" or physical vapour deposition "PVD". For analysis, specimens (screws for pull-out, cones for push-out tests) were sand-blasted, so that roughnesses between Ra = 0.8 microm (Rz = 4 microm) and Ra = 2.0 microm (Rz = 9 microm) were generated. The bond strengths observed

  14. The effects of Various Endodontic Irrigants on the Push-out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Sahebi, Safoora; Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Naghizade, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of various irrigants on the push-out bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods and Materials: A total of 140 dentin disks with a thickness of 1.5±0.2 mm and lumen size of 1.3 mm, were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10) and 4 control groups (n=5). The lumen of disks in groups 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9 were filled with CEM and groups 4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12 were filled with MTA. Control groups were filled with CEM and MTA. Specimens were incubated at 37°C for one day in groups 1 to 6 and seven days in groups 7 to 12. After incubation the samples were divided into three subgroups (n=10) that were either immersed for 30 min in 5.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or saline solution. The push-out bond strength values were measured by using a universal testing machine. The nature of the failures were determined by light microscope. Data was analyzed using the three-way ANOVA to evaluate the effect of material type, different irrigants and time intervals. Post hoc Tukey’s test was used for two-by-two comparison of the groups. Results: CEM cement significantly showed a higher push-out bond strength in comparison with MTA (P=0.001). The elapse of time significantly increased the bond strength (P=0.001). There was no significant difference between the irrigants used in this study (P=0.441). Bond failure was predominantly of mixed type in MTA and of cohesive type in CEM samples. Conclusion: Based on this study, endodontic irrigants did not influence the push-out bond strength of MTA and CEM cement. PMID:27790256

  15. The effects of Various Endodontic Irrigants on the Push-out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Safoora; Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Naghizade, Sina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of various irrigants on the push-out bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). A total of 140 dentin disks with a thickness of 1.5±0.2 mm and lumen size of 1.3 mm, were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10) and 4 control groups (n=5). The lumen of disks in groups 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9 were filled with CEM and groups 4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12 were filled with MTA. Control groups were filled with CEM and MTA. Specimens were incubated at 37(°)C for one day in groups 1 to 6 and seven days in groups 7 to 12. After incubation the samples were divided into three subgroups (n=10) that were either immersed for 30 min in 5.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or saline solution. The push-out bond strength values were measured by using a universal testing machine. The nature of the failures were determined by light microscope. Data was analyzed using the three-way ANOVA to evaluate the effect of material type, different irrigants and time intervals. Post hoc Tukey's test was used for two-by-two comparison of the groups. CEM cement significantly showed a higher push-out bond strength in comparison with MTA (P=0.001). The elapse of time significantly increased the bond strength (P=0.001). There was no significant difference between the irrigants used in this study (P=0.441). Bond failure was predominantly of mixed type in MTA and of cohesive type in CEM samples. Based on this study, endodontic irrigants did not influence the push-out bond strength of MTA and CEM cement.

  16. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Hong; Qian, Yue-Tong; Zhu, Song; Zhao, Su-Qian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested: (i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts: DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (α=0.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts. PMID:24177170

  17. Influence of different light sources on microtensile bond strength and gap formation of resin cement under porcelain inlay restorations.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, A N; Usumez, A

    2004-09-01

    Clinical success with ceramic inlays/onlays has been assisted by the ability to develop a reliable bond of composite resin to dental tissues. The purpose of this study was to test the efficiency of two different light sources on microtensile bond strength and the gap formation of resin cement under class II porcelain inlay restorations. Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were prepared in 30 freshly extracted, intact human premolar teeth. Then impressions were made and ceramic inlays were fabricated. In the cementation process, the resin cement/inlay combinations were exposed to two different photopolymerization units. The polymerizations through 15 specimens were performed with a conventional halogen light source for 60 s, and the other specimens were cured by a plasma arc light for 9 s. After the cementation process, two 1.2 x 1.2 mm wide 'I' shape sections per tooth were produced with a sectioning machine and sections were subjected to microtensile testing after 24 h or 1 week. Gap formation of specimens cured by different photopolymerization units were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistically significant differences were found between the microtensile bond strength of inlays exposed to conventional light and plasma arc curing unit (P < 0.001). Plasma arc curing units make it possible to polymerize composite in much shorter times than conventional curing unit. However, the samples polymerized with conventional halogen light produced better microtensile bond strength than the plasma arc unit.

  18. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  19. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Hong; Qian, Yue-Tong; Zhu, Song; Zhao, Su-Qian

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested: (i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts: DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (α=0.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts.

  20. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  1. Effect of zirconia surface treatment using nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid on the shear bond strengths of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hyung; Kim, Sun Jai; Shim, June Sung; Lee, Keun-Woo

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the surface roughness of zirconia when using Zircos E etching system (ZSAT), applying a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid compound as a pretreatment agent, and also to compare the shear bonding strength according to different resin cements. ZSAT, air abrasion, and tribochemical silicacoating were applied on prepared 120 zirconia specimens (10 mm in diameter, 7 mm in height) using CAD/CAM. Each 12 specimens with 4 different resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, Rely X Unicem, Superbond C&B, and Hot bond) were applied to test interfacial bond strength. The statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA). The results are as follows: after application of the ZSAT on the zirconia specimens, surface roughness value after 2-hour etching was higher than those after 1- and 3-hour etching on SEM images. For Superbond C&B and Rely X Unicem, the specimens treated with ZSAT showed higher shear bond strength values than those treated with air abrasion and tribochemical silicacoating system. Regarding the failure mode of interface over cement and zirconia surface, Rely X Unicem and Hot bond showed cohesive failures and Panavia F 2.0 and Superbond C&B showed mixed failures. Zircos E etching system in zirconia restoration could increase its shear bond strength. However, its long term success rate and clinical application should be further evaluated.

  2. Adhesion between glass fiber posts and resin cement: evaluation of bond strength after various pre-treatments.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Cumhur; Piskin, Bulent; Akin, Gulsah E; Bektas, Ozden Ozel; Akin, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate surface roughness and bond strength of glass fiber posts to a resin cement after various surface treatments. Sixty individually formed glass fiber posts with a diameter of 1.5 mm and a length of 20 mm were used for this study. They were randomly assigned to six groups of pre-treatment (n = 10/group): Group C, untreated (control); Group SB, sandblasted; Group SC, silica coated; Group HF, hydrofluoric acid-etched; Group N, Nd:YAG laser irradiated; Group E, Er:YAG laser irradiated. Surface roughness of the posts was measured before and after pre-treatment. The posts were then bonded to resin cement and tensile bond strengths were determined in a universal testing machine. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA and post-hoc comparison tests (α = 0.05) were performed. The highest bond strength value was observed in group HF, followed by group SC. There was a statistically significant difference in bond strength between group C and groups HF, SC and E (p < 0.001, p = 0.002 and p = 0.041, respectively). Posts of group SB and group N showed the highest surface roughness. The findings of the present study reveal that hydrofluoric acid-etching, silica coating and Er:YAG laser irradiation provided a significant increase in bond strength between glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  3. Shear bond strength of a self-etched resin cement to an indirect composite: effect of different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Harorli, O T; Barutcugil, C; Kirmali, O; Kapdan, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin cement (Rely X-U200) bonded to differently conditioned indirect composite samples. Sixty-six composite resin specimens (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared with an indirect composite resin (Grandia) and randomly divided into six groups. Surfaces of the samples were treated with one of the following treatments; %37 phosphoric acid etching, sandblasting, 1,5 W, 2 W and 3 W erbium, chromium: Yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser application. An untreated group was used as a control. In each group surface of the sample was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. The remaining samples (n = 60) were built up with a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X-U200) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm height. After 24 h water storage at 37°C, the prepared specimens were submitted to shear bond strength test. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the bond strength values of different groups. Highest shear bond strength values were observed in sandblasting group however there were not statistical difference among the tested surface treatment methods. In Shear bond strength of resin, cement was independent of the surface conditioning methods applied on tested indirect resin composite.

  4. Effect of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of two resin cements to aged simulated composite core materials.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Shakerian, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Roughening of the aged composite resin core (CRC) surface seems essential for durable adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments and different resin cements on microtensile bond strength (µ TBS) between two aged core build-up composites (CBCs) and feldspathic ceramic. A total of 16 composite blocks made of two CBCs, Core.it and Build-it were randomly assigned to four surface treatment groups after water storage and thermocycling (2 weeks and 500 cycles). Experimental groups included surface roughening with air abrasion (AA), hydrofluoric acid, pumice, and laser and then were bonded to computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic blocks using two resin cements, Panavia F2 (PF), and Duo-link (DL). The µ TBS was tested, and the fracture mode was assessed. The data were analyzed with multiple analysis of variance to estimate the contribution of different surface treatments, resin cements, and two aged CRCs on µ TBS. Statistical significance level was set at α < 0.05. Surface treatment and cement type significantly affected bond strength (P < 0.001) but the type of CRC did not (P = 0.468). Between roughening methods, the highest and the lowest values of µ TBS were sequentially obtained in AA and Er.YAG laser groups. The highest bond strength was in AA group cemented with PF (31.83 MPa). The most common failure mode was cohesive fracture in the cement. Different surface treatments had different effects on µ TBS of aged CRCs to feldspathic ceramics. PF was significantly better than DL.

  5. Resin cement to indirect composite resin bonding: effect of various surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Kirmali, Omer; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Harorli, Osman; Kapdan, Alper; Er, Kursat

    2015-01-01

    Debonding at the composite-adhesive interface is a major problem for indirect composite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength (BS) of an indirect composite resin after various surface treatments (air-abrasion with Al2O3, phosphoric acid-etchig and different applications of NdYAG laser irradiations). Fifty composite disks were subjected to secondary curing to complete polymerization and randomly divided into five experimental groups (n = 10) including Group 1, untreated (control); Group 2, phosphoric acid-etched; Group 3, air-abrasion with Al2 O3 ; Group 4, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with non-contact and Group 5, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with contact. They were then bonded to resin cement and shear BS was determined in a universal testing device at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the BS values. The highest BS value was observed in Group 4 and followed by Group 3. Tukey test showed that there was no statistical difference between Group1, 2 and 5. Furthermore, differences in BSs between Group 4 and the other groups except Group 3 were significant (p < 0.05) and also there were significant differences in BSs between Group 3 to 1 and Group 3 to 2 (p < 0.05). This study reveals that air-abrasion with Al2 O3 and Nd:YAG laser irradiation with non-contact provided a significant increase in BS between indirect composite and resin cement. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. RECYCLED WASTE-BASED CEMENT COMPOSITE PATCH MATERIALS FOR RAPID/PERMANENT ROAD RESTORATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2001-07-31

    Over the past year, KeySpan Energy sponsored a research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) aimed at recycling boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) byproducts generated from Keyspan's power stations into potentially useful materials, and at reducing concurrent costs for their disposal. Also, KeySpan has an interest in developing strategies to explicitly integrate industrial ecology and green chemistry. From our collaborative efforts with Keyspan (Diane Blankenhom Project Manager, and Kenneth Yager), we succeeded in recycling them into two viable products; Pb-exchange adsorbents (PEAs), and high-performance cements (HpCs). These products were made from chemically bonded cement and ceramic (CBC) materials that were synthesized through two-step chemical reaction pathways, acid-base and hydration. Using this synthesis technology, both the WWTS and BA served in acting as solid base reactants, and sodium polyphosphate, [-(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}], known as an intermediator of fertilizer, was employed as the acid solution reactant. In addition, two commercial cement additives, Secar No. 51 calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and Type I calcium silicate cement (CSC), were used to improve mechanical behavior and to promote the rate of acid-base reaction of the CBC materials.

  7. Evaluation of bond strength of self-adhesive cements to dentin with or without application of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Fava, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin using self-adhesive cements with and without the application of adhesive systems. Seventy-two bovine incisors were used, in which the buccal surfaces were ground down to expose an area of dentin measuring a minimum of 4 x 4 mm. The indirect resin composite Resilab was used to make 72 blocks, which were cemented onto the dentin surface of the teeth and divided into 4 groups (n = 18): group 1: self-adhesive resin cement BiFix SE, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 2: self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem, used according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 3: etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system + BiFix SE; group 4: etch-and-rinse Single Bond 2 adhesive system + RelyX Unicem. The specimens were sectioned into sticks and subjected to microtensile testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL- 200 MF). Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The mean values (± standard deviation) obtained for the groups were: group 1: 15.28 (± 8.17)a, group 2: 14.60 (± 5.21)a, group 3: 39.20 (± 9.98)c, group 4: 27.59 (± 6.57)b. Different letters indicate significant differences (ANOVA; p = 0.0000). The application of adhesive systems before self-adhesive cements significantly increased the bond strength to dentin. In group 2, RelyX Unicem associated with the adhesive system Single Bond 2 showed significantly lower mean tensile bond strengths than group 3 (BiFix SE associated with the etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system).

  8. Evaluation and comparison of the effect of different surface preparations on bond strength of glass ionomer cement with nickel-chrome metal-ceramic alloy: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Hasti, Kalpana; Jagadeesh, H G; Patil, Narendra P

    2011-03-01

    Retention of fixed partial dentures is mostly dependent upon the bond between metal and cement as well as cement and tooth structure. However, most of the time clinical failure of bond has been observed at metal and cement interface. The treatment of metal surface, prior to luting, plays a crucial role in bonding cement with the metal. This study is conducted to evaluate and compare the effect of different surface preparations on the bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement with nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy. Fifty caries-free extracted molar teeth were made flat until the dentin of the occlusal surface was exposed. After fabrication of the wax patterns and subsequent castings, the castings were subjected to porcelain firing cycles. The nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy discs were also divided into five groups and subjected to various surface treatments: (1) Unsandblasted (U), (2) sandblasted (S), (3) sandblasted and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO4 (SK), (4) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points (UD) and (5) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO(4) (UDK). After surface treatments, the castings were cemented using Fuji PLUS encapsulated resin-modified glass ionomer cement. The obtained values of all the groups were subjected to statistical analysis for Tensile and Shear bond strength. Different surface treatments of the metal affects the bond strength values of resin-modified glass ionomer cement when used as luting agent.

  9. Effects of dental adhesive cement and surface treatment on bond strength and leakage of zirconium oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tsukakoshi, Makoto; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the interactive influence of adhesive materials and surface treatments on bond strength of zirconium oxide ceramics, six types of adhesive resin cements (RelyX ARC (RA), Super-Bond C & B (SB), Linkmax (LM), Panavia Fluoro Cement (PF), Bistite II (BT), and Imperva Dual (ID)), three types of resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements (Xeno Cem Plus (XC), Vitremer Luting (VR), and Fuji Luting (FL)), as well as four types of surface treatments (# 600 polishing, sandblasting, silane, and Rocatec system) were used in this study. Results of this study indicated that all the tested adhesive materials treated with Rocatec system achieved the highest shear bond strength (31.9-67.1 MPa). In particular, the highest shear bond strength value of 67.1 MPa was found for Linkmax and Rocatec treatment combination, while the lowest shear bond strength value of 5.4 MPa was found for RelyX and # 600 polishing combination. Furthermore, results showed that Rocatec treatment was an effective way to prevent marginal leakage.

  10. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    PubMed Central

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p<0.05), whereas there were no significant differences found between the control and the other groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  11. Effect of dentin pretreatment and curing mode on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim was to evaluate the effect of curing mode and different dentin surface pretreatment on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six extracted human permanent molars were sectioned horizontally exposing flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into 12 groups (3 teeth/group) according to the dentin surface pretreatment methods (control, 18% EDTA, 10% Polyacrylic acid) and curing mode (self-curing vs. light-curing) of cement. After pretreatment, composite resin blocks were cemented with the following: (a) G-CEM LinkAce; (b) RelyX U200, followed by either self-curing or light-curing. After storage, the teeth were sectioned and µTBS test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Student T-test and Scheffe's post-hoc test at P<.05 level. RESULTS For G-CEM LinkAce cement groups, polyacrylic acid pretreatment showed the highest µTBS in the self-cured group. In the light-cured group, no significant improvements were observed according to the dentin surface pretreatment. There were no significant differences between curing modes. Both dentin surface pretreatment methods helped to increase the µTBS of RelyX U200 resin cement significantly and degree of pretreatment effect was similar. No significant differences were found regarding curing modes except control groups. In the comparisons of two self-adhesive resin cements, all groups within the same pretreatment and curing mode were significantly different excluding self-cured control groups. CONCLUSION Selecting RelyX U200 used in this study and application of dentin surface pretreatment with EDTA and polyacrylic acid might be recommended to enhance the bond strength of cement to dentin. PMID:26330979

  12. Effect of Photoactivation Timing on the Mechanical Properties of Resin Cements and Bond Strength of Fiberglass Post to Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R D; Valdívia, A D C M; Bicalho, A A; Franco, S D; Tantbirojn, D; Versluis, A; Soares, C J

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that photoactivation timing and resin cement affect mechanical properties and bond strength of fiberglass posts to root dentin at different depths. Fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) were luted with RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray), or RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) using three photoactivation timings: light curing immediately, after three minutes, or after five minutes. Push-out bonding strength, PBS (n=10) was measured on each root region (coronal, middle, apical). The elastic modulus (E) and Vickers hardness (VHN) of the cement layer along the root canal were determined using dynamic indentation (n=5). A strain-gauge test was used to measure post-gel shrinkage of each cement (n=10). Residual shrinkage stress was assessed with finite element analysis. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance in a split-plot arrangement and a Tukey test (α=0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the influence of study factors. The five-minute delay photoactivation timing significantly increased the PBS for all resin cements evaluated. The PBS decreased significantly from coronal to apical root canal regions. The mean values for E and VHN increased significantly with the delayed photoactivation for RelyX Unicem and decreased from coronal to apical root regions for all resin cements with the immediate-curing timing. The PBS of fiber posts to root dentin, E, and VHN values were affected by the root canal region, photoactivation timing, and resin cement type. Shrinkage stress values decreased gradually with delayed photoactivation for all the cements.

  13. Effect of dentin pretreatment and curing mode on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Youm, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Kwon, Yong-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Kil

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of curing mode and different dentin surface pretreatment on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements. Thirty-six extracted human permanent molars were sectioned horizontally exposing flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into 12 groups (3 teeth/group) according to the dentin surface pretreatment methods (control, 18% EDTA, 10% Polyacrylic acid) and curing mode (self-curing vs. light-curing) of cement. After pretreatment, composite resin blocks were cemented with the following: (a) G-CEM LinkAce; (b) RelyX U200, followed by either self-curing or light-curing. After storage, the teeth were sectioned and µTBS test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Student T-test and Scheffe's post-hoc test at P<.05 level. For G-CEM LinkAce cement groups, polyacrylic acid pretreatment showed the highest µTBS in the self-cured group. In the light-cured group, no significant improvements were observed according to the dentin surface pretreatment. There were no significant differences between curing modes. Both dentin surface pretreatment methods helped to increase the µTBS of RelyX U200 resin cement significantly and degree of pretreatment effect was similar. No significant differences were found regarding curing modes except control groups. In the comparisons of two self-adhesive resin cements, all groups within the same pretreatment and curing mode were significantly different excluding self-cured control groups. Selecting RelyX U200 used in this study and application of dentin surface pretreatment with EDTA and polyacrylic acid might be recommended to enhance the bond strength of cement to dentin.

  14. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Methods: In this in vitro study thirty discs of zirconia with a diameter of 6 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into two groups of 15. In the test group the zirconia disc surfaces were irradiated by CO2 laser with an output power of 3 W and energy density of 265.39 j/cm2. Composite resin discs were fabricated by plastic molds, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness and were cemented on zirconia disk surfaces with Panavia F2.0 resin cement (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Shear bond strength was measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture type was assessed under a stereomicroscope at ×40. Surface morphologies of two specimens of the test group were evaluated under SEM before and after laser pretreatment. Data was analyzed by paired t-test (p value < 0.05). Results: The mean SBS values of the laser and control groups were 12.12 ± 3.02 and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Surface treatment with CO2 laser significantly increased SBS between resin cement and zirconia ceramic (p value = 0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, surface treatment with CO2 laser increased the SBS between resin cement and the zirconia ceramic. PMID:25653809

  15. Effect of storage and acid etching on the tensile bond strength of composite resins to glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, M F; Domitti, S S; Consani, S; de Goes, M F

    1999-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluates the effect of storage time and acid etching on the tensile bond strength of glass ionomer cement to composite resins. The bonded assemblies were stored at 100% relative humidity and 37 degrees C for 1 hour, 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months. The test specimen was loaded at tension to failure on an Otto Wolpert-Werke testing instrument with a crosshead speed of 6 mm/min. The results showed a significant statistical difference for etched Vidrion F when compared to etched Ketac Bond at all storage periods. The unetched samples were statistically similar at 3 months, with the highest values for Vidrion F.

  16. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  17. The effects of non-thermal plasma and conventional treatments on the bond strength of fiber posts to resin cement

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Marques, Juliana das Neves; Gonzalez, Caroline Brum; Simão, Renata Antoun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the effect of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and ammonia (NH3) plasmas on the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts with conventional treatments. Materials and Methods Sixty-five fiber posts were divided into 5 groups: Control (no surface treatment); H2O2 (24% hydrogen peroxide for 1 min); Blasting (blasting with aluminum oxide for 30 sec); NH3 (NH3 plasma treatment for 3 min); HMDSO (HMDSO plasma treatment for 15 min). After the treatments, the Ambar adhesive (FGM Dental Products) was applied to the post surface (n = 10). The fiber post was inserted into a silicon matrix that was filled with the conventional resin cement Allcem Core (FGM). Afterwards, the post/cement specimens were cut into discs and subjected to a push-out bond strength (POBS) test. Additionally, 3 posts in each group were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The POBS data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey's honest significant difference post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results The Blasting and NH3 groups showed the highest POBS values. The HMDSO group showed intermediate POBS values, whereas the Control and H2O2 groups showed the lowest POBS values. Conclusion Blasting and NH3 plasma treatments were associated with stronger bonding of the conventional resin cement Allcem to fiber posts, in a procedure in which the Ambar adhesive was used. PMID:28503478

  18. The effects of non-thermal plasma and conventional treatments on the bond strength of fiber posts to resin cement.

    PubMed

    do Prado, Maíra; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Marques, Juliana das Neves; Gonzalez, Caroline Brum; Simão, Renata Antoun

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the effect of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and ammonia (NH3) plasmas on the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts with conventional treatments. Sixty-five fiber posts were divided into 5 groups: Control (no surface treatment); H2O2 (24% hydrogen peroxide for 1 min); Blasting (blasting with aluminum oxide for 30 sec); NH3 (NH3 plasma treatment for 3 min); HMDSO (HMDSO plasma treatment for 15 min). After the treatments, the Ambar adhesive (FGM Dental Products) was applied to the post surface (n = 10). The fiber post was inserted into a silicon matrix that was filled with the conventional resin cement Allcem Core (FGM). Afterwards, the post/cement specimens were cut into discs and subjected to a push-out bond strength (POBS) test. Additionally, 3 posts in each group were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The POBS data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey's honest significant difference post hoc test (α = 0.05). The Blasting and NH3 groups showed the highest POBS values. The HMDSO group showed intermediate POBS values, whereas the Control and H2O2 groups showed the lowest POBS values. Blasting and NH3 plasma treatments were associated with stronger bonding of the conventional resin cement Allcem to fiber posts, in a procedure in which the Ambar adhesive was used.

  19. Evaluation of four cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin.

    PubMed

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Druck, Carolina Ceolin; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This trial used push-out testing to evaluate four different fiber post cementation strategies. Specimens of bovine mandibular teeth were randomly allocated into four groups according to cementation strategies (n = 10): ScotchBond MultiPurpose and RelyX ARC (Group 1); AdheSE and Multilink Automix (Group 2); phosphoric acid and RelyX U100 (Group 3); and RelyX U100 (Group 4). Four slices from each specimen (2.0 mm thick) were obtained for the push-out test. All slices were analyzed for failure mode after testing. A one-way ANOVA showed differences between the groups (P = 0.002). A Tukey test indicated that Group 1 had the highest bond strength values (13.96 ± 6.41 MPa). Groups 2 (6.58 ± 2.14 MPa), 3 (5.85 ± 2.57 MPa), and 4 (8.19 ± 2.28 MPa) had similar bond strengths, but all of them were lower than Group 1. A three-step total etching adhesive system, associated with a conventional resin cement, might be a good alternative for fiber post cementation.

  20. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomofumi; Spintzyk, Sebastian; Schille, Christine; Zöldföldi, Judit; Paterakis, Angelos; Schweizer, Ernst; Stephan, Ingrid; Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group): no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax) and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C) after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05). Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01). In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05). Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05) and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode. PMID:28773641

  1. Influence of different drying methods on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Kyung; Min, Bong Ki; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of different drying methods of dentin surface on the bonding efficacy of self-adhesive resin cements (SRCs). Three SRCs (RelyX U200, RU; Maxcem Elite, ME; and BisCem, BC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX Luting 2, RL) were used. The characteristics of the materials were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis and surface roughness and contact angle measurements. Human dentin surfaces were finished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and assigned to three groups according to these drying methods: ethanol dehydration, drying by waiting for 10 s after blot-drying and blot-drying. The four cements were used for luting composite overlays to the dried dentin. After 24 h storage at 37°C and 100% relative humidity, stick-shaped specimens with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm(2) were prepared and stressed to failure in tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (n = 27). Failure modes of fractured specimens were assessed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. RL was the most hydrophilic, followed by BC and ME and then RU. All the luting cements luted to ethanol-dehydrated dentin showed zero bond strengths. For the three SRCs, drying by waiting produced higher microtensile bond strengths than blot-drying. RU showed the best bonding performance in the above two dentin conditions. RL showed significantly higher bond strength in blot-drying condition than in drying-by-waiting (p < 0.001). This study suggests that dentin surface moisture has a crucial effect on the bond strength of SRCs.

  2. Utilization of the coconut shell of babaçu (Orbignya sp.) to produce cement-bonded particleboard.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Renato Rocha; Del Menezzi, Cláudio Henrique Soares; Teixeira, Divino Eterno

    2002-11-01

    This experiment evaluated the use of the material of the outer coconut shell of babaçu (Orbignya sp.), a palm tree from Brazil, for the manufacture of particleboards bonded with Portland cement. Four treatments were analyzed at two target densities (1.2 g/cm3 and 1.4 g/cm3) and two levels (0% and 4%) of addition of calcium chloride. The lignocellulosic material from babaçu presented a low cement inhibition index according to the hydration test. Testing of manufactured panels showed that good physical and mechanical properties were achieved at the treatment levels tested.

  3. Halogen bonding with carbene bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bene, Janet E.; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2017-10-01

    Ab initio MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations have been performed to determine the structures and binding energies of complexes formed from five singlet carbene bases acting as electron-pair donors to four ClX acids. Complexes with ClCCH and ClCN are stabilized by traditional halogen bonds. With one exception, complexes with ClNC and ClF are stabilized by (carbene-Cl)+ ⋯ -NC and (carbene-Cl)+ ⋯ -F ion-pair halogen bonds subsequent to chlorine transfer. These complexes have been characterized in terms of their structures, binding energies, charge-transfer energies, bonding properties, and spin-spin coupling constants.

  4. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  5. Micro-shear bond strength of different resin cements to ceramic/glass-polymer CAD-CAM block materials.

    PubMed

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid treatment on bond strength of resin cements to three different types of ceramic/glass containing CAD-CAM block composite materials. CAD-CAM block materials of polymer infiltrated (Vita Enamic), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and nanoceramic (Cerasmart) with a thickness of 1.5mm were randomly divided into two groups according to the surface treatment performed. In Group 1, specimens were wet-ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers up to no. 1000. In Group 2, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel was applied to ceramics. Three different resin cements (RelyX, Variolink Esthetic and G-CEM LinkAce) were applied to the tubes in 1.2-mm thick increments and light-cured for 40s using LED light curing unit. Half of the specimens (n=10) were submitted to thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C). The strength measurements were accomplished with a universal testing machine (Lloyd Instruments) at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences between ceramics and resin cements (p<0.001). However, hydrofluoric acid gel treatment had no effect on bond strength values (p=0.073). In addition, thermal cycling significantly decreased bond strength values of resin cements to ceramics (p<0.001). Use of appropriate resin cement systems with different ceramic/glass-polymer materials might promote the bonding capacity of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Micro-shear bond strength of different resin cements to ceramic/glass-polymer CAD-CAM block materials.

    PubMed

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2016-03-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid treatment on bond strength of resin cements to three different types of ceramic/glass containing CAD-CAM block composite materials. CAD-CAM block materials of polymer infiltrated (Vita Enamic), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and nanoceramic (Cerasmart) with a thickness of 1.5mm were randomly divided into two groups according to the surface treatment performed. In Group 1, specimens were wet-ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers up to no. 1000. In Group 2, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel was applied to ceramics. Three different resin cements (RelyX, Variolink Esthetic and G-CEM LinkAce) were applied to the tubes in 1.2-mm thick increments and light-cured for 40s using LED light curing unit. Half of the specimens (n=10) were submitted to thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C). The strength measurements were accomplished with a universal testing machine (Lloyd Instruments) at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences between ceramics and resin cements (p<0.001). However, hydrofluoric acid gel treatment had no effect on bond strength values (p=0.073). In addition, thermal cycling significantly decreased bond strength values of resin cements to ceramics (p<0.001). Use of appropriate resin cement systems with different ceramic/glass-polymer materials might promote the bonding capacity of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microtensile bond strength between indirect composite resin inlays and dentin: effect of cementation strategy and mechanical aging.

    PubMed

    Prochnow, Emília Pithan; Amaral, Marina; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; Silva, Tatiana Bernardon; Saavedra, Guilherme; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite inlays to dentin using two cementation strategies, before and after mechanical aging. Standardized inlay cavities (bucco-lingual width: 3 mm; depth: 4 mm) were prepared in 32 human premolars. The teeth were embedded in self-curing acrylic resin up to 3 mm from the cementoenamel junction, impressions were made using a polyvinyl siloxane material, master dies were obtained using type 4 stone, and inlay composite resin restorations were fabricated (Sinfony, 3M ESPE). The teeth were randomly allocated into 4 groups according to the cementation strategy (conventional [C] and simplified [S]) and aging (mechanical cycling [MC] and not aged): C[G1]: Adper SingleBond + RelyX ARC without aging; CMC[G2]: conventional cementation + mechanical cycling (106 cycles, 88 N, 4 Hz, ± 37°C); S[G3]: self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U-100) without aging; SMC[G4] self-adhesive cementation + mechanical cycling. Intaglio surfaces of composite inlays were treated by tribochemical silica coating in G1 and G2, while G3 and G4 received no surface treatment. Non-aged specimens were stored in a moist environment at ca 37°C for the same period as MC (3 days). Non-trimmed beam specimens (bonding area = 1 mm²) were produced by serial cutting, and microtensile testing was performed (0.5 mm/min). Two-way ANOVA showed that the microtensile bond strength was affected only by cementation strategy (p < 0.0001). Tukey's test showed that groups G1 (35.1 ± 9.1) and G2 (32.7 ± 10.7) presented significantly higher bond strength values than G3 (8.7 ± 6.3) and G4 (5.2 ± 4.6). The use of a conventional adhesive technique and tribochemical silica coating resulted in higher μTBS than the one-step simplified cementation, even after mechanical cycling.

  8. Bond strength with custom base indirect bonding techniques.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Arndt; Shi, Jianmin; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. But there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. In this in vitro investigation, stainless steel brackets were bonded to 100 permanent bovine incisors using the Thomas technique, the modified Thomas technique, and light-cured direct bonding for a control group. The following five groups of 20 teeth each were formed: (1) modified Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), (2) Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Custom I Q), (3) Thomas technique with light-cured base composite (Transbond XT) and chemically cured sealant (Sondhi Rapid Set), (4) modified Thomas technique with chemically cured base adhesive (Phase II) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), and (5) control group directly bonded with light-cured adhesive (Transbond XT). Mean bond strengths in groups 3, 4, and 5 were 14.99 +/- 2.85, 15.41 +/- 3.21, and 13.88 +/- 2.33 MPa, respectively, and these groups were not significantly different from each other. Groups 1 (mean bond strength 7.28 +/- 4.88 MPa) and 2 (mean bond strength 7.07 +/- 4.11 MPa) showed significantly lower bond strengths than groups 3, 4, and 5 and a higher probability of bond failure. Both the original (group 2) and the modified (group 1) Thomas technique were able to achieve bond strengths comparable to the light-cured direct bonded control group.

  9. The effects of dentin and intaglio indirect ceramic optimized polymer restoration surface treatment on the shear bond strength of resin cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, A.; Suprastiwi, E.; Usman, M.

    2017-08-01

    Ceramic optimized polymer (ceromer) bonds to the tooth substrate through resin cements. The bond strength between dentin, resin cement, and ceromer depends on the applied surface treatment. To analyze the effects of dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment on the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five dentin premolar and ceromer specimens were bonded with resin cement and divided into three groups as follows: in group 1, no treatment was applied; in group 2, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching and a bonding agent; and in group 3, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching, a bonding agent, and intaglio ceromer surface treatment with etching and silane. All specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours, and the shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Group 3 showed the highest shear bond strength, followed by group 2. The surface treatment of dentin and intaglio ceromer showed significantly improved shear bond strength in the group comparison. Dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment can improved the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement.

  10. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yenisey, Murat; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Rona, Nergiz

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. 220 zirconium-oxide ceramic (Ceramill ZI) specimens were prepared, sintered in two different period (Short=Ss, Long=Ls) and divided into ten treatment groups as: GC, no treatment; GSil, silanized (ESPE-Sil); GSilPen, silane flame treatment (Silano-Pen); GSb, sandblasted; GSbSil, sandblasted+silanized; GSbCoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (CoJet)+silanized; GSbRoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (Rocatech-Plus)+silanized; GSbDSil, sandblasted+diamond particle abraded (Micron MDA)+silanized; GSbSilPen, sandblasted+silane flame treatment+silanized; GSbLSil, sandblasted+Er:Yag (Asclepion-MCL30) laser treated+silanized. The composite resin (Filtek Z-250) cylinders were cemented to the treated ceramic surfaces with a resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Shear bond strength test was performed after specimens were stored in water for 24h and thermo-cycled for 6000 cycles (5-55 °C). Data were statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tamhane's multiple comparison test (α=0.05). According to the ANOVA, sintering time, surface treatments and their interaction were statistically significant (p<0.05). The highest bond strengths were obtained in GSbCoSil (Ss=13.36/Ls=11.19MPa) and lowest values were obtained in GC (Ss=4.70/Ls=4.62 MPa) for both sinter groups. Sintering time may be effective on the bond strength and 30 μm silica coating (Cojet) with silane coupling application technique increased the bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of surface treatments and resin cement selection on bonding to densely-sintered zirconium-oxide ceramic.

    PubMed

    de Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Monticelli, Francesca; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Estrella; Ferrari, Marco; Osorio, Raquel

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface conditioning on the microtensile bond strength of zirconium-oxide ceramic to dual-cured resin cements. Eighteen cylinder-shaped zirconium-oxide ceramic blocks (Cercon Zirconia, Dentsply) were treated as follows: (1) Sandblasting with 125 microm aluminum-oxide (Al(2)O(3)) particles; (2) tribochemical silica coating using 50 microm Al(2)O(3) particles modified by silica; (3) no treatment. Each ceramic cylinder was duplicated in composite resin (Tetric Evo Ceram, Ivoclar-Vivadent) using a silicon mold. Composite cylinders were bonded to conditioned ceramics using: (1) Calibra (Densply Caulk); (2) Clearfil Esthetic Cement (Kuraray); (3) Rely x Unicem (3M ESPE). After 24h bonded specimens were cut into microtensile sticks that were loaded in tension until failure. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons (p<0.05). Failure mode was recorded and the interfacial morphology of debonded specimens was observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Surface topography and ceramic average surface roughness were analyzed under an atomic force microscope (AFM). Significant changes in zirconia surface roughness occurred after sandblasting (p<0.001). Bond strength of Clearfil cement to zirconia was significantly higher than that of Rely x Unicem and Calibra, regardless of the surface treatment (p<0.001). When using Calibra, premature failures occurred in non-treated and silica coated zirconia surfaces. The phosphate monomer-containing luting system (Clearfil Esthetic Cement) is recommended to bond zirconia ceramics and surface treatments are not necessary.

  12. Tensile bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to microabraded and silica-coated or tin-plated high noble ceramic alloy.

    PubMed

    Swartz, J M; Davis, R D; Overton, J D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of alloy surface microabrasion, silica coating, or microabrasion plus tin plating on the tensile bond strengths between a resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cement and a high-noble alloy. Bond strength between the microabraded alloy specimens and conventional glass-ionomer cement or resin cement were included for comparison. One hundred twenty uniform size, disk-shaped specimens were cast in a noble metal alloy and divided into 6 groups (n = 10 pairs/group). The metal surfaces of the specimens in each group were treated and cemented as follows. Group 1: No surface treatment (as cast, control), cemented with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 2: Microabrasion with 50-microm aluminum oxide particles, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 3: A laboratory microabrasion and silica coating system, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 4: Microabrasion and tin-plating, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 5: Microabrasion only, conventional glass-ionomer cement. Group 6: Microabrasion and tin-plating, conventional resin cement. The uniaxial tensile bond strength for each specimen pair was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron Corp, Canton, MA). Results were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (alpha = 0.05) and a Tukey post-hoc analysis. Mean bond strength: Group 1: 3.6 (+/- 1.5) MPa. Group 2: 4.2 (+/-0.5) MPa. Group 3: 6.7 (+/- 0.9) MPa. Group 4: 10.6 (+/- 1.8) MPa. Group 5: 1.1 (+/- 0.4) MPa. Group 6: 14.6 (+/- 2.3) MPa. Group 6 was significantly stronger than Group 4. The bond strength of specimens cemented with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 4) was significantly stronger than all other groups except the resin cement with microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 6). Microabraded and tin-plated alloy specimens luted with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement resulted in the greatest mean tensile strengths

  13. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    PubMed

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane.

  14. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  15. Effect of adhesive resin cements and post surface silanization on the bond strengths of adhesively inserted fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Bitter, Kerstin; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strengths and the effect of silanization of fiber posts inserted with different adhesive systems. Sixty DT Light Posts (size 1) were used. Thirty posts were pretreated with silane. The posts were cemented into form-congruent artificial root canals (12 mm) of bovine dentine. Six groups were formed: G1, Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G2, Monobond-S+Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G3, ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G4, Monobond-S+ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G5, RelyX Unicem; and G6, Monobond-S+RelyX Unicem. The mean (standard deviation) tensile bond strengths (megapascals) were 7.69 (0.85) for G1, 7.15 (1.01) for G2, 6.73 (0.85) for G3, 6.78 (0.97) for G4, 4.79 (0.58) for G5, and 4.74 (0.88) for G6. G1 achieved significantly higher bond strengths than G3 and G5; G3 had significantly higher values than G5 (P < .05; Scheffé procedure). Silanization had no significant effect (P > .05, one-way analysis of variance). Tensile bond strengths were significantly influenced by the type of resin cement. Silanization of fiber post surfaces seems to have no clinical relevance.

  16. Comparison of in vitro tensile bond strengths of luting cements to metallic and tooth-colored posts.

    PubMed

    Sahmali, Sevil; Demirel, Figen; Saygili, Gülbin

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of tooth-colored ceramic and carbon-fiber post materials as well as titanium and stainless steel post materials luted with three different kinds of luting cements. Disks of alloy post materials were polished with 600-grit SiC paper, air abraded, and ultrasonically cleaned. Ceramic surfaces were pretreated with hydrofluoric acid and silanized. Panavia F, Vitremer, and ProTec Cem cements were bonded to the post specimens and placed in a humidor for 24 hours. Specimens were placed in a jig, and the debonding values were obtained using a universal testing machine. Means and standard deviations were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Panavia F provided the highest bond strengths for all types of post materials. ProTec Cem bonded more strongly to stainless steel and titanium than to zirconium oxide. Vitremer results were the lowest. Bonds to carbon-fiber post materials were weaker than to metallic post materials, but stronger than to zirconium oxide. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a higher percentage of cohesive failures.

  17. Influence of Photoinitiator and Light-Curing Source on Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements to Dentin.

    PubMed

    Segreto, Dario Raimundo; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo; Brandt, William Cunha; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength (BS) of experimental resin cements formulated with different photoinitiators when activated by two kinds of light-curing units (LCUs) through a ceramic material. Seven resin blends with different camphorquinone (CQ) and/or phenylpropanedione (PPD) concentrations (weight) were prepared: C5: 0.5% CQ; C8: 0.8% CQ; P5: 0.5% PPD; P8: 0.8% PPD; C1P4: 0.1% CQ and 0.4% PPD; C4P1: 0.4% CQ and 0.1% PPD; C4P4: 0.4% CQ and 0.4% PPD. Two LCUs were used: one quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH - 850 mW/cm²) and one light-emitting diode (LED - 1300 mW/cm²). The microtensile bond strength of each blend was assessed. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The BS values did not exhibit significant differences for LCUs, regardless of the photoinitiator type. Three cements showed significant differences: P5 and C5 had higher BS with QTH, and C4P1 with LED. For QTH, P5 showed the highest and C1P4 the lowest BS. For the LED, C4P1 showed the highest BS of all the cements. The results indicated that PPD was a viable alternative in the formulation of photocured resin cements, reducing or eliminating CQ that is yellowish without impairing the bond strength. Furthermore, both LED and QTH were effective in curing resin cements that contain PPD or CQ.

  18. Effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG Lasers on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohamadi, Ebrahim; Shabani, Amanj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Because of poor bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics, laser surface treatments have been suggested to improve adhesion. The present study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Materials and Methods: Ninety zirconia disks (6×2 mm) were randomly divided into six groups of 15. In the control group, no surface treatment was used. In the test groups, laser surface treatment was accomplished using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, respectively (groups two and three). Composite resin disks (3×2 mm) were fabricated and cemented to zirconia disks with self-etch resin cement and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the test groups four-six, the samples were prepared as in groups one-three and then thermocycled and stored in distilled water for six months. The SBS tests were performed (strain rate of 0.5 mm/min). The fracture modes were observed via stereomicroscopy. Data were analyzed with one and two-way ANOVA, independent t and Tukey’s tests. Results: The SBS values of Nd:YAG group (18.95±3.46MPa) was significantly higher than that of the CO2 group (14.00±1.96MPa), but lower than that of controls (23.35±3.12MPa). After thermocycling and six months of water storage, the SBS of the untreated group (1.80±1.23 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the laser groups. In groups stored for 24 hours, 60% of the failures were adhesive; however, after thermocycling and six months of water storage, 100% of failures were adhesive. Conclusion: Bonding durability of resin cement to zirconia improved with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser surface treatment of zirconia ceramic. PMID:27148380

  19. In vitro comparative bond strength of contemporary self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion.

    PubMed

    Blatz, Markus B; Phark, Jin-Ho; Ozer, Fusun; Mante, Francis K; Saleh, Najeed; Bergler, Michael; Sadan, Avishai

    2010-04-01

    This study compared shear bond strengths of six self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion. One hundred twenty zirconia samples were air-abraded (group SB; n = 60) or left untreated (group NO). Composite cylinders were bonded to the zirconia samples with either BisCem (BC), Maxcem (MC), G-Cem (GC), RelyX Unicem Clicker (RUC), RelyX Unicem Applicator (RUA), or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Shear bond strength was tested after thermocycling, and data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Without abrasion, RUA (8.0 MPa), GC (7.9 MPa), and CSA (7.6 MPa) revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the other cements. Air-particle abrasion increased bond strengths for all test cements (p < 0.001). GC (22.4 MPa) and CSA (18.4 MPa) revealed the highest bond strengths in group SB. Bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia were increased by air-particle abrasion. Cements containing adhesive monomers (MDP/4-META) were superior to other compositions.

  20. Effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Gharouni, Mahya

    2017-01-01

    Background Considering the probability of chemical and enzymatic reactions between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the dentin structure and their specific inhibitors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of MMPs (galardin) on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Material and Methods Forty-eight sound human premolars were mounted in self-cured acrylic resin after removal of the enamel on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The dentin surfaces achieved were polished and prepared with 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=16) based on the concentration of galardin used (with no galardin, galardin at a high concentration and galardin at a low concentration). In addition, 96 composite resin blocks, measuring 3 mm in height and diameter, were prepared. The composite resin blocks were bonded to the buccal and lingual surface dentin with Rely-X Unicem (RXC) and Speed CEM (SPC) self-adhesive resin cements, respectively, according to manufacturers’ instructions. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the shear bond strength values were determined in MPa and fracture modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni test (α=0.05). Results The shear bond strength of galardin at high concentration was significantly higher than that in the control group and galardin at a low concentrations (P<0.001). In addition, galardin at a low concentration exhibited higher shear bond strength compared to the control group (P=0.005). Furthermore, higher shear bond strength values were reported with the use of RXC compared to SPC (P<0.001). Conclusions Irrigation with galardin increased the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin and this increase had a direct relationship with the concentration of galardin in the solution. Key words:N-(2(R)-2

  1. Bonding effectiveness of two adhesive luting cements to glass fiber posts: pull-out evaluation of three different post surface conditioning methods.

    PubMed

    Graiff, Lorenzo; Rasera, Laura; Calabrese, Marco; Vigolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P < 0.0001). The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P = 0.0465). SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials.

  2. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P < 0.0001). The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P = 0.0465). SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials. PMID:24987418

  3. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Acidic Environment on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Sahebi, Safoora; Naderi, Misagh; Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat; Shanbezadeh, Najmeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This laboratory study was performed to evaluate the effect of different acidic pH values on the push-out bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight root dentin slices were obtained from freshly extracted single rooted human teeth and their lumen were instrumented to achieve a diameter of 1.3 mm. Then, CEM cement was mixed according to manufacturers’ instruction and placed in the lumens with minimal pressure. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=12) which were wrapped in pieces of gauze soaked in either synthetic tissue fluid (STF) (pH=7.4) or butyric acid which was buffered at pH values of 4.4, 5.4 and 6.4. They were then incubated for 4 days at 37°C. The push-out test was performed by means of the universal testing machine. Specimens were then examined under a digital light microscope at 20× magnification to determine the nature of the bond failure. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test for pairwise comparisons. Results: The highest push-out bond strength (10.19±4.39) was seen in the pH level of 6.4, which was significantly different from the other groups (P<0.05). The values decreased to 2.42±2.25 MPa after exposure to pH value of 4.4. Conclusion: Lower pH value of highly acidic environments (pH=4.4), adversely affects the force needed for displacement of CEM cement; while in higher pH values (pH=6.4) the bond-strength was not affected. CEM cement is recommended in clinical situations where exposure to acidic environment is unavoidable. PMID:25386207

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Three Commercially Available Glass Ionomer Cements in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to comparatively evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of three commercially available glass ionomer cements - Miracle Mix (MM) (GC America Inc., Alsip, USA), Ketac Molar (KM) (3M Corp., Minnesota, USA) and amalgomer CR (AM) (Advanced Healthcare Ltd., Kent, England) in primary teeth and later examine the mode of the adhesive failure at the interface. Materials and Methods: Totally, 90 extracted sound primary molars were selected, and dentin on the buccal surface of crowns was exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the restorative materials being tested. SBS tests were performed, and the obtained values were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < 0.05). SBS mean values on were recorded in megapascals (MPa) and the mode of failure was assessed using a scanning electron microscope. Results: SBS (in MPa) was - MM-5.39, KM-4.84, AM-6.38. The predominant failure mode was cohesive. Conclusion: Amalgomer CR exhibited statistically significant higher SBS of 6.38 MPa to primary teeth and has better adhesion to the primary teeth compared to the other test materials and can be considered as a restorative material in pediatric dentistry. However, the results of this study should be corroborated with further investigation to reach a definitive conclusion. PMID:26464550

  6. A novel cement-based hybrid material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasibulin, Albert G.; Shandakov, Sergey D.; Nasibulina, Larisa I.; Cwirzen, Andrzej; Mudimela, Prasantha R.; Habermehl-Cwirzen, Karin; Grishin, Dmitrii A.; Gavrilov, Yuriy V.; Malm, Jari E. M.; Tapper, Unto; Tian, Ying; Penttala, Vesa; Karppinen, Maarit J.; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2009-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are known to possess exceptional tensile strength, elastic modulus and electrical and thermal conductivity. They are promising candidates for the next-generation high-performance structural and multi-functional composite materials. However, one of the largest obstacles to creating strong, electrically or thermally conductive CNT/CNF composites is the difficulty of getting a good dispersion of the carbon nanomaterials in a matrix. Typically, time-consuming steps of purification and functionalization of the carbon nanomaterial are required. We propose a new approach to grow CNTs/CNFs directly on the surface of matrix particles. As the matrix we selected cement, the most important construction material. We synthesized in a simple one-step process a novel cement hybrid material (CHM), wherein CNTs and CNFs are attached to the cement particles. The CHM has been proven to increase 2 times the compressive strength and 40 times the electrical conductivity of the hardened paste, i.e. concrete without sand.

  7. An in vitro evaluation of the zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on its bonding to resin cement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Sun, Ting; Liu, Ruoyu; Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Shao, Longquan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) between zirconia and resin cement was investigated in this work. 160 zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into four groups according to surface treatments: (1) airborne-particle-abrasion treatment (APA); (2) glass infiltration and hydrofluoric acid treatment (GI+HF); (3) mesoporous zirconia coating (MZ); and (4) no treatment (C). The as-prepared zirconia specimens were bonded using Panavia F2.0 and RelyX Unicem. The MTBS values were tested using a universal testing machine, and data were analyzed using ANOVA and SNK methods (a=0.05). The MTBS values obtained after GI+HF and MZ treatments were significantly higher than those obtained after APA and C treatments (P<0.05), especially for samples cemented with Panavia F2.0. The results reveal that zirconia surface treatments using GI+HF and MZ yield higher bond strength than those using APA or C, regardless of the resin cements.

  8. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin and enamel: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raphaela F; Ramos, Carla M; Francisconi, Paulo A S; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians continue to search for ways to simplify bonding procedures without compromising clinical efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear strength of self-adhesive cements RelyX U100 and RelyX U200, and conventional resin cement RelyX ARC to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments. The crowns of 120 bovine incisor teeth were separated from the roots and embedded in epoxy resin in polyvinyl chloride tubes. In each tooth, the area to be cemented was delimited with central holed adhesive tape. The teeth were distributed into 12 groups (n=10) according to the substrate; etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid; and cement type of enamel-U100, enamel-phosphoric acid-U100, enamel-U200, enamel-phosphoric acid-U200, enamel-ARC, enamel-phosphoric acid-ARC, dentin-U100, dentin-phosphoric acid-U100, dentin-U200, dentin-phosphoric acid-U200, dentin-ARC, and dentin-phosphoric acid-ARC. After 7 days of storage in artificial saliva, shear strength tests were performed by using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=.05). Fracture analysis was performed with a light microscope. Two specimens from each group were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. In enamel, ARC (9.96 MPa) had higher shear strength (P=.038) than U100 (5.14 MPa); however, after surface etching, U100 (17.81 MPa) and U200 (17.52 MPa) had higher shear strength (P<.001). With dentin, no significant differences were observed (P=.999), except for dentin-ARC (0.34 MPa) (P=.001). Most fractures were of the adhesive type. U200 self-adhesive cement had similar bond strength to the ARC in enamel, but the combination with phosphoric acid had the best bond strength. For dentin, self-adhesive resin cements are equally effective alternatives to conventional resin cement. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Conclusions: Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group. PMID:25713488

  10. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement.

    PubMed

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group.

  11. Correlative analysis of cement-dentin interfaces using an interfacial fracture toughness and micro-tensile bond strength approach.

    PubMed

    Souza, Evelise M; De Munck, Jan; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-12-01

    To determine the interfacial fracture toughness (iFT) and micro-tensile strength (μTBS) of composite cements bonded to dentin. Fifty feldspar ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita Zahnfabrik) were luted onto dentin using two self-adhesive (G-CEM LinkAce, GC; SpeedCEM, Ivoclar Vivadent), two self-etch (Multilink Primer & Multilink Automix, Ivoclar Vivadent; Scotchbond Universal & RelyX Ultimate, 3 M ESPE), and one etch-and-rinse (Excite F DSC & Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent) composite cement (n=10). After 48h in 100% relative humidity at 37°C, one half of each tooth was sectioned in sticks with a chevron notch at the cement-dentin interface and tested in a 4-point bending test setup (iFT). The remaining half of the tooth was sectioned in micro-specimens and stressed in tension until failure (μTBS). The mode of failure was determined with a stereomicroscope at 50× magnification. Data were submitted to Weibull analysis and Pearson's correlation (α=0.05). At 10% probability of failure, no significant differences could be found using iFT, while the etch-and-rinse composite cement Variolink II presented a significantly higher μTBS at this level. At 63.2% probability of failure, the self-adhesive composite cement G-CEM LinkAce revealed a significantly lower μTBS and iFT, and the self-etch cement Multilink Automix also revealed a significantly lower μTBS than all other cements. The correlation found between iFT and μTBS was moderate and not significant (r(2)=0.618, p=0.11). Overall, the etch-and-rinse and 'universal' self-etch composite cements performed best. The micro-tensile bond strength and interfacial fracture toughness tests did not correlate well. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Various Glass Ionomer Cements to Dentin of Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Singh, Deepti J; Sibal, Gurleen K

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate and compare shear bond strength of various glass ionomer cements (GICs) to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and methods Sample size taken for the study was 72 deciduous molars with intact buccal or lingual surfaces. Samples were randomly divided into three groups, i.e., groups A, B, and C and were restored with conventional type II GIC, type II light cure (LC) GIC, and type IX GIC respectively. Thermocycling was done to simulate oral conditions. After 24 hours, shear bond strength was determined using Instron Universal testing Machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/ minute until fracture. Results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results It was found that the shear bond strength was highest in group B (LC GIC) 9.851 ± 1.620 MPa, followed by group C (type IX GIC) 7.226 ± 0.877 MPa, and was lowest in group A (conventional GIC) 4.931 ± 0.9735 MPa. Conclusion Light cure GIC was significantly better than type IX GIC and conventional GIC in terms of shear bond strength. How to cite this article Somani R, Jaidka S, Singh DJ, Sibal GK. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Various Glass Ionomer Cements to Dentin of Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):192-196. PMID:27843248

  13. Shear Bond Strength of a Self-adhering Flowable Composite and a Flowable Base Composite to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-enriched Mixture Cement, and Biodentine.

    PubMed

    Altunsoy, Mustafa; Tanrıver, Mehmet; Ok, Evren; Kucukyilmaz, Ebru

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-adhering flowable composite (Vertise Flow; Kerr, Orange, CA) and a flowable composite (X-tra base; Voco GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine (Septodent, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses Cedex, France), and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM; Yektazist Dandan, Tehran, Iran). Sixty cylindric acrylic blocks with a hole (3 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm in height) were prepared. The acrylic blocks were filled with MTA, Biodentine, and CEM (n = 20) and accordingly allocated into 3 groups. The specimens were stored for 72 hours at 37°C and 100% humidity. Then, each group was divided into 2 subgroups according to the composite resin type used (n = 10). Vertise Flow and X-tra base were applied over MTA, Biodentine, and CEM and then polymerized. SBS was tested in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test. The Vertise Flow-CEM and X-tra base-MTA groups showed significantly higher SBS values than the group made of Vertise flow-Biodentine (P < .05). There were no statistically significant differences among the other groups (P > .05). MTA and CEM exhibited higher SBS than Biodentine; therefore, they could be preferred under flowable composites. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitivity of the bond strength to the structure of the interface between reinforcement and cement, and the variability of this structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1998-06-01

    The variability in interfacial structure and the sensitivity of the bond strength to this variation were studied for each of the interfaces between carbon fiber and cement paste, between stainless steel fiber and cement paste, and between steel rebar and concrete. The interfacial structural variation was indicated by the variation in the contact electrical resistivity. The interface between steel rebar and concrete had least variability but most sensitivity. The interface between carbon fiber and cement paste had less variability but more sensitivity than that between steel fiber and cement paste.

  15. Effect of Imaging Powders on the Bond Strength of Resin Cement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-19

    composite , metal or ceramic restorations. Self-adhesive resin cements do not require a separate adhesive or etchant and appear to have a major benefit...compared to more traditional resin cements due to their simplicity of application. Relatively little information exists about the composition and...Strength of Resin Cement" is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner. #lIZ Christopher R

  16. Bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement: the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement. Two types of CAD/CAM restorative materials (Vita Enamic [VE] and Lava Ultimate [LU]) were used. The specimens were divided into five groups in each test according to the surface treatment performed; Gr 1 (control; no treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasted [SB]), Gr 3 (SB+silane [S]), Gr 4 (hydrofluoric acid [HF]), and Gr 5 (HF+S). A dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE [BF]) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion after 24 h of storage in distilled water or after 30 days using the μTBS test. Following fracture testing, specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and morphology of the CAD/CAM restorative materials were characterized after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment, type of CAD/CAM restorative material, and water storage periods showed a significant effect on the μTBS (p<0.001). For the LU/BF system, there was no significant difference in the bond strength values between different surface treatments (p>0.05). On the other hand, for the VE/BF system, surface treatment with HF+S showed higher bond strength values compared with SB and HF surface treatments (p<0.05). Surface roughness and SEM analyses showed that the surface topography of CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement is material dependent. The VE/BF CAD/CAM material provided higher bond strength values compared with the LU/BF CAD/CAM material.

  17. Evaluation of the Bond Strength of Resin Cements Used to Lute Ceramics on Laser-Etched Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Background data: Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Materials and methods: Two adhesive cements, one “etch-and-rinse” [Variolink II (V)] and one “self-etch” [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann–Whitney U test. Results: No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (p<0.05). Conclusions: Dentin surfaces prepared with lasers may provide comparable ceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used. PMID:24992276

  18. Sandblasting and tin-plating-surface treatments to improve bonding with resin cements.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, A D

    1993-05-01

    The superior cementation strengths of the adhesive resin cements can now be used in the dental surgery for posts, crowns and bridges and for intra-oral repairs to fractured porcelain fused to metal crowns or bridges, thanks to the availability of miniature sandblasters and portable tin-platers. The author describes the techniques involved.

  19. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  20. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Ajay; Pujar, Madhu; Patil, Chetan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of using a “post” for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. “Debonding” is the most common failure in fiber-reinforced composite type of posts. This study was aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive dual-cured luting agent (RelyX U100) with a total etch resin luting agent (Variolink II) used to cement two different FRC posts. Materials and Methods: Eighty human maxillary anterior single-rooted teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post space prepared and divided into four groups (n = 20); Group I: D.T. light post (RTD) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent), Group II: D.T. light post (RTD) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE), Group III: Glassix post (Nordin) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent) and Group IV: Glassix post (Nordin) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE). Each root was sectioned to get slices of 2 ± 0.05-mm thickness. Push-out tests were performed using a triaxial loading frame. To express bond strength in megapascals (Mpa), load value recorded in Newton (N) was divided by the area of the bonded interface. After testing the push-out strengths, the samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean values of the push-out bond strength show that Group I and Group III had significantly higher values than Group II and Group IV. The most common mode of failure observed was adhesive between dentin and luting material and between post and luting material. Conclusions: The mean push-out bond strengths were higher for Groups I and III where Variolink II resin cement was used for luting the fiber post, which is based on the total etch

  1. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    PubMed

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  2. The Effect of Chlorhexidine on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Adl, Alireza; Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat; Gavahian, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) on the push-out bond strength (BS) of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: Root-dentin slices from 60 single-rooted human teeth with the lumen diameter of 1.3 mm were used. The samples were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=15), and their lumens were filled with CEM cement mixed with either its specific provided liquid (groups 1 and 3) or 2% CHX (groups 2 and 4). The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 3 days (groups 1 and 2) and 21 days (groups 3 and 4). The push-out BS were measured using a universal testing machine. The slices were examined under a light microscope at 40× magnification to determine the nature of bond failure. The data were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA. For subgroup analysis the student t-test was applied. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: After three days, there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.892). In the 21-day specimens the BS in group 3 (CEM) was significantly greater than group 4 (CEM+CHX) (P=0.009). There was no significant difference in BS between 3 and 21-day samples in groups 2 and 4 (CEM+CHX) (P=0.44). However, the mean BS after 21 days was significantly greater compared to 3-day samples in groups 1 and 3 (P=0.015). The bond failure in all groups was predominantly of cohesive type. Conclusion: Mixing of CEM with 2% CHX had an adverse effect the bond strength of this cement. PMID:25598812

  3. Surface treatment with a fractional CO2 laser enhances shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Alirezaei, Mehrnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The present study investigated the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia. Materials and methods: Ninety zirconia blocks were prepared and divided into 6 groups of 15 by treatment. Group 1 served as the control group, whereas groups 2 and 3 were treated with air abrasion and a universal primer (Monobond plus), respectively. The remaining zirconia copings were treated with a fractional CO2 laser for 10 seconds using 10 W/10 mJ (group 4), 10 w/14 mJ (group 5) or 20 W/10 mJ (group 6). A luting cement (Clearfil SA) was bonded to the treated zirconia surfaces and cured for 40 seconds. SBS was measured with a universal testing machine and the type of bond failure was determined. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in SBS among the study groups (p<0.001). The highest SBS values were observed in the groups treated with the fractional CO2 laser at settings of 20 W/10 mJ (28.1 MPa) or 10 W/14 mJ (27.4 MPa), followed by the specimens treated with the universal primer (22.8 MPa). The control specimens exhibited the lowest SBS (9.4 MPa) among the study groups (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the distribution of failure modes among the groups (p=0.871). Conclusions: The application of fractional CO2 laser can improve bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, and thus it could be considered as an appropriate alternative to conventional methods of zirconia surface treatment. PMID:27141151

  4. Effect of 4-MET- and 10-MDP-based primers on resin bonding to titanium.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimoto, Youhei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Mine, Atsushi; Nakamura, Mariko; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Kuboki, Takuo

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a 4-MET- and 10-MDP-based primer on the bond strength of two resin cements (SuperBond C&B, Sun Medical; Panavia Fluoro Cement, Kuraray) to titanium (Ti). Ti plates were treated with six experimental primers consisting of, respectively, 10-MDP and 4-MET in concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10wt%, or were kept untreated (control). The highest tensile bond strength of Panavia Fluoro Cement to Ti was obtained when the Ti surface was pre-treated with 10wt% 10-MDP and was significantly higher than that when a lower concentrated 10-MDP-based primer or any 4-MET-based primer was used. On the contrary, no significant difference in tensile bond strength of SuperBond C&B was found for the untreated and six pre-treated Ti surfaces, although pre-treatment with each 10-MDP-based primer resulted in a higher tensile bond strength as compared to any 4-MET pre-treatment. Altogether, the data obtained strongly suggest that 10-MDP is effective to improve the adhesive performance of resin to titanium.

  5. Relationship between apatite-forming ability and mechanical properties of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement modified with calcium salts and alkoxysilane.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Kawachi, Giichiro; Kikuta, Koichi; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2008-03-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based bone cement is used for the fixation of artificial joints in orthopaedics. However, the fixation is liable to loosen in the body, because the cement does not bond to living bone. So-called bioactive ceramics bond directly to living bone through the apatite layer formed on their surfaces in the body. We previously revealed that modification using gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and water-soluble calcium salts such as calcium acetate and calcium hydroxide was effective for providing the PMMA-based bone cement with apatite-forming ability in a simulated body fluid (SBF, Kokubo solution) that closely reproduces the body environment. However, the effect of the chemical reaction forming the apatite on the mechanical properties of the cements has not been clarified. The present work aimed to investigate this issue from the viewpoint of the interface structure between the apatite and the cement. The surface of the cement modified with calcium acetate and MPS was fully covered with newly formed apatite after soaking in Kokubo solution within 7 days, while half of the surface area of the cement modified with calcium hydroxide and MPS was covered with the apatite. The bending strength of the modified cements decreased after soaking in Kokubo solution. Porous structure was observed in the region about 50-100 microm in depth from the top surface because of release of the Ca2+ ions by both modified cements after soaking in Kokubo solution. The decrease in bending strength of the modified cements could be attributed to the formation of the pores. In addition, the pores on the top surfaces of the cements were filled with the newly formed apatite. The apatite formation would be effective not only for bioactivity but also for decreasing the reduction of mechanical strength.

  6. Bonding material containing ashes after domestic waste incineration for cementation of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Varlakov, A.P.; Gorbunova, O.A.; Arustamov, A.E.; Barinov, A.S.

    2007-07-01

    It is known that cement minerals hydration is accompanied with heat emission. Heat of hardening influences formation of a cement compound structure and its properties. It is important to reduce the heat quantity at continuous cementation of waste and filling of compartments of a repository or containers by a cement grout. For reduction of heating, it is necessary to use cement of mineral additives (fuel ashes, slag and hydraulic silica). Properties of ashes after domestic waste incineration can be similar to ones of fly fuel ashes. However, ash after domestic waste incineration is toxic industrial waste as it contains toxic elements (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, Zn). Utilization of secondary waste (slag and ash) of combustion plants is an important environmental approach to solving cities' issues. Results of the research have shown that ashes of combustion plants can be used for radioactive waste conditioning. Co-processing of toxic and radioactive waste is ecologically and economically effective. At SIA 'Radon', experimental batches of cement compositions are used for cementation of oil containing waste. (authors)

  7. Relined Fiberglass Post: Effect of Luting Length, Resin Cement, and Cyclic Loading on the Bond to Weakened Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    de Souza, N C; Marcondes, M L; da Silva, Dff; Borges, G A; Júnior, Lh Burnett; Spohr, A M

    This study evaluated the effects of luting length of the post, the resin cement, and cyclic loading on pull-out bond strength of fiberglass posts relined with composite resin in weakened roots. The canals of 80 bovine incisors were endodontically treated and weakened with diamond burs. The teeth were randomly divided into eight groups (n=10) according to the luting procedures of the relined fiberglass post (RFP): In groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, the RFPs were luted with RelyX ARC, and in groups 5, 6, 7, and 8 they were luted with RelyX U200. In groups 1, 3, 5, and 7, the RFPs were luted at a length of 5 mm, and in groups 2, 4, 6, and 8 they were luted at a length of 10 mm. Specimens from groups 3, 4, 7, and 8 were submitted to cyclic loading. Specimens were subjected to a pull-out bond strength test in a universal testing machine. The results (MPa) were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test (α=0.05). Six human upper anterior teeth were used to analyze the bond interface by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The pull-out bond strength of RFPs luted with RelyX U200 was statistically higher than that of RelyX ARC. Cyclic loading influenced the bond strength only for the luting length of 5 mm. CLSM analysis revealed the formation of resin cement tags for both materials. Luting length is an important factor in retaining RFPs in weakened roots when they are subjected to cyclic loading, and RelyX U200 resulted in greater bond strengths to the root canal in comparison with RelyX ARC.

  8. Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resins compared to resin cements with etch and rinse adhesives to enamel and dentin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lührs, A-K; Guhr, S; Günay, H; Geurtsen, W

    2010-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements should ease the placement of dental restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate their shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. Sixty molars were randomly assigned to 12 test groups (each n = 10), and the approximal surfaces were ground flat to get an enamel and dentin surface with a diameter of at least 4 mm. Ceramic specimens were bonded to the surfaces with either Variolink/Syntac Classic (VSC), Panavia F2.0 (PAF), RelyX Unicem (RLX), Maxcem Elite (MCE), iCem (IC), or an experimental self-adhesive resin cement (EXP). The shear bond strength (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min) was measured after 24-h storage in NaCl (37 degrees C). The fracture modes were determined with a stereomicroscope (magnification, 8-50-fold). VSC had the highest shear bond strength within the enamel groups (42.9 +/- 9 MPa) and IC the lowest (10.5 +/- 4.2 MPa, p < 0.001). The highest dentin shear bond strength was determined for VSC (39.2 +/- 8.9 MPa, p < 0.001) and the lowest for EXP (7.8 +/- 3.9 MPa, p < 0.001). Self-adhesive resin cements fractured mainly between resin and enamel or dentin. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements was inferior compared to conventional composite resin cements.

  9. The effect of environmental pressure and resin cements on the push-out bond strength of a quartz fiber post to teeth root canals.

    PubMed

    Geramipanah, F; Sadighpour, L; Assadollahi, R

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of environmental pressure changes on the bond strength between a fiber post and one of three resin cements using different mixing methods and modes of application. Sixty single-canal human teeth were divided into three groups (n = 20) and endodontically treated. Post spaces were prepared, and a quartz fiber post was secured with either a self-adhesive machine-mixed cement (RelyX Unicem, Aplicap), a self-adhesive hand-mixed cement (RelyX Unicem), or a self-etching dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F2). Half of each group was subjected to 24 pressure cycles from 0 to 5 atmospheres. The mean push-out bond strength of the posts was calculated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). Regardless of the pressure, Unicem Aplicap achieved the highest bond strength (P < 0.05). The bond strengths of all groups were significantly lower after they were subjected to the pressure cycles (P < 0.003), and they were lower in the apical regions. Bond strengths between the fiber post and root canal can be affected by environmental pressure while the type of resin cements, their mixing methods and modes of application incorporated lower porosity, achieving higher bond strength.

  10. Effect of thermomechanical aging on bond strength and interface morphology of glass fiber and zirconia posts bonded with a self-etch adhesive and a self-adhesive resin cement to natural teeth.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Batu Can; Ozer, Fusun; Takeichi, Takuro; Karabucak, Bekir; Koray, Fatma; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-09-01

    Information regarding the effect of thermomechanical aging (TMA) on the bond strength of luting cements to root canal dentin and endodontic posts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of TMA on the bond strength of fiber and zirconia posts bonded to root canal dentin with 2 different resin cements with microtensile and scanning electron microscopic evaluation. Eighty extracted single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and restored with either a glass fiber post (FP) or a zirconia post (ZP) with 2 commercially available resin luting cements. The teeth were divided into 2 main groups. In the first group, posts (n=40) were bonded with a self-etch adhesive cement (SEAC). In the second group (n=40), posts were bonded using a self-adhesive cement (SAC). During the first aging phase, all specimens in each group were stored in distilled water for 30 days at 37°C. During the second phase, half of the specimens in each group were subjected to the TMA. The test groups were as follows: FP/SEAC, FP/SEAC+TMA, ZP/SEAC, ZP/SEAC+TMA, FP/SAC, FP/SAC+TMA, ZP/SAC, and ZP/SAC+TMA. The bond strength was measured with a microtensile test. Data were analyzed by 3-way analysis of variance and the Tukey honest significant different test (α=.05). FP/SEAC at 30 days was higher than in the other groups. However, bond strength values were significantly reduced in this group after TMA (P<.001). Bond strength values and physical properties of SEAC with higher filler content were more affected by the TMA than those of SALC. According to scanning electron microscopic observation, TMA also affected the micromorphologic interface between the posts and the resin cements as well as between the resin cements and the root canal dentin. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of tooth preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to contaminated dentin.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of a self-adhesive luting cement after using four different techniques to remove surface contamination on dentin. Extracted human molars were flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for full crown preparation. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at room temperature with 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were randomly divided into four groups, and excess provisional cement was removed with (1) a hand instrument (excavator), (2) prophy with a mixture of flour pumice and water (3) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 microm at 40 psi and (4) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 50 microm at 40 psi. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated and residual materials were detected using SEM and EDS analysis of randomly selected specimens. The ceramics were treated with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized to the prepared dentin prior to cementing with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE). The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Particle abrasion treatment of dentin with an aluminous oxide particle provided the highest values of bond strength, while hand instrument excavation was the lowest (p < 0.05). Aluminous oxide particle size did not significantly influence the bond strength at 40 psi. The use of low pressure and small particle abrasion treated dentin as a mechanical cleansing protocol prior to definitive cementation increased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin-luting cement to dentin following eugenol-containing temporary cement.

  12. Effect of airborne-particle abrasion on dentin with experimental niobophosphate bioactive glass on the microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Lima, Darlon Martins; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Martinelli, José Roberto; Bauer, José

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of two resin cements bonded to dentin pre-treated with experimental niobophosphate bioactive glass (NBG). The experimental bioactive glass was prepared by mixing different amounts of NbO5; (NH4)2HP4; CaO; Na2CO3. The particle size distribution and composition of the bioactive glass powder were determined. Twenty flat dentin surfaces from sound extracted human molars were polished with 600-grit SiC paper and air-abraded using experimental bioactive glass niobium powder. The bonding procedures were accomplished by the application of two resin cements: self-etching Panavia F or self-adhesive RelyX U-100. The resin-bonded specimens were cut and the μTBS test was performed after 24h. The failure mode was determined with a stereomicroscope at 40× magnification. The results were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The two-way ANOVA did not detect interactions between factors, but only a difference between the self-etching and self-adhesive cement (p=0.001). The self-etching resin cement Panavia F obtained a higher μTBS than the self-adhesive cement Relyx U-100. The predominant failure mode of the cements was adhesive/mixed between the resin cement and dentin. A new bioactive glass containing niobium did not interfere with the immediate bonding performance of self-etching and self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Giannini, Marcelo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm) were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C); 2- silane priming (SI); 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA); 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF); 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12). Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.

  14. Fusion sputtering for bonding to zirconia-based materials.

    PubMed

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of fusion sputtering on zirconia-resin microtensile bond strength after 6 months of water storage. Zirconia disks received one of the following surface treatments: particle abrasion with 50-µm aluminum oxide particles or fusion sputtering, while as-sintered specimens served as a control. The prepared zirconia disks (Lava Zirconia) were bonded to pre-aged composite disks (Filtek Z250) using a phosphatemonomer- containing resin cement (RelyX Unicem), and the bonded specimens were sectioned into micro-bars (1 x 1 x 6 mm) which were either immediately tested or after 6 months of water storage (n = 25). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface roughness were performed for the prepared specimens. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Particle abrasion (33.1 MPa) and fusion sputtering (42.5 MPa) produced significantly higher MTBS values and resisted degradation after 6 months of water storage, while as-sintered specimens (12.4 MPa) demonstrated a significant reduction in bond strength after water storage (2.9 MPa). SEM examination indicated that fusion sputtering resulted in the creation of retentive zirconia beads on the treated surface, which enhanced micromechanical retention with adhesive resin and prevented interfacial failure. Fusion sputtering is a new and a simple method suitable for enhancing the bond strength of adhesive resins to zirconia-based frameworks.

  15. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  16. [Bonding of glass ionomer cement to dentin. An in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Lopez, S; Perez Gutierrez, I; Navajas Rodriguez de Mondelo, J M

    1991-01-01

    It's been studied "in vitro" the influence of the "Smear Layer" on the cement adhesión of the glass ionomer to the dentin. Using phosphoric acid at 37% and poliacrylic in the dentin during short periods of time, the adhesion between the cement and the dentin is improved because the Smear Layer is removed totally in the case of phosphoric acid and partially in the case of polyacrylic acid.

  17. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette; Massi, Marcos; Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0-14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  18. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  19. Indirect resin composite restorations bonded to dentin using self-adhesive resin cements applied with an electric current-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Gotti, Valeria Bisinoto; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Sauro, Salvatore; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Correr, Americo Bortolazzo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of an electric current-assisted application on the bond strength and interfacial morphology of self-adhesive resin cements bonded to dentin. Indirect resin composite build-ups were luted to prepared dentin surfaces using two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem and BisCem) and an ElectroBond device under 0, 20, or 40 μA electrical current. All specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test and to interfacial SEM analysis. The electric current-assisted application induced no change (P > 0.05) on the overall bond strength, although RelyX Unicem showed significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.05) than BisCem. Similarly, no differences were observed in terms of interfacial integrity when using the electrical current applicator.

  20. Effect of hygroscopic expansion on the push-out resistance of glass ionomer-based cements used for the luting of glass fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Cury, Alvaro H; Goracci, Cecilia; de Lima Navarro, Maria Fidela; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Sadek, Fernanda T; Tay, Franklin R; Ferrari, Marco

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the contribution of hygroscopic expansion of glass-ionomer (GIC) and resin modified glass-ionomer (RMGIC) luting cements to the push-out resistance of fiber posts. Glass fiber posts were luted to post spaces using different cements. Experimental specimens were stored in water, while control specimens were desiccated and stored in mineral oil to eliminate water from intraradicular dentinal tubules and/or the external environment that could have contributed to hygroscopic expansion of the cements. Thin slice push-out tests revealed no difference in retention strengths of resin composite cements that were stored in water or oil. Conversely, GIC and RMGIC cements exhibited increased retention strengths after water sorption. As unfavorable cavity geometry is taxing to dentin bond integrity in root canals, a strategy that relies on increasing the frictional resistance to post dislodgement via delayed hygroscopic expansion of glass-ionomer based materials may be a more pragmatic approach to fiber post retention.

  1. Comparison of the shear bond strengths of conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Isabel Cristina Prado Torres; Pignatta, Lilian Maria Brisque; Arantes, Flávia de Moraes; Santos, Eduardo César Almada

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare in vitro the shear bond strength between metallic brackets (Abzil) with conventional mesh bases and metallic brackets with bases industrially sandblasted with aluminum oxide using three adhesive systems, in order to assess the influence of sandblasting on adhesiveness and to compare 3 different bonding systems. Two hundred and forty bovine incisors were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (40 teeth in each group), according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. The brackets were direct-bonded in bovine teeth with 3 adhesive systems: System A - conventional Transbond XT (3M - Unitek); System B - Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer + Transbond XT (3M - Unitek) and System C - Fuji ORTHO LC resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement in capsules (GC Corp.). Shear bond strength tests were performed 24 hours after bonding, in a DL-3000 universal testing machine (EMIC), using a load cell of 200 kgf and a speed of 1 mm/min. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and showed no significant difference between conventional and sandblasted bracket bases. However, comparison between the bonding systems presented significantly different results. System A (14.92 MPa) and system C (13.24 MPa) presented statistically greater shear bond strength when compared to system B (10.66 MPa). There was no statistically significant difference between system A and system C.

  2. Short-term evaluation of the pulpo-dentin complex response to a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and a bonding agent applied in deep cavities.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; do Nascimento, Alexandre Batista Lopes; Teixeira, Hilcia Mezzalira; Hebling, Josimeri

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the response of the pulpo-dentin complex following application of a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement or an adhesive system in deep cavities performed in human teeth. Deep class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of 26 premolars. In Group 1 the cavity walls (dentin) and enamel were conditioned with 32% phosphoric acid and the dentin adhesive system One Step (Bisco, Inc., Itasca, IL, USA) was applied. In Groups 2 and 3, before total etching and application of bonding agent, the cavity floor was lined with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement-Vitrebond (3M ESPE Dental Products Division, St. Paul, MN, USA) or the calcium hydroxide cement-Dycal (control group, Dentsply, Mildford, DE, USA), respectively. The cavities were restored using light-cured Z-100 composite resin (3M ESPE). The teeth were extracted between 5 and 30 days and prepared for microscopic assessment. Serial sections were stained with H/E, Masson's trichrome and Brown and Brenn techniques. In Group 1, the inflammatory response was more evident than in Groups 2 and 3. Diffusion of dental material components across dentinal tubules was observed only in Group 1, in which the intensity of the pulp response increased as the remaining dentin thickness decreased. Bacteria were evidenced in the lateral walls of two samples (Group 2) which exhibited no inflammatory response or tissue disorganization. Based on the experimental conditions, it was concluded total acid etching followed by application of One Step bonding agent cannot be recommended as adequate procedures. In this clinical condition the cavity walls should be lined with a biocompatible dental material, such as Vitrebond or Dycal.

  3. Sequestration of phosphorus from wastewater by cement-based or alternative cementitious materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jiding; Kong, Yaping; Shi, Xianming

    2014-10-01

    Cement-based and alternative cementitious materials were tested in the laboratory for their capability of removing phosphate from wastewater. The results demonstrated that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were suitable for describing the adsorption characteristics of these materials. Among the four types of filter media tested, the cement-based mortar A has the highest value of maximum adsorption (30.96 mg g(-1)). The P-bonding energy (KL) and adsorption capacity (K) exhibited a positive correlation with the total content of Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in each mortar. The maximum amount of P adsorbed (Qm) and adsorption intensity (1/n) exhibited a positive correlation with the CaO content in each mortar. For three of them, the P-removal rates were in excess of 94 percent for phosphorus concentrations ranging from 20 to 1000 mg L(-1). The underlying mechanisms were examined using field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM), coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results reveal that the removal of phosphate predominantly followed a precipitation mechanism in addition to weak physical interactions between the surface of adsorbent filter media and the metallic salts of phosphate. The use of cement-based or alternative cementitious materials in the form of ground powder shows great promise for developing a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable technology for P-sequestration and for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The impact of surface preparation on shear bond strength of metallic orthodontic brackets bonded with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Elnafar, Ayman A S; Alam, Mohammad K; Hasan, Rozita

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of four enamel preparation techniques on shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) and enamel surface roughness (Ra) were also investigated after cement removal. One hundred and forty-four human premolars were divided into four groups (n = 36 in each group) as follows: Group 1, 37% phosphoric acid (i.e. conventional); Group 2, sandblasting; Group 3, sodium hypochlorite and 37% phosphoric acid; and Group 4, sodium hypochlorite and sandblasting. Twenty-four hours after bonding, the brackets were debonded with an Instron machine using a crosshead speed of 1·0 mm/min; the ARI was evaluated by an image analyser system; the Ra was measured by profilometry; and the morphology of the tooth enamel surface was observed by scanning electron microscope evaluation. Data were submitted to ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test (α = 0·05). Mean SBS values for Groups 1-4 were 13·86, 9·08, 17 and 9·63 MPa, respectively. Mean ARI for Groups 1-4 were 11·16, 2·06, 20·66 and 3·73%. The SBS and ARI showed statistically significant differences between the four groups (P<0·001). The Ra (μm) showed no significant differences between groups. Bracket bonding using RMGIC showed adequate adhesion for clinical use, and the type of enamel preparation had a significant influence. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  5. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-04-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (MTA), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin (CR) on dentine. 120 extracted human third molars were embedded in cold-cured-resin and grinned down to the dentine. For each material 30 specimens were produced in standardised height and width and the materials were applied according to manufacturers´ instructions on the dentine samples. Only in the CR group a self-etching dentine-adhesive was used. In all other groups the dentine was not pre-treated. All specimens were stored at 37.5 °C and 100% humidity for 2d, 7d and 14d. With a testing device the shear bond strength was determined (separation of the specimens from the dentine surface). The statistical evaluation was performed using ANOVA and Tukey-test (p < 0.05). At all observation periods the CR showed the significant highest shear bond strength (p < 0.05). After 2d significant differences in the shear bond strength were detectable between all tested materials, whereby CR had the highest and MTA the lowest values (p < 0.05). After 7d and 14d the shear bond strengths of MTA and Biodentine increased significantly compared to the 2d investigation period (p < 0.05). Biodentine showed a significantly higher shear bond strength than MTA (p < 0.05), while the difference between Biodentine and GIC was not significant (p > 0.05). After 7d Biodentine showed comparable shear bond values than GIC, whereas the shear bond values for MTA were significantly lower even after 14d. The adhesion of Biodentine to dentine surface seams to be superior compared to that of MTA.

  6. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  7. The effect of a diode laser and traditional irrigants on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement.

    PubMed

    Tuncdemir, Ali Riza; Yildirim, Cihan; Ozcan, Erhan; Polat, Serdar

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of a diode laser and traditional irrigants on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement. Fifty-five incisors extracted due to periodontal problems were used. All teeth were instrumented using a set of rotary root canal instruments. The post spaces were enlarged for a No.14 (diameter, 1.4 mm) Snowlight (Abrasive technology, OH, USA) glass fiber reinforced composite post with matching drill. The teeth were randomly divided into 5 experimental groups of 11 teeth each. The post spaces were treated with the followings: Group 1: 5 mL 0.9% physiological saline; Group 2: 5 mL 5.25% sodium hypochlorite; Group 3: 5 mL 17% ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), Group 4: 37% orthophosphoric acid and Group 5: Photodynamic diode laser irradiation for 1 minute after application of light-active dye solution. Snowlight posts were luted with self-adhesive resin cement. Each root was sectioned perpendicular to its long axis to create 1 mm thick specimens. The push-out bond strength test method was used to measure bond strength. One tooth from each group was processed for scanning electron microscopic analysis. BOND STRENGTH VALUES WERE AS FOLLOW: Group 1 = 4.15 MPa; Group 2 = 3.00 MPa; Group 3 = 4.45 MPa; Group 4 = 6.96 MPa; and Group 5 = 8.93 MPa. These values were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference test (P<.05). Significantly higher bond strength values were obtained with the diode laser and orthophosphoric acid (P<.05). There were no differences found between the other groups (P>.05). Orthophosphoric acid and EDTA were more effective methods for removing the smear layer than the diode laser. However, the diode laser and orthophosphoric acid were more effective at the cement dentin interface than the EDTA, Therefore, modifying the smear layer may be more effective when a self-adhesive system is used.

  8. The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applied or not:Panavia F2.0 (P), Panavia F2.0 using Primer (PRIME Plus, Bisco Inc, Schaumburg, IL, USA) (PZ), Superbond C&B (S), and Superbond C&B using Primer (SZ). For each of the groups, the cementation was conducted. The specimens were kept in sterilized water (37℃) for 24 hours. Retentive forces were tested and measured, and a statistical analysis was carried out. The nature of failure was recorded. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of retentive force in Newton for each group were 265.15 ± 35.04 N (P), 318.21 ± 22.24 N (PZ), 445.13 ± 78.54 N (S) and 508.21 ± 79.48 N (SZ). Superbond C&B groups (S & SZ) showed significantly higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0 groups (P & PZ). In Panavia F2.0 groups, the use of primer was found to contribute to the increase of retentive force. On the other hand, in Superbond C&B groups, the use of primer did not influence the retention forces. Adhesive failure was observed in all groups. CONCLUSION This study suggests that cementation of the zirconia abutments and zirconia copings with Superbond C&B have a higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0. When using Panavia F2.0, the use of primer increases the retentive force. PMID:23755347

  9. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Khosravanifard, Behnam; Rakhshan, Vahid; Araghi, Solmaz; Parhiz, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on composite-to-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI). Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25). All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent) and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC). The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h) and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min). The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was scored under ×10 magni-fication. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’sexact test (α=0.05). Results The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The dif-ference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test). SBS of both control (P=0.014) and experimental (P=0.000) groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments), which de-serves further studies. PMID:22991638

  10. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  11. Characterization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using a novel hydroxyapatite-based formulation.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Santa Cruz, Grace; Goebel, W Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2009-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements are typically prepared using beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) as the base component. However, hydroxyapatite (HA) is an interesting alternative because of its potential for reducing cement acidity, as well as modulating cement properties via ionic substitutions. In the present study, we have characterized DCPD cements prepared with a novel formulation based on monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and HA. Cements were prepared using a 4:1 MCPM:HA molar ratio. The reactivity of HA in this system was verified by showing DCPD formation using poorly crystalline HA, as well as highly crystalline HA. Evaluation of cements prepared with poorly crystalline HA revealed that setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system, and that the use of a setting regulator is necessary to maintain workability of the cement paste. Compressive testing showed that MCPM/HA cements have strengths comparable to what has previously been published for DCPD cements. However, preliminary in vitro analysis of cement degradation revealed that conversion of DCPD to HA may occur much more rapidly in the MCPM/HA system compared to cements prepared with beta-TCP. Future studies should investigate this property further, as it could have important implications for the use of HA-based DCPD cement formulations.

  12. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John

    2008-07-07

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

  13. Significant shear bond strength improvements of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement with a resin coating.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Michael T; Stoeckel, Daniel C; Rawson, Kenneth G; Welch, Dan B

    2017-01-01

    Previous evidence has suggested that resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) may be sensitive to temperature and moisture changes for the first 24 hours after photopolymerization. To test the hypothesis that a resin coating placed over the surface of an RMGIC restoration would decrease the susceptibility to moisture and temperature conditions, 44 RMGIC samples were prepared in inverted-cone recesses drilled in epoxy resin plates. After abrasion of all samples with 800-grit silicon carbide paper to simulate a diamond bur finish on the surface, a coat of highly filled resin was applied to the experimental group (n = 22) and cured according to the manufacturer's instructions. The plates were thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C and then maintained at 37°C with 95% humidity. The thermocycled samples were bonded to a second epoxy resin plate filled with RMGIC and subjected to shear bond strength testing. The resin-coated group had a significantly greater mean shear bond strength than the control group (P < 0.05). The resin coating also appeared to affect the mode of failure by significantly increasing the number of mixed failures (P < 0.05). The results suggest that a resin coating protects RMGIC from moisture- and temperature-induced damage and increases shear bond strength.

  14. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Renata Andreza Talaveira; COUTINHO, Margareth; CARDOZO, Pedro Igor; da SILVA, Larissa Alves; ZORZATTO, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. Objective this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C), medium (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root. Material and methods Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group): group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37ºC for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. Results Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05). Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3%) than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%), ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0%) and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3%) (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05). Conclusions Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity. PMID:21710099

  15. Bonding Ni-Cr alloy to tooth structure with adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Penugonda, B; Scherer, W; Cooper, H; Kokoletsos, N; Koifman, V

    1992-01-01

    This study was to determine the shear bond strengths of Ni-Cr alloy to Ni-Cr alloy (Group I), Ni-Cr alloy to enamel (Group II), and Ni-Cr alloy to dentin (Group III) using Imperva Dual, DC Metabond, All-Bond, Geristore, and Panavia. All bonded specimens were thermocycled 2000 x (5 degrees C-55 degrees C) after 24 hours and subjected to shear bond testing on a Universal Instron Testing Machine. In all groups of the study, Imperva Dual and CB Metabond had significantly (p < .05) higher bond values than Panavia.

  16. The effect of air abrasion of metal implant abutments on the tensile bond strength of three luting agents used to cement implant superstructures: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Jugdev, Jasvinder; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lynch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effect of airborne particle abrasion of metal implant abutments on tensile bond strength (TBS) of TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier implant cements. Specimens were designed to replicate a single metal implant crown cemented to both smooth and airborne particle-abraded Osteo-Ti implant abutments with zero degrees of taper. Twenty castings were fabricated and cemented to either a smooth surface abutment (SSA) or to an airborne particle-abraded abutment (AAA). TBS was measured with a 50-kg load and a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/min in a universal testing machine. Each cement was tested 10 times on both abutment types. The mean TBS values (standard deviations, 95% confidence intervals) of SSAs for TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier cements were 115.89 N (26.44, 96.98-134.81), 134.43 N (36.95, 108.25-160.60), and 132.51 N (55.10, 93.09-171.93), respectively. The corresponding values for AAAs were 129.69 N (30.39, 107.95-151.43), 298.67 N (80.36, 241.19-356.16), and 361.17 N (133.23, 265.86-456.48), respectively. There was no significant difference in TBS among the dental cements when used with an SSA. Air abrasion of abutments did not increase the TBS of TempBond but significantly increased crown retention with Retrieve and Premier. For SSAs, all failures were adhesive on the abutment surface; for AAAs, mostly cohesive cement failures occurred. The retention of copings cemented with Retrieve or Premier to zero-degree-taper abutments was significantly increased after airborne particle abrasion of the abutments. However, this was not significant when TempBond was used. Airborne particle abrasion of abutments and the use of Retrieve or Premier can be recommended for nonretrievable prostheses. Although TempBond functioned similarly to the two other cements in SSAs, it is advisable to limit its use to provisional prostheses; its long-term performance needs to be assessed clinically.

  17. Push-out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Weakened Roots with Different Luting Agents.

    PubMed

    da Silveira-Pedrosa, Daniele M; Martins, Luis Rm; Sinhoreti, Mário Ac; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D; Costa, Edson D; de F Pedrosa-Filho, Celso; de Carvalho, Jacy Ribeiro

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the push-out bond strength (BS) of direct anatomic posts (DAPs) and conventional fiber posts (CFPs) cemented with different luting agents in different thirds of flared root canals. A total of 60 human single-rooted canine teeth were transversally sectioned 16 mm from the radicular apex. After endodontic treatment, canals were flared with diamond burs. Samples were divided into six groups according to post type and luting agent: DAP and RelyX U100 (RXU); DAP and RelyX ARC (RXA); DAP and RelyX Luting 2 (RXL); CFP and RXU; CFP and RXA; CFP and RXL. Roots were sectioned transversely into six 1-mm-thick slices. The push-out test was performed and failure modes were observed. The DAP groups (7.23 ± 2.05) showed highest BS values (p < 0.05) when compared with CFP (5.93 ± 1.76). RelyX U100 (8.17 ± 1.70) showed higher BS values (p < 0.05) than RXA (6.46 ± 1.38), and RXL (5.10 ± 1.65) showed the lowest values. Bond strength on the apical third was statistically lower (p < 0.05) than that on the other thirds of the root canals. There was a predominance of adhesive failure for all groups. The DAPs improved retention in flared root canals, and RXU was the most effective luting agent. The apical third showed the lowest BS values. The relining procedure of fiber posts with composite and the proper selection of luting resin cement are important for increasing bonding effectiveness in flared root canals.

  18. Deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite nano-particle on zirconia ceramic: a potential solution for the poor bonding characteristic of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    PubMed

    Azari, Abbas; Nikzad, Sakineh; Yazdani, Arash; Atri, Faezeh; Fazel Anvari-Yazdi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    The poor bonding strength of zirconia to different dental substrates is one of the challenging issues in restorative dentistry. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent biocompatible material with fine bonding properties. In this study, it was hypothesized that hydroxyapatite coating on zirconia would improve its bond strength. Forty-five zirconia blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups: hydroxyapatite coating, sandblasting, and no preparation (control). The blocks were bonded to cement and the micro-shear bond strength was measured following load application. The bond strength values were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test in 3 groups and paired comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test. The failure patterns of the specimens were studied by a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope and then analyzed by the chi-square test (significance level = 0.05). Deposition of hydroxyapatite on the zirconia surface significantly improved its bond strength to the resin cement in comparison with the control specimens (p < 0.0001). Also, the bond strength was similar to the sandblasted group (p = 0.34). The sandblasted and control group only showed adhesive failure, but the hydroxyapatite coated group had mixed failures, indicating the better quality of bonding (p < 0.0001). As a final point, hydroxyapatite coating on the zirconia surface improved the bond strength quality and values.

  19. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanitsa, Natalya; Sarkisov, Yurij; Gorshkova, Aleksandra; Demyanenko, Olga

    2016-01-01

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  20. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    SciTech Connect

    Kopanitsa, Natalya Sarkisov, Yurij Gorshkova, Aleksandra Demyanenko, Olga

    2016-01-15

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  1. Microwave nondestructive detection of chloride in cement based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benally, Aaron D.; Bois, Karl J.; Nowak, Paul S.; Zoughi, Reza

    1999-12-01

    Preliminary results pertaining to the near-field microwave nondestructive detection and evaluation of chloride in cement paste and mortar specimens are presented. The technique used for this purpose utilizes an open-ended rectangular waveguide at the aperture of which the reflection properties of the specimens are measured. It is shown that the magnitude of reflection coefficient is a useful parameter for detecting chloride in these specimens. Furthermore, the difference in the amount of chloride present in these various specimens, at the time of mixing, can also be determined. Reflection property measurements were conducted in S-band (2.6 GHz-3.95 GHz) and X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) for two sets of four mortar specimens with 0.50 and 0.60 water-to-cement ratio and varying salt (NaCl) contents added to the mixing water used in producing these specimens. It is shown that the reflection properties of these materials vary considerably as a function of their chloride content. Also, by monitoring the daily variation in the reflection coefficient of each specimen during the curing period, the effect of chloride on curing can be nondestructively ascertained. Finally, it is shown that the detection and evaluation of chloride content in cement based materials can be performed using a simple comparative process with respect to a non-contaminated specimen.

  2. Microwave nondestructive detection of chloride in cement based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benally, Aaron D.; Bois, Karl J.; Zoughi, Reza; Nowak, Paul S.

    1999-12-02

    Preliminary results pertaining to the near-field microwave nondestructive detection and evaluation of chloride in cement paste and mortar specimens are presented. The technique used for this purpose utilizes an open-ended rectangular waveguide at the aperture of which the reflection properties of the specimens are measured. It is shown that the magnitude of reflection coefficient is a useful parameter for detecting chloride in these specimens. Furthermore, the difference in the amount of chloride present in these various specimens, at the time of mixing, can also be determined. Reflection property measurements were conducted in S-band (2.6 GHz-3.95 GHz) and X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) for two sets of four mortar specimens with 0.50 and 0.60 water-to-cement ratio and varying salt (NaCl) contents added to the mixing water used in producing these specimens. It is shown that the reflection properties of these materials vary considerably as a function of their chloride content. Also, by monitoring the daily variation in the reflection coefficient of each specimen during the curing period, the effect of chloride on curing can be nondestructively ascertained. Finally, it is shown that the detection and evaluation of chloride content in cement based materials can be performed using a simple comparative process with respect to a non-contaminated specimen.

  3. Peen treatment on a titanium implant: effect of roughness, osteoblast cell functions, and bonding with bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Morshed; Riahinezhad, Shahram; Sultana, Fariha; Vaughan, Melville B; Knight, Joshua; Morris, Tracy L

    2016-01-01

    Implant failure due to poor integration of the implant with the surrounding biomaterial is a common problem in various orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. Implant fixation mostly depends upon the implant surface topography. Micron to nanosize circular-shaped groove architecture with adequate surface roughness can enhance the mechanical interlock and osseointegration of an implant with the host tissue and solve its poor fixation problem. Such groove architecture can be created on a titanium (Ti) alloy implant by laser peening treatment. Laser peening produces deep, residual compressive stresses in the surfaces of metal parts, delivering increased fatigue life and damage tolerance. The scientific novelty of this study is the controlled deposition of circular-shaped rough spot groove using laser peening technique and understanding the effect of the treatment techniques for improving the implant surface properties. The hypothesis of this study was that implant surface grooves created by controlled laser peen treatment can improve the mechanical and biological responses of the implant with the adjoining biomaterial. The objective of this study was to measure how the controlled laser-peened groove architecture on Ti influences its osteoblast cell functions and bonding strength with bone cement. This study determined the surface roughness and morphology of the peen-treated Ti. In addition, this study compared the osteoblast cell functions (adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation) between control and peen-treated Ti samples. Finally, this study measured the fracture strength between each kind of Ti samples and bone cement under static loading. This study found that laser peen treatment on Ti significantly changed the surface architecture of the Ti, which led to enhanced osteoblast cell adhesion and differentiation on Ti implants and fracture strength of Ti–bone cement interfaces compared with values of untreated Ti samples. Therefore, the laser peen treatment

  4. Effects of tree species and wood particle size on the properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufacturing from tree prunings.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Ramadan A; Al-Mefarrej, H A; Abdel-Aal, M A; Alshahrani, T S

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the possibility of using the prunings of six locally grown tree species in Saudi Arabia for cement-bonded particleboard (CBP) production. Panels were made using four different wood particle sizes and a constant wood/cement ratio (1/3 by weight) and target density (1200 kg/m3). The mechanical properties and dimensional stability of the produced panels were determined. The interfacial area and distribution of the wood particles in cement matrix were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that the panels produced from these pruning materials at a target density of 1200 kg m(-3) meet the strength and dimensional stability requirements of the commercial CBP panels. The mean moduli of rupture and elasticity (MOR and MOE) ranged from 9.68 to 11.78 N mm2 and from 3952 to 5667 N mm2, respectively. The mean percent water absorption for twenty four hours (WA24) ranged from 12.93% to 23.39%. Thickness swelling values ranged from 0.62% to 1.53%. For CBP panels with high mechanical properties and good dimensional stability, mixed-size or coarse particles should be used. Using the tree prunings for CBPs production may help to solve the problem of getting rid of these residues by reducing their negative effects on environment, which are caused by poor disposal of such materials through direct combustion process and appearance of black cloud and then the impact on human health or the random accumulation and its indirect effects on the environment.

  5. The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55℃. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392