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Sample records for cement based bonded

  1. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Noble and Base Metal Alloys with Different Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Raeisosadat, Farkhondeh; Ghavam, Maryam; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Arami, Sakineh; Sedaghati, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen. Materials and Method: Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to “Degubond 4” (Au Pd) and “Verabond” (Ni Cr) alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021) and Verabond (P< 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291) and Verabond (P=0.899). Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003). The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011). The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59). RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035). Conclusion: The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2. PMID:25628687

  2. Effect of artificial saliva and pH on shear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramic.

    PubMed

    Geramipanah, F; Majidpour, M; Sadighpour, L; Fard, M J Kharazi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of media with different pH on shear and strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramics. Sixty rectangularly shaped specimens made of a zirconia based ceramic (Cercon, Dentsply) were prepared, air-blasted with 110 microm aluminum oxide particles (Al203) and randomly assigned into three groups (n = 30). A universal resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M/ESPE) was bonded to each specimen using one of the following three cements: Calibra (Dentsply), Panavia F2 (kurary) and Unicem (3M/ESPE). Specimens were thermal cycled and stored in one of the following three media for two weeks: water at pH = 7, saliva at pH = 7 and saliva at pH = 3.5. The mean shear bond strength of each group was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (alpha = 0.05). The modes of failure were recorded using a streomicroscope. All specimens in the Calibra groups showed premature debonding. No significant difference was found between the two other cements or different media. The failure modes in the two latter cements were predominantly adhesive. Despite the adverse effect of acidic media on the properties of restorative materials, the media did not significantly influence the bond strength of MDP-containing resin cement and a self-adhesive cement to a zirconia- based ceramic.

  3. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    PubMed

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100).

  4. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®)

    PubMed Central

    CANTEKİN, Kenan; AVCİ, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Material and Methods Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7) (p<0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively). Conclusions The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite. PMID:25141202

  5. Push-out bond strength of MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emmanuel Jnl; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Zanon, Mayara; Senna, Plínio Mendes; DE-Deus, Gustavo; Zuolo, Mário Luis; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2016-06-14

    This study was designed to investigate the resistance to dislodgment provided by MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement. Biodentine and White MTA Angelus were used as reference materials for comparison. Three discs 1 ± 0.1 mm thick were obtained from the middle third of the roots of 5 maxillary canines. Three 0.8-mm-wide holes were drilled on the axial surface of each root disc. Standardized irrigation was performed. Then the holes were dried with paper points and filled with one of the three tested cements. The filled dental slices were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 7.2) for 7 days before the push-out assessment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to assess the effect of each endodontic cement on the push-out bond strength. Mann-Whitney with Bonferroni correction was used to isolate the differences. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05. All specimens had measurable push-out values and no premature failure occurred. There were significant differences among the materials (p <0.05). The Biodentine specimens had the highest push-out bond strength values (p < 0.05). MTA HP had significantly higher bond strength than White MTA (p < 0.05). MTA HP showed better push-out bond strength than its predecessor, White MTA; however, Biodentine had higher dislodgment resistance than both MTA formulations.

  6. Understanding acoustic methods for cement bond logging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Tao, Guo; Shang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    Well cementation is important for oil/gas production, underground gas storage, and CO2 storage, since it isolates the reservoir layers from aquifers to increase well integrity and reduce environmental footprint. This paper analyzes wave modes of different sonic/ultrasonic methods for cement bonding evaluation. A Two dimensional finite difference method is then used to simulate the wavefield for the ultrasonic methods in the cased-hole models. Waveforms of pulse-echo method from different interfaces in a good bonded well are analyzed. Wavefield of the pitch-catch method for free casing, partial or full bonded models with ultra-low density cement are studied. Based on the studies, the modes in different methods are considered as follows: the zero-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S0) for sonic method, the first-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S1) for the pulse-echo method, and the zero-order anti-symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (A0) for the pitch-catch method. For the sonic method, a directional transmitter in both the azimuth and axial directions can generate energy with a large incidence angle and azimuth resolution, which can effectively generate S0 and break out the azimuth limitation of the conventional sonic method. Although combination of pulse-echo and pitch-catch methods can determine the bonding condition of the third interface for the ultra-low density cement case, the pitch-catch cannot tell the fluid annulus thickness behind casing for the partial bonded cased-hole.

  7. The evaluation of dual cement resins in orthodontic bonding.

    PubMed

    Smith, R T; Shivapuja, P K

    1993-05-01

    Dual-cement resins are composite resins that are both light activated and chemically cured. They can be cured completely with a visible light source or by the catalyst and base reaction of the material. With the control of setting time, dual cements appear to offer clinicians advantages in orthodontic bonding. The purposes of the present research are to compare various dual cements in regard to orthodontic bonding and to evaluate them in relation to currently used chemically cured and light-cured composite resins for bonding stainless steel mesh-backed orthodontic brackets. Seven currently available orthodontic bonding systems (three light cured and four chemically cured) and three dual cements were evaluated. Each of the 10 groups contained 15 noncarious mandibular incisors. Mandibular incisor brackets were bonded to the teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendation. After bonding, the teeth were stored for 5 days in water at 37 degrees C. An Instron machine (Instron Corp., Canton, Mass.) was used to test samples. All samples were compared with Concise orthodontic bonding composite (3M, St. Paul, Minn.). The results of this investigation show that it is possible to bond solid, mesh-backed metal orthodontic brackets to teeth with a dual cement. The shear bond strengths of the dual cements, as tested in the laboratory, should be adequate to withstand normal orthodontic forces. Increased control of the setting time of the dual cements will allow the clinician more time to correctly position brackets and to remove excess resin before curing. In addition, the clinician can be assured of complete polymerization with the chemical properties of the dual cement resins.

  8. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  9. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  10. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  11. The fluid-compensated cement bond log

    SciTech Connect

    Nayfeh, T.H.; Leslie, H.D.; Wheelis, W.B.

    1984-09-01

    An experimental and numerical wave mechanics study of cement bond logs demonstrated that wellsite computer processing can now segregate wellbore fluid effects from the sonic signal response to changing cement strength. Traditionally, cement logs have been interpreted as if water were in the wellbore, without consideration of wellbore fluid effects. These effects were assumed to be negligible. However, with the increasing number of logs being run in completion fluids such as CaCl/sub 2/, ZnBr/sub 2/, and CaBr/sub 2/, large variations in cement bond logs became apparent. A Schlumberger internal paper showing that bond log amplitude is related to the acoustic impedance of the fluid in which the tool is run led to a comprehensive study of wellbore fluid effects. Numerical and experimental models were developed simulating wellbore geometry. Measurements were conducted in 5-, 7-, and 95/8-in. casings by varying the wellbore fluid densities, viscosities, and fluid types (acoustic impedance). Parallel numerical modeling was undertaken using similar parameters. The results showed that the bond log amplitude varied dramatically with the wellbore fluid's acoustic impedance; for example, there was a 70 percent increase in the signal amplitude for 11.5-lb/ gal CaCl/sub 2/ over the signal amplitude in water. This led to the development of a Fluid-Compensated Bond log that corrects the amplitude for acoustic impedance of varying wellbore fluids, thereby making the measurements more directly related to the cement quality.

  12. A study of self-adhesive resin cements for bonding to silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy -- effect of including primer components in cement base.

    PubMed

    Muraguchi, Koichi; Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacies of adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, G-CEM, RelyX Unicem Clicker, Vitremer Paste) for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy not surface-pretreated with metal primer. For control, Panavia F 2.0 -developed for use with a proprietary metal primer, Alloy Primer- was tested with and without metal primer application. Pairs of alloy disks (10.0 and 8.0 mm in diameters, 3.0 mm thickness) were air-abraded with alumina and bonded with one of the cements. Shear bond strengths (SBSs) were measured before and after 50,000 times of thermocycling. Among Maxcem, RelyX Unicem Clicker and the control, there were no statistical differences in SBS before and after thermocycling. After thermocycling, Clearfil SA Luting exhibited the highest SBS among all the cements. Results showed that Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, and RelyX Unicem Clicker were efficacious for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy after air abrasion surface treatment for the latter.

  13. Cement design based on cement mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Thiercelin, M.J.; Dargaud, B.; Baret, J.F.; Rodriquez, W.J.

    1998-12-01

    The disappearance of cement bond log response as a result of variations of downhole conditions has been observed in numerous wells. This observation has led to concern about the loss of proper zonal isolation. Stresses induced in the cement, through deformation of the cemented casing resulting from the variation of downhole conditions, are the cause of this damage. The authors present an analysis of the mechanical response of set cement in a cased wellbore to quantify this damage and determine the key controlling parameters. The results show that the thermo-elastic properties of the casing, cement, and formation play a significant role. The type of failure, either cement debonding or cement cracking, is a function of the nature of the downhole condition variations. This analysis allows one to propose appropriate cement mechanical properties to avoid cement failure and debonding. The authors show that the use of high compressive strength cement is not always the best solution and, in some cases, flexible cements are preferred.

  14. Reactive Silicate Coatings for Protecting and Bonding Reinforcing Steel in Cement-Based Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Bentur, Diamond and Mindess , 1985; Wei, Mandel and Said, 1986; Horne, Richardson and Brydson, 2007). Most research have concluded that the...around a steel fiber. (after Bentur, Diamond and Mindess , 1985.) The ITZ is typically on the order of 100µm in thickness and the exact...International, West Conshohocken, PA. Bentur, A. Diamond, S. and Mindess , S., 1985: Cracking Processes in Steel Fibre Reinforced Cement Pastes

  15. Phosphate based oil well cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  16. The fluid-compensated cement bond log

    SciTech Connect

    Nayfeh, T.H.; Wheelis, W.B. Jr.; Leslie, H.D.

    1986-08-01

    Simulations of cement bond logging (CBL) have shown that wellbore fluid effects can be segregated from sonic-signal response to changing cement strengths. Traditionally, the effects have been considered negligible and the CBL's have been interpreted as if water were in the wellbore. However, large variations in CBL's have become apparent with the increasing number of logs run in completion fluids, such as CaCl/sub 2/, ZnBr/sub 2/, and CaBr/sub 2/. To study wellbore fluid effects, physical and numerical models were developed that simulated the wellbore geometry. Measurements were conducted in 5-, 7-, and 9 5/8-in. casings for a range of wellbore fluid types and for both densities and viscosities. Parallel numerical modeling used similar parameters. Results show that bond-log amplitudes varied dramatically with the wellbore fluid acoustic impedance-i.e., there was a 70% increase in signal amplitudes for 11.5 lbm/gal (1370-kg/m/sup 3/) CaCl/sub 2/ over the signal amplitude in water. This led to the development of a fluid-compensated bond log that corrects the amplitude for acoustic impedance of various wellbore fluids, thereby making the measurements more directly related to the cement quality.

  17. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  18. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  19. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5±1 min. The compressive strength after 24h of incubation was approximately 8.45±1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10±1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16±4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics.

  20. [Dentin bonding of cements. The bonding of cements with dentin in combination with various indirect restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Sahafi, Alireza; Flury, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The number of both luting agents and restorative materials available on the market has rapidly increased. This study compared various types of luting agents when used to bond different indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders were produced of six restorative materials (gold alloy, titanium, feldspathic porcelain, leucite-glass ceramic, zirconia, and an indirect resin composite). Following relevant pretreatment, the end surface of the cylinders were luted to ground, human dentin with eight different luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37 °C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens was measured and the fracture mode was examined stereo-microscopically. Restorative material and luting agent both had a significant effect on bond strength and there was a significant interaction between the two variables. The zinc phosphate cement and the glass ionomer cements resulted in the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements.

  1. A practical approach to the interpretation of cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.L.

    1985-03-01

    The Cement Bond Log has been controversial since its inception. Despite its potential, it is possibly the most maligned logging service available to the industry. Effective zone isolation between permeable intervals in a well requires a cement sheath over an appreciable vertical interval. It is necessary for the annular cement sheath to provide an effective hydraulic seal in order to withstand subsequent completion and production operations. The oil industry has used wireline well logs to detect the presence or absence of cement behind pipe for more than twenty years. Users have attempted, not always successfully, to evaluate the effectiveness of cement bond to both pipe and formation, ostensibly, with Cement Bond Logs. Cement Bond Logs do not mislead. Poor interpretation habits mislead. Knowledge of the well completion and the inherent physical restraints placed upon the log measurements is needed in order to properly evaluate the log. The purpose here is to dispel some of the myths created by misguided interpretation practices. Examples of Cement Bond Logs which fall into this category are presented.

  2. A practical approach to the interpretation of cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.L.

    1985-07-01

    The cement bond log has been controversial since its inception. Despite its potential, it is possibly the most maligned logging service available to the industry. Effective zone isolation between permeable intervals in a well requires a cement sheath over an appreciable vertical interval. It is necessary for the annular cement sheath to provide an effective hydraulic seal to withstand subsequent completion and production operations. The oil industry has used wireline well logs to detect the presence or absence of cement behind pipe for more than 20 years. Users have attempted, not always successfully, to evaluate the effectiveness of cement bond to both pipe and formation with cement bond logs. Cement bond logs do not mislead. Poor interpretation habits mislead. Knowledge of the well completion and the inherent physical restraints placed on the log measurements is needed to evaluate the log properly. The purpose here is to dispel some of the myths created by misguided interpretation practices. Examples of cement bond logs that fall into this category are be presented.

  3. Cement bond log evaluation of foam- and synthetic-cemented casings

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckdorfer, R.A.; Jacobs, W.R.; Masson, J.P.

    1984-11-01

    Cement bond log (CBL /SUP TM/ ) studies on foam- and synthetic-cemented wells were initiated to determine the feasibility of, as well as to develop technologies for, evaluating these novel cementing services. Early CBL's on these cementing systems showed little effect on the log amplitude curve. Hence, CBL evaluations were difficult to obtain and interpret. A special sonde with a 1.3-ft (0.4-m) transmitter-toreceiver spacing was developed for this study. Sonic signal amplitudes were determined by using cemented shortcasing test sections. Sonic attenuation rates were correlated to compressive strengths for a range of cement densities. Experimental details of the cementing operation and logging studies are discussed. Data relating attenuation rates to compressive strengths and cement densities also are presented. Field results are discussed.

  4. Dentin bonding agents and resin cements--current status.

    PubMed

    Woolsey, G; O'Mahony, A; Hansen, P A

    2000-01-01

    Contemporary restorative dentistry is a rapidly evolving science which challenges the progressive clinician with a plethora of "new and improved" products. Sound product choices should be couched in the prudent consideration of well conducted in vitro and in vivo product research. This review shall list the most recent product developments in dentin bonding agents (fifth generation agents), resin-containing dental cements and the newest generation of dental cements i.e., resin-ionomer dental cements.

  5. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-03-04

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations.

  6. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations. PMID:26019653

  7. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  8. Evaluation of bonding behavior of silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy to adhesive luting cements.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Kawaguchi, T; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2010-12-01

    The bond strengths of a silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy used with adhesive luting cements were investigated. The metal surfaces were primed with two metal conditioners designed for noble metal alloys or base metal alloys, or prepared using a Rocatec tribochemical coating unit. Two adhesive luting cements (Super-Bond C&B and Panavia F 2.0) were applied. It can be concluded that airborne-particle abrasion with alumina was effective, but the effects on the bond durability of both the metal conditioners and the tribochemical silica coating method were not clear Such bonding behavior seems to be particular to this kind of silver-rich dental casting alloy.

  9. Influence of cement thickness on resin-zirconia microtensile bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Shim, June-Sung; Han, Chong-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of resin cement thickness on the microtensile bond strength between zirconium-oxide ceramic and resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-two freshly extracted molars were transversely sectioned at the deep dentin level and bonded to air-abraded zirconium oxide ceramic disks. The specimens were divided into 8 groups based on the experimental conditions (cement type: Rely X UniCem or Panavia F 2.0, cement thickness: 40 or 160 µm, storage: thermocycled or not). They were cut into microbeams and stored in 37℃ distilled water for 24 h. Microbeams of non-thermocycled specimens were submitted to a microtensile test, whereas those of thermocycled groups were thermally cycled for 18,000 times immediately before the microtensile test. Three-way ANOVA and Sheffe's post hoc tests were used for statistical analysis (α=95%). RESULTS All failures occurred at the resin-zirconia interface. Thermocycled groups showed lower microtensile bond strength than non-thermocycled groups (P<.001). Differences in cement thickness did not influence the resin-zirconia microtensile bond strength given the same resin cement or storage conditions (P>.05). The number of adhesive failures increased after thermocycling in all experimental conditions. No cohesive failure was observed in any experimental group. CONCLUSION When resin cements of adhesive monomers are applied over air-abraded zirconia restorations, the degree of fit does not influence the resin-zirconia microtensile bond strength. PMID:22053241

  10. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  11. Acoustic logging on ultralow density cement bonded quality evaluation in cased hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Shang, X.; Chen, T.; Tao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Cementing operation after drilling boreholes ensures oil and gas to be extracted effectively and avoids oil spill events such as BP Mexico oil leakage events. However, the loss of cement in deep formation due to its high density happens and raises issues. In order to overcome this problem, ultralow density cement or gas-based cements are used more and more commonly in recent years. Current acoustic evaluation tools, used to determine the cement bond quality, are designed for conventional high density cement. Therefore, they are not capable to image the ultralow density cement, whose acoustic properties are similar to borehole drilling mud. In this paper, a new acoustic technique is developed to image the ultralow density cement behind case. Finite difference method and analytical methods are used to simulate the wave-field of cased borehole which ultralow density cement bonded on. Based on the simulations, the optimal parameters of the evaluation tool design are proposed including spacing (from source to the nearest receiver and between the two neighboring receiver), frequency of source.

  12. Porous Surface Modified Bioactive Bone Cement for Enhanced Bone Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Dong, Jingjing; Guo, Dagang; Mao, Mengmeng; Kong, Liang; Li, Yang; Wu, Zixiang; Lei, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. Materials and Methods The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant–bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. Results The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect. Conclusions

  13. Toughness, bonding and fluoride-release properties of hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Milanita E; Arita, Kenji; Nishino, Mizuho

    2003-09-01

    Improving the mechanical strength of glass ionomer cement while preserving its favorable clinical properties such as fluoride release, bonding to tooth structure and biocompatibility is desirable. In this study, hydroxyapatite was incorporated into chemically setting glass ionomer cement and its effect on the fracture toughness, bonding to dentin and fluoride release was identified. Commercial glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP((R)) ) was the control and base material. Eight weight percent of hydroxyapatite was added into the glass ionomer powder. Specimens were fabricated and the fracture toughness, shear bond strength and eluted fluoride ion concentration were measured. Adding hydroxyapatite into the glass ionomer cement led to significantly higher fracture toughness after 15min and 24h from mixing. The hydroxyapatite-added cement also exhibited bond strength to dentin similar to that of the control from 15min to 56 days and consistent fluoride release for 13 weeks. SEM findings showed a cohesive type of fracture in the material for all specimens in both groups. These results indicate that hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement has a potential as a reliable restorative material with improved fracture toughness, long-term bonding to dentin and unimpeded ability of sustained fluoride release.

  14. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  15. Effects of cyclic stressing on attachment bond strength using glass ionomer cement and composite resin.

    PubMed

    Moseley, H C; Horrocks, E N; Pearson, G J; Davies, E H

    1995-02-01

    Bonded orthodontic brackets were subjected to cyclic loading in order to simulate the effect of occlusal forces. The subsequent effect on bond strength was determined. Stainless steel, mesh-based brackets were bonded to extracted teeth with either composite resin or glass ionomer cement. A jig was designed to subject each bracket to a preselected loading level and the 24-hour shear/peel bond strength of both stressed and unstressed brackets was subsequently measured. Cyclic loading brought about a comparative decrease in bond strength when using both types of material. The potential implications of selecting these different types of bonding material for clinical use are discussed.

  16. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (p<0.05). The combination of Scotchbond Universal surface treatment with Panavia SA cement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond

  17. Effect of polymer admixtures to cement on the bond strength and electrical contact resistivity between steel fiber and cement

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1996-02-01

    The addition of methylcellulose (0.4% by weight of cement) or latex (20% by weight of cement) to cement paste gave similarly significant increases of the shear bond strength between stainless steel fiber and cement paste, in spite of the low concentration of methylcellulose compared to latex. The methylcellulose addition did not affect the contact electrical resistivity between fiber and cement, whereas the latex addition increased this resistivity. Hence, for low cost and low contact resistivity, methylcellulose is preferred to latex. For a given cement paste composition, the bond strength increased linearly with the contact resistivity.

  18. Use of Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (emats) for Cement Bond Logging of Gas Storage Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, A. O.; Domangue, E. J.; Barolak, J. G.; Patterson, D. J.

    2008-02-01

    According to the Department of Energy (DOE), there are approximately 110 operators maintaining more than 17,000 gas storage wells in over 415 underground storage facilities across the USA. In virtually every application, steel casing, cemented into place, serves to isolate the well from the underground formations. The process of cementing wellbore casing provides two major benefits: 1) cement prevents gas migration between the casing and formation; 2) cement transfers stress from the casing to the formation, increasing the effective strength and working pressure of the casing. Current cement evaluation techniques use an acoustic wave generated and received by a logging tool within the wellbore to detect cement placed outside the casing. These techniques rely on fluid in the casing to provide acoustic coupling between the logging tool and the casing and therefore are unable to operate in gas-filled boreholes. This paper details efforts to confirm the validity and applicability of the use of EMATs for evaluating cement in gas-filled boreholes. The methods and techniques proposed for the cement bond logging using EMATs are confirmed and validated based on the results obtained from the numerical modeling and experiments with physical cement models. Partial funding for this investigation was provided by the DOE and Gas Storage Technology Consortium.

  19. Various cements and their effects on bond strength of zirconia ceramic to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Prylinska-Czyzewska, Agata; Piotrowski, Pawel; Prylinski, Mariusz; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Zirconia ceramic disks (Cercon) were fabricated using a computer-aided design/ computer-assisted manufacture system and fitted to hard tooth tissues from freshly extracted bovine mandibular incisors using seven cements (zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, Eco-Link, Panavia F 2.0, Clearfil SA Cement, MaxCem Elite, and GC Fuji Plus) with various physicochemical and bonding properties. Bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine (Hounsfield H5KS) with a 5,000-N head and a cutting knife speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The study showed that the strongest bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tooth tissues was obtained with Panavia F 2.0 adhesive cement based on 10 methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate monomer.

  20. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  1. UV irradiation improves the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Chen, Li; Li, Deli; Tan, Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the effect of UV irradiation on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Twelve epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (Cont.): No surface treatment. Group 2 (Low-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 10 cm for 10 min. Group 3 (High-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 1 cm for 3 min. A resin cement (CLEARFIL SA LUTING) was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which contained fiber posts in the center. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the mean bond strengths (MPa) were 18.81 for Cont. group, 23.65 for Low-UV group, 34.75 for High-UV group. UV irradiation had a significant effect on the bond strength (p<0.05). UV irradiation demonstrates its capability to improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  2. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  3. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    PubMed Central

    NOVAIS, Veridiana Resende; RAPOSO, Luís Henrique Araújo; de MIRANDA, Rafael Resende; LOPES, Camila de Carvalho Almança; SIMAMOTO, Paulo Cézar; SOARES, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick. PMID:28198977

  4. A comparison of new ultrasonic cement and casing evaluation logs with standard cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Sheives, T.C.; Tello, L.N.; Maki, V.E. Jr.; Standley, T.E.; Blankinship, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic inspection techniques have been implemented to evaluate cement bond and casing conditions. These techniques, relying on state of the art downhole, high-speed waveform digitization, can successfully determine cement voids and channels and also provide accurate bond information in the presence of a microannulus. The downhole microprocessor controlled electronics transmits the digitized waveforms to the surface for computations and display. The downhole waveforms are then viewed by the operator in real time to insure proper log quality. Numerous log examples showing comparisons with the standard Cement Bond Log (CBL) demonstrate that the accuracy and resolution of the new approach provide much more information. Casing conditions are determined using both acoustic caliper measurements and a new casing thickness measurement technique. The acoustic caliper measurement not only determines accurately the casing inside diameter, but also detects the pipe gap at casing collars. The new measurement determines actual casing thickness variations due to internal or external pipe wear or corrosion. Experimental results along with log examples show the effectiveness and accuracy of measuring the actual casing thickness at the well site in real time.

  5. Antimicrobial properties and dentin bonding strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Mestres, G; Abdolhosseini, M; Bowles, W; Huang, S-H; Aparicio, C; Gorr, S-U; Ginebra, M-P

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) when NH4H2PO4 was used or an amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate when NaH2PO4 was used. The MPC had appropriate setting times for hard tissue applications, high early compressive strengths and higher strength of bonding to dentin than commercial mineral trioxide aggregate cement. Bacteriological studies were performed with fresh and aged cements against three bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (planktonic and in biofilm) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. These bacteria have been associated with infected implants, as well as other frequent hard tissue related infections. Extracts of different compositions of MPC had bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties against the three bacterial strains tested. This was associated mainly with a synergistic effect between the high osmolarity and alkaline pH of the MPC. These intrinsic antimicrobial properties make MPC preferential candidates for applications in dentistry, such as root fillers, pulp capping agents and cavity liners.

  6. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P<.001). DMSO did not affect immediate bonding of the two cements. Aging significantly reduced P-OBS in control groups (P<.001), while in DMSO-treated groups, no difference in P-OBS was observed after aging (P>.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements. PMID:27555893

  7. Shear stresses in cemented and bonded optics due to temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, P. R.; Vukobratovich, D.

    2015-09-01

    This paper applies analytical means previously published by Chen and Nelson (1979) to estimate the shear stresses developed within the joints between typical cemented optical components and within opto-mechanical subassemblies made of materials with significantly different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) when exposed to extreme ambient temperatures. Two cemented doublet examples, one involving glasses with a large CTE mismatch and another with more equal CTEs, are analyzed. An example involving a prism made of fused silica bonded with epoxy to a titanium base also is considered.

  8. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets cemented with a zinc oxide-polyvinyl cement.

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Garcia-Godoy, F

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths and enamel surface structure after debonding a conventional metal bracket and a polycrystalline ceramic bracket bonded with a bipolar zinc oxide-polyvinyl cement (F-21) or a light-cured resin cement (Transbond). Forty extracted human premolars were used. The buccal enamel surfaces were used, and the teeth randomly divided into four groups of 10 teeth each: group 1: conventional metal bracket (Unitek) bonded with Transbond; group 2: metal bracket bonded with F-21; group 3: ceramic bracket (Transcend 2000) bonded with Transbond; and group 4: ceramic bracket bonded with F-21. The brackets were bonded to the etched enamel surfaces according to manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours and then thermocycled for 300 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The specimens were mounted in dental stone and placed in the Instron at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min with a knife-edged blade. Immediately after debonding, the enamel surface and bracket-enamel interface were evaluated visually and with a stereomicroscope. Representative samples were then examined with the scanning electron microscope. The analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were performed. The results in megapascals were Group 1: 19,6 (+/- 9,6); group 2: 14,3 (+/- 4,6); group 3: 28,8 (+/- 12,6); and group 4: 18,5 (+/- 7,5). Group 3 was statistically significantly different (P < 0.008) from all other groups. Groups 1, 2, and 4 were not significantly different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effect of conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of phosphate monomer-based cement on zirconia ceramic in dry and aged conditions.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Balducci, Ivan; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the durability of bond strength between a resin cement and aluminous ceramic submitted to various surface conditioning methods. Twenty-four blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm(3)) of a glass-infiltrated zirconia-alumina ceramic (In-Ceram Zirconia Classic) were randomly divided into three surface treatment groups: ST1-Air-abrasion with 110-mum Al2O3 particles + silanization; ST2-Laboratory tribochemical silica coating method (110-microm Al2O3, 110-microm silica) (Rocatec) + silanization; ST3-Chairside tribochemical silica coating method (30-microm SiO(x)) (CoJet) + silanization. Each treated ceramic block was placed in its silicone mold with the treated surface exposed. The resin cement (Panavia F) was prepared and injected into the mold over the treated surface. Specimens were sectioned to achieve nontrimmed bar specimens (14 sp/block) that were randomly divided into two conditions: (a) Dry-microtensile test after sectioning; (b) Thermocycling (TC)-(6,000x, 5-55 degrees C) and water storage (150 days). Thus, six experimental groups were obtained (n = 50): Gr1-ST1 + dry; Gr2-ST1 + TC(;) Gr3-ST2 + dry; Gr4-ST2 + TC; Gr5-ST3 + dry; Gr6-ST3 + TC. After microtensile testing, the failure types were noted. ST2 (25.1 +/- 11) and ST3 (24.1 +/- 7.4) presented statistically higher bond strength (MPa) than that of ST1 (17.5 +/- 8) regardless of aging conditions (p < 0.0001). While Gr2 revealed the lowest results (13.3 +/- 6.4), the other groups (21.7 +/- 7.4-25. 9 +/- 9.1) showed statistically no significant differences (two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test, alpha = 0.05). The majority of the failures were mixed (82%) followed by adhesive failures (18%). Gr2 presented significantly higher incidence of ADHESIVE failures (54%) than those of other groups (p = 0.0001). Both laboratory and chairside silica coating plus silanization showed durable bond strength. After aging, air-abrasion with 110-microm Al(2)O(3) + silanization showed the largest decrease

  10. The effect of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of different resin cements to enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Atsü, Saadet Sağlam

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Cementation failures of restorations are frequently observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of initial and repeated bonding on the bond strengths of different resin cements to enamel and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety human maxillary central incisors were bisected longitudinally. The 180 tooth halves were divided into 2 groups (n = 90) for enamel and dentin bonding. The enamel and dentin groups were further divided into 3 groups (n = 30) for different resin cement types. Composite resin (Filtek Ultimate) cylinders (3 × 3 mm) were prepared and luted to enamel and dentin using Variolink II (Group V), RelyX ARC (Group R), or Panavia F 2.0 (Group P) resin cement. After 24 hours, initial shear bond strengths of the resin cements to enamel and dentin were measured. Using new cylinders, the specimens were de-bonded and re-bonded twice to measure the first and the second bond strengths to enamel and dentin. Failure modes and bonding interfaces were examined. Data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel were similar for all the groups. The first (15.3 ± 2.2 MPa) and second (10.4 ± 2.2 MPa) bond strengths to dentin were significantly higher in Group V (P<.0001). Second bond strengths of dentin groups were significantly lower than initial and first bond strengths to dentin (P<.0001). CONCLUSION All resin cements have similar initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel. Variolink II has the highest first and second bond strength to dentin. Bond strength to dentin decreases after the first re-bonding for all resin cements. PMID:28243393

  11. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    PubMed Central

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab’ah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistically significant differences were defined at the α = 0.05 level. Bond failures were categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Results The SBS values ranged from 3.76 to 6.81 MPa for cements bonded to enamel and from 4.48 to 5.94 MPa for cements bonded to dentin (p > 0.05 between surfaces). There were no statistically significant differences between the SBS values to enamel versus dentin for any given cement type. All cements exhibited adhesive failure at the resin/tooth interface. Conclusions Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution. PMID:26082572

  12. [Studies on bond strength and hardness of base materials].

    PubMed

    Suga, T; Chiba, E; Shinya, A; Yokozuka, S

    1989-04-01

    Since base materials are used in the construction of abutment teeth and the cavity walls of the teeth with healthy pulp, they need considerable bonding and mechanical strength depending on the site of application. In the present study we examined bonding strength, Martens-Mayer hardness and Vickers hardness of base materials in comparison with natural dentin in order to reevaluate them in terms of prosthetic materials and to provide assessment criteria for their application to prosthetic treatment. The results were as follows: 1) The bonding test showed the lowest value (4.6kgf/cm2) in calcium hydroxide FR (HFR) and the highest (47.9kgf/cm2) in HY-Bond polycarboxylate cement (CHC), a type of polycarboxylate cement. 2) In the test of bonding strength with various types of cement, calcium hydroxide preparations and zinc phosphate cement showed low values (4.6-23.5kgf/cm2) while polycarboxylate cement and glass-ionomer cement showed relatively high values (17.8-40.5kgf/cm2). 3) The Martens-Mayer hardness test showed the highest value (10.82 x 10(4] in dentin cement (GDE) and the lowest (1.09 x 10(4] in propack (EPR). 4) The Vickers hardness test showed the highest value (82) in neo-protect cement (ZPR) and the lowest (1) in propack (EPR). 5) In both Martens-Mayer and Vickers hardness tests with various types of cement, zinc phosphate cement and glass- ionomer cement showed high values, while low values were obtained in calcium hydroxide preparations and zinc-oxide eugenol cement. 6) Zinc phosphate cement and glass-ionomer cement showed no statistically significant differences from natural dentin in either Martens-Mayer hardness or Vickers hardness.

  13. Chromium speciation in hazardous, cement-based waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. F.; Bajt, S.; Clark, S. B.; Lamble, G. M.; Langton, C. A.; Oji, L.

    1995-02-01

    XANES and EXAFS techniques were used to determine the oxidation states and local structural environment of Cr in cement-based waste forms. Results show that Cr in untreated Portland cement formulations remains as toxic Cr 6+, while slag additives to the cement reduce Cr 6+ to the less toxic, less mobile Cr 3+ species. EXAFS analysis suggests that the Cr 6+ species is surrounded by four nearest oxygen atoms, while the reduced Cr 3+ sp ecies is surrounded by six oxygen atoms. The fitted CrO bond lengths for Cr 6+ and Cr 3+ species are around 1.66 and 1.98 Å, respectively.

  14. 3D micro-CT analysis of void formations and push-out bonding strength of resin cements used for fiber post cementation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the void parameters within the resin cements used for fiber post cementation by micro-CT (µCT) and regional push-out bonding strength. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-one, single and round shaped roots were enlarged with a low-speed drill following by endodontic treatment. The roots were divided into three groups (n=7) and fiber posts were cemented with Maxcem Elite, Multilink N and Superbond C&B resin cements. Specimens were scanned using µCT scanner at resolution of 13.7 µm. The number, area, and volume of voids between dentin and post were evaluated. A method of analysis based on the post segmentation was used, and coronal, middle and apical thirds considered separately. After the µCT analysis, roots were embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned into 2 mm thick slices (63 sections in total). Push-out testing was performed with universal testing device at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed. Data were analyzed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests (α=.05). RESULTS Overall, significant differences between the resin cements and the post level were observed in the void number, area, and volume (P<.05). Super-Bond C&B showed the most void formation (44.86 ± 22.71). Multilink N showed the least void surface (3.51 ± 2.24 mm2) and volume (0.01 ± 0.01 mm3). Regional push-out bond strength of the cements was not different (P>.05). CONCLUSION µCT proved to be a powerful non-destructive 3D analysis tool for visualizing the void parameters. Multilink N had the lowest void parameters. When efficiency of all cements was evaluated, direct relationship between the post region and push-out bonding strength was not observed. PMID:27141253

  15. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed only between Provy (164.44 ± 31.23) and Temp Bond NE (88.48 ± 21.83) after cementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  16. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

  17. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  18. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  19. Correlation between the strength of glass ionomer cements and their bond strength to bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Yasushi; Kuramochi, Ken-ichi; Harashima, Atsushi; Honda, Muneaki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Yamaga, Taniichiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the possible correlation between the strength of glass ionomers and their adhesive strength to bovine teeth. The shear bond strengths of three different brands of glass ionomer mixed at four different P/L ratios to bovine teeth were measured 24 hours after the cement specimens were prepared. The correlation between shear bond strength and mechanical strength reported in our previous study was also examined. No significant (p > 0.05) increases in the bond strength to bovine teeth were found in any of the cements when the mixing ratio increased. The present study showed no significant (p > 0.05) correlation between mechanical strength of cement and its bond strength to bovine teeth. Rather than trying to increase the strength of the cement, it would be more effective to enhance the adhesive bond strength through procedures such as surface conditioning or cleaning of the tooth structure when glass ionomers are used as luting agents.

  20. Barnacle cement: a polymerization model based on evolutionary concepts.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Gary H; Vega, Irving E; Wahl, Kathryn J; Orihuela, Beatriz; Beyley, Veronica; Rodriguez, Eva N; Everett, Richard K; Bonaventura, Joseph; Rittschof, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Enzymes and biochemical mechanisms essential to survival are under extreme selective pressure and are highly conserved through evolutionary time. We applied this evolutionary concept to barnacle cement polymerization, a process critical to barnacle fitness that involves aggregation and cross-linking of proteins. The biochemical mechanisms of cement polymerization remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that this process is biochemically similar to blood clotting, a critical physiological response that is also based on aggregation and cross-linking of proteins. Like key elements of vertebrate and invertebrate blood clotting, barnacle cement polymerization was shown to involve proteolytic activation of enzymes and structural precursors, transglutaminase cross-linking and assembly of fibrous proteins. Proteolytic activation of structural proteins maximizes the potential for bonding interactions with other proteins and with the surface. Transglutaminase cross-linking reinforces cement integrity. Remarkably, epitopes and sequences homologous to bovine trypsin and human transglutaminase were identified in barnacle cement with tandem mass spectrometry and/or western blotting. Akin to blood clotting, the peptides generated during proteolytic activation functioned as signal molecules, linking a molecular level event (protein aggregation) to a behavioral response (barnacle larval settlement). Our results draw attention to a highly conserved protein polymerization mechanism and shed light on a long-standing biochemical puzzle. We suggest that barnacle cement polymerization is a specialized form of wound healing. The polymerization mechanism common between barnacle cement and blood may be a theme for many marine animal glues.

  1. Effect of Steam Autoclaving on the Tensile Strength of Resin Cements Used for Bonding Two-Piece Zirconia Abutments.

    PubMed

    Fadanelli, Marcos Alexandre; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho do; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of steam autoclave sterilization on the tensile strength of two types of resin cements used to bond customized CAD/CAM zirconia abutments onto titanium bases. Forty sets of zirconia abutments cemented to screwed titanium bases of implants analogs were divided into 4 groups (n = 10). Two groups were treated with a conventional chemically activated resin cement (ML, Multilink Ivoclar Vivadent) and the other two groups with a self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). One group from each cement was submitted to steam autoclaving. The autoclave sterilization cycle was performed after 72 hours of cementation for 15 minutes at 121°C and 2.1 Kgf/cm(2). The samples were subjected to tensile strength testing in a universal testing machine (200 Kgf, 0.5 mm/min), from which the means and standard deviations were obtained in Newtons. Results showed (via ANOVA and Tukey's test; α = 0.05) that in the absence of steam autoclaving, no difference was observed in tensile strength between the cements tested: ML: 344.87 (93.79) and U200: 280 (92.42) (P = .314). Steam autoclaving, however, significantly increased tensile strength for the ML: 465.42 (87.87) compared to U200: 289.10 (49.02) (P < .001). Despite the significant increase in the ML samples (P = .013), autoclaving did not affect the tensile strength of the U200 samples (P > 0.05). The authors concluded that steam autoclaving increases the mean tensile strength of the chemically activated cement compared to the dual-cure self-adhesive cement. The performance of both cements evaluated was similar if the sterilization step was disconsidered.

  2. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Tomoko; Uno, Shigeru; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Yamada, Toshimoto; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM) and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, P < 0.05). The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found. PMID:22606202

  3. Push-out bond strength of different translucent fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Bazzo, João Fernando; Pedriali, Maria Beatriz Bergonse Pereira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the bond strength of different translucent fiber posts in the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the fiber post used: Reforpost (opaque [control]), exacto, white post, radix, and Macro-Lock Illusion X-RO. The roots were subjected to chemomechanical preparation and cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. The teeth were sectioned into slices of the different root thirds and tested for bond strength (push-out). Two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test were used to verify statistical differences between groups (P < 0.05). Results: No significant difference between the root thirds was detected (P > 0.05). However, the performance of the posts demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05). RDX had a lower performance in the apical third (P < 0.05). The other fiber posts had the same performance irrespective of the root third evaluated. The predominant failure pattern was adhesive between resin cement and root dentin. Conclusion: In general, the different translucent fiber posts showed the same performance. Yet, translucent fiber posts did not show superior bond strength compared with the opaque fiber post in any of the root thirds evaluated. PMID:27994324

  4. Bonding of Resin Cement to Zirconia with High Pressure Primer Coating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-jie; Jiao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Li-juan; Fang, Ming; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiang; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of air-drying pressure during ceramic primer coating on zirconia/resin bonding and the surface characteristics of the primed zirconia. Methods Two ceramic primers (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CCP, Kuraray Medical Inc. and Z-Prime Plus, ZPP, Bisco Inc.) were applied on the surface of air-abraded zirconia (Katana zirconia, Noritake) and dried at 4 different air pressures (0.1–0.4 MPa). The primed zirconia ceramic specimens were bonded with a resin-based luting agent (SA Luting Cement, Kuraray). Micro-shear bond strengths of the bonded specimens were tested after 3 days of water storage or 5,000× thermocycling (n = 12). Failure modes of the fractured specimens were examined with scanning electron miscopy. The effects of air pressure on the thickness of the primer layers and the surface roughness (Sa) of primed zirconia were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (n = 6), optical profilometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (n = 6), respectively. Results Clearfil Ceramic Primer air-dried at 0.3 and 0.4 MPa, yielding significantly higher µSBS than gentle air-drying subgroups (p<0.05). Compared to vigorous drying conditions, Z-Prime Plus air-dried at 0.2 MPa exhibited significantly higher µSBS (p<0.05). Increasing air-drying pressure reduced the film thickness for both primers. Profilometry measurements and ESEM showed rougher surfaces in the high pressure subgroups of CCP and intermediate pressure subgroup of ZPP. Conclusion Air-drying pressure influences resin/zirconia bond strength and durability significantly. Higher air-drying pressure (0.3-0.4 MPa) for CCP and intermediate pressure (0.2 MPa) for ZPP are recommended to produce strong, durable bonds between resin cement and zirconia ceramics. PMID:24992678

  5. The effect of sodium hypochlorite and resin cement systems on push-out bond strength of cemented fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad I.; Bin-Shuwaish, Mohammed S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the effect of different endodontic irrigant solutions and resin cement systems on the bond strength of cemented fiber posts. Methods: Sixty human single-rooted anterior teeth were sectioned transversely at 2 mm incisal to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The roots were treated endodontically, and teeth were distributed into six groups: group A, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow Core Build-Up material; group B, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem Self-Adhesive Universal Resin Cement; group C, includes 2.5% NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow; group D, includes 2.5%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem; group E, includes NaCl, irrigant with MultiCore Flow; and group F, includes NaCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem. Universal tapered fiber posts (No. 3 RelyX Fiber Post) were cemented, and roots were sectioned into cervical and apical segments. Samples were then subjected to a push-out bond strength test and failure modes were examined. Results: The mean push-out bond strength for group D showed the highest mean value (20.07 MPa), while the lowest value was found in group A. There was a significant difference between groups with regard to the irrigants used (p<0.001), however, no significant difference was found between groups with regard to resin systems (p>0.05). The total mean push-out bond strength of the cervical segments was found to be significantly higher than the apical segments (p<0.001). Conclusion: The irrigant solution have a clear influence on the push-out bond strength of the fiber posts regardless of the cement used. Both adhesive resin systems showed similar bonding strength. PMID:27648037

  6. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Results: Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (P<.05). Groups that had received light-cured provisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Conclusions: Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable. PMID:21912495

  7. Bond strengths of three chemical adhesive cements adhered to a nickel-chromium alloy for direct bonded retainers.

    PubMed

    Atta, M O; Smith, B G; Brown, D

    1990-02-01

    Sandblasted surfaces of a beryllium-free, nickel-chromium alloy were bonded with one of three chemical adhesives. After either immersion in water for up to 6 months or thermal cycling between 5 degrees and 60 degrees C for 500 cycles, the bonded specimens were tested for both shear and tensile strength. The highest values of tensile and shear bond strengths were found with Panavia Ex material, and these values showed no significant changes after thermal cycling. For ABC cement and for Super-Bond C & B material, the strength of the bond was significantly improved with thermal cycling. However, immersion in water for 6 months caused a significant decrease in the strength of the bond of specimens adhered with ABC cement.

  8. Regional bond strengths to root canal dentin of fiber posts luted with three cementation systems.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Reis, Alessandra; Gomes, João Carlos; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Calixto, Abraham Lincoln

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the cementation system on the regional push-out bond strength and failure pattern of fiber posts to radicular dentin. The roots of 48 extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16), according to the cementation system: AdperScotchbond Multi-Purpose + resin cement RelyX ARC (SBMP+ARC); Adper SingleBond 2 + RelyX ARC (SB+ARC) and; RelyX U100 self-adhesive resin cement (U100). The posts were cemented as per manufacturer's instructions for each cementation system. After 1 week, the roots were sectioned transversely into 6 discs. Two discs were obtained from the cervical, middle and apical thirds and the push-out test was carried out. The failure pattern was examined on all debonded specimens. The data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test. When U100 was used, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was observed among the different root regions. Statistically higher push-out bond strength values were detected in the cervical third for SBMP+ARC and SB+ARC (p<0.05). The U100 showed significantly more mixed failures than SBMP+ARC in the apical third (p<0.05). In conclusion, the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 was the only cement not sensitive to the root canal region.

  9. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond

  10. Antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing Galla chinensis extract

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LU-FEI; LUO, FENG; XUE, CHAO-RAN; DENG, MENG; CHEN, CHEN; WU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Galla chinensis extract (GCE), a naturally-derived agent, has a significant inhibitory effect on cariogenic bacteria. The present study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing GCE. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement incorporated GCE at five mass fractions (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8%) to prepare GCE-containing cement for analysis. For the agar diffusion test, cement specimens were placed on agar disk inoculated with Streptococcus mutans (strain ATCC 25175). Following 48 h incubation, the inhibition halo diameter was measured. To assess bacteria colonization susceptibility, S. mutans adhesion to cement specimens was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following 48 h incubation. To evaluate bond strength, a total of 50 metal brackets were bonded on premolar surfaces by using cement (10 teeth/group). Following immersion in an artificial saliva for 3 days, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The results demonstrated that GCE-containing samples exhibited a larger bacterial inhibition halo than control, and the inhibition zone increased as the GCE mass fraction increased. SEM analysis demonstrated that S. mutans presented a weaker adherent capacity to all GCE-containing cements compared with control, but the difference between each GCE-containing group was not significant. SBS values of each GCE-containing group exhibited no difference compared with the control. In conclusion, GCE-containing adhesive cement exhibits a promising inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and adhesion. Without compromising bond strength, adding GCE in adhesive cement may be an attractive option for preventing white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27073642

  11. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  12. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    GARCIA-CONTRERAS, Rene; SCOUGALL-VILCHIS, Rogelio Jose; CONTRERAS-BULNES, Rosalía; SAKAGAMI, Hiroshi; MORALES-LUCKIE, Raul Alberto; NAKAJIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC) compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w). Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc), Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05). In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05), flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05), and antibacterial activity (p<0.001), without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II) is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force. PMID:26221928

  13. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials.

  14. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Rene; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio Jose; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Morales-Luckie, Raul Alberto; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC) compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w). Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc), Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05). In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05), flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05), and antibacterial activity (p<0.001), without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II) is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force.

  15. Cementation of prosthetic restorations: from conventional cementation to dental bonding concept.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marcela Filié; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2011-05-01

    The cementation procedure of metal-free fixed partial dentures exhibits special characteristics about the porcelains and cementation agents, which turns the correct association between these materials necessary. Our purpose in this literature review was to point the main groups of cements associated to metal-free restoration and discuss about the advantages, disadvantages, and recommendations of each one. Our search was confined to the electronic databases PubMed and SciELO and to books about this matter. There are essentially 3 types of hard cement: conventional, resin, or a hybrid of the two. The metal-free restorations can be fixed with conventional or resin cements. The right choice of luting material is of vital importance to the longevity of dental restorative materials. Conventional cements are advantageous when good compressive straight, good film thickness, and water dissolution resistance are necessary. However, they need an ideal preparation, and they are not acid dissolution resistant. Conventional cements are indicated to porcelains that cannot be acid etched. Resin cements represent the choice to metal-free restoration cementation because they present better physical properties and aesthetic than conventional agents.

  16. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength between resin cements and zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Erdem, A; Akar, G C; Erdem, A; Kose, T

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the bond strength of resin cement and yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic with different surface conditioning methods. Two hundred presintered Y-TZP ceramic specimens were prepared, sintered (4 × 4 × 4 mm), and randomly assigned to four equal groups as control (C, no conditioning); airborne particle abraded (APA, air abrasion with 11 μm Al2O3); tribochemical silica coating/silane coupling system (TSC, Rocatec, air abrasion with 110 μm Al2O3, 30 μm silica-coated Al2O3 and silane); and laser (L, Er:YAG laser irradiation treated at a power setting of 200 mJ). After specimen preparation, composite resin cylinders were prepared and cemented with resin cements (Clearfil Esthetic, Panavia F 2.0, Rely X-U100, Super Bond C&B, and Multilink Automix) on the ceramic surfaces and kept in an incubator at 37°C for 60 days. All specimens were tested for shear bond strength with a universal testing machine, and fractured surfaces were evaluated by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). The bond strengths for C and L groups were not significantly different according to adhesive resin cement. APA and TSC resulted in increased bond strength for Panavia F 2.0 and Rely X-U100 resin cements. Additionally, TSC presented higher bond strength with Multilink Automix. Adhesive fracture between the ceramic and resin cement was the most common failure. Complete cohesive fracture at the ceramic or composite cylinders was not observed. Regardless of the adhesive resin cement used, laser treatment did not improve resin bond strength.

  17. A comparison of bond strengths of complete crowns using two types of cements and three cleaning agents.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, L F; Garbin, C A; Bonfante, G; Do Valle, A L

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of three cleaning agents on the bond strength of complete crowns cemented with zinc phosphate and polycarboxylate cements. For the polycarboxylate cement group, three cleaning agents were used: Tergentol; Tergentol + polyacrylic acid; Tergentol + citric acid. Zinc phosphate cement was used as a control group with Tergentol. There were no statistically significant differences of mean retentive force for either cement regardless of the test conditions. The marginal fit after cementation was also evaluated and the results of zinc polycarboxylate were lower than zinc phosphate cement and were statistically significant.

  18. Effect of eugenol-based endodontic cement on the adhesion of intraradicular posts.

    PubMed

    Alfredo, Edson; de Souza, Emanuel Soares; Marchesan, Melissa Andréia; Paulino, Silvana Maria; Gariba-Silva, Ricardo; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2006-01-01

    The present study evaluated, in vitro, the influence of an eugenol-based endodontic sealer (EndoFill) on the adhesion of intra-radicular posts cemented with a resin-based cement (Enforce) ou a zinc phosphate cement. Twenty-four single-rooted maxillary canines were divided into 2 groups (n=12) and obturated with either gutta-percha points plus EndoFill or gutta-percha points alone (no cement). In each group, half of intracanal posts (n=6) were cemented with Enforce resin-based cement and half with zinc phosphate cement. Specimens were submitted to pull-out test in an Instron machine and tensile force was applied at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement. The maximum forces required for post removal was recorded (N) and means were submitted to statistical analysis by Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.01). Posts cemented with zinc phosphate cement were significantly more retentive (353.4 N) than those cemented with Enforce (134.9 N) (p<0.01). Regarding the influence of the eugenol-based cement (EndoFill) on post retention, there was statistically significant difference (p<0.01) only between the groups cemented with Enforce, i.e., in the canals filled with EndoFill + guta-percha there was lower bond strength than in the canals filled with gutta-percha points alone (101.5 and 168.2 N, respectively). In conclusion, the zinc-phosphate-based cement showed greater post retention than the resin-based cement. The findings of this study suggest that the eugenol-containing sealer interfered with the adhesive properties of the resin-based cement.

  19. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin.

    PubMed

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção; Michida, Silvia Masae Araújo; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Oliveira, Simone Helena Gonçalves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured), light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED), and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling). All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h) and sectioned (n = 10): G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC), and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The bond strength values (MPa) were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40)ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59)ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62)ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32)a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90)c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99)bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30)ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98)bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH). There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  20. Bond strength evaluation of three self-adhesive luting systems used for cementing composite and porcelain.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, F; Minnoni, A; Vitalone, L M; Carluccio, F; Vadini, M; Paolantonio, M; D'Arcangelo, C

    2011-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were recently introduced with the purpose of simplifying the cementation technique, as they combine the use of adhesive and cement in a single application, eliminating the need for pretreatment of the tooth. In the present study a microtensile bond strength test (μ-TBS) was used to compare three self-adhesives, an etch-and-rinse and a self-etch luting system, in the cementation of resin-based composite (RBC) and ceramic disks to dentin. Freshly extracted molars were transversally sectioned to expose flat, deep dentin surfaces. Cylindrical specimens (5 mm in diameter and 10 mm in height), consisting of RBC disks and leucite-based glass ceramic disks, were produced. The RBC disks were sandblasted with 50-μm Al2O3. The ceramic disks were conditioned with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid gel and silane application. All of the disks were then bonded to dentin surfaces employing five different luting agents: iCEM Self Adhesive (Heraeus Kulzer), MaxCem (Kerr Corporation), RelyX UniCem (3M ESPE), EnaCem HF (Micerium), and Panavia F2.0 (Kuraray-Dental). The products were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce multiple beams measuring approximately 1 mm2 in cross section. For each experimental group 12 beams were tested. The preterm failures were also taken into account. All of the specimen preparations were performed by the same operator. The beams were tested under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Mean μ-TBS values were calculated for each group. Data were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance, and multiple comparisons were performed using a Tukey test (α=0.05). The UniCem group showed the lowest number of preterm failures among the tested self-adhesive systems. When premature debondings were included in the mean value calculation, bond strength values for the UniCem group were statistically equal to or even higher than those

  1. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 μm grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

  2. Influence of eugenol-containing temporary cement on efficacy of dentin-bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1999-02-01

    Zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cements are widely used as temporary filling materials. However, eugenol has earlier been shown to have a detrimental effect on both resin composites and dentin-bonding systems. The aim of the present in vitro study was to examine whether ZOE cement would also reduce the efficacy of relatively new dentin-bonding systems. This was done by determination of gap formation around resin composite fillings in dentin cavities and of bond strength of resin composite to enamel and dentin. The tooth surfaces involved were either freshly cut, or had been exposed to a ZOE cement (IRM) or to a non-ZOE cement (Cavit) for 7 d before application of a dentin-bonding system (Gluma CPS or Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) and a resin composite (Z100). Gap formation was assessed in a light microscope on 20-min-old fillings and expressed as wall-to-wall contraction (the width of the maximum marginal gap in % of the cavity diameter). Bond strength was measured in shear on 1-d-old specimens. The mean values of wall-to-wall contraction were 0.06-0.09% with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 0.20-0.24% with Gluma CPS. The mean values of bond strength to enamel were 22-25 MPa for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 20-23 MPa for Gluma CPS, and to dentin were 20-22 MPa for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 13-14 MPa for Gluma CPS. The use of Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus resulted in higher bond strength to dentin and less wall-to-wall contraction than did Gluma CPS. No differences were found in either wall-to-wall contraction or in bond strength between the three groups for either dentin-bonding system. Thus, the ZOE cement did not influence the efficacy of two relatively new dentin-bonding systems.

  3. Effects of dentin surface treatments on shear bond strength of glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of a conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Materials and methods 80 bovine permanent incisors were used. 40 cylindrical specimens of a GIC (Fuji IX GP Extra) and 40 cylindrical specimens of a RMGIC (Fuji II LC) were attached to the dentin. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 8 groups of equal size (n=10), 4 for every type of glass-ionomer cement, corresponding to type of dentin surface treatments. Group 1: GC Cavity Conditioner; Group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel; Group 3: Clearfil SE Bond; Group 4: no dentin conditioning (control). The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Model 3343, Instron Corp., Canton, Mass., USA) and subsequently tested for shear bond strength (MPa). Results ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups. Post hoc Tukey test showed different values of shear bond strength for Fuji IX GP Extra and for Fuji II LC. The different conditioners variably influence the adhesion of the glass-ionomer cements tested. Conclusions. RMGIC shear bond to dentin was higher than GIC. The use of a Self-etch adhesive system improved the shear bond strength values of RMGIC and lowered the shear bond strength values of GIC significantly. PMID:24753797

  4. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect.

  5. Nano-scale hydrogen-bond network improves the durability of greener cements

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Johan; Rodrigues, Michelle Santos; Telling, Mark T. F.; Beraldo, Antonio Ludovico; Santos, Sérgio Francisco; Aldridge, Laurence P.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    More than ever before, the world's increasing need for new infrastructure demands the construction of efficient, sustainable and durable buildings, requiring minimal climate-changing gas-generation in their production. Maintenance-free “greener” building materials made from blended cements have advantages over ordinary Portland cements, as they are cheaper, generate less carbon dioxide and are more durable. The key for the improved performance of blends (which substitute fine amorphous silicates for cement) is related to their resistance to water penetration. The mechanism of this water resistance is of great environmental and economical impact but is not yet understood due to the complexity of the cement's hydration reactions. Using neutron spectroscopy, we studied a blend where cement was replaced by ash from sugar cane residuals originating from agricultural waste. Our findings demonstrate that the development of a distinctive hydrogen bond network at the nano-scale is the key to the performance of these greener materials. PMID:24036676

  6. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Bond Strength of Dual-Cured Resin Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Poluri, Ramya Krishna; Nagaraj, Hema; Siddaruju, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the microtensile bond strength of resin cements to enamel and dentin and to determine the type of bond failure using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study 40 teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and divided into two main groups i.e., Group A for enamel and Group B for dentin. Each group is again subdivided into four subgroups, which are as follows; Subgroup 1 for Calibra resin cement, Subgroup 2 for Paracem, Subgroup 3 for Variolink II and Subgroup 4 for Rely X ARC. These resin cements were applied on enamel and dentin according to manufacturer’s instructions followed by incremental build-up of composite resin on the top of resin cements. Each tooth was sectioned perpendicular to the resin-substrate interface with a slow speed diamond saw under water cooling yielding sections of approximately 1 mm2. On an average, three sections from each tooth were used for testing. The beams obtained after sectioning were stressed to failure under tension in a custom made stainless steel forceps held in a universal testing machine (Lloyd) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Results were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, independent t-test, and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test. Results: Cements bonded to enamel substrates showed higher mean bond strength compared to dentin, which is statistically significant. Rely X ARC showed highest mean bond strength to both the substrates. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength to enamel and dentin and, Rely X ARC resin cement showed higher bond strength compared with the other groups. PMID:26225104

  8. Planning and interpreting cement bond logs; Implementation of an expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K.; Wydrinski, R.; Feldman, D.S. )

    1991-07-01

    The Cement Bond Log Advisor is an expert system being developed to assist users in the design, evaluation, and interpretation of cement bond logs (CBL's). CBL's are produced by sonic tools run after the casing is cemented in a well to determine how well the cement is bonded to the casing and formation and whether a cement squeeze jog should be attempted. During the development of program, two particular challenges were encountered and resolved in ways that might be of general interest to developers of expert system applications for the petroleum industry. The first challenge was to find an efficient and effective method for guiding the user in correlating and interpreting the relationships between multiple sources of continuous visual data (the various waveforms making up the log output). Second, the nomographs, which correlate log amplitudes with cement compressive strength and are used in the log interpretation, were derive from empirical data and were not readily reduced to functional relationships through traditional curve-fitting techniques. The use of adductive induction was found to be effective in deriving suitable relationships. The paper focuses on the techniques used to implement the application, with emphasis placed on how the two challenges described above were met.

  9. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coating with 110 µm Al2O3 particles which modified with silica; and, Group 3, tribochemical treatment - silica coating + silanization. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours before testing shear bond strength. Results Silica coating and tribochemical treatment significantly increased the bond strength of the MA, UN, BR, BI, SE and CL to zirconia compared to #600 polishing. For both #600 polished and silica coating treatments, MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement CL had the highest bond strengths to zirconia. Conclusion Applying silica coating and tribochemical treatment improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to zirconia, especially for CL. PMID:20690416

  10. Fracture resistance of zirconia FPDs with adhesive bonding versus conventional cementation.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Hmaidouch, Rim; Behr, Michael; Handel, Gerhard; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of three different zirconia fixed partial dentures (FPDs) with different cementation methods. Forty-eight three-unit FPDs were adhesively bonded (AB) or conventionally cemented (CC). Sixteen glass-infiltrated zirconia FPDs were used as a control. Fracture resistance was determined after aging. The zirconia systems showed no significant different fracture forces with the different bonding methods (CC: Cercon [1,231.5 ± 410.1 N], Ceramill [1,311.3 ± 318.3 N], Vita YZ [1,269.0 ± 317.4 N]; AB: Cercon [1,072.3 ± 516.7 N], Ceramill [1,358.6 ± 176.4 N], Vita YZ [1,270.6 ± 267.6N]) or between the different materials. The control group provided significantly lower fracture strength. Regarding fracture resistance, adhesive bonding or conventional cementation of zirconia FPDs showed no restrictions for posterior application.

  11. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    PubMed Central

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (p<0.05). The microscopic analysis revealed a high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed fractures, and cohesive failures in the dentin. Conclusions The use of a previous dentin hybridization protocol is able to increase adhesive bonding resistance of self-adhesive resin cement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  12. Orthodontic bracket bonding with a plasma-arc light and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Komori, A; Kojima, I; Ando, F

    2001-07-01

    Developments in light-curing technology have led to the introduction of a plasma-arc light-curing unit that delivers high-intensity output for faster curing. The purposes of this study were to determine the shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with a plasma-arc light-curing unit and to evaluate the durability of the resultant bond strength with thermal cycling. Comparisons were made between light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin. Two light-curing units were used in this study: a plasma-arc light-curing unit and a conventional light-curing unit. The mean shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement with the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units were 20.3 MPa and 26.0 MPa, respectively. An analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units. Light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin demonstrated similar bond strengths and exhibited no statistical differences. There was no statistical difference in bond strength between the teeth that were thermal cycled and those that were not. Failure sites for the brackets bonded with light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement appeared to be predominantly at the bracket-adhesive interface. The SDs of light-cured composite resin were high for both light-curing units. Whereas the coefficients of variation for light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement ranged from 20% to 30%, those of light-cured composite resin ranged from 40% to 60%. The bond strength of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with either a conventional light-curing unit or a plasma-arc light-curing unit surpassed the clinically required threshold. The plasma-arc light-curing unit may be an advantageous alternative to the conventional light-curing unit for orthodontic bracket bonding with both

  13. Method and apparatus for combined cement bond and acoustic well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. R. E.

    1985-01-22

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring acoustic signals having amplitudes of widely varying magnitude during one traversal of the borehole corresponding to indications of cement bonding along a casing as well as acoustic travel time through an increment of the formation. Variable attenuators are provided associated with acoustic receivers disposed within the logging sonde wherein attenuation may be automatically adjusted as a function of acoustic transmitter-receiver trigger pulses transmitted downhole, depending upon whether a cement bond or other log of acoustic signal information having a substantially different magnitude is desired.

  14. Bonded Fly Ash: A Low-Energy Replacement for Portland Cement Concrete to Improve Resistance to Chem-Bio Intrusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    The paper discusses the background of cementitious materials, and generally compares natural (Pozzolanic) cement to manufactured ( Portland ) cement . Fly...ash is discussed as a common Pozzolan, and in particular, the low-energy requirement for fly ash as compared to Portland cement . Also...photomicrographs of fly ash particles and of chemically bonded fly ash are compared to a photomicrograph of Portland cement particles and a photograph of Portland

  15. The impact of endodontic irrigating solutions on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Pelegrine, Rina Andrea; Silveira, Cláudia Fernandes de Magalhães; Bueno, Vanessa Castro Pestana da Silveira; Alves, Vanessa de Oliveira; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pereira, Gisele Damiana da Silveira; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based restorative materials, widely used to cement posts, may be influenced by irrigants used during endodontic chemical-mechanical preparation. This study evaluated the impact of endodontic irrigating solutions and adhesive cement systems on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. Ninety-six bovine incisors were divided into 12 groups (4 irrigants × 3 resin cements; n = 8). Prepared canals were irrigated with saline solution, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine gel, and posts were cemented with RelyX ARC, Panavia F, or RelyX U100. The bond strength was evaluated by means of the push-out test, and results were subjected to analysis of variance. The mean bond strength observed for the combination of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and RelyX U100 cement was significantly lower (8.82 MPa) than the values found for the other groups (P < 0.05). The other combinations of irrigating solution and resin cement had no adverse effect on the bond strength of the glass fiber posts to dentin.

  16. Multi-step adhesive cementation versus one-step adhesive cementation: push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin before and after mechanical cycling.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marina; Rippe, Marilia Pivetta; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Monaco, Carlo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical cycling on resin push-out bond strength to root dentin, using two strategies for fiber post cementation. Forty bovine roots were embedded in acrylic resin after root canal preparation using a custom drill of the fiber post system. The fiber posts were cemented into root canals using two different strategies (N = 20): a conventional adhesive approach using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system combined with a conventional resin cement (ScotchBond Multi Purpose Plus + RelyX ARC ), or a simplified adhesive approach using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). The core was built up with composite resin and half of the specimens from each cementation strategy were submitted to mechanical cycling (45 degree angle; 37 degrees C; 88 N; 4 Hz; 700,000 cycles). Each specimen was cross-sectioned and the disk specimens were pushed-out. The means from every group (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test (P = 0.05). The cementation strategy affected the push-out results (P < 0.001), while mechanical cycling did not (P = 0.3716). The simplified approach (a self-adhesive resin cement) had better bond performance despite the conditioning. The self-adhesive resin cement appears to be a good option for post cementation. Further trials are needed to confirm these results.

  17. Performance of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement under load-bearing conditions: an in vivo evaluation and FE simulation.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schröder, Christian; Heinemann, Sascha; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2016-09-01

    In the past, bioactive bone cement was investigated in order to improve the durability of cemented arthroplasties by strengthening the bone-cement interface. As direct bone-cement bonding may theoretically lead to higher stresses within the cement, the question arises, whether polymethylmethacrylate features suitable mechanical properties to withstand altered stress conditions? To answer this question, in vivo experiments and finite element simulations were conducted. Twelve rabbits were divided into two groups examining either bioactive polymethylmethacrylate-based cement with unchanged mechanical properties or commercially available polymethylmethacrylate cement. The cements were tested under load-bearing conditions over a period of 7 months, using a spacer prosthesis cemented into the femur. For the finite element analyses, boundary conditions of the rabbit femur were simulated and analyses were performed with respect to different loading scenarios. Calculations of equivalent stress distributions within the cements were applied, with a completely bonded cement surface for the bioactive cement and with a continuously interfering fibrous tissue layer for the reference cement. The bioactive cement revealed good in vivo bioactivity. In the bioactive cement group two failures (33 %), with complete break-out of the prosthesis occurred, while none in the reference group. Finite element analyses of simulated bioactive cement fixation showed an increase in maximal equivalent stress by 49.2 to 109.4 % compared to the simulation of reference cement. The two failures as well as an increase in calculated equivalent stress highlight the importance of fatigue properties of polymethylmethacrylate in general and especially when developing bioactive cements designated for load-bearing conditions.

  18. Bond strength and durability of glass ionomer cements used as bonding agents in the placement of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Klockowski, R; Davis, E L; Joynt, R B; Wieczkowski, G; MacDonald, A

    1989-07-01

    One potential risk of orthodontic treatment is the development of surface decalcification in association with use of brackets and bands. A bonding agent that could render tooth structure more resistant to the caries process clearly would reduce the negative iatrogenic outcomes of orthodontic therapy and thereby benefit the patient. Glass ionomer cement (GIC) bonds chemically to both enamel and dentin. In addition its high fluoride content makes enamel more resistant to caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of GIC when used as a bonding agent in the placement of orthodontic brackets. The materials tested were three GICs (Ketac-Fil, Ketac-Cem, and Chelon) and a standard bonding agent currently in widespread use (Rely-A-Bond). Brackets were attached to the facial surface of 96 premolar specimens and half the specimens for each bonding agent were thermocycled. Bond shear strength was determined with an Instron testing device by applying a load to the occlusal margin of each bracket to the point of failure. A two-way ANOVA indicated a significant bonding agent by thermocycling interaction (F = 4.78, p less than 0.01). Thermocycling decreased bond strength significantly for all materials, but had the greatest impact on Rely-A-Bond. However, Rely-A-Bond provided the strongest bond with and without thermocycling. Although bond strength for the standard orthodontic bonding agent deteriorates significantly under thermal stress, these results suggest that it is still greater than the bond strength provided by GIC materials.

  19. Comparison of Endodontic Medicaments on Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Dentin Using Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Ravanbod, Shirin; Ranjbarian, Parisa; Kousehlar, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Endodontic irrigants and medicaments may affect the bond strength of intracanal posts to root dentin. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX) on bond strength of fiber post cemented with resin cement to root dentin. Materials and Method: This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 36 mandibular premolars. Canals were prepared using the step back technique. After root canal irrigation, the teeth were divided into three groups of 12. Ca(OH)2 paste and CHX gel were used as intracanal medicaments in the first and second groups respectively. No intracanal medicament was used in the third group (control group). Access cavities were then sealed and the teeth were incubated for one week. The root canals were then filled using gutta percha and AH26 sealer and the teeth were incubated for 72 hours. Tooth crowns were then cut at the level of the cementoenamel junction and intracanal posts were placed. The teeth were mounted in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin, and incubated for one week .They were then sectioned into 1.5mm thick slices from their coronal surface using a fully automated cutting machine, and subjected to push-out test until failure. The load at debonding was recorded and data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, post-hoc test and t-test. The coronal margin of the root was at the level of the surface of acrylic resin in the mold. Results: The mean bond strength was 4.45 MPa in the Ca(OH)2, 2.45 MPa in the CHX and 2.48 MPa in the control group. The difference in this regard was statistically significant among groups (p= 0.04). The Ca(OH)2 group had significant differences with the CHX and control groups (p= 0.03 and p= 0.02, respectively). The difference between the CHX and control groups was not significant (p= 0.974). Conclusion: Based on the results, Ca(OH)2 increased the bond strength of fiber post to root dentin but 2% CHX had no effect on bond

  20. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Kasra; Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Kharrazi fard, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr) and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm) were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20), high noble BegoStar (n=50) and gold coin alloys (n=50). Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (BegoStar and gold coin) received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours. Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001) and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01). The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01). In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001) while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001). For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa) was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa) (P<0.01). Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching. PMID:27536326

  1. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-W<0.001). The worst techniques were Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Rely X; Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Multilink and Lava TM + CoJet + silane + Multilink. Adhesive failure (separation of cement and ceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-W<0.001). Electron microscopy confirmed that the surface treatments modified the zirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  2. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16). Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure. PMID:25383350

  3. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Material and Methods: Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Results: Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction “material” vs “root third” was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between “material” vs “application technique” (p<0.05). For ARC, U200, and MAX, significantly lower percentages of bubbles were observed when the Centrix syringe delivered the cements. Equivalent percentages of voids were observed for CSA, irrespective of the application technique (p>0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (p<0.05). Bond strength varied with the root third: cervical>medium>apical (p<0.05). No correlations were found between the bond strength and voids. Conclusions: Bond strength and voids are negatively influenced by the conventional application technique for

  4. In vitro study of 24-hour and 30-day shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements used to bond orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lippitz, S J; Staley, R N; Jakobsen, J R

    1998-06-01

    Interest in using composite resin-glass ionomer hybrid cements as orthodontic bracket adhesives has grown because of their potential for fluoride release. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements (Advance, Fuji Duet, Fuji Ortho LC) used as bracket adhesives with a composite resin 24 hours and 30 days after bonding. The amount of adhesive remaining on the debonded enamel surface was scored for each adhesive. Mesh-backed stainless-steel brackets were bonded to 100 extracted human premolars, which were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C until being tested to failure in a testing machine. The hybrid cements, with one exception, had bond strengths similar to those of the composite resin at 24 hours and 30 days. Fuji Ortho LC had significantly lower bond strengths (ANOVA p < or = 0.05) than the other adhesives at 24 hours and 30 days when it was bonded to unetched, water-moistened enamel. Adhesive-remnant scores were similar for all cements, except for cement Fuji Ortho LC when it was bonded to unetched enamel. The resin-glass ionomer cements we tested appear to have bond strengths suitable for routine use as orthodontic bracket-bonding adhesives.

  5. Bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Rodrigues, José Roberto; da Silva, João Maurício Ferraz; Pagani, Clovis; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatments and thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cement to human enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were selected. The crowns of 40 teeth were transversally sectioned, exposing the mid-coronal dentin. The buccal surfaces of the other 40 teeth were grinded to obtain a 5 mm2 flat enamel area. Eighty resin blocks were produced and cemented to the dental surfaces with RelyX Unicem, then grouped according to the surface treatment (n=10): UnicemC with no conditioning, UnicemP with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s, and UnicemPA with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2). There were two control groups, one for enamel and the other for dentin: VR with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2) plus Variolink II. The enamel-dentin resin cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens, which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (5,000 x; 5°C/55°C). The samples were submitted to μTBS, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed statistical differences between UnicemC and the others. UnicemPA and VR showed better bond strength to dentin during the period before and after thermocycling, respectively. For the enamel, UnicemP showed better bond strength for both situations. Only for UnicemPA did the thermocycling significantly decrease the bond strength values. Within the limits of this study, it could be concluded that the bond strength is influenced by the surface treatments, and that thermocycling decreases the bond strength of all groups, but significantly only for UnicemPA.

  6. Bonding between oxide ceramics and adhesive cement systems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papia, Evaggelia; Larsson, Christel; du Toit, Madeleine; Vult von Steyern, Per

    2014-02-01

    The following aims were set for this systematic literature review: (a) to make an inventory of existing methods to achieve bondable surfaces on oxide ceramics and (b) to evaluate which methods might provide sufficient bond strength. Current literature of in vitro studies regarding bond strength achieved using different surface treatments on oxide ceramics in combination with adhesive cement systems was selected from PubMed and systematically analyzed and completed with reference tracking. The total number of publications included for aim a was 127 studies, 23 of which were used for aim b. The surface treatments are divided into seven main groups: as-produced, grinding/polishing, airborne particle abrasion, surface coating, laser treatment, acid treatment, and primer treatment. There are large variations, making comparison of the studies difficult. An as-produced surface of oxide ceramic needs to be surface treated to achieve durable bond strength. Abrasive surface treatment and/or silica-coating treatment with the use of primer treatment can provide sufficient bond strength for bonding oxide ceramics. This conclusion, however, needs to be confirmed by clinical studies. There is no universal surface treatment. Consideration should be given to the specific materials to be cemented and to the adhesive cement system to be used.

  7. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase synthetic inhibitors on dentin microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stape, T H S; Menezes, M S; Barreto, B C F; Aguiar, F H B; Martins, L R; Quagliatto, P S

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or 24% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid gel (EDTA) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements. Composite blocks were luted to superficial noncarious human dentin (n=10) using two resin cements (RelyX ARC [ARC] and RelyX U100 [U100]) and three dentin pretreatments (without pretreatment-control, CHX, and EDTA). CHX was applied for 60 seconds on the acid-etched dentin in the ARC/CHX group, and for the same time on smear layer-covered dentin in the U100/CHX group. EDTA was applied for 45 seconds on smear-covered dentin in the U100/EDTA group, and it replaced phosphoric acid conditioning in the ARC/EDTA group for 60 seconds. After storage in water for 24 hours, specimens were prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. The results were submitted to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. ARC produced significantly higher μTBS (p<0.05) compared to the U100, except when EDTA was used. For ARC, no pretreatment and CHX produced higher μTBS than EDTA. For U100, EDTA produced higher μTBS; no statistical difference occurred between CHX pretreatment and when no pretreatment was performed. While CHX did not affect immediate dentin bond strength of both cements, EDTA improved bond strength of U100, but it reduced dentin bond strength of ARC.

  8. Influence of the Cement Film Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Human Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Natália Araújo Silva; Ferreira, Reinaldo de Souza; Maurício, Marcos Henrique de Pinho; Paciornik, Sidnei; de Miranda, Mauro Sayão

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the influence of the cement film thickness on the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts in the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of root canal spaces. Thirty roots were randomly divided into three groups, according to the fiber post system's drills: (G1) #2; (G2) #3; (G3) #4. The posts were cemented using a self-adhesive cement, and a small amount of powdered Rhodamine B was used as a stain. Images of both sides of each slice were obtained before and after the push-out test. To determine the cement thickness, a macro routine was developed using the software KS 400. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test. G2 (14.62 ± 5.15 MPa) showed statistically higher bond strength values than G1 (10.04 ± 5.13 MPa) and G3 (7.68 ± 6.14 MPa). All groups presented higher bond strength values in the apical third. The bur diameter significantly influenced the results of the shear bond strength for the push-out test. The slight increase in the cement thickness allowed an increase in the values of shear bond strength when compared to very thin or very thick cement films. PMID:27143971

  9. Evaluation of shear bond strength between dual cure resin cement and zirconia ceramic after thermocycling treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Kang, Cheol-Kyun; Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was performed to evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) between three dual-cured resin cements and silica coated zirconia, before and after thermocycling treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty specimens were cut in 15 × 2.75 mm discs using zirconia. After air blasting of 50 µm alumina, samples were prepared by tribochemical silica coating with Rocatec™ plus. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the dual-cure resin cement used: (1) Calibra silane+Calibra®, (2) Monobond S+Multilink® N and (3) ESPN sil+RelyX™ Unicem Clicker. After the resin cement was bonded to the zirconia using a Teflon mold, photopolymerization was carried out. Only 10 specimens in each group were thermocycled 6,000 times. Depending on thermocycling treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10) and SBS was measured by applying force at the speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. To find out the differences in SBS according to the types of cements and thermocycling using the SPSS, two-way ANOVA was conducted and post-hoc analysis was performed by Turkey's test. RESULTS In non-thermal aged groups, SBS of Multilink group (M1) was higher than that of Calibra (C1) and Unicem (U1) group (P<.05). Moreover, even after thermocycling treatment, SBS of Multilink group (M2) was higher than the other groups (C2 and U2). All three cements showed lower SBS after the thermocycling than before the treatments. But Multilink and Unicem had a significant difference (P<.05). CONCLUSION In this experiment, Multilink showed the highest SBS before and after thermocycling. Also, bond strengths of all three cements decreased after thermocycling. PMID:25722830

  10. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  11. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink® II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus® (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: Combination of CEREC® Blocs PC and Variolink® II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Conclusion: Variolink® II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used. PMID:26430296

  12. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  13. Influence of the Resin Cement Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Regina Maria Helen-Cot; Kinder, Gustavo Ross; Alfredo, Edson; Quaranta, Tarcisio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of resin cement thickness on the bond strength of prefabricated and customized glass fiber posts after storage in distilled water. Thirty human uniradicular roots were treated endodontically. The roots were divided into 3 groups: THIN (thin cement layer) - post space preparation with #0.5 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; THICK (thick cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; and CUSTOM (customized cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of a customized post (#0.5 glass fiber posts customized with resin composite). All posts were luted with self-adhesive resin cement. The push-out test was carried out after storage for 24 h and 90 days in distilled water at 37 °C. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05). Bond strengths were significantly higher for CUSTOM (9.37 MPa), than for THIN (7.85 MPa) and THICK (7.07 MPa), which were statistically similar. Considering the thirds, the bond strength varied in the sequence: apical (7.13 MPa) < middle (8.22 MPa) = coronal (8.94 MPa). Bond strength for 24 h storage was significantly higher (8.80 MPa) than for 90-day storage (7.40 MPa). It may be concluded that the thickness of resin cement influenced the bond strength of glass fiber posts. The customized posts presented higher bond strength. Storage in water for 90 days affected negatively the values of bond strength, especially for thick cement layers in the apical third.

  14. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PAMIR, Tijen; ŞEN, Bilge Hakan; EVCIN, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. Material and Methods Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM) or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM) glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2) or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM) was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1) no etching, (2) 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3) 30 s of etching, and (4) 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250), the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05). Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p<0.001). No significant differences were determined between the self-etching and etch-rinse & bond adhesives at any etching time (p>0.05). However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. Conclusions The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal. PMID:23329245

  15. Critical surface energy of composite cement containing MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate) and chemical bonding to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Dabsie, Firas; Grégoire, Geneviève; Sharrock, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Self-adhesive composite cements are increasingly used for cementing inlays/onlays, intraradicular posts, crowns and laminate veneers. Wider clinical acceptance is driven by simpler and faster handling procedures, much like observed for self-etching adhesives. 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) is a bi-functional monomer incorporated as the reactive ingredient in a contemporary self-adhesive cement. We have examined the surface free energy parameters of this cement and studied the mode of action of the cement on dentine substrate by contact angle measurements to determine the critical surface energy of the cement. Retention of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the acrylate moieties on the surface of hydroxyapatite particles suggests that MDP contributes to the overall bonding to dentine by forming ionic chemical bonds with surface calcium ions in dentine crystalites.

  16. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1–10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between other groups (P>0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05). Conclusion: Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC. PMID:25628698

  17. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE I REPORT AUGUST 1997 - JULY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.; YAGER,K.A.

    2002-08-05

    In exploring methods to recycle boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS), by-products generated from Keyspan's power plants, into commercially viable materials, we synthesized chemically bonded cements (CBC) offering the following three specific characteristics; (1) immobilization of hazardous heavy metals, such as Pb, Ni, and V, (2) rapid hardening and setting properties, and (3) development of high mechanical strength. The CBCs were prepared through an acid-base reaction between these by-products acting as the solid base reactants and the sodium polyphosphate solution as the cement-forming acid reactant, followed by a hydrating reaction. Furthermore, two additives, the calcium aluminate cements (CAC) and the calcium silicate cements (CSC) were incorporated into the CBC systems to improve their properties. Using a CBC formulation consisting of 53.8 wt% WWTS, 23.1 wt% CSC, and 23.1 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}]{sub 2} the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests showed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, and V metals leached out from the specimens were minimal. This formulation originally contained {approx} 28800 mg/kg of Pb, {approx} 6300 mg/kg of Ni, and {approx} 11130 mg/kg of V; the amounts leaching into the acid extraction fluid were only 0.15 mg/L of Pb, 0.15 mg/L of Ni, and 4.63 mgiL of V. On the other hand, CBC specimens derived from a formulation consisting of 42 wt% BA, 18 wt% CAC and 40 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}] displayed an excellent compressive strength of 10.8 MPa at an early curing age of 2 hours after mixing at room temperature. The reason for its rapid hardening was due to a high exothermic energy evolved by the acid-base reaction. Furthermore, when these specimens were immersed for 28 days in water at 25 C, and exposed for 20 hours to steam at 80 C, a very high compressive strength of 3.32 MPa developed. Two physico-chemical factors played an important role in improving the mechanical strength of

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  19. Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups.

  20. LEACHING BOUNDARY IN CEMENT-BASED WASTE FORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cement-based fixation systems are among the most commonly employed stabilization/solidification techniques. These cement haste mixtures, however, are vulnerable to ardic leaching solutions. Leaching of cement-based waste forms in acetic acid solutions with different acidic streng...

  1. Effects of post surface conditioning before silanization on bond strength between fiber post and resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbarian, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Post surface conditioning is necessary to expose the glass fibers to enable bonding between fiber post and resin cement. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning on tensile bond strength (TBS) of a glass fiber reinforced post to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this in vitro study, 40 extracted single canal central incisors were endodontically treated and post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into four groups according to the methods of post surface treatment (n=10): 1) Silanization after etching with 20% H2O2, 2) Silanization after airborne-particle abrasion, 3) Silanization, and 4) No conditioning (Control). Adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) was used for cementation of the fiber posts to the root canal dentin. Three slices of 3 mm thick were obtained from each root. A universal testing machine was used with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute for performing the push-out tests. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05). RESULTS It is revealed that different surface treatments and root dentin regions had significant effects on TBS, but the interaction between surface treatments and root canal regions had no significant effect on TBS. There was significant difference among H2O2 + Silane Group and other three groups. CONCLUSION There were significant differences among the mean TBS values of different surface treatments. Application of hydrogen peroxide before silanization increased the bond strength between resin cements and fiber posts. The mean TBS mean values was significantly greater in the coronal region of root canal than the middle and apical thirds. PMID:23755337

  2. Effect of Coloring–by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Mahshid, Minoo; Berijani, Naeem; Sadr, Seyed Jalil; Homayoon, Sepide Sorour

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin cement. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored). To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade) and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance. Results: Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001). The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa). Conclusion: Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades. PMID:26884775

  3. Effect of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength between Resin Cement and Ce-TZP/Al2O3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Shim, June-Sung; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Although several studies evaluating the mechanical properties of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 have been published, to date, no study has been published investigating the bonding protocol between Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and resin cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to air-abraded Ce-TZP/Al2O3 when primers and two different cement types were used. Materials and Methods. Two types of zirconia (Y-TZP and Ce-TZP/Al2O3) specimens were further divided into four subgroups according to primer application and the cement used. Shear bond strength was measured after water storage for 3 days or 5,000 times thermocycling for artificial aging. Results. The Y-TZP block showed significantly higher shear bond strength than the Ce-TZP/Al2O3 block generally. Primer application promoted high bond strength and less effect on bond strength reduction after thermocycling, regardless of the type of cement, zirconia block, or aging time. Conclusions. Depending on the type of the primer or resin cement used after air-abrasion, different wettability of the zirconia surface can be observed. Application of primer affected the values of shear bond strength after the thermocycling procedure. In the case of using the same bonding protocol, Y-TZP could obtain significantly higher bond strength compared with Ce-TZP/Al2O3. PMID:27382569

  4. Technical assessment of three layered cement-bonded boards produced from wastepaper and sawdust.

    PubMed

    Fuwape, Joseph Adeola; Fabiyi, James Sunday; Osuntuyi, Edward Olusola

    2007-01-01

    The technical properties of three layered cement-bonded boards (CBBs) made from wastepaper and sawdust were investigated. The CBBs were produced at three density levels of 1000, 1200 and 1300 kg/m3 and at four cement/particle ratios of 2.0:1, 2.5:1, 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 on a weight to weight basis. The technical properties evaluated were modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS). The MOR values ranged from 4.85 to 11.69 MPa and MOE values ranged from 2.80 to 5.57 GPa. The mean values of WA and TS after 24 h of water soaking of the CBBs ranged from 18.18% to 40.49% and 3.55% to 12.13%, respectively. MOR and MOE of the CBBs increased with increase in board density, but MOR decreased with the increase in cement/particle ratio. On the other hand, WA and TS decreased with increase in board density and cement/particle ratio. CBBs produced from wastepaper and sawdust at cement/particle ratios of 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 are suitable for building construction such as paneling, ceiling and partitioning.

  5. Effect of metal type and surface treatment on shear bond strength of resin cement (in vitro study)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Helou, Hiba; Swed, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures appeared to prevent the excessive preparation of dental tissue. Investigation of surface treatments to improve the bond of resin cements to metals may contribute to the longevity of these restorations. Due to the potential lack of ideal preparation form, the type of alloy and its surface pretreatment may have clinically relevant correlations with the retentive strength of castings to minimally retentive preparations. Aim: The aim of this search is to study the bonding resin cement strength to different types of the metal alloy due to the surface treatment. Purpose: Evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) between a palladium-silver alloy (Pb-Ag) and commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) cast alloy with resin luting cements. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 cylinders having 5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in height were divided into two different main groups of metal type: 60 cylinders cast from CP Ti Grade I (Tritan - Reintitan - Germany-Dentaurum) as a base metal and 60 cylinders cast from Pb-Ag (Status-Yamakin, Japan) as a noble metal. 30 cylinders from each type were embedded in acrylic resin, and the rest were left without embedded in acrylic resin. All of the cylinders were smoothed with silicon carbide papers and sandblasting with 50-μm aluminum oxide. Specimens of each metal type were divided into two subgroups, which received one of the following luting techniques: (1) Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), (2) Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent) plus metal zirconia primer (MZP). Every two cylinders from the same metal type and surface treatment were bonded to each other. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then thermal cycled (500 cycles, 5–55°C). After thermal cycling, the specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for an additional 24 h before being tested in shear strength. Data (MPa) were analyzed using T-s tests to study the significance of

  6. A three-year clinical trial using a glass ionomer cement for the bonding of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Miller, J R; Mancl, L; Arbuckle, G; Baldwin, J; Phillips, R W

    1996-01-01

    Recent clinical studies measuring orthodontic bracket failure, when using glass ionomer cement as an adhesive, have reported a wide range of percentages of bracket failure. The present study recorded bracket failure over a 3-year period, longer than had been previously measured. Seventeen participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, either using glass ionomer cement or composite resin for bonding. In each group, brackets were bonded to incisors, canines, and premolars. Bracket failure was measured over the duration of comprehensive orthodontic treatment for all participants. Brackets bonded with the glass ionomer cement were more likely to fail (log-rank test; P < or = 0.022). This difference was clinically significant. At the present time, the disadvantage of extra bracket failures appears to outweigh potential advantages when considering glass ionomer cement for the routine bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  7. Influence of temporary cement remnant and surface cleaning method on bond strength to dentin of a composite luting system.

    PubMed

    Kanakuri, Katsuhito; Kawamoto, Yoshikazu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the influence of polycarboxylate temporary cement remaining on the dentin surface on the bond strength of a composite luting system. An acrylic resin plate was luted to bovine dentin with a polycarboxylate temporary cement (HY-Bond Temporary Cement Hard, HYB). The temporary cement was not used for the control groups. After removing the temporary cement with an excavator, dentin specimens were divided into five groups; 1) no subsequent treatment, 2) cleaning with a rotational brush (RTB), 3) cleaning with a rotational brush and non-fluoridated flour of pumice, 4) sweeping with an air scaler, and 5) treated with a sonic toothbrush. A silane-treated ceramic disk (IPS Empress) was bonded to each dentin specimen with a composite luting system (Panavia F). Shear testing results showed that the RTB groups exhibited the highest bond strength regardless of the use of temporary cement (P < 0.05). The use of a rotational brush with water coolant is recommended to achieve ideal bond strength between the Panavia F luting system and dentin to which HYB temporary cement was primarily applied.

  8. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; da ROSA, Ricardo Abreu; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO, Daniele; KUGA, Milton Carlos; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; do VALLE, Accácio Lins; VIDOTTI, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Material and Methods Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Results Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Conclusions Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values. PMID:25004052

  9. Effect of cement type and water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post.

    PubMed

    Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Spyrides, George Miguel; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de; Jnoub, Alexandre Abrão; Dias, Kátia Regina Hostilio Cervantes; Bonfantes, Gerson

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the cement type and the water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post. Glass fiber posts (Fibrekor, Jeneric Pentron) were luted to post spaces using a self-cured resin cement (C&B Cement [CB]), a glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem [KC]) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC FujiCEM [FC]) according to the manufacturers' instructions. For each luting agent, the specimens were exposed to one of the following water storage times (n=5): 1 day (T1), 7 days (T7), 90 days (T90) and 180 days (T180). Push-out tests were performed after the storage times. Control specimens were not exposed to water storage, but subjected to the push-out test 10 min after post cementation. Data (in MPa) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn`s test (α=0.05). Cement type and water storage time had a significant effect (p<0.05) on the push-out bond strength. CB showed significantly higher values of retention (p<0.05) than KC and FC, irrespective of the water storage time. Water storage increased significantly the push-out bond strength in T7 and T90, regardless of the cement type (p<0.05). The results showed that fiber posts luted to post spaces with the self-cured resin cement exhibited the best bonding performance throughout the 180-day water storage period. All cements exhibited a tendency to increase the bond strength after 7 and 90 days of water storage, decreasing thereafter.

  10. Effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement.

    PubMed

    Moezzizadeh, Maryam; Nojedehian, Hanieh; Valizadeh Haghi, Haleh

    2017-01-31

    This study aimed to assess the effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement. A total of 120 specimens were used in this in-vitro, experimental study. Zirconia discs measuring 10×7×2 mm were cut from Y-TZP zirconia blocks, sintered, cleaned and received different surface treatments of sandblasting, bioglass powder coating+etching, bioglass powder coating+etching+silanization, bioglass slurry coating+etching, bioglass slurry coating+etching+silanization, silica coating+silanization, silica coating+etching+silanization and no treatment group (control). Then the microshear bond strength testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were done. Data were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U and the Kruskal Wallis tests. Significant differences existed in bond strength of different groups (p<0.001). The sandblasted and bioglass coated groups showed higher and the colloidal silica-coated groups showed lower bond strength compared to the control group.

  11. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  12. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  13. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium.

  14. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Curing Process of Polymethylmethacrylate-based Bone Cement Modified with Hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viano, Ann; Auwarter, Julie; Hoffmeister, Brent; Rho, Jae-Young

    2000-03-01

    The use of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based bone cement for implantation of metallic prostheses is becoming increasingly common. Failure of a cemented prosthesis often occurs when there is weak bonding at the bone/cement or cement/metal interface. The addition of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles, a synthetically produced version of the natural mineral in bone, may improve the adhesion by promoting bone growth into the cement itself. The curing time of PMMA bone cement determines the speed of implant insertion, which can affect the mechanical strength of the cement. Pure PMMA has a well-characterized curing time of 9-12 minutes, depending on environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. By measuring the propagation of ultrasonic pulses through a sample of bone cement, the curing process can be monitored. As the material hardens, the velocity of an ultrasonic pulse increases, and the attenuation decreases. These parameters were measured as a function of time for PMMA mixed with 0, 10 and 30investigation of the curing process as a function of hydroxyapatite concentration.

  15. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm below the dentine-enamel junction). Resin cements were applied on dentin surfaces and composite blocks were luted under constant seating pressure. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to time intervals. Specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of 1 mm(2) in diameter and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min. Both resin cements showed higher micro-tensile bond strength to superficial dentin than that to deep or cervical dentin (P < 0.001). Micro-tensile bond strengths of Panavia F2.0 were higher than those of Multilink Sprint at different dentin regions (P < 0.001). Immediate micro-tensile bond strengths were higher than those of delayed micro-tensile bond strengths for both resin cements (P < 0.001). It was concluded that resin cements with different chemical formulations and applications yield significantly different micro-tensile bond strengths to different dentin regions.

  16. Bonding of contemporary glass ionomer cements to different tooth substrates; microshear bond strength and scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    El Wakeel, Aliaa Mohamed; Elkassas, Dina Wafik; Yousry, Mai Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) and ultramorphological characterization of glass ionomer (GI) cements; conventional GI cement (Fuji IX, CGI), resin modified GI (Fuji II LC, RMGI) and nano-ionomer (Ketac N100, NI) to enamel, dentin and cementum substrates. Materials and Methods: Forty-five lower molars were sectioned above the cemento-enamel junction. The occlusal surfaces were ground flat to obtain enamel and dentin substrates, meanwhile the cervical one-third of the root portion were utilized to evaluate the bonding efficacy to cementum substrate. Each substrate received microcylinders from the three tested materials; which were applied according to manufacturer instructions. μSBS was assessed using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc test. Modes of failure were examined using stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Interfacial analysis of the bonded specimens was carried out using environmental field emission scanning electron microscope. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that materials, substrates and their interaction had a statistically significant effect on the mean μSBS values at P values; ˂0.0001, 0.0108 and 0.0037 respectively. RMGI showed statistically significant the highest μSBS values to all examined tooth substrates. CGI and RMGI show substrate independent bonding efficiency, meanwhile; NI showed higher μSBS values to dentin and cementum compared to enamel. Conclusion: Despite technological development of GI materials, mainly the nano-particles use, better results have not been achieved for both investigations, when compared to RMGI, independent of tooth substrate. PMID:26038646

  17. Push-out bond strengths of fiber-reinforced composite posts with various resin cements according to the root level

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Noh, Young-Sin; Lee, Yoon; Min, Kyung-San

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine whether the push-out bond strengths between the radicular dentin and fiber reinforced-composite (FRC) posts with various resin cements decreased or not, according to the coronal, middle or apical level of the root. MATERIALS AND METHODS FRC posts were cemented with one of five resin cement groups (RelyX Unicem: Uni, Contax with activator & LuxaCore-Dual: LuA, Contax & LuxaCore-Dual: Lu, Panavia F 2.0: PA, Super-Bond C&B: SB) into extracted human mandibular premolars. The roots were sliced into discs at the coronal, middle and apical levels. Push-out bond strength tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and the failure aspect was analyzed. RESULTS There were no significant differences (P>.05) in the bond strengths of the different resin cements at the coronal level, but there were significant differences in the bond strengths at the middle and apical levels (P<.05). Only the Uni and LuA cements did not show any significant decrease in their bond strengths at all the root levels (P>.05); all other groups had a significant decrease in bond strength at the middle or apical level (P<.05). The failure aspect was dominantly cohesive at the coronal level of all resin cements (P<.05), whereas it was dominantly adhesive at the apical level. CONCLUSION All resin cement groups showed decreases in bond strengths at the middle or apical level except LuA and Uni. PMID:24049569

  18. Bonding strength of resin cement to silicate glass ceramics for dental CAD/CAM systems is enhanced by combination treatment of the bonding surface.

    PubMed

    Shimakura, Yusuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Fujishima, Akihiro; Kunii, Jun; Miyazaki, Takashi; Kawawa, Tadaharu

    2007-09-01

    To increase the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated, leucite-reinforced glass ceramics with a resin cement, the effects of the following were investigated: surface modification by tribochemical (TBC) treatment, followed by combined application of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer. Bond strength was evaluated by a shear bond test. It was found that a silane coupling agent was useful for all the surfaces, particularly for the TBC-treated surface. This was because of the presence of a silica layer on the modified surface. The combination of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer on the TBC surface allowed marked improvement in bonding, whereby the bonding endured 20,000 cycles of thermal cycling. Therefore, TBC treatment in combination with a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer substantially increased the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated glass ceramics with resin cement, if the treatment conditions were appropriate.

  19. An effect of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of resin cement to porcelain restoration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Ho

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine differences in shear bond strength to human dentin using immediate dentin sealing (IDS) technique compared to delayed dentin sealing (DDS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups with 10 teeth each. The control group was light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) and cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. IDS/SE (immediate dentin sealing, Clearfil™ SE Bond) and IDS/SB (immediate dentin sealing, AdapterTM Single Bond 2) were light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Clearfil™ SE Bond and Adapter™ Sing Bond 2, respectively), whereas DDS specimens were not treated with any dentin bonding agent. Specimens were cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. Dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) was left unpolymerized until the application of porcelain restoration. Shear strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a speed of 5 mm/min and evaluated of fracture using an optical microscope. RESULTS The mean shear bond strengths of control group and IDS/SE group were not statistically different from another at 14.86 and 11.18 MPa. Bond strength of IDS/SE group had a significantly higher mean than DDS group (3.14 MPa) (P < .05). There were no significance in the mean shear bond strength between IDS/SB (4.11 MPa) and DDS group. Evaluation of failure patterns indicates that most failures in the control group and IDS/SE groups were mixed, whereas failures in the DDS were interfacial. CONCLUSION When preparing teeth for indirect ceramic restoration, IDS with Clearfil™ SE Bond results in improved shear bond strength compared with DDS. PMID:21165186

  20. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P<0.001). Rinsing protocol and cement type resulted in similar variations in the mean bond strength in all tests (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium

  1. Microtensile bond strength of glass ionomer cements to artificially created carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyungho; Oshida, Yoshiki; Platt, Jeffrey A; Cochran, Michael A; Matis, Bruce A; Yi, Keewook

    2006-01-01

    In this laboratory study, the microtensile bond strengths of a conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin modified glass ionomer cement (CRMGIC) to artificially created carious dentin and sound dentin were compared, and the ultrastructural morphology of the fractured interface was examined with a low-vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM). The specimens were divided into 4 groups: 1) a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil Plus Aplicap) placed on sound dentin; 2) a conventional GIC placed on artificially created carious dentin; 3) an RMGIC (Photac-Fil Aplicap) placed on sound dentin and 4) an RMGIC placed on artificially created carious dentin. Artificial carious lesions were created using a chemical demineralizing solution of 0.1 M/L lactic acid and 0.2% carbopol. GIC buildups were made on the dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's directions. After storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 1 x 1 x 8-mm beams for the microtensile bond strength test. The microtensile bond strength of each specimen was measured, and failure mode was determined using an optical microscope (40x). The fractured surfaces were further examined with SEM. Two-way analysis of variance showed that the mean microtensile bond strengths of a GIC and an RMGIC to carious dentin were significantly lower than those to sound dentin, and the mean microtensile bond strengths of Photac-Fil to both sound and carious dentin were significantly higher than those of Ketac-Fil Plus. Chi-square tests indicated that there was a significant difference in failure mode between the sound dentin and carious dentin groups. In sound dentin groups, cohesive failure in GIC was pre- dominant; whereas, mixed failure was predominant in carious dentin groups. SEM examination showed that the specimens determined to be cohesive failures under light microscopy in the Photac-Fil/Sound Dentin group were actually mixed failures under high magnification of SEM.

  2. Magnesia-Based Cements: A Journey of 150 Years, and Cements for the Future?

    PubMed

    Walling, Sam A; Provis, John L

    2016-04-13

    This review examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 150 years of work worldwide on magnesium-based inorganic cements, with a focus on both scientific and patent literature. Magnesium carbonate, phosphate, silicate-hydrate, and oxysalt (both chloride and sulfate) cements are all assessed. Many such cements are ideally suited to specialist applications in precast construction, road repair, and other fields including nuclear waste immobilization. The majority of MgO-based cements are more costly to produce than Portland cement because of the relatively high cost of reactive sources of MgO and do not have a sufficiently high internal pH to passivate mild steel reinforcing bars. This precludes MgO-based cements from providing a large-scale replacement for Portland cement in the production of steel-reinforced concretes for civil engineering applications, despite the potential for CO2 emissions reductions offered by some such systems. Nonetheless, in uses that do not require steel reinforcement, and in locations where the MgO can be sourced at a competitive price, a detailed understanding of these systems enables their specification, design, and selection as advanced engineering materials with a strongly defined chemical basis.

  3. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Heidari, Bijan; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15). In control group (CNT) no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001). The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001). In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples. PMID:25383349

  4. Analysis of Bond Strength by Pull Out Test on Fiber Glass Posts Cemented in Different Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Mariana Benedetti Ferreira; Michida, Silvia Masae de Araújo; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; de Oliveira, Giovani Corrêa; Silva, Cleverson de Oliveira e

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of pull-out test, the bond strength of fiberglass posts when cemented with different lengths in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted bovine roots were cut in the cementoenamel junction with 21 mm length. They were endodontically treated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). Group 1 - Preparation of 2/3 of the remaining roots; Group 2 - Preparation of ½ of the remaining roots and Group 3 - Preparation of ¼ of remaining roots. For all groups it were used posts n = 3 (Exacto, Angelus, Brazil), and cemented with self-etching resin cement (RelyXU200). After cementing posts, the samples were thermocycled (10.000 cycles/5°C and 55°C). The pull-out test was performed on a universal testing machine (EMIC - DL500) and the values obtained were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (one-factor ANOVA) and multiple comparison test of Tukey, with level of significance of 5%. Results: The mean values ± standard deviation in Newtons (N) were: Group 1 = 120.5 (±42.8) A, Group 2 = 103.1 (±31.2) AB, Group 3 = 41.2 (±22.4) C, P < 0.005. Conclusion: The preparation of ½ of remaining root appears to be a viable alternative when 2/3 of the preparation of the remaining root is not possible, but more results are needed for clinical validation. PMID:25954063

  5. Is the bonding of self-adhesive cement sensitive to root region and curing mode?

    PubMed Central

    BOING, Thaynara Faelly; GOMES, Giovana Mongruel; GOMES, João Carlos; REIS, Alessandra; GOMES, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To evaluate the influence of two curing techniques on the degree of conversion (DC) of resin cements and on bond strength (BS) of fiber posts in different regions of root dentin. Material and Methods Twenty single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post spaces were prepared. The roots were randomly divided into two groups (n=10), according to the activation mode of the resin cement RelyX™ U200 (3M ESPE Saint Paul, MN, USA): conventional (continuous activation mode) and soft-start activation mode (Ramp). The posts (WhitePost DC/FGM) were cemented according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and, after one week, the roots were cross-sectioned into six discs each of 1-mm thickness, and the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of the root canals were identified. The DC was evaluated under micro-Raman spectroscopy and the BS was evaluated by the push-out test. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results Neither the activation mode nor the root regions affected the DC of the resin cement. Higher BS was achieved in the soft-start group (p=0.036); lower BS was observed in the apical third compared to the other root regions (p<0.001). Irrespective of the activation mode and root region, the mixed failure mode was the most prevalent. Conclusion The BS of fiber posts to root canals can be improved by soft-started polymerization. The DC was not affected by the curing mode. PMID:28198970

  6. The effect of simplified adhesives on the bond strength to dentin of dual-cure resin cements.

    PubMed

    Shade, A M; Wajdowicz, M N; Bailey, C W; Vandewalle, K S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths to dentin of two dual-cure resin cements, one with a unique initiator, NX3 (Kerr Corp), and the other with a traditional redox-initiator system, Calibra (Dentsply), when used in combination with simplified or nonsimplified adhesive agents. The two dual-cure resin cements, in either self- or dual-cure activation modes, were bonded to human dentin with four dental adhesives to create 16 subgroups of 10 specimens each. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine. With both NX3 and Calibra, bond strengths significantly increased when the specimens were dual cured. In addition, with either cement in either mode, the nonsimplified adhesives performed significantly better than did the simplified adhesive bonding agents. When used specifically with simplified adhesives in either cure mode, NX3 did not produce significantly higher bond strengths than did Calibra. In general, lower dentin bond strengths were found with simplified adhesives or self-cure activation with either resin cement.

  7. Development of a ceramic primer with higher bond durability for resin cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui

    2010-07-01

    To increase the bond durability of resin to the CAD/CAM ceramic surface, two types of two-bottle type ceramic primers, consisting of Primer A1 or A2 and Primer B, were designed. Primer A1 was prepared by dissolving 25, 50, or 100 mg of gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane in 1 mL of ethanol. Primer A2 was prepared by dissolving 50 mg of mixed silanes, consisting of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, in 1 mL of ethanol. Mole fractions of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane were 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mol%. Primer B was prepared after dissolving 0.01, 0.05 or 0.1 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid in ethanol by 50 vol%. Ceramic surface was silanated with a mixture of Primers A1 and B or Primers A2 and B for 1 min, and then air-dried. Commercial GC ceramic primer and Porcelain Liner M were utilized. Thereafter, dual-curing type resin cement was bonded to silanated ceramic surface through visible-light irradiation. Shear bond strength of resin to the ceramic surface was measured, before and after thermo-cycling. Addition of 0.01 or 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid to the gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane allowed for significant increases in the bond strength. However, thermo-cycling resulted in significant decreases of approximately 5 MPa in the bond strength. Conversely, when the mixed silane, where 30 mol% of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane dissolved in gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, was utilized with 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid, the reduction in the bond strength decreased to approximately 2 MPa. The designed ceramic primers exhibited higher ceramic bond durability than commercial ceramic primers.

  8. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  9. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). RESULTS Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (P<.05). Heat drying after silanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (P<.05). However, no effect was determined for hydrogen peroxide etching before applying silane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). CONCLUSION Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study. PMID:27141252

  10. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  11. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). Results: After 24 h, CEC luted to pre-treated zirconia achieved the highest MTBS. Using RXU, alumina and zirconia registered comparable MTBS. CAL failed prematurely, except when luted to sandblasted zirconia. After NaOClaq storage, CEC significantly lowered MTBS when luted to zirconia or alumina. RXU decreased MTBS only when bonded to silica-coated alumina. CAL recorded 100 % of pre-testing failures. Micromorphological alterations were evident after NaOClaq immersion. Conclusions: Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or

  12. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  13. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  14. Shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements to Er:YAG laser-treated tooth structure.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation of enamel and dentin on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIC). Twenty molars were selected and the roots removed. The crowns were bisected, embedded in polyester resin and ground to plane the enamel or expose the dentin. The bonding site was delimited, and samples were randomly assigned according to the cavity preparation device: I--Er.YAG laser (350mJ/2Hz); II--Carbide bur (control group). They were subdivided according to the restorative material employed: A) Fuji II LC (GC); B) Vitremer (3M). Samples were then fixed to a metallic device where ionomer cylinders were prepared. Sequentially, the molars were stored for 24 hours and subjected to a shear bond strength test (50Kgf at 0.5 mm/minute). Means in MPa were: Enamel--IA) 4.77 (+/- 1.12); IB) 4.36 (+/- 1.50); IIA) 7.70 (+/- 1.53); IIB) 7.34 (+/- 1.52) and Dentin--IA) 3.13 (+/- 1.15); IB) 2.67 (+/- 0.74); IIA) 6.38 (+/- 1.44); IIB) 5.58 (+/-2.09). Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA. Adhesion for enamel was more efficient than for dentin (p < 0.01). The cavities prepared with a conventional bur (control group) presented higher bond strength values than those recorded for Er:YAG laser (p < 0.01). No significant differences were observed between the restorative materials. Based on these results, it was concluded that Er:YAG laser adversely affected the shear bond strength of RMGIC for both enamel and dentin.

  15. Effect of Cementation Technique of Individually Formed Fiber-Reinforced Composite Post on Bond Strength and Microleakage

    PubMed Central

    Makarewicz, Dominika; Le Bell-Rönnlöf, Anna-Maria B; Lassila, Lippo V.J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different cementation techniques of individually formed E-glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post on bond strength and microleakage. Methods: The crowns of extracted third molars were removed and post preparation was carried out with parapost drills (diameter 1.5 mm). After application of bonding agents individually formed FRC posts (everStick POST, diameter 1.5 mm) were cemented into the post spaces with either ParaCem®Universal or self-adhesive RelyX™Unicem, using two different cementation techniques: 1) an “indirect (traditional) technique” where the post was prepolymerized prior application of luting cement and insertion into the post space or 2) a “direct technique” where the uncured post was inserted to the post space with luting cement and light-polymerized in situ at the same time. After water storage of 48 hours, the roots (n = 10/group) were cut into discs of thickness of 2 mm. A push-out force was applied until specimen fracture or loosening of the post. A microleakage test was carried out on roots which were not subjected to the loading test (n= 32) to evaluate the sealing capacity of the post-canal interface. The microleakage was measured using dye penetration depth under a stereomicroscope. Results: Higher bond strength values (p<0.05) and less microleakage (p<0.05) were obtained with the “direct technique” compared to the “indirect technique”. None of the FRC posts revealed any dye penetration between the post and the cement. Conclusions: The “direct technique” seems to be beneficial when cementing individually formed FRC posts. PMID:23986792

  16. The effects of Various Endodontic Irrigants on the Push-out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Sahebi, Safoora; Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Naghizade, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of various irrigants on the push-out bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods and Materials: A total of 140 dentin disks with a thickness of 1.5±0.2 mm and lumen size of 1.3 mm, were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10) and 4 control groups (n=5). The lumen of disks in groups 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9 were filled with CEM and groups 4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12 were filled with MTA. Control groups were filled with CEM and MTA. Specimens were incubated at 37°C for one day in groups 1 to 6 and seven days in groups 7 to 12. After incubation the samples were divided into three subgroups (n=10) that were either immersed for 30 min in 5.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or saline solution. The push-out bond strength values were measured by using a universal testing machine. The nature of the failures were determined by light microscope. Data was analyzed using the three-way ANOVA to evaluate the effect of material type, different irrigants and time intervals. Post hoc Tukey’s test was used for two-by-two comparison of the groups. Results: CEM cement significantly showed a higher push-out bond strength in comparison with MTA (P=0.001). The elapse of time significantly increased the bond strength (P=0.001). There was no significant difference between the irrigants used in this study (P=0.441). Bond failure was predominantly of mixed type in MTA and of cohesive type in CEM samples. Conclusion: Based on this study, endodontic irrigants did not influence the push-out bond strength of MTA and CEM cement. PMID:27790256

  17. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Hong; Qian, Yue-Tong; Zhu, Song; Zhao, Su-Qian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested: (i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts: DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (α=0.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts. PMID:24177170

  18. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  19. Influence of different light sources on microtensile bond strength and gap formation of resin cement under porcelain inlay restorations.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, A N; Usumez, A

    2004-09-01

    Clinical success with ceramic inlays/onlays has been assisted by the ability to develop a reliable bond of composite resin to dental tissues. The purpose of this study was to test the efficiency of two different light sources on microtensile bond strength and the gap formation of resin cement under class II porcelain inlay restorations. Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were prepared in 30 freshly extracted, intact human premolar teeth. Then impressions were made and ceramic inlays were fabricated. In the cementation process, the resin cement/inlay combinations were exposed to two different photopolymerization units. The polymerizations through 15 specimens were performed with a conventional halogen light source for 60 s, and the other specimens were cured by a plasma arc light for 9 s. After the cementation process, two 1.2 x 1.2 mm wide 'I' shape sections per tooth were produced with a sectioning machine and sections were subjected to microtensile testing after 24 h or 1 week. Gap formation of specimens cured by different photopolymerization units were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistically significant differences were found between the microtensile bond strength of inlays exposed to conventional light and plasma arc curing unit (P < 0.001). Plasma arc curing units make it possible to polymerize composite in much shorter times than conventional curing unit. However, the samples polymerized with conventional halogen light produced better microtensile bond strength than the plasma arc unit.

  20. RECYCLED WASTE-BASED CEMENT COMPOSITE PATCH MATERIALS FOR RAPID/PERMANENT ROAD RESTORATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2001-07-31

    Over the past year, KeySpan Energy sponsored a research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) aimed at recycling boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) byproducts generated from Keyspan's power stations into potentially useful materials, and at reducing concurrent costs for their disposal. Also, KeySpan has an interest in developing strategies to explicitly integrate industrial ecology and green chemistry. From our collaborative efforts with Keyspan (Diane Blankenhom Project Manager, and Kenneth Yager), we succeeded in recycling them into two viable products; Pb-exchange adsorbents (PEAs), and high-performance cements (HpCs). These products were made from chemically bonded cement and ceramic (CBC) materials that were synthesized through two-step chemical reaction pathways, acid-base and hydration. Using this synthesis technology, both the WWTS and BA served in acting as solid base reactants, and sodium polyphosphate, [-(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}], known as an intermediator of fertilizer, was employed as the acid solution reactant. In addition, two commercial cement additives, Secar No. 51 calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and Type I calcium silicate cement (CSC), were used to improve mechanical behavior and to promote the rate of acid-base reaction of the CBC materials.

  1. Evaluation and comparison of the effect of different surface preparations on bond strength of glass ionomer cement with nickel-chrome metal-ceramic alloy: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Hasti, Kalpana; Jagadeesh, H G; Patil, Narendra P

    2011-03-01

    Retention of fixed partial dentures is mostly dependent upon the bond between metal and cement as well as cement and tooth structure. However, most of the time clinical failure of bond has been observed at metal and cement interface. The treatment of metal surface, prior to luting, plays a crucial role in bonding cement with the metal. This study is conducted to evaluate and compare the effect of different surface preparations on the bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement with nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy. Fifty caries-free extracted molar teeth were made flat until the dentin of the occlusal surface was exposed. After fabrication of the wax patterns and subsequent castings, the castings were subjected to porcelain firing cycles. The nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy discs were also divided into five groups and subjected to various surface treatments: (1) Unsandblasted (U), (2) sandblasted (S), (3) sandblasted and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO4 (SK), (4) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points (UD) and (5) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO(4) (UDK). After surface treatments, the castings were cemented using Fuji PLUS encapsulated resin-modified glass ionomer cement. The obtained values of all the groups were subjected to statistical analysis for Tensile and Shear bond strength. Different surface treatments of the metal affects the bond strength values of resin-modified glass ionomer cement when used as luting agent.

  2. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    PubMed Central

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p<0.05), whereas there were no significant differences found between the control and the other groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  3. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  4. Effect of dentin pretreatment and curing mode on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim was to evaluate the effect of curing mode and different dentin surface pretreatment on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six extracted human permanent molars were sectioned horizontally exposing flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into 12 groups (3 teeth/group) according to the dentin surface pretreatment methods (control, 18% EDTA, 10% Polyacrylic acid) and curing mode (self-curing vs. light-curing) of cement. After pretreatment, composite resin blocks were cemented with the following: (a) G-CEM LinkAce; (b) RelyX U200, followed by either self-curing or light-curing. After storage, the teeth were sectioned and µTBS test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Student T-test and Scheffe's post-hoc test at P<.05 level. RESULTS For G-CEM LinkAce cement groups, polyacrylic acid pretreatment showed the highest µTBS in the self-cured group. In the light-cured group, no significant improvements were observed according to the dentin surface pretreatment. There were no significant differences between curing modes. Both dentin surface pretreatment methods helped to increase the µTBS of RelyX U200 resin cement significantly and degree of pretreatment effect was similar. No significant differences were found regarding curing modes except control groups. In the comparisons of two self-adhesive resin cements, all groups within the same pretreatment and curing mode were significantly different excluding self-cured control groups. CONCLUSION Selecting RelyX U200 used in this study and application of dentin surface pretreatment with EDTA and polyacrylic acid might be recommended to enhance the bond strength of cement to dentin. PMID:26330979

  5. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Methods: In this in vitro study thirty discs of zirconia with a diameter of 6 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into two groups of 15. In the test group the zirconia disc surfaces were irradiated by CO2 laser with an output power of 3 W and energy density of 265.39 j/cm2. Composite resin discs were fabricated by plastic molds, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness and were cemented on zirconia disk surfaces with Panavia F2.0 resin cement (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Shear bond strength was measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture type was assessed under a stereomicroscope at ×40. Surface morphologies of two specimens of the test group were evaluated under SEM before and after laser pretreatment. Data was analyzed by paired t-test (p value < 0.05). Results: The mean SBS values of the laser and control groups were 12.12 ± 3.02 and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Surface treatment with CO2 laser significantly increased SBS between resin cement and zirconia ceramic (p value = 0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, surface treatment with CO2 laser increased the SBS between resin cement and the zirconia ceramic. PMID:25653809

  6. Evaluation of four cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin.

    PubMed

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Druck, Carolina Ceolin; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This trial used push-out testing to evaluate four different fiber post cementation strategies. Specimens of bovine mandibular teeth were randomly allocated into four groups according to cementation strategies (n = 10): ScotchBond MultiPurpose and RelyX ARC (Group 1); AdheSE and Multilink Automix (Group 2); phosphoric acid and RelyX U100 (Group 3); and RelyX U100 (Group 4). Four slices from each specimen (2.0 mm thick) were obtained for the push-out test. All slices were analyzed for failure mode after testing. A one-way ANOVA showed differences between the groups (P = 0.002). A Tukey test indicated that Group 1 had the highest bond strength values (13.96 ± 6.41 MPa). Groups 2 (6.58 ± 2.14 MPa), 3 (5.85 ± 2.57 MPa), and 4 (8.19 ± 2.28 MPa) had similar bond strengths, but all of them were lower than Group 1. A three-step total etching adhesive system, associated with a conventional resin cement, might be a good alternative for fiber post cementation.

  7. Utilization of the coconut shell of babaçu (Orbignya sp.) to produce cement-bonded particleboard.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Renato Rocha; Del Menezzi, Cláudio Henrique Soares; Teixeira, Divino Eterno

    2002-11-01

    This experiment evaluated the use of the material of the outer coconut shell of babaçu (Orbignya sp.), a palm tree from Brazil, for the manufacture of particleboards bonded with Portland cement. Four treatments were analyzed at two target densities (1.2 g/cm3 and 1.4 g/cm3) and two levels (0% and 4%) of addition of calcium chloride. The lignocellulosic material from babaçu presented a low cement inhibition index according to the hydration test. Testing of manufactured panels showed that good physical and mechanical properties were achieved at the treatment levels tested.

  8. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    PubMed

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane.

  9. Effect of adhesive resin cements and post surface silanization on the bond strengths of adhesively inserted fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Bitter, Kerstin; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strengths and the effect of silanization of fiber posts inserted with different adhesive systems. Sixty DT Light Posts (size 1) were used. Thirty posts were pretreated with silane. The posts were cemented into form-congruent artificial root canals (12 mm) of bovine dentine. Six groups were formed: G1, Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G2, Monobond-S+Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G3, ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G4, Monobond-S+ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G5, RelyX Unicem; and G6, Monobond-S+RelyX Unicem. The mean (standard deviation) tensile bond strengths (megapascals) were 7.69 (0.85) for G1, 7.15 (1.01) for G2, 6.73 (0.85) for G3, 6.78 (0.97) for G4, 4.79 (0.58) for G5, and 4.74 (0.88) for G6. G1 achieved significantly higher bond strengths than G3 and G5; G3 had significantly higher values than G5 (P < .05; Scheffé procedure). Silanization had no significant effect (P > .05, one-way analysis of variance). Tensile bond strengths were significantly influenced by the type of resin cement. Silanization of fiber post surfaces seems to have no clinical relevance.

  10. Comparison of in vitro tensile bond strengths of luting cements to metallic and tooth-colored posts.

    PubMed

    Sahmali, Sevil; Demirel, Figen; Saygili, Gülbin

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of tooth-colored ceramic and carbon-fiber post materials as well as titanium and stainless steel post materials luted with three different kinds of luting cements. Disks of alloy post materials were polished with 600-grit SiC paper, air abraded, and ultrasonically cleaned. Ceramic surfaces were pretreated with hydrofluoric acid and silanized. Panavia F, Vitremer, and ProTec Cem cements were bonded to the post specimens and placed in a humidor for 24 hours. Specimens were placed in a jig, and the debonding values were obtained using a universal testing machine. Means and standard deviations were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Panavia F provided the highest bond strengths for all types of post materials. ProTec Cem bonded more strongly to stainless steel and titanium than to zirconium oxide. Vitremer results were the lowest. Bonds to carbon-fiber post materials were weaker than to metallic post materials, but stronger than to zirconium oxide. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a higher percentage of cohesive failures.

  11. Effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG Lasers on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohamadi, Ebrahim; Shabani, Amanj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Because of poor bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics, laser surface treatments have been suggested to improve adhesion. The present study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Materials and Methods: Ninety zirconia disks (6×2 mm) were randomly divided into six groups of 15. In the control group, no surface treatment was used. In the test groups, laser surface treatment was accomplished using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, respectively (groups two and three). Composite resin disks (3×2 mm) were fabricated and cemented to zirconia disks with self-etch resin cement and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the test groups four-six, the samples were prepared as in groups one-three and then thermocycled and stored in distilled water for six months. The SBS tests were performed (strain rate of 0.5 mm/min). The fracture modes were observed via stereomicroscopy. Data were analyzed with one and two-way ANOVA, independent t and Tukey’s tests. Results: The SBS values of Nd:YAG group (18.95±3.46MPa) was significantly higher than that of the CO2 group (14.00±1.96MPa), but lower than that of controls (23.35±3.12MPa). After thermocycling and six months of water storage, the SBS of the untreated group (1.80±1.23 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the laser groups. In groups stored for 24 hours, 60% of the failures were adhesive; however, after thermocycling and six months of water storage, 100% of failures were adhesive. Conclusion: Bonding durability of resin cement to zirconia improved with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser surface treatment of zirconia ceramic. PMID:27148380

  12. Influence of Photoinitiator and Light-Curing Source on Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements to Dentin.

    PubMed

    Segreto, Dario Raimundo; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo; Brandt, William Cunha; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength (BS) of experimental resin cements formulated with different photoinitiators when activated by two kinds of light-curing units (LCUs) through a ceramic material. Seven resin blends with different camphorquinone (CQ) and/or phenylpropanedione (PPD) concentrations (weight) were prepared: C5: 0.5% CQ; C8: 0.8% CQ; P5: 0.5% PPD; P8: 0.8% PPD; C1P4: 0.1% CQ and 0.4% PPD; C4P1: 0.4% CQ and 0.1% PPD; C4P4: 0.4% CQ and 0.4% PPD. Two LCUs were used: one quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH - 850 mW/cm²) and one light-emitting diode (LED - 1300 mW/cm²). The microtensile bond strength of each blend was assessed. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The BS values did not exhibit significant differences for LCUs, regardless of the photoinitiator type. Three cements showed significant differences: P5 and C5 had higher BS with QTH, and C4P1 with LED. For QTH, P5 showed the highest and C1P4 the lowest BS. For the LED, C4P1 showed the highest BS of all the cements. The results indicated that PPD was a viable alternative in the formulation of photocured resin cements, reducing or eliminating CQ that is yellowish without impairing the bond strength. Furthermore, both LED and QTH were effective in curing resin cements that contain PPD or CQ.

  13. In vitro comparative bond strength of contemporary self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion.

    PubMed

    Blatz, Markus B; Phark, Jin-Ho; Ozer, Fusun; Mante, Francis K; Saleh, Najeed; Bergler, Michael; Sadan, Avishai

    2010-04-01

    This study compared shear bond strengths of six self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion. One hundred twenty zirconia samples were air-abraded (group SB; n = 60) or left untreated (group NO). Composite cylinders were bonded to the zirconia samples with either BisCem (BC), Maxcem (MC), G-Cem (GC), RelyX Unicem Clicker (RUC), RelyX Unicem Applicator (RUA), or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Shear bond strength was tested after thermocycling, and data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Without abrasion, RUA (8.0 MPa), GC (7.9 MPa), and CSA (7.6 MPa) revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the other cements. Air-particle abrasion increased bond strengths for all test cements (p < 0.001). GC (22.4 MPa) and CSA (18.4 MPa) revealed the highest bond strengths in group SB. Bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia were increased by air-particle abrasion. Cements containing adhesive monomers (MDP/4-META) were superior to other compositions.

  14. Effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Gharouni, Mahya

    2017-01-01

    Background Considering the probability of chemical and enzymatic reactions between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the dentin structure and their specific inhibitors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of MMPs (galardin) on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Material and Methods Forty-eight sound human premolars were mounted in self-cured acrylic resin after removal of the enamel on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The dentin surfaces achieved were polished and prepared with 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=16) based on the concentration of galardin used (with no galardin, galardin at a high concentration and galardin at a low concentration). In addition, 96 composite resin blocks, measuring 3 mm in height and diameter, were prepared. The composite resin blocks were bonded to the buccal and lingual surface dentin with Rely-X Unicem (RXC) and Speed CEM (SPC) self-adhesive resin cements, respectively, according to manufacturers’ instructions. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the shear bond strength values were determined in MPa and fracture modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni test (α=0.05). Results The shear bond strength of galardin at high concentration was significantly higher than that in the control group and galardin at a low concentrations (P<0.001). In addition, galardin at a low concentration exhibited higher shear bond strength compared to the control group (P=0.005). Furthermore, higher shear bond strength values were reported with the use of RXC compared to SPC (P<0.001). Conclusions Irrigation with galardin increased the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin and this increase had a direct relationship with the concentration of galardin in the solution. Key words:N-(2(R)-2

  15. Effect of Acidic Environment on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Sahebi, Safoora; Naderi, Misagh; Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat; Shanbezadeh, Najmeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This laboratory study was performed to evaluate the effect of different acidic pH values on the push-out bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight root dentin slices were obtained from freshly extracted single rooted human teeth and their lumen were instrumented to achieve a diameter of 1.3 mm. Then, CEM cement was mixed according to manufacturers’ instruction and placed in the lumens with minimal pressure. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=12) which were wrapped in pieces of gauze soaked in either synthetic tissue fluid (STF) (pH=7.4) or butyric acid which was buffered at pH values of 4.4, 5.4 and 6.4. They were then incubated for 4 days at 37°C. The push-out test was performed by means of the universal testing machine. Specimens were then examined under a digital light microscope at 20× magnification to determine the nature of the bond failure. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test for pairwise comparisons. Results: The highest push-out bond strength (10.19±4.39) was seen in the pH level of 6.4, which was significantly different from the other groups (P<0.05). The values decreased to 2.42±2.25 MPa after exposure to pH value of 4.4. Conclusion: Lower pH value of highly acidic environments (pH=4.4), adversely affects the force needed for displacement of CEM cement; while in higher pH values (pH=6.4) the bond-strength was not affected. CEM cement is recommended in clinical situations where exposure to acidic environment is unavoidable. PMID:25386207

  16. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P < 0.0001). The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P = 0.0465). SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials. PMID:24987418

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Three Commercially Available Glass Ionomer Cements in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to comparatively evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of three commercially available glass ionomer cements - Miracle Mix (MM) (GC America Inc., Alsip, USA), Ketac Molar (KM) (3M Corp., Minnesota, USA) and amalgomer CR (AM) (Advanced Healthcare Ltd., Kent, England) in primary teeth and later examine the mode of the adhesive failure at the interface. Materials and Methods: Totally, 90 extracted sound primary molars were selected, and dentin on the buccal surface of crowns was exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the restorative materials being tested. SBS tests were performed, and the obtained values were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < 0.05). SBS mean values on were recorded in megapascals (MPa) and the mode of failure was assessed using a scanning electron microscope. Results: SBS (in MPa) was - MM-5.39, KM-4.84, AM-6.38. The predominant failure mode was cohesive. Conclusion: Amalgomer CR exhibited statistically significant higher SBS of 6.38 MPa to primary teeth and has better adhesion to the primary teeth compared to the other test materials and can be considered as a restorative material in pediatric dentistry. However, the results of this study should be corroborated with further investigation to reach a definitive conclusion. PMID:26464550

  18. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Conclusions: Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group. PMID:25713488

  19. An in vitro evaluation of the zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on its bonding to resin cement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Sun, Ting; Liu, Ruoyu; Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Shao, Longquan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) between zirconia and resin cement was investigated in this work. 160 zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into four groups according to surface treatments: (1) airborne-particle-abrasion treatment (APA); (2) glass infiltration and hydrofluoric acid treatment (GI+HF); (3) mesoporous zirconia coating (MZ); and (4) no treatment (C). The as-prepared zirconia specimens were bonded using Panavia F2.0 and RelyX Unicem. The MTBS values were tested using a universal testing machine, and data were analyzed using ANOVA and SNK methods (a=0.05). The MTBS values obtained after GI+HF and MZ treatments were significantly higher than those obtained after APA and C treatments (P<0.05), especially for samples cemented with Panavia F2.0. The results reveal that zirconia surface treatments using GI+HF and MZ yield higher bond strength than those using APA or C, regardless of the resin cements.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Various Glass Ionomer Cements to Dentin of Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Singh, Deepti J; Sibal, Gurleen K

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate and compare shear bond strength of various glass ionomer cements (GICs) to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and methods Sample size taken for the study was 72 deciduous molars with intact buccal or lingual surfaces. Samples were randomly divided into three groups, i.e., groups A, B, and C and were restored with conventional type II GIC, type II light cure (LC) GIC, and type IX GIC respectively. Thermocycling was done to simulate oral conditions. After 24 hours, shear bond strength was determined using Instron Universal testing Machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/ minute until fracture. Results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results It was found that the shear bond strength was highest in group B (LC GIC) 9.851 ± 1.620 MPa, followed by group C (type IX GIC) 7.226 ± 0.877 MPa, and was lowest in group A (conventional GIC) 4.931 ± 0.9735 MPa. Conclusion Light cure GIC was significantly better than type IX GIC and conventional GIC in terms of shear bond strength. How to cite this article Somani R, Jaidka S, Singh DJ, Sibal GK. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Various Glass Ionomer Cements to Dentin of Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):192-196. PMID:27843248

  1. The effect of moisture on the shear bond strength of gold alloy rods bonded to enamel with a self-adhesive and a hydrophobic resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Wiechmann, Dirk; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of enamel moisture on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a hydrophobic resin cement, Maximum Cure (MC), and a self-adhesive resin cement, Multilink Sprint (MLS), after etching of the enamel. Forty cylindrical gold alloy rods were used to simulate the Incognito lingual bracket system. They were bonded to the enamel of 40 human teeth embedded in self-cured acrylic resin. Twenty were bonded with MC (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel) and 20 with MLS (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel). The SBS of MC and MLS was determined in a universal testing machine and the site of bond failure was defined by the adhesive remnant index (ARI). A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed followed by Games-Howell post hoc pairwise comparison tests on the SBS results (P < 0.05) and a chi-square test was used for the analysis of ARI scores (P < 0.05). On dry enamel, no significant differences between MC (58 +/- 5 MPa) and MLS (64 +/- 13 MPa) were noted. On wet enamel, the adherence of MC (6 +/- 8 MPa) and MLS (37 +/- 13 MPa) significantly decreased but to a lesser extent for MLS. The ARI scores corroborated these results. In conclusion, MC did not tolerate moisture. MLS was also affected but maintained sufficient adherence.

  2. A novel cement-based hybrid material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasibulin, Albert G.; Shandakov, Sergey D.; Nasibulina, Larisa I.; Cwirzen, Andrzej; Mudimela, Prasantha R.; Habermehl-Cwirzen, Karin; Grishin, Dmitrii A.; Gavrilov, Yuriy V.; Malm, Jari E. M.; Tapper, Unto; Tian, Ying; Penttala, Vesa; Karppinen, Maarit J.; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2009-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are known to possess exceptional tensile strength, elastic modulus and electrical and thermal conductivity. They are promising candidates for the next-generation high-performance structural and multi-functional composite materials. However, one of the largest obstacles to creating strong, electrically or thermally conductive CNT/CNF composites is the difficulty of getting a good dispersion of the carbon nanomaterials in a matrix. Typically, time-consuming steps of purification and functionalization of the carbon nanomaterial are required. We propose a new approach to grow CNTs/CNFs directly on the surface of matrix particles. As the matrix we selected cement, the most important construction material. We synthesized in a simple one-step process a novel cement hybrid material (CHM), wherein CNTs and CNFs are attached to the cement particles. The CHM has been proven to increase 2 times the compressive strength and 40 times the electrical conductivity of the hardened paste, i.e. concrete without sand.

  3. The effect of dentin desensitizer on shear bond strength of conventional and self-adhesive resin luting cements after aging.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, B; Hartmann, R; Hartmann, L; Roos, M; Ozcan, M; Sailer, I; Hämmerle, C H F

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the impact of Gluma Desensitizer on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two conventional (RelyX ARC, Panavia 21) and two self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem) resin luting cements after water storage and thermocycling. Human third molars (N=880) were embedded in acrylic resin. The buccal dentin was exposed. Teeth were randomly divided into four main groups, and the following cements were adhered: 1) RelyX ARC, 2) Panavia 21, 3) RelyX Unicem, and 4) G-Cem. In half of the teeth in each group, dentin was treated with Gluma Desensitizer. In the conventional cement groups, the corresponding etchant and adhesive systems were applied. SBS of the cements was tested after 1 hour (initial); at 1, 4, 9, 16, and 25 days of water storage; and at 1, 4, 9, 16, and 25 days of thermocycling. SBS data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); this was followed by the post hoc Scheffé test and a t-test. Overall, the highest mean SBS (MPa) was obtained by RelyX ARC (ranging from 14.6 ± 3.9 to 17.6 ± 5.2) and the lowest by Panavia 21 in combination with Gluma Desensitizer (ranging from 0.0 to 2.9 ± 1.0). All tested groups with and without desensitizer showed no significant decrease after aging conditions compared with baseline values (p>0.05). Only the Panavia 21/Gluma Desensitizer combination showed a significant decrease after 4 days of thermocyling compared with initial values and 1 day thermocycling. Self-adhesive cements with Gluma Desensitizer showed increased SBS after aging conditions (ranging from 7.4 ± 1.4 to 15.2 ± 3) compared with groups without desensitizer (ranging from 2.6 ± 1.2 to 8.8 ± 2.9). No cohesive failures in dentin were observed in any of the test groups. Although self-adhesive cements with and without desensitizer presented mainly adhesive failures after water storage (95.8%) and thermocyling (100%), conventional cement (RelyX ARC) showed mainly mixed failures (90.8% and 89.2%, after water storage and thermocyling, respectively

  4. Effect of 4-MET- and 10-MDP-based primers on resin bonding to titanium.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimoto, Youhei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Mine, Atsushi; Nakamura, Mariko; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Kuboki, Takuo

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a 4-MET- and 10-MDP-based primer on the bond strength of two resin cements (SuperBond C&B, Sun Medical; Panavia Fluoro Cement, Kuraray) to titanium (Ti). Ti plates were treated with six experimental primers consisting of, respectively, 10-MDP and 4-MET in concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10wt%, or were kept untreated (control). The highest tensile bond strength of Panavia Fluoro Cement to Ti was obtained when the Ti surface was pre-treated with 10wt% 10-MDP and was significantly higher than that when a lower concentrated 10-MDP-based primer or any 4-MET-based primer was used. On the contrary, no significant difference in tensile bond strength of SuperBond C&B was found for the untreated and six pre-treated Ti surfaces, although pre-treatment with each 10-MDP-based primer resulted in a higher tensile bond strength as compared to any 4-MET pre-treatment. Altogether, the data obtained strongly suggest that 10-MDP is effective to improve the adhesive performance of resin to titanium.

  5. Evaluation of the Bond Strength of Resin Cements Used to Lute Ceramics on Laser-Etched Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Background data: Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Materials and methods: Two adhesive cements, one “etch-and-rinse” [Variolink II (V)] and one “self-etch” [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann–Whitney U test. Results: No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (p<0.05). Conclusions: Dentin surfaces prepared with lasers may provide comparable ceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used. PMID:24992276

  6. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  7. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Ajay; Pujar, Madhu; Patil, Chetan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of using a “post” for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. “Debonding” is the most common failure in fiber-reinforced composite type of posts. This study was aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive dual-cured luting agent (RelyX U100) with a total etch resin luting agent (Variolink II) used to cement two different FRC posts. Materials and Methods: Eighty human maxillary anterior single-rooted teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post space prepared and divided into four groups (n = 20); Group I: D.T. light post (RTD) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent), Group II: D.T. light post (RTD) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE), Group III: Glassix post (Nordin) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent) and Group IV: Glassix post (Nordin) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE). Each root was sectioned to get slices of 2 ± 0.05-mm thickness. Push-out tests were performed using a triaxial loading frame. To express bond strength in megapascals (Mpa), load value recorded in Newton (N) was divided by the area of the bonded interface. After testing the push-out strengths, the samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean values of the push-out bond strength show that Group I and Group III had significantly higher values than Group II and Group IV. The most common mode of failure observed was adhesive between dentin and luting material and between post and luting material. Conclusions: The mean push-out bond strengths were higher for Groups I and III where Variolink II resin cement was used for luting the fiber post, which is based on the total etch

  8. Surface treatment with a fractional CO2 laser enhances shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Alirezaei, Mehrnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The present study investigated the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia. Materials and methods: Ninety zirconia blocks were prepared and divided into 6 groups of 15 by treatment. Group 1 served as the control group, whereas groups 2 and 3 were treated with air abrasion and a universal primer (Monobond plus), respectively. The remaining zirconia copings were treated with a fractional CO2 laser for 10 seconds using 10 W/10 mJ (group 4), 10 w/14 mJ (group 5) or 20 W/10 mJ (group 6). A luting cement (Clearfil SA) was bonded to the treated zirconia surfaces and cured for 40 seconds. SBS was measured with a universal testing machine and the type of bond failure was determined. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in SBS among the study groups (p<0.001). The highest SBS values were observed in the groups treated with the fractional CO2 laser at settings of 20 W/10 mJ (28.1 MPa) or 10 W/14 mJ (27.4 MPa), followed by the specimens treated with the universal primer (22.8 MPa). The control specimens exhibited the lowest SBS (9.4 MPa) among the study groups (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the distribution of failure modes among the groups (p=0.871). Conclusions: The application of fractional CO2 laser can improve bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, and thus it could be considered as an appropriate alternative to conventional methods of zirconia surface treatment. PMID:27141151

  9. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    PubMed

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  10. The Effect of Chlorhexidine on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Adl, Alireza; Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat; Gavahian, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) on the push-out bond strength (BS) of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: Root-dentin slices from 60 single-rooted human teeth with the lumen diameter of 1.3 mm were used. The samples were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=15), and their lumens were filled with CEM cement mixed with either its specific provided liquid (groups 1 and 3) or 2% CHX (groups 2 and 4). The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 3 days (groups 1 and 2) and 21 days (groups 3 and 4). The push-out BS were measured using a universal testing machine. The slices were examined under a light microscope at 40× magnification to determine the nature of bond failure. The data were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA. For subgroup analysis the student t-test was applied. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: After three days, there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.892). In the 21-day specimens the BS in group 3 (CEM) was significantly greater than group 4 (CEM+CHX) (P=0.009). There was no significant difference in BS between 3 and 21-day samples in groups 2 and 4 (CEM+CHX) (P=0.44). However, the mean BS after 21 days was significantly greater compared to 3-day samples in groups 1 and 3 (P=0.015). The bond failure in all groups was predominantly of cohesive type. Conclusion: Mixing of CEM with 2% CHX had an adverse effect the bond strength of this cement. PMID:25598812

  11. Bonding material containing ashes after domestic waste incineration for cementation of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Varlakov, A.P.; Gorbunova, O.A.; Arustamov, A.E.; Barinov, A.S.

    2007-07-01

    It is known that cement minerals hydration is accompanied with heat emission. Heat of hardening influences formation of a cement compound structure and its properties. It is important to reduce the heat quantity at continuous cementation of waste and filling of compartments of a repository or containers by a cement grout. For reduction of heating, it is necessary to use cement of mineral additives (fuel ashes, slag and hydraulic silica). Properties of ashes after domestic waste incineration can be similar to ones of fly fuel ashes. However, ash after domestic waste incineration is toxic industrial waste as it contains toxic elements (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, Zn). Utilization of secondary waste (slag and ash) of combustion plants is an important environmental approach to solving cities' issues. Results of the research have shown that ashes of combustion plants can be used for radioactive waste conditioning. Co-processing of toxic and radioactive waste is ecologically and economically effective. At SIA 'Radon', experimental batches of cement compositions are used for cementation of oil containing waste. (authors)

  12. Relationship between apatite-forming ability and mechanical properties of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement modified with calcium salts and alkoxysilane.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Kawachi, Giichiro; Kikuta, Koichi; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2008-03-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based bone cement is used for the fixation of artificial joints in orthopaedics. However, the fixation is liable to loosen in the body, because the cement does not bond to living bone. So-called bioactive ceramics bond directly to living bone through the apatite layer formed on their surfaces in the body. We previously revealed that modification using gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and water-soluble calcium salts such as calcium acetate and calcium hydroxide was effective for providing the PMMA-based bone cement with apatite-forming ability in a simulated body fluid (SBF, Kokubo solution) that closely reproduces the body environment. However, the effect of the chemical reaction forming the apatite on the mechanical properties of the cements has not been clarified. The present work aimed to investigate this issue from the viewpoint of the interface structure between the apatite and the cement. The surface of the cement modified with calcium acetate and MPS was fully covered with newly formed apatite after soaking in Kokubo solution within 7 days, while half of the surface area of the cement modified with calcium hydroxide and MPS was covered with the apatite. The bending strength of the modified cements decreased after soaking in Kokubo solution. Porous structure was observed in the region about 50-100 microm in depth from the top surface because of release of the Ca2+ ions by both modified cements after soaking in Kokubo solution. The decrease in bending strength of the modified cements could be attributed to the formation of the pores. In addition, the pores on the top surfaces of the cements were filled with the newly formed apatite. The apatite formation would be effective not only for bioactivity but also for decreasing the reduction of mechanical strength.

  13. Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resins compared to resin cements with etch and rinse adhesives to enamel and dentin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lührs, A-K; Guhr, S; Günay, H; Geurtsen, W

    2010-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements should ease the placement of dental restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate their shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. Sixty molars were randomly assigned to 12 test groups (each n = 10), and the approximal surfaces were ground flat to get an enamel and dentin surface with a diameter of at least 4 mm. Ceramic specimens were bonded to the surfaces with either Variolink/Syntac Classic (VSC), Panavia F2.0 (PAF), RelyX Unicem (RLX), Maxcem Elite (MCE), iCem (IC), or an experimental self-adhesive resin cement (EXP). The shear bond strength (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min) was measured after 24-h storage in NaCl (37 degrees C). The fracture modes were determined with a stereomicroscope (magnification, 8-50-fold). VSC had the highest shear bond strength within the enamel groups (42.9 +/- 9 MPa) and IC the lowest (10.5 +/- 4.2 MPa, p < 0.001). The highest dentin shear bond strength was determined for VSC (39.2 +/- 8.9 MPa, p < 0.001) and the lowest for EXP (7.8 +/- 3.9 MPa, p < 0.001). Self-adhesive resin cements fractured mainly between resin and enamel or dentin. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements was inferior compared to conventional composite resin cements.

  14. Comparison of the shear bond strengths of conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Isabel Cristina Prado Torres; Pignatta, Lilian Maria Brisque; Arantes, Flávia de Moraes; Santos, Eduardo César Almada

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare in vitro the shear bond strength between metallic brackets (Abzil) with conventional mesh bases and metallic brackets with bases industrially sandblasted with aluminum oxide using three adhesive systems, in order to assess the influence of sandblasting on adhesiveness and to compare 3 different bonding systems. Two hundred and forty bovine incisors were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (40 teeth in each group), according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. The brackets were direct-bonded in bovine teeth with 3 adhesive systems: System A - conventional Transbond XT (3M - Unitek); System B - Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer + Transbond XT (3M - Unitek) and System C - Fuji ORTHO LC resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement in capsules (GC Corp.). Shear bond strength tests were performed 24 hours after bonding, in a DL-3000 universal testing machine (EMIC), using a load cell of 200 kgf and a speed of 1 mm/min. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and showed no significant difference between conventional and sandblasted bracket bases. However, comparison between the bonding systems presented significantly different results. System A (14.92 MPa) and system C (13.24 MPa) presented statistically greater shear bond strength when compared to system B (10.66 MPa). There was no statistically significant difference between system A and system C.

  15. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Giannini, Marcelo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm) were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C); 2- silane priming (SI); 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA); 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF); 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12). Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.

  16. The effects of tooth preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to contaminated dentin.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of a self-adhesive luting cement after using four different techniques to remove surface contamination on dentin. Extracted human molars were flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for full crown preparation. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at room temperature with 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were randomly divided into four groups, and excess provisional cement was removed with (1) a hand instrument (excavator), (2) prophy with a mixture of flour pumice and water (3) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 microm at 40 psi and (4) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 50 microm at 40 psi. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated and residual materials were detected using SEM and EDS analysis of randomly selected specimens. The ceramics were treated with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized to the prepared dentin prior to cementing with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE). The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Particle abrasion treatment of dentin with an aluminous oxide particle provided the highest values of bond strength, while hand instrument excavation was the lowest (p < 0.05). Aluminous oxide particle size did not significantly influence the bond strength at 40 psi. The use of low pressure and small particle abrasion treated dentin as a mechanical cleansing protocol prior to definitive cementation increased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin-luting cement to dentin following eugenol-containing temporary cement.

  17. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  18. [Bonding of glass ionomer cement to dentin. An in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Lopez, S; Perez Gutierrez, I; Navajas Rodriguez de Mondelo, J M

    1991-01-01

    It's been studied "in vitro" the influence of the "Smear Layer" on the cement adhesión of the glass ionomer to the dentin. Using phosphoric acid at 37% and poliacrylic in the dentin during short periods of time, the adhesion between the cement and the dentin is improved because the Smear Layer is removed totally in the case of phosphoric acid and partially in the case of polyacrylic acid.

  19. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  20. Sequestration of phosphorus from wastewater by cement-based or alternative cementitious materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jiding; Kong, Yaping; Shi, Xianming

    2014-10-01

    Cement-based and alternative cementitious materials were tested in the laboratory for their capability of removing phosphate from wastewater. The results demonstrated that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were suitable for describing the adsorption characteristics of these materials. Among the four types of filter media tested, the cement-based mortar A has the highest value of maximum adsorption (30.96 mg g(-1)). The P-bonding energy (KL) and adsorption capacity (K) exhibited a positive correlation with the total content of Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in each mortar. The maximum amount of P adsorbed (Qm) and adsorption intensity (1/n) exhibited a positive correlation with the CaO content in each mortar. For three of them, the P-removal rates were in excess of 94 percent for phosphorus concentrations ranging from 20 to 1000 mg L(-1). The underlying mechanisms were examined using field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM), coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results reveal that the removal of phosphate predominantly followed a precipitation mechanism in addition to weak physical interactions between the surface of adsorbent filter media and the metallic salts of phosphate. The use of cement-based or alternative cementitious materials in the form of ground powder shows great promise for developing a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable technology for P-sequestration and for wastewater treatment.

  1. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  2. The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applied or not:Panavia F2.0 (P), Panavia F2.0 using Primer (PRIME Plus, Bisco Inc, Schaumburg, IL, USA) (PZ), Superbond C&B (S), and Superbond C&B using Primer (SZ). For each of the groups, the cementation was conducted. The specimens were kept in sterilized water (37℃) for 24 hours. Retentive forces were tested and measured, and a statistical analysis was carried out. The nature of failure was recorded. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of retentive force in Newton for each group were 265.15 ± 35.04 N (P), 318.21 ± 22.24 N (PZ), 445.13 ± 78.54 N (S) and 508.21 ± 79.48 N (SZ). Superbond C&B groups (S & SZ) showed significantly higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0 groups (P & PZ). In Panavia F2.0 groups, the use of primer was found to contribute to the increase of retentive force. On the other hand, in Superbond C&B groups, the use of primer did not influence the retention forces. Adhesive failure was observed in all groups. CONCLUSION This study suggests that cementation of the zirconia abutments and zirconia copings with Superbond C&B have a higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0. When using Panavia F2.0, the use of primer increases the retentive force. PMID:23755347

  3. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Khosravanifard, Behnam; Rakhshan, Vahid; Araghi, Solmaz; Parhiz, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on composite-to-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI). Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25). All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent) and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC). The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h) and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min). The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was scored under ×10 magni-fication. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’sexact test (α=0.05). Results The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The dif-ference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test). SBS of both control (P=0.014) and experimental (P=0.000) groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments), which de-serves further studies. PMID:22991638

  4. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  5. Characterization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using a novel hydroxyapatite-based formulation.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Santa Cruz, Grace; Goebel, W Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2009-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements are typically prepared using beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) as the base component. However, hydroxyapatite (HA) is an interesting alternative because of its potential for reducing cement acidity, as well as modulating cement properties via ionic substitutions. In the present study, we have characterized DCPD cements prepared with a novel formulation based on monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and HA. Cements were prepared using a 4:1 MCPM:HA molar ratio. The reactivity of HA in this system was verified by showing DCPD formation using poorly crystalline HA, as well as highly crystalline HA. Evaluation of cements prepared with poorly crystalline HA revealed that setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system, and that the use of a setting regulator is necessary to maintain workability of the cement paste. Compressive testing showed that MCPM/HA cements have strengths comparable to what has previously been published for DCPD cements. However, preliminary in vitro analysis of cement degradation revealed that conversion of DCPD to HA may occur much more rapidly in the MCPM/HA system compared to cements prepared with beta-TCP. Future studies should investigate this property further, as it could have important implications for the use of HA-based DCPD cement formulations.

  6. Bonding Ni-Cr alloy to tooth structure with adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Penugonda, B; Scherer, W; Cooper, H; Kokoletsos, N; Koifman, V

    1992-01-01

    This study was to determine the shear bond strengths of Ni-Cr alloy to Ni-Cr alloy (Group I), Ni-Cr alloy to enamel (Group II), and Ni-Cr alloy to dentin (Group III) using Imperva Dual, DC Metabond, All-Bond, Geristore, and Panavia. All bonded specimens were thermocycled 2000 x (5 degrees C-55 degrees C) after 24 hours and subjected to shear bond testing on a Universal Instron Testing Machine. In all groups of the study, Imperva Dual and CB Metabond had significantly (p < .05) higher bond values than Panavia.

  7. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Renata Andreza Talaveira; COUTINHO, Margareth; CARDOZO, Pedro Igor; da SILVA, Larissa Alves; ZORZATTO, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. Objective this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C), medium (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root. Material and methods Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group): group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37ºC for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. Results Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05). Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3%) than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%), ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0%) and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3%) (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05). Conclusions Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity. PMID:21710099

  8. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John

    2008-07-07

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

  9. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    SciTech Connect

    Kopanitsa, Natalya Sarkisov, Yurij Gorshkova, Aleksandra Demyanenko, Olga

    2016-01-15

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  10. Microwave nondestructive detection of chloride in cement based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benally, Aaron D.; Bois, Karl J.; Nowak, Paul S.; Zoughi, Reza

    1999-12-01

    Preliminary results pertaining to the near-field microwave nondestructive detection and evaluation of chloride in cement paste and mortar specimens are presented. The technique used for this purpose utilizes an open-ended rectangular waveguide at the aperture of which the reflection properties of the specimens are measured. It is shown that the magnitude of reflection coefficient is a useful parameter for detecting chloride in these specimens. Furthermore, the difference in the amount of chloride present in these various specimens, at the time of mixing, can also be determined. Reflection property measurements were conducted in S-band (2.6 GHz-3.95 GHz) and X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) for two sets of four mortar specimens with 0.50 and 0.60 water-to-cement ratio and varying salt (NaCl) contents added to the mixing water used in producing these specimens. It is shown that the reflection properties of these materials vary considerably as a function of their chloride content. Also, by monitoring the daily variation in the reflection coefficient of each specimen during the curing period, the effect of chloride on curing can be nondestructively ascertained. Finally, it is shown that the detection and evaluation of chloride content in cement based materials can be performed using a simple comparative process with respect to a non-contaminated specimen.

  11. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanitsa, Natalya; Sarkisov, Yurij; Gorshkova, Aleksandra; Demyanenko, Olga

    2016-01-01

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  12. Microwave nondestructive detection of chloride in cement based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benally, Aaron D.; Bois, Karl J.; Zoughi, Reza; Nowak, Paul S.

    1999-12-02

    Preliminary results pertaining to the near-field microwave nondestructive detection and evaluation of chloride in cement paste and mortar specimens are presented. The technique used for this purpose utilizes an open-ended rectangular waveguide at the aperture of which the reflection properties of the specimens are measured. It is shown that the magnitude of reflection coefficient is a useful parameter for detecting chloride in these specimens. Furthermore, the difference in the amount of chloride present in these various specimens, at the time of mixing, can also be determined. Reflection property measurements were conducted in S-band (2.6 GHz-3.95 GHz) and X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) for two sets of four mortar specimens with 0.50 and 0.60 water-to-cement ratio and varying salt (NaCl) contents added to the mixing water used in producing these specimens. It is shown that the reflection properties of these materials vary considerably as a function of their chloride content. Also, by monitoring the daily variation in the reflection coefficient of each specimen during the curing period, the effect of chloride on curing can be nondestructively ascertained. Finally, it is shown that the detection and evaluation of chloride content in cement based materials can be performed using a simple comparative process with respect to a non-contaminated specimen.

  13. Peen treatment on a titanium implant: effect of roughness, osteoblast cell functions, and bonding with bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Morshed; Riahinezhad, Shahram; Sultana, Fariha; Vaughan, Melville B; Knight, Joshua; Morris, Tracy L

    2016-01-01

    Implant failure due to poor integration of the implant with the surrounding biomaterial is a common problem in various orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. Implant fixation mostly depends upon the implant surface topography. Micron to nanosize circular-shaped groove architecture with adequate surface roughness can enhance the mechanical interlock and osseointegration of an implant with the host tissue and solve its poor fixation problem. Such groove architecture can be created on a titanium (Ti) alloy implant by laser peening treatment. Laser peening produces deep, residual compressive stresses in the surfaces of metal parts, delivering increased fatigue life and damage tolerance. The scientific novelty of this study is the controlled deposition of circular-shaped rough spot groove using laser peening technique and understanding the effect of the treatment techniques for improving the implant surface properties. The hypothesis of this study was that implant surface grooves created by controlled laser peen treatment can improve the mechanical and biological responses of the implant with the adjoining biomaterial. The objective of this study was to measure how the controlled laser-peened groove architecture on Ti influences its osteoblast cell functions and bonding strength with bone cement. This study determined the surface roughness and morphology of the peen-treated Ti. In addition, this study compared the osteoblast cell functions (adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation) between control and peen-treated Ti samples. Finally, this study measured the fracture strength between each kind of Ti samples and bone cement under static loading. This study found that laser peen treatment on Ti significantly changed the surface architecture of the Ti, which led to enhanced osteoblast cell adhesion and differentiation on Ti implants and fracture strength of Ti–bone cement interfaces compared with values of untreated Ti samples. Therefore, the laser peen treatment

  14. Effects of tree species and wood particle size on the properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufacturing from tree prunings.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Ramadan A; Al-Mefarrej, H A; Abdel-Aal, M A; Alshahrani, T S

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the possibility of using the prunings of six locally grown tree species in Saudi Arabia for cement-bonded particleboard (CBP) production. Panels were made using four different wood particle sizes and a constant wood/cement ratio (1/3 by weight) and target density (1200 kg/m3). The mechanical properties and dimensional stability of the produced panels were determined. The interfacial area and distribution of the wood particles in cement matrix were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that the panels produced from these pruning materials at a target density of 1200 kg m(-3) meet the strength and dimensional stability requirements of the commercial CBP panels. The mean moduli of rupture and elasticity (MOR and MOE) ranged from 9.68 to 11.78 N mm2 and from 3952 to 5667 N mm2, respectively. The mean percent water absorption for twenty four hours (WA24) ranged from 12.93% to 23.39%. Thickness swelling values ranged from 0.62% to 1.53%. For CBP panels with high mechanical properties and good dimensional stability, mixed-size or coarse particles should be used. Using the tree prunings for CBPs production may help to solve the problem of getting rid of these residues by reducing their negative effects on environment, which are caused by poor disposal of such materials through direct combustion process and appearance of black cloud and then the impact on human health or the random accumulation and its indirect effects on the environment.

  15. The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55℃. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392

  16. Bond Mechanisms in Fiber Reinforced Cement-Based Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    such as latex, fly ash, and microsilica . 0 Also the medium from which the fiber was pulled out included a control mix without fibers, mixes with 1...significant improvement in the peak load (up to four times), but has no effect on the post-peak response. The addition of microsilica does not seem to...strength decreases with addition of microsilica and increases drastically with the addition of latex. Parameswaran and Rajagopalan [48] recognized the fact

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Push Out Bond Strength of a Fiber Post System using Four Different Resin Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anshuraj Kopal Ashok Kumar; Muddugangadhar, B C; Amarnath, G S; Garg, Ashu; Kumar, Ullash; Rao, T R Poonam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Debonding is one of the frequent causes of failure experienced in fiber-reinforced composite posts, and establish along post space-dentin adhesive interface. The purpose of this study was to assess push-out bond strength of a fiber-reinforced post system using four different resin cements. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study 40 mandibular premolars were decoronated, and roots were treated endodontically. Following the post space preparation, the roots were grouped into four groups of 10 specimens each. Fiber-reinforced composite posts were cemented with four resin cement systems: (a) Multilink Speed, (b) Rely X Unicem, (c) Calibra, and (d) Permaflo DC. Three sections of each root, with a thickness of 3 mm, were prepared. The push-out test was with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min, and bond strength values were evaluated. The data were analyzed with using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and post-hoc Scheffe test. Result: The mean push-out bond strength was highest for Rely X Unicem (18.0 ± 1.81), followed by Multilink Speed (13.1 ± 0.75) and Permaflo DC (12.8 ± 0.95). The lowest mean push-out bond strength was seen with Calibra (11.8 ± 0.69). There were statistically significant differences seen in the push-out bond strength of resin cement in different root canal regions using MANOVA and post-hoc Scheffe test. Conclusion: Mean push-out bond strength was highest for Rely X Unicem, followed by Multilink Speed and Permaflo DC. Lowest mean push-out bond strength was seen with respect to Calibra. PMID:26225108

  18. Bond Strength of Two Resin Cements to Dentin After Disinfection Pretreatment: Effects of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Compared with Chemical Antibacterial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Fekrazad, Reza; Shafiei, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study compared the effects of two disinfection procedures (2% chlorhexidine [CHX] solution versus Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation) on the shear bond strength of ED primer II/Panavia F2.0 (ED/P) and Excite DSC/Variolink N (Ex/V). Background data: Different methods are used for cavity disinfection prior to adhesive cementation, which may influence the bonding ability of resin cements. Methods: Flat dentin surfaces were prepared on 100 extracted premolars and randomly divided into 10 groups. In the eight experimental groups, indirect composite samples were cemented with either ED/P or Ex/V under three disinfecting conditions on the dentin surface as follows: (1) CHX application before ED primer II/ after etching, (2) wet laser irradiation (Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 20 Hz, 0.75 W, 15% water +15% air), (3) dry laser irradiation with no water and air cooling. The control groups had no disinfectant application. After 24 h water storage, bond strength test was performed. The data (MPa) were analyzed using two way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: The lowest and highest bond strengths were obtained by dry laser and wet laser (10.18±2.67 and 17.36±2.94 for ED/P, 9.64±2.66 and 20.07±3.36 for Ex/V, respectively). For each cement, two-by-two comparisons of four groups revealed significant differences only for dry laser with others (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of CHX and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at the low fluences with water/air cooling as the antibacterial agents does not adversely influence the bonding ability of the etch-and-rinse and the self-etch cements. PMID:23600378

  19. Comparison of The Effect of Implant Abutment Surface Modifications on Retention of Implant-Supported Restoration with A Polymer Based Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Nabaprakash; Lakshmi, Namratha; Azhagarasan, N.S.; Agnihotri, Yoshaskam; Rajan, Manoj; Hariharan, Ramasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Background: In cement-retained implant-supported restoration it is important to gain adequate retention of definitive restoration as well as retrievability of prosthesis. The surface of the abutment, alloy of the restoration and the type of cement used influences the retention of the restoration. There is a need to analyze the influence of surface modifications of abutments on the retentive capabilities of provisional implant cements. Purpose of study: To compare the effect of implant abutment surface modifications on retention of implant-supported restoration cemented with polymer based cement. Materials and method: Thirty solid titanium implant abutments (ADIN), 8mm height, were divided into 3 groups. Ten abutments with retentive grooves (Group I) as supplied by the manufacturer, Ten abutments milled to 20 taper circumferentially (Group II), and Ten abutments milled and air-abraded with 110 μm aluminum oxide (Group III) were used in this study. Ni-Cr coping were casted for each abutment and polymer based cement was used to secure them to the respective abutments. Using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/minute, tensile bond strength was recorded (N). Results: Mean tensile bond strength of Group I, II and III were found to be 408.3, 159.9 and 743.8 Newton respectively. The values were statistically different from each other (p<0.001). Conclusion: Abutments with milled and sandblasted surface provide the highest retention followed by abutments with retentive grooves and then by abutments with milled surface when cast copings were cemented to implant abutments with polymer based cement. Clinical implications: Retention of restoration depends on the surface of the abutment as well as the luting agents used. Incorporation of retentive grooves or particle abrasion can enhance retention especially in situation of short clinical crown. PMID:24596785

  20. Plasma nitriding of titanium alloy: Effect of roughness, hardness, biocompatibility, and bonding with bone cement.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Morshed; Riahinezhad, Shahram; Li, Yanling; Vaughan, Melville B; Sultana, Fariha; Morris, Tracy L; Phinney, Lucas; Hossain, Khalid

    2016-11-25

    Titanium (Ti) alloys have been widely used in orthopedics and orthodontic surgeries as implants because of their beneficial chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. Improvement of these properties of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V Eli, is possible by the use of plasma nitriding treatment on the Ti alloy. The novelty of this study is the evaluation of a DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment method on the surface, mechanical and biological properties of Ti alloy. Specifically, this study measured the chemical states, roughness, hardness, and biocompatibility of plasma nitride treated Ti-6Al-4V Eli as well as determined the effect of plasma treatment on the fracture strength between the Ti alloy and bone clement. This study hypothesized that DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment may alter the surface chemical and mechanical states of the Ti alloy that may influence the fracture strength of implant/cement interfaces under static load. This study found that plasma nitride treatment on Ti alloy does not have effect on the roughness and biocompatibility (P value > 0.5), but significantly effect on the hardness and fracture strength of Ti-bone cement interfaces compared to those values of untreated Ti samples (P value < 0.5). Therefore, the DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treated Ti alloy can potentially be used for orthopedic applications.

  1. Dentin bond strength of two resin-ceramic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) materials and five cements after six months storage.

    PubMed

    Flury, Simon; Schmidt, Stefanie Zita; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to investigate dentin bond strength of two resin-ceramic materials and five cements after 24 h and six months storage. Cylinders (n=15/group) of Lava Ultimate (3M ESPE) and VITA ENAMIC (VITA Zahnfabrik) were cemented to mid-coronal dentin of 300 extracted human molars with RelyX Ultimate (3M ESPE), PANAVIA F2.0 (Kuraray), Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), els cem (Saremco Dental), or Ketac Cem Plus (3M ESPE). Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured after 24 h or six months storage (37°C, 100% humidity) and statistically analyzed (significance level: α=0.05). SBS varied markedly between Lava Ultimate and VITA ENAMIC, between the five cements, and between storage of either 24 h or six months. After six months, SBS was highest when Lava Ultimate was cemented with RelyX Ultimate and when VITA ENAMIC was cemented with RelyX Ultimate or with Variolink II. Lava Ultimate was somewhat more sensitive to storage than was VITA ENAMIC.

  2. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Lee, Yoon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n = 10). They were treated as follows: untreated (control), Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P < 0.05). Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:26539485

  3. Effects of metal primers on bonding of adhesive resin cement to noble alloys for porcelain fusing.

    PubMed

    Okuya, Nobuhiro; Minami, Hiroyuki; Kurashige, Hisanori; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of metal primers on the bonding of adhesive resin to four pure metals (Au, Pd, Ag, Cu) and two noble alloys for porcelain fusing (high-gold and high-palladium content alloys). Bonding surface was polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and primed with one of the three metal primers (V-Primer, Metaltite, and M.L. Primer). Bonded specimens were fabricated by applying adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B) on the primed surface. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C for 2,000 cycles). The highest SBS values to each pure metal after thermocycling were 33.5 MPa for Au by M.L. Primer, 35.0 MPa for Ag by V-Primer, and 34.4 MPa for Cu by Metaltite. SBS to high-gold content alloy after thermocycling was 33.3 MPa by M.L. Primer. None of the primers was effective for pure Pd and high-palladium content alloy after thermocycling.

  4. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hajime; Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire; Carro-Mateo, Beatriz; Collier, Nick; Milestone, Neil

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  5. Response of a PGNAA setup for pozzolan-based cement concrete specimens.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Garwan, M A; Maslehuddin, M; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B; Raashid, M

    2010-01-01

    Pozzolanic materials are added to Portland cement concrete to increase its durability, particularly corrosion-resistance. In this study the elemental composition of a pozzolanic cement concrete was measured non-destructively utilizing an accelerator-based Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup. The optimum size of the pozzolanic cement concrete specimen was obtained through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results were experimentally verified through the gamma-ray yield measurement from the pozzolanic cement concrete specimens as a function of their radii. The concentration of the pozzolanic material in the cement concrete specimens was evaluated by measuring gamma-ray yield for calcium and iron from pozzolanic cement concrete specimens containing 5-80 wt% pozzolan. A good agreement was noted between the experimental values and the Monte Carlo simulation results, indicating an excellent response of the KFUPM accelerator-based PGNAA setup for pozzolan based concrete.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  7. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSAbond strength was achieved with Sb+Si treatment. SEM revealed that sandblasting roughened surfaces.

  8. Intrafibrillar mineralization of polyacrylic acid-bound collagen fibrils using a two-dimensional collagen model and Portland cement-based resins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiyu; Gu, Lisha; Huang, Zihua; Sun, Qiurong; Chen, Huimin; Ling, Junqi; Mai, Sui

    2017-02-01

    The biomimetic remineralization of apatite-depleted dentin is a potential method for enhancing the durability of resin-dentin bonding. To advance this strategy from its initial proof-of-concept design, we sought to investigate the characteristics of polyacrylic acid (PAA) adsorption to desorption from type I collagen and to test the mineralization ability of PAA-bound collagen. Portland cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were homogenized with a hydrophilic resin blend to produce experimental resins. The collagen fibrils reconstituted on nickel (Ni) grids were mineralized using different methods: (i) group I consisted of collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in simulated body fluid (SBF); (ii) group II consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in SBF; and (iii) group III consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with β-TCP-doped Portland cement-based resin in deionized water. Intrafibrillar mineralization was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. We found that a carbonyl-associated peak at pH 3.0 increased as adsorption time increased, whereas a hydrogen bond-associated peak increased as desorption time increased. The experimental resins maintained an alkaline pH and the continuous release of calcium ions. Apatite was detected within PAA-bound collagen in groups II and III. Our results suggest that PAA-bound type I collagen fibrils can be mineralized using Portland cement-based resins.

  9. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; Lima, Felipe Coelho; Saboia, Vicente de Paula Aragão; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby de Souza; Neves, Aline de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M) to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8) according to the filling material, (1) AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH)/Gutta-Percha cone; (2) Epiphany SE (Pentron)/Resilon cone; (3) RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in bond strength between AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p > 0.05). Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials. PMID:25383347

  10. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Nobuaki, ARAO; Keiichi, YOSHIDA; Takashi, SAWASE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS) and Block HC (BHC)] were pretreated as follows: (a) no treatment (None), (b) application of a ceramic primer (CP), (c) alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB), (d) AB followed by CP (AB+CP), and (e) glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB) followed by CP (GBB+CP). The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS) and ResiCem (RC)]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0) and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C) were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05). Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p<0.05). AB showed significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than the None group, while CP did not (p<0.05). GBB exhibited smaller surface defects than did AB; however, their surface roughnesses were not significantly different (p>0.05). The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05), but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05). Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP. PMID:26814465

  11. Nondestructive evaluation of the mechanical behavior of cement-based nanocomposites under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tragazikis, I. K.; Dalla, P. T.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dassios, K.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The present paper describes the acoustic emission (AE) behavior and the mechanical properties of Portlant cement-based mortars due to the addition of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This research aims in investigating the crack growth behavior of modified cement mortar with MWCNTs that act as nanoreinforcement during an unaxial compression test using acoustic emission technique. MWCNTs were used in various concentrations inside the matrix. Density, sound's speed, modulus, bending strength, compression strength were studied for five different concentrations. The adding and the increase of MWCNTs concentrations upper to 0.2 % by weight of cement not improving the mechanical properties of cement-based mortar but increase the acoustic emission activity.

  12. Cement-based grouts in geological disposal of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Onofrei, M.

    1996-04-01

    The behavior and performance of a specially developed high-performance cement-based grout has been studied through a combined laboratory and in situ research program conducted under the auspices of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP). A new class of cement-based grouts - high-performance grouts-with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures was developed and investigated. These high-performance grouts, which were injected into fractures in the granitic rock at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada, are shown to successfully reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass from <10{sup -7} m s{sup -1} to 10{sup -9} m s{sup -1} and to penetrate fissures in the rock with apertures as small as 10 {mu}m. Furthermore, the laboratory studies have shown that this high - performance grout has very low hydraulic conductivity and is highly leach resistant under repository conditions. Microcracks generated in this materials from shrinkage, overstressing or thermal loads are likely to self-seal. The results of these studies suggest that the high-performance grouts can be considered as viable materials in disposal-vault sealing applications. Further work is needed to fully justify extrapolation of the results of the laboratory studies to time scales relevant to performance assessment.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a new vertebroplasty cement based on gold-containing PMMA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Eva; Saralidze, Ketie; Roth, Alex K; de Jong, Joost J A; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Lataster, Arno; Brans, Boudewijn T; Knetsch, Menno L W; Djordjevic, Ivan; Willems, Paul C; Koole, Leo H

    2016-03-01

    There are a number of drawbacks to incorporating large concentrations of barium sulfate (BaSO4) as the radiopacifier in PMMA-based bone cements for percutaneous vertebroplasty. These include adverse effects on injectability, viscosity profile, setting time, mechanical properties of the cement and bone resorption. We have synthesized a novel cement that is designed to address some of these drawbacks. Its powder includes PMMA microspheres in which gold particles are embedded and its monomer is the same as that used in commercial cements for vertebroplasty. In comparison to one such commercial cement brand, VertaPlex™, the new cement has longer doughing time, longer injection time, higher compressive strength, higher compressive modulus, and is superior in terms of cytotoxicity. For augmentation of fractured fresh-frozen cadaveric vertebral bodies (T6-L5) using simulated vertebroplasty, results for compressive strength and compressive stiffness of the construct and the percentage of the volume of the vertebral body filled by the cement were comparable for the two cements although the radiopacity of the new cement was significantly lower than that for VertaPlex™. The present results indicate that the new cement warrants further study.

  14. Rheology of bauxite-based low-cement shotcreting castables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianxin

    Continuous research efforts on castable technology since two decades have lead to the transformation of placement mode from vibrating to self-flow to pumping and shotcreting. Shotcreting (an installation process of self-flow castables by combining pumping and shooting), as a high efficient installation technique, has demanded castable composition with specific characteristics in terms of rheology. Though, the understanding on self-low castable technology is appreciable, the state-of-art on shotcreting has not yet been revealed and the literature on this area is scarce. This demands an in-depth research on this particular subject. The goal of the current investigation is to develop a predictive method of shotcreting castable with good pumpability and self-flowability through rheological approach and to validate the approach through shotcreting trial. A bauxite-based low-cement self-flow castable has been chosen for this purpose. Basically, three test methods have been adopted to fulfill the stated purpose: flow table test, viscometer and a new rheometer. A rheometer has been used to measure the rheological behavior of chosen castables. Through this, two rheological constants are obtained which are used to predict the pumpability of chosen system. This approach has overcome the drawback of measuring rheology of fine matrix portion only to predict the castable behaviors. Fine matrix rheology has also been evaluated using viscometer for comparison purpose. The relationship between viscometer and rheometer measurement are analysed. To support the results of rheometer and viscometer, conductivity measurement on fine matrix portion, exothermic profile measurement on castable mix, mechanical and physical properties measurements after drying and the appearance of castable green bodies are also carried out. The whole work is divided into four stages. In stage I, all raw materials used in this work, including bauxites, cements, microsilicas, reactive aluminas, have been

  15. Photochromic supramolecular azopolyimides based on hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa; Flakus, Henryk; Jarczyk-Jedryka, Anna; Konieczkowska, Jolanta; Siwy, Mariola; Bijak, Katarzyna; Sobolewska, Anna; Stumpe, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    The approach of deriving new photoresponsive active supramolecular azopolymers based on the hydrogen bonds is described. Polymers with imide rings, i.e., poly(esterimide)s and poly(etherimide)s, with phenolic hydroxyl or carboxylic groups were applied as matrixes for the polymer-dye supramolecular systems. Supramolecular films were built on the basis of the hydrogen bonds between the functional groups of the polymers and various azochromophores, that is, 4-phenylazophenol, 4-[4-(6-hydroxyhexyloxy)phenylazo]benzene, 4-[4-(6-hexadecaneoxy)phenylazo]pyridine and 4-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)pyridine. The hydrogen bonding interaction in azo-systems were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and for selected assembles by 1H NMR technique. The obtained polyimide azo-assembles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and DSC measurements. H-bonds allow attaching a chromophore to each repeating unit of the polymer, thereby suppressing the macroscopic phase separation except for the systems based on 4-[4-(6-hydroxyhexyloxy)phenylazo]benzene. H-bonds systems were amorphous and revealed glass transition temperatures lower than for the polyimide matrixes (170-260 °C). The photoresponsive behavior of the azo-assemblies was tasted in holographic recording experiment.

  16. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for iron-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels. The Cr-Si ferrite layers have proven to be very resistant to high temperature cyclic oxidation and to pitting in aqueous solutions. The process has been patented, and is being transferred for industrial application, e.g. for water walls of utility boilers, etc. In the proposed extension of this project, the use of mixed pure metal powders in the pack will be extended to achieve similar ferrite Fe-Cr-Al coatings with excellent oxidation resistance, with the eventual transfer of the technology to industry. In other recent studies, Ni-base alloy rods were aluminized by the halide-activated pack cementation process to bring their average composition to that for the ORNL-developed Ni{sub 3}Al, for use as a welding rod. A similar effort to develop a welding rod for the ORNL Fe{sub 3}Al alloy did not yield reproducible coating compositions or growth kinetics. The continued effort to produce Duriron-type (Fe-18Si-5Cr) coatings on steels was not successful. Literature for the intrinsic diffusion coefficients suggests that this task cannot be achieved.

  17. Hybrid Polyvinyl Alcohol and Cellulose Fiber Pulp Instead of Asbestos Fibers in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrieh, M. M.; Mahmoudi, A.; Shadkam, H. R.

    2015-05-01

    The Taguchi method was used to determine the optimum content of a four-parameters cellulose fiber pulp, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers, a silica fume, and bentonite for cement-based composite sheets. Then cement composite sheets from the hybrid of PVA and the cellulose fiber pulp were manufactured, and their moduli of rapture were determined experimentally. The result obtained showed that cement composites with a hybrid of PVA and cellulose fiber pulp had a higher flexural strength than cellulose-fiber- reinforced cement ones, but this strength was rather similar to that of asbestos-fiber-reinforced cement composites. Also, using the results of flexural tests and an analytical method, the tensile and compressive moduli of the hybrid of PVA and cement sheet were calculated. The hybrid of PVA and cellulose fiber pulp is proposed as an appropriate alternative for substituting asbestos in the Hatschek process.

  18. Zirconia: cementation of prosthetic restorations. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; GLORIA, F.; NAPOLI, E.; PUJIA, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim of the work Aim of the work was to execute a review of the international literature about the cementation of zirconia restorations, analyzing the properties of the cements most commonly used in clinical activities. Materials and methods It was performed, through PubMed, a bibliographic search on the international literature of the last 10 years using the following limits: studies in English, in vitro studies, randomized clinical trial, reviews, meta-analysis, guide-lines. Were excluded from the search: descriptive studies, case reports, discussion articles, opinion’s leader. Results From studies results that common surface treatments (silanization, acid etching) are ineffective on zirconia because it has an inert surface without glassy component (on which this surface treatments act primarily), instead the sandblasting at 1atm with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) results significantly effective for the resulting roughening that increase the surface energy and the wettability of the material. Furthermore it has been shown that zinc phosphate-based cements, Bis-GMA-based and glass-ionomer cements can’t guarantee a stable long-term adhesion, instead resin cements containing phosphate monomer 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown higher adhesion and stability values than the other cements. In particular, it has seen that bond strength of zirconia copings on dentin, using MDP-based cement, is about 6,9MPa; this value is comparable to that obtained with gold copings cementation. Conclusions Analyzed studies have led to the following conclusions: sandblasting with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) is the best surface treatment to improve adhesion between resin cements and zirconia; resin cements containing phosphate ester monomers 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown in the studies an higher bond strength and stability after ageing treatment; the best procedure for cementing zirconia restorations results the combination of

  19. Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activity of new calcium-based cement (Biodentine) compared to MTA and glass ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    Bhavana, Vankayala; Chaitanya, Krishna Popuri; Gandi, Padma; Patil, Jayaprakash; Dola, Binoy; Reddy, Rahul B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal properties of calcium-based cement, Biodentine (Ca3SiO2), compared to commercial glass ionomer cements (GICs) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods: Pellets of GICs, ProRoot MTA, and Biodentine were prepared to test the influence of these cements on the growth of four oral microbial strains: Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans; using agar diffusion method. Wells were formed by removing the agar and the manipulated materials were immediately placed in the wells. The pellets were lodged in seeded plates and the growth inhibition diameter around the material was measured after 24-72 h incubation at 37°C. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test to compare the differences among the three cements at different concentrations. Results: Test indicates that the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine, on all the microorganisms tested, was very strong, showing a mean inhibition zone of 3.2 mm, which extends over time towards all the strains. For Biodentine, GIC, and MTA, the diameters of the inhibition zones for S. mutans were significantly larger than for E. faecalis, Candida, and E. coli (P < 0.05). Conclusion: All materials showed antimicrobial activity against the tested strains except for GIC on Candida. Largest inhibition zone was observed for Streptococcus group. Biodentine created larger inhibition zones than MTA and GIC. PMID:25657526

  20. [Technology-based emission inventory of particulate matters (PM) from cement industry].

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; He, Ke-bin; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Zuo-yi

    2008-08-01

    A bottom-up PM emission model was developed based on the production technologies and PM emission control devices in Chinese cement industry. Through analyzing the historical distribution of technologies in cement producing and the impact of standards on PM emission control from cement industry, emission factors of cement industry in China during 1990-2004 were generated by this technology-based model, and emission inventories were developed thereby. Emission factor decreased from 27.9 kg x t(-1) cement in 1990 to 8.05 kg x t(-1) cement in 2004. Emissions of PM from cement industry in China reached the peak value in 1997, with 1044 x 10(4) t of TSP, 716 x 10(4) t of PM10, 436 x 10(4) t of PM2.5 emitted, then decreased until 2001, and increased slowly again during 2001-2004. The distribution of PM emissions among provinces is uneven. Shandong, Guangdong, Hebei, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, and Henan contribute more than 50% of emissions of China. Rapid spread of pre-calcining kilns in China and implementation of Emission Standard of Air Pollutants for Cement Industry in 2004 will probably decrease PM emissions from cement industry to a large extent, leading to obvious variation on PM pollution characteristics in China.

  1. Biocompatibility of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive compared with a glass lonomer cement and a high copper amalgam.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasushi; Seki, Yuichi; Sasafuchi, Yasutaka; Arakawa, Makoto; Burrow, Michael F; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the pulpal response and in-vivo microleakage of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive and compared the results with a glass ionomer cement and amalgam. Cervical cavities were prepared in monkey teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups. A self-etching primer system (Imperva FluoroBond, Shofu) was applied to the teeth in one of the experimental groups, and the cavities were filled with a flowable composite (SI-BF-2001-LF, Shofu). In the other groups, a glass ionomer cement (Fuji II, GC) or amalgam (Dispersalloy, Johnson & Johnson) filled the cavity. The teeth were then extracted after 3, 30 and 90 days, fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution and prepared according to routine histological techniques. Five micrometer sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or Brown and Brenn gram stain for bacterial observation. No serious inflammatory reaction of the pulp, such as necrosis or abscess formation, was observed in any of the experimental groups. Slight inflammatory cell infiltration was the main initial reaction, while deposition of reparative dentin was the major long-term reaction in all groups. No bacterial penetration along the cavity walls was detected in the flowable composite or glass ionomer cement except for one case at 30 days in the glass ionomer cement. The flowable composite bonded with self-etching adhesive showed an acceptable biological com- patibility to monkey pulp. The in vivo sealing ability of the flowable composite in combination with the self-etching adhesive was considered comparable to glass ionomer cement. Amalgam restorations without adhesive liners showed slight bacterial penetration along the cavity wall.

  2. Surface analysis and shear bond strength of zirconia on resin cements after non-thermal plasma treatment and/or primer application for metallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; Matos, Adaias Oliveira; Landers, Richard; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; De Souza, Grace Mendonça; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2017-03-01

    There is no established protocol for bonding zirconia (Y-TZP) with resin cements. Non-thermal plasma (NTP) may be an alternative for the clinical problems related to adhesion. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the surface of Y-TZP exposed to methane (CH4) NTP or coated with a layer of primer for metal alloys and the association between the two methods and to evaluate the effect of NTP treatment on bond strength between Y-TZP and two resin cements. A total of 235 Y-TZP discs (8×2mm) were distributed into five groups: Co (no surface treatment), Pr (primer), NTP (methane plasma), Pr+NTP and NTP+Pr. The effect of the treatment type on the surface free energy, morphology, topography and chemical composition of the Y-TZP discs was investigated. The discs were cemented to composite resin substrates using Panavia F2.0 or RelyX U200. Shear bond strength (n=10) analyses were performed (1mm/min) before and after thermocycling (5-55°C, 2000cycles) on the bonded specimens. The data were analyzed with one and three-way ANOVAs and Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). NTP reduced the surface energy and roughness of the Y-TZP discs. SEM-EDS and XPS analyses showed the presence of the organic thin film, which significantly improved the bond strength results when Rely X U200 was used, whereas the primer treatment was more effective with Panavia F2.0. Thermocycling significantly reduced the bond strength results of the NTP and Pr+NTP groups cemented with Rely X U200 and the Pr and NTP+Pr groups cemented with Panavia F2.0. Nonthermal plasma improves the bond strength between Rely X U200 and Y-TZP and also seems to have water-resistant behavior, whereas Panavia F2.0 showed better results when associated with primer.

  3. Bond strength of resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements after enamel etching.

    PubMed

    Cortes, O; Garcia-Godoy, F; Boj, J R

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of resin-reinforced glass ionomers to enamel etched or unetched. Human, non-carious extracted permanent molars stored in distilled water were used. Flat buccal and lingual enamel surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The teeth were then distributed at random into six groups of 5 teeth (10 surfaces) each: Group 1: Fuji II LC, no enamel etching; Group 2: Fuji II LC, enamel etched with 10% phosphoric acid for 10 seconds; Group 3: Dyract, no enamel etching; Group 4: Dyract, enamel etched with 10% phosphoric acid for 10 seconds; Group 5: Photac-Fil, no enamel etching; Group 6: Photac-Fil, enamel etched with 10% phosphoric acid for 10 seconds. Cylindrical samples of the glass ionomers were prepared in plastic molds and bonded to the enamel surface according to the manufacturers' instructions. All samples were placed in distilled water for 24 hours, and sheared with an Instron at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results (in MPa) were: Group 1: 11.29 +/- 4.84; Group 2: 19.64 +/- 5.43; Group 3: 8.26 +/- 3.61; Group 4: 22.04 +/- 5.40; Group 5: 2.05 +/- 3.05; Group 6: 9.12 +/- 6.61. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls procedure revealed that on etched enamel, Fuji II LC and Dyract had a significantly higher bond strength than all the other groups tested (P < 0.0001), but not significantly different between each other. With these two groups, cohesive failure within the material was recorded in all samples while in the unetched samples, all specimens displayed an adhesive failure (glass ionomer-enamel interface). All samples with Photac-Fil, with or without enamel etching had adhesive failures.

  4. BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT TO PRIMARY DENTIN AFTER CUTTING WITH DIFFERENT BUR TYPES AND DENTIN CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Nicoló, Rebeca Di; Shintome, Luciana Keiko; Myaki, Silvio Issáo; Nagayassu, Marcos Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12). In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer – 3M/ESPE) prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5%) and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence. PMID:19089179

  5. Influence of eugenol on the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts cemented with different types of resin luting agents.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Erhan; Çetin, Ali Riza; Capar, İsmail Davut; Tunçdemir, Ali Riza; Aydinbelge, Hale Ari

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of eugenol on the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts cemented with different types of resin luting agents. Seventy-two extracted maxillary single-rooted canine teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 36 teeth. Group 1, the control group, was filled with gutta-percha only (i.e., did not receive eugenol), whereas group 2 was filled with a eugenol-containing sealer. All root canals were filled and each group was divided into three subgroups. The posts in each subgroup were cemented with the following materials: subgroup 1 with a 2-step self-etching adhesive system (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V + Panavia F); subgroup 2 with a 1-step self-etching adhesive (Panavia F); and subgroup 3 with a self-adhesive (Clearfil SA Cement). Dislodgement resistance was measured using a universal testing machine. All data were subjected to ANOVA using a factorial design and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The use of the eugenol-containing sealer significantly reduced the push-out bond strength of the fiber post (P < 0.05). The push-out bond strength of Panavia F was significantly higher than those of the other groups filled with the eugenol-containing sealer (P < 0.05). The Panavia F group was less susceptible to the inhibiting effect of eugenol than were the other evaluated groups when the fiber post was cemented in the canals filled with the eugenol-containing sealer.

  6. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Kachuei, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5) with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence), 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma), and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem). Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A) were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh) in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃), the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05). Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016). The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin. PMID:24790921

  7. Magnesium-based bone cement and bone void filler: preliminary experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Stephen A; Peauroi, John

    2009-03-01

    Bone cement has great potential in craniofacial surgery in the repair of osseous defects secondary to surgery or trauma. This includes the use of bone cement as a bone void filler for full-thickness cranial defects and as augmentation of deficient bones. Ideally, this material should be easily available, biocompatible, resorbable, bone inductive, and have adhesive qualities to bone. Calcium-based bone cements have some of these qualities but have a higher than desirable failure rate. OsteoCrete, a new magnesium-based bone cement and bone void filler, was compared to Norian in critical-sized skull defects and cementing bone flaps in rabbits. Both materials were successful; however, OsteoCrete had a faster resorption and replacement by bone rate than Norian. Bone flap position and apparent stability were also superior with OsteoCrete. There were no adverse reactions to either cement. A magnesium-based bone cement presents with advantages when compared with a comparator calcium-based cement in craniofacial surgery.

  8. Properties of lightweight cement-based composites containing waste polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Záleská, Martina; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Improvement of buildings thermal stability represents an increasingly important trend of the construction industry. This work aims to study the possible use of two types of waste polypropylene (PP) for the development of lightweight cement-based composites with enhanced thermal insulation function. Crushed PP waste originating from the PP tubes production is used for the partial replacement of silica sand by 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mass%, whereas a reference mixture without plastic waste is studied as well. First, basic physical and thermal properties of granular PP random copolymer (PPR) and glass fiber reinforced PP (PPGF) aggregate are studied. For the developed composite mixtures, basic physical, mechanical, heat transport and storage properties are accessed. The obtained results show that the composites with incorporated PP aggregate exhibit an improved thermal insulation properties and acceptable mechanical resistivity. This new composite materials with enhanced thermal insulation function are found to be promising materials for buildings subsoil or floor structures.

  9. Glycerol Salicylate-based Pulp-Capping Material Containing Portland Cement.

    PubMed

    Portella, Fernando Freitas; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Santos, Paula Dapper; Sartori, Cláudia; Wegner, Everton; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the water sorption, solubility, pH and ability to diffuse into dentin of a glycerol salicylate-based, pulp-capping cement in comparison to a conventional calcium hydroxide-based pulp capping material (Hydcal). An experimental cement was developed containing 60% glycerol salicylate resin, 10% methyl salicylate, 25% calcium hydroxide and 5% Portland cement. Water sorption and solubility were determined based on mass changes in the samples before and after the immersion in distilled water for 7 days. Material discs were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 7 days and 28 days, and a digital pHmeter was used to measure the pH of water. The cement's ability to diffuse into bovine dentin was assessed by Raman spectroscopy. The glycerol salicylate-based cement presented higher water sorption and lower solubility than Hydcal. The pH of water used to store the samples increased for both cements, reaching 12.59 ± 0.06 and 12.54 ± 0.05 after 7 days, for Hydcal and glycerol salicylate-based cements, respectively. Both cements were able to turn alkaline the medium at 24 h and sustain its alkalinity after 28 days. Hydcal exhibited an intense diffusion into dentin up to 40 µm deep, and the glycerol salicylate-based cement penetrated 20 µm. The experimental glycerol salicylate-based cement presents good sorption, solubility, ability to alkalize the surrounding tissues and diffusion into dentin to be used as pulp capping material.

  10. Effect of additive metals, Sn, Ga, and In in Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys on initial bond strength of 4-META adhesive cement to these alloys.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shin-ichi; Churnjitapirom, Pornkiat; Miyagawa, Yukio; Ogura, Hideo

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three additives, Sn, Ga, and In, as well as the main constituents, Pd and Cu, of Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys on the initial bond strength of 4-META adhesive cement to these alloys. The Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys consisted of 20%, 30% or 40% Pd, and 10%, 15% or 20% Cu, 20% Au, and Ag as balance. Besides, additive metals (Sn, Ga, and In) of 2% and 4% were added to these compositions. The addition of three additives, in general, increased the initial bond strength of the cement in comparison to the mother compositions (0% additives), although the degrees of effectiveness of the three additives were different and varied with their contents. Among these additives, a remarkable increase in bond strength was observed with the addition of In. The increase in Cu content, in many cases, resulted in an increase in bond strength at high Pd contents (30% and 40%), but a decrease at low Pd content (20%) in some cases. The positive effects of the three additives and Cu could be due to the formation of a suitable oxide layer for strong bonding with 4-META.

  11. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L.; Morris, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

  12. Comparison of the fixation effects of heavy metals by cement rotary kiln co-processing and cement based solidification/stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Cheng; Jin, Yiying; Nie, Yongfeng; Li, Jinhui

    2009-06-15

    Cement rotary kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes and cement based solidification/stabilization could both immobilize heavy metals. The different retention mechanisms of the two technologies lead to different fixation effects of heavy metals. The same amount of heavy metal compounds were treated by the two types of fixation technologies. Long-term leaching test (160 days), the maximum availability leaching test (NEN 7341) and a modified three-step sequential extraction procedure, proposed by the Commission of the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR) were employed to compare the fixation effects of the two fixation technologies. The leaching concentrations in NEN 7341 and long-term leaching tests were compared with identification standard for hazardous wastes (GB5085.3-1996) and drinking water standard (GB5749-2005). The results indicate that the leaching concentrations of the long-term leaching test and NEN 7341 test were lower than the regulatory limits and the leached ratios were small. Both cement based solidification/stabilization and cement rotary kiln co-processing could effectively fix heavy metals. Calcination in a cement rotary kiln and the following hydration that follows during cement application could fix As, Cd, Pb and Zn more effectively and decrease the release to the environment. Cement solidification/stabilization technology has better effect in immobilizing Cr and Ni. Cr wastes are more fitful to be treated by cement solidification/stabilization.

  13. Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material

    DOEpatents

    Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1987-10-01

    A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

  14. FTIR spectroscopic features of γ-ray influence on new cement kiln dust based glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddeek, Yasser B.; Mohamed, Gehan Y.; Shokry Hassan, H.; Mostafa, A. M. A.; Abd elfadeel, G.

    2015-08-01

    A harmful environmental problem such as cement kiln dust (CKD) was considered as a source of CaO and SiO2, which are useful oxides for the glass industry. So, Na2O, B2O3, Bi2O3, PbO and CKD were used to fabricate new borate based glasses. The structure of the prepared glasses was studied by FTIR before and after gamma irradiation at doses up to 120 kGy. Analysis of FTIR before irradiation revealed that CKD split the characteristic broad band of the vibrations of BO3 structural units into two bands and created two effective ranges of concentrations which were confirmed by N4 calculations. After gamma irradiation, the intensity of the FTIR bands decreased and the structure of glass was weakened when 0 ≤ CKD ≤ 23.5 mol% as a result of energy transferred by gamma rays. Increasing CKD beyond this limit created bridging oxygens, more covalent bonds and interlinked the structural groups of the glass network which may resist the irradiation effects. The glass containing 32 mol% of CKD showed higher resistance for radiation effects which was attributed to its strong covalent bonds and to [BiO6] and [PbO6] structural units.

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Response to Low-Modulus PMMA-Based Bone Cement

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Elin; Mestres, Gemma; Treerattrakoon, Kiatnida; López, Alejandro; Karlsson Ott, Marjam; Larsson, Sune; Persson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The high stiffness of acrylic bone cements has been hypothesized to contribute to the increased number of fractures encountered after vertebroplasty, which has led to the development of low-modulus cements. However, there is no data available on the in vivo biocompatibility of any low-modulus cement. In this study, the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility of two types of low-modulus acrylic cements, one modified with castor oil and one with linoleic acid, were evaluated using human osteoblast-like cells and a rodent model, respectively. While the in vitro cytotoxicity appeared somewhat affected by the castor oil and linoleic acid additions, no difference could be found in the in vivo response to these cements in comparison to the base, commercially available cement, in terms of histology and flow cytometry analysis of the presence of immune cells. Furthermore, the in vivo radiopacity of the cements appeared unaltered. While these results are promising, the mechanical behavior of these cements in vivo remains to be investigated. PMID:26366415

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength and Fluoride Release of Conventional Glass Ionomer with 1% Ethanolic Extract of Propolis Incorporated Glass Ionomer Cement –Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Attiguppe Ramashetty; Basappa, Nadig

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Atraumatic restorative treatment is a minimal intervention approach which involves manual removal of caries followed by restoration using adhesive restorative material. Due to incomplete manual caries excavation, there is a high chance of secondary caries under the restoration. Hence, many antibacterial agents have been incorporated in cement to enhance their antibacterial effect. Propolis is one of the natural medicines that has highlighted application in dentistry. Aim The current study evaluated the shear bond strength and fluoride release of Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) combined with 1% Ethanolic Extract of Propolis (EEP). The research hypothesis was that the incorporation of 1% EEP in GIC has an effect on shear bond strength and fluoride release. Materials and Methods A study was conducted among two groups. Group A conventional GIC (control), Group B GIC incorporated with 1% EEP (experimental). Shear bond strength: Thirty samples were prepared. Dentinal surface was restored and bond strength was assessed using a universal testing machine. Fluoride release: Thirty samples were prepared and stored in distilled water at a constant temperature until the time of measurement. The fluoride release was assessed by ion selective electrode after 1st day and 7th day. Data obtained by shear bond strength analysis was subjected to statistical analysis using an unpaired t-test and the data obtained by the fluoride release analysis was subjected to an unpaired t-test and paired t-test. Results Result showed that there was no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength between the groups (p-value 0.77). A statistically significant difference was noticed in fluoride release among the groups after 1st and 7th day (p-0.001). However, the release was lesser in both the groups after the 1st day. Conclusion A 1% EEP incorporated GIC enhanced the fluoride release without causing a significant effect on shear bond strength of GIC. PMID:27437368

  17. Influence of irrigation protocols on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive luting agent 24 hours after endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lima, Jessica Ferraz Carvalho; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Humel, Maria Malerba Colombi; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. Fifty-six bovine incisor roots were endodontically prepared and separated into 7 groups (n = 8) according to irrigation protocols: group 1, sterile saline (control); group 2, chlorhexidine (CHX) gel 2% and saline; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% and saline; group 4, CHX and saline (final irrigation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] 17%); group 5, NaOCl and saline (final irrigation with EDTA); group 6, CHX and saline (final irrigation with NaOCl and EDTA); and group 7, NaOCl (final irrigation with CHX and EDTA). No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied.

  18. Recycling red mud from the production of aluminium as a red cement-based mortar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Jianfeng; Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Piqi; Chen, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Current management for red mud is insufficient and a new method is needed. A series of experiments have been carried out to develop a new approach for effective management of red mud. Mortars without or with 3%, 6% and 9% red mud were prepared and their fresh and hardened properties were measured to access the possibility of recycling the red mud in the production of red cement-based mortar. The mechanisms corresponding to their mechanical performance variations were explored by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the fresh mortars with red mud present an increase of viscosity as compared with the control. However, little difference is found when the content of red mud is altered. It also can be seen that red mud increases flow time and reduces the slump flow of the mortar. Meanwhile, it is found that mortar with red mud is provided with higher air content. Red mud is eligible to adjust the decorative mortar colour. Compressive strength of mortar is improved when less than 6% red mud is added. However, overall it has a slightly negative effect on tensile bond strength. It decreases the Ca(OH)2 content and densifies the microstructure of hardened paste. The heavy metal concentrations in leachates of mortars with red mud are much lower than the values required in the standard, and it will not do harm to people's health and the environment. These results are important to recycle and effectively manage red mud via the production of red cement-based mortar.

  19. Heat treatment of pre-hydrolyzed silane increases adhesion of phosphate monomer-based resin cement to glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Cotes, Caroline; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different forms of heat treatment on a pre-hydrolyzed silane to improve the adhesion of phosphate monomer-based (MDP) resin cement to glass ceramic. Resin and feldspathic ceramic blocks (n=48, n=6 for bond test, n=2 for microscopy) were randomly divided into 6 groups and subject to surface treatments: G1: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + MDP resin cement (Panavia F); G2: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G3: Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G4: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G5: Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G6: Silane + Panavia F. Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to categorize the failure types. Data were analyzed statistically using two-way test ANOVA and Tukey's test (=0.05). Heat treatment of the silane containing MDP, with prior etching with HF (G2: 13.15 ± 0.89a; G4: 12.58 ± 1.03a) presented significantly higher bond strength values than the control group (G1: 9.16 ± 0.64b). The groups without prior etching (G3: 10.47 ± 0.70b; G5: 9.47 ± 0.32b) showed statistically similar bond strength values between them and the control group (G1). The silane application without prior etching and heat treatment resulted in the lowest mean bond strength (G6: 8.05 ± 0.37c). SEM analysis showed predominantly adhesive failures and EDS analysis showed common elements of spectra (Si, Na, Al, K, O, C) characterizing the microstructure of the glass-ceramic studied. Heat treatment of the pre-hydrolyzed silane containing MDP in an oven at 100 °C for 2 min or with hot air application at 50 ± 5 ºC for 1 min, was effective in increasing the bond strength values between the ceramic and resin cement containing MDP.

  20. Evaluation and comparison of the effect of different surface treatment modifications on the shear bond strength of a resin cement to titanium: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Veljee, Tahsin Mansur; Shruthi, C. S.; Poojya, R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of grit blasting, chemical treatment, and application of alloy primer combinations on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-cure resin cement to titanium surface. Materials and Methods: Fifty cast commercially pure titanium discs (9 mm × 2 mm) were divided into five groups (n = 10), which received the following surface treatments: Control group (no surface treatment), group 1 (grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles and application of alloy primer), group 2 (grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles and chemical treatment using 1N HCl), group 3 (chemical treatment using 1N HCl and application of alloy primer), and group 4 (Grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles, chemical treatment using 1N HCl and application of alloy primer). Superbond C and B resin cement was applied to the treated titanium surfaces including controls. SBSs were determined after thermocycling for 5000 cycles. Data (megapascal) were analyzed by ANOVA and Bonferroni test. Results: Group 4 (grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles, chemical treatment using 1N hydrochloric acid, and application of alloy primer) produced the highest bond strength followed by group 1, group 3, group 2, and the control group which showed the least bond strength. Conclusion: (1) Air-abrasion with alumina particles increases the micromechanical retention of the resin to titanium. (2) The alloy primer promotes wettability, which increases the adhesive bonding of resin cement to titanium. (3) Chemical treatment using hydrochloric acid effectively pretreats the titanium surface thereby increasing the SBS values. PMID:26929532

  1. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  3. Summary report on the development of a cement-based formula to immobilize Hanford facility waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, T.M.; McDaniel, E.W.; Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.; Loflin, J.A.; Mattus, A.J.; Morgan, I.L.; Tallent, O.K.; West, G.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report recommends a cement-based grout formula to immobilize Hanford Facility Waste in the Transportable Grout Facility (TGF). Supporting data confirming compliance with all TGF performance criteria are presented. 9 refs., 24 figs., 50 tabs.

  4. Influence of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of pressed ceramic luted to dentin with self-etch resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P < 0.05) applied for multiple paired comparisons. Results. The shear bond strength results for group A to E ranged from 6.94 ± 1.53 to 10.03 ± 3.50 MPa. One-way ANOVA demonstrated a difference (P < 0.05) between the groups tested and the Tukey HSD demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) difference between the shear bond strength (SBS) of Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A-D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  5. Sorption of radionuclides by cement-based barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kefei Pang, Xiaoyun

    2014-11-15

    This paper investigates the sorption of radionuclide ions, {sup 137}Cs{sup +} and {sup 90}Sr{sup 2+}, by cement-based barrier materials for radioactive waste disposal. A mortar with ternary binder is prepared and powder samples are ground from the hardened material following a predetermined granulometry. After pre-equilibrium with an artificial pore solution, the sorption behaviors of powder samples are investigated through single sorption and blended sorption. The results show that: (1) no systematic difference is observed for single and blended sorptions thus the interaction between {sup 137}Cs{sup +} and {sup 90}Sr{sup 2+} sorptions must be weak; (2) the sorption kinetics is rapid and all characteristic times are less than 1d; (3) the sorption capacity is enhanced by C–A–S–H hydrates and the measured K{sub d} values can be predicted from C–S–H sorption data with Ca/Si ratio equal to Ca/(Si + Al) ratio.

  6. Influence of air-abrasion executed with polyacrylic acid-Bioglass 45S5 on the bonding performance of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Thompson, Ian; Toledano, Manuel; Nucci, Cesare; Banerjee, Avijit

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the microtensile bond strength (μTBS), after 6 months of storage in PBS, of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) bonded to dentine pretreated with Bioglass 45S5 (BAG) using various etching and air-abrasion techniques. The RMGIC (GC Fuji II LC) was applied onto differently treated dentine surfaces followed by light curing for 30 s. The specimens were cut into matchsticks with cross-sectional areas of 0.9 mm(2). The μTBS of the specimens was measured after 24 h or 6 months of storage in PBS and the results were statistically analysed using two-way anova and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). Further RMCGIC-bonded dentine specimens were used for interfacial characterization, micropermeability, and nanoleakage analyses by confocal microscopy. The RMGIC-dentine interface layer showed no water absorption after 6 months of storage in PBS except for the interdiffusion layer of the silicon carbide (SiC)-abraded/polyacrylic acid (PAA)-etched bonded dentine. The RMGIC applied onto dentine air-abraded with BAG/H(2)O only or with BAG/PAA-fluid followed by etching procedures (10% PAA gel) showed no statistically significant reduction in μTBS after 6 months of storage in PBS. The abrasion procedures performed using BAG in combination with PAA might be a suitable strategy to enhance the bonding durability and the healing ability of RMGIC bonded to dentine.

  7. Lignin-based cement fluid loss control additive

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a hydraulic cement slurry composition. It comprises: a hydraulic cement, and the following expressed as parts by weight per 100 parts of the hydraulic cement, water from about 25 to 105 parts, and from abut 0.5 to 2.5 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of a sulfonated lignin and a sulfomethylated lignin, wherein the lignin has been sequentially crosslinked by reacting the lignin with a member of the group consisting of formaldehyde and epichlorohydrin and alkoxylated with between about 2 to about 6 moles of a compound selected from the group consisting of ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, butylene oxide and a combination thereof per 1000 g of the lignin.

  8. Spectroscopic and microscopic characterization of portland cement based unleached and leached solidified waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaita, Ghaleb N.; Tate, Philip H.

    1998-05-01

    In this study, portland cement based solidified/stabilized (S/S) waste and a cement-only control were studied before and after leaching. The solidified waste samples were prepared from a mix of organic-containing industrial waste sludge and portland cement. Toxicity characterization leaching procedure (TCLP) was the leaching test employed. The samples were studied using multi-surface analytical techniques including XPS, SIMS, XRD, FE-SEM and EDS. The data obtained from the various techniques show that leaching does not measurably affect the morphology or composition of the solidified waste sample. However, subtle changes in the composition of the cement control sample were observed. While the concentration of the elements observed on the surface of leached and unleached waste samples by XPS are very similar (except for Mg, Na and N), study of the corresponding cement samples exhibit differences in the level of C, Si, S, and Ca. The unleached cement sample shows lower levels of C and Si, but higher levels of O, S, Ca and Mg, indicating that leaching alters the cement sample. EDS analyses of the elemental composition of the bulk of the leached and unleached waste samples are similar, and also are similar for the leached and unleached cement samples, indicating that under the conditions of the TCLP test, leaching has no effect on the bulk. The high level of Ca present on the surface of the solidified waste indicates entrapment of the waste by the cement. The information and results obtained show that the surface analytical techniques used in this work, when combined with environmental wet methods, can provide a more complete picture of the concentration, chemical state and immobility of solidified waste.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Selected Physicochemical Properties of Pozzolan Portland and MTA-Based Cements.

    PubMed

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of pozzolan Portland cement were compared to ProRoot MTA and MTA BIO. To test the pH, the samples were immersed in distilled water for different periods of time. After the pH analysis, the sample was retained in the plastic recipient, and the electrical conductivity of the solution was measured. The solubility and radiopacity properties were evaluated according to specification 57 of the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA). The statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at a 5% level of significance. Pozzolan Portland cement exhibited pH and electrical conductivity mean values similar to those of the MTA-based cements. The solubilities of all tested materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA standards. Only the MTA-based cements met the ANSI/ADA recommendations for radiopacity. It might be concluded that the pH and electrical conductivity of pozzolan Portland cement are similar to and comparable to those of MTA-based cements.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Selected Physicochemical Properties of Pozzolan Portland and MTA-Based Cements

    PubMed Central

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of pozzolan Portland cement were compared to ProRoot MTA and MTA BIO. To test the pH, the samples were immersed in distilled water for different periods of time. After the pH analysis, the sample was retained in the plastic recipient, and the electrical conductivity of the solution was measured. The solubility and radiopacity properties were evaluated according to specification 57 of the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA). The statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at a 5% level of significance. Pozzolan Portland cement exhibited pH and electrical conductivity mean values similar to those of the MTA-based cements. The solubilities of all tested materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA standards. Only the MTA-based cements met the ANSI/ADA recommendations for radiopacity. It might be concluded that the pH and electrical conductivity of pozzolan Portland cement are similar to and comparable to those of MTA-based cements. PMID:27437473

  11. Performance of volcanic ash and pumice based blended cement concrete in mixed sulfate environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, K.M.A. . E-mail: ahossain@ryerson.ca; Lachemi, M.

    2006-06-15

    The deterioration of concrete structures due to the presence of mixed sulfate in soils, groundwater and marine environments is a well-known phenomenon. The use of blended cements incorporating supplementary cementing materials and cements with low C{sub 3}A content is becoming common in such aggressive environments. This paper presents the results of an investigation on the performance of 12 volcanic ash (VA) and finely ground volcanic pumice (VP) based ASTM Type I and Type V (low C{sub 3}A) blended cement concrete mixtures with varying immersion period of up to 48 months in environments characterized by the presence of mixed magnesium-sodium sulfates. The concrete mixtures comprise a combination of two Portland cements (Type I and Type V) and four VA/VP based blended cements with two water-to-binder ratio of 0.35 and 0.45. Background experiments (in addition to strength and fresh properties) including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and rapid chloride permeability (RCP) were conducted on all concrete mixtures to determine phase composition, pozzolanic activity, porosity and chloride ion resistance. Deterioration of concrete due to mixed sulfate attack and corrosion of reinforcing steel were evaluated by assessing concrete weight loss and measuring corrosion potentials and polarization resistance at periodic intervals throughout the immersion period of 48 months. Plain (Type I/V) cement concretes, irrespective of their C{sub 3}A content performed better in terms of deterioration and corrosion resistance compared to Type I/V VA/VP based blended cement concrete mixtures in mixed sulfate environment.

  12. Effect of a calcium-silicate-based restorative cement on pulp repair.

    PubMed

    Tran, X V; Gorin, C; Willig, C; Baroukh, B; Pellat, B; Decup, F; Opsahl Vital, S; Chaussain, C; Boukpessi, T

    2012-12-01

    In cases of pulp injury, capping materials are used to enhance tertiary dentin formation; Ca(OH)(2) and MTA are the current gold standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of a new calcium-silicate-based restorative cement to induce pulp healing in a rat pulp injury model. For that purpose, cavities with mechanical pulp exposure were prepared on maxillary first molars of 27 six-week-old male rats, and damaged pulps were capped with either the new calcium-silicate-based restorative cement (Biodentine), MTA, or Ca(OH)(2). Cavities were sealed with glass-ionomer cement, and the repair process was assessed at several time-points. At day 7, our results showed that both the evaluated cement and MTA induced cell proliferation and formation of mineralization foci, which were strongly positive for osteopontin. At longer time-points, we observed the formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge at the injury site, secreted by cells displaying an odontoblastic phenotype. In contrast, the reparative tissue induced by Ca(OH)(2) showed porous organization, suggesting a reparative process different from those induced by calcium silicate cements. Analysis of these data suggests that the evaluated cement can be used for direct pulp-capping.

  13. Experimental Calcium Silicate-Based Cement with and without Zirconium Oxide Modulates Fibroblasts Viability.

    PubMed

    Slompo, Camila; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Gasque, Kellen Cristina da Silva; Damante, Carla Andreotti; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether the use of zirconium oxide as a radiopacifier of an experimental calcium silicate-based cement (WPCZO) leads to cytotoxicity. Fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations (10 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL, and 0.1 mg/mL) of the cements diluted in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) for periods of 12, 24, and 48 h. Groups tested were white Portland cement (WPC), white Portland cement with zirconium oxide (WPCZO), and white mineral trioxide aggregate Angelus (MTA). Control group cells were not treated. The cytotoxicity was evaluated through mitochondrial-activity (MTT) and cell-density (crystal violet) assays. All cements showed low cytotoxicity. In general, at the concentration of 10 mg/mL there was an increase in viability of those groups treated with WPC and WPCZO when compared to the control group (p<0.05). A similar profile for the absorbance values was noted among the groups: 10 mg/mL presented an increase in viability compared to the control group. On the other hand, smaller concentrations presented a similar or lower viability compared to the control group, in general. A new dental material composed of calcium silicate-based cement with 20% zirconium oxide as the radiopacifier showed low cytotoxicity as a promising material to be exploited for root-end filling.

  14. Application of Neutron imaging in pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement: comparison of hydration of H20 with D2O based Portland cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussenova, D.; Bilheux, H.; Radonjic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Wellbore Cement studies have been ongoing for decades. The studies vary from efforts to reduce permeability and resistance to corrosive environment to issues with gas migration also known as Sustained Casing Pressure (SCP). These practical issues often lead to health and safety problems as well as huge economic loss in oil and gas industry. Several techniques have been employed to reduce the impact of gas leakage. In this study we purely focus on expandable liners, which are introduced as part of oil well reconstruction and work-overs and as well abandonment procedures that help in prevention of SCP. Expandable liner is a tube that after application of a certain tool can increase its diameter. The increase in diameter creates extra force on hydrated cement that results in reducing width of interface fractures and cement-tube de-bonding. Moreover, this also causes cement to change its microstructure and other porous medium properties, primarily hydraulic conductivity. In order to examine changes before and after operations, cement pore structure must be well characterized and correlated to cement slurry design as well as chemical and physical environmental conditions. As modern oil well pipes and tubes contain iron, it is difficult to perform X-ray tomography of a bulk measurement of the cement in its wellbore conditions, which are tube wall-cement-tube wall. Neutron imaging is a complementary technique to x-ray imaging and is well suited for detection of light elements imbedded in metallic containers. Thus, Neutron Imaging (NI) is investigated as a tool for the detection of pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement. Recent measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) neutron imaging facility. NI is is highly sensitive to light elements such as Hydrogen (H). Oil well cements that have undergone a full hydration contain on average 30%-40% of free water in its pore structure. The unreacted water is the main

  15. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P < 0.05). Thermocycling significantly reduced μSBS in SBU (22.49 MPa ± 4.11) (P < 0.05), but not in NC (20.68 MPa ± 4.60) and PC (28.77 MPa ± 3.52) (P > 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  16. Hydraulic behavior of calcium sulfoaluminate-based cements derived from industrial process wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Beretka, J.; Sherman, N. . Div. of Building); Vito, B. de . Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Santoro, L. . Dipt. di Chimica); Valenti, G.L. . Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell'Ambiente)

    1993-09-01

    The manufacture of cements based on calcium sulfoaluminate (C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]) [In this paper, the notation adopted in cement chemistry, vis. C=CO, A=Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], [bar S]=SO[sub 3], S=SiO[sub 2], and H=H[sub 2]O, has been used.] requires lower firing temperatures and lower grinding energy, as compared to ordinary Portland cements (OPC). Some of these low-energy cements can be formulated in order to develop high early strength and other performances similar to OPC. Further interest towards these types of cements relies on the possibility of using industrial process wastes as raw materials for their manufacture. It has been found that a number of industrial wastes and by-products such as phosphogypsum, bauxite fines, fly ash and blast furnace slag, can be employed without negatively affecting the hydraulic behavior of cements of planned C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]:[beta]-C[sub 2]S:C[bar S] weight ratio 1.5:1:1. Blast furnace slag and fly ash can also be advantageously used as blending components of the fired products.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  18. Lack of correlation between tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and leakage in roots filled with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Ricardo; da SILVA NETO, Ulisses Xavier; CARNEIRO, Everdan; FARINIUK, Luiz Fernando; WESTPHALEN, Vânia Portela Ditzel; CUNHA, Rodrigo Sanches

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze possible correlations among tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and apical leakage in fillings performed with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin. Material and Methods Sixty similar, extracted human mandibular central incisors were irrigated, instrumented and filled following the same protocol. First, apical leakage was quantified by fluid filtration tests. Then, these same specimens were sectioned for analysis of tubular dentine cement penetration and the middle thirds were submitted to push-out tests to analyze the adhesiveness of the fillings. Results In brief, the means and standard deviations with a confidence interval of 95% were as follows: tubular dentine cement penetration (8.875±4.540), adhesiveness (4.441±2.683) and apical leakage (0.318±0.215). The data were confronted using the Pearson's test (P>0.05), and it was possible to prove that there was no correlation between (1) tubular dentine cement penetration and apical leakage (r2: 0.08276), (2) tubular dentine cement penetration and adhesiveness (r2: -0.2412) and (3) adhesiveness and apical leakage (r2: 0.1340). Conclusion After analysis of these data, it could be observed that there exists no correlation among the variables analyzed in this study. PMID:24626245

  19. Influence of silica-based hybrid material on the gas permeability of hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Hou, P.; Xie, N.; Zhou, Z.; Cheng, X.

    2017-03-01

    Surface treatment is one of the most effective ways to elongate the service life of concrete. The surface treatment agents, including organic and inorganic types, have been intensively studied. In this paper, the silica-based hybrid nanocomposite, which take advantages of both organic and inorganic treatment agents, was synthesized and used for surface treatment of hardened cement-based material. The effectiveness of organic and inorganic hybrid nanocomposite was evaluated through investigations on the gas permeability of cement-based materials. The results showed that SiO2/PMHS hybrid nanocomposite can greatly decrease the gas transport properties of hardened cement-based materials and has a great potential for surface treatment of cementitious materials.

  20. Characterization of composite materials based on cement-ceramic powder blended binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of newly developed composite mortars with incorporated ceramic powder coming from precise brick cutting as partial Portland cement replacement up to 40 mass% is presented in the paper. Fine ceramic powder belongs to the pozzolanic materials. Utilization of pozzolanic materials is accompanied by lower request on energy needed for Portland clinker production which generally results in lower production costs of blended binder and lower CO2 emission. In this paper, the ceramic powder is used in cement based mortar composition in amount of 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 mass% of cement. Chemical composition of ceramic powder is analyzed by X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction. The particle size distribution of ceramics is accessed on laser diffraction principle. For 28 days cured mortar samples, basic physical and mechanical properties are experimentally determined. The obtained results demonstrate that ceramic powder has potential to replace a part of Portland cement in composition of cement based composites and to reduce negative environmental impact of their production.

  1. The interaction of zinc oxide-based dental cements with aqueous solutions of potassium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, K; Booth, S E; Coleman, N J; Nicholson, J W

    2008-09-01

    The ability of zinc oxide-based dental cements (zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate) to take up fluoride from aqueous solution has been studied. Only zinc phosphate cement was found to take up any measurable fluoride after 5 h exposure to the solutions. The zinc oxide filler of the zinc phosphate also failed to take up fluoride from solution. The key interaction for this uptake was thus shown to involve the phosphate groups of the set cement. However, whether this took the form of phosphate/fluoride exchange, or the formation of oxyfluoro-phosphate groups was not clear. Fluoride uptake followed radicaltime kinetics for about 2 h in some cases, but was generally better modelled by the Elovich equation, dq(t)/dt = alpha exp(-betaq(t)). Values for alpha varied from 3.80 to 2.48 x 10(4), and for beta from 7.19 x 10(-3) to 0.1946, though only beta showed any sort of trend, becoming smaller with increasing fluoride concentration. Fluoride was released from the zinc phosphate cements in processes that were diffusion based up to M(t)/M(infinity) of about 0.4. No further release occurred when specimens were placed in fresh volumes of deionised water. Only a fraction of the fluoride taken up was re-released, demonstrating that most of the fluoride taken up becomes irreversibly bound within the cement.

  2. Microstructure of TiC-Based Coatings on Cemented Carbide Derived by Sol-Gel Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Guo, Zhixing; Qi, Kaifeng; Huang, Kun; Deng, Jianxiong; Liu, Jia

    2017-02-01

    TiC-based coating is prepared by depositing TiO2 sol on cemented carbide compact and liquid phase sintering. TiC forms due to carbothermal reduction reaction of TiO2 and then reacts with WC and transforms to TiC-based solid solution. Ti content changes the WC growth mechanism and results in the multi-stepped morphology. When sintered cemented carbide is used as substrate, WC keeps the equilibrium truncated triangle prism morphology due to the relatively weak diffusion among Ti, WC, and Co.

  3. Helical polymers based on intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded aromatic polyamides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Xuan; Shi, Zhu-Ming; Li, Zhan-Ting; Guan, Zhibin

    2010-12-21

    Inspired by arylamide-based oligomeric foldermers that are stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding, a series of polyamides with intramolecular hydrogen-bonding motifs were synthesized via polycondensation reactions. These polymers can fold into helical conformation different from their linear control. The chirality of helical conformation can further be tuned via acid-base complexation using chiral residues.

  4. Microcrack Identification in Cement-Based Materials Using Nonlinear Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Qu, J.; Kurtis, K. E.; Wu, S. C.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents results from tests that use nonlinear acoustic waves to distinguish microcracks in cement-based materials. Portland cement mortar samples prepared with alkali-reactive aggregate were exposed to an aggressive environment to induce cracking were compared to control samples, of the same composition, but which were not exposed to aggressive conditions. Two nonlinear ultrasonic methods were used to characterize the samples, with the aim of identifying the time and extent of microcracking; these techniques were a nonlinear acoustical modulation (NAM) method and a harmonic amplitude relation (HAR) method. These nonlinear acoustic results show that both methods can distinguish damaged samples from undamaged ones, demonstrating the potential of nonlinear acoustic waves to provide a quantitative evaluation of the deterioration of cement-based materials.

  5. Calcium Silicate-Based Cements Associated with Micro- and Nanoparticle Radiopacifiers: Physicochemical Properties and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bosso-Martelo, Roberta; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Viapiana, Raqueli; Berbert, Fábio Luis Camargo Vilella; Basso Bernardi, Maria Inês

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties and bioactivity of two formulations of calcium silicate-based cements containing additives (CSCM) or resin (CSCR), associated with radiopacifying agents zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and niobium oxide (Nb2O5) as micro- and nanoparticles; calcium tungstate (CaWO4); and bismuth oxide (Bi2O3). MTA Angelus was used as control. Methods. Surface features and bioactivity were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and the chemical composition by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS-X). Results. CSCM and CSCR presented larger particle sizes than MTA. Hydroxyapatite deposits were found on the surface of some materials, especially when associated with the radiopacifier with ZrO2 nanoparticles. All the cements presented calcium, silicon, and aluminum in their composition. Conclusion. Both calcium silicate-based cements presented composition and bioactivity similar to MTA when associated with the radiopacifiers evaluated. PMID:27347552

  6. Properties of Cement-based Composite Materials under Different Storing Environment Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, T. L.; Weng, S. H.; Cho, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    This study reports on the properties of cement-based composite materials (mortars) under different storing environment temperature, as determined using the accelerated chloride migration test (ACMT). Mortars with a water/cement ratio of 0.45 and five fine aggregate volume fractions (0%, 15%, 30%, 50% and 60%) under various environment temperatures (25, 40, 60 and 80°C) were evaluated according to the passage of chloride ions through the specimens using ACMT. Calculate chloride migration coefficients on the steady-state. Cement-based composite materials with 60 % fine aggregate presented a migration coefficient higher than that of other specimens, whereas mortar with 30 % fine aggregate was lower, due to the effects of dilution and tortuosity.

  7. Effect of brief heat-curing on microstructure and mechanical properties in fresh cement based mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, P.; Hidalgo, A.; Marmol, I.; Morales, J.; Sanchez, L.

    2009-07-15

    The effect of temperature on fresh mortar and cement paste was evaluated by simulating the curing conditions of external buildings plastering applied under extremely hot weather. The specimens were heated at controlled temperatures in the 40-80 {sup o}C range by exposure to IR radiation over short periods. The effect of soaking for a short time was also examined. The results of compressive strength tests, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mercury porosimetry helped to characterize the mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the studied sample. Early age behaviour (28 days) in neat cement was barely affected by the temperature. By contrast, exposure to high temperatures caused significant microstructural changes in the mortar. However, successive soaking over short periods was found to reactivate the mechanism of curing and restore the expected mechanical properties. Based on the results, application of cement based mortar at high temperatures is effective when followed by a short, specific soaking process.

  8. Competition of hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds in complexes of hypohalous acids with nitrogenated bases.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Blanco, Fernando; Solimannejad, Mohammad; Elguero, Jose

    2008-10-30

    A theoretical study of the complexes formed by hypohalous acids (HOX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and At) with three nitrogenated bases (NH 3, N 2, and NCH) has been carried out by means of ab initio methods, up to MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computational method. In general, two minima complexes are found, one with an OH...N hydrogen bond and the other one with a X...N halogen bond. While the first one is more stable for the smallest halogen derivatives, the two complexes present similar stabilities for the iodine case and the halogen-bonded structure is the most stable one for the hypoastatous acid complexes.

  9. EFFECT OF EUGENOL-BASED ENDODONTIC SEALER ON THE ADHESION OF INTRARADICULAR POSTS CEMENTED AFTER DIFFERENT PERIODS

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Larissa Lustosa Lima; Giovani, Alessandro Rogério; Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa Silva; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal; Alfredo, Edson; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Paulino, Silvana Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated in vitro the influence of an eugenol-based sealer (EndoFill) on the retention of stainless steel prefabricated posts cemented with zinc phosphate and resin-based (Panavia F) cements after different periods of root canal obturation, using the pull-out test. Material and methods: Sixty upper canines were decoronated and the roots were embedded in resin blocks. The specimens were distributed into 3 groups, according to the period elapsed between canal obturation and post cementation: Group I - immediately; Group II - 72 h and Group III - 4 months. The groups were subdivided according to the type of cement used for post cementation: A - zinc phosphate and B - Panavia F. Following the experimental periods, specimens were subjected to pull- out test in an Instron machine with application of tensile force at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement. The maximum forces required for post removal were recorded (kN) and means were subjected to statistical analysis by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test (α=0.001) Results: There were statistically significant differences (p<0.01) between the posts cemented with zinc phosphate cement (0.2112 kN) and Panavia F (0.0501 kN). However, no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found between the three post cementation periods, regardless of the cement. Conclusions: It was concluded that the eugenol-based sealer influenced the tensile strength of the posts cemented with the resin cement, but had no influence on the time waited between root canal obturation and post space preparation/post cementation. PMID:20027430

  10. Marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of 2 zirconia crown systems luted with glass ionomer and MDP-based cements.

    PubMed

    Sener, Isil; Turker, Begum; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and phosphate monomer-containing resin cement (MDP-RC) under 2 zirconia crown systems (Cercon and DC-Zirkon). Forty human premolars were prepared for all-ceramic zirconia crowns with a 1 mm circumferential finish line and a 1.5 mm occlusal reduction. The crowns (n = 10 per group) from each zirconia system were randomly divided into 2 groups and cemented either with GIC (Vivaglass CEM) or MDP-RC (Panavia F 2.0) cement. The cemented crowns were thermocycled 5000 times (5°-55°C). The crowns were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours and sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally. Specimens were examined under optical microscope (100X). Data were analyzed using Student t-test and chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Mean marginal gap values for Cercon (85 ± 11.4 μm) were significantly higher than for DC-Zircon (75.3 ± 13.2 μm) (P = 0.018). The mean cement thickness values of GIC (81.7 ± 13.9 μm) and MDP-RC (78.5 ± 12.5 μm) were not significantly different (P = 0.447). Microleakage scores did not demonstrate significant difference between GIC (P = 0.385) and MDP-RC (P = 0.631) under Cercon or DC-Zircon. Considering the cement thickness values and microleakage scores obtained, both zirconia crown systems could be cemented in combination with either GIC or MDP-RC.

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  12. Flow properties of MK-based geopolymer pastes. A comparative study with standard Portland cement pastes.

    PubMed

    Favier, Aurélie; Hot, Julie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-02-28

    Geopolymers are presented in many studies as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement. Previous studies have focused on their chemical and mechanical properties, their microstructures and their potential applications, but very few have focussed on their rheological behaviour. Our work highlights the fundamental differences in the flow properties, which exist between geopolymers made from metakaolin and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). We show that colloidal interactions between metakaolin particles are negligible and that hydrodynamic effects control the rheological behaviour. Metakaolin-based geopolymers can then be described as Newtonian fluids with the viscosity controlled mainly by the high viscosity of the suspending alkaline silicate solution and not by the contribution of direct contacts between metakaolin grains. This fundamental difference between geopolymers and OPC implies that developments made in cement technology to improve rheological behaviour such as plasticizers will not be efficient for geopolymers and that new research directions need to be explored.

  13. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, Ivan; Endzhievskaya, Irina; Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg m3, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W m * °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  14. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Voroshilov, Ivan Endzhievskaya, Irina Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-15

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg \\ m{sup 3}, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W \\ m {sup *} °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  15. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  16. Social Bonds and the Role of School-Based Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Ann Marie; Peguero, Anthony A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the impact of school-based victimization on the adolescent's social bond. Previous research has provided empirical support for Hirschi's social control theory that the strength of the adolescent's social bond is associated with the probability that he or she will engage in criminal offending. However, research identifying what…

  17. Leaching of VOCs from cement-based stabilized/solidified refinery oily sludge using solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Karamalidis, A K; Voudrias, E A

    2007-10-01

    Cement-based Stabilization/Solidification was applied to refinery oily sludge. Zero Headspace Extraction was employed for the investigation of the leaching behavior of volatile organic compounds from untreated and stabilized/solidified oily sludge in water. A method is described combining zero headspace extraction, solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography with flame ionization detector for determination of volatile organic compounds in aqueous leachates. For stabilization/solidification of the waste, two types of cement were used, I42.5 and II42.5. The I42.5 is a Portland Cement whereas the II42.5 is a Blended Cement, which contains pozzolanic material. In general, the I42.5 cement showed better immobilizing characteristics than the II42.5 cement, but the difference was small. The leaching behavior of toluene, o-xylene, p,m-xylene and ethylbenzene from stabilized/solidified samples was similar for both types of cement. The reduction in the maximum leached amount of stabilized/solidified specimens compared with that of the untreated oily sludge alone, varied from 80% to 98%, for specimens with 10% cement addition (both types). Increased leaching was observed with increasing cement addition. In the case of naphthalene, stabilized/solidified samples leached more than threefold the amount leached from the untreated oily sludge alone.

  18. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  19. Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An; Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu

    2013-10-15

    Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: • We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. • Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. • The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. • The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. • XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

  20. Cytotoxicity of a calcium aluminate cement in comparison with other dental cements and resin-based materials.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander; Konradsson, Katarina; König, Franz; Van Dijken, Jan W V; Schedle, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of a calcium aluminate cement with several currently used direct restorative materials. Specimens of three composites (QuiXfil, Tetric Ceram, Filtek Supreme), one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard Cement), one glass ionomer cement (Ketac Molar), and one calcium aluminate cement (DoxaDent), were used fresh or after 7-days' preincubation in cell culture medium at 37 degrees C, pH 7.2. PVC strips for ISO 10993-5 cytotoxicity test were used as positive control and glass specimens as negative control. L-929 fibroblasts (5-ml aliquots, containing 3 x 10(4) cells/ml), cultivated in DMEM with 10% FCS, 1% glutamine, and 1% penicillin/streptomycin at 37 degrees C/5% CO2 and trypsinized, were exposed to the specimens for 72 h. The cells were harvested, centrifuged, and resuspended in 500 microl DMEM and then counted in 500 microl DMEM for 30 s with a flow cytometer at 488 nm. The analysis of variance comparing the six materials showed different influences on L-929 fibroblast cytotoxicity (p <0.0001). The cytotoxicity of all specimens diminished with increasing preincubation time (p <0.0001). Fresh DoxaDent exhibited the lowest cytotoxicity, followed by QuiXfil. Ketac Molar showed the highest cytotoxicity. After 7 days of preincubation, Harvard Cement and Filtek Supreme demonstrated more cytotoxicity than the other materials (p <0.005).

  1. Tridimensional quantitative porosity characterization of three set calcium silicate-based repair cements for endodontic use.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Erika Thuanne Gonçalves; Nunes Tameirão, Michele Dias; Roter, Juliana Marins; De Assis, Joaquim Teixeira; De Almeida Neves, Aline; De-Deus, Gustavo André

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the this study was to quantitatively evaluate in three-dimensional (3D), the porosity degree of three improved silicate-based endodontic repair cements (iRoot BP Plus®, Biodentine®, and Ceramicrete) compared to a gold-standard calcium silicate bioactive cement (Pro Root® MTA). From each tested cement, four samples were prepared by a single operator following the manufacturer's instructions in terms of proportion, time, and mixing method, using cylindrical plastic split-ring moulds. The moulds were lubricated and the mixed cements were inserted with the aid of a cement spatula. The samples were scanned using a compact micro-CT device (Skyscan 1174, Bruker micro-CT, Kontich, Belgium) and the projection images were reconstructed into cross-sectional slices (NRecon v.1.6.9, Bruker micro-CT). From the stack of images, 3D models were rendered and the porosity parameters of each tested material were obtained after threshold definition by comparison with standard porosity values of Biodentine®. No statistically significant differences in the porosity parameters among the different materials were seen. Regarding total porosity, iRoot BP Plus® showed a higher percentage of total porosity (9.58%), followed by Biodentine® (7.09%), Pro Root® MTA (6.63%), and Ceramicrete (5.91%). Regarding closed porosity, Biodentine® presented a slight increase in these numbers compared to the other sealers. No significant difference in porosity between iRoot BP Plus®, Biodentine®, and Ceramicrete were seen. In addition, no significant difference in porosity between the new calcium silicate-containing repair cements and the gold-standard MTA were found.

  2. Early hardness and shear bond strength of dual-cure resin cement light cured through resin overlays with different dentin-layer thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-S; Kim, J-W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether dentin-layer thickness of resin overlays could affect the early hardness and shear bond strength of dual-cure resin cement (DCRC, RelyX ARC) after light curing with light curing units (LCUs) of various power densities: Optilux 360 (360), Elipar Freelight 2 (FL2), and Elipar S10 (S10). Resin overlays were fabricated using an indirect composite resin (Sinfony) with a dentin layer, an enamel layer, and a translucent layer of 0.5 mm thickness each (0.5-0.5-0.5) or of 0.2 mm, 0.5 mm, and 0.8 mm thickness (0.2-0.5-0.8), respectively. The DCRC was light cured for 40 seconds through the overlays, and surface hardness and shear bond strength to bovine dentin were tested 10 minutes after the start of light curing. Surface hardness was higher when the DCRC was light cured through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination than when the DCRC was light cured through the 0.5-0.5-0.5 combination with all LCUs. The ratio of upper surface hardness of DCRC light cured through resin overlays relative to the upper surface hardness of DCRC light cured directly was more than 90% only when the DCRC was light cured with S10 through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination. The shear bond strength value was higher when the DCRC was light cured with S10 through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination than when light cured with S10 through the 0.5-0.5-0.5 combination. This study indicates that reducing the dentin-layer thickness while increasing the translucent-layer thickness of resin inlays can increase the photopolymerization of DCRC, thereby increasing the early bond strength of resin inlays to dentin.

  3. Radiopacity of different resin-based and conventional luting cements compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gürel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-02-03

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different resin-based luting materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disc specimens (N=130, n=10 per group) (diameter: 6 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared from 10 resin-based and 3 conventional luting cements. Human canine dentin (n=10), bovine enamel (n=10), bovine dentin (n=10) and Aluminium (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted and equivalent Al thickness values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The radiopacity values of conventional cements and two resin luting materials (Rely X Unicem and Variolink II), were significantly higher than that of bovine enamel that could be preferred for restorations cemented on enamel. Since all examined resin-based luting materials showed radiopacity values equivalent to or greater than that of human and bovine dentin, they could be considered suitable for the restorations cemented on dentin.

  4. Social bonds and the role of school-based victimization.

    PubMed

    Popp, Ann Marie; Peguero, Anthony A

    2012-11-01

    This study explores the impact of school-based victimization on the adolescent's social bond. Previous research has provided empirical support for Hirschi's social control theory that the strength of the adolescent's social bond is associated with the probability that he or she will engage in criminal offending. However, research identifying what factors influence the strength of the adolescent's social bond is limited. In addition, research has established that school-based victimization is associated with numerous negative outcomes, including diminished educational outcomes and criminal offending. Therefore, it is plausible that school-based victimization undermines the adolescent's social bonds to school. Using a sample of 10th-grade students from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002, HLM models were developed to explore the relationship between school-based victimization and the adolescent's social bond to school. The results suggest that school-based victimization has a negative association with three elements of the adolescent's social bond to school: attachment, commitment, and belief. This study demonstrates the need for further research to identify the determinants of the strength of the adolescent's social bond to school.

  5. Effects of setting regulators on the efficiency of an inorganic acid based alkali-free accelerator reacting with a Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Maltese, C. . E-mail: Building.lab@mapei.it; Pistolesi, C.; Bravo, A.; Cella, F.; Cerulli, T.; Salvioni, D.

    2007-04-15

    Today, in the field of underground constructions, alkali-free accelerators are commonly employed, during tunnel excavation, to allow flash concrete setting. In this way, the cementitious sprayed material can firmly bond to the tunnel walls, controlling the convergence (the tendency of the section to squeeze). Their efficiency may be related to many parameters like: cement type, setting regulator, concrete composition, working temperature. Nevertheless, the influence of such factors on the accelerator performance has not been clarified yet. The accelerator efficacy is evaluated by real spraying test in job site or, when only laboratory equipment are available, by measuring the final setting times of cement systems admixed with the accelerator. Several alkali-free flash setting admixtures are available on the market. They can be divided into two main categories both containing aluminium sulphate complexes stabilized either by inorganic acids or by organic acids. In this paper, the influence of different setting regulators on the performances of an inorganic acid based alkali-free accelerator was analysed. Portland cement samples were obtained by mixing clinker with gypsum, {alpha}-hemihydrate, {beta}-hemihydrate or anhydrite. The setting regulator instantaneous dissolution rates were evaluated through conductivity measurements. The setting time of cement pastes with and without the accelerator was measured. It was found that the shorter the final setting time (therefore the more efficient is the accelerator) the lower the setting regulator instantaneous dissolution rate. In order to understand this phenomenon, a comparison was performed between accelerated cement paste samples containing the setting regulator with the highest ({beta}-hemihydrate) and the lowest instantaneous dissolution rate (anhydrite). The analytical work included morphological (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy-Field Emission Gun - ESEM-FEG), crystal-chemical (X-Ray Powder Diffraction

  6. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of calcium silicate-based cements on an osteoblast lineage.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Cornélio, Ana Lívia; Rodrigues, Elisandra Márcia; Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Falcoski, Thaís de Oliveira Rodrigues Sanzovo; Soares, Christiane Pienna; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Rossa, Carlos; Tanomaru, Mário

    2016-05-20

    Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2) of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC) and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM) and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1) (CSCR 2) (CSCR3). The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT-) was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+) used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni's posttest (p < 0.05), and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05). The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.

  7. A new method to analyze copolymer based superplasticizer traces in cement leachates.

    PubMed

    Guérandel, Cyril; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Krier, Gabriel; De Lanève, Michel; Guillot, Xavier; Pierre, Christian; Muller, Jean François

    2011-03-15

    Enhancing the flowing properties of fresh concrete is a crucial step for cement based materials users. This is done by adding polymeric admixtures. Such additives have enabled to improve final mechanicals properties and the development of new materials like high performance or self compacting concrete. Like this, the superplasticizers are used in almost cement based materials, in particular for concrete structures that can have a potential interaction with drinking water. It is then essential to have suitable detection techniques to assess whether these organic compounds are dissolved in water after a leaching process or not. The main constituent of the last generation superplasticizer is a PolyCarboxylate-Ester copolymer (PCE), in addition this organic admixture contains polyethylene oxide (free PEO) which constitutes a synthesis residue. Numerous analytical methods are available to characterize superplasticizer content. Although these techniques work well, they do not bring suitable detection threshold to analyze superplasticizer traces in solution with high mineral content such as leachates of hardened cement based materials formulated with superplasticizers. Moreover those techniques do not enable to distinguish free PEO from PCE in the superplasticizer. Here we discuss two highly sensitive analytical methods based on mass spectrometry suitable to perform a rapid detection of superplasticizer compounds traces in CEM I cement paste leachates: MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, is used to determine the free PEO content in the leachate. However, industrial copolymers (such as PCE) are characterized by high molecular weight and polymolecular index. These two parameters lead to limitation concerning analysis of copolymers by MALDI-TOFMS. In this study, we demonstrate how pyrolysis and a Thermally assisted Hydrolysis/Methylation coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, provides good results for the detection of PCE copolymer traces in CEM I cement paste

  8. Strain sensitivity of carbon nanotube cement-based composites for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonella; Ubertini, Filippo; Laflamme, Simon; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, Annibale L.; Kenny, Josè M.

    2016-04-01

    Cement-based smart sensors appear particularly suitable for monitoring applications, due to their self-sensing abilities, their ease of use, and their numerous possible field applications. The addition of conductive carbon nanofillers into a cementitious matrix provides the material with piezoresistive characteristics and enhanced sensitivity to mechanical alterations. The strain-sensing ability is achieved by correlating the variation of external loads or deformations with the variation of specific electrical parameters, such as the electrical resistance. Among conductive nanofillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for the fabrication of self-monitoring composites. However, some issues related to the filler dispersion and the mix design of cementitious nanoadded materials need to be further investigated. For instance, a small difference in the added quantity of a specific nanofiller in a cement-matrix composite can substantially change the quality of the dispersion and the strain sensitivity of the resulting material. The present research focuses on the strain sensitivity of concrete, mortar and cement paste sensors fabricated with different amounts of carbon nanotube inclusions. The aim of the work is to investigate the quality of dispersion of the CNTs in the aqueous solutions, the physical properties of the fresh mixtures, the electromechanical properties of the hardened materials, and the sensing properties of the obtained transducers. Results show that cement-based sensors with CNT inclusions, if properly implemented, can be favorably applied to structural health monitoring.

  9. Effects of TEA·HCl hardening accelerator on the workability of cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenhao; Ding, Zhaoyang; Chen, Yanwen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the test is to research the influence rules of TEA·HCl on the workability of cement paste and concrete. Based on the features of the new hardening accelerator, an experimental analysis system were established through different dosages of hardening accelerator, and the feasibility of such accelerator to satisfy the need of practical engineering was verified. The results show that adding of the hardening accelerator can accelerate the cement hydration, and what’s more, when the dosage was 0.04%, the setting time was the shortest while the initial setting time and final setting time were 130 min and 180 min, respectively. The initial fluidity of cement paste of adding accelerator was roughly equivalent compared with that of blank. After 30 min, fluidity loss would decrease with the dosage increasing, but fluidity may increase. The application of the hardening accelerator can make the early workability of concrete enhance, especially the slump loss of 30 min can improve more significantly. The bleeding rate of concrete significantly decreases after adding TEA·HCl. The conclusion is that the new hardening accelerator can meet the need of the workability of cement-based materials in the optimum dosage range.

  10. A micromechanical study of drying and carbonation effects in cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. Q.; Shao, J. F.; Kondo, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a micromechanical study of mechanical properties of cement-based materials by taking into account effects of water saturation degree and carbonation process. To this end, the cement-based materials are considered as a composite material constituted with a cement matrix and aggregates (inclusions). Further, the cement matrix is seen as a porous medium with a solid phase (CSH) and pores. Using a two-step homogenization procedure, a closed-form micromechanical model is first formulated to describe the basic mechanical behavior of materials. This model is then extended to partially saturated materials in order to account for the effects of water saturation degree on the mechanical properties. Finally, considering the solid phase change and porosity variation related to the carbonation process, the micromechanical model is coupled with the chemical reaction and is able to describe the consequences of carbonation on the macroscopic mechanical properties of material. Some comparisons between numerical results and experimental data are presented.

  11. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-07-21

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  12. Brownfield reuse of dredged New York Harbor sediment by cement-based solidification/stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Loest, K.; Wilk, C.M.

    1998-12-31

    Newly effective federal regulations restrict the ocean disposal of sediments dredged from the harbors of New York and Newark. The New York Port Authority is faced with a critical situation: find land-based disposal/uses for 10`s of millions cubic yards of sediments or lose standing as a commercial port for ocean-going ships. One of the technologies now being employed to manage the sediments is portland cement-based solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment. At least 4 million cubic yards of the sediments will undergo cement-based S/S treatment. This treatment will immobilize heavy metals, dioxin, PCBs and other organic contaminants in the sediment. The treatment changes the sediment from a environmental liability into a valuable structural fill. This structural fill is being used at two properties. The first property is an old municipal landfill in Port Newark, New Jersey. The treated sediments are being used as structural fill to cover about 20 acres of the landfill. This will allow planned redevelopment of the landfill property into a shopping mall. The second property called the Seaboard site, was the location of a coal gasification facility and later a wood preservation facility. This 160-acre property has been designated for brownfield redevelopment. Over 4 million cubic yards of treated sediments will eventually cover this site. Portland cement is the selected S/S binding reagent. Nearly 500,000 tons of cement will eventually be used to treat the sediments. Cement was selected for its ability to (a) change the peanut butter-like consistency of the sediments into a structural material and (b) to physically and chemically immobilize hazardous constituents in the sediment.

  13. Acoustic evaluation of cementing quality using obliquely incident ultrasonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wen-Xing; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Che, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic cement bond logging is a widely used method for evaluating cementing quality. Conventional ultrasonic cement bond logging uses vertical incidence and cannot accurately evaluate lightweight cement bonding. Oblique incidence is a new technology for evaluating cement quality with improved accuracy for lightweight cements. In this study, we simulated models of acoustic impedance of cement and cementing quality using ultrasonic oblique incidence, and we obtained the relation between cementing quality, acoustic impedance of cement, and the acoustic attenuation coefficient of the A0-mode and S0-mode Lamb waves. Then, we simulated models of different cement thickness and we obtained the relation between cement thickness and the time difference of the arrival between the A0 and A0' modes.

  14. Sulfate deterioration of cement-based materials examined by x-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Nikhila N.; Kurtis, Kimberly E.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Jupe, Andrew C.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2004-10-01

    Sulfate ions present in soil, groundwater, seawater, decaying organic matter, acid rain, and industrial effluent adversely affect the long-term durability of portland cement concrete, but lack of complete understanding of the nature and consequences of sulfate attack hamper our ability to accurately predict performance of concrete in sulfate-rich environments. One impediment to improved understanding of sulfate deterioration of cement-based materials has been the lack of appropriate non-destructive characterization techniques. Laboratory x-ray microtomography affords an opportunity to study in situ the evolution of physical manifestations of damage due to sulfate exposure. The influence of materials selection and mixture parameters - including water-to-cement ratio, cement type, and presence or absence of aggregate, as well as the influence of sulfate exposure conditions, including sulfate and cation type (i.e., Na2SO4 and MgSO4) and concentration - have been examined by microtomography to determine their influence on the rate and character of the sulfate-induced deterioration.

  15. Effectiveness of cement-based systems for stabilization and solidification of spent pot liner inorganic fraction.

    PubMed

    Silveira, B I; Dantas, A E M; Blasques, J E M; Santos, R K P

    2003-03-17

    Approximately 7000 t of spent pot liner (SPL) wastes are generated annually from activities associated with Alumi;nio Brasileiro S.A. (ALBRAS) plant located at Barcarena, Pará state, Brazil. The inorganic fraction of SPL contains high level of toxic compounds like cyanide and fluoride; its safe disposal has been the subject of serious discussions in Brazil. This study evaluated the option of a cement-based stabilization/solidification system as an effective means for safe disposal of SPL inorganic fraction in the field. The studies were carried out with concrete hexagonal blocks manufactured with a constant mass of 10% (w/w) of waste, 20% (w/w) of cement, and varied percentages of water, coarse aggregate, sand, and additives. The concrete matrices porosity and compressive strength were controlled by using microsilica (MS) and superplaticizer (SP). The results showed an average pH values for the SPL inorganic fraction and fragmented blocks of 10.2 and 11.1, respectively. Mixing the waste with concrete ingredients the solidification/stabilization effectiveness for the leachable cyanides and fluorides were of 59.33 and 57.95%, respectively. The results showed that the water/cement (W/C) ratio reduction through superplasticizer addition improved the compressive strength and the required value of 35 MPa was reached with blocks manufactured with 10 and 15% (weight of cement) of microsilica, after 28 days of curing time.

  16. Development and comparison of neural network based soft sensors for online estimation of cement clinker quality.

    PubMed

    Pani, Ajaya Kumar; Vadlamudi, Vamsi Krishna; Mohanta, Hare Krishna

    2013-01-01

    The online estimation of process outputs mostly related to quality, as opposed to their belated measurement by means of hardware measuring devices and laboratory analysis, represents the most valuable feature of soft sensors. As of now there have been very few attempts for soft sensing of cement clinker quality which is mostly done by offline laboratory analysis resulting at times in low quality clinker. In the present work three different neural network based soft sensors have been developed for online estimation of cement clinker properties. Different input and output data for a rotary cement kiln were collected from a cement plant producing 10,000 tons of clinker per day. The raw data were pre-processed to remove the outliers and the resulting missing data were imputed. The processed data were then used to develop a back propagation neural network model, a radial basis network model and a regression network model to estimate the clinker quality online. A comparison of the estimation capabilities of the three models has been done by simulation of the developed models. It was observed that radial basis network model produced better estimation capabilities than the back propagation and regression network models.

  17. Analysis of Metal Contents in Portland Type V and MTA-Based Cements

    PubMed Central

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), the concentration levels of 11 metals in Type V gray and structural white PC, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Bio. Samples, containing one gram of each tested cement, were prepared and transferred to a 100 mL Teflon tube with a mixture of 7.0 mL of nitric acid and 21 mL of hydrochloric acid. After the reaction, the mixture was filtered and then volumed to 50 mL of distilled water. For each metal, specific patterns were determined from universal standards. Arsenic quantification was performed by hydride generator. The analysis was performed five times and the data were statistically analyzed at 5% level of significance. Only the cadmium presented concentration levels of values lower than the quantification limit of the device. The AAS analysis showed increased levels of calcium, nickel, and zinc in structural white PC. Type V PC presented the greatest concentration levels of arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and manganese (P < 0.05). Bismuth was found in all cements, and the lowest concentration levels were observed in Portland cements, while the highest were observed in ProRoot MTA. Both PC and MTA-based cements showed evidence of metals inclusion. PMID:25436238

  18. Analysis of metal contents in Portland Type V and MTA-based cements.

    PubMed

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Dalla Villa, Ricardo; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), the concentration levels of 11 metals in Type V gray and structural white PC, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Bio. Samples, containing one gram of each tested cement, were prepared and transferred to a 100 mL Teflon tube with a mixture of 7.0 mL of nitric acid and 21 mL of hydrochloric acid. After the reaction, the mixture was filtered and then volumed to 50 mL of distilled water. For each metal, specific patterns were determined from universal standards. Arsenic quantification was performed by hydride generator. The analysis was performed five times and the data were statistically analyzed at 5% level of significance. Only the cadmium presented concentration levels of values lower than the quantification limit of the device. The AAS analysis showed increased levels of calcium, nickel, and zinc in structural white PC. Type V PC presented the greatest concentration levels of arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and manganese (P < 0.05). Bismuth was found in all cements, and the lowest concentration levels were observed in Portland cements, while the highest were observed in ProRoot MTA. Both PC and MTA-based cements showed evidence of metals inclusion.

  19. GIS Based Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis For Cement Plant Site Selection For Cuddalore District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, A.

    2015-12-01

    India's cement industry is a vital part of its economy, providing employment to more than a million people. On the back of growing demands, due to increased construction and infrastructural activities cement market in India is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.96 percent during the period 2014-2019. In this study, GIS-based spatial Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) is used to determine the optimum and alternative sites to setup a cement plant. This technique contains a set of evaluation criteria which are quantifiable indicators of the extent to which decision objectives are realized. In intersection with available GIS (Geographical Information System) and local ancillary data, the outputs of image analysis serves as input for the multi-criteria decision making system. Moreover, the following steps were performed so as to represent the criteria in GIS layers, which underwent the GIS analysis in order to get several potential sites. Satellite imagery from LANDSAT 8 and ASTER DEM were used for the analysis. Cuddalore District in Tamil Nadu was selected as the study site as limestone mining is already being carried out in that region which meets the criteria of raw material for cement production. Several other criteria considered were land use land cover (LULC) classification (built-up area, river, forest cover, wet land, barren land, harvest land and agriculture land), slope, proximity to road, railway and drainage networks.

  20. Nature of hydrogen bonding in charged hydrogen-bonded complexes and imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2011-12-15

    The nature of hydrogen bonding was compared in neutral complexes and negatively charged complexes consisting of either the HF molecule or the halide anion (fluoride and chloride) and the C-H bond in the methane molecule with a varying degree of fluorination (such as CH(4), CH(2)F(2), and CHF(3)). Both linear (C(3v) symmetry) and nonlinear (C(2v) symmetry) hydrogen-bonded complexes were studied. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory was used to decompose interaction energies into fundamental components such as Coulomb, repulsion, induction and dispersion to analyze the interplay among these forces in stabilizing hydrogen bonding. In the linear charged complexes, both Coulomb attraction and induction significantly contributed to the stabilization of hydrogen bonding. In the nonlinear charged complexes, mainly Coulomb attraction contributed to the HB complex stabilization, with the inductive forces playing a less important role. Contrary to the neutral complexes, dispersion forces played only a marginal role in the charged complexes. Interplay between the fundamental forces was also investigated in the ion pairs of the imidazolium-based ionic liquid, [C(2)mim]Cl, that were categorized as either (1) typical ion-ion interaction, with the anion interacting from above or below the imidazolium plane; or (2) hydrogen-bonding interaction, with the anion interacting with the C2-H bond of the imidazolium cation. Both types of interactions were found to induce similar charge transfers, and the analysis of the energetic components revealed only a slight difference in the ion pairs studied: (1) both interactions were electrostatically driven, between 86% and 88% of the overall attractive energy, with the electrostatic component being slightly lower in the hydrogen-bonded ion pairs by ~8 kJ mol(-1); and (2) dispersion forces were found to be stronger in the typical ion-ion interactions by ~15 kJ mol(-1) and could be possible only due to the fact that the anion was able to move

  1. Characterisation and use of biomass fly ash in cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Rajamma, Rejini; Ball, Richard J; Tarelho, Luís A C; Allen, Geoff C; Labrincha, João A; Ferreira, Victor M

    2009-12-30

    This paper presents results about the characterisation of the biomass fly ashes sourced from a thermal power plant and from a co-generation power plant located in Portugal, and the study of new cement formulations incorporated with the biomass fly ashes. The study includes a comparative analysis of the phase formation, setting and mechanical behaviour of the new cement-fly ash formulations based on these biomass fly ashes. Techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and environmental scanning electron spectroscopy (ESEM) were used to determine the structure and composition of the formulations. Fly ash F1 from the thermal power plant contained levels of SiO(2), Al(2)O(3) and Fe(2)O(3) indicating the possibility of exhibiting pozzolanic properties. Fly ash F2 from the co-generation plant contained a higher quantity of CaO ( approximately 25%). The fly ashes are similar to class C fly ashes according to EN 450 on the basis of chemical composition. The hydration rate and phase formation are greatly dependant on the samples' alkali content and water to binder (w/b) ratio. In cement based mortar with 10% fly ash the basic strength was maintained, however, when 20% fly ash was added the mechanical strength was around 75% of the reference cement mortar. The fly ashes contained significant levels of chloride and sulphate and it is suggested that the performance of fly ash-cement binders could be improved by the removal or control of these chemical species.

  2. Physico-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of synthesized cement based on plasma- and wet technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Natalya; Skripnikova, Nelli

    2016-01-01

    In this work we studied the influence of plasma-chemical technology of cement clinker synthesis under conditions of high-concentrated heat streams on the properties of cement on fixing such factors as raw-material type (chemical and mineralogical composition), fraction composition, homogenization and module characters of the raw-material mixture. In this connection the sludge of the cement plant in town Angarsk, based on which the cement clinker synthesis using the wet- and plasma-chemical technologies was performed, was used in the studies. The results of chemical X-ray-phase analysis, petrography of cement clinkers, differential scanning colorimetry of hardened cement paste are represented in this work. The analysis of building-technical properties of inorganic viscous substances was performed. It was found that in using the identical raw-material mixture the cement produced with temperature higher by 1650 °C than the traditional one may indicate the higher activity. The hardened cement paste compressive strength at the age of 28 days was higher than the strength of the reference samples by 40.8-41.4 %.

  3. A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Wichlas, Florian Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene; Rump, Jens; Chopra, Sascha S.; Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.; Bail, Hermann J.

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

  4. A comprehensive multiscale moisture transport analysis: From porous reference silicates to cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmi, H.; Petit, D.; Tariel, V.; Korb, J.-P.; Denoyel, R.; Bouchet, R.; Levitz, P.

    2015-07-01

    Natural and manufactured disordered systems are ubiquitous and often involve hierarchical structures. This structural organization optimizes defined physical properties at several scales from molecular to representative volumes where the usual homogenization approach becomes efficient. For studying a particular physical property on these systems it is thus required to use a general method of analysis based on the joint application of complementary techniques covering the whole set of time-and length-scales. Here we review a comprehensive multiscale method presented for analyzing the three-dimensional moisture transport in hierarchical porous media such as synthesized reference silicates and cement-based materials. Several techniques (NMR spectroscopy, relaxometry, diffusometry, X-ray micro-tomography, conductivity…) have been used to evidence the interplay between the different scales involved in this transport process. This method allows answering the general opened questions concerning the scale dependence of such a moisture transport in cement-based materials. We outline the main results of the multiscale techniques applied on reference porous silicates allowing separating the impact of geometry, hydric state and wettability on the moisture transport. Based on this approach, we prove that this transport at micro- and meso-scale is determinant to modify the moisture at macro-scale during setting or for hardened cement-based materials.

  5. Effect of silica coating combined to a MDP-based primer on the resin bond to Y-TZP ceramic.

    PubMed

    May, Liliana Gressler; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Capelli, Diana Barca; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of silica coating and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP)-based primer applications upon the bonding durability of a MDP-based resin cement to a yttrium stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Ninety-six Y-TZP tabs were embedded in an acrylic resin (free surface for adhesion: 5 × 5 mm(2)), ground finished and randomly divided into four groups (N = 24) according to the ceramic surface conditioning: (1) cleaning with isopropanol (ALC); (2) ALC + phosphoric acid etching + MDP-based primer application (MDP-primer); (3) silica coating + 3-methacryloyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPS)-based coupling agent application (SiO2 + MPS-Sil); and (4) SiO2 + MDP-primer. The MDP-based resin cement was applied on the treated surface using a cylindrical mold (diameter= 3 mm). Half of the specimens from each surface conditioning were stored in distilled water (37 °C, 24 h) before testing. Another half of the specimens were stored (90 days) and thermo-cycled (12,000 x) during this period (90 d/TC) before testing. A shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Two factors composed the experimental design: ceramic conditioning strategy (in four levels) and storage condition (in two levels), totaling eight groups. After 90 d/TC (Tukey; p < 0.05), SiO2 + MDP-primer (24.40 MPa) promoted the highest SBS. The ALC and MDP-primer groups debonded spontaneously during 90 d/TC. Bonding values were higher and more stable in the SiO2 groups. The use of MDP-primer after silica coating increased the bond strength.

  6. A multi-scale micromechanical investigation on thermal conductivity of cement-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiahan; Xu, Shilang; Zeng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Cement-based composites (CBCs) are one of the most widely used materials in construction. An appealing characterization of thermal conductivity of CBCs plays an essential role to evaluate the energy consumption in buildings and to facilitate the development of novel thermal insulation materials. Based on Eshelby equivalent inclusion principle and multi-scale methodology, this paper attempted to present a generalized multi-scale micromechanical model in terms of thermal performance of the CBCs, which covers some classic models for thermal conductivity estimation. A Mori-Tanaka homogenization method was applied to investigate the thermal conductivity of the CBCs of different compounds, water-to-cement ratios and curing ages. In addition, saturation degree factor was considered. The results of this model are in good agreement with the experimental value, showing that the multi-scale model developed in this paper is able to evaluate the thermal conductivity of the CBCs in different conditions.

  7. Effect of thermally induced strain on optical fiber sensors embedded in cement-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-bo; Zhou, Li-min; Jin, Wei; Lau, K. T.; Poon, Chi-kin

    2003-04-01

    A critical issue in developing a fiber-optic strain gauge is its codependency on temperature and strain. Any changes in the output of the optical fiber sensor due to its own thermal sensitivity and the thermal expansion of the most material will be misinterpreted as a change in shape-induced strain in the structure. This codependence is often referred to as thermally induced apparent strain or simply apparent strain. In this paper, an analytical model was developed to evaluate the thermally induced strain in fiber optic sensors embedded in cement-based composites. The effects of thermal induced strain on embedded optical fiber were measured with a white-light fiber-optic Michelson sensing interferometer for a number of cement-based host materials.

  8. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resin Bonded to Resin-Modified Glass-ionomer Containing Micro- and Nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Moradian, Marzie; Motamedi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) to composite resin has a very important role in the durability of sandwich restorations. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent candidate as a filler material for improving the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cement. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding micro- and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder to RMGI on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nanofilled and silorane-based composite resins bonded to RMGI containing micro- and nano-HA. Materials and Method Sixty cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a hole of 5.5×2.5 mm (diameter × height) were prepared and randomly divided into 6 groups as Group 1 with RMGI (Fuji II LC) plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 2 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group3 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group 4 with RMGI plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 5 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90Filtek composite resin; and Group 6 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin. The specimens were stored in water (37° C, 1 week) and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C). SBS test was performed by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0.05). Results There were significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (RMGI groups, p= 0.025), and groups 3 and 6 (RMGI+ nano-HA groups, p= 0.012). However, among Z350 and P90 specimens, no statistically significant difference was detected in the SBS values (p= 0.19, p= 0.083, respectively). Conclusion RMGI containing HA can improve the bond strength to methacrylate-based in comparison to silorane-based composite resins. Meanwhile, RMGI

  9. Natural Bond Critical Point analysis: quantitative relationships between natural bond orbital-based and QTAIM-based topological descriptors of chemical bonding.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Frank

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a "Natural Bond Critical Point" (NBCP) module for the natural bond orbital (NBO) program that allows mutual analysis of NBO-based versus Bader-type quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) topological descriptors of chemical bonding interactions. Conventional QTAIM bond path and bond critical point (BCP) descriptors deduced from total electron density ρ(r) can thereby be compared with analogous "natural" (NBCP) descriptors for idealized densities ρ(NAIM)(r) composed solely from NBO-based "natural atoms in molecules" (NAIM) at the terminal nuclei. Standard ρ(r(BCP)) and [nabla](2)ρ(r(BCP)) descriptors can also be decomposed into unique contributions from individual NBOs or other localized, semilocalized, or delocalized orbital components. These results allow one to recognize many relationships between QTAIM and NBO analyses, showing why close correlations are often found between NBO-based versus ρ(r(BCP))-based characterizations of chemical bonding interactions, despite strongly divergent conceptions of "the atom in the molecule."

  10. Feasibility of using reject fly ash in cement-based stabilization/solidification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.S.; Qiao, X.C.; Cheeseman, C.R.; Lin, Z.S.

    2006-01-15

    Stabilization/solidification (s/s) has been routinely used for the final treatment of hazardous wastes prior to land disposal. These processes involve adding one or more solidifying reagents into the waste to transform it into a monolithic solid with improved structural integrity. Cement-based systems with partial replacement by pulverized fuel ash (PFA) have been widely used to minimize leaching of contaminants from hazardous wastes. The finer fraction of PFA ({lt}45 {mu} m, fine fly ash, MA), produced by passing the raw ash through a classifying process is commonly used in s/s processes. Low-grade fly ash is rejected (rFA) from the ash classifying process, and is largely unused due to high carbon content and large particle size but represents a significant proportion of PFA. This paper presents experimental results of a study that has assessed the feasibility of using rFA in the cement-based s/s of a synthetic heavy metal waste. Results were compared to mixes containing fFA. The strength results show that cement-based waste forms with rFA replacement are suitable for disposal at landfill and that the addition of heavy metal sludge can increase the degree of hydration of fly ash and decrease the porosity of samples. Adding Ca(OH){sub 2} and flue gas desulphurization sludge reduces the retarding effect of heavy metals on strength development. The results of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and Dynamic Leach Test show that rFA can be used in cement-based s/s wastes without compromising performance of the product.

  11. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of cement-based structures immobilising radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Spasova, L.M.; Ojovan, M.I.; Hayes, M.; Godfrey, H.

    2007-07-01

    The long term performance of cementitious structures immobilising radioactive waste can be affected by physical and chemical processes within the encapsulating materials such as formation of new phases (e.g., vaterite, brucite), degradation of cement phases (e.g., CSH gel, portlandite), degradation of some waste components (e.g., organics), corrosion of metallic constituents (aluminium, magnesium), gas emission, further hydration etc. The corrosion of metals in the high pH cementitious environment is of especial concern as it can potentially cause wasteform cracking. One of the perspective non-destructive methods used to monitor and assess the mechanical properties of materials and structures is based on an acoustic emission (AE) technique. In this study an AE non-destructive technique was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious structures with encapsulated metallic waste such as aluminium. AE signals generated as a result of aluminium corrosion in a small-size blast furnace slag (BFS)/ordinary Portland cement (OPC) sample were detected, recorded and analysed. A procedure for AE data analysis including conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis was applied and demonstrated to provide information on the aluminium corrosion process and its impact on the mechanical performance of the encapsulating cement matrix. (authors)

  13. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS.

  14. Expansive Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-10-01

    either burned simultaneously with a portland ce4nt or !r;terground with portland cement clinker ; Type M - a mixture of portland cement, calcium-aluminate... clinker that is interground with portland clinker or blended with portland cement or, alternately, it may be formed simul- taneously vrith the portland ... clinker compounds during the burning process. 3. Expansive cement, Type M is either a mixture of portland cement, calcium aluminate cement, and calcium

  15. Effect of carbon nanotubes on properties of cement-sand-based piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunjung; Zhao, Ping; Enemuoh, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) were dispersed in a cement-sand-based piezoelectric smart composite as conductive fillers to improve its poling efficiency, leading to a desirable piezoelectric effect. By introducing a small amount of CNTs, continuous electric networks between Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) particles were created, thus making the composite poling easier. Specimens were prepared by mixing PZT powders, Portland cement and sand with CNTs, followed by pressing it with a load frame system. The effect of quantity of CNTs ranging from 0 to 1.0 volume percent on properties of the composite, including its piezoelectric coefficient, dielectric constant and loss, and sensing effects, were characterized. It was found that the addition of CNTs facilitated effective poling at room temperature and improved the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composite. The composite modified by CNTs achieved optimal properties when the CNTs content was 0.7 vol.%.

  16. Degradation of recycled PET fibers in Portland cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, D.A. . E-mail: denise@ecv.ufsc.br; Betioli, A.M.; Gleize, P.J.P.; Roman, H.R.; Gomez, L.A.; Ribeiro, J.L.D.

    2005-09-01

    In order to investigate the durability of recycled PET fibers embedded in cement-based materials, fiber-reinforced mortar specimens were tested until 164 days after mixing. Compressive, tensile, and flexural strengths, elasticity modulus, and toughness of the specimens were determined. The mortars were also analyzed by SEM. The results have shown that PET fibers have no significant influence on mortars strengths and elasticity modulus. However, the toughness indexes I {sub 5}, I {sub 10}, and I {sub 20} decreased with time due to the degradation of PET fibers by alkaline hydrolysis when embedded in the cement matrix. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and SEM analysis of PET fibers immersed and kept for 150 days in alkaline solutions supported the conclusions.

  17. Cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of cements based on calcium silicate and of dental formocresol.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyunjung; Jeong, Youngdan; Kim, Miri

    2017-03-01

    Increasing interest is being paid to the toxicities of dental materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of endodontic compounds to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) reproductive cells. Cultured CHO-K1 cells were treated with dental formocresol, two types of calcium hydroxide paste, and two types of mineral trioxide aggregate cement for 24h. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was performed on each culture, and the micronucleus frequency was determined by performing a micronucleus assay. Alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay were used to detect DNA damage. Out of the five materials tested, only dental formocresol significantly increased DNA damage. The mineral trioxide aggregate cements based on calcium silicate were not found to be potentially genotoxic. The data suggest that dental formocresol should not be recommended for use in vital pulp therapy on young teeth.

  18. Reinterpretation of the bond-valence model with bond-order formalism: An improved bond-valence-based interatomic potential for PbTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi; Grinberg, Ilya; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2013-09-01

    We present a modified bond-valence model of PbTiO3 based on the principles of bond-valence and bond-valence vector conservation. The relationship between the bond-valence model and the bond-order potential is derived analytically in the framework of a tight-binding model. An energy term, bond-valence vector energy, is introduced into the atomistic model and the potential parameters are reoptimized. This model potential can be applied both to canonical-ensemble (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal ensemble (NPT) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This model reproduces the experimental phase transition in NVT MD simulations and also exhibits the experimental sequence of temperature-driven and pressure-driven phase transitions in NPT simulations. We expect that this improved bond-valence model can be applied to a broad range of inorganic materials.

  19. Continuing Bonds in Bereavement: An Attachment Theory Based Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Nigel P.; Gao, Beryl; Paderna, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    An attachment theory based perspective on the continuing bond to the deceased (CB) is proposed. The value of attachment theory in specifying the normative course of CB expression and in identifying adaptive versus maladaptive variants of CB expression based on their deviation from this normative course is outlined. The role of individual…

  20. In vitro degradation and in vivo resorption of dicalcium phosphate cement based grafts.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Zhang, Yu Ling; Grover, Liam; Merle, Géraldine E; Tamimi, Faleh; Barralet, Jake

    2015-10-01

    There are two types of DCP: dihydrated (brushite) and anhydrous (monetite). After implantation, brushite converts to hydroxyapatite (HA) which resorbs very slowly. This conversion is not observed after implantation of monetite cements and result in a greater of resorption. The precise mechanisms of resorption and degradation however of these ceramics remain uncertain. This study was designed to investigate the effect of: porosity, surface area and hydration on in vitro degradation and in vivo resorption of DCP. Brushite and two types of monetite cement based grafts (produced by wet and dry thermal conversion) were aged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and bovine serum solutions in vitro and were implanted subcutaneously in rats. Here we show that for high relative porosity grafts (50-65%), solubility and surface area does not play a significant role towards in vitro mass loss with disintegration and fragmentation being the main factors dictating mass loss. For grafts having lower relative porosity (35-45%), solubility plays a more crucial role in mass loss during in vitro ageing and in vivo resorption. Also, serum inhibited dissolution and the formation of HA in brushite cements. However, when aged in PBS, brushite undergoes phase conversion to a mixture of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and HA. This phase conversion was not observed for monetite upon ageing (in both serum and PBS) or in subcutaneous implantation. This study provides greater understanding of the degradation and resorption process of DCP based grafts, allowing us to prepare bone replacement materials with more predictable resorption profiles.

  1. Evaluation of frost damage in cement-based materials by a nonlinear elastic wave technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Soriano, L.; Payá, J.

    2014-03-01

    Frost resistance of concrete is a major concern in cold regions. RILEM (International union of laboratories and experts in construction materials, systems and structures) recommendations provide two alternatives for evaluating frost damage by nondestructive evaluation methods for concrete like materials. The first method is based on the ultrasonic pulse velocity measurement, while the second alternative technique is based on the resonant vibration test. In this study, we monitor the frost damage in Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5 and aggregate to cement ratio of 3. The samples are completely saturated by water and are frozen for 24 hours at -25°C. The frost damage is monitored after 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 freezing-thawing cycles by nonlinear impact resonance acoustic spectroscopy (NIRAS). The results obtained are compared with those obtained by resonant vibration tests, the second alternative technique recommended by RILEM. The obtained results show that NIRAS is more sensitive to early stages of damage than the standard resonant vibration tests.

  2. A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1994-03-01

    The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

  3. IMPACT OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL MUD CONTAMINATION ON WELLBORE CEMENT- FORMATION SHEAR BOND STRENGTH Authors: Arome Oyibo1 and Mileva Radonjic1 * 1. Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, aoyibo1@tigers.lsu.edu, mileva@lsu.edu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyibo, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement has been used to provide well integrity through zonal isolation in oil & gas wells and geothermal wells. Cementing is also used to provide mechanical support for the casing and protect the casing from corrosive fluids. Failure of cement could be caused by several factors ranging from poor cementing, failure to completely displace the drilling fluids to failure on the path of the casing. A failed cement job could result in creation of cracks and micro annulus through which produced fluids could migrate to the surface which could lead to sustained casing pressure, contamination of fresh water aquifer and blow out in some cases. In addition, cement failures could risk the release of chemicals substances from hydraulic fracturing into fresh water aquifer during the injection process. To achieve proper cementing, the drilling fluid should be completely displaced by the cement slurry. However, this is hard to achieve in practice, some mud is usually left on the wellbore which ends up contaminating the cement afterwards. The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the impact of both physical and chemical mud contaminations on cement-formation bond strength for different types of formations. Physical contamination occurs when drilling fluids (mud) dries on the surface of the formation forming a mud cake. Chemical contamination on the other hand occurs when the drilling fluids which is still in the liquid form interacts chemically with the cement during a cementing job. We investigated the impact of the contamination on the shear bond strength and the changes in the mineralogy of the cement at the cement-formation interface to ascertain the impact of the contamination on the cement-formation bond strength. Berea sandstone and clay rich shale cores were bonded with cement cores with the cement-formation contaminated either physically or chemically. For the physically contaminated composite cores, we have 3 different sample designs: clean

  4. Cement Based Batteries and their Potential for Use in Low Power Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, A.; Holmes, N.; Norton, B.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the development of an innovative cement-electrolyte battery for low power operations such as cathodic protection of reinforced concrete. A battery design was refined by altering different constituents and examining the open circuit voltage, resistor loaded current and lifespan. The final design consisted of a copper plate cathode, aluminium plate anode, and a cement electrolyte which included additives of carbon black, plasticiser, Alum salt and Epsom salt. A relationship between age, temperature and hydration of the cell and the current it produced was determined. It was found that sealing the battery using varnish increased the moisture retention and current output. Current was also found to increase with internal temperature of the electrolyte and connecting two cells in parallel further doubled or even tripled the current. Parallel-connected cells could sustain an average current of 0.35mA through a 10Ω resistor over two weeks of recording. The preliminary findings demonstrate that cement-based batteries can produce sufficient sustainable electrical outputs with the correct materials and arrangement of components. Work is ongoing to determine how these batteries can be recharged using photovoltaics which will further enhance their sustainability properties.

  5. Characterization of new acrylic bone cement based on methyl methacrylate/1-hydroxypropyl methacrylate monomer.

    PubMed

    Pascual, B; Goñi, I; Gurruchaga, M

    1999-01-01

    New formulations of acrylic bone cement based on methyl methacrylate/1-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (MMA/HPMA) monomers were developed with the purpose of obtaining more ductile materials with reduced polymerization shrinkage. In this way, the ductility of such materials increased, but the introduction of high percentages of the hydrophilic component produced an important decrease in Young's modulus and strength. To ascertain the reason for the deterioration of the tensile parameters, an analysis by scanning electron microscopy of these formulations was carried out; it revealed poor adhesion between the matrix and poly(MMA) beads. We also observed that the polymerization shrinkage increased as the amount of hydrophilic monomer in the formulation decreased, and the 50% (v/v) HPMA modified bone cement compensated for this volume reduction with its water uptake swelling. Measurements taken on the setting time and polymerization exotherm showed a decrease in the former and an increase in the latter, because of the introduction of a more reactive monomer in the bone cement formulation.

  6. Bactericidal strontium-releasing injectable bone cements based on bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Delia S; Karpukhina, Natalia; Kedia, Gopal; Bhat, Aditya; Law, Robert V; Radecka, Izabela; Hill, Robert G

    2013-01-06

    Strontium-releasing injectable bone cements may have the potential to prevent implant-related infections through the bactericidal action of strontium, while enhancing bone formation in patients suffering from osteoporosis. A melt-derived bioactive glass (BG) series (SiO2–CaO–CaF2–MgO) with 0–50% of calcium substituted with strontium on a molar base were produced. By mixing glass powder, poly(acrylic acid) and water, cements were obtained which can be delivered by injection and set in situ, giving compressive strength of up to 35 MPa. Strontium release was dependent on BG composition with increasing strontium substitution resulting in higher concentrations in the medium. Bactericidal effects were tested on Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis; cell counts were reduced by up to three orders of magnitude over 6 days. Results show that bactericidal action can be increased through BG strontium substitution, allowing for the design of novel antimicrobial and bone enhancing cements for use in vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty for treating osteoporosis-related vertebral compression fractures.

  7. Bactericidal strontium-releasing injectable bone cements based on bioactive glasses

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Delia S.; Karpukhina, Natalia; Kedia, Gopal; Bhat, Aditya; Law, Robert V.; Radecka, Izabela; Hill, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Strontium-releasing injectable bone cements may have the potential to prevent implant-related infections through the bactericidal action of strontium, while enhancing bone formation in patients suffering from osteoporosis. A melt-derived bioactive glass (BG) series (SiO2–CaO–CaF2–MgO) with 0–50% of calcium substituted with strontium on a molar base were produced. By mixing glass powder, poly(acrylic acid) and water, cements were obtained which can be delivered by injection and set in situ, giving compressive strength of up to 35 MPa. Strontium release was dependent on BG composition with increasing strontium substitution resulting in higher concentrations in the medium. Bactericidal effects were tested on Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis; cell counts were reduced by up to three orders of magnitude over 6 days. Results show that bactericidal action can be increased through BG strontium substitution, allowing for the design of novel antimicrobial and bone enhancing cements for use in vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty for treating osteoporosis-related vertebral compression fractures. PMID:23097502

  8. DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF A CEMENT BASED SOLID WASTE FORM USING SYNTHETIC UP-1 GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    COOKE, G.A.; LOCKREM, L.L.

    2006-11-10

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site is investigating the conversion of several liquid waste streams from evaporator operations into solid cement-based waste forms. The cement/waste mixture will be poured into plastic-lined mold boxes. After solidification the bags will be removed from the molds and sealed for land disposal at the Hanford Site. The RJ Lee Group, Inc. Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) at Columbia Basin College (CBC) was requested to develop and test a cementitious solids (CS) formulation to solidify evaporated groundwater brine, identified as UP-1, from Basin 43. Laboratory testing of cement/simulant mixtures is required to demonstrate the viability of cement formulations that reduce the overall cost, minimize bleed water and expansion, and provide suitable strength and cure temperature. Technical support provided mixing, testing, and reporting of values for a defined composite solid waste form. In this task, formulations utilizing Basin 43 simulant at varying wt% solids were explored. The initial mixing consisted of making small ({approx} 300 g) batches and casting into 500-mL Nalgene{reg_sign} jars. The mixes were cured under adiabatic conditions and checked for bleed water and consistency at recorded time intervals over a 1-week period. After the results from the preliminary mixing, four formulations were selected for further study. The testing documentation included workability, bleed water analysis (volume and pH) after 24 hours, expansivity/shrinkage, compressive strength, and selected Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach analytes of the resulting solid waste form.

  9. Effect of endodontic sealer and resin luting strategies on pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to dentin.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo J; Bueno, Vanessa C P S; Dias, Carlos T S; Paulillo, Luís A M S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of eugenol-containing endodontic sealers and luting strategy on the pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to dentin. Sixty-four bovine incisors were randomly assigned into two groups of 32 specimens each for obturation procedure with gutta-percha only, or with Pulp Canal Sealer EWT Subsequently, the roots were prepared for the fiber post Reforpost and all specimens of each endodontic sealing procedure were allocated to four groups (n = 8), according to the strategies for post cementation: A) Single Bond 2 and RelyX ARC; B) All Bond 2 and C&B cement; C) All Bond 2 and RelyX ARC; D) Single Bond 2 and C&B Cement. The posts were cemented immediately after the endodontic treatment. The pull-out test was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine (EMIC). Data (Kgf) were submitted to a two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p < or = 0.05). The eugenol-based sealer did not influence the pull-out bond strength of fiber posts regardless of the luting strategy. RelyX ARC showed higher bond strength than C&B Cement when used with Single Bond 2 adhesive system, when the eugenol-based sealer was present. All Bond 2, when associated to all cements studied, promoted similar bond strength, regardless of the eugenol-containing endodontic sealer In conclusion, eugenol-containing sealer did not influence the pull-out bond strength values of the resin luting systems for glass fiber post cementation. The bond system and resin cement association from the same manufacturer had similar bond strength values for dentin.

  10. Immediate impact on the rim zone of cement based materials due to chemical attack

    SciTech Connect

    Schwotzer, M.; Scherer, T.; Gerdes, A.

    2015-01-15

    Cement based materials are in their widespread application fields exposed to various aqueous environments. This can lead to serious chemical changes affecting the durability of the materials. In particular in the context of service life prediction a detailed knowledge of the reaction mechanisms is a necessary base for the evaluation of the aggressivity of an aqueous medium and this is deduced commonly from long term investigations. However, these processes start immediately at the material/water-interface, when a cementitious system comes into contact with an aqueous solution, altering here the chemical composition and microstructure. This rim zone represents the first hurdle that has to be overcome by an attacking aqueous solution. Therefore, the properties of the surface near area should be closely associated with the further course of deterioration processes by reactive transport. In this context short term exposure experiments with hardened cement paste over 4 and 48 h have been carried out with demineralized water, hard tap water and different sulfate solutions. In order to investigate immediate changes in the near-surface region, depth profile cuts have been performed on the cement paste samples by means of focused ion beam preparation techniques. A scanning beam of Gallium ions is applied to cut a sharp edge in the cement paste surface, providing insights into the composition and microstructure of the upper ten to hundred microns. Electron microscopic investigations on such a section of the rim zone, together with surface sensitive X-ray diffraction accompanied by a detailed characterization of the bulk composition confirm that the properties of the material/water interface are of relevance for the durability of cement based systems in contact with aqueous solutions. In this manner, focused ion beam investigations constitute auspicious tools to contribute to a more sophisticated understanding of the reaction mechanisms. - Highlights: • The chemical

  11. Mechanical Behavior and Thermal Stability of Acid-Base Phosphate Cements and Composites Fabricated at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colorado Lopera, Henry Alonso

    This dissertation presents the study of the mechanical behavior and thermal stability of acid-base phosphate cements (PCs) and composites fabricated at ambient temperature. These materials are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). Among other advantages of using PCs when compared with traditional cements are the better mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength), lower density, ultra-fast (controllable) setting time, controllable pH, and an environmentally benign process. Several PCs based on wollastonite and calcium and alumino phosphates after thermal exposure up to 1000°C have been investigated. First, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of wollastonite-based PC (Wo-PC) exposed to temperatures up to 1000°C in air environment were studied. The effects of processing conditions on the curing and shrinkage of the wollastonite-based PC were studied. The chemical reactions and phase transformations during the fabrication and during the thermal exposure are analyzed in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA Then, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of glass, carbon and basalt fiber reinforced Wo-PC composites, were studied using SEM, XRD, TGA. The flexural strength and Weibull statistics were analyzed. A significant strength degradation in the composites were found after the thermal exposure at elevated temperatures due to the interdifusion and chemical reactions across the fibers and the matrix at temperatures over 600°C. To overcome this barrier, we have developed a new PC based on calcium and alumino-phosphates (Ca-Al PCs). The Ca-Al PCs were studied in detail using SEM, XRD, TGA, curing, shrinkage, Weibull statistics, and compression tests. Our study has confirmed that this new composite material is chemically and mechanically stable at temperatures up to 1000°C. Moreover, the compression strength increases after exposure to 1000

  12. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  13. Influence of Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser surface treatment on microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composites to resin cement. Lasers surface treatment of indirect resin composites.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, T M F; de Souza, A C Oliveira; Batista, G R; Borges, A B; Torres, C R G

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the surface pretreatment of indirect resin composite (Signum, Admira Lab and Sinfony) on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement. Sixty samples made of each brand were divided into 6 groups, according to surface treatment: (1) control; (2) controlled-air abrasion with Al2O3; (3) Er:YAG Laser 200 mJ, 10 Hz, for 10s; (4) Er: YAG Laser 300 mJ, 10 Hz, for 10 s; (5) Nd:YAG 80 mJ, S15Hz for 1 min; (6) Nd:YAG 120mJ, 15 Hz for 1 min. After treatments, all the groups received an application of 37% phosphoric acid and adhesive. The pair of blocks of the same brand were cemented to each other with dual resin cement. The blocks were sectioned to obtain resin-resin sticks (1 x1 mm) and analyzed by microtensile bond testing. The bond strength values were statistically different, irrespective of the surface treatment performed, with highest values for Sinfony (43.81 MPa) and lowest values for Signum (32.33 MPA). The groups treated with the Nd:YAG laser showed the lowest bond strength values and power did not interfere in the results, both for Nd:YAG laser and Er:YAG. Controlled-air abrasion with Al203 is an efficient surface treatment method and the use of the Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers reduced bond strength, irrespective of the intensity of energy used.

  14. Sorption kinetics of superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) in fresh Portland cement-based pastes visualized and quantified by neutron radiography and correlated to the progress of cement hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Schroefl, Christof; Mechtcherine, Viktor; Vontobel, Peter; Hovind, Jan; Lehmann, Eberhard

    2015-09-15

    Water sorption of two superabsorbent polymers in cement-based pastes has been characterized by neutron radiography. Cement pastes with W/C of 0.25 and 0.50 and one additionally containing silica fume (W/C = 0.42) were investigated. The SAPs differed in their inherent sorption kinetics in extracted cement pore solution (SAP 1: self-releasing; SAP 2: retentive). Desorption from SAP 1 started very early after paste preparation. Hence, its individual non-retentiveness governs its behavior only. SAP 2 released water into all matrices, but its kinetics were different. In the paste with the highest W/C, some moderate water release was recorded from the beginning. In the other two pastes, SAP 2 retained its stored liquid during the dormant period, i.e., up to the percolation threshold. Intense desorption then set in and continued throughout the acceleration period. These findings explain the pronouncedly higher efficiency of SAP 2 as internal curing admixture as compared to SAP 1.

  15. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  16. The Effect of Simplified Bonding Agents on the Bond Strength to Dentin of Self-Activated Dual-Cure Resin Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-26

    barbituric acids , aromatic sulphonate amides and tert-butyl peroxymaleic acid in dental adhesive resin. J Polym Sci 1999;72:1655- 1668. Lee Ann...is the aim of this study to verify the accuracy of the claim so that clinicians can take advantage of its properties with the comfort of knowing it...the Incompatibilities between Simplified Dental Adhesives and Self-Cure Resin Cements……………..……30 I. Eliminate the Acid -Base Reaction…………..……………31

  17. In vivo evaluation of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement with unchanged mechanical properties in a load-bearing model on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Hausdorf, Jörg; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-07-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate-based bone cements are widely used for fixation of joint replacements. To improve the long-term outcome, bioactive bone cements are aspired to advance the bone-cement interface. This study evaluated the in vivo properties of a new polymethylmethacrylate-based bioactive bone cement with addition of amphiphilic phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate. Previous in vitro studies confirmed bioactive properties in cell culture, as well as unchanged mechanical properties are tests according to ISO 5833:2002.Three different variations of the cement (polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 and polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 + Na2CO3) were compared to conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement. To evaluate the properties under load-bearing conditions, a spacer prosthesis was implanted into the femoral diaphysis of 24 rabbits. Additionally, a cement plug was installed into the proximal tibia. After three months, polished sections with Giemsa surface staining were prepared. The bioactivity was determined using the bone affinity index.The sections showed a good osseointegration of the bioactive bone cement without cement cracks under load-bearing conditions. Regarding the bone affinity index, the bioactive bone cement revealed a significantly higher value in the proximal tibia (25.9-37.7%) and around the spacer prosthesis (36.8-58.9%) compared to the conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement (12.8-17.0%).The results confirm the in vivo bioactivity of this bone cement. The absence of cement cracks indicates a sufficient mechanical stability to fix prostheses with this bioactive cement, but for a final assessment long-term tests are necessary.

  18. Cement evaluation tool: a new approach to cement evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, B.; Dumont, A.; Pittman, D.; Seeman, B.

    1982-08-01

    Cement bond logging achieves its greatest utility when it provides the production engineer with precise indications of cement strength and distribution around the casing. Zone isolation is of critical importance in production. Previous logging systems have yielded measures of cement bond that were circumferential averages of cement quality. These were difficult to interpret. Additionally, they were sensitive to the degree of shear coupling between pipe, cement, and formation and thus were affected by microannulus. The cement evaluation tool (CET) described here overcomes these difficulties. It provides a measurement of cement presence and strength, which is largely insensitive to microannulus. Its log output is interpreted easily. Tool design allows examination of the casing circumferentially at each depth. Impedance behind casing is measured. Laboratory calibration measurements allow this to be presented in terms of cement compressive strength. Cement channels are distinguished easily, and a zone isolation indicator can be presented. Additionally, casing internal diameter and distortion are displayed. European and North American field tests have been completed, and performance for a variety of well conditions is discussed. The ability of the tool to identify channels is confirmed. Sequential runs with and without excess pressure demonstrate immunity to microannulus in cases where CBL is affected but where microannulus is small enough to prohibit hydraulic communication. Geometrical measurements have been good indicators of casing deformation and have identified casing corrosion and wear.

  19. Model-based adhesive shrinkage compensation for increased bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Schlette, Christian; Lakshmanan, Shunmuganathan; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian; Roβmann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The assembly process of optical components consists of two phases - the alignment and the bonding phase. Precision - or better process repeatability - is limited by the latter one. The limitation of the alignment precision is given by the measurement equipment and the manipulation technology applied. Today's micromanipulators in combination with beam imaging setups allow for an alignment in the range of far below 100nm. However, once precisely aligned optics need to be fixed in their position. State o f the art in optics bonding for laser systems is adhesive bonding with UV-curing adhesives. Adhesive bonding is a multi-factorial process and thus subject to statistical process deviations. As a matter of fact, UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects during their curing process, making offsets for shrinkage compensation mandatory. Enhancing the process control of the adhesive bonding process is the major goal of the activities described in this paper. To improve the precision of shrinkage compensation a dynamic shrinkage prediction is envisioned by Fraunhofer IPT. Intense research activities are being practiced to gather a deeper understanding of the parameters influencing adhesive shrinkage behavior. These effects are of different nature - obviously being the raw adhesive material itself as well as its condition, the bonding geometry, environmental parameters like surrounding temperature and of course process parameters such as curing properties. Understanding the major parameters and linking them in a model-based shrinkage-prediction environment is the basis for improved process control. Results are being deployed by Fraunhofer in prototyping, as well as volume production solutions for laser systems.

  20. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  1. In situ grouting of low-level burial trenches with a cement-based grout

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    A restoration technology being evaluated for use in the closure of one of the low-level radwaste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is trench stabilization using a cement-based grout. To demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of this technology, two interconnecting trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) were selected as candidates for in situ grouting with a particulate grout. The primary objective was to demonstrate the increased trench stability and decreased potential for leachate migration following in situ injection of a particulate grout into the waste trenches. Stability against trench subsidence is a critical issue. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Preparation of lunar regolith based geopolymer cement under heat and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gabrielle; Montes, Carlos; Eklund, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Ever since the beginning of the space program, lunar habitation has always been on peoples' minds. Prior researchers have explored habitat building materials - some based on earth-based construction materials, some based on in-situ lunar resources. Geopolymer cement is a cementitious binder made of aluminosilicate materials such as lunar regolith. A cementitious binder made of lunar regolith as the main geopolymer precursor, instead of as an added aggregate, is a solution that has not been deeply explored in prior works. This research explores the curing process of lunar regolith based geopolymer cement in an environment that loosely approximates the lunar environment, using the lunar average daytime temperature and a vacuum. The results did not show much promise for the samples cured under both heat and vacuum as the longest-cured data point did not meet compressive strength standards, but another pathway to lunar habitation may be found in a separate set of samples that cured under heat and ambient atmospheric pressure.

  3. Selective perrhenate recognition in pure water by halogen bonding and hydrogen bonding alpha-cyclodextrin based receptors.

    PubMed

    Cornes, Stuart P; Sambrook, Mark R; Beer, Paul D

    2017-03-20

    Alpha-cyclodextrin based anion receptors functionalised with pendant arms containing halogen and hydrogen bond donor motifs display selective association of perrhenate in aqueous media at neutral pH. NMR and ITC anion binding investigations reveal the halogen bonding receptor to be the superior host.

  4. Study of a hydraulic dicalcium phosphate dihydrate/calcium oxide-based cement for dental applications.

    PubMed

    el-Briak, Hasna; Durand, Denis; Nurit, Josiane; Munier, Sylvie; Pauvert, Bernard; Boudeville, Phillipe

    2002-01-01

    By mixing CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O (DCPD) and CaO with water or sodium phosphate buffers as liquid phase, a calcium phosphate cement was obtained. Its physical and mechanical properties, such as compressive strength, initial and final setting times, cohesion time, dough time, swelling time, dimensional and thermal behavior, and injectability were investigated by varying different parameters such as liquid to powder (L/P) ratio (0.35-0.7 ml g(-1)), molar calcium to phosphate (Ca/P) ratio (1.67-2.5) and the pH (4, 7, and 9) and the concentration (0-1 M) of the sodium phosphate buffer. The best results were obtained with the pH 7 sodium phosphate buffer at the concentration of 0.75 M. With this liquid phase, physical and mechanical properties depended on the Ca/P and L/P ratios, varying from 3 to 11 MPa (compressive strength), 6 to 10 min (initial setting time), 11 to 15 min (final setting time), 15 to 30 min (swelling time), 7 to 20 min (time of 100% injectability). The dough or working time was over 16 min. This cement expanded during its setting (1.2-5 % according to Ca/P and L/P ratios); this would allow a tight filling. Given the mechanical and rheological properties of this new DCPD/CaO-based cement, its use as root canal sealing material can be considered as classical calcium hydroxide or ZnO/eugenol-based pastes, without or with a gutta-percha point.

  5. Experimental evidence of a moisture clog effect in cement-based materials under temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaoting; Rougelot, Th.; Davy, C.A.; Chen, Wei; Agostini, F.; Skoczylas, F.; Bourbon, X.

    2009-12-15

    This study is an original contribution to the understanding of the hydraulic behaviour of cement-based materials when subjected to temperature rises. Permeability is measured continuously during heating by injecting inert gas into a sample at homogeneous temperature. Using a confining cell especially designed in our laboratory, the sample is submitted to a constant heating rate, up to 200 deg. C, superimposed to hydrostatic pressure (at ca. 5 MPa). In parallel with a normalised CEM II mortar (water-to-cement ratio (W/C) of 0.5), a CEM V-cement-based concrete, used in nuclear waste storage applications, is studied. For normalised mortar, gas retention is evidenced, depending on the sample size (scale effect), water saturation level S{sub w}, and heating rate. For dry normalised mortar, permeability may be divided by two during heating. In conjunction with thermo-gravimetry analysis (TGA) results, such evolution is attributed to the dehydration of C-S-H around 150 deg. C. Indeed, mass loss after heat cycling is substantially higher than that due to free water release solely: mortar loses structural, bound water during the process. For partially-saturated and long mortar samples, a gas retention phenomenon is recorded when heating at a rate of ca. 4.9 deg. C/min. Our analysis is that free water inside the macropores, as well as bound water released from the C-S-H, dilates or vaporizes, and obstructs the interconnected porous network. Due to moisture clogging, no more gas is allowed through the material pore network: a so-called gas retention phenomenon occurs. Most interestingly, although loosing structural water like normalised mortar, yet over a wider temperature range, dry CEM V concrete displays good temperature resistance, as its permeability remains constant during heating. For highly partially-saturated concrete, a gas retention effect is recorded. As a conclusion, observed phenomena at the laboratory scale testify of potentially strong gas retention effects

  6. Cement evaluation; Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkington, P.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Cement evaluation began with the calculation of cement tops. This calculation assumed gauge holes and no channeling of the cement through the mud. Calipers were not available at that time. In the mid-1930's, the use of temperature surveys to determine the top of cement (TOC) was documented in technical journals. Properly run temperature surveys can identify the TOC, but distribution of cement-e.g., vertical isolation through zones of interest-is difficult to ascertain. Radioactive tracer surveys were run in the late 1930's to determine cement tops. Carnotite was mixed in the lead slurry and cement tops were determined with a gamma ray log. Tracer surveys had the same limitations as temperature logs but were not time-sensitive. This paper reports on methods that have been and are currently being used for cement evaluation including temperature logs, radioactive traces, and cement bond tools.

  7. Ink-bottle effect in mercury intrusion porosimetry of cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Moro, F; Böhni, H

    2002-02-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is a widely used method for studying porous materials, in particular, cement-based materials. The usual interpretation of such measurements is based on certain assumptions. One of these is that each pore is connected to the sample surface directly or through larger pores. Pores not meeting this assumption are called ink-bottle pores. The effect that sample size has on the MIP characteristics of concrete samples, like the ink-bottle effect and hysteresis, was studied by measuring additional extrusion and intrusion cycles. In order to characterize the extrusion and ink-bottle behavior, the amount of entrapped mercury chi(p) was estimated. Superimposition of extrusion and second intrusion curves is achieved if the contact angle theta is adjusted from theta(i), the intrusion contact angle, to theta(e), the extrusion contact angle. The threshold radius is often assumed to be a dominant pore radius, yet in this study the entrapped mercury content shows no evidence for the presence of a dominant pore radius. Even if characteristic properties of cement-based materials can be estimated with MIP, comparison of results is rendered difficult by the significant effects of sample preparation techniques and sample size and the ink-bottle effect due to randomly present air bubbles.

  8. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45–1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350–400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre‐crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra‐ and/or inter‐tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz‐MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  9. The application of 1-3 cement-based piezoelectric transducers in active and passive health monitoring for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lei; Huang, Shifeng; Cheng, Xin; Lu, Youyuan; Li, Zongjin

    2009-09-01

    1-3 cement-based piezoelectric composite has been developed for health monitoring of concrete structures. Transducers made of this type of composite have broadband frequency response. Plain concrete and engineered cement composite (ECC) beams with embedded 1-3 cement-based piezoelectric transducers were prepared and tested. During experiments, the transducers were used to perform active and passive detection of the damage evolution of the beams. In active detection, a damage index based on the average energy of the received waves was proposed and used. In passive detection, acoustic emission (AE) events were recorded and the accumulated AE event number was analyzed with the loading history. Crack localization was also accomplished in the passive monitoring. The results of the two methods demonstrated similar trends in interpreting the damage evolution of the concrete beam. The results were also consistent with each material's characteristics.

  10. EVALUATION OF ORGANIC VAPOR RELEASE FROM CEMENT-BASED WASTE FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A; Jack Zamecnik, J; Russell Eibling, R

    2006-09-27

    A cement based waste form was evaluated to determine the rates at which various organics were released during heating caused by the cementitious heat-of-hydration reaction. Saltstone is a cement-based waste form for the disposal of low-level salt solution. Samples were prepared with either Isopar{reg_sign} L, a long straight chained hydrocarbon, or (Cs,K) tetraphenylborate, a solid that, upon heating, decomposes to benzene and other aromatic compounds. The saltstone samples were heated over a range of temperatures. Periodically, sample headspaces were purged and the organic constituents were captured on carbon beds and analyzed. Isopar{reg_sign} L was released from the saltstone in a direct relationship to temperature. An equation was developed to correlate the release rate of Isopar{reg_sign} L from the saltstone to the temperature at which the samples were cured. The release of benzene was more complex and relied on both the decomposition of the tetraphenylborate as well as the transport of the manufactured benzene through the curing saltstone. Additional testing with saltstone prepared with different surface area/volume also was performed.

  11. Radiopacity evaluation of Portland and MTA-based cements by digital radiographic system

    PubMed Central

    BORGES, Alvaro Henrique; PEDRO, Fabio Luiz Miranda; SEMANOFF-SEGUNDO, Alex; MIRANDA, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; PÉCORA, Jesus Djalma; CRUZ FILHO, Antônio Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiopacity of Portland and MTA-based cements using the Digora TM digital radiographic system. Material and Methods The performed tests followed specification number 57 from the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (2000) for endodontic sealing materials. The materials were placed in 5 acrylic plates, especially designed for this experiment, along with a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 1 to 10 mm in thickness. The set was radiographed at a 30 cm focus-object distance and with 0.2 s exposure time. After the radiographs were taken, the optical laser readings of radiographs were performed by Digora TM system. Five radiographic density readings were performed for each studied material and for each step of the aluminum scale. Results White ProRoot MTA (155.99±8.04), gray ProRoot MTA (155.96±16.30) and MTA BIO (143.13±16.94) presented higher radiopacity values (p<0.05), while white non-structural Portland (119.76±22.34), gray Portland (109.71±4.90) and white structural Portland (99.59±12.88) presented lower radiopacity values (p<0.05). Conclusions It was concluded that MTA-based cements were the only materials presenting radiopacity within the ANSI/ADA specifications. PMID:21625738

  12. Bond Strengths of Silorane- and Methacrylate-Based Composites to Various Underlying Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Sezin; Sen Tunc, Emine; Gonulol, Nihan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) values of a methacrylate (FZ 250) and a silorane-based (FS) resin composite to various underlying materials. Materials and Methods. A total of 80 samples were prepared with four different underlying materials; a flowable (FLC) and a bulk-fill flowable composite (BFC), and a conventional (CGIC) and resin modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC). These underlying materials were laminated plus to methacrylate or silorane-based resin composites (n = 10). To evaluate the specimens SBS values were evaluated with a universal testing machine (cross-head speed; 1.0 mm/min). Statistical comparisons were carried out using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test with a significance level of P < 0.05. Results. SBS values for FZ250 were significantly higher than for FS for all of the underlying materials tested (P < 0.05). SBS values of FZ250 to BFC were significantly higher than to all other materials (P < 0.05), whereas SBS values of FS did not vary significantly according to underlying material (P > 0.05). Conclusion. The use of FS in conjunction with any of the tested materials showed lower SBS than the FZ 250. Also, new low elastic modulus liner BFC presented slightly good interfacial adhesion so, the usage of BFC as an underlying material may be preferable for FZ 250. PMID:24895608

  13. Research on a Defects Detection Method in the Ferrite Phase Shifter Cementing Process Based on a Multi-Sensor Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) System

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bo; Fu, Guicui; Li, Yanruoyue; Zhao, Youhu

    2016-01-01

    The cementing manufacturing process of ferrite phase shifters has the defect that cementing strength is insufficient and fractures always appear. A detection method of these defects was studied utilizing the multi-sensors Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) theory. Aiming at these process defects, the reasons that lead to defects are analyzed in this paper. In the meanwhile, the key process parameters were determined and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests during the cure process of resin cementing were carried out. At the same time, in order to get data on changing cementing strength, multiple-group cementing process tests of different key process parameters were designed and conducted. A relational model of cementing strength and cure temperature, time and pressure was established, by combining data of DSC and process tests as well as based on the Avrami formula. Through sensitivity analysis for three process parameters, the on-line detection decision criterion and the process parameters which have obvious impact on cementing strength were determined. A PHM system with multiple temperature and pressure sensors was established on this basis, and then, on-line detection, diagnosis and control for ferrite phase shifter cementing process defects were realized. It was verified by subsequent process that the on-line detection system improved the reliability of the ferrite phase shifter cementing process and reduced the incidence of insufficient cementing strength defects. PMID:27517935

  14. Research on a Defects Detection Method in the Ferrite Phase Shifter Cementing Process Based on a Multi-Sensor Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) System.

    PubMed

    Wan, Bo; Fu, Guicui; Li, Yanruoyue; Zhao, Youhu

    2016-08-10

    The cementing manufacturing process of ferrite phase shifters has the defect that cementing strength is insufficient and fractures always appear. A detection method of these defects was studied utilizing the multi-sensors Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) theory. Aiming at these process defects, the reasons that lead to defects are analyzed in this paper. In the meanwhile, the key process parameters were determined and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests during the cure process of resin cementing were carried out. At the same time, in order to get data on changing cementing strength, multiple-group cementing process tests of different key process parameters were designed and conducted. A relational model of cementing strength and cure temperature, time and pressure was established, by combining data of DSC and process tests as well as based on the Avrami formula. Through sensitivity analysis for three process parameters, the on-line detection decision criterion and the process parameters which have obvious impact on cementing strength were determined. A PHM system with multiple temperature and pressure sensors was established on this basis, and then, on-line detection, diagnosis and control for ferrite phase shifter cementing process defects were realized. It was verified by subsequent process that the on-line detection system improved the reliability of the ferrite phase shifter cementing process and reduced the incidence of insufficient cementing strength defects.

  15. Retentive shear strengths of various bonding attachment bases.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J I

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether any of the commercially available attachment bases had significantly better retentive properties. This was determined by their shear strengths after all were bonded to bovine incisors with Auto-Tach. The mean shear strengths of sixteen bases were statistically compared to each other at 24 hours and at 30 days. In addition, the data were converted to pounds per square inch to ascertain if the size of the base significantly influenced the mean shear strength. It was concluded that (1). one of the foil mesh bases tested for shear strength was significantly superior to the two other base designs (indents with undercuts and solid bases with perforations); (2). mechanical retention of the attachment bases to the adhesive was not significantly affected after being placed in distilled water at 37 degrees C. either for 24 hours or for 30 days; (3). smaller foil mesh bases could be used without sacrificing significant shear strength.

  16. Investigating flow properties of partially cemented fractures in Travis Peak Formation using image-based pore-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokan-Lawal, Adenike; Prodanović, Maša.; Eichhubl, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Natural fractures can provide preferred flow pathways in otherwise low-permeability reservoirs. In deep subsurface reservoirs including tight oil and gas reservoirs, as well as in hydrothermal systems, fractures are frequently lined or completely filled with mineral cement that reduces or occludes fracture porosity and permeability. Fracture cement linings potentially reduce flow connectivity between the fracture and host rock and increase fracture wall roughness, which constricts flow. We combined image-based fracture space characterization, mercury injection capillary pressure and permeability experiments, and numerical simulations to evaluate the influence of fracture-lining cement on single-phase and multiphase flows along a natural fracture from the Travis Peak Formation, a tight gas reservoir sandstone in East Texas. Using X-ray computed microtomographic image analysis, we characterized fracture geometry and the connectivity and geometric tortuosity of the fracture pore space. Combining level set method-based progressive quasistatic and lattice Boltzmann simulations, we assessed the capillary-dominated displacement properties and the (relative) permeability of a cement-lined fracture. Published empirical correlations between aperture and permeability for barren fractures provide permeability estimates that vary among each other, and differ from our results, vary by several orders of magnitude. Compared to barren fractures, cement increases the geometric tortuosity, aperture variation of the pore space, and capillary pressure while reducing the single-phase permeability by up to 2 orders of magnitude. For multiphase displacement, relative permeability and fluid entrapment geometry resemble those of porous media and differ from those characteristic of barren fractures.

  17. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  18. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. RESULTS: GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. CONCLUSION: It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation. PMID:28028417

  19. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials

    PubMed Central

    Küçükkaya, Selen; Görduysus, Mehmet Ömer; Zeybek, Naciye Dilara; Müftüoğlu, Sevda Fatma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P > 0.05). MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P < 0.05). Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73%) after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P < 0.05). Despite the significant changes in cell viability over time, materials presented similar cytotoxicity profile. Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures. PMID:26904364

  20. Brushite-based calcium phosphate cement with multichannel hydroxyapatite granule loading for improved bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byung Yeol; Padalhin, Andrew Reyas; Sarker, Avik; Carpena, Nathaniel; Kim, Boram; Paul, Kallyanshish; Choi, Hwan Jun; Bae, Sang-Ho; Lee, Byong Taek

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report brushite-based calcium phosphate cement (CPC) system to enhance the in vivo biodegradation and tissue in-growth by incorporation of micro-channeled hydroxyapatite (HAp) granule and silicon and sodium addition in calcium phosphate precursor powder. Sodium- and silicon-rich calcium phosphate powder with predominantly tri calcium phosphate (TCP) phase was synthesized by an inexpensive wet chemical route to react with mono calcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) for making the CPC. TCP nanopowder also served as a packing filler and moderator of the reaction kinetics of the setting mechanism. Strong sintered cylindrical HAp granules were prepared by fibrous monolithic (FM) process, which is 800 µm in diameter and have seven micro-channels. Acid sodium pyrophosphate and sodium citrate solution was used as the liquid component which acted as a homogenizer and setting time retarder. The granules accelerated the degradation of the brushite cement matrix as well as improved the bone tissue in-growth by permitting an easy access to the interior of the CPC through the micro-channels. The addition of micro-channeled granule in the CPC introduced porosity without sacrificing much of its compressive strength. In vivo investigation by creating a critical size defect in the femur head of a rabbit model for 1 and 2 months showed excellent bone in-growth through the micro-channels. The granules enhanced the implant degradation behavior and bone regeneration in the implanted area was significantly improved after two months of implantation.

  1. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ae; Abo-Mosallam, Hany A; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Gyu-Ri; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2014-09-01

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO2-P2O5-CaO-ZnO-MgO(1-X)-SrOX-CaF2 (X=0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X=0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X=0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues.

  2. 30 CFR 250.428 - What must I do in certain cementing and casing situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inadequate cement job (such as lost returns, cement channeling, or failure of equipment) (1) Pressure test the casing shoe; (2) Run a temperature survey; (3) Run a cement bond log; or (4) Use a combination of these techniques. (d) Inadequate cement job Re-cement or take other remedial actions as approved by...

  3. Influence of calcium sulfoaluminate cement on the pullout performance of reinforcing fibers: An evaluation of the micro-mechanical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Robert Benjamin

    The objective of this research was to determine the influence of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement on reinforcing fibers by evaluating the fiber pullout behavior, and bonding characteristics, of a single fiber embedded in a cementitious paste matrix. Four types of fibers commonly used in industry were evaluated: 1) Polyvinyl alcohol; 2) Polypropylene; 3) Coated Steel; and 4) Plain Steel. Upward trends in energy costs and potential greenhouse gas regulations favor an increased use of construction materials that require lower energy and lower CO2 emissions to fabricate, such as CSA cement, as opposed to the production of ordinary portland cement (OPC), which is more energy intensive and produces more CO2 emissions. However, widespread use of CSA cement requires a more in-depth understanding of the engineering characteristics that govern its performance, including interaction with reinforcing fibers. The overarching objective of this research was to provide the engineering base needed for the utilization of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement-based construction materials. The aims of the research were (1) to develop an ettringite-rich calcium sulfoaluminate cement, and (2) evaluate the pullout characteristics of reinforcing fibers embedded in a CSA-cement matrix. Key elements of the strategy included (1) Compare the performance of a laboratory-fabricated CSA cement to a commercial CSA cement and OPC, (2) Evaluate the peak load, and toughness of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement and OPC, (3) Evaluate the debonding-energy density and multiple-cracking behavior of fibers in CSA cement and OPC, and (4) Evaluate the shear bond strength of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement and OPC. Based on the findings of this PhD dissertation, calcium sulfoaluminate cement has a significant influence on the characteristics and behavior of embedded reinforcing fibers. An important factor contributing to the bond strength between fiber and matrix was the ability to transfer interfacial

  4. Laser assisted and hermetic room temperature bonding based on direct bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneveld, Jeroen; Tijssen, Peter; Oonk, Johannes; Olde Riekerink, Mark; Tigelaar, Hildebrand; van't Oever, Ronny; Blom, Marko

    2014-03-01

    A novel method for laser assisted room temperature bonding of two substrates is presented. The method enables the packaging of delicate (bio)structures and/or finished (MEMS) devices, as there is no need for a high temperature annealing process. This also allows the bonding of two substrates with non-matching thermal expansion coefficients. The basis of the presented technology is the ability to create a direct pre-bond between two substrates. These can be two glass substrates, of which one has a thin film metal coating (e.g. Cr. Ti, Ta, Au…), or a silicon-glass combination. After (aligned) pre-bonding of the two wafers, a laser (e.g. a Nd:YAG laser) is used to form a permanent bond line on the bond interface, using the metal layer as a light absorber (or the silicon, in the case of a glass-silicon combination). The permanent bond line width is in the order of 10-50μm. The use of a laser to form the permanent bond ensures a hermetic sealing of the total package; a distinctive advantage over other, more conventional methods of room temperature bonding (e.g. adhesive bonding). He-leak testing showed leak rates in the order of 10-9 mbar l/s. This meets the failure criteria of the MIL-STD-883H standard of 5x10-8 mbar l/s. An added functionality of the proposed method is the possibility to create electrical circuitry on the bond interface, using the laser to modify the metal interlayer, rendering it electrically non-conductive. Biocompatible packages are also possible, by choosing the appropriate interlayer material. This would allow for the fabrication of implantable packages.

  5. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs.

    PubMed

    Gawthrop, Peter J; Crampin, Edmund J

    2014-11-08

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks.

  6. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs

    PubMed Central

    Gawthrop, Peter J.; Crampin, Edmund J.

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks. PMID:25383030

  7. The effect of glass ionomer cement or composite resin bases on restoration of cuspal stiffness of endodontically treated premolars in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, N; Just, N; Haller, B; Hugo, B; Klaiber, B

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to decide whether composite resin or conventional glass ionomer cement should be preferred as a base material in endodontically treated premolars. Twelve extracted human maxillary premolars were mounted in a universal testing machine at a 35 degrees angle. Cuspal stiffness was determined by applying a load of 75 N to the buccal cusp and recording the displacement of the cusp using inductive displacement transducers. In the same teeth, different cavity preparations and restorations were performed sequentially. Standard MOD cavities were enlarged to allow endodontic access. In addition, the cusps were undermined. Half of the teeth were restored to the level of the previous shallow cavities using conventional glass ionomer cement (Ketac Fil), in the rest of the teeth dentine bonding agent (Syntac) and composite resin (Tetric) were used instead. Finally, composite resin fillings (Tetric) were placed. All restorations were removed and the experiments were repeated twice. For each replication, the assignment of the base materials to the experimental groups was reversed, and ceramic inlays (Empress) were used as final restorations for the last replication. Improvement of cuspal stiffness achieved by conventional glass ionomer bases was very small, whereas composite resin bases increased cuspal stability by more than a factor of two. After placement of the final restorations, however, there was no longer a difference between teeth with different base materials. Nevertheless, composite resin bases might be preferred for two reasons. Firstly, deterioration of adhesive restorations will probably start at the cavosurface margins. The incidence of margin gaps, however, will not only compromise marginal seal but also the stabilizing effect of the restoration. In this situation, the resin base may still stabilize the tooth. Moreover, resin bases may reduce the risk of cusp fracture during the time between cavity preparation and the insertion

  8. Halogen bonding: a study based on the electronic charge density.

    PubMed

    Amezaga, Nancy J Martinez; Pamies, Silvana C; Peruchena, Nélida M; Sosa, Gladis L

    2010-01-14

    Density functional theory (DFT) and atoms in molecules theory (AIM) were used to study the characteristic of the noncovalent interactions in complexes formed between Lewis bases (NH(3), H(2)O, and H(2)S) and Lewis acids (ClF, BrF, IF, BrCl, ICl, and IBr). In order to compare halogen and hydrogen bonds interactions, this study included hydrogen complexes formed by some Lewis bases and HF, HCl, and HBr Lewis acids. Ab initio, wave functions were generated at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level with optimized structures at the same level. Criteria based on a topological analysis of the electron density were used in order to characterize the nature of halogen interactions in Lewis complexes. The main purpose of the present work is to provide an answer to the following questions: (a) why can electronegative atoms such as halogens act as bridges between two other electronegative atoms? Can a study based on the electron charge density answer this question? Considering this, we had performed a profound study of halogen complexes in the framework of the AIM theory. A good correlation between the density at the intermolecular bond critical point and the energy interaction was found. We had also explored the concentration and depletion of the charge density, displayed by the Laplacian topology, in the interaction zone and in the X-Y halogen donor bond. From the atomic properties, it was generally observed that the two halogen atoms gain electron population in response to its own intrinsic nature. Because of this fact, both atoms are energetically stabilized.

  9. Multi-scale modeling of fiber and fabric reinforced cement based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soranakom, Chote

    With an increased use of fiber reinforced concrete in structural applications, proper characterization techniques and development of design guides are needed. This dissertation presents a multi-scale modeling approach for fiber and fabric reinforced cement-based composites. A micromechanics-based model of the yarn pullout mechanism due to the failure of the interfacial zone is presented. The effect of mechanical anchorage of transverse yarns is simulated using nonlinear spring elements. The yarn pullout mechanism was used in a meso-scale modeling approach to simulate the yarn bridging force in the crack evolution process. The tensile stress-strain response of a tension specimen that experiences distributed cracking can be simulated using a generalized finite difference approach. The stiffness degradation, tension stiffening, crack spacing evolution, and crack width characteristics of cement composites can be derived using matrix, interface and fiber properties. The theoretical models developed for fabric reinforced cement composites were then extended to cover other types of fiber reinforced concrete such as shotcrete, glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), ferrocement and other conventional composite systems. The uniaxial tensile stress-strain response was used to formulate a generalized parametric closed-form solution for predicting flexural behavior of various composites at the macro-structural level. The flexural behaviors of these composites were modeled in a unified manner by means of a moment-curvature relationship based on the uniaxial material models. A variety of theoretical models were developed to address the various mechanisms including: an analytical yarn pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference fabric pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference tension model; closed-form solutions for strain-softening materials; closed-form solutions for strain-softening/hardening materials; and closed-form solutions for

  10. Application of the sonic volumetric scan log to cement evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Broding, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The imaging process of a volumetric scan presentation produces a sonic image that gives a pictorial display of the cement in place. The cemented zone can be further evaluated from transmittance and velocity scans. The image can be selected to include the casing to cement bond, the full cemented zone or the cement to formation bond. Sectoring, tilting and rotation of the image allows one to quickly make a first interpretation for any suspect areas. A more detailed study from transmittance and velocity data permits a reliable qualification of the physical properties of the cement in place.

  11. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

  12. Effect of saliva and blood contamination on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of two calcium-silicate based cements: Portland cement and biodentine.

    PubMed

    Alhodiry, W; Lyons, M F; Chadwick, R G

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of contamination with saliva and blood on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of pure gray Portland cement and Biodentine (Septodont, Allington, UK). A one-way ANOVA showed that contamination caused no significant difference between the cements in bi-axial flexural strength (P> 0.05). However there was a significant difference in setting time (Pcement taking longer than Biodentine, regardless of the contaminant, and contamination with blood increased the setting time of both materials. Biodentine was similar in strength to Portland cement, but had a shorter setting time for both contaminated and non-contaminated samples.

  13. Effect of physicochemical properties of a cement based on silicocarnotite/calcium silicate on in vitro cell adhesion and in vivo cement degradation.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Julia Lucas; Rueda, Carmen; Manchón, Ángel; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2016-08-02

    A silicon calcium phosphate cement (Si-CPC) was developed to produce a composite of calcium phosphate and calcium silicate. The silicon cements prepared with low silicon (Si) content were composed of crystalline phases of brushite and silicocarnotite. However, the cements prepared with high Si content were mainly composed of amorphous phases of silicocarnotite, hydroxyapatite and calcium silicate. The cement porosity was about 40% with a shift of the average pore diameter to the nanometric range with increasing Si content. Interestingly, this new cement system provides a matrix with a high specific surface area of up to 29 m(2) g(-1). The cytocompatibility of the new Si-doped cements was tested with a human osteoblast-like cell line (MG-63) showing an enhancement of cell proliferation (up to threefold) when compared with unsubstituted material. Cements with a high silica content also improved the cell attachment. The in vivo results indicated that Si-CPCs induce the formation of new bone tissue, and modify cement resorption. We conclude that this cement provides an optimal environment to enhance osteoblast growth and proliferation that could be of interest in bone engineering.

  14. Considerations for proper selection of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Simon, James F; Darnell, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Selecting the proper cement for sufficient bond strength has become progressively complicated as the number of different materials for indirect restorations has increased. The success of any restoration is highly dependent on the proper cement being chosen and used. The function of the cement is not only to seal the restoration on the tooth but also, in some cases, to support the retention of the restoration. This ability to strengthen retention varies by the cement chosen by the clinician; therefore, careful consideration must precede cement selection.

  15. Effect of carbonation on the linear and nonlinear dynamic properties of cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiras, Jesus N.; Kundu, Tribikram; Popovics, John S.; Monzó, José; Borrachero, María V.; Payá, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Carbonation causes a physicochemical alteration of cement-based materials, leading to a decrease of porosity and an increase of material hardness and strength. However, carbonation will decrease the pH of the internal pore water solution, which may depassivate the internal reinforcing steel, giving rise to structural durability concerns. Therefore, the proper selection of materials informed by parameters sensitive to the carbonation process is crucial to ensure the durability of concrete structures. The authors investigate the feasibility of using linear and nonlinear dynamic vibration response data to monitor the progression of the carbonation process in cement-based materials. Mortar samples with dimensions of 40×40×160 mm were subjected to an accelerated carbonation process through a carbonation chamber with 55% relative humidity and >95% of CO2 atmosphere. The progress of carbonation in the material was monitored using data obtained with the test setup of the standard resonant frequency test (ASTM C215-14), from a pristine state until an almost fully carbonated state. Linear dynamic modulus, quality factor, and a material nonlinear response, evaluated through the upward resonant frequency shift during the signal ring-down, were investigated. The compressive strength and the depth of carbonation were also measured. Carbonation resulted in a modest increase in the dynamic modulus, but a substantive increase in the quality factor (inverse attenuation) and a decrease in the material nonlinearity parameter. The combined measurement of the vibration quality factor and nonlinear parameter shows potential as a sensitive measure of material changes brought about by carbonation.

  16. Analysis of Cement-Based Pastes Mixed with Waste Tire Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, O. C.; Ozyazgan, C.; Sayin, B.

    2017-03-01

    Using the methods of thermal gravimetry, differential thermal analysis, Furier transform infrared analysis, and capillary absorption, the properties of a cement composite produced by introducing waste tyre rubber into a cement mixture were investigated. It was found that the composite filled with the rubber had a much lower water absorption ability than the unfilled one.

  17. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing Processes Based on Emergy and Ecological Footprint Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housin...

  18. Effect of Metakaolin on Strength and Efflorescence Quantity of Cement-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tsai-Lung; Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the basic mechanical and microscopic properties of cement produced with metakaolin and quantified the production of residual white efflorescence. Cement mortar was produced at various replacement ratios of metakaolin (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% by weight of cement) and exposed to various environments. Compressive strength and efflorescence quantify (using Matrix Laboratory image analysis and the curettage method), scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were reported in this study. Specimens with metakaolin as a replacement for Portland cement present higher compressive strength and greater resistance to efflorescence; however, the addition of more than 20% metakaolin has a detrimental effect on strength and efflorescence. This may be explained by the microstructure and hydration products. The quantity of efflorescence determined using MATLAB image analysis is close to the result obtained using the curettage method. The results demonstrate the best effectiveness of replacing Portland cement with metakaolin at a 15% replacement ratio by weight. PMID:23737719

  19. Vibrational study on the bioactivity of Portland cement-based materials for endodontic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, P.; Tinti, A.; Gandolfi, M. G.; Rossi, P. L.; Prati, C.

    2009-04-01

    The bioactivity of a modified Portland cement (wTC) and a phosphate-doped wTC cement (wTC-P) was studied at 37 °C in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). The cements, prepared as disks, were analysed at different ageing times (from 1 day to 2 months) by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopies. The presence of deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes as a function of the storage time were investigated. The presence of an apatite deposit on the surface of both cements was already revealed after one day of ageing in DPBS. The trend of the I 965/I 991 Raman intensity ratio indicated the formation of a meanly thicker apatite deposit on the wTC-P cement at all the investigated times. This result was confirmed by the trend of the I 1030/I 945 IR intensity ratio calculated until 14 days of ageing. At 2 months, the thickness of the apatite deposit on wTC and wTC-P was about 200 and 500 μm, respectively, as estimated by micro-Raman spectroscopy, confirming the higher bioactivity of the phosphate-doped cement. Vibrational techniques allowed to gain more insights into the cement transformation and the different hydration rates of the various cement component. The setting of the cement and the formation of the hydrated silicate gel (C-S-H phase) was spectroscopically monitored through the I 830/I 945 IR intensity ratio.

  20. Radiopacifier Particle Size Impacts the Physical Properties of Tricalcium Silicate–based Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Gutmann, James L.; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiopaque additive, bismuth oxide, particle size on the physical properties, and radiopacity of tricalcium silicate–based cements. Methods Six types of tricalcium silicate cement (CSC) including CSC without bismuth oxide, CSC + 10% (wt%) regular bismuth oxide (particle size 10 μm), CSC + 20% regular bismuth oxide (simulating white mineral trioxide aggregate [WMTA]) as a control, CSC + 10% nano bismuth oxide (particle size 50–80 nm), CSC + 20% nano-size bismuth oxide, and nano WMTA (a nano modification of WMTA comprising nanoparticles in the range of 40–100 nm) were prepared. Twenty-four samples from each group were divided into 4 groups and subjected to push-out, surface microhardness, radiopacity, and compressive strength tests. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance with the post hoc Tukey test. Results The push-out and compressive strength of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% and 20% nano bismuth oxide were significantly higher than CSC with 10% or 20% regular bismuth oxide (P < .05). The surface micro-hardness of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% regular bismuth oxide had the lowest values (P < .05). The lowest radiopacity values were seen in CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% nano bismuth oxide (P < .05). Nano WMTA samples showed the highest values for all tested properties (P < .05) except for radiopacity. Conclusions The addition of 20% nano bismuth oxide enhanced the physical properties of CSC without any significant changes in radiopacity. Regular particle-size bismuth oxide reduced the physical properties of CSC material for tested parameters. PMID:25492489

  1. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  2. Bonding values of two contemporary ceramic inlay materials to dentin following simulated aging

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ashraf Abdelfattah

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the push-out bond strength of feldspar and zirconia-based ceramic inlays bonded to dentin with different resin cements following simulated aging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Occlusal cavities in 80 extracted molars were restored in 2 groups (n=40) with CAD/CAM feldspar (Vitablocs Trilux forte) (FP) and zirconia-based (Ceramill Zi) (ZR) ceramic inlays. The fabricated inlays were luted in 2 subgroups (n=20) with either etch-and-bond (RelyX Ultimate Clicker) (EB) or self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem Aplicap) (SA) resin cement. Ten inlays in each subgroup were subjected to 3,500 thermal cycles and 24,000 loading cycles, while the other 10 served as control. Horizontal 3 mm thick specimens were cut out of the restored teeth for push out bond strength testing. Bond strength data were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's comparisons at α=.05. The mode of ceramic-cement-dentin bond failure for each specimen was also assessed. RESULTS No statistically significant differences were noticed between FP and ZR bond strength to dentin in all subgroups (ANOVA, P=.05113). No differences were noticed between EB and SA (Tukey's, P>.05) bonded to either type of ceramics. Both adhesive and mixed modes of bond failure were dominant for non-aged inlays. Simulated aging had no significant effect on bond strength values (Tukey's, P>.05) of all ceramic-cement combinations although the adhesive mode of bond failure became more common (60-80%) in aged inlays. CONCLUSION The suggested cement-ceramic combinations offer comparable bonding performance to dentin substrate either before or after simulated aging that seems to have no adverse effect on the achieved bond. PMID:26816574

  3. Injectable acrylic bone cements for vertebroplasty based on a radiopaque hydroxyapatite. Bioactivity and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Lidia; Parra, Juan; Vázquez, Blanca; Bravo, Antonio López; Collía, Francisco; Goñi, Isabel; Gurruchaga, Marilo; San Román, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Radiopaque bone cements have been formulated to provide injectable pastes with improved bioactivity to be applied in vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty techniques. The bioactive compound was strontium containing hydroxyapatite salt, which was introduced as obtained (SrHA) or after treatment with MMA monomer (SrHA-t). The in vitro bioactivity of the cements was tested in cement films or in cement pastes introduced directly in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution at 37 degrees C to mimic the in vivo conditions. Precipitation of an apatite-like layer was observed for the 20 wt %-SrHA-t containing cement in the first experiments, and in all formulations in the second ones. The deposited particles were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and by EDAX analysis. Radiopacity of cements after immersion in SBF was confirmed. The biocompatibility exhibited by the SrHA containing cements was, in some cases, superior to that shown by a formulation with 10 wt % of BaSO(4). The new formulations prepared with the treated filler exhibited the lowest cytotoxicity and enhanced cellular proliferation. The in vivo biocompatibility tested by an intramuscular model in rats indicated the formation of a membrane formed by collagen fibers containing fibroblasts with no inflammatory cells, such as macrophages, giant cells or lymphocytes in all formulations.

  4. Bi-layered calcium phosphate cement-based composite scaffold mimicking natural bone structure

    PubMed Central

    He, Fupo; Ye, Jiandong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a core/shell bi-layered calcium phosphate cement (CPC)-based composite scaffold with adjustable compressive strength, which mimicked the structure of natural cortical/cancellous bone, was fabricated. The dense tubular CPC shell was prepared by isostatic pressing CPC powder with a specially designed mould. A porous CPC core with unidirectional lamellar pore structure was fabricated inside the cavity of dense tubular CPC shell by unidirectional freeze casting, followed by infiltration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and immobilization of collagen. The compressive strength of bi-layered CPC-based composite scaffold can be controlled by varying thickness ratio of dense layer to porous layer. Compared to the scaffold without dense shell, the pore interconnection of bi-layered scaffold was not obviously compromised because of its high unidirectional interconnectivity but poor three dimensional interconnectivity. The in vitro results showed that the rat bone marrow stromal cells attached and proliferated well on the bi-layered CPC-based composite scaffold. This novel bi-layered CPC-based composite scaffold is promising for bone repair. PMID:27877603

  5. Evidence-based concepts and procedures for bonded inlays and onlays. Part I. Historical perspectives and clinical rationale for a biosubstitutive approach.

    PubMed

    Dietschi, Didier; Spreafico, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This first article in the series (Part I) aims to present an updated rationale and treatment approach for indirect adhesive posterior restorations based on the best scientific and long-term clinical evidence available. The proposed treatment concept relies on the basic ideas of (1) the placement of an adhesive base/liner (Dual Bonding [DB] and Cavity Design Optimization [CDO]) and, when needed, (2) a simultaneous relocation of deep cervical margins (Cervical Margin Relocation [CMR]), prior to (3) impression taking to ensure a more conservative preparation and easier-to-follow clinical steps, and the use of (4) a highly filled, light-curing restorative material for the cementation (Controlled Adhesive Cementation [CAC]), together with restoration insertion facilitation, the application of sonic/ultrasonic energy, and/or material heating. The suggested clinical protocol will help the practitioner to eliminate the most frequently experienced difficulties relating to the preparation, isolation, impression taking and cementation of tooth-colored inlays and onlays. This protocol can be applied to both ceramics and composites as no material has been proven to be the most feasible or reliable in all clinical indications regarding its physicochemical and handling characteristics. For the time being, however, we have to regard such indirect restorations as a biosubstitution due to the monolithic nature of the restoration, with still very imperfect replication of the specific natural dentin-enamel assemblage.

  6. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  7. Bonding Heat-Resistant Fabric to Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Acid etching, densification, and silica cement ensure strong bond. Key step in preparation for bonding to glazed tile is etching quartz fabric and tile with acid. This increases adhesion of silica cement used to form bond. Procedures use high-temperature materials exclusively and therefore suitable for securing flexible seals and heat barriers around doors and viewing ports in furnaces and kilns.

  8. Effect of the Type of Endodontic Sealer on the Bond Strength Between Fiber Post and Root Wall Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Zare, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: An important factor that interferes with the bonding between the root canal wall and resin cement is the root canal sealer remnant. There is controversy about the effect of eugenol-containing sealers on the bond strength between resin cements and fiber post. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the type of endodontic sealer on the bond strength of FRC posts cemented with resin cement to the root canal wall. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 20 extracted mandibular first premolars were endodontically treated and divided into two groups according to the endodontic sealer used (n=10): G1: AH26 (Resin based); and G2: Endofill (Eugenol-based). After preparing post space, adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) was used for cementation of the fiber post to the root canal dentin. Three 3 mm thick slices were obtained from each root. The push-out test was performed with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05). Results: The two-way ANOVA showed that different root canal sealers (P=0.037) had significant effects on bond strength (BS), but root canal regions (P=0.811) and interaction between root canal sealers and root canal regions (P=0.258) had no significant effects on BS. Maximum and minimum mean values were observed in the AH26 group, the apical region and the Endofill group in the apical region, respectively. Post Hoc Tukey test revealed that there were no significant differences between different root canal regions in both cements (P>0.05). Conclusion: The region of root canal had no effect on the bond strength of cemented fiber posts to the root canal. Eugenol-based sealers (Endofill) significantly reduced the bond strength between fiber posts luted with resin cement to the root canal. PMID:25584058

  9. Electrical behavior of structural cement-based materials: Science and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jingyao

    The electrical behavior of cement-based structural materials was studied for damage/microstructural evolution investigation, electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, fiber dispersion characterization, and for understanding of polarization, depolarization, the role of moisture, and the effects of aggregates and silica fume. Monitoring was performed in real time during static loading, dynamic loading creep, freeze-thaw cycling and drying shrinkage. It involved the use of the cement-based material itself as the sensor and was based on the dependence of the DC electrical resistivity on the damage/microstructural condition. The volume resistivity was the attribute used for monitoring interfaces in the material. The interfaces included that between steel rebar and concrete and that between old concrete and new concrete. The resistivity increased upon damage infliction or damage aggravation, but decreased upon damage diminution. In addition, it increased during microstructural change, which occurred even in the early stage of compressive elastic deformation. An increase in compressive strain rate was found to cause the fractional increase in resistivity to be less at the same strain, because micro structural change took time. The fractional increase in resistivity per unit strain was the parameter used to describe the extent of strain-induced micro structural change. Its value was much higher during creep or drying shrinkage than during static loading up to failure, due to the long time associated with creep and the hydration that accompanied drying shrinkage. Freeze-thaw cycling caused damage, which progressed cycle by cycle and occurred in each cycle more significantly upon cooling than upon heating. The presence of sand increased the fractional change in resistivity at the same drying shrinkage strain, whereas the presence of silica fume decreased the fractional change in resistivity at the same shrinkage strain. The presence of sand or silica fume also enhanced

  10. Poly(carboxylate ether)-based superplasticizer achieves workability retention in calcium aluminate cement

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Omid; Menceloglu, Yusuf Ziya; Akbulut, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) suffers from loss of workability in less than an hour (~15 minutes) after first touch of water. Current superplasticizers that are utilized to modify the viscosity of cement admixtures are designed to target ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The high affinity between these superplasticizers and cement particles were found to be detrimental in CAC systems. Utilization of a monomer that, instead, facilitates gradual adsorption of a superplasticizer provides workability retention. For the first time in literature, we report a superplasticizer that caters to the properties of CAC such as high rate of surface development and surface charge. While neat CAC was almost unworkable after 1 hour, with the addition of only 0.4% of the optimized superplasticizer, 90% fluidity retention was achieved. PMID:28134316

  11. Poly(carboxylate ether)-based superplasticizer achieves workability retention in calcium aluminate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Omid; Menceloglu, Yusuf Ziya; Akbulut, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) suffers from loss of workability in less than an hour (~15 minutes) after first touch of water. Current superplasticizers that are utilized to modify the viscosity of cement admixtures are designed to target ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The high affinity between these superplasticizers and cement particles were found to be detrimental in CAC systems. Utilization of a monomer that, instead, facilitates gradual adsorption of a superplasticizer provides workability retention. For the first time in literature, we report a superplasticizer that caters to the properties of CAC such as high rate of surface development and surface charge. While neat CAC was almost unworkable after 1 hour, with the addition of only 0.4% of the optimized superplasticizer, 90% fluidity retention was achieved.

  12. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (p<0.05). Comparison between each sealer in different experimental times did not reveal any differences. The main failure type was adhesive at dentin/cement interface (89.4%). The time elapsed between the root canal filling and post cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin.

  13. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: A dynamics based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E.

    2014-12-07

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the use of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed.

  14. Cytotoxic effects of new MTA-based cement formulations on fibroblast-like MDPL-20 cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Santos, Alailson Domingos dos; Moraes, João Carlos Silos; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the cytotoxic effects of a novel cement called CER on periodontal fibroblast-like cells of mice (MDPL-20), in comparison with different formulations of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), by means of the cell viability test (MTT) and cell morphology analysis. Thirty-two round-shaped samples were fabricated with the following cements: white MTA, white and gray CER and experimental white MTA. The samples were immersed in serum-free culture medium for 24 hours or 7 days (n = 16). The extracts (culture medium + components released from the cements) were applied for 24 hours to previously cultured cells (40.000 cells/cm2) in the wells of 24-well plates. Cells seeded in complete culture medium were used as a negative control. Cell viability was assessed using the MTT assay. Two samples of each cement were used for cell morphology analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The extracts obtained at the 7-day period presented higher cytotoxicity compared with the 24-hour period (p < 0.05). The gray CER obtained at 24 hours presented the highest cytotoxic effect, whereas the experimental white MTA presented the lowest, similar to the control (p > 0.05). However, at the 7-day period, the experimental white MTA presented no significant difference in comparison with the other cements (p > 0.05). At the 7-day period, CER cement presented cytotoxic effects on fibroblast-like cells, similar to different MTA formulations. However, the immersion period in the culture medium influenced the cytotoxicity of the cements, which was greater for CER cement at 24 hours.

  15. Bonding of Cf/SiC composite to Invar alloy using an active cement, Ag-Cu eutectic and Cu interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhao; Xiaohong, Li; Jinbao, Hou; Qiang, Sun; Fuli, Zhang

    2012-10-01

    The interfacial microstructures and mechanical properties of the joints formed by active cement added brazing in vacuum of Cf/SiC composite to Invar alloy, using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy and pure copper foil as braze alloy and interlayer respectively, were investigated. CuTi, Cu4Ti3, Fe2Ti and the reaction layer of TiC and Si were the predominant components at the joint interface. The maximum shear strength of the joint was 77 MPa for brazing at 850 °C for 15 min. The results show that active cement added brazing in vacuum using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy and Cu interlayer can be used successfully for joining Cf/SiC composites to Invar alloy.

  16. Evaluation of injectable strontium-containing borate bioactive glass cement with enhanced osteogenic capacity in a critical-sized rabbit femoral condyle defect model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Shichang; Wang, Hui; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Liu, Zhongtang; Huang, Wenhai; Zhang, Changqing

    2015-02-04

    The development of a new generation of injectable bone cements that are bioactive and have enhanced osteogenic capacity for rapid osseointegration is receiving considerable interest. In this study, a novel injectable cement (designated Sr-BBG) composed of strontium-doped borate bioactive glass particles and a chitosan-based bonding phase was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The bioactive glass provided the benefits of bioactivity, conversion to hydroxyapatite, and the ability to stimulate osteogenesis, while the chitosan provided a cohesive biocompatible and biodegradable bonding phase. The Sr-BBG cement showed the ability to set in situ (initial setting time = 11.6 ± 1.2 min) and a compressive strength of 19 ± 1 MPa. The Sr-BBG cement enhanced the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro when compared to a similar cement (BBG) composed of chitosan-bonded borate bioactive glass particles without Sr. Microcomputed tomography and histology of critical-sized rabbit femoral condyle defects implanted with the cements showed the osteogenic capacity of the Sr-BBG cement. New bone was observed at different distances from the Sr-BBG implants within eight weeks. The bone-implant contact index was significantly higher for the Sr-BBG implant than it was for the BBG implant. Together, the results indicate that this Sr-BBG cement is a promising implant for healing irregularly shaped bone defects using minimally invasive surgery.

  17. DSC and TG Analysis of a Blended Binder Based on Waste Ceramic Powder and Portland Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Kulovaná, Tereza; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Rahhal, Viviana; Irassar, Edgardo; Černý, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Cement industry belongs to the business sectors characteristic by high energy consumption and high {CO}2 generation. Therefore, any replacement of cement in concrete by waste materials can lead to immediate environmental benefits. In this paper, a possible use of waste ceramic powder in blended binders is studied. At first, the chemical composition of Portland cement and ceramic powder is analyzed using the X-ray fluorescence method. Then, thermal and mechanical characterization of hydrated blended binders containing up to 24 % ceramic is carried out within the time period of 2 days to 28 days. The differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry measurements are performed in the temperature range of 25°C to 1000°C in an argon atmosphere. The measurement of compressive strength is done according to the European standards for cement mortars. The thermal analysis results in the identification of temperature and quantification of enthalpy and mass changes related to the liberation of physically bound water, calcium-silicate-hydrates dehydration and portlandite, vaterite and calcite decomposition. The portlandite content is found to decrease with time for all blends which provides the evidence of the pozzolanic activity of ceramic powder even within the limited monitoring time of 28 days. Taking into account the favorable results obtained in the measurement of compressive strength, it can be concluded that the applied waste ceramic powder can be successfully used as a supplementary cementing material to Portland cement in an amount of up to 24 mass%.

  18. β-Dicalcium silicate-based cement: synthesis, characterization and in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies.

    PubMed

    Correa, Daniel; Almirall, Amisel; García-Carrodeguas, Raúl; dos Santos, Luis Alberto; De Aza, Antonio H; Parra, Juan; Delgado, José Ángel

    2014-10-01

    β-dicalcium silicate (β-Ca₂ SiO₄, β-C₂ S) is one of the main constituents in Portland cement clinker and many refractory materials, itself is a hydraulic cement that reacts with water or aqueous solution at room/body temperature to form a hydrated phase (C-S-H), which provides mechanical strength to the end product. In the present investigation, β-C₂ S was synthesized by sol-gel process and it was used as powder to cement preparation, named CSiC. In vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies were assessed by soaking the cement samples in simulated body fluid solutions and human osteoblast cell cultures for various time periods, respectively. The results showed that the sol-gel process is an available synthesis method in order to obtain a pure powder of β-C₂ S at relatively low temperatures without chemical stabilizers. A bone-like apatite layer covered the material surface after soaking in SBF and its compressive strength (CSiC cement) was comparable with that of the human trabecular bone. The extracts of this cement were not cytotoxic and the cell growth and relative cell viability were comparable to negative control.

  19. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  20. X-ray microtomography for fracture studies in cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Eric N.; Keane, Denis T.

    1999-09-01

    In this study we are interested in microstructure-property relationships in portland cement-based materials. Specifically, we are interested in relating microfracture and damage to bulk mechanical properties. To do this a high resolution three-dimensional scanning technique called x-ray microtomography was applied to measure internal damage and crack growth in small mortar cylinders loaded in uniaxial compression. Synchrotron-based microtomography allows us to resolve internal features that are only a few microns in size. Multiple tomographic scans were made of the same specimen at different levels of deformation, the deformation being applied through a custom built loading frame. Three-dimensional image analysis was used to measure internal crack growth during each deformation increment. Measured load-deformation curves were used to calculate the non-recoverable work of load on the specimen. Incremental non-recoverable work of load was related to measured incremental change in crack surface area to estimate work-of-fracture in three dimensions. Initial results indicate a nearly constant work-of-fracture for the early stages of crack growth. These results show that basic fracture mechanics principles may be applied to concrete in compression, however we must think in terms of 3D multiple crack systems rather than traditional 2D single crack systems.

  1. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for Fe-base and refractory alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1998-03-10

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels and refractory metal alloys. A new comprehensive theory to treat the multi-component thermodynamic equilibria in the gas phase for several coexisting solid phases was developed and used. Many different processes to deposit various types of coatings on several types of steels were developed: Cr-Si codeposition for low- or medium-carbon steels, Cr-Al codeposition on low-carbon steels to yield either a Kanthal-type composition (Fe-25Cr-4Al in wt.%) or else a (Fe, Cr){sub 3}Al surface composition. An Fe{sub 3}Al substrate was aluminized to achieve an FeAl surface composition, and boron was also added to ductilize the coating. The developmental Cr-lean ORNL alloys with exceptional creep resistance were Cr-Al coated to achieve excellent oxidation resistance. Alloy wires of Ni-base were aluminized to provide an average composition of Ni{sub 3}Al for use as welding rods. Several different refractory metal alloys based on Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb have been silicided, also with germanium additions, to provide excellent oxidation resistance. A couple of developmental Cr-Zr alloys were similarly coated and tested.

  2. Adhesive bonding of a lithium disilicate ceramic material with resin-based luting agents.

    PubMed

    Nagai, T; Kawamoto, Y; Kakehashi, Y; Matsumura, H

    2005-08-01

    This study evaluates the bonding characteristics of a lithium disilicate-based ceramic material (IPS Empress 2). Two sizes of disk specimens of the material were made, and three groups of disk pairs were separately surface-prepared using three techniques; etching with phosphoric acid, etching with hydrofluoric acid, and air-abrasion with alumina. Each group was further divided into four sub-groups; group (i) was bonded with the Variolink II composite, (ii) was treated with the Monobond-S silane primer and bonded with the Variolink II composite, (iii) was bonded with the Super-Bond acrylic adhesive and (iv) was treated with the Porcelain Liner M silane primer and bonded with the Super-Bond acrylic adhesive. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 100 000 thermocycles. Bond strength varied from 10.6 to 71.5 MPa before thermocycling, whereas post-thermocycling bond strength ranged from 0 to 61.2 MPa. Among the three surface preparations, hydrofluoric acid etching (HF) was most effective in enhancing bond strength of both luting materials, especially for unsilanized specimens. Application of the silane primer elevated bond strength of both luting agents regardless of surface preparation method. It can be concluded, for both luting agents, that durable bond to the Empress 2 ceramic material can be achieved through the combined application of HF and the proprietary silane primer.

  3. The Impact of Thermocycling Process on the Dislodgement Force of Different Endodontic Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermocycling (500 cycles, 5°C/55°C) on the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements including WMTA, Nano-WMTA, and Bioaggregate to root dentin. Forty-eight dentin slices were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16) and filled with Angelus WMTA, Nano-WMTA, or Bioaggregate. After incubation, half of the samples were thermocycled while the other half remained untreated. Push-out bond strength was calculated, and the modes of the bond failures were determined by SEM. The highest bond strength was seen in nonthermocycled Nano-WMTA samples and the lowest in thermocycled Bioaggregate samples. The significant differences between nonthermocycled and thermocycled samples were only noticed in WMTA and Nano-WMTA groups (P < 0.001). The mode of failure for thermocycled samples of all three cements was mostly cohesive. Thermocycling process can drastically affect the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements. The intrastructural damages occurred due to the thermal stresses, causing cohesive failures in set materials. Sealing property of endodontic cements which have experienced the thermal stresses can be jeopardized due to occlusal forces happening in furcation cites. PMID:24063004

  4. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Aleksiejunaite, Monika; Sidlauskas, Antanas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n = 10). Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT) in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC) in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers' instructions (experiment I) and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II) and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III). Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p < 0.05). LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI) provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted. PMID:28386279

  5. Composition-structure-property relationships for non-classical ionomer cements formulated with zinc-boron germanium-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Boyd, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Non-classical ionomer glasses like those based on zinc-boron-germanium glasses are of special interest in a variety of medical applications owning to their unique combination of properties and potential therapeutic efficacy. These features may be of particular benefit with respect to the utilization of glass ionomer cements for minimally invasive dental applications such as the atruamatic restorative treatment, but also for expanded clinical applications in orthopedics and oral-maxillofacial surgery. A unique system of zinc-boron-germanium-based glasses (10 compositions in total) has been designed using a Design of Mixtures methodology. In the first instance, ionomer glasses were examined via differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and (11)B MAS NMR spectroscopy to establish fundamental composition - structure-property relationships for the unique system. Secondly, cements were synthesized based on each glass and handling characteristics (working time, Wt, and setting time, St) and compression strength were quantified to facilitate the development of both experimental and mathematical composition-structure-property relationships for the new ionomer cements. The novel glass ionomer cements were found to provide Wt, St, and compression strength in the range of 48-132 s, 206-602 s, and 16-36 MPa, respectively, depending on the ZnO/GeO2 mol fraction of the glass phase. A lower ZnO mol fraction in the glass phase provides higher glass transition temperature, higher N4 rate, and in combination with careful modulation of GeO2 mol fraction in the glass phase provides a unique approach to extending the Wt and St of glass ionomer cement without compromising (in fact enhancing) compression strength. The data presented in this work provide valuable information for the formulation of alternative glass ionomer cements for applications within and beyond the dental clinic, especially where conventional approaches to modulating working time and strength exhibit co

  6. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    PubMed Central

    TANOUE, Naomi; MATSUDA, Yasuhiro; YANAGIDA, Hiroaki; MATSUMURA, Hideo; SAWASE, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. Material and Methods Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm) were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1) air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON); 2) 1) + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA); 3) 1) + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP); 4) treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. Results The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05) greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. Conclusion Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used. PMID:24037070

  7. Classification of metal-oxide bonded interactions based on local potential- and kinetic-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David; Crawford, T Daniel; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy; Downs, R. T.

    2006-02-28

    A classification of the HF bonded interactions comprising a large number of molecules has been proposed by Espinosa et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5529 (2002)] based on the ratio |V(rc)|/G(rc) where |V(rc)| is the magnitude of the local potential energy density and G(rc) is the local kinetic density evaluated at the bond critical points, rc. A calculation of the ratio for the MO bonded interactions comprising a relatively large number of molecules and earth materials, together with the constraints imposed by the values of Ñ2ρ(rc) and the local electronic energy density H(rc) = G(rc) + V(rc) in the HF study, yielded the same classification for the oxides as found for the fluorides. This is true despite the different trends of the bond critical point and local energy properties with the bond length displayed by the HF and MO bonded interactions. LiO, NaO and MgO bonded interactions classify as closed shell ionic bonds, BeO, AlO, SiO, BO and PO bonded interactions classify as bonds of intermediate character and NO bonded interactions classify as shared covalent bonds. CO and SO bonded interactions classify as both intermediate and covalent bonded interactions. The CO triple bonded interaction classifies as a bond of intermediate character and the CO single bonded interaction classifies as a covalent bond whereas their H(rc) value indicates that they are both covalent bonds. The |V(rc)|/G(rc) ratios for the BeO, AlO and SiO bonded interactions indicate that they have a substantial component of ionic character despite their classification as bonds of intermediate character. The trend between |V(rc)|/G(rc) and the character of the bonded interaction is consistent with trends expected from electronegativity considerations. The connection between the net charges and the experimental SiO bond length evaluated for the Si and O atoms comprising two orthosilicates are examined in terms of the |V(rc)|/G(rc) values.

  8. Acoustic emission for characterising the crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composites (SHCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.C.; Pirskawetz, S.; Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Schmidt, W.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the analysis of crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composite (SHCC) under tensile and flexural load by using acoustic emission (AE). AE is a non-destructive technique to monitor the development of structural damage due to external forces. The main objective of this research was to characterise the cracking behaviour in SHCC in direct tensile and flexural tests by using AE. A better understanding of the development of microcracks in SHCC will lead to a better understanding of pseudo strain-hardening behaviour of SHCC and its general performance. ARAMIS optical deformation analysis was also used in direct tensile tests to observe crack propagation in SHCC materials. For the direct tensile tests, SHCC specimens were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibre with three different volume percentages (1%, 1.85% and 2.5%). For the flexural test beam specimens, only a fibre dosage of 1.85% was applied. It was found that the application of AE in SHCC can be a good option to analyse the crack growth in the specimens under increasing load, the location of the cracks and most importantly the identification of matrix cracking and fibre rupture or slippage.

  9. Effect of eugenol-based root canal sealers on retention of prefabricated metal posts luted with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ali, Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of two different eugenol-based root canal sealers on the retention of prefabricated metal posts luted with adhesive resin cement. Materials and methods Thirty prefabricated ParaPosts randomly divided among three groups of 10 each were luted into extracted single-rooted teeth with adhesive resin cement. Two of the groups had been obturated with Gutta–Percha and one of two eugenol-based root canal sealers (Endofil and Tubli-Seal), respectively. The third group was not obturated and served as the control. The forces required for dislodgment of posts from their prepared post spaces were recorded using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple range test was used to determine the mean differences. Results Endofil and Tubli-Seal groups demonstrated significantly reduced retention compared to the unobturated (control) group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Eugenol-based sealers significantly reduced the retention of prefabricated posts luted with adhesive resin cement. PMID:23960462

  10. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  11. Effects of cement creep on stem subsidence and stresses in the cement mantle of a total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; McKellop, H

    1997-02-01

    In cemented total hip prostheses, the role of creep of the acrylic cement (polymethyl methacrylate, [PMMA]) in increasing or decreasing the chance of failure of the cement mantle is a subject of ongoing controversy. In the present study we used a three-dimensional finite-element model of a cemented stem to assess the influence of cement creep on subsidence of the stem, and on the stress and strain in the cement under cyclic load, both in the short and long term. The cement layer was assigned the shear and bulk creep moduli of Zimmer regular PMMA cement, which were obtained experimentally. The stem-cement interface was modeled either as (1) completely bonded, (2) completely debonded with friction, or (3) completely debonded and frictionless. Under the cyclic load some cement creep occurred with all three bonding conditions, allowing additional subsidence of the stem and a decrease in the stress components within the cement. During the unloaded period the full recovery of the preload conditions could be reached with the completely bonded and with the frictionless interfaces. With the frictional interface there was residual cement creep, residual stresses within the cement, and residual subsidence of the stem during the unloaded period; however, the reduction of the stress was at most 13% and the subsidence was about 0.46 mm. The much larger subsidence of debonded stems that is often observed clinically might be attributed to the factors which were not included in the present model, such as circumferential bone remodeling.

  12. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  13. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Grace; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  14. Optimization of growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii in bio-based cement pastes to mitigate delay in hydration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah L; Kirisits, Mary Jo; Ferron, Raissa Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as a novel method to improve durability and remediate cracks in concrete. One way to introduce microorganisms to concrete is by replacing the mixing water with a bacterial culture in nutrient medium. In the literature, yeast extract often has been used as a carbon source for this application; however, severe retardation of hydration kinetics has been observed when yeast extract is added to cement. This study investigates the suitability of alternative carbon sources to replace yeast extract for microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation in cement-based materials. A combination of meat extract and sodium acetate was identified as a suitable replacement in growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii; this alternative growth medium reduced retardation by 75 % (as compared to yeast extract) without compromising bacterial growth, urea hydrolysis, cell zeta potential, and ability to promote calcium carbonate formation.

  15. On the Relation of Setting and Early-Age Strength Development to Porosity and Hydration in Cement-Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lootens, Didier; Bentz, Dale P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a linear relationship between compressive strength (mortar cubes and concrete cylinders) and cumulative heat release normalized per unit volume of (mixing) water for a wide variety of cement-based mixtures at ages of 1 d and beyond. This paper utilizes concurrent ultrasonic reflection and calorimetry measurements to further explore this relationship from the time of specimen casting to 3 d. The ultrasonic measurements permit a continuous evaluation of thickening, setting, and strength development during this time period for comparison with the ongoing chemical reactions, as characterized by isothermal calorimetry measurements. Initially, the ultrasonic strength-heat release relation depends strongly on water-to-cement ratio, as well as admixture additions, with no universal behavior. Still, each individual strength-heat release curve is consistent with a percolation-based view of the cement setting process. However, beyond about 8 h for the systems investigated in the present study, the various strength-heat release curves merge towards a single relationship that broadly characterizes the development of strength as a function of heat released (fractional space filled), demonstrating that mortar and/or concrete strength at early ages can be effectively monitored using either ultrasonic or calorimetry measurements on small paste or mortar specimens. PMID:27046956

  16. On the Relation of Setting and Early-Age Strength Development to Porosity and Hydration in Cement-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Lootens, Didier; Bentz, Dale P

    2016-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a linear relationship between compressive strength (mortar cubes and concrete cylinders) and cumulative heat release normalized per unit volume of (mixing) water for a wide variety of cement-based mixtures at ages of 1 d and beyond. This paper utilizes concurrent ultrasonic reflection and calorimetry measurements to further explore this relationship from the time of specimen casting to 3 d. The ultrasonic measurements permit a continuous evaluation of thickening, setting, and strength development during this time period for comparison with the ongoing chemical reactions, as characterized by isothermal calorimetry measurements. Initially, the ultrasonic strength-heat release relation depends strongly on water-to-cement ratio, as well as admixture additions, with no universal behavior. Still, each individual strength-heat release curve is consistent with a percolation-based view of the cement setting process. However, beyond about 8 h for the systems investigated in the present study, the various strength-heat release curves merge towards a single relationship that broadly characterizes the development of strength as a function of heat released (fractional space filled), demonstrating that mortar and/or concrete strength at early ages can be effectively monitored using either ultrasonic or calorimetry measurements on small paste or mortar specimens.

  17. Squeeze cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Kundert, D.P.; Dahl, J.A.; Dalrymple, E.D.; Gerke, R.R.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a method for terminating the flow of fluid from a portion of a subterranean formation into a wellbore. It comprises: placing within the wellbore adjacent the portion a volume of a slurry of hydraulic cement, permitting the volume to penetrate into the portion; and maintaining the slurry in the portion for a time sufficient to enable the slurry to form a rigid mass of cement in the portion.

  18. Magnetic forward models of Cement oil field, Oklahoma, based on rock magnetic, geochemical, and petrologic constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.L.; Webring, M.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Tuttle, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic forward models of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, were generated to assess the possibility that ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite related to hydrocarbon seepage in the upper 1 km of Permian strata contributes to aeromagnetic anomalies at Cement. Six bodies having different magnetizations were constructed for the magnetic models. Total magnetizations of the bodies of highest pyrrhotite content range from about 3 ?? 10-3 to 56 ?? 10-3 A/m in the present field direction and yield magnetic anomalies (at 120 m altitude) having amplitudes of less than 1 nT to ~6 to 7 nT, respectively. Numerous assumptions were made in the generation of the models, but nevertheless, the results suggest that pyrrhotite, formed via hydrocarbon reactions and wi