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Sample records for cement paste induced

  1. Try-in Pastes Versus Resin Cements: A Color Comparison.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Edenize Cristina; Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Rodrigues Gonçalves de Oliveira, Maria Beatriz; Takano, Alfa Emília; de Carvalho Cardoso, Paula; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the color of ceramic veneer restorations using different shades of try-in pastes and resin cement. Researchers found no differences between try-in pastes and resin cements after cementation. PMID:27213935

  2. Correlating cement characteristics with rheology of paste

    SciTech Connect

    Vikan, H. Justnes, H.; Winnefeld, F.; Figi, R.

    2007-11-15

    The influence of cement characteristics such as cement fineness and clinker composition on the 'flow resistance' measured as the area under the shear stress-shear rate flow curve has been investigated. Three different types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulphonate-formaldehyde condensate, polyether grafted polyacrylate, and lignosulphonate have been tested in this context on 6 different cements. The flow resistance correlated well with the cement characteristic (Blaine.{l_brace}d.cC{sub 3}A + [1 - d].C{sub 3}S{r_brace}) where the factor d represents relative reactivity of cubic C{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S while cC{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S represent the content of these minerals. It was found to be either a linear or exponential function of the combined cement characteristic depending on plasticizer type and dosage. The correlation was valid for a mix of pure cement and cement with fly ash, limestone filler (4%), as well as pastes with constant silica fume dosage, when the mineral contents were determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffractograms.

  3. Study of Tritium Behavior in Cement Paste

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, H.; Motoshima, T.; Satake, S.; Nishikawa, M.

    2005-07-15

    The concrete materials are used as the partition wall of the tritium handling facilities. It is important to grasp the tritium behavior in the concrete wall for radiation safety. It is considered in this study that the surface water on the concrete materials consists of physically adsorbed water, chemically adsorbed water and structural water as in the case of porous adsorption materials. The adsorption capacity due to physically and chemically adsorption isotherms observed in this study shows that the amount of water adsorption on the cement paste is a quarter of the amount adsorbed onto the surface of activated alumina or molecular sieves 5A (MS-5A). It shows that concrete is easily contaminated with tritiated water.

  4. Effect of Microorganism Sporosarcina pasteurii on the Hydration of Cement Paste.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Cheol; Lee, Chang Joon; Chun, Woo Young; Kim, Wha Jung; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2015-08-01

    Years of research have shown that the application of microorganisms increases the compressive strength of cement-based material when it is cured in a culture medium. Because the compressive strength is strongly affected by the hydration of cement paste, this research aimed to investigate the role of the microorganism Sporosarcina pasteurii in hydration of cement paste. The microorganism's role was investigated with and without the presence of a urea-CaCl2 culture medium (i.e., without curing the specimens in the culture medium). The results showed that S. pasteurii accelerated the early hydration of cement paste. The addition of the urea-CaCl2 culture medium also increased the speed of hydration. However, no clear evidence of microbially induced calcite precipitation appeared when the microorganisms were directly mixed with cement paste. PMID:25876598

  5. Microstructural Origins of Cement Paste Degradation by External Sulfate Attack

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pan; Garboczi, Edward J.; Miao, Changwen; Bullard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    A microstructure model has been applied to simulate near-surface degradation of portland cement paste in contact with a sodium sulfate solution. This new model uses thermodynamic equilibrium calculations to guide both compositional and microstructure changes. It predicts localized deformation and the onset of damage by coupling the confined growth of new solids with linear thermoelastic finite element calculations of stress and strain fields. Constrained ettringite growth happens primarily at the expense of calcium monosulfoaluminate, carboaluminate and aluminum-rich hydrotalcite, if any, respectively. Expansion and damage can be mitigated chemically by increasing carbonate and magnesium concentrations or microstructurally by inducing a finer dispersion of monosulfate. PMID:26722191

  6. Temperature influence on water transport in hardened cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Drouet, Emeline; Poyet, Stéphane; Torrenti, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-15

    Describing water transport in concrete is an important issue for the durability assessment of radioactive waste management reinforced concrete structures. Due to the waste thermal output such structures would be submitted to moderate temperatures (up to 80 °C). We have then studied the influence of temperature on water transport within hardened cement pastes of four different formulations. Using a simplified approach (describing only the permeation of liquid water) we characterized the properties needed to describe water transport (up to 80 °C) using dedicated experiments. For each hardened cement paste the results are presented and discussed.

  7. Interactions between chloride and cement-paste materials.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Fabien; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique; Zanni, Hélène; Bresson, Bruno; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Malosse, Lucie; Gan, Zehong

    2005-02-01

    The durability of cement-based materials with respect to exterior aggressions is one of the current priorities in civil engineering. Depending on their use, the cement-based materials can be exposed to different types of aggressive environments. For instance, damages to concrete structures in contact with a saline environment (sea water on bridges, deicing salts on roads, etc.) are of utmost importance. Upon exposure to saline water, Cl- ions penetrate into the structures and subsequently lead to reinforcement corrosion. Chloride attack is often combined with other aggressive influences such as temperature (e.g., freezing) or the ingress of other ions (e.g., sulfates in sea water). We therefore aim to explore the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on the structural chemistry of cement paste. Existing studies about reinforcement corrosion by chloride have focused on the penetration of Cl- ions and the comparison between "free" ions (water-soluble ions) and bound ones. However, little is known about the fixation mechanisms, the localization of Cl in the cement matrix and the structural interaction between Cl and the silicate and aluminate hydrate phases present in cement paste. We present here results of a multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance study on the fixation of chloride in the hydration products and the characterization of new phases potentially appearing due to chloride ingress.

  8. Microstructure of Wet Cement Pastes: a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehng, Jyh-Yuar

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis has been applied to interpret the evolution of microstructure in a cement paste during hydration. The work in this thesis has yielded a better understanding of the geometric and physical characterization of porous materials, and specifically cement pastes. A basic understanding of the wet-dry and freeze-thaw processes of cement pastes has been developed. The pore structure evolution has been studied by the suppression of the freezing temperature of water and compared with relaxation analysis performed at room temperature. Both methods consistently show that hydrating cement pastes have two principal components in their size distribution. Firstly, in situ measurements have been made of the water consumption, the total specific surface area, and pore water size distribution as a function of hydration time. The amount of evaporable water in the pore space can be determined from the magnitude of the NMR signal, and the NMR relaxation times provide a measure of the characteristic pore sizes. Drying studies have been performed to determine the surface spin-spin relaxation time. The NMR results on evolution of cement pore structure with hydration clearly show five different stages. The water consumption was determined to be a linear function of the logarithm of hydration time over a wide range during which the total surface area of the wet gel remains constant. These experiments support a model of capillary and gel pores in the cement paste and provide strong evidence of a stable dense-gel structure. Secondly, supercooling and thawing point depression of confined water has been studied systematically. The depression of the freezing point of liquid water confined within a pore was found to be dependent on the pore size with capillary pore water freezing at 240 K and the remaining gel pore water freezing over a temperature range extending to as low as 160 K. Finally, an important application of NMR has been developed to monitor

  9. Accelerated carbonation of Friedel's salt in calcium aluminate cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Goni, S.; Guerrero, A

    2003-01-01

    The stability of Friedel's salt with respect to carbonation has been studied in calcium aluminate cement (CAC) pastes containing NaCl (3% of Cl{sup -} by weight of cement). Carbonation was carried out on a powdered sample in flowing 5% CO{sub 2} gas at 65% relative humidity to accelerate the process. At an intermediate carbonation step, a part of the sample was washed and dried up to 10 cycles to simulate a dynamic leaching attack. The two processes were followed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), pH and Cl{sup -} analyses in the simulated pore solution.

  10. Model for the developing microstructure in Portland cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Tennis, P.D. )

    1994-12-01

    A method is proposed for quantitatively predicting the volume of the major phases in hydrated cement pastes as a function of (1) the composition of the cement, (2) the degree of reaction, and (3) the initial water: cement ratio. This procedure is then used to develop a quantitative model for the surface area and volume of porosity that is accessible to nitrogen in calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H). Published values for surface areas and volume of pores are compared with the predictions made by the model. An implication of the model is that there are two types of C-S-H, or perhaps regions within the C-S-H: one that nitrogen can penetrate and one that it cannot.

  11. A preliminary study of CO2 sequestration of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Lee, H.; Hwang, J.; Oh, J.; Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, CO2 capture and storage technologies to reduce CO2 concentration in the atmosphere have been extensively studied because global warming is a worldwide issue. Waste cement is a potential raw material for mineral carbonation. In general, carbonation refers a calcite forming reaction in hydrated cement. The carbonation of portlandite in hydrated cement is very straightforward. However, the carbonation of CSH (calcium silicate hydrate: CaO-SiO2-H2O) composing the largest portion of hydrated cement involved in complex reactions and is a key to increase the carbonation efficiency of waste cement. The present study was conducted to have basic information for utilizing waste cement as a raw material for CO2 sequestration. Cement paste was made with W:C= 6:4 and stored for 28 days in water bath. The prepared cement paste was pulverized, and fine grains sizing less than 0.15mm was used for experiment. For the direct aqueous carbonation experiment, 15g of sample is reacted with 200 ml of 1M NaHCO3 in 500ml HDPE bottle. 1M NaCl and 0.25 M MgCl2 was used for additives after leaching test with 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5M NaCl and MgCl2 solutions, and the carbonation efficiency of these additives was evaluated. After reaction, the reacted cement paste and supernatant solution were separated from centrifuging at 5000rpm. The reacted cement paste was analyzed with XRD, DSC/TGA and SEM/EDS. The supernatant solution was filtered with 0.45um membrane filter, and nitric acid was added to lower 2 for preventing calcite precipitation. Then, chemical composition of solution was analyzed with ICP-OES. The leaching of Ca ion is increased with increasing NaCl concentration and is maximized at 1M solution. Extremely small leaching of Si ion indicates that NaCl feebly affect on the carbonation of CSH. The leaching of Ca ion in MgCl2 solution is 10 times greater than in NaCl solution and is maximized at 0.5M solution. The increased Ca leaching is probably caused by the decalcification of

  12. Corrosion inhibitor mechanisms on reinforcing steel in Portland cement pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Farrel James

    2001-07-01

    The mechanisms of corrosion inhibitor interaction with reinforcing steel are investigated in the present work, with particular emphasis on effects associated with corrosion inhibitors admixed into Portland cement paste. The principal objective in reinforcing steel corrosion inhibition for Portland cement concrete is observed to be preservation of the naturally passive steel surface condition established by the alkaline environment. Introduction of chloride ions to the steel surface accelerates damage to the passive film. Excessive damage to the passive film leads to loss of passivity and a destabilization of conditions that facilitate repair of the passive film. Passive film preservation in presence of chloride ions is achieved either through stabilization of the passive film or by modification of the chemical environment near the steel surface. Availability of inhibitors to the steel surface and their tendency to stabilize passive film defects are observed to be of critical importance. Availability of admixed corrosion inhibitors to the passive film is affected by binding of inhibitors during cement paste hydration. It is determined that pore solution concentrations of inorganic admixed inhibitors tend to be lower than the admixed concentration, while pore solution concentrations of organic admixed inhibitors tend to be higher than the admixed concentration. A fundamental difference of inhibitor function is observed between film-forming and defect stabilizing corrosion inhibitors. Experiments are conducted using coupons of reinforcing steel that are exposed to environments simulating chloride-contaminated Portland cement concrete. A study of the steel/cement paste interface is also performed, and compounds forming at this interface are identified using X-Ray diffraction.

  13. POF based smart sensor for studying the setting dynamics of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, M.; Sheeba, M.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2007-10-01

    Fiber optic smart sensors are used to monitor the civil structures. One of the important parameters in civil engineering is the setting characteristics of concrete made of cement. The paper discusses how a simple polymer optical fiber can be used to characterise the setting dynamics of various grades of cement. The results explain the comparative performance of polymer fiber over silica fiber. The basic principle underlying the sensor is that as the cement sets, it exerts a stress on the sensing fiber, which is laid within the cement paste. This stress induces strain on the optical fiber, which can be thought of as a series of aperiodic microbends on the surface of the fiber. This in turn changes the characteristics of the light signal transmitted through the fiber and can be viewed as stress induced modulation of light in the fiber. By monitoring the intensity variation of transmitted light signal with time we can determine the cement setting rate. This can be used as an effective tool for quality testing of commercially available cements of different grades.

  14. The effects of Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 on antifungal and crack remediation of cement paste.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Seung-Hwan; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the antifungal effects of cement paste containing Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 against Aspergillus niger, a deleterious fungus commonly found in cement buildings and structures. To test the antifungal effects, cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 was neutralized by CO2 gas, and the fungal growth inhibition was examined according to the clear zone around the cement specimen. In addition to the antifungal effects of the cement paste added with bacteria, calcium crystal precipitation of P. polymyxa E681 was examined by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 showed strong antifungal effects but fusA mutant (deficient in fusaricidin synthesis) showed no antifungal activity. Crack sealing of the cement paste treated with P. polymyxa E681 was captured by light microscope showed fungal growth inhibition and crack repairing in cement paste.

  15. The effects of Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 on antifungal and crack remediation of cement paste.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Seung-Hwan; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the antifungal effects of cement paste containing Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 against Aspergillus niger, a deleterious fungus commonly found in cement buildings and structures. To test the antifungal effects, cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 was neutralized by CO2 gas, and the fungal growth inhibition was examined according to the clear zone around the cement specimen. In addition to the antifungal effects of the cement paste added with bacteria, calcium crystal precipitation of P. polymyxa E681 was examined by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 showed strong antifungal effects but fusA mutant (deficient in fusaricidin synthesis) showed no antifungal activity. Crack sealing of the cement paste treated with P. polymyxa E681 was captured by light microscope showed fungal growth inhibition and crack repairing in cement paste. PMID:24824950

  16. Physical Origins of Thermal Properties of Cement Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, Mohammad Javad; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.

    2015-06-01

    Despite the ever-increasing interest in multiscale porous materials, the chemophysical origin of their thermal properties at the nanoscale and its connection to the macroscale properties still remain rather obscure. In this paper, we link the atomic- and macroscopic-level thermal properties by combining tools of statistical physics and mean-field homogenization theory. We begin with analyzing the vibrational density of states of several calcium-silicate materials in the cement paste. Unlike crystalline phases, we indicate that calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) exhibit extra vibrational states at low frequencies (<2 THz ) compared to the vibrational states predicted by the Debye model. This anomaly is commonly referred to as the boson peak in glass physics. In addition, the specific-heat capacity of CSH in both dry and saturated states scales linearly with the calcium-to-silicon ratio. We show that the nanoscale-confining environment of CSH decreases the apparent heat capacity of water by a factor of 4. Furthermore, full thermal conductivity tensors for all phases are calculated via the Green-Kubo formalism. We estimate the mean free path of phonons in calcium silicates to be on the order of interatomic bonds. This satisfies the scale separability condition and justifies the use of mean-field homogenization theories for upscaling purposes. Upscaling schemes yield a good estimate of the macroscopic specific-heat capacity and thermal conductivity of cement paste during the hydration process, independent of fitting parameters.

  17. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  18. Undrained heating and anomalous pore-fluid pressurization of a hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabezloo, S.; Sulem, J.; Saint-Marc, J.

    2009-04-01

    Temperature increase in a fluid-saturated porous material in undrained condition leads to volume change and pore pressure increase due to the discrepancy between the thermal expansion coefficients of the pore fluid and of the pore volume. This increase of the pore fluid pressure induces a reduction of the effective mean stress, and can lead to shear failure or hydraulic fracturing. This phenomenon is important is important in environmental engineering for radioactive (exothermal) waste disposal in deep clay geological formations as well as in geophysics in the studies of rapid fault slip events when shear heating tends to increase the pore pressure and to decrease the effective compressive stress and the shearing resistance of the fault material (Sulem et al. 2007). This is also important in petroleum engineering where the reservoir rock and the well cement lining undergo sudden temperature changes for example when extracting heavy oils by steam injection methods. This rapid increase of temperature could damage cement sheath integrity of wells and lead to loss of zonal isolation. The values of the thermal pressurization coefficient, defined as the pore pressure increase due to a unit temperature increase in undrained condition, is largely dependent upon the nature of the material, the state of stress, the range of temperature change, the induced damage. The large variability of the thermal pressurization coefficient reported in the literature for different porous materials with values from 0.01MPa/°C to 1.5MPa/°C highlights the necessity of laboratory studies. This phenomenon of thermal pressurization is studied experimentally for a fluid-saturated hardened cement paste in an undrained heating test. Careful analysis of the effect of the dead volume of the drainage system of the triaxial cell has been performed based on a simple correction method proposed by Ghabezloo and Sulem (2008, 2009). The drained and undrained thermal expansion coefficients of the hardened

  19. Carbonation profiles in cement paste analyzed by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan, I.; Sanchez, J.; Andrade, C.; Evans, A.

    2012-02-01

    The present work deals with the carbonation process in cement based materials such as concrete. In order to clarify the evolution of the two main phases involved in the process, portlandite and calcium carbonate as a function of depth, spatially resolved neutron diffraction experiments have been performed at SALSA diffractometer at ILL in carbonated cement paste samples. Specimens submitted to different carbonation processes, both natural and accelerated, have been analyzed with this non destructive technique. The evolution of the main diffraction peaks of portlandite and calcite has been followed by means of neutron diffraction patterns measured at different depths. The results indicate that, in specimens subjected to CO2 atmospheres for 24 and 48 hours, the amount of calcite increases from the centre of the specimen to the surface. In both type of specimens calcite is formed at all depths analyzed, with higher quantities for the ones submitted to the longest carbonation period. Regarding the evolution of portlandite in these specimens, it almost completely disappeared, with only a low amount of the phase constant throughout the sample. In specimens subjected to air in a closed chamber for 21 months, higher amounts of portlandite were observed throughout the sample and little increase of calcite in the outer part, pointing out a much less severe reaction. The absorption effects are characterized by measuring in perpendicular directions and an absorption coefficient is calculated for portlandite.

  20. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  1. Effect of various superplasticizers on rheological properties of cement paste and mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, I.; Agarwal, S.K. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of eight commercial superplasticizers including one developed from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL) at CBRI on the rheological properties viz. viscosity and flow of cement paste and mortars have been investigated. The viscosity measurements have been made at various shear rates (5--100 rpm). It is found that at higher rates (100 rpm) even with the low concentration of superplasticizers (0.1), the viscosity of the cement paste is more or less the same as that obtained with 0.6 % dosages of SPs at lesser shear rates. The effect of split addition (delayed addition) of superplasticizers on viscosity of cement paste and 1:3 cement sand mortar have also been studied. A decrease in viscosity due to split addition has been observed in the cement paste and there is an increase of 15--20 % in flow of mortars.

  2. Degradation of sulfur mustard and sarin over hardened cement paste.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hairong; Cheng, Zhenxing; Zhou, Liming; Zuo, Guomin; Kong, Lingce

    2009-03-01

    A study has been done to examine the degradation of sulfur mustard (HD) and sarin (GB) over hardened cement paste (HCP). The HCP behaved as a typical base like CaO and Ca(OH)2. The base sites over the HCP were not entirely poisoned by H2O and CO2 in air, and about 0.47 mmol/g base sites could still be evidenced by chemisorption of CO2. A large amount of water irreversibly adsorbed by HCP was experimentally demonstrated. Ten kinds of products through hydrolysis S(N)1 (C-Cl), elimination E1 or E2 (C-Cl, C-H), and addition-elimination (A-E) under the action of base sites and water from the degradation of HD over HCP were detected and identified by GC-FPD, GC-MS, and NMR approaches. Their distribution and kinds varied with time of degradation and water content Both degradation activity and distribution of products from HD were strongly determined by the strength and density of base sites and the water content in HCP. The molecules of GB adsorbed over HCP in comparison with HD could be more quickly and completely degraded into hydrolyzed products such as isopropyl methylphosphonic acid and methylphosphonic acid by adsorbed water, in comparison with HD. PMID:19350934

  3. Physico-chemical studies of hardened cement paste structure with micro-reinforcing fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    The results of physico-chemical studies of modified hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers are given in this article. The goal was to study the reasons of the increase of strength properties of modified hardened cement paste by the method of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. It is shown that the use of mineral fibers in the production of cement based material has positive effect on its properties. The study found out that the increase in the strength of the hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers is due to the increase of the rate of hydration of cement without a significant change in the phase composition in comparison with hardened cement paste without additive. The results of microstructure investigation (of control samples and samples of the reinforced hardened cement paste) have shown that introduction of mineral fibers in the amount of 0.1-2 % by weight of cement provides the structure of the homogeneous microporous material with uniform distribution of the crystalline phase provided by densely packed hydrates.

  4. A speciation solver for cement paste modeling and the semismooth Newton method

    SciTech Connect

    Georget, Fabien; Prévost, Jean H.; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2015-02-15

    The mineral assemblage of a cement paste may vary considerably with its environment. In addition, the water content of a cement paste is relatively low and the ionic strength of the interstitial solution is often high. These conditions are extreme conditions with respect to the common assumptions made in speciation problem. Furthermore the common trial and error algorithm to find the phase assemblage does not provide any guarantee of convergence. We propose a speciation solver based on a semismooth Newton method adapted to the thermodynamic modeling of cement paste. The strong theoretical properties associated with these methods offer practical advantages. Results of numerical experiments indicate that the algorithm is reliable, robust, and efficient.

  5. Characterization of eco-cement paste produced from waste sludges.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Lin, Tung-Tsan

    2011-06-01

    In this study, marble sludge, sewage sludge, drinking water treatment plant sludge, and basic oxygen furnace sludge were used as replacements for limestone, sand, clay, and iron slag, respectively, as the raw materials for the production of cement in order to produce eco-cement. It was found that it is feasible to use marble sludge to replace up to 50% of the limestone and also that other materials can serve as total replacements for the raw materials typically used in the production of cement. The major components of Portland cement were all found in eco-cement clinkers. The eco-cement was confirmed to produce calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrates during the hydration process, increasing densification with the curing age. The compressive strength (S(c)) and microstructural evaluations conducted at 28 d revealed the usefulness of eco-cement. It was observed that the S(c) data correlated linearly with the pore volume (P) data at 28 d. The proposed model equation could be represented as S(c)=178-461P (correlation coefficient, R(2)=0.96). Two parameters, the large capillary pore volume and the medium capillary pore volume, were evaluated using multiple regression analysis. PMID:21570706

  6. Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Liang; Ko, Ming-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Juu-En

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic {beta}-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability.

  7. Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Liang; Ko, Ming-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Juu-En

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic β-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability.

  8. Hydration of blended cement pastes containing waste ceramic powder as a function of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinherrová, Lenka; Trník, Anton; Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Rahhal, Viviana; Irassar, Edgardo F.; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The production of a cement binder generates a high amount of CO2 and has high energy consumption, resulting in a very adverse impact on the environment. Therefore, use of pozzolana active materials in the concrete production leads to a decrease of the consumption of cement binder and costs, especially when some type of industrial waste is used. In this paper, the hydration of blended cement pastes containing waste ceramic powder from the Czech Republic and Portland cement produced in Argentina is studied. A cement binder is partially replaced by 8 and 40 mass% of a ceramic powder. These materials are compared with an ordinary cement paste. All mixtures are prepared with a water/cement ratio of 0.5. Thermal characterization of the hydrated blended pastes is carried out in the time period from 2 to 360 days. Simultaneous DSC/TG analysis is performed in the temperature range from 25 °C to 1000 °C in an argon atmosphere. Using this thermal analysis, we identify the temperature, enthalpy and mass changes related to the liberation of physically bound water, calcium-silicate-hydrates gels dehydration, portlandite, vaterite and calcite decomposition and their changes during the curing time. Based on thermogravimetry results, we found out that the portlandite content slightly decreases with time for all blended cement pastes.

  9. Coagulated silica - a-SiO2 admixture in cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous silica (a-SiO2) in fine-grained form possesses a high pozzolanic activity which makes it a valuable component of blended binders in concrete production. The origin of a-SiO2 applied in cement-based composites is very diverse. SiO2 in amorphous form is present in various amounts in quite a few supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) being used as partial replacement of Portland cement. In this work, the applicability of a commercially produced coagulated silica powder as a partial replacement of Portland cement in cement paste mix design is investigated. Portland cement CEM I 42.5R produced according to the EU standard EN 197-1 is used as a reference binder. Coagulated silica is applied in dosages of 5 and 10 % by mass of cement. The water/binder ratio is kept constant in all the studied pastes. For the applied silica, specific surface area, density, loss on ignition, pozzolanic activity, chemical composition, and SiO2 amorphous phase content are determined. For the developed pastes on the basis of cement-silica blended binder, basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density, and total open porosity are accessed. Pore size distribution is determined using MIP analysis. Initial and final setting times of fresh mixtures are measured by automatic Vicat apparatus. Effect of silica admixture on mechanical resistivity is evaluated using compressive strength, bending strength, and dynamic Young's modulus measurement. The obtained data gives evidence of a decreased workability of paste mixtures with silica, whereas the setting process is accelerated. On the other hand, reaction activity of silica with Portland cement minerals results in a slight decrease of porosity and improvement of mechanical resistivity of cement pastes containing a-SiO2.

  10. Photocatalytic cementitious materials: influence of the microstructure of cement paste on photocatalytic pollution degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-12-01

    Incorporation of nanophotocatalysts into cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic pollution mitigation. In this study, the photocatalytic nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) conversion by titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) blended cement pastes was used as a standard process to evaluate the internal factors that may influence the depollution performance. The chemical composition and microstructure of the TiO(2) modified cement pastes were characterized and analyzed. The active photocatalytic sites related to the surface area of TiO(2) are the key factor in determining the photocatalytic activity. Ordinary Portland cement pastes showed lower photocatalytic activity than white cement pastes probably due to the influence of minor metallic components. X-ray diffraction and thermal gravity analysis demonstrated that TiO(2) was chemically stable in the hydrated cement matrix. The NO(x) removal ability decreased with the increase of curing age. This could be attributed to the cement hydration products which filled up capillary pores forming diffusion barriers to both reactants and photons. It was also proved that surface carbonation could reduce the photocatalytic pollution removal efficiency after the hydration of cement.

  11. Influence of time addition of superplasticizers on the rheological properties of fresh cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Aiad, Ismail

    2003-08-01

    It is well known that the fluidity and the fluidity loss of fresh cement pastes are affected by the kind and the time of addition of organic admixtures. The influence of the time addition of two chemical admixtures, namely, melamine formaldehyde sulfonate (MFS) and naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonate (NFS), on the rheological properties of ordinary Portland and sulfate-resisting cement pastes through the first 120 min of hydration was investigated. The admixture addition was delayed by 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min. Shear stress and apparent viscosity of the cement pastes were determined at different shear rates (3-146 s{sup -1}) and hydration times of 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. The concentration of Ca{sup 2+} and the combined water content of the cement pastes were determined after 120 min. Yield stress and plastic viscosity values were also determined by using the Bingham model. The results show that an increase in the addition time of the admixture reduces the shear stress, the yield stress, and the plastic viscosity of the cement pastes at the early ages (15 min) as well as at later early ages (120 min). The optimum delaying time of admixture addition is found to be 10-15 min. This time does not depend on the cement and superplasticizer type.

  12. Colour matching of composite resin cements with their corresponding try-in pastes.

    PubMed

    Kampouropoulos, D; Gaintantzopoulou, M; Papazoglou, E; Kakaboura, A

    2014-06-01

    Two shades of four resin cements (Calibra, Clearfil Esthetic, Insure, Variolink II), in light- and dual-curing modes, were tested for colour matching with their corresponding try-in pastes, immediately after photopolymerization and after 24-hour dry and dark storage. Colour measurements were performed for 0.8 mm-thick specimens through a 0.8mm-thick ceramic plate. For each resin cement, colour differences (deltaE) were calculated between the two curing modes, and between the corresponding try-in paste, at baseline and after 24h. deltaE>0 values were detected between all resin cements and their try-in pastes, which were brand/shade/curing mode depended. The try-in pastes of the Variolink II system demonstrated the best colour matching (deltaE<2). Try-in pastes of Calibra and Insure, at both curing modes, did not match at an acceptable value, the shade of their corresponding resin cements (deltaE>3.3). Calibra presented the highest colour differences. deltaE values of the Clearfil Esthetic system immediately after photo-activation ranged between 2 and 3 units. A ceramic restoration may fail aesthetically as a result of not acceptable colour match (deltaE>3.3) between the shade of certain resin cements and their relevant try-in pastes. PMID:25134367

  13. Colour matching of composite resin cements with their corresponding try-in pastes.

    PubMed

    Kampouropoulos, D; Gaintantzopoulou, M; Papazoglou, E; Kakaboura, A

    2014-06-01

    Two shades of four resin cements (Calibra, Clearfil Esthetic, Insure, Variolink II), in light- and dual-curing modes, were tested for colour matching with their corresponding try-in pastes, immediately after photopolymerization and after 24-hour dry and dark storage. Colour measurements were performed for 0.8 mm-thick specimens through a 0.8mm-thick ceramic plate. For each resin cement, colour differences (deltaE) were calculated between the two curing modes, and between the corresponding try-in paste, at baseline and after 24h. deltaE>0 values were detected between all resin cements and their try-in pastes, which were brand/shade/curing mode depended. The try-in pastes of the Variolink II system demonstrated the best colour matching (deltaE<2). Try-in pastes of Calibra and Insure, at both curing modes, did not match at an acceptable value, the shade of their corresponding resin cements (deltaE>3.3). Calibra presented the highest colour differences. deltaE values of the Clearfil Esthetic system immediately after photo-activation ranged between 2 and 3 units. A ceramic restoration may fail aesthetically as a result of not acceptable colour match (deltaE>3.3) between the shade of certain resin cements and their relevant try-in pastes.

  14. Influence of various amount of diatomaceous earth used as cement substitute on mechanical properties of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Medved, Igor; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Zahálková, Jana; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Active silica containing materials in the sub-micrometer size range are commonly used for modification of strength parameters and durability of cement based composites. In addition, these materials also assist to accelerate cement hydration. In this paper, two types of diatomaceous earths are used as partial cement replacement in composition of cement paste mixtures. For raw binders, basic physical and chemical properties are studied. The chemical composition of tested materials is determined using classical chemical analysis combined with XRD method that allowed assessment of SiO2 amorphous phase content. For all tested mixtures, initial and final setting times are measured. Basic physical and mechanical properties are measured on hardened paste samples cured 28 days in water. Here, bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive and flexural strength, are measured. Relationship between compressive strength and total open porosity is studied using several empirical models. The obtained results give evidence of high pozzolanic activity of tested diatomite earths. Their application leads to the increase of both initial and final setting times, decrease of compressive strength, and increase of flexural strength.

  15. E-modulus evolution and its relation to solids formation of pastes from commercial cements

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Lino; Azenha, Miguel; Geiker, Mette; Figueiras, Joaquim

    2012-07-15

    Models for early age E-modulus evolution of cement pastes are available in the literature, but their validation is limited. This paper provides correlated measurements of early age evolution of E-modulus and hydration of pastes from five commercial cements differing in limestone content. A recently developed methodology allowed continuous monitoring of E-modulus from the time of casting. The methodology is a variant of classic resonant frequency methods, which are based on determination of the first resonant frequency of a composite beam containing the material. The hydration kinetics - and thus the rate of formation of solids - was determined using chemical shrinkage measurements. For the cements studied similar relationships between E-modulus and chemical shrinkage were observed for comparable water-to-binder ratio. For commercial cements it is suggested to model the E-modulus evolution based on the amount of binder reacted, instead of the degree of hydration.

  16. Constitutive modeling of the aging viscoelastic properties of portland cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasley, Zachary C.; Lange, David A.

    2007-12-01

    Analytical approaches for modeling aging viscoelastic behavior of concrete include the time-shift approach (analogous to time-temperature superposition), the solidification theory, and the dissolution-precipitation approach. The aging viscoelastic properties of concrete are generally attributed solely to the cement paste phase since the aggregates are typically linear elastic. In this study, the aging viscoelastic behavior of four different cement pastes has been measured and modeled according to both the time-shift approach and the solidification theory. The inability of each individual model to fully characterize the aging viscoelastic response of the materials provides insight into the mechanisms for aging of the viscoelastic properties of cement paste and concrete. A model that considers aging due to solidification in combination with inherent aging of the cement paste gel (modeled using the time-shift approach) more accurately predicted the aging viscoelastic behavior of portland cement paste than either the solidification or time-shift approaches independently. The results provide evidence that solidification and other intrinsic gel aging mechanisms are concurrently active in the aging process of cementitious materials.

  17. Reactivity of NO2 and CO2 with hardened cement paste containing activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgnies, M.; Dubois-Brugger, I.; Krou, N. J.; Batonneau-Gener, I.; Belin, T.; Mignard, S.

    2015-07-01

    The development of building materials to reduce the concentration of NO2 is growing interest in a world where the air quality in urban areas is affected by the car traffic. The main binder in concrete is the cement paste that is partly composed of calcium hydroxide. This alkaline hydrate composing the hardened cement paste shows a high BET surface area (close to 100 m2.g-1) and can absorb low-concentrations of NO2. However, the presence of CO2 in the atmosphere limits the de-polluting effect of reference cement paste, mainly due to carbonation of the alkaline hydrates (reaction leading to the formation of calcium carbonate). The results established in this paper demonstrate that the addition of activated carbon in the cement paste, because of its very high BET surface area (close to 800 m2.g-1) and its specific reactivity with NO2, can significantly improve and prolong the de-polluting effect in presence of CO2 and even after complete carbonation of the surface of the cement paste.

  18. Analysis of C-S-H gel and cement paste by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Andrew J. . E-mail: andrew.allen@nist.gov; Thomas, Jeffrey J. . E-mail: jthomas@northwestern.edu

    2007-03-15

    The role of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) in the characterization of cement is briefly reviewed. The unique information obtainable from SANS analysis of C-S-H gel in hydrating cement is compared with that obtainable by other neutron methods. Implications for the nature of C-S-H gel, as detected by SANS, are considered in relation to current models. Finally, the application of the SANS method to cement paste is demonstrated by analyzing the effects of calcium chloride acceleration and sucrose retardation on the resulting hydrated microstructure.

  19. XRD Analysis of Cement Paste Samples Exposed to the Simulated Environment of a Deep Repository - 12239

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Eduardo G.A.; Marumo, Julio T.; Vicente, Roberto; Gobbo, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    Portland cement materials are widely used as engineered barriers in repositories for radioactive waste. The capacity of such barriers to avoid the disposed of radionuclides to entering the biosphere in the long-term depends on the service life of those materials. Thus, the performance assessment of structural materials under a series of environmental conditions prevailing at the environs of repositories is a matter of interest. The durability of cement paste foreseen as backfill in a deep borehole for disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources is investigated in the development of the repository concept. Results are intended to be part of the body of evidence in the safety case of the proposed disposal technology. This paper presents the results of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Analysis of cement paste exposed to varying temperatures and simulated groundwater after samples received the radiation dose that the cement paste will accumulate until complete decay of the radioactive sources. The XRD analysis of cement paste samples realized in this work allowed observing some differences in the results of cement paste specimens that were submitted to different treatments. The cluster analysis of results was able to group tested samples according to the applied treatments. Mineralogical differences, however, are tenuous and, apart from ettringite, are hardly observed. The absence of ettringite in all the seven specimens that were kept in dry storage at high temperature had hardly occurred by natural variations in the composition of hydrated cement paste because ettringite is observed in all tested except the seven specimens. Therefore this absence is certainly the result of the treatments and could be explained by the decomposition of ettringite. Although the temperature of decomposition is about 110-120 deg. C, it may be initially decomposed to meta-ettringite, an amorphous compound, above 50 deg. C in the absence of water. Influence of irradiation on the mineralogical

  20. Hydration kinetics of cements by Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Application to Portland-cement-derived endodontic pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolotti, Villiam; Fantazzini, Paola; Sauro, Salvatore; Zanna, Silvano

    2012-03-15

    Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) of {sup 1}H nuclei is used to monitor the maturation up to 30 days of three different endodontic cement pastes. The 'Solid-liquid' separation of the NMR signals and quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times allow one to follow the formation of chemical compounds and the build-up of the nano- and subnano-structured C-S-H gel. {sup 1}H populations, distinguished by their different mobilities, can be identified and assigned to water confined within the pores of the C-S-H gel, to crystallization water and Portlandite, and to hydroxyl groups. Changes of the TD-NMR parameters during hydration are in agreement with the expected effects of the different additives, which, as it is known, can substantially modify the rate of reactions and the properties of cementitious pastes. Endodontic cements are suitable systems to check the ability of this non-destructive technique to give insight into the complex hydration process of real cement pastes.

  1. Analysis of the infrared spectrum and microstructure of hardened cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.F.; Lo, Y.; Tam, C.M.; Chung, C.Y. )

    1999-06-01

    Phase transformation was found in hardened cement paste exposed to dynamic loading caused by typhoon and the normal static-dynamic loading. The concrete samples were obtained from a 20-year-old residential building. The bonding characteristics and microstructure of the hardened cement paste with different loading history have been carefully studied using scanning electron microscopy analysis and infrared spectrum technique. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs indicate that there is a morphological difference in the concrete microstructure. The infrared spectrum analysis has provided information for understanding the phase transformation characteristics of the primary bonds and secondary bonds. This has led to the establishment of a microscopic model describing the correlation between the behavior of the hydrate lime and the properties of the hardened cement paste.

  2. Accelerated carbonation of cement pastes in situ monitored by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, M. Andrade, C.; Turrillas, X.; Campo, J.; Cuello, G.J.

    2008-12-15

    In-situ monitoring of the changes that take place in the phase composition of cement pastes during accelerated carbonation (100% CO{sub 2}) for different binders, has been carried out, by taking Neutron Diffraction patterns in parallel with the carbonation experiments. The variation of the intensity of chosen reflections for each phase along the experiment has been used to monitor concentration changes and has supplied data, in real time, for fractional conversion of different phases (Portlandite, Ettringite and CSH gel) of the hydrated cement pastes. Fitting of these results has allowed to make a qualitative approach to the kinetics of the carbonation of the different phases and extracting conclusions on the microstructural changes that takes place during the carbonation of cement pastes.

  3. A review of binders used in cemented paste tailings for underground and surface disposal practices.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amjad; Yanful, Ernest K

    2013-12-15

    Increased public awareness of environmental issues coupled with increasingly stringent environmental regulations pertaining to the disposal of sulphidic mine waste necessitates the mining industry to adopt more competent and efficient approaches to manage acid rock drainage. Cemented paste tailings (CPT) is an innovative form of amalgamated material currently available to the mining industry in developed countries. It is made usually from mill tailings mingled with a small amount of binder (customarily Portland cement) and water. The high cost associated with production and haulage of ordinary Portland cement and its alleged average performance as a sole binder in the long term (due to vulnerability to internal sulphate attack) have prompted users to appraise less expensive and technically efficient substitutes for mine tailings paste formulations. Generally, these binders include but are not limited to sulphate resistant cements, and/or as a partial replacement for Portland cement by artificial pozzolans, natural pozzolans, calcium sulphate substances and sodium silicates. The approach to designing environmentally efficient CPT is to ensure long-term stability and effective control over environmental contaminants through the use of composite binder systems with enhanced engineering properties to cater for inherit deficiencies in the individual constituents. The alkaline pore solution created by high free calcium rich cement kiln dust (CKD) (byproduct of cement manufacturing) is capable of disintegrating the solid glassy network of artificial pozzolans to produce reactive silicate and aluminate species when attacked by (OH(-)) ions. The augmented pozzolanic reactivity of CKD-slag and CKD-fly ash systems may produce resilient CPT. Since cemented paste comprising mine tailings and binders is a relatively new technology, a review of the binding materials used in such formulations and their performance evaluation in mechanical fill behaviour was considered pertinent in

  4. Analyses and models of the autogenous shrinkage of hardening cement paste. 1: Modeling at macroscopic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, C.; Ehrlacher, A.; Acker, P.

    1995-10-01

    After having studied phenomena linked to hydration and self-desiccation, one notes that capillary depression is the main origin of the autogenous shrinkage of hardening cement paste. Based on this mechanism, modeling at macroscopic scale is undertaken for a commonly used cement paste (CPA 55) with a W/C ratio = 0.42. It consists in introducing a macroscopic stress due to the capillary depression and characterizing the viscoelastic aging behavior of the material. The result is in satisfactory agreement with measurements.

  5. Water dynamics in hardened ordinary Portland cement paste or concrete: from quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Bordallo, Heloisa N; Aldridge, Laurence P; Desmedt, Arnaud

    2006-09-14

    Portland cement reacts with water to form an amorphous paste through a chemical reaction called hydration. In concrete the formation of pastes causes the mix to harden and gain strength to form a rock-like mass. Within this process lies the key to a remarkable peculiarity of concrete: it is plastic and soft when newly mixed, strong and durable when hardened. These qualities explain why one material, concrete, can build skyscrapers, bridges, sidewalks and superhighways, houses, and dams. The character of the concrete is determined by the quality of the paste. Creep and shrinkage of concrete specimens occur during the loss and gain of water from cement paste. To better understand the role of water in mature concrete, a series of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments were carried out on cement pastes with water/cement ratio varying between 0.32 and 0.6. The samples were cured for about 28 days in sealed containers so that the initial water content would not change. These experiments were carried out with an actual sample of Portland cement rather than with the components of cement studied by other workers. The QENS spectra differentiated between three different water interactions: water that was chemically bound into the cement paste, the physically bound or "glassy water" that interacted with the surface of the gel pores in the paste, and unbound water molecules that are confined within the larger capillary pores of cement paste. The dynamics of the "glassy" and "unboud" water in an extended time scale, from a hundred picoseconds to a few nanoseconds, could be clearly differentiated from the data. While the observed motions on the picosecond time scale are mainly stochastic reorientations of the water molecules, the dynamics observed on the nanosecond range can be attributed to long-range diffusion. Diffusive motion was characterized by diffusion constants in the range of (0.6-2) 10(-9) m(2)/s, with significant reduction compared to the rate of diffusion

  6. Individual and combined effects of chloride, sulfate, and magnesium ions on hydrated Portland-cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, T.S.; Wakeley, L.D.; Young, C.L.

    1994-03-01

    Ground water with a high concentration of magnesium ion is known to cause deterioration to portland cement concretes. A proposed mechanism for this deterioration process published previously involves an approximate 1:1 replacement of Ca ions by Mg ions in the crystalline phases of hydrated cement. The current study was undertaken to determine which ions, among magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, cause deterioration; whether their deleterious action is individual or interdependent; and to relate this mechanism of deterioration to the outlook for a 100-yr service life of concretes used in mass placements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Loss of Ca ion by cement pastes was found to be strongly related to the concentration of Mg ion in simulated ground-water solutions in which the paste samples were aged. This was true of both salt- containing and conventional cement pastes. No other ion in the solutions exerted a strong effect on Ca loss. Ca ion left first from calcium hydroxide in the pastes, depleting all calcium hydroxide by 60 days. Some calcium silicate hydrate remained even after 90 days in the solutions with the highest concentration of Mg ion, while the paste samples deteriorated noticeably. The results indicated a mechanism that involves dissolution of Ca phases and transport of Ca ions to the surface of the sample, followed by formation of Mg-bearing phases at this reaction surface rather than directly by substitution within the microstructure of hydrated cement. Given that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate are the principal strength-giving phases of hydrated cement, this mechanism indicates the likelihood of significant loss of integrity of a concrete exposed to Mg-bearing ground water at the WIPP. The rate of deterioration ultimately will depend on Mg-ion concentration, the microstructure materials of the concrete exposed to that groundwater, and the availability of brine.

  7. Quantifying the distribution of paste-void spacing of hardened cement paste using X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Tae Sup; Kim, Kwang Yeom; Choo, Jinhyun; Kang, Dong Hun

    2012-11-15

    The distribution of paste-void spacing in cement-based materials is an important feature related to the freeze-thaw durability of these materials, but its reliable estimation remains an unresolved problem. Herein, we evaluate the capability of X-ray computed tomography (CT) for reliable quantification of the distribution of paste-void spacing. Using X-ray CT images of three mortar specimens having different air-entrainment characteristics, we calculate the distributions of paste-void spacing of the specimens by applying previously suggested methods for deriving the exact spacing of air-void systems. This methodology is assessed by comparing the 95th percentile of the cumulative distribution function of the paste-void spacing with spacing factors computed by applying the linear-traverse method to 3D air-void system and reconstructing equivalent air-void distribution in 3D. Results show that the distributions of equivalent void diameter and paste-void spacing follow lognormal and normal distributions, respectively, and the ratios between the 95th percentile paste-void spacing value and the spacing factors reside within the ranges reported by previous numerical studies. This experimental finding indicates that the distribution of paste-void spacing quantified using X-ray CT has the potential to be the basis for a statistical assessment of the freeze-thaw durability of cement-based materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paste-void spacing in 3D can be quantified by X-ray CT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of the paste-void spacing follows normal distribution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spacing factor and 95th percentile of CDF of paste-void spacing are correlated.

  8. Flow properties of MK-based geopolymer pastes. A comparative study with standard Portland cement pastes.

    PubMed

    Favier, Aurélie; Hot, Julie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-02-28

    Geopolymers are presented in many studies as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement. Previous studies have focused on their chemical and mechanical properties, their microstructures and their potential applications, but very few have focussed on their rheological behaviour. Our work highlights the fundamental differences in the flow properties, which exist between geopolymers made from metakaolin and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). We show that colloidal interactions between metakaolin particles are negligible and that hydrodynamic effects control the rheological behaviour. Metakaolin-based geopolymers can then be described as Newtonian fluids with the viscosity controlled mainly by the high viscosity of the suspending alkaline silicate solution and not by the contribution of direct contacts between metakaolin grains. This fundamental difference between geopolymers and OPC implies that developments made in cement technology to improve rheological behaviour such as plasticizers will not be efficient for geopolymers and that new research directions need to be explored.

  9. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled NaCl solution confined in porous cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang; Li, Kefei; Fen-Chong, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Clarifying the nucleation process of chloride-based deicing salt solution (e.g., NaCl solution) confined in cement-based porous materials remains an important issue to understand its detrimental effects on material substrates. In this study, the pore structures of hardened cement pastes were characterized by mercury-intrusion and nitrogen-sorption porosimetry. The ice nucleation temperature of NaCl solution of different concentrations confined in the hardened cement pastes was measured and analyzed by classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. The kinetic factor, contact-angle factor including the contact angle between ice and the substrate were evaluated. The results revealed that the contact angle between ice and the substrate showed the minimum value when adding 3% NaCl into water. The heterogeneous ice nucleation rates were found to be proportional to the water activity shifts.

  10. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Apedo, K.L.; Munzer, C.; He, H.; Montgomery, P.; Serres, N.; Fond, C.; Feugeas, F.

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  11. Microstructurally based mechanisms for modeling shrinkage of cement paste at multiple levels

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Yunping

    1993-07-15

    Shrinkage of cement paste is controlled by a number of mechanisms that operate in various parts of the microstructure and at various length scales. A model for creep and shrinkage can be developed by combining several models that describe phenomena at each of several length scales, ranging from the nanometer to the meter. This model is described and preliminary results are discussed.

  12. The application of waterworks sludge ash to stabilize the volume of cement paste.

    PubMed

    Luo, H L; Kuo, W T; Lin, D F

    2008-01-01

    In order to extend the recycling of waterworks sludge to engineering applications, this paper addresses the influence of nano-SiO2 on incinerated waterworks sludge ash (IWSA) cement paste attacked by sulfate. Tests were performed such as length measurement for volume change, compressive strength, weight loss, and micro-structural testing using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that when a portion of the cement in the paste was replaced by IWSA, the IWSA diluted the cementitious material C3A, and filled the capillary pores in the hardened paste. Moreover, since IWSA has potential pozzolanic activity, it can chemically react with Ca(OH)2 crystals in the paste and can consequently improve the resistance of the paste to sulfate attack. Test results also show that due to the fully developed pozzolanic effect of IWSA, the major reaction products of sulfate attack, gypsum and ettringite, were clearly reduced. Hence, the expansion rate in length decreased with the increase of IWSA replacement. Furthermore, the addition of nano-SiO2 to IWSA cement paste can also reduce the length expansion rate.

  13. Chloride diffusivity in hardened cement paste from microscale analyses and accounting for binding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.; Bentz, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion of chloride ions in hardened cement paste (HCP) under steady-state conditions and accounting for the highly heterogeneous nature of the material is investigated. The three-dimensional HCP microstructures are obtained through segmentation of x-ray images of real samples as well as from simulations using the cement hydration model CEMHYD3D. Moreover, the physical and chemical interactions between chloride ions and HCP phases (binding), along with their effects on the diffusive process, are explicitly taken into account. The homogenized diffusivity of the HCP is then derived through a least square homogenization technique. Comparisons between numerical results and experimental data from the literature are presented.

  14. Superplasticizer effect on cement paste structure and concrete freeze-thaw resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuldyakov, Kirill; Kramar, Lyudmila; Trofimov, Boris; Ivanov, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Article presents the results of studies of various types of superplasticizer additives and their influence on concrete structure and resistance under cyclic freezing-thawing. Glenium ACE 430 was taken as a polycarboxylate superplasticizer, and SP-1 - as a naphthalene-formaldehyde superplasticizer. It is revealed that at identical structure, W/C and fluidity of concrete mix, application of the polycarboxylate superplasticizer, Glenium AC 430, in comparison to the naphthalene-formaldehyde one SP-1, facilitates the increase of the concrete grade in freeze and thaw resistance from F2300 to F2400, concrete freeze and thaw resistance can be possible even higher if the gravel with higher freeze and thaw resistance is applied. To assess the superplasticizers influence on cement paste structure tests of the phase composition of the cement paste of the studied concrete were conducted. It is established that the use of polycarboxylate superplasticizer together with silica fume facilitates formation of cement plaster structure from tobermorite gel. This gel has increased basicity and is resistant to crystallization due to cyclic freezing. It is shown that in the presence of SP-1+SF in the cement paste of concrete during hydration the structure of hydrosilicate phases preferably comprises of C-S-H(I) and C-S-H(II) phases which actively crystallize while cyclic freezing and thawing and reduce freeze-thaw resistance of concrete.

  15. Cloride ion diffusion in low water-to-solid cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.R.; Knab, L.I.; Garboczi, E.J. ); Xiong, L.X. )

    1991-06-01

    Diffusion coefficients of 0.3 water to solids ratio (w/s) hydrated portland cement paste specimens were measured using a conventional diffusion cell. Specimens were made from both ASTM Type 1 and Type 2 portland cements and blends containing mineral admixtures (fly ash, granulated blastfurnace slag, or silica fume). The average diffusion coefficient for the portland cement paste specimens was 14 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2}/s. The diffusion coefficients for the specimens containing mineral admixtures were such more variable than those for the portland cement paste specimens. A probable cause of the variability in the test results was the presence of cracks observed in the test specimens. The effects of the depth of concrete cover over reinforcing steel and of the chloride ion diffusion coefficient on the service life of reinforced concrete exposed to chloride ions were predicted based on a diffusion model. Based on the model, the effect of the cover was shown to be proportional to the square of the cover depth. 18 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Radon exhalation of cementitious materials made with coal fly ash: Part 2--testing hardened cement-fly ash pastes.

    PubMed

    Kovler, K; Perevalov, A; Levit, A; Steiner, V; Metzger, L A

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in measuring radionuclides and radon concentrations in fly ash (FA), cement and other components of building products is due to the concern about health hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The paper focuses on studying the influence of FA on radon exhalation rate (radon flux) from cementitious materials. In the previous part of the paper the state of the art was presented, and the experiments for testing raw materials, Portland cement and coal fly ash, were described. Since the cement and FA have the most critical role in the radon release process relative to other concrete constituents (sand and gravel), and their contribution is dominant in the overall radium content of concrete, tests were carried out on cement paste specimens with different FA contents, 0-60% by weight of the binder (cement+FA). It is found that the dosage of FA in cement paste has a limited influence on radon exhalation rate, if the hardened material is relatively dense. The radon flux of cement-FA pastes is lower than that of pure cement paste: it is about approximately 3 mBq m(-2) s(-1) for cement-FA pastes with FA content as high as 960 kg m(-3).

  17. Rheological evaluation of dense suspensions; Simulation of a fresh cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.E. ); Shaughnessy, R.J. III )

    1990-05-01

    The rheology of fresh cement pasts is a function of not only particle size, shape, and concentration, but also the cement setting reactions. This greatly complicates the analysis of data obtained in any rheological experiment. To separate the slurry contribution to the system rheology from the chemical reaction component, a slurry of marble-dust particles is used to represent a cement slurry. In this study, both tube-flow and concentric-cylinder rheometers are used to evaluate the rheological behavior of the dense suspensions. The apparent slip of the suspension makes correlation of the flow curves generated from the two viscometers difficult. The degree of slip in both viscometers becomes increasingly significant as the marble-dust concentration increases. The use of a grooved bob in the concentric-cylinder viscometer considerably reduces the amount of slip. Large annular gaps also contribute to inconsistent results. An analysis of the data from both types of viscometers is presented.

  18. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  19. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-03-25

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  20. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  1. Evaluation of water transfer from saturated lightweight aggregate to cement paste matrix by neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, I.; Kanematsu, M.; Noguchi, T.; Iikura, H.; Teramoto, A.; Hayano, H.

    2009-06-01

    In high-strength concrete with low water-cement ratio, self-desiccation occurs due to cement hydration and causes shrinkage and an increased risk of cracking. While high-strength concrete has a denser matrix than normal-strength concrete, resulting in lower permeability, early-age cracks would cancel out this advantage. For the mitigation of this self-desiccation and resultant shrinkage, water-saturated porous aggregate, such as artificial lightweight aggregate, may be used in high-strength concrete. In this contribution, for the purpose of clarification of the volume change of high-strength concrete containing water-saturated lightweight aggregate, water transfer from the lightweight aggregate to cement paste matrix is visualized by neutron radiography. As a result, it is clear that water was supplied to the cement paste matrix in the range 3-8 mm from the surface of the aggregate, and the osmotic forces may yield water transfer around lightweight aggregate in a few hours after mixing.

  2. Development of Carbon Nanotube Modified Cement Paste with Microencapsulated Phase-Change Material for Structural–Functional Integrated Application

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongzhi; Yang, Shuqing; Memon, Shazim Ali

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase-change materials (MPCM) can be used to develop a structural–functional integrated cement paste having high heat storage efficiency and suitable mechanical strength. However, the incorporation of MPCM has been found to degrade the mechanical properties of cement based composites. Therefore, in this research, the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the properties of MPCM cement paste was evaluated. Test results showed that the incorporation of CNTs in MPCM cement paste accelerated the cement hydration reaction. SEM micrograph showed that CNTs were tightly attached to the cement hydration products. At the age of 28 days, the percentage increase in flexural and compressive strength with different dosage of CNTs was found to be up to 41% and 5% respectively. The optimum dosage of CNTs incorporated in MPCM cement paste was found to be 0.5 wt %. From the thermal performance test, it was found that the cement paste panels incorporated with different percentages of MPCM reduced the temperature measured at the center of the room by up to 4.6 °C. Inverse relationship was found between maximum temperature measured at the center of the room and the dosage of MPCM. PMID:25867476

  3. Pore size distribution, strength, and microstructure of portland cement paste containing metal hydroxide waste

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, Z.A.; Mahmud, H.; Shaaban, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes is used to convert hazardous metal hydroxide waste sludge into a solid mass with better handling properties. This study investigated the pore size development of ordinary portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxide waste sludge and rice husk ash using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of acre and the addition of rice husk ash on pore size development and strength were studied. It was found that the pore structures of mixes changed significantly with curing acre. The pore size shifted from 1,204 to 324 {angstrom} for 3-day old cement paste, and from 956 to 263 {angstrom} for a 7-day old sample. A reduction in pore size distribution for different curing ages was also observed in the other mixtures. From this limited study, no conclusion could be made as to any correlation between strength development and porosity. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Mathematical modeling of cement paste microstructure by mosaic pattern. Part II. Application

    SciTech Connect

    Tennis, P.D.; Xi, Y.; Jennings, H.M.

    1997-07-01

    A model based on mosaic pattern analysis is shown to have the potential to describe the complex shapes and spatial distribution of phases in the microstructures of multiphase materials. Several characteristics of both micrographs of portland cement pastes and images generated using the few parameters of the model are determined and, for the most part, agreement is good. The advantage is that spatial features of the microstructures can be captured by a few parameters. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  5. Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi; Nawa, Toyoharu; Owada, Hitoshi; Shibata, Masahito

    2013-10-15

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

  6. Utilization of water-reducing admixtures in cemented paste backfill of sulphide-rich mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2010-07-15

    This study presents the effect of three different water-reducing admixtures (WRAs) on the rheological and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples. A 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa and the maintenance of the stability (i.e. > or = 0.7 MPa) over 360 days of curing were desired as the design criteria. Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland composite cement (PCC) were used as binders at 5 wt.% dose. WRAs were initially tested to determine the dosage of a WRA for a required consistency of 7'' for CPB mixtures. A total of 192 CPB samples were then prepared using WRAs. The utilization of WRAs enhanced the flow characteristics of the CPB mixture and allowed to achieve the same consistency at a lower water-to-cement ratio. For OPC, the addition of WRAs appeared to improve the both short- and long-term performance of CPB samples. However, only polycarboxylate-based superplasticiser produced the desired 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa when PCC was used as the binder. These findings suggest that WRAs can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich tailings to improve the strength and stability in short and long terms allowing to reduce binder costs in a CPB plant. PMID:20382473

  7. In Vivo Osteogenic Potential of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Microspheres: Comparison with Injectable Cement Pastes.

    PubMed

    Cuzmar, Erika; Perez, Roman A; Manzanares, Maria-Cristina; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Franch, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The osteogenic capacity of biomimetic calcium deficient hydroxyapatite microspheres with and without collagen obtained by emulsification of a calcium phosphate cement paste has been evaluated in an in vivo model, and compared with an injectable calcium phosphate cement with the same composition. The materials were implanted into a 5 mm defect in the femur condyle of rabbits, and bone formation was assessed after 1 and 3 months. The histological analysis revealed that the cements presented cellular activity only in the margins of the material, whereas each one of the individual microspheres was covered with osteogenic cells. Consequently, bone ingrowth was enhanced by the microspheres, with a tenfold increase compared to the cement, which was associated to the higher accessibility for the cells provided by the macroporous network between the microspheres, and the larger surface area available for osteoconduction. No significant differences were found in terms of bone formation associated with the presence of collagen in the materials, although a more extensive erosion of the collagen-containing microspheres was observed.

  8. Assessment of arsenic immobilization in synthetically prepared cemented paste backfill specimens.

    PubMed

    Coussy, Samuel; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Blanc, Denise; Moszkowicz, Pierre; Bussière, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Mine tailings coming from the exploitation of sulphide and/or gold deposits can contain significant amounts of arsenic (As), highly soluble in conditions of weathering. Open mine voids backfilling techniques are now widely practiced by modern mining companies to manage the tailings. The most common one is called cemented paste backfill (CPB), and consists of tailings mixed with low amounts of hydraulic binders (3-5%) and a high proportion of water (typically 25%). The CPB is transported through a pipe network, to be placed in the mine openings. CPB provides storage benefits and underground support during mining operations. Moreover, this technique could also enhance contaminant stabilization, by fixing the contaminants in the binder matrix. CPB composites artificially spiked with As were synthesized in laboratory, using two types of hydraulic binders: a Portland cement, and a mix of fly ash and Portland cement. After curing duration of 66 days, the CPB samples were subjected to several leaching tests in various experimental conditions in order to better understand and then predict the As geochemical behaviour within CPBs. The assessment of the As release indicates that this element is better stabilized in Portland cement-based matrices rather than fly ash-based matrices. The As mobility differs in these two matrices, mainly because of the different As-bearing minerals formed during hydration processes. However, the total As depletion does not exceed 5% at the end of the most aggressive leaching test, indicating that As is well immobilized in the two types of CPB. PMID:22054566

  9. In Vivo Osteogenic Potential of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Microspheres: Comparison with Injectable Cement Pastes

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares, Maria-Cristina; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Franch, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The osteogenic capacity of biomimetic calcium deficient hydroxyapatite microspheres with and without collagen obtained by emulsification of a calcium phosphate cement paste has been evaluated in an in vivo model, and compared with an injectable calcium phosphate cement with the same composition. The materials were implanted into a 5 mm defect in the femur condyle of rabbits, and bone formation was assessed after 1 and 3 months. The histological analysis revealed that the cements presented cellular activity only in the margins of the material, whereas each one of the individual microspheres was covered with osteogenic cells. Consequently, bone ingrowth was enhanced by the microspheres, with a tenfold increase compared to the cement, which was associated to the higher accessibility for the cells provided by the macroporous network between the microspheres, and the larger surface area available for osteoconduction. No significant differences were found in terms of bone formation associated with the presence of collagen in the materials, although a more extensive erosion of the collagen-containing microspheres was observed. PMID:26132468

  10. A Confocal Microscopic Evaluation of the Dehydration Effect on Conventional, Resin Reinforced Powder/Liquid and Paste to Paste Glass Ionomer Luting Cements

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Kandaswamy, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dehydration of resin-modified glass ionomer powder/liquid system, resin-modified glass ionomer paste/paste luting cements in three different quantities and to compare them with a conventional glass ionomer luting cement using confocal laser scanning microscope. Materials and Methods: A conventional glass ionomer (Group I), a resin modified powder/liquid system (Group II), and a resin-modified paste/paste system (Group III) were selected for the study. In Group III, there were three subgroups based on the quantity of material dispensed. 50 premolar teeth were selected and randomly divided among the groups with 10 samples in each. The teeth were ground flat to expose a flat occlusal dentin. A device was made to standardize the thickness of cement placed on the teeth. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then longitudinally sectioned to examine the tooth dentin interface under a confocal microscope. The specimens were allowed to dehydrate under the microscope for different time intervals. The width of the crack after dehydration near the dentinal interface was measured at definite intervals in all the groups and analyzed statistically using Student’s t-test. Results: Conventional glass ionomer cement showed the maximum width of the crack followed by resin modified paste/paste system during the dehydration period. Resin modified powder/liquid system did not show cohesive failure. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer luting cement is more susceptible to cohesive failure when subjected to dehydration compared to resin-modified glass ionomer paste/paste luting cement. Among the luting cements, resin-modified glass ionomer powder/liquid system showed the best results when subjected to dehydration. PMID:26464535

  11. Influence of superplasticizers on the rheology and stability of limestone and cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mikanovic, Nikola Jolicoeur, Carmel

    2008-07-15

    The influence of superplasticizers on the rheological properties and dynamic stability of cement and reference limestone pastes were examined at room temperature. The pastes were initially formulated to exhibit nearly identical rheological parameters and bleeding-segregation characteristics, with w/c = 0.50 for the limestone and 0.55 for the cement. The former was examined at equilibrium pH {approx} 10 and at pH 12.5 following addition of Ca(OH){sub 2} to allow distinction of effects related to high pH and Ca{sup +2} from those related to cement hydration reactions. Both polynaphthalene- (PNS) and polyacrylate-type (PC) superplasticizers were investigated, adjusting the dosages to cover the same range of paste fluidity. Superplasticizer-particle interactions were monitored through binding isotherms and zeta potential measurements. The rheology of the pastes was evaluated through the mini-slump test and dynamic viscosity measurements which yielded key rheological parameters: yield stress, elastic and loss moduli (G' and G'') and zero-shear viscosity ({eta}{sub 0}). The paste stability was monitored as function of time, i.e. migration of solids and liquid phase measured in-situ and in 'real time', through surface bleeding measurements and from a multipoint conductivity method. The results provide new insight on the relative modes of action of PNS- and PC-type superplasticizers as dispersants. Also, the combined rheology and stability data allow an improved description of the processes responsible for bleeding and segregation in cementitious and reference systems.

  12. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere-Cement Paste Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronins, J.; Setina, J.; Sahmenko, G.; Lagzdina, S.; Shishkin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore size distribution by using the mercury porosimetry was determined. In a cold climate where the temperature often falls below 0 °C, it is important to avoid the amount of micrometer sized pores in the final structure and to decrease water absorption capacity of material. In winter conditions, water fills such pores and causes additional stresses to their walls by expansion while freezing. It was found that generally water uptake capacity for cement paste samples decreased up to 20% by increasing the concentration of CS up to 40 volume %, at the same time, the volume of micrometer sized opened pores increases.

  13. Effects of Blended-Cement Paste Chemical Composition Changes on Some Strength Gains of Blended-Mortars

    PubMed Central

    Kirgiz, Mehmet Serkan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC) on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG) were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC) were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP) or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP) for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min). Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC) and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS) and flexural strengths (FS) of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O), and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2) at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM) in comparison with reference mortars (RM) at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement. PMID:24587737

  14. Effects of blended-cement paste chemical composition changes on some strength gains of blended-mortars.

    PubMed

    Kirgiz, Mehmet Serkan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC) on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG) were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC) were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP) or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP) for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min). Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC) and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS) and flexural strengths (FS) of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O), and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2) at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM) in comparison with reference mortars (RM) at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement.

  15. Modeling the degradation of Portland cement pastes by biogenic organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Devillers, Philippe

    2010-08-15

    Reactive transport models can be used to assess the long-term performance of cement-based materials subjected to biodegradation. A bioleaching test (with Aspergillus niger fungi) applied to ordinary Portland cement pastes during 15 months is modeled with HYTEC. Modeling indicates that the biogenic organic acids (acetic, butyric, lactic and oxalic) strongly accelerate hydrate dissolution by acidic hydrolysis whilst their complexation of aluminum has an effect on the secondary gel stability only. The deepest degradation front corresponds to portlandite dissolution and decalcification of calcium silicate hydrates. A complex pattern of sulfate phases dissolution and precipitation takes place in an intermediate zone. The outermost degraded zone consists of alumina and silica gels. The modeling accurateness of calcium leaching, pH evolution and degradation thickness is consistently enhanced whilst considering increase of diffusivity in the degraded zones. Precipitation of calcium oxalate is predicted by modeling but was hindered in the bioleaching reactor.

  16. Measuring permeability and stress relaxation of young cement paste by beam bending

    SciTech Connect

    Vichit-Vadakan, W.; Scherer, George W

    2003-12-01

    When a saturated rod of a porous material is deflected in three-point bending, two types of time-dependent relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body, and viscoelastic (VE) relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the VE stress relaxation function of the sample. We report the early-age evolution of permeability, elastic modulus, and stress relaxation function for Type III Portland cement paste with water-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.45, 0.50, and 0.55. The stress relaxation function is shown to preserve its shape during aging; that function is numerically transformed into the creep function.

  17. Dielectric properties of portland cement paste as a function of time since mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Paul R.; Bilotta, Stephen

    1989-12-01

    The dielectric properties of portland cement paste and mortar have been measured in the frequency range 100 Hz-7 MHz as a function of time since mixing. Over much of the spectrum, the ac conductance of the samples appears directly related to the amount of unbound water remaining in the sample and ionic conduction predominates. In addition, interesting structure was found in both the conductance and capacitance data at high frequencies as the free water content was reduced. We conclude that relatively simple measurements of this kind can be a useful tool in concrete research and may provide the basis for simple, in situ, nondestructive measurement of the degree of curing of concrete or for monitoring water migration in concrete structures. Measurements on sealed samples of partially or fully cured concrete reveal also the water-cement ratio of the original mix.

  18. Mathematical modeling of cement paste microstructure by mosaic pattern Part I. Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Y.; Tennis, P.D.; Jennings, H.M.

    1996-08-01

    This paper develops a mathematical model using mosaic patterns to characterize structural features of complex, multiphase and multidimensional microstructures, such as those for cement paste. A multiphase microstructure can be characterized by {ital m} independent parameters: the first {ital m}{minus}1 parameters are equivalent to the volume fractions of the phases, while the final parameter describes the grain size, and thus, the spatial arrangement of the microstructure. An evaluation procedure for the parameters is given; they can be evaluated based on a 2D image, and then the 3D microstructure can be simulated by the present model. The relationship among the model parameters and material parameters, such as water-to-cement ratio and particle size distribution, are also established. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  19. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tingting; Vandeperre, Luc J.; Cheeseman, Christopher R.

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  20. The influence of silanized nano-SiO{sub 2} on the hydration of cement paste: NMR investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bede, A. Pop, A.; Ardelean, I.; Moldovan, M.

    2015-12-23

    It is known that by adding a small amount of nanoparticles to the cement-based materials a strong influence on the workability, strength and durability is obtained. These characteristics of the material are fundamentally determined by the hydration process taking place after mixing the cement grains with water. In the present study the influence introduced by the addition of nano-silica with silanized surfaces on the hydration process was investigated using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The cement samples were prepared using gray cement at a water-to-cement ratio of 0.4 and a 5% addition of nanosilica. The surface of the nanoparticles was modified using a coating of Silane A174. The cement pastes were monitored during their standard curing time of 28 days. It was established that, by using unmodified nanosilica particles, an acceleration of the hydration process takes place as compared with the pure cement paste. On the other side, by adding silanized nanoparticles, the dormancy stage significantly extends and the hydration process is slower. This slowing down process could enhance the mechanical strength of cement based materials as a result of a better compaction of the hydrated samples.

  1. The influence of silanized nano-SiO2 on the hydration of cement paste: NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bede, A.; Pop, A.; Moldovan, M.; Ardelean, I.

    2015-12-01

    It is known that by adding a small amount of nanoparticles to the cement-based materials a strong influence on the workability, strength and durability is obtained. These characteristics of the material are fundamentally determined by the hydration process taking place after mixing the cement grains with water. In the present study the influence introduced by the addition of nano-silica with silanized surfaces on the hydration process was investigated using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The cement samples were prepared using gray cement at a water-to-cement ratio of 0.4 and a 5% addition of nanosilica. The surface of the nanoparticles was modified using a coating of Silane A174. The cement pastes were monitored during their standard curing time of 28 days. It was established that, by using unmodified nanosilica particles, an acceleration of the hydration process takes place as compared with the pure cement paste. On the other side, by adding silanized nanoparticles, the dormancy stage significantly extends and the hydration process is slower. This slowing down process could enhance the mechanical strength of cement based materials as a result of a better compaction of the hydrated samples.

  2. Microwave detection of delaminations between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite and hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D.; Kazemi, M.; Marler, K.; Zoughi, R.; Myers, J.; Nanni, A.

    2002-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used for the rehabilitation of concrete structures. Detection and characterization of delaminations between an FRP composite and a concrete surface are of paramount importance. Consequently, the development of a one sided, non-contact, real time and rapid nondestructive testing (NDT) technique for this purpose is of great interest. Near-field microwave NDT techniques, using open-ended rectangular waveguide probes, have shown great potential for detecting delaminations in layered composite structures such as these. The results of some theoretical and experimental investigations on a specially prepared cement paste specimen are presented here.

  3. Effect of various Portland cement paste compositions on early-age strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetta, Alana G.

    Early-age strain in paste, mortar, and concrete mixtures was investigated using a new method where the specimen shape was a cone frustum. Strain of the specimen from both the horizontal and vertical directions was captured by height change measurement. The volumetric strain was then calculated as a function of the height change and was plotted versus time. A correlation was found between the slopes of the volumetric strain curve resulting from this test method and the initial setting time of the tested material. An initial evaluation of the repeatability of this innovative test method was conducted. The early-age strain effects of aggregate volume, shrinkage reducing admixture, water-cementitious ratio (w/cm), and partial cement replacement with supplementary cementitious materials were tested and individually compared. From these comparisons, it was observed that ambient temperature, bleed water development, and rheological properties had a significant impact on the volumetric strain results. Data showed increased strain as aggregate volume was reduced and as the w/cm was changed from 0.25 up to 0.50. The addition of shrinkage reducing admixture generally caused an increase in the 36-hour volumetric strain value. In most of the mixtures, cement replacement with 20% fly ash or 10% metakaolin reduced the measured volumetric strain when the w/cm was 0.30. Replacement of cement with 10% silica fume caused an insignificant change in volumetric strain results.

  4. Effect of sodium monofluorophosphate treatment on microstructure and frost salt scaling durability of slag cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Copuroglu, O. . E-mail: o.copuroglu@citg.tudelft.nl; Fraaij, A.L.A.; Bijen, J.M.J.M.

    2006-08-15

    Sodium-monofluorophosphate (Na-MFP) is currently in use as a surface applied corrosion inhibitor in the concrete industry. Its basic mechanism is to protect the passive layer of the reinforcement steel against disruption due to carbonation. Carbonation is known as the most detrimental environmental effect on blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) concrete with respect to frost salt scaling. In this paper the effect of Na-MFP on the microstructure and frost salt scaling resistance of carbonated BFSC paste is presented. The results of electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are discussed. It is found that the treatment modifies the microstructure and improves the resistance of carbonated BFSC paste against frost salt attack.

  5. The impact of sulphate and magnesium on chloride binding in Portland cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    De Weerdt, K.; Orsáková, D.; Geiker, M.R.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of magnesium and sulphate present in sea water on chloride binding in Portland cement paste was investigated. Ground well hydrated cement paste was exposed to MgCl{sub 2}, NaCl, NaCl + MgCl{sub 2}, MgSO{sub 4} + MgCl{sub 2} and artificial sea water solutions with a range of concentrations at 20 °C. Chloride binding isotherms are determined and pH of the solutions were measured. A selection of samples was examined by SEM-EDS to identify phase changes upon exposure. The experimental data were compared with calculations of a thermodynamic model. Chloride binding from sea water was similar to chloride binding for NaCl solutions. The magnesium content in the sea water lead to a slight decrease in pH, but this did not result in a notable increase in chloride binding. The sulphate present in sea water reduces both chloride binding in C–S–H and AFm phases, as the C–S–H incorporates more sulphates instead of chlorides, and part of the AFm phases converts to ettringite.

  6. Properties of high calcium fly ash geopolymer pastes with Portland cement as an additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoo-ngernkham, Tanakorn; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Sata, Vanchai; Pangdaeng, Saengsuree; Sinsiri, Theerawat

    2013-02-01

    The effect of Portland cement (OPC) addition on the properties of high calcium fly ash geopolymer pastes was investigated in the paper. OPC partially replaced fly ash (FA) at the dosages of 0, 5%, 10%, and 15% by mass of binder. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions were used as the liquid portion in the mixture: NaOH 10 mol/L, Na2SiO3/NaOH with a mass ratio of 2.0, and alkaline liquid/binder (L/B) with a mass ratio of 0.6. The curing at 60°C for 24 h was used to accelerate the geopolymerization. The setting time of all fresh pastes, porosity, and compressive strength of the pastes at the stages of 1, 7, 28, and 90 d were tested. The elastic modulus and strain capacity of the pastes at the stage of 7 d were determined. It is revealed that the use of OPC as an additive to replace part of FA results in the decreases in the setting time, porosity, and strain capacity of the paste specimens, while the compressive strength and elastic modulus seem to increase.

  7. Release of internal curing water from lightweight aggregates in cement paste investigated by neutron and X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, P.; Münch, B.; Weiss, W. J.; Kaestner, A.; Jerjen, I.; Josic, L.; Lehmann, E.; Lura, P.

    2011-09-01

    A sealed sample of cement paste containing a pre-wetted and a dry lightweight aggregate (LWA) particle was investigated in the period between 0.5 and 20.3 h after mixing. Changes in the local water distribution in the sample during hydration were evaluated using the subtraction of 3D images obtained by subsequent neutron tomographies (NT). As both water retention in the LWA and its release to the cement paste are influenced by the pore structure of the aggregate, a high-resolution image of the sample was subsequently captured by X-ray tomography. The internal curing water released from the LWA traveled at least 3 mm from the LWA into the cement paste in the first day. Hardly any gradient in the water content of the cement paste against the distance from the LWA was observed. This suggests that the release of water for internal curing (IC) is relatively fast and the water is distributed fairly homogeneously from the LWA for at least 3 mm within the hydrating cement paste.

  8. Characterization of high-calcium fly ash and its influence on ettringite formation in portland cement pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishmack, Jody Kathleen

    High-calcium Class C fly ashes derived from Powder River Basin coal are currently used as supplementary cementing materials in portland cement concrete. These fly ashes tend to contain significant amounts of sulfur, calcium, and aluminum, thus they are potential sources of ettringite. Characterization of six high-calcium fly ashes originating from Powder River Basin coal have been carried out. The hydration products formed in pastes made from fly ash and water were investigated. The principal phases produced at room temperature were ettringite, monosulfate, and stratlingite. The relative amounts formed varied with the specific fly ash. Removal of the soluble crystalline sulfur bearing minerals indicated that approximately a third of the sulfur is located in the fly ash glass. Pore solution analyses indicated that sulfur concentrations increased at later ages. Three fly ashes were selected for further study based on their ability to form ettringite. Portland cement-fly ash pastes made with the selected fly ashes were investigated to evaluate ettringite and monosulfate formation. Each of the fly ashes were mixed with four different types of portland cements (Type I, I/II, II, and III) as well as three different Type I cements exhibiting a range of C3A and sulfate contents. The pastes had 25% or 35% fly ash by total weight of solids and a water:cement-fly ash ratio of 0.45. The samples were placed in a curing room (R.H. = 100, 23°C) and were then analyzed at various ages by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the principal hydration products. The hydration products identified by XRD were portlandite, ettringite (an AFt phase), monosulfate, and generally smaller amounts of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate (all AFm phases). Although the amount of ettringite formed varied with the individual cement, only a modest correlation with cement sulfate content and no correlation with cement C3A content was observed. DSC

  9. Sorption kinetics of superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) in fresh Portland cement-based pastes visualized and quantified by neutron radiography and correlated to the progress of cement hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Schroefl, Christof; Mechtcherine, Viktor; Vontobel, Peter; Hovind, Jan; Lehmann, Eberhard

    2015-09-15

    Water sorption of two superabsorbent polymers in cement-based pastes has been characterized by neutron radiography. Cement pastes with W/C of 0.25 and 0.50 and one additionally containing silica fume (W/C = 0.42) were investigated. The SAPs differed in their inherent sorption kinetics in extracted cement pore solution (SAP 1: self-releasing; SAP 2: retentive). Desorption from SAP 1 started very early after paste preparation. Hence, its individual non-retentiveness governs its behavior only. SAP 2 released water into all matrices, but its kinetics were different. In the paste with the highest W/C, some moderate water release was recorded from the beginning. In the other two pastes, SAP 2 retained its stored liquid during the dormant period, i.e., up to the percolation threshold. Intense desorption then set in and continued throughout the acceleration period. These findings explain the pronouncedly higher efficiency of SAP 2 as internal curing admixture as compared to SAP 1.

  10. Limitation in obtainable surface roughness of hardened cement paste: 'virtual' topographic experiment based on focussed ion beam nanotomography datasets.

    PubMed

    Trtik, P; Dual, J; Muench, B; Holzer, L

    2008-11-01

    Surface roughness affects the results of nanomechanical tests. The surface roughness values to be measured on a surface of a porous material are dependent on the properties of the naturally occurring pore space. In order to assess the surface roughness of hardened cement paste (HCP) without the actual influence of the usual sample preparation for nanomechanical testing (i.e. grinding and polishing), focussed ion beam nanotomography datasets were utilized for reconstruction of 3D (nanoscale resolution) surface profiles of hardened cement pastes. 'Virtual topographic experiments' were performed and root mean square surface roughness was then calculated for a large number of such 3D surface profiles. The resulting root mean square (between 115 and 494 nm) is considerably higher than some roughness values (as low as 10 nm) reported in the literature. We suggest that thus-analysed root mean square values provide an estimate of a 'hard' lower limit that can be achieved by 'artefact-free' sample preparation of realistic samples of hardened cement paste. To the best of our knowledge, this 'hard' lower limit was quantified for a porous material based on hydraulic cement for the first time. We suggest that the values of RMS below such a limit may indicate sample preparation artefacts. Consequently, for reliable nanomechanical testing of disordered porous materials, such as hardened cement paste, the preparation methods may require further improvement.

  11. Effect of calcium formate as an accelerator on the physicochemical and mechanical properties of pozzolanic cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Heikal, Mohamed

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of calcium formate (CF) as an accelerator on the properties of pozzolanic cement pastes. Three types of cements were used in this investigation. These cements were OPC and pozzolanic cements containing 80 mass% OPC and 20 mass% silica fume (SF) or 20 mass% ground clay bricks (GCB). The dosages of CF were 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 mass% of cement. The compressive strength, total porosity, and hydration kinetics such as free lime and combined water contents were investigated. The results obtained in this study showed that the addition of CF shortens the initial and final setting times and increases the compressive strength and combined water content as well as gel/space ratio at all ages of hydration. On the other hand, it decreases the total porosity. CF activates the liberation of Ca(OH){sub 2} of OPC pastes. The free lime content of pozzolanic cement in the presence of CF increases up to 7 days, then decreases at the later ages of hydration.

  12. Microstructural and bulk property changes in hardened cement paste during the first drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Ippei; Nishioka, Yukiko; Igarashi, Go; Matsui, Kunio

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports the microstructural changes and resultant bulk physical property changes in hardened cement paste (hcp) during the first desorption process. The microstructural changes and solid-phase changes were evaluated by water vapor sorption, nitrogen sorption, ultrasonic velocity, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance. Strength, Young's modulus, and drying shrinkage were also examined. The first drying process increased the volume of macropores and decreased the volume of mesopores and interlayer spaces. Furthermore, in the first drying process globule clusters were interconnected. During the first desorption, the strength increased for samples cured at 100% to 90% RH, decreased for 90% to 40% RH, and increased again for 40% to 11% RH. This behavior is explained by both microstructural changes in hcp and C–S–H globule densification. The drying shrinkage strains during rapid drying and slow drying were compared and the effects of the microstructural changes and evaporation were separated.

  13. Response of entrained air-void systems in cement paste to pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Scope and Method of Study: Determine the response of entrained air-void systems in fresh cement paste to applied pressures by utilizing micro-computed tomography. Compare results to those suggested by the ASTM C231 Type B pressure meter calibration equations. Findings and Conclusions: The results of this research suggest that although the Type B pressure meter assumptions are valid for the compression of individual voids, the volume of air-voids which dissolve under pressure is significant enough to register noticeable errors when using a synthetic air-entraining admixture with the Type B pressure meter test. Results currently suggest that air-void systems with a significant percentage of small voids present will have higher deviation from the Boyle's Law model used by the Type B pressure meter due to the dissolution of these air-voids.

  14. Quantification of fly ash in hydrated, blended Portland cement pastes by backscattered electron imaging.

    PubMed

    Deschner, F; Münch, B; Winnefeld, F; Lothenbach, B

    2013-08-01

    An automated image analysis procedure for the segmentation of anhydrous fly ash from backscattered electron images of hydrated, fly ash blended Portland cement paste is presented. A total of six hundred backscattered electron images per sample are acquired at a magnification of 2000. Characteristic features of fly ash particles concerning grey level, shape and texture were used to segment anhydrous fly ash by a combination of grey level filtering, grey level segmentation and morphological filtering techniques. The thresholds for the grey level segmentation are determined for each sample by semiautomatic histogram analysis of the full image stack of each sample. The analysis of the presented dataset reveals a standard deviation of the reaction degree of fly ash of up to 4.3%. The results agree with a selective dissolution method to quantify the reaction degree of fly ash showing the potential of the presented image analysis procedure.

  15. Impact of the associated cation on chloride binding of Portland cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    De Weerdt, K.; Colombo, A.; Coppola, L.; Justnes, H.; Geiker, M.R.

    2015-02-15

    Well hydrated cement paste was exposed to MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2} and NaCl solutions at 20 °C. The chloride binding isotherms for free chloride concentrations ranging up to 1.5 mol/l were determined experimentally. More chlorides were found to be bound when the associated cation was Mg{sup 2} {sup +} or Ca{sup 2} {sup +} compared to Na{sup +}. The chloride binding capacity of the paste appeared to be related to the pH of the exposure solution. In order to explain the cation dependency of the chloride binding a selection of samples was investigated in detail using experimental techniques such as TG, XRD and SEM–EDS to identify the phases binding the chlorides. The experimentally obtained data were compared with the calculations of a thermodynamic model, GEMS. It was concluded that the measured change in chloride binding depending on the cation was mainly governed by the pH of the exposure solution and thereby the binding capacity of the C-S-H.

  16. Temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of silica fume cement pastes with a very low water–binder ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, I.; Teramoto, A.

    2013-08-15

    Ultra-high-strength concrete with a large unit cement content undergoes considerable temperature increase inside members due to hydration heat, leading to a higher risk of internal cracking. Hence, the temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes made with silica fume premixed cement with a water–binder ratio of 0.15 was studied extensively. Development of autogenous shrinkage showed different behaviors before and after the inflection point, and dependence on the temperature after mixing and subsequent temperature histories. The difference in autogenous shrinkage behavior poses problems for winter construction because autogenous shrinkage may increase with decrease in temperature after mixing before the inflection point and with increase in temperature inside concrete members with large cross sections.

  17. Permeability and elastic modulus of cement paste as a function of curing temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Valenza, John J. Thomas, Jeffrey J.

    2012-02-15

    The permeability and elastic modulus of mature cement paste cured at temperatures between 8 Degree-Sign C and 60 Degree-Sign C were measured using a previously described beam bending method. The permeability increases by two orders of magnitude over this range, with most of the increase occurring when the curing temperature increases from 40 Degree-Sign C to 60 Degree-Sign C. The elastic modulus varies much less, decreasing by about 20% as the curing temperature increases from 20 Degree-Sign C to 60 Degree-Sign C. All specimens had very low permeability, k < 0.1 nm{sup 2}, despite having relatively high porosity, {phi} {approx} 40%. Concomitant investigations of the microstructure using small angle neutron scattering and thermoporometry indicate that the porosity is characterized by nanometric pores, and that the characteristic size of pores controlling transport increases with curing temperature. The variation of the microstructure with curing temperature is attributed to changes in the pore structure of the calcium-silicate-hydrate reaction product. Both the empirical Carmen-Kozeny, and modified Carmen-Kozeny permeability models suggest that the tortuosity is very high regardless of curing temperature, {xi} {approx} 1000.

  18. Temperature dependence, 0 to 40 deg. C, of the mineralogy of Portland cement paste in the presence of calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Matschei, Thomas; Glasser, Fredrik P.

    2010-05-15

    Thermodynamic calculations disclose that significant changes of the AFm and AFt phases and amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} occur between 0 and 40 deg. C; the changes are affected by added calcite. Hydrogarnet, C{sub 3}AH{sub 6}, is destabilised at low carbonate contents and/or low temperatures < 8 deg. C and is unlikely to form in calcite-saturated Portland cement compositions cured at < 40 deg. C. The AFm phase actually consists of several structurally-related compositions which form incomplete solid solutions. The AFt phase is close to its ideal stoichiometry at 25 deg. C but at low temperatures, < 20 deg. C, extensive solid solutions occur with CO{sub 3}-ettringite. A nomenclature scheme is proposed and AFm-AFt phase relations are presented in isothermal sections at 5, 25 and 40 deg. C. The AFt and AFm phase relations are depicted in terms of competition between OH, CO{sub 3} and SO{sub 4} for anion sites. Diagrams are presented showing how changing temperatures affect the volume of the solid phases with implications for space filling by the paste. Specimen calculations are related to regimes likely to occur in commercial cements and suggestions are made for testing thermal impacts on cement properties by defining four regimes. It is concluded that calculation provides a rapid and effective tool for exploring the response of cement systems to changing composition and temperature and to optimise cement performance.

  19. Aggregate-cement paste transition zone properties affecting the salt-frost damage of high-performance concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Cwirzen, Andrzej; Penttala, Vesa

    2005-04-01

    The influence of the cement paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on the frost durability of high-performance silica fume concrete (HPSFC) has been studied. Investigation was carried out on eight non-air-entrained concretes having water-to-binder (W/B) ratios of 0.3, 0.35 and 0.42 and different additions of condensed silica fume. Studies on the microstructure and composition of the cement paste have been made by means of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)-BSE, ESEM-EDX and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) analysis. The results showed that the transition zone initiates and accelerates damaging mechanisms by enhancing movement of the pore solution within the concrete during freezing and thawing cycles. Cracks filled with ettringite were primarily formed in the ITZ. The test concretes having good frost-deicing salt durability featured a narrow transition zone and a decreased Ca/Si atomic ratio in the transition zone compared to the bulk cement paste. Moderate additions of silica fume seemed to densify the microstructure of the ITZ.

  20. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste.

    PubMed

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-16

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite.

  1. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite.

  2. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste.

    PubMed

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite. PMID:25592665

  3. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite. PMID:25592665

  4. Predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of cemented paste backfill from ultrasonic pulse velocity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the predictability of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) prepared from three different tailings (Tailings T1, Tailings T2 and Tailings T3) using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. For this purpose, 180 CPB samples with diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm (similar to NX size) prepared at different binder dosages and consistencies were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7-56 days of curing periods. The effects of binder dosage and consistency on the UPV and UCS properties of CPB samples were investigated and UCS values were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. Microstructural analyses were also performed on CPB samples in order to understand the effect of microstructure (i.e. total porosity) on the UPV data. The UPV and UCSs of CPB samples increased with increasing binder dosage and reducing the consistency irrespective of the tailings type and curing periods. Changes in the mixture properties observed to have a lesser extent on the UPV properties of CPB, while, their effect on the UCS of CPB was significant. Empirical equations were produced for each mixture in order to predict the UCSs of CPB through UPV. The validity of the equations was also checked by t- and F-test. The results showed that a linear relation appeared to exist between the UPV and UCS with high correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.79) and all models were valid by statistical analysis. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses have revealed that the UPV properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties (i.e. total porosity). The major output of this study is that UPV test can be effectively used for a preliminary prediction of the strength of CPB.

  5. Effect of Additives and pH on the Formation of Carbonate Mineral by CO2 Sequestration of Cement Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, J.; Lee, H.; Son, B. S.; Oh, J.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 in the atmosphere causes a global warming that is a big issue nowadays. Many studies of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technologies have been studied all over the world. Waste cement is a good source for aqueous carbonation because it is rich in calcium. Therefore, this study was performed to develop the aqueous carbonation method for waste cement powder. Cement paste was made with water/cement ratio of 6:4 and cured for 28 days in water bath. The cement paste was pulverized into a fine powder sizing less than 0.15 mm. To study effect of additives and pH on the formation of carbonate minerals, aqueous carbonation experiments were conducted. The mineral compositions and morphology of carbonate mineral were identified by XRD and SEM/EDS analysis. 1.0 M NaCl and 0.25 M MgCl2 were applied as additives. Aqueous carbonation experiment was conducted with injecting pure CO2 gas (99.9%) to a reactor containing 200 ㎖ of reacting solution. The pH of reacting solution was controled to determine formational condition of carbonate minerals. In 0.25 M MgCl2 solution, calcite was dominant mineral at high pH. More aragonite, however, formed as decreasing pH of solution with injection of CO2. The presence of Mg2+ in solution makes aragonite more dominant than calcite. Aragonite was mainly formed at the high pH of solution with 1.0 M NaCl additive, whereas calcite was more preponderant mineral than aragonite as falling pH. It show that unstable aragonite transformed to calcite as decreasing pH. In no additive solution, vaterite was dominantly formed at the initial stage of experiement, but unstable vaterite transformed to well crystallized calcite with further carbonation.

  6. Evaluation of pore structures and cracking in cement paste exposed to elevated temperatures by X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang Yeom; Yun, Tae Sup; Park, Kwang Pil

    2013-08-15

    When cement-based materials are exposed to the high temperatures induced by fire, which can rapidly cause temperatures of over 1000 °C, the changes in pore structure and density prevail. In the present study, mortar specimens were subjected to a series of increasing temperatures to explore the temperature-dependent evolution of internal pore structure. High-performance X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe the evolution of temperature-induced discontinuities at the sub-millimeter level. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the cause of physical changes in the heated mortar specimens. Results exhibit the changes in pore structure caused by elevated temperatures, and thermally induced fractures. We discuss the progressive formation of thermally induced fracture networks, which is a prerequisite for spalling failure of cement-based materials by fire, based on visual observations of the 3D internal structures revealed by X-ray CT.

  7. The effects of the mechanical–chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cheng-Gang; Sun, Chang-Jung; Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Milling extracted MSWI fly ash. ► Increasing specific surface area, destruction of the crystalline texture, and increasing the amount of amorphous materials. ► Increasing heavy metal stability. ► Inducing pozzolanic reactions and increasing the early and later strength of the cement paste. - Abstract: A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96 h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50 times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} and led to the generation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste.

  8. On the mechanism of polypropylene fibres in preventing fire spalling in self-compacting and high-performance cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Ye, G.; De Schutter, G.; Yuan, Y.; Taerwe, L.

    2008-04-15

    With the increasing application of self-compacting concrete (SCC) in construction and infrastructure, the fire spalling behavior of SCC has been attracting due attention. In high performance concrete (HPC), addition of polypropylene fibers (PP fibers) is widely used as an effective method to prevent explosive spalling. Hence, it would be useful to investigate whether the PP fibers are also efficient in SCC to avoid explosive spalling. However, no universal agreement exists concerning the fundamental mechanism of reducing the spalling risk by adding PP fiber. For SCC, the reduction of flowability should be considered when adding a significant amount of fibres. In this investigation, both the micro-level and macro-level properties of pastes with different fiber contents were studied in order to investigate the role of PP fiber at elevated temperature in self-compacting cement paste samples. The micro properties were studied by backscattering electron microscopy (BSE) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests. The modification of the pore structure at elevated temperature was investigated as well as the morphology of the PP fibers. Some macro properties were measured, such as the gas permeability of self-compacting cement paste after heating at different temperatures. The factors influencing gas permeability were analyzed. It is shown that with the melting of PP fiber, no significant increase in total pore volume is obtained. However, the connectivity of isolated pores increases, leading to an increase of gas permeability. With the increase of temperature, the addition of PP fibers reduces the damage of cement pastes, as seen from the total pore volume and the threshold pore diameter changes. From this investigation, it is concluded that the connectivity of pores as well as the creation of micro cracks are the major factors which determine the gas permeability after exposure to high temperatures. Furthermore, the connectivity of the pores acts as a dominant factor

  9. Optimization of growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii in bio-based cement pastes to mitigate delay in hydration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah L; Kirisits, Mary Jo; Ferron, Raissa Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as a novel method to improve durability and remediate cracks in concrete. One way to introduce microorganisms to concrete is by replacing the mixing water with a bacterial culture in nutrient medium. In the literature, yeast extract often has been used as a carbon source for this application; however, severe retardation of hydration kinetics has been observed when yeast extract is added to cement. This study investigates the suitability of alternative carbon sources to replace yeast extract for microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation in cement-based materials. A combination of meat extract and sodium acetate was identified as a suitable replacement in growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii; this alternative growth medium reduced retardation by 75 % (as compared to yeast extract) without compromising bacterial growth, urea hydrolysis, cell zeta potential, and ability to promote calcium carbonate formation.

  10. The effects of the mechanical-chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Gang; Sun, Chang-Jung; Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun

    2013-04-01

    A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH)2 and led to the generation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste.

  11. Deterioration of hardened cement paste under combined sulphate-chloride attack investigated by synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, J.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2016-06-01

    The exact mechanisms of the phase transitions caused by a combined sulphate-chloride attack are discussed controversially. The main points concern the mutual influences of sulphate and chloride ions during the secondary binding processes of these anions within cement hydrate phases. We simulated combined sulphate-chloride attack under laboratory conditions using solutions containing NaCl and Na2SO4 in different concentrations. Three sample compositions were used for the preparation of the specimens. In two of them, 30% of Portland cement was replaced by supplementary cementitious materials (fly ash, slag). The phase distribution in the samples was determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The analysis with high spatial resolution allows the localisation of the secondary phase formation in the microstructural profile of the sample. A mechanism of the phase developments under combined sulphate-chloride attack is derived.

  12. Micro-observations of different types of nano-Al₂O₃on the hydration of cement paste with sludge ash replacement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huan-Lin; Lin, Deng-Fong; Shieh, Show-Ing; You, Yan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants have become important in developing countries. Consequently, the amount of sewage sludge produced by these countries has been gradually increasing, and determining how to properly recycle this sludge is becoming an important topic for researchers. In this study, to expand the recyclability of sewage sludge ash (SSA) in engineering applications, two types of nano-aluminium oxides (Al₂O₃), MC2A and MC2R, were added to SSA/cement paste and mortar specimens. The MC2R type (γ phase) had a smaller particle size and larger specific surface area than the MC2A type (α phase). The results indicate that the addition of nano-Al₂O₃to SSA/cement paste can effectively improve the hydration products of the paste. Moreover, the amount of hydration products increased as the amount of nano-Al₂O₃added to the SSA/cement paste increased. The test results indicate that MC2A nano-Al₂O₃can more uniformly distribute in the paste body and improve the hydration of cement than MC2R nano-Al₂O₃. Thus, more calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel and calcium aluminate hydrate (C-A-H) salts were produced, and the strength of the specimens was improved. This study suggests that MC2A nano-Al₂O₃is preferable to MC2R nano- Al₂O₃for SSA/cement specimen applications.

  13. Micro-observations of different types of nano-Al₂O₃on the hydration of cement paste with sludge ash replacement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huan-Lin; Lin, Deng-Fong; Shieh, Show-Ing; You, Yan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants have become important in developing countries. Consequently, the amount of sewage sludge produced by these countries has been gradually increasing, and determining how to properly recycle this sludge is becoming an important topic for researchers. In this study, to expand the recyclability of sewage sludge ash (SSA) in engineering applications, two types of nano-aluminium oxides (Al₂O₃), MC2A and MC2R, were added to SSA/cement paste and mortar specimens. The MC2R type (γ phase) had a smaller particle size and larger specific surface area than the MC2A type (α phase). The results indicate that the addition of nano-Al₂O₃to SSA/cement paste can effectively improve the hydration products of the paste. Moreover, the amount of hydration products increased as the amount of nano-Al₂O₃added to the SSA/cement paste increased. The test results indicate that MC2A nano-Al₂O₃can more uniformly distribute in the paste body and improve the hydration of cement than MC2R nano-Al₂O₃. Thus, more calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel and calcium aluminate hydrate (C-A-H) salts were produced, and the strength of the specimens was improved. This study suggests that MC2A nano-Al₂O₃is preferable to MC2R nano- Al₂O₃for SSA/cement specimen applications. PMID:26510613

  14. Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals from Cement Pastes Using a Modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

    PubMed

    Huang, Minrui; Feng, Huajun; Shen, Dongsheng; Li, Na; Chen, Yingqiang; Shentu, Jiali

    2016-03-01

    As the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) can not exhaust the acid neutralizing capacity of the cement rotary kiln co-processing solid wastes products which is particularly important for the assessment of the leaching concentrations of heavy metals. A modified TCLP was proposed. The extent of leaching of heavy metals is low using the TCLP and the leaching performance of the different metals can not be differentiated. Using the modified TCLP, however, Zn leaching was negligible during the first 180 h and then sharply increased (2.86 ± 0.18 to 3.54 ± 0.26 mg/L) as the acidity increased (pH < 6.0). Thus, Zn leaching is enhanced using the modified TCLP. While Pb leached readily during the first 126 h and then leachate concentrations decreased to below the analytical detection limit. To conclude, this modified TCLP is a more suitable method for these cement rotary kiln co-processing products. PMID:26781629

  15. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Bertron, Alexandra; Larreur-Cayol, Steeves; Escadeillas, Gilles

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate.

  16. (31)P Solid-State NMR study of the chemical setting process of a dual-paste injectable brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Legrand, A P; Sfihi, H; Lequeux, N; Lemaître, J

    2009-10-01

    The composition and evolution of a brushite-type calcium phosphate cement was investigated by Solid-State NMR and X-ray during the setting process. The cement is obtained by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate [Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O, MCPM] in presence of water, with formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate or brushite [CaHPO(2).2H(2)O, DCPD]. Analysis of the initial beta-TCP paste has shown the presence of beta-calcium pyrophosphate [Ca(2)P(2)O(7), beta-CPy] and that of the initial MCPM a mixture of MCPM and dicalcium phosphate [CaHPO(4), DCP]. Follow-up of the chemical composition by (31)P Solid-State NMR enables to show that the chemical setting process appeared to reach an end after 20 min. The constant composition observed at the end of the process was similarly determined.

  17. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  18. The mechanism of cesium immobilization in densified silica-fume blended cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Nes, G. Katz, A.; Peled, Y.; Zeiri, Y.

    2008-05-15

    The role of silica-fume agglomerates, found in densified silica-fume (DSF) pastes, in the immobilization mechanism of Cs ions was studied. Samples of cementitious pastes containing two different forms of silica fume - DSF and raw silica fume (RSF) - were prepared. Leaching experiments showed that both additives reduced the leachability of the metal ion, but the effect of the DSF paste was much stronger. Scanning Electron Microscopy, together with Differential Thermal Analysis, proved that no agglomerated particles were present in the RSF pastes and that the extent of pozzolanic reactivity was higher. We therefore believe that unreacted silica within the DSF agglomerates adsorbs Cs ions and consequently increases their immobilization. Furthermore, this work suggests that during the pozzolanic reaction, a hydrated rim develops around the agglomerate that acts as an additional diffusion barrier for the Cs ions, resulting in an increased efficiency of Cs immobilization.

  19. Usage of internal magnetic fields to study the early hydration process of cement paste by MGSE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, Janez; Ardelean, Ioan

    2016-11-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients, arising within the porous media due to susceptibility differences at the interfaces of solid and liquid as well as due to the contained magnetic impurities, can be employed by the method of modulated gradient spin echo to get insight into the velocity autocorrelation spectrum of liquid confined in the porous structure. New theoretical treatment of spin interaction with the radio-frequency field and the simultaneously applied static non-uniform magnetic field provides the formula that match well with the measurement of restricted diffusion of water in pores of cement paste. Its fitting to the experimental data gives the changes in the mean size of capillary pores, the spin relaxation and the magnitude of mean internal magnetic field gradients during the induction period and early acceleration stage of hydration processes at different temperatures.

  20. Adsorption of cefixime from aqueous solutions using modified hardened paste of Portland cement by perlite; optimization by Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Rasoulifard, Mohammad Hossein; Khanmohammadi, Soghra; Heidari, Azam

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have used a simple and cost-effective removal technique by a commercially available Fe-Al-SiO2 containing complex material (hardened paste of Portland cement (HPPC)). The adsorbing performance of HPPC and modified HPPC with perlite for removal of cefixime from aqueous solutions was investigated comparatively by using batch adsorption studies. HPPC has been selected because of the main advantages such as high efficiency, simple separation of sludge, low-cost and abundant availability. A Taguchi orthogonal array experimental design with an OA16 (4(5)) matrix was employed to optimize the affecting factors of adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, type of adsorbent, contact time and pH. On the basis of equilibrium adsorption data, Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models were also confirmed. The results showed that HPPC and modified HPPC were both efficient adsorbents for cefixime removal. PMID:27642826

  1. Adsorption of cefixime from aqueous solutions using modified hardened paste of Portland cement by perlite; optimization by Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Rasoulifard, Mohammad Hossein; Khanmohammadi, Soghra; Heidari, Azam

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have used a simple and cost-effective removal technique by a commercially available Fe-Al-SiO2 containing complex material (hardened paste of Portland cement (HPPC)). The adsorbing performance of HPPC and modified HPPC with perlite for removal of cefixime from aqueous solutions was investigated comparatively by using batch adsorption studies. HPPC has been selected because of the main advantages such as high efficiency, simple separation of sludge, low-cost and abundant availability. A Taguchi orthogonal array experimental design with an OA16 (4(5)) matrix was employed to optimize the affecting factors of adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, type of adsorbent, contact time and pH. On the basis of equilibrium adsorption data, Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models were also confirmed. The results showed that HPPC and modified HPPC were both efficient adsorbents for cefixime removal.

  2. THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-09-21

    The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

  3. Microleakage of Three Types of Glass Ionomer Cement Restorations: Effect of CPP-ACP Paste Tooth Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Doozandeh, Maryam; Shafiei, Fereshteh; Alavi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) increases the mineral content of tooth structure. This may enhance the chemical bonding of glass ionomer cements (GIC) and marginal sealing of their restorations. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP paste pretreatment on the microleakage of three types of GIC. Materials and Method In this study, 72 Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in root. The cavities were divided into 6 groups. Cavities in group 1 and 2 were restored with Fuji II, group 3 and 4 with Fuji II LC, and group 5 and 6 with Ketac N100 with respect to the manufacturers’ instructions. In groups 2, 4 and 6, CPP-ACP containing paste (MI paste) was placed into the cavities for 3 minutes before being filled with GIC. The teeth were thermocycled, stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage under stereomicroscope. Kruskall-Wallis and Chi-Square tests were used to analyze the data. Result There were no statistically significant differences between the control and the CPP-ACP pretreatment groups in enamel and dentin margins. In pairwise comparisons, there were no significant differences between the control and the experimental groups in enamel margin, and in dentin margins of G1 and 2, G5 and 6; however, a significant differences was detected in dentin margins between G3 and 4 (p= 0.041). Conclusion CPP-ACP paste pretreatment did not affect the microleakage of Fuji II and Ketac N100 in enamel or dentin, but decreased the microleakage in dentine margins of Fuji II LC when cavity conditioner was applied before surface treatment. PMID:26331147

  4. Desorption of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, mustard agent, from the surface of hardened cement paste (HCP) wafers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hairong; Zhou, Xuezhi; Guan, Yingqiang; Zhou, Liming; Wang, Xinming; Yan, Huijuan

    2013-05-01

    The decontamination of surfaces exposed to chemical warfare agents is an interesting scientific topic. The desorption behavior of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD) from the surface of the HD-contaminated hardened cement paste (HCP) was investigated under different weather conditions, which should provide scientific reference data for protection and decontamination projects involving HD-contaminated HCP in different conditions. The desorption of HD from the surface of HCP wafers was studied, and the effects of the purge air flow rate, water content, sorption temperature, and substrate age were investigated. HD desorption was detected from the surface of HD-contaminated HCP, but the desorption velocity was relatively slow. The desorption quantity remained within an order of magnitude throughout a time span of 36h (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), and the amount of HD that was desorbed from each square meter of HCP surface was approximately 1.1g (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), which was approximately 5.5 percent of the total HD that was initially applied. A higher flow rate of the purge air, increased water content, and longer substrate age of HCP all increased the HD desorption. In contrast, increased temperatures suppressed HD desorption. PMID:23395389

  5. On the use of peak-force tapping atomic force microscopy for quantification of the local elastic modulus in hardened cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Trtik, Pavel; Kaufmann, Josef; Volz, Udo

    2012-01-15

    A surface of epoxy-impregnated hardened cement paste was investigated using a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging mode that allows for the quantitative mapping of the local elastic modulus. The analyzed surface was previously prepared using focussed ion beam milling. The same surface was also characterized by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrate the capability of this quantitative nanomechanical mapping to provide information on the local distribution of the elastic modulus (from about 1 to about 100 GPa) with a spatial resolution in the range of decananometers, that corresponds to that of low-keV back-scattered electron imaging. Despite some surface roughness which affects the measured nanomechanical properties it is shown that topography, adhesion and Young's modulus can be clearly distinguished. The quantitative mapping of the local elastic modulus is able to discriminate between phases in the cement paste microstructure that cannot be distinguished from the corresponding back-scattered electron images.

  6. Monitoring of hardening and hygroscopic induced strains in a calcium phosphate bone cement using FBG sensor.

    PubMed

    Bimis, A; Karalekas, D; Bouropoulos, N; Mouzakis, D; Zaoutsos, S

    2016-07-01

    This study initially deals with the investigation of the induced strains during hardening stage of a self-setting calcium phosphate bone cement using fiber-Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors. A complementary Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) investigation was also conducted at different time intervals of the hardening period and its findings were related to the FBG recordings. From the obtained results, it is demonstrated that the FBG response is affected by the microstructural changes taking place when the bone cement is immersed into the hardening liquid media. Subsequently, the FBG sensor was used to monitor the absorption process and hygroscopic response of the hardened and dried biocement when exposed to a liquid/humid environment. From the FBG-based calculated hygric strains as a function of moisture concentration, the coefficient of moisture expansion (CME) of the examined bone cement was obtained, exhibiting two distinct linear regions.

  7. Monitoring of hardening and hygroscopic induced strains in a calcium phosphate bone cement using FBG sensor.

    PubMed

    Bimis, A; Karalekas, D; Bouropoulos, N; Mouzakis, D; Zaoutsos, S

    2016-07-01

    This study initially deals with the investigation of the induced strains during hardening stage of a self-setting calcium phosphate bone cement using fiber-Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors. A complementary Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) investigation was also conducted at different time intervals of the hardening period and its findings were related to the FBG recordings. From the obtained results, it is demonstrated that the FBG response is affected by the microstructural changes taking place when the bone cement is immersed into the hardening liquid media. Subsequently, the FBG sensor was used to monitor the absorption process and hygroscopic response of the hardened and dried biocement when exposed to a liquid/humid environment. From the FBG-based calculated hygric strains as a function of moisture concentration, the coefficient of moisture expansion (CME) of the examined bone cement was obtained, exhibiting two distinct linear regions. PMID:26807773

  8. TiO{sub 2}-containing cement pastes and mortars: Measurements of the photocatalytic efficiency using a rhodamine B-based colourimetric test

    SciTech Connect

    Ruot, Bertrand; Olive, Francois; Plassais, Arnaud; Guillot, Laurent; Bonafous, Laurent

    2009-10-15

    The photocatalytic activities of cement pastes and mortars, containing various amounts of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in the anatase form, were evaluated and compared. The density, total porosity and pore size distribution of the materials were measured, and the amount of TiO{sub 2} being at their surfaces was estimated. The photocatalytic efficiency was evaluated by monitoring the discolouration of rhodamine B applied to the surface of the materials which were then exposed to artificial sun light; this evaluation was based on the use of a dimensionless specific activity coefficient. For TiO{sub 2} contents higher than 1 wt% (up to 5 wt%), cement pastes exhibited a photocatalytic activity higher than that of mortars because their activity was roughly proportional to the TiO{sub 2} content, whereas the activity of mortars levelled off. On the other hand, the type of cement used to prepare the materials had a low effect on the photocatalytic performances. (author)

  9. Development of a Laboratory Cement Quality Analysis Apparatus Based on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Li, Yufang; Gong, Yao; Dong, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Wang, Zhe; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Xiangjie; Li, Yi; Jia, Suotang

    2015-11-01

    Determination of the chemical composition of cement and ratio values of clinker plays an important role in cement plants as part of the optimal process control and product quality evaluation. In the present paper, a laboratory laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) apparatus mainly comprising a sealed optical module and an analysis chamber has been designed for possible application in cement plants for on-site quality analysis of cement. Emphasis is placed on the structure and operation of the LIBS apparatus, the sealed optical path, the temperature controlled spectrometer, the sample holder, the proper calibration model established for minimizing the matrix effects, and a correction method proposed for overcoming the ‘drift’ obstacle. Good agreement has been found between the laboratory measurement results from the LIBS method and those from the traditional method. The absolute measurement errors presented here for oxides analysis are within 0.5%, while those of ratio values are in the range of 0.02 to 0.05. According to the obtained results, this laboratory LIBS apparatus is capable of performing reliable and accurate, composition and proximate analysis of cement and is suitable for application in cement plants. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61127017, 61378047, 61205216, 61178009, 61108030, 61475093, and 61275213), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2013BAC14B01), the 973 Program of China (No. 2012CB921603), the Shanxi Natural Science Foundation, China (Nos. 2013021004-1, 2012021022-1), and the Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Nos. 2013-011 and 2013-01)

  10. Polishing-paste-induced silica granuloma of the gingiva.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, T; Kuffer, R; Dubrez, B

    2001-01-01

    Polishing-paste-induced silica granuloma of the gingiva, an uncommon condition, may mimic various local or systemic pathological entities. A 33-year-old woman and a 42-year-old man were referred for a localised refractory gingival inflammation. Clinical diagnoses included allergy, lichen planus and herpes. Biopsy showed well-demarcated non-caseating granulomas, associating epithelioid and Langhans giant cells. Special bacterial and mycological stains were negative. Systemic examination and laboratory tests ruled out sarcoidosis and Crohn's disease. Polarised light revealed birefringent crystalline foreign material. A diagnosis of silica granuloma was made. Both patients had frequent dental hygiene treatment including polishing with abrasive paste, suggesting an iatrogenic implantation of the foreign bodies. Gingival damage can result from the use of some dental materials containing silica. Often asymptomatic, sometimes producing visible lesions, granulomatous gingivitis may mislead into wrong diagnosis and treatment. Old silica granulomas may become symptomatic if the patient contracts sarcoidosis.

  11. Influence of magnesia-to-phosphate molar ratio on microstructures, mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of magnesium potassium phosphate cement paste with large water-to-solid ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Biwan; Ma, Hongyan; Li, Zongjin

    2015-02-15

    This paper describes the influence of the magnesia-to-phosphate (M/P) molar ratios ranging from 4 to 12, on the properties and microstructures of magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC) pastes with a large water-to-solid ratio (w/s) of 0.50. The setting behavior, compressive strength, tensile bonding strength and thermal conductivity of the MKPC pastes, were investigated. The results show that an increase in the M/P ratio can slow down the setting reaction, and clearly degrade the mechanical strengths, but clearly improve the thermal conductivity of MKPC pastes. Furthermore, micro-characterizations including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, on the MKPC pastes reveal that a lower M/P ratio can facilitate better crystallization of the resultant magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate (MKP) and a denser microstructure. Moreover, strong linear correlations are found between the mechanical strengths and the MKP-to-space ratio, and between thermal conductivity and the volume ratio of the unreacted magnesia to the MKP. - Highlights: • Increase of M/P molar ratio causes clear mechanical degradations on MKPC pastes. • Thermal conductivity of MKPC pastes is improved with increase of M/P molar ratio. • Lower M/P ratio leads to better MKP crystallization and denser microstructure. • Strengths of MKPC pastes are linearly correlated to the MKP-to-space ratios. • Thermal conductivity is affected by the volume ratio of unreacted magnesia to MKP.

  12. Effect of an organic additive on the rheology of an aluminous cement paste and consequences on the densification of the hardened material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hafiane, Y.; Smith, A.; Bonnet, J. P.; Tanouti, B.

    2005-03-01

    The material used in the present work is Secar 71 (Lafarge) mixed with water containing an organic additive (acetic acid noted HOAc). The rheological behavior of these pastes is studied. The best dispersion is obtained when the mass content of the additive with respect to the cement is equal to 0.5%. The microstructural characterizations of samples aged 4 days at 20° C and 95 % relative humidity reveal a significant increase in the density and a reduction in porosity for very small percentages of additive. The remarkable effect of the acetic acid on the microstructure of hardened material is correlated with its good dispersing action.

  13. Micro- and nano-X-ray computed-tomography: A step forward in the characterization of the pore network of a leached cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Bossa, Nathan; Chaurand, Perrine; Vicente, Jérôme; Borschneck, Daniel; Levard, Clément; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Rose, Jérôme

    2015-01-15

    Pore structure of leached cement pastes (w/c = 0.5) was studied for the first time from micro-scale down to the nano-scale by combining micro- and nano-X-ray computed tomography (micro- and nano-CT). This allowed assessing the 3D heterogeneity of the pore network along the cement profile (from the core to the altered layer) of almost the entire range of cement pore size, i.e. from capillary to gel pores. We successfully quantified an increase of porosity in the altered layer at both resolutions. Porosity is increasing from 1.8 to 6.1% and from 18 to 58% at the micro-(voxel = 1.81 μm) and nano-scale (voxel = 63.5 nm) respectively. The combination of both CT allowed to circumvent weaknesses inherent of both investigation scales. In addition the connectivity and the channel size of the pore network were also evaluated to obtain a complete 3D pore network characterization at both scales.

  14. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing. PMID:21762950

  15. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing.

  16. A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Wichlas, Florian Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene; Rump, Jens; Chopra, Sascha S.; Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.; Bail, Hermann J.

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

  17. Cement dust pollution induces toxicity or deficiency of some essential elements in wild plants growing around a cement factory.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Salih; Atici, Ökkes; Gülen, Yasir

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cement dust pollution on contents of some significant essential elements (P, S, K, Ca, Fe and Cl) in wild plants (Medigago varia, Anchusa leptophylla, Euphorbia orientalis, Lactuca serriola, Artemisia spicigera, Crambe orientalis, Convolvulus sepium and Senecio vernalis) using wavelength-dispersive spectrometer X-ray fluorescence technique. Plant samples were collected from different locations around a cement factory which is located at Askale about 50 km from Erzurum (Turkey). The element contents in the plant specimens that existed in both 0-100 m (dense dusted) and 2000 m (undusted) areas were compared. P, S, K and Cl contents were found to be high in the plants growing in areas 0-100 m from the cement factory, compared to same plants at 2000 m far from the factory. However, Ca and Fe contents were determined to be low in plants growing in 0-100 m area from the factory. Results of the study can contribute to understand how mineral deficiency and toxicity lead to detrimental effects on plant growth and development in the fields contaminated by cement dust.

  18. Calcium silicate cement-induced remineralisation of totally demineralised dentine in comparison with glass ionomer cement: tetracycline labelling and two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Atmeh, A R; Chong, E Z; Richard, G; Boyde, A; Festy, F; Watson, T F

    2015-02-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy, in combination with tetracycline labelling, was used to observe the remineralising potentials of a calcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine(TM) ) and a glass ionomer cement (GIC:​Fuji​IX) on totally demineralised dentine. Forty demineralised dentine discs were stored with either cement in three different solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS) with tetracycline, phosphate-free tetracycline, and tetracycline-free PBS. Additional samples of demineralised dentine were stored alone in the first solution. After 8-week storage at 37 °C, dentine samples were imaged using two-photon fluorescence microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Samples were later embedded in PMMA and polished block surfaces studied by 20 kV BSE imaging in an SEM to study variations in mineral concentration. The highest fluorescence intensity was exhibited by the dentine stored with Biodentine(TM) in the PBS/tetracycline solution. These samples also showed microscopic features of matrix remineralisation including a mineralisation front and intra- and intertubular mineralisation. In the other solutions, dentine exhibited much weaker fluorescence with none of these features detectable. Raman spectra confirmed the formation of calcium phosphate mineral with Raman peaks similar to apatite, while no mineral formation was detected in the dentine stored in cement-free or PBS-free media, or with GIC. It could therefore be concluded that Biodentine(TM) induced calcium phosphate mineral formation within the dentine matrix when stored in phosphate-rich media, which was selectively detectable using the tetracycline labelling.

  19. Extraoral Retrograde Root Canal Filling of an Orthodontic-induced External Root Resorption Using CEM Cement

    PubMed Central

    Kheirieh, Sanam; Fazlyab, Mahta; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Eghbal, Mohamad Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory external root resorption (IERR) after orthodontic treatments is an unusual complication. This case report describes a non-vital maxillary premolar with symptomatic extensive IERR (with a crown/root ratio of 1:1) after receiving orthodontic treatment. The first appointment included drainage, chemo-mechanical preparation of the canal and intra-canal medication with calcium hydroxide (CH) along with prescription of analgesic/antibiotic. The subsequent one-week follow-up revealed the persistence of symptoms and formation of a sinus tract. Finally, extraoral endodontic treatment was planned; the tooth was atraumatically extracted and retrograde root canal filling with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed followed by tooth replantation. Clinical signs/symptoms subsided during 7 days postoperatively. The sinus tract also resolved after one week. Six-month and one-year follow-ups revealed complete healing and a fully functional asymptomatic tooth. This case study showed favorable outcomes in a refractory periapical lesion associated with orthodontically induced extensive IERR. The chemical as well as biological properties of CEM cement may be a suitable endodontic biomaterial for these cases. PMID:24688586

  20. Recycled rubber in cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, D.; Tratt, K.; Wool, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    Disposal of 200 million waste tires in the US each year has become a major problem. An environmentally sound innovative technology of recycling rubber in cement matrix was examined. Using silane coupling agent the rubber was bonded to the hydrating cement making a lighter composite, which absorbed more energy than ordinary Portland cement. The bonding information was obtained by peel strength analysis. SEM was used to understand the mode of fracture in pure cement paste, cement bonded rubber composite and rubber filled cement paste. It was found that cracks propagate through the rubber particle in rubber bonded cement composite while in unbonded rubber cement mix, the cracks propagate around the interface. The density and shrinkage measurements are also discussed.

  1. Investigation of shock-induced combustion past blunt projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixtures at various free-stream conditions and parameters. Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A seven-species, seven reactions finite rate hydrogen-air chemical reaction mechanism is used combined with a finite-difference, shock-fitting method to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. The study has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model.

  2. On the physico-chemical evolution of low-pH and CEM I cement pastes interacting with Callovo-Oxfordian pore water under its in situ CO{sub 2} partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dauzères, A.; Le Bescop, P.; Cau-Dit-Coumes, C.; Brunet, F.; Bourbon, X.; Timonen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Chomat, L.; Sardini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Within the framework of geological repositories for radioactive waste, structural concretes must be adapted to the underground chemical conditions. CEM I cement-based materials are characterised by high pH that may produce an alkaline plume in the near-field of the repository. In order to avoid this problem, low-pH cements have been designed. This study compares the physico-chemical behaviour of a low-pH material with a CEM I cement paste, both being subjected to leaching by an aqueous solution. An original experimental setup was designed to reproduce the underground conditions using a specific CO{sub 2} regulation device. Under these conditions, the low-pH material was strongly degraded, which results in coarser porosity, whereas thickness degradation of the CEM I cement paste is limited by the precipitation of a magnesium-calcite crust over the surface, which reduces the exchange of soluble species. This paper also presents a new approach for microstructure characterisation based on high-resolution X-ray microtomography.

  3. Drug-induced liver injury: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2010-05-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare but potentially serious idiosyncratic reaction. By using candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, replicated associations for DILI susceptibility with HLA genes and genes relevant to drug metabolism have been detected, mainly since 2000. The HLA associations include a strong association between flucloxacillin-induced injury and the class I allele B*5701 and weaker associations for co-amoxiclav and ximelagatran DILI with the class II genotype. These associations suggest an injury mechanism involving an immune response, possibly to a complex of drug or metabolite and protein. For genes relevant to drug metabolism, the best replicated association is between isoniazid DILI and NAT2 slow acetylation. Homozygosity for GSTM1 null and/or GSTT1 null alleles also seems to be a risk factor for DILI, with associations described independently for several drugs. Other not-yet-replicated associations have been described for genes relevant to drug metabolism and oxidative stress and cytokine genes.

  4. Retention of crowns cemented on implant abutments with temporary cements.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yuko; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This study was to examine the retentive force of crowns to implant abutments with commercial temporary cements. Six different temporary cements were investigated. Cast crowns were cemented to the abutments using each cement and their retentive forces to abutments were determined 7 or 28 days after cementing (n=10). The retentive force of the cements to abutments varied widely among the products [27-109 N (7-day), 18-80 N (28-days)]. The retentive force of all the cements was not reduced as the time elapsed, except for two products tested. The polycarboxylate cements and paste-mixing type eugenol-free cements revealed comparable retentive force after 28 days of storage. The powder-liquid type cements showed a positive correlation (p<0.05) between the retentive force and the shear strength, while a negative correlation (p<0.05) was obtained for paste-mixing type cement between the retentive force and compressive strength. Mechanical strength of temporary cements could not be a prominent predicting factor for retention of the crowns on the abutments.

  5. Prediction of flow induced sound: Past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, William; Zawadzki, Irek

    2002-05-01

    The prediction of flow-induced vibration and sound has developed into a refined analysis technology. At its genesis the capability to provide engineering evaluations of flow-driven surfaces was crude and semi-empirical. The ability to provide acoustic estimations of fidelity depended on empiricism, similitude, and engineering experience. Very little was known of the physics of flow-structure interaction to permit otherwise. Currently, capabilities to make high-fidelity engineering predictions have benefitted from continual advances in three major areas. Our knowledge of the physics of flow sources has matured to understand acoustically-relevant flow structures and the interaction of flows with surfaces. Our ability to computationally model structural response and acoustic Green's functions has evolved because of parallel advances in structural acoustics. Computational fluid dynamics has developed into a refined tool for simulating flow over complex geometries. It is continuing to evolve as we learn how to model acoustically relevant subsonic flow structures with large eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation. Once principally a technology available only to military application, these tools are becoming more commonplace in industrial applications. This lecture will trace some of these developments, show some examples, and indicate promising areas of advancement.

  6. Effect of CO2-induced reactions on the mechanical behaviour of fractured wellbore cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterbeek, Timotheus; Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Geomechanical damage, such as fracturing of wellbore cement, can severely impact well integrity in CO2 storage fields. Chemical reactions between the cement and CO2-bearing fluids may subsequently alter the cement's mechanical properties, either enhancing or inhibiting damage accumulation during ongoing changes in wellbore temperature and stress-state. To evaluate the potential for such effects, we performed triaxial compression tests on Class G Portland cement, conducted at down-hole temperature (80 ° C) and effective confining pressures ranging from 1 to 25 MPa. After deformation, samples displaying failure on localised shear fractures were reacted with CO2-H2O, and then subjected to a second triaxial test to assess changes in mechanical properties. Using results from the first phase of deformation, baseline yield and failure criteria were constructed for virgin cement. These delineate stress conditions where unreacted cement is most prone to dilatational (permeability-enhancing) failure. Once shear-fractures formed, later reaction with CO2 did not produce further geomechanical weakening. Instead, after six weeks of reaction, we observed up to 83% recovery of peak-strength and increased frictional strength (15-40%) in the post-failure regime, due to calcium carbonate precipitation in the fractures. As such, our results suggest more or less complete mechanical healing on timescales of the order of months.

  7. Vascularization of plastic calcium phosphate cement in vivo induced by in-situ-generated hollow channels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Dong, Chao; Shen, Zhonghua; Chen, Yan; Yu, Bo; Shi, Haishan; Zhou, Changren; Ye, Jiandong

    2016-11-01

    Despite calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is promising for bone repair therapy, slow biodegradation and insufficient vascularization in constructs negatively impacts its clinical application. A self-setting CPC composited with gelatin fiber is investigated to test the utility of this tissue engineering strategy to support rapid and extensive vascularization process. The interconnected hollow channels in CPC are formed after dissolution of gelatin fibers in vivo. The CPC-gelatin samples exhibit relatively decent/enhanced mechanical property, compared to the control. When implanted in vivo, the pre-established vascular networks in material anastomose with host vessels and accelerate vascular infiltration throughout the whole tissue construct. Different channel sizes induce different vascularization behaviors in vivo. Results indicate that the channel with the size of 250μm increases the expression of the representative angiogenic factors HIF1α, PLGF and migration factor CXCR4, which benefit the formation of small vessels. On the other hand, the channel with the size of 500μm enhances VEGF-A expression, which benefit the development of large vessels. Notably, the intersection area of channels has high invasive, sprouting and vasculogenesis potential under hypoxic condition, because more HIF1α-positive cells are observed there. Observation of the CD31-positive lumen in the border of scaffold indicates the ingrowth of blood vessels from its host into material through channel, benefited from gradually increased HIF1α expression. This kind of material was suggested to promote the effective application of bone regeneration through the combination of in situ self-setting, plasticity, angiogenesis, and osteoconductivity. PMID:27524007

  8. Determining the mechanical strength of CO2-induced reaction zones in wellbore cement: is it worth it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Marcelis, Fons; van der Linden, Arjan; Liteanu, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    CO2 injection, either for long-term CO2 storage (CCS) or Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), strongly hinges on maintaining storage integrity. Injection and legacy wells penetrating the caprock pose one of the most likely points of leakage. In order to be able to predict the long-term integrity of such wellbores, it's important to understand their chemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviour, and how it may change due to CO2 exposure. Generally, in response to CO2/brine/cement interactions, a number of different reaction zones are observed, each with their own chemical, and hence mechanical, signature. To aid mechanical modelling efforts, assessing the risk of cement failure caused by stress and temperature changes, knowledge is required of the strength of each of these zones. We performed experiments on Class G Portland cement to investigate the chemical-mechanical coupling due to CO2-exposure. Batch reaction experiments, in the presence of CO2-rich brine, were performed under typical storage conditions (T = 65° C, PCO2 = 8 MPa) for various periods of time (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 months). After exposure, mechanical tests were performed on the observed reaction zones, using the so-called core scratching technique, to evaluate the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) as a function of exposure time. Chemical analyses (CT-imaging, SEM microscopy, EDX chemical analysis) showed the formation of three reaction zones, similarly to what has been observed in other studies. Measurements of the mechanical strength of these different zones showed highly variable results. Such variations have also been observed in other studies, using different measurement techniques. The large variability in strength measurements is most likely an inherent result of the heterogenic nature of cement, which affects the extent and location of reaction throughout the sample. This begs the question: is it worth studying the mechanical strength of reaction-induced zones in cement? Or will it suffice to

  9. Childhood Reactions to Terrorism-Induced Trauma: A Review of the Past 10 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fremont, Wanda P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the literature about the clinical presentation and treatment interventions of childhood reactions to terrorism-induced trauma. Method: The literature on children's responses to terrorist activities was reviewed. Results: Over the past 10 years, more research has emerged on the subject of terrorism in children. Many of the…

  10. Effectiveness of hydroxyapatite-vancomycin bone cement in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus induced chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Uwe; Joist, Alexander; Gosheger, G; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Brandt, Burkhard; von Eiff, Christof

    2005-09-01

    In the field of local application of antimicrobials, a number of novel drugs and/or new drug delivery systems have been developed in recent years. The present study aimed to investigate hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) as a carrier for vancomycin in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus aureus strains with various mechanisms of resistance. The release of vancomycin from standard test cylinders was determined in vitro and the efficacy of the delivery system was measured in vivo using a rabbit model of chronic osteomyelitis. First, powdered HAC was mixed with vancomycin at 80, 160 and 240 mg/g. After hardening, formed cylinders were eluted in phosphate buffer and antibiotic release was measured by agar diffusion. High levels of release (1512+/-318 to 1937+/-336 microg/ml) were obtained for 12 to 20 days depending on the dosage of vancomycin. Additionally, bone infection was induced in the tibia of 30 New Zealand white rabbits by injecting either a methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain (MRSA) or a S. aureus strain with a small colony variant (SCV) phenotype. After 3 weeks (chronic infection), all animals were treated by debridement. Moreover, group 1 (challenged with SCVs) and group 2 (challenged with MRSA) were treated by filling the marrow with HAC alone, whereas in groups 3 (SCVs) and 4 (MRSA) the marrow was filled with HAC/vancomycin (160 mg/g). After 6 weeks all animals were sacrificed. At 3 weeks, pathogens were detected in 24 of 30 animals. All swabs of the control groups, positive for S. aureus on day 21, were also positive on day 42 and S. aureus strains recovered were shown to be clonal to the strains used for induction of osteomyelitis. By contrast, no growth was found in the treatment group following 7 days of incubation in BHI bouillon. HAC/vancomycin-treated animals showed no histological evidence of infection on day 42. In the other groups, different stages of chronic osteomyelitis were found histologically. No local or systemic side

  11. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  12. A new approach in quantitative in-situ XRD of cement pastes: Correlation of heat flow curves with early hydration reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, Christoph; Goetz-Neunhoeffer, Friedlinde; Neubauer, Juergen

    2011-01-15

    XRD measurements of the hydration of synthetical cement (SyCem) were used to calculate the resulting heat flow from changes in the phase content. Calculations were performed by application of thermodynamic data. The comparison with data recorded from heat flow calorimetry was in good agreement with the calculated heat flow. The initial maximum of heat flow mainly is caused by the aluminate reaction. During the entire main period the silicate reaction dominates hydration with a high and long first maximum of heat flow. The second but less intense heat flow maximum - only visible as a shoulder in most of the technical cements - can be attributed to an acceleration of the aluminate reaction with the enhanced dissolution of C{sub 3}A and the final formation of ettringite. Moreover, the investigation showed that the dissolution process of C{sub 3}A is directly controlled by the availability of the calcium sulfate phases.

  13. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Milestone, N. B.; Gordon, L. E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-09-01

    Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  14. Laser-induced forward transfer of high-viscosity silver pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Martin, D.; Brasz, C. F.; Chen, Y.; Morales, M.; Arnold, C. B.; Molpeceres, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a study of the morphology of individual dots of silver paste deposited by laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is performed using a ns-pulsed laser at 532 nm. The LIFT process is characterized by scanning confocal microscopy on the deposited material and in-situ time-resolved imaging during the transfer in order to illuminate the flow dynamics in relation to the pulse energy and paste thickness. The influence of process parameters on the structure of transferred dots is explained both phenomenologically and analytically. Depending on the experimental conditions, different transfer regimes were observed. These regimes have similarities to those reported for LIFT of Newtonian fluids and nanopastes, but the multiphase and non-Newtonian rheology and thicker films used lead to noticeable differences, such as the formation of a continuous and stable pillar connecting donor and acceptor substrates when the paste film is thick enough and the energy is optimum. This process regime allows transfer of dots with high aspect ratios, which is desirable for the printing of contacts on solar cells.

  15. In Vitro Spectrophotometry of Tooth Discoloration Induced by Tooth-Colored Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Arman, Marjan; Khalilak, Zohreh; Rajabi, Moones; Esnaashari, Ehsan; Saati, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There are numerous factors that can lead to tooth discoloration after endodontic treatment, such as penetration of endodontic materials into the dentinal tubules during root canal treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare discoloration induced by tooth colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in extracted human teeth. Methods and Materials: Thirty two dentin-enamel cuboid blocks (7×7×2 mm) were prepared from extracted maxillary central incisors. Standardized cavities were prepared in the middle of each cube, leaving 1 mm of enamel and dentin on the labial surface. The specimens were randomly divided into two study groups (n=12) and two positive and negative control groups (n=4). In either study groups the cavities were filled with MTA or CEM cement. The positive and negative control groups were filled with blood or left empty, respectively. The cavities were sealed with composite resin and stored in normal saline. Color measurement was carried out by spectrophotometry at different time intervals including before (T0), and 1 week (T1), 1 month (T2) and 6 months (T3) after placement of materials. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare the discoloration between the groups; the material type was considered as the inter-subject factor. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: No significant differences were detected between the groups in all time intervals (P>0.05). Conclusion: Tooth discoloration was similarly detectable with both of the two experimental materials. PMID:26576163

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  17. A new quantification method based on SEM-EDS to assess fly ash composition and study the reaction of its individual components in hydrating cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Durdziński, Paweł T.; Dunant, Cyrille F.; Haha, Mohsen Ben; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-07-15

    Calcareous fly ashes are high-potential reactive residues for blended cements, but their qualification and use in concrete are hindered by heterogeneity and variability. Current characterization often fails to identify the dominant, most reactive, amorphous fraction of the ashes. We developed an approach to characterize ashes using electron microscopy. EDS element composition of millions of points is plotted in a ternary frequency plot. A visual analysis reveals number and ranges of chemical composition of populations: silicate, calcium-silicate, aluminosilicate, and calcium-rich aluminosilicate. We quantified these populations in four ashes and followed their hydration in two Portland-ash systems. One ash reacted at a moderate rate: it was composed of 70 vol.% of aluminosilicates and calcium-silicates and reached 60% reaction at 90 days. The other reacted faster, reaching 60% at 28 days due to 55 vol.% of calcium-rich aluminosilicates, but further reaction was slower and 15 vol.% of phases, the silica-rich ones, did not react.

  18. Influence of artificially-induced porosity on the compressive strength of calcium phosphate bone cements.

    PubMed

    Mouzakis, Dionysios; Zaoutsos, Stefanos Polymeros; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Rokidi, Stamatia; Papanicolaou, George

    2016-07-01

    The biological and mechanical nature of calcium phosphate cements (CPC's) matches well with that of bone tissues, thus they can be considered as an appropriate environment for bone repair as bone defect fillers. The current study focuses on the experimental characterization of the mechanical properties of CPCs that are favorably used in clinical applications. Aiming on evaluation of their mechanical performance, tests in compression loading were conducted in order to determine the mechanical properties of the material under study. In this context, experimental results occurring from the above mechanical tests on porous specimens that were fabricated from three different porous additives, namely albumin, gelatin and sodium alginate, are provided, while assessment of their mechanical properties in respect to the used porous media is performed. Additionally, samples reinforced with hydroxyapatite crystals were also tested in compression and the results are compared with those of the above tested porous CPCs. The knowledge obtained allows the improvement of their biomechanical properties by controlling their structure in a micro level, and finds a way to compromise between mechanical and biological response. PMID:26945808

  19. Sensitivity of ice-cemented Antarctic soils to greenhouse-induced thawing: Are terrestrial archives at risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanger, Kate M.; Marchant, David R.

    2007-07-01

    We modeled the sensitivity of six ice-cemented slope deposits from the western McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica to failure by shallow, thaw-induced planar sliding. The deposits examined have purportedly remained physically stable, without morphologic evidence for downslope movement, for millions of years. Could they fail in the near future from greenhouse-induced warming? To address this question, we first prescribed various increases in mean summertime soil surface temperature (MSSST) and modeled numerically the resultant changes in soil thaw depths using a one-dimensional heat diffusion equation (including the effects of latent heat of fusion). Second, we calculated the minimum thaw depths required to facilitate failure by shallow planar sliding for each deposit; for all numerical simulations, we maintained present soil-moisture conditions and used a Mohr-Coulomb-based equation of safety factor. Third, we calculated the rate of subsurface meltwater flow assuming Darcy's Law. Our results show that although most deposits contain sufficient subsurface ice to induce sliding upon thawing, lateral rates of water flow of as much as ˜ 40 m/day for some colluvial deposits prohibit the build-up of requisite pore pressures for failure. On the other hand, silty deposits, that contain gravimetric water ≥ 15%, occur on slopes > 20°, and possess low hydraulic conductivities (˜ 30-60 cm/day), common in the Dry Valleys region, could fail if MSSST, and by inference mean summertime atmospheric temperatures, increase by 4 to 9 °C. This temperature increase is similar to that predicted to occur from greenhouse-induced warming in Antarctica over the next century.

  20. Stress-induced cervical lesions: review of advances in the past 10 years.

    PubMed

    Lee, W C; Eakle, W S

    1996-05-01

    The accumulation of experimental and clinical evidence during the past decade has significantly contributed to the understanding of the role of occlusally generated tensile stress in the etiology of certain noncarious cervical lesions of teeth. More important, this knowledge has led to the understanding of the reasons why traditional restorative treatments of these stress-induced cervical lesions fail. The case of failure can be attributed to the occlusally generated stresses that are concentrated at the cervical region and result in debonding, leakage, retention failure, and, ultimately, restorative failure. With the new understanding, restorative approaches that combine chemical adhesion and restorative materials of appropriate elastic properties show promise of long-term success. PMID:8709012

  1. The role of induced entrainment in past stratiform cloud seeding experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcek, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    In the late 1940s, probably the most effective and visually-obvious cloud seeding demonstrations showed that supercooled stratiform clouds could be cleared by seeding with dry ice, dropped from aircraft flying above a cloud deck. Numerous well-documents photos show areas 1-2 miles wide cleared along a flight track. The accepted mechanism of cloud clearing assumed that dry ice induced ice formation in the supercooled liquid cloud, followed by growth of ice at the expense of water, with the larger ice particles ultimately falling as snow. The mechanism was amplified by dynamic feedbacks induced by latent heat release (warming) as liquid water froze, thus propagating the dynamic and freezing/precipitation cycle laterally away from the flight track. Here we show that probably a more important effect is the entrainment and EVAPORATION of cloud water induced by turbulent mixing in the aircraft wake. Under many conditions, evaporation induced by turbulence can generate mixtures of air that are COLDER than the cloudy air or the air above the cloud, thus initiating unstable DOWNWARD (negatively-buoyant) motions, which will self-propagate laterally away from a turbulent flight track. We present here the range of environmental conditions where entrainment/evaporation would be most likely to occur in terms of the temperature difference between cloudy air and air just above cloud top, and the relative humidity of air above cloud top at different temperatures and altitudes in the atmosphere. It is suggested here that past cloud seeding experiments had little to do with glaciation, and more likely resulted from induced entrainment followed by evaporation and downward motions of negatively buoyant air resulting from cloud-top entrainment instability. Buoyancy and condensed water content of mixtures of cloudy air and cloud-free air immediately above cloud top vs. the mixing proportions. A supercooled cloud containing 0.1 g/kg liquid water at 600 mb, -20 degrees C is mixed with air

  2. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  3. Atlantic-induced pan-tropical climate change over the past three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xichen; Xie, Shang-Ping; Gille, Sarah T.; Yoo, Changhyun

    2016-03-01

    During the past three decades, tropical sea surface temperature (SST) has shown dipole-like trends, with warming over the tropical Atlantic and Indo-western Pacific but cooling over the eastern Pacific. Competing hypotheses relate this cooling, identified as a driver of the global warming hiatus, to the warming trends in either the Atlantic or Indian Ocean. However, the mechanisms, the relative importance and the interactions between these teleconnections remain unclear. Using a state-of-the-art climate model, we show that the Atlantic plays a key role in initiating the tropical-wide teleconnection, and the Atlantic-induced anomalies contribute ~55-75% of the tropical SST and circulation changes during the satellite era. The Atlantic warming drives easterly wind anomalies over the Indo-western Pacific as Kelvin waves and westerly anomalies over the eastern Pacific as Rossby waves. The wind changes induce an Indo-western Pacific warming through the wind-evaporation-SST effect, and this warming intensifies the La Niña-type response in the tropical Pacific by enhancing the easterly trade winds and through the Bjerknes ocean dynamical processes. The teleconnection develops into a tropical-wide SST dipole pattern. This mechanism, supported by observations and a hierarchy of climate models, reveals that the tropical ocean basins are more tightly connected than previously thought.

  4. Microscale investigation of arsenic distribution and species in cement product from cement kiln coprocessing wastes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4. PMID:24223030

  5. Microscale investigation of arsenic distribution and species in cement product from cement kiln coprocessing wastes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4.

  6. Fabrication of macroporous cement scaffolds using PEG particles: In vitro evaluation with induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Sladkova, Martina; Palmer, Michael; Öhman, Caroline; Alhaddad, Rawan Jaragh; Esmael, Asmaa; Engqvist, Håkan; de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria

    2016-12-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been extensively used in reconstructive dentistry and orthopedics, but it is only recently that CPCs have been combined with stem cells to engineer biological substitutes with enhanced healing potential. In the present study, macroporous CPC scaffolds with defined composition were fabricated using an easily reproduced synthesis method, with minimal fabrication and processing steps. Scaffold pore size and porosity, essential for cell infiltration and tissue ingrowth, were tuned by varying the content and size of polyethylene glycol (PEG) particles, resulting in 9 groups with different architectural features. The scaffolds were characterized for chemical composition, porosity and mechanical properties, then tested in vitro with human mesenchymal progenitors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MPs). Biomimetic decellularized bone scaffolds were used as reference material in this study. Our manufacturing process resulted in the formation of macroporous monetite scaffolds with no residual traces of PEG. The size and content of PEG particles was found to affect scaffold porosity, and thus mechanical properties. Irrespective of pore size and porosity, the CPC scaffolds fabricated in this study supported adhesion and viability of human iPSC-MPs similarly to decellularized bone scaffolds. However, the architectural features of the scaffolds were found to affect the expression of bone specific genes, suggesting that specific scaffold groups could be more suitable to direct human iPSC-MPs in vitro toward an osteoblastic phenotype. Our simplistic fabrication method allows rapid, inexpensive and reproducible construction of macroporous CPC scaffolds with tunable architecture for potential use in dental and orthopedic applications. PMID:27612757

  7. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  8. Laser Induced Forward Transfer of High Viscosity Silver Paste for New Metallization Methods in Photovoltaic and Flexible Electronics Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Munoz-Martin, D.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Sánchez-Cortezon, E.; Murillo-Gutierrez, J.

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) has been studied in the past as a promising approach for precise metallization in electronics using metallic inks and pastes. In this work we present large area metallization using LIFT of fully commercial silver-based pastes initially designed for solar cell screen-printing. We discuss the mechanisms for the material transfer both in ns and ps regimes of irradiation of these high viscosity materials, and the potential use of this technique in the photovoltaic industry (both in standard c-Si solar cells and thin film technologies) and flexible electronics devices. In particular we summarize the results of our group in this field, demonstrating that our approach is capable of improving the aspect ratio of the standard metallization patterns achieved with screen-printing technologies in those technological fields and, in addition, of fulfilling the requirements imposed by the mechanical properties of the substrates in flexible electronic applications.

  9. Antioxidant effect of lycopene-enriched tomato paste on N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Kujawska, Malgorzata; Ewertowska, Malgorzata; Adamska, Teresa; Sadowski, Czeslaw; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2014-12-01

    Lycopene is a carotenoid pigment produced by vegetables and fruits, with tomatoes and their processed products being the most abundant sources. A high number of conjugated dienes make lycopene a powerful radical scavenger. Its antioxidant properties are considered to be primarily involved in many beneficial health effects. The present study was designed to assess the protective effect of lycopene-enriched tomato paste against N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced oxidative stress in rats. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided randomly into six groups. Four groups were treated with tomato paste, per os, for 28 days in doses which were equivalent to 0.5 (groups II and V) and 2.5 mg/kg b.w./day of lycopene (groups III and VI). Rats from groups IV-VI were given intraperitoneally a single dose of NDEA, 150 mg/kg b.w. Group I (control) was given distilled water. Pretreatment with tomato paste protected the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase. Their activity was recovered by 32-97 %, as compared to NDEA-treated rats. Microsomal lipid peroxidation in the liver was decreased in rats pretreated with a lower dose of tomato paste by 28 %, as compared to animals given NDEA alone. Pretreatment with tomato paste caused a decrease in plasma concentration of protein carbonyls, even below the control level, in rats given NDEA. Moreover, a 10 % reduction of DNA damage in leucocytes caused by NDEA was observed. The tomato paste tested was able to suppress NDEA-induced oxidative stress in rats. PMID:25387411

  10. Radiographic appearance of commonly used cements in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pette, Gregory A; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Norkin, Frederic J

    2013-01-01

    Cement-retained restorations allow for a conventional fixed partial denture approach to restoring dental implants. However, inadequate removal of excess cement at the time of cementation may introduce a severe complication: cement-induced peri-implantitis. Radiopaque cements are more easily detected on radiographs and should improve the recognition of extravasated cement at the time of insertion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of commercially available cements in vitro. Eighteen different cements commonly used for luting restorations to implants were tested at both 0.5- and 1.0-mm thicknesses. The cements examined were zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide, zinc polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate, resin-reinforced glass ionomer, urethane resin, resin, and composite resin. Two samples of each cement thickness underwent standardized radiography next to an aluminum step wedge as a reference. The mean grayscale value of each of the nine 1-mm steps in the step wedge were used as reference values and compared to each of the cement samples. Temp Bond Clear (resin), IMProv (urethane resin), Premier Implant Cement (resin), and Temrex NE (resin) were not radiographically detectable at either sample thickness. Cements containing zinc were the most detectable upon radiographic analysis. There are significant differences in the radiopacity of many commonly used cements. Since cementinduced peri-implantitis can lead to late implant failure, cements that can be visualized radiographically may reduce the incidence of this problem.

  11. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  12. Capture of green-house carbon dioxide in Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.; Knox, L.

    1993-12-31

    A novel process has been developed to sequester green-house carbon dioxide produced by the cement industry in precast cement products. Typically, 10--24 wt % of CO{sub 2} produced by calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering of the cement may be captured. The carbonation process also cures the cement paste within minutes into hard bodies. The process maintains high pH conditions during curing, to allow conventional steel reinforcement of concrete. The process will save time and money to the cement industry, and at the same time, help them to comply with the Clean Air Act by sequestering the green-house carbon dioxide.

  13. Cogrinding significance for calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement. II. Effect on cement properties.

    PubMed

    Tadier, Solène; Bolay, Nadine Le; Fullana, Sophie Girod; Cazalbou, Sophie; Charvillat, Cédric; Labarrère, Michel; Boitel, Daniel; Rey, Christian; Combes, Christèle

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we aim to evaluate the contribution of the cogrinding process in controlling calcium carbonate-dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement properties. We set a method designed to evaluate phase separation, usually occurring during paste extrusion, which is quantitative, reliable, and discriminating and points out the determining role of cogrinding to limit filter-pressing. We show that solid-phase cogrinding leads to synergistic positive effects on cement injectability, mechanical properties, and radio-opacity. It allows maintaining a low (<0.4 kg) and constant load during the extrusion of paste, and the paste's composition remains constant and close to that of the initial paste. Analogous behavior was observed when adding a third component into the solid phase, especially SrCO(3) as a contrasting agent. Moreover, the cement's mechanical properties can be enhanced by lowering the L/S ratio because of the lower plastic limit. Finally, unloaded or Sr-loaded cements show uniform and increased optical density because of the enhanced homogeneity of dry component distribution. Interestingly, this study reveals that cogrinding improves and controls essential cement properties and involves processing parameters that could be easily scaled up. This constitutes a decisive advantage for the development of calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cements and, more generally, of injectable multicomponent bone cements that meet a surgeon's requirements. PMID:21953727

  14. Dermatoses in cement workers in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y L; Wang, B J; Yeh, K C; Wang, J C; Kao, H H; Wang, M T; Shih, H C; Chen, C J

    1999-01-01

    Construction workers are known to have occupational dermatoses. The prevalence of such dermatoses was unknown in Taiwanese construction workers. The objective of this study was to determine the work exposure, prevalence of skin manifestations, and sensitivity to common contact allergens in cement workers of southern Taiwan. A total of 1147 current regular cement workers were telephone-interviewed about skin problems during the past 12 months, work exposure, and personal protection. Among those interviewed, 166 were examined and patch tested with common contact allergens. A high % of cement workers reported skin problems in the past 12 months. More men (13.9%) reported skin problems possibly related to work than women (5.4%). Prevalence was associated with lower use of gloves, duration of work as cement worker, and more time in jobs involving direct manual handling of cement, especially tiling. A high % of dermatitis was noted in the 166 workers examined, which correlated with reported skin problems. On patch testing, construction workers had a high frequency of sensitivity to chromate. Sensitivity to chromate or cobalt was associated with reported skin problems, or dorsal hand dermatitis on examination. These workers' dermatitis was under-diagnosed and inadequately managed. It is concluded that cement workers in southern Taiwan had a high prevalence of skin problems related to cement use. Protective measures, work practice, and physician education should be improved to prevent or manage such problems.

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  16. Lunar cement and lunar concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

  17. Effect of mixing water magnetic activation cycle on cement stone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaevskaya, S. A.; Abzaev, Yu A.; Safronov, V. N.; Sarkisov, Yu S.; Gorlenko, N. P.; Ermilova, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigations of hydration processes and structure formation of the cement paste matrix mixed with water activated by magneto static field using water treatment cycle technology. It is shown that crystallization of phases occurs in the cement-water system at different rates, and phase redistribution in the structure of the cement paste matrix is described before and after magnetic activation of mixing water. Also, modeling of the cement-water system and calculations of amorphous and crystalline phases using the Rietveld refinement method before and after magnetic activation show that strength properties of the cement paste matrix depend not only on quantitative but also qualitative relationship between phases.

  18. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  19. Bone formation induced by strontium modified calcium phosphate cement in critical-size metaphyseal fracture defects in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Sommer, Ursula; Elkhassawna, Thaqif; Rehling, Tanja; Hundgeburth, Marvin; Henß, Anja; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Lips, Katrin S; Heiss, Christian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Szalay, Gabor; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Schnettler, Reinhard; Alt, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The first objective was to investigate new bone formation in a critical-size metaphyseal defect in the femur of ovariectomized rats filled with a strontium modified calcium phosphate cement (SrCPC) compared to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and empty defects. Second, detection of strontium release from the materials as well as calcium and collagen mass distribution in the fracture defect should be targeted by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). 45 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups: (1) SrCPC (n = 15), (2) CPC (n = 15), and (3) empty defect (n = 15). Bilateral ovariectomy was performed and three months after multi-deficient diet, the left femur of all animals underwent a 4 mm wedge-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy that was internally fixed with a T-shaped plate. The defect was then either filled with SrCPC or CPC or was left empty. After 6 weeks, histomorphometric analysis showed a statistically significant increase in bone formation of SrCPC compared to CPC (p = 0.005) and the empty defect (p = 0.002) in the former fracture defect zone. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher bone formation at the tissue-implant interface in the SrCPC group compared to the CPC group (p < 0.0001). These data were confirmed by immunohistochemistry revealing an increase in bone-morphogenic protein 2, osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin expression and a statistically significant higher gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen10a1 and osteocalcin in the SrCPC group compared to CPC. TOF-SIMS analysis showed a high release of Sr from the SrCPC into the interface region in this area compared to CPC suggesting that improved bone formation is attributable to the released Sr from the SrCPC.

  20. Bone formation induced by strontium modified calcium phosphate cement in critical-size metaphyseal fracture defects in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Sommer, Ursula; Elkhassawna, Thaqif; Rehling, Tanja; Hundgeburth, Marvin; Henß, Anja; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Lips, Katrin S; Heiss, Christian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Szalay, Gabor; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Schnettler, Reinhard; Alt, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The first objective was to investigate new bone formation in a critical-size metaphyseal defect in the femur of ovariectomized rats filled with a strontium modified calcium phosphate cement (SrCPC) compared to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and empty defects. Second, detection of strontium release from the materials as well as calcium and collagen mass distribution in the fracture defect should be targeted by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). 45 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups: (1) SrCPC (n = 15), (2) CPC (n = 15), and (3) empty defect (n = 15). Bilateral ovariectomy was performed and three months after multi-deficient diet, the left femur of all animals underwent a 4 mm wedge-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy that was internally fixed with a T-shaped plate. The defect was then either filled with SrCPC or CPC or was left empty. After 6 weeks, histomorphometric analysis showed a statistically significant increase in bone formation of SrCPC compared to CPC (p = 0.005) and the empty defect (p = 0.002) in the former fracture defect zone. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher bone formation at the tissue-implant interface in the SrCPC group compared to the CPC group (p < 0.0001). These data were confirmed by immunohistochemistry revealing an increase in bone-morphogenic protein 2, osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin expression and a statistically significant higher gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen10a1 and osteocalcin in the SrCPC group compared to CPC. TOF-SIMS analysis showed a high release of Sr from the SrCPC into the interface region in this area compared to CPC suggesting that improved bone formation is attributable to the released Sr from the SrCPC. PMID:23906515

  1. Wind-induced Resuspension Events in the Venice Lagoon: evidence from the Past and Trends for the Future.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alpaos, A.; Carniello, L.; D'Alpaos, L.; Rinaldo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Wind waves promote the erosion and degradation of ubiquitous geomorphic features of tidal landscapes, such as subtidal platforms, tidal flats and salt marshes. Both in the vertical and in the horizontal planes, wind-wave induced erosion is one of the chief processes controlling the morphodynamic evolution of shallow tidal basins. Wind-wave induced bottom shear stresses can promote the disruption of the polymeric microphytobenthic biofilm and lead to the erosion of tidal-flat surfaces and to the increase in suspended sediment concentration which in turn affects the stability of intertidal ecosystems. As an example, the Venice Lagoon has experienced strong erosion processes in the last two centuries, which progressively deepened the lagoonal bottoms, promoted the loss of fine cohesive sediments through the inlets after storms, and lead to the loss of extensive salt-marsh areas. Towards the goal of developing a synthetic theoretical framework to represent wind wave-induced resuspension events and account for their erosional effects on the long-term biomorphodynamic evolution of tidal systems, we employed a full-fledged finite element model accounting for the role of wind waves and tidal currents on the hydrodynamic circulation in shallow basins. Our analyses of the spatial and temporal characteristics of wind-induced erosion events for the actual configuration of the Venice Lagoon and for a few configurations of the last two centuries, allow us to reconstruct erosive trends typical of past Venice Lagoon configurations and to provide predictions on future scenarios for the Venice Lagoon.

  2. Dysregulation of DNA methylation induced by past arsenic treatment causes persistent genomic instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  3. Dysregulation of DNA Methylation Induced by Past Arsenic Treatment Causes Persistent Genomic Instability in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  4. Dysregulation of DNA methylation induced by past arsenic treatment causes persistent genomic instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects.

  5. La Niña-Induced Rainfall Events in East Java, Indonesia During the Past Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunghino, B.; Rodysill, J. R.; Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.

    2012-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern oscillation and associated changes in the Walker Circulation are major controls on variability in precipitation and convection across the tropical Pacific Ocean. Despite the importance of these phenomena to Pacific, as well as global rainfall, there is considerable debate over whether radiative heating of the tropical Pacific Ocean enhances or reduces Walker Circulation strength and ENSO variability. Paleolimnological reconstructions from Peru (Moy et al., 2002, Nature) and the Galapagos (Conroy et al., 2008, Quat. Sci. Rev.) suggest large variations in precipitation and surface runoff driven by El Niño events during the past millennium at one of ENSO's centers of action in the eastern Pacific. However, these records are rectified signals in that they unable to record ENSO's other phase, La Niña, which results in anomalously high rainfall in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool region. To gain new perspective on the history of rainfall on the western end of the Walker Circulation over the last 1,200 years, we present a new record of runoff from the southwestern edge of the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool. Our runoff record is constructed with grain size and magnetic susceptibility data from a sediment core from Lake Lading, located in East Java, Indonesia. This core consists of laminated sediments accumulating at 0.45 cm/yr, allowing us to reconstruct surface runoff at 2.2 yr resolution. Runoff events preserved in the well-dated core-top sediments correspond to high monthly rainfall anomalies in instrumental data, and all runoff events between 1950 and 2010 occur during La Niña years. Our data suggests highly variable surface runoff over the past millennium at the multi-decadal timescale, but indicates relatively weak variability at the multi-centennial band, i.e. the well-known Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and Little Ice Age (LIA). During the Medieval Climate Anomaly, when the Asian Summer Monsoon was strong, variations in surface runoff appear to be

  6. Numerical simulation of shock-induced combustion past blunt bodies using shock-fitting technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A finite-difference, shock-fitting method is used to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. In this approach, the bow shock represents a boundary of the computational domain and is treated as a discontinuity across which Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are applied. All interior details of the flow such as compression waves, reaction front, and the wall boundary layer are captured automatically in the solution. Since shock-fitting approach reduces the amount of artificial dissipation, all the intricate details of the flow are captured much more clearly than has been possible with the shock-capturing approach. This has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model than before.

  7. Vortex-induced noise and vibration in flow past several flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan Mun

    A model formulation for the problem of vortex impingement on a pair of elastic tandem cylinders is presented. The parametric relations among a variety of fluid dynamic and structural dynamic properties are illustrated. The noise field essentially responds at the cylinder response frequency and the sound pressure level is generally increased by the vibration of the cylinders. The interaction of an array of vortices is also considered and the results indicate that four vortices are required for the possibility of the chaotic motion and the broadband noise. The vortex shedding off an inclined flat plane is modelled using the discrete vortex method along with the Lamb vortex model. The model tested for the rolling-up of a vortex sheet behind the elliptically loaded wing demonstrates that the smooth rollup is achieved inside the core region of the vortex sheet. The subsequent application of the model to the vortex shedding problem shows that the computed results such as the kinematics of the wake development, the fluid loading and the Strouhal number are in fair agreement with previous experimental measurements. The noise field exhibits a broadband character with the peak occurring at the vortex shedding frequency. A numerical conformal mapping technique is developed to transform multiple flat plates into the same number of circular cylinders. Employing the multiple body mapping method, the flow past a series of flat plates is investigated. The calculated results indicate that the presence of a downstream body in the wake of another body produces a feedback effect upstream which, in turn, has a significant effect on the upstream flow. In the case of vortex shedding, the presence of a downstream splitter plate in the center of the wake of an inclined plate appears to suppress the regular, periodic vortex shedding process. The addition of more inclined plates appears to reduce the Strouhal frequency which is the frequency at which the noise field responds.

  8. Fracture behavior of cemented sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasabi, Ahmad Othman

    While fracture mechanics for cementitious materials and composites in the past three decades have developed mainly in concrete applications, it has not yet gained its rightful place in the geotechnical field. There are many examples in the geotechnical literature, especially those related to brittle and stiff soils, where traditional approaches of analysis have proven to be inadequate. While geotechnical problems are inherently complex in nature, using the finite element method (FEM) with fracture mechanics (FM) have been shown to provide powerful analytical tool that could be used to investigate and solve many problems in geomechanics and geotechnical engineering. This thesis addresses the application of FM concepts and theories in analysis of cemented soils. In addition to theoretical aspects, experiments were conducted to evaluate the application of FM to cemented soils. Three point bending beam tests with crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD) conducted on cemented sand samples showed that fracture parameters, such as CMOD, indeed could play an important role in investigation of such soils. Using this unambiguous material parameter, field engineers might have a reliable measure that could prove to be useful in stability assessment of earth structures and soil structure system. By studying size effect on cemented sand, strong relationship was established between critical CMOD and failure, which might be a very useful index and analysis tool in geotechnical engineering practice.

  9. Micro-thermal stress analysis of cement based pavement composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhao, Y.; Pang, S.S.; Huang, W.

    1998-12-31

    A four-layer sphere model for microscopic thermal analysis was proposed based upon the structural form of cement based pavement composites. Using temperature induced stresses of pavement structure as the external field, the micro-thermal stresses of two types of cement based pavement composite were calculated. The results showed that, by introducing the low stiffness rubberized asphalt in the interphase of coarse aggregate phase and cement mortar phase of Portland cement concrete, the interfacial thermal stresses could be reduced significantly, thus improving crack resistance of the pavement material under low temperature environment. Factors affecting micro-thermal stress of cement based pavement composite were discussed.

  10. Sulfate attack monitored by microCT and EDXRD: Influence of cement type, water-to-cement ratio, and aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, N.N.; Jupe, A.C.; Stock, S.R.; Wilkinson, A.P.; Lee, P.L.; Kurtis, K.E. . E-mail: kkurtis@ce.gatech.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray microtomography (microCT) and spatially resolved energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) were used in combination to non-destructively monitor the physical and chemical manifestations of damage in Portland cement paste samples subjected to severe sodium sulfate attack. Additional measurements of expansion and compressive strength were made on complementary mortar and cement paste specimens. Specifically, the influences of cement type (ASTM Types I and V), water-to-cement ratio (0.485 and 0.435), and the presence of aggregate on the rate and forms of damage were examined. As expected, Type V cement samples exhibited less cracking and expansion than the Type I cement samples. EDXRD indicated an anticorrelation between ettringite and gypsum in the near-surface region for Type V samples, which may be associated with crack formation. An unanticipated result for Type I cement pastes was that cracking was apparent at earlier exposure times and progressed more rapidly for samples with w/c of 0.435, than for those with w/c of 0.485. Possible mechanisms for this behavior are proposed. The presence of aggregate particles resulted in a more rapid rate of cracking, as compared to the corresponding cement paste sample.

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  12. [Pregnancy termination in Bulgaria – past, present and future perspectives. Drugs induced abortion – guidelines by WHO].

    PubMed

    Marinov, B; Andreeva, A

    2013-01-01

    There are still too many unsafe abortions performed worldwide. Together with the efforts to reduce the abortion by choice, we note a rise in the need for mid trimester pregnancy termination for medical reasons. The article looks at the past present and future perspective of the abortion as a procedure in Bulgaria. States the fact that medical abortion is officially not widely performed. We reckon that with the existing guidelines by WHO and with Mifepriston and Misoprostol recently registered in Bulgaria, it is time for the medical abortion to become part of the clinical practice in Bulgaria. We believe that early medical abortion as well as mid trimester induced abortion is and adequate if not better alternative to the existing in Bulgaria procedures.

  13. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  14. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  15. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  16. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Feng Meyer, Christian

    2009-04-15

    A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  19. Long-term hydrodynamic response induced by past climatic and geomorphologic forcing: The case of the Paris basin, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, A.; Violette, S.; Gonçalvès, J.; Ledoux, E.; Guyomard, Y.; Guillocheau, F.; Kageyama, M.; Ramstein, G.; Suc, J.-P.

    In the framework of safe underground storage of radioactive waste in low-permeability layers, it is essential to evaluate the mobility of deep groundwaters over timescales of several million years. On these timescales, the environmental evolution of a repository should depend upon a range of natural processes that are primarily driven by climate and geomorphologic variations. In this paper, the response of the Paris basin groundwater system to variations in its hydrodynamic boundary conditions induced by past climate and geodynamic changes over the last five million years is investigated. A three-dimensional transient modelling of the Paris basin aquifer/aquitard system was developed using the code NEWSAM (Ecole des Mines de Paris, ENSMP). The geometry and hydrodynamic parameters of the model originate from a basin model, NEWBAS (ENSMP), built to simulate the geological history of the basin. Geomorphologic evolution is deduced from digital elevation model analysis, which allows to estimate river-valley incision and alpine surrection. Climate forcing results from palaeoclimate modelling experiments using the LMDz atmospheric general circulation model (Institut Pierre Simon Laplace) with a refined spatial resolution, for the present, the Last Glacial Maximum (21 ka) and the Middle Pliocene Warmth (∼3 Ma). The water balance is computed by the distributed hydrological model MODSUR (ENSMP). Results about the simulated evolution of piezometric heads in the system in response to the altered boundary conditions are presented, in particular in the vicinity of ANDRA’s Bure potential repository site within the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous layer. For the present, the comparison of head patterns between steady state and time dependent simulation shows little differences for aquifer layers close to the surface but suggests a transient state of the current system in the main aquitards of the basin and in the deep aquifers, characterized by abnormally low fluid potentials

  20. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  1. Study on the effects of white rice husk ash and fibrous materials additions on some properties of fiber-cement composites.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Yahya; Ziabari, Kamran Pourhooshyar; Torkaman, Javad; Ashori, Alireza; Jafari, Mohammad

    2013-03-15

    This work assesses the effects of white rice husk ash (WRHA) as pozzolanic material, virgin kraft pulp (VKP), old corrugated container (OCC) and fibers derived from fiberboard (FFB) as reinforcing agents on some properties of blended cement composites. In the sample preparation, composites were manufactured using fiber-to-cement ratio of 25:75 by weight and 5% CaCl(2) as accelerator. Type II Portland cement was replaced by WRHA at 0%, 25% and 50% by weight of binder. A water-to-binder ratio of 0.55 was used for all blended cement paste mixes. For parametric study, compressive strength, water absorption and density of the composite samples were evaluated. Results showed that WRHA can be applied as a pozzolanic material to cement and also improved resistance to water absorption. However, increasing the replacement level of WRHA tends to reduce the compressive strength due to the low binding ability. The optimum replacement level of WRHA in mortar was 25% by weight of binder; this replacement percentage resulted in better compressive strengths and water absorption. OCC fiber is shown to be superior to VKF and FFB fibers in increasing the compressive strength, due to its superior strength properties. As expected, the increase of the WRHA content induced the reduction of bulk density of the cement composites. Statistical analysis showed that the interaction of above-mentioned variable parameters was significant on the mechanical and physical properties at 1% confidence level.

  2. Physico-chemical investigation of clayey/cement-based materials interaction in the context of geological waste disposal: Experimental approach and results

    SciTech Connect

    Dauzeres, A.; Le Bescop, P.; Sardini, P.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.

    2010-08-15

    Within the concepts under study for the geological disposal of intermediate-level long-lived waste, cement-based materials are considered as candidate materials. The clayey surrounding rock and the cement-based material being considered differ greatly in their porewater composition. Experiments are conducted on the diffusion of solutes constituting those porewaters in a confined clay/cement composite system using cells. The test temperature was set at 25 {sup o}C and 2, 6 and 12 months. Results supply new information: carbonation is low and not clog the interface. Such absence of carbonation allows for the diffusion of aqueous species and, thus, for the degradation of the cement paste and the illitisation of illite/smectite interstratifications. The cement material is subjected to a decalcification: portlandite dissolution and a CaO/SiO{sub 2} reduction in the calcium silicate hydrate. The sulphate in diffusion induces non-destructive ettringite precipitation in the largest pores. After 12 months, about 800 {mu}m of cement material is concerned by decalcification.

  3. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  4. Cementation of indirect restorations: an overview of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stamatacos, Catherine; Simon, James F

    2013-01-01

    The process of ensuring proper retention, marginal seal, and durability of indirect restorations depends heavily on effective cementation. Careful consideration must be made when selecting an adhesive cement for a given application. This article provides information on resin cements that can guide clinicians in determining which type of cement is best suited to their clinical needs regarding cementation of indirect restorations. Emphasis is placed on successful cementation of all-ceramic restorations.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  6. Early-age monitoring of cement structures using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Zhichun; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    With more and more broad applications of the cement-based structures such as neat cement paste, cement mortar and concrete in civil engineering, people hope to find out what their performances should like. The in-service performances of cement-based structures are highly affected by their hardening process during the early-age. But it is still a big problem for traditional sensors to be used to monitor the early curing of cement-based structures due to such disadvantages as difficulties to install sensors inside the concrete, limited measuring points, poor durability and interference of electromagnetic wave and so on. In this paper, according to the sensing properties of the Fiber Bragg Grating sensors and self-characters of the cement-based structures, we have successfully finished measuring and monitoring the early-age inner-strain and temperature changes of the neat cement paste, concrete with and without restrictions, mass concrete structures and negative concrete, respectively. Three types of FBG-based sensors have been developed to monitor the cement-based structures. Besides, the installation techniques and the embedding requirements of FBG sensors in cement-based structures are also discussed. Moreover, such kind of technique has been used in practical structure, 3rd Nanjing Yangtze Bridge, and the results show that FBG sensors are well proper for measuring and monitoring the temperature and strain changes including self-shrinkage, dry shrinkage, plastic shrinkage, temperature expansion, frost heaving and so on inside different cement-based structures. This technique provides us a new useful measuring method on early curing monitoring of cement-based structures and greater understanding of details of their hardening process.

  7. Chemical and Physical Reactions of Wellbore Cement under CO2 Storage Conditions: Effects of Cement Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutchko, B. G.; Strazisar, B. R.; Huerta, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Dzombak, D. A.; Thaulow, N.

    2008-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 into geologic formations requires long-term storage and low leakage rates to be effective. Active and abandoned wells in candidate storage formations must be evaluated as potential leakage points. Wellbore integrity is an important part of an overall integrated assessment program being developed at NETL to assess potential risks at CO2 storage sites. Such a program is needed for ongoing policy and regulatory decisions for geologic carbon sequestration. The permeability and integrity of the cement in the well is a primary factor affecting its ability to prevent leakage. Cement must be able to maintain low permeability over lengthy exposure to reservoir conditions in a CO2 injection and storage scenario. Although it is known that cement may be altered by exposure to CO2, the results of ongoing research indicate that cement curing conditions, fluid properties, and cement additives play a significant role in the rate of alteration and reaction. The objective of this study is to improve understanding of the factors affecting wellbore cement integrity for large-scale geologic carbon sequestration projects. Due to the high frequency use of additives (pozzolan) in wellbore cement, it is also essential to understand the reaction of these cement-pozzolan systems upon exposure to CO2 under sequestration conditions (15.5 MPa and 50°C). Laboratory experiments were performed to determine the physical and chemical changes, as well as the rate of alteration of commonly used pozzolan-cement systems under simulated sequestration reservoir conditions, including both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine. The rate of alteration of the cement-pozzolan systems is considerably faster than with neat cement. However, the alteration of physical properties is much less significant with the pozzolanic blends. Permeability of a carbonated pozzolanic cement paste remains sufficiently small to block significant vertical migration of CO2 in a wellbore. All of the

  8. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY, ELECTRON PROBE MICROANALYSIS, AND NMR OF TOLUENE WASTE IN CEMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    BUTLER,L.G.

    1999-07-22

    Synchrotron X-ray microtomography shows vesicular structures for toluene/cement mixtures, prepared with 1.22 to 3.58 wt% toluene. Three-dimensional imaging of the cured samples shows spherical vesicles, with diameters ranging from 20 to 250 {micro}m; a search with EPMA for vesicles in the range of 1-20 {micro}m proved negative. However, the total vesicle volume, as computed from the microtomography images, accounts for less than 10% of initial toluene. Since the cements were cured in sealed bottles, the larger portion of toluene must be dispersed within the cement matrix. Evidence for toluene in the cement matrix comes from {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in chain silicates with added toluene. Also, {sup 2}H NMR of d{sub 8}-toluene/cement samples shows high mobility for all, toluene and thus no toluene/cement binding. A model that accounts for all observations follows: For loadings below about 3 wt%, most toluene is dispersed in the cement matrix, with a small fraction of the initial toluene phase separating from the cement paste and forming vesicular structures that are preserved in the cured cement. Furthermore, at loadings above 3 wt%, the abundance of vesicles formed during toluene/cement paste mixing leads to macroscopic phase separation (most toluene floats to the surface of the cement paste).

  9. Novel bioactive composite bone cements based on the beta-tricalcium phosphate-monocalcium phosphate monohydrate composite cement system.

    PubMed

    Huan, Zhiguang; Chang, Jiang

    2009-05-01

    Bioactive composite bone cements were obtained by incorporation of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5, C3S) into a brushite bone cement composed of beta-tricalcium phosphate [beta-Ca3(PO4)2, beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O, MCPM], and the properties of the new cements were studied and compared with pure brushite cement. The results indicated that the injectability, setting time and short- and long-term mechanical strength of the material are higher than those of pure brushite cement, and the compressive strength of the TCP/MCPM/C3S composite paste increased with increasing aging time. Moreover, the TCP/MCPM/C3S specimens showed significantly improved in vitro bioactivity in simulated body fluid and similar degradability in phosphate-buffered saline as compared with brushite cement. Additionally, the reacted TCP/MCPM/C3S paste possesses the ability to stimulate osteoblast proliferation and promote osteoblastic differentiation of the bone marrow stromal cells. The results indicated that the TCP/MCPM/C3S cements may be used as a bioactive material for bone regeneration, and might have significant clinical advantage over the traditional beta-TCP/MCPM brushite cement.

  10. Energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Helmuth, R.A; Whiting, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The main objectives of Phase 2 are to determine the feasibility of using cements with controlled particle size distributions (CPSD cements) in practical concrete applications, and to refine our estimates of the potential energy savings that may ensue from such use. The work in Phase 2 is divided into two main tasks, some parts of which will be carried out simultaneously: Task 1 will continue cement paste studies to optimize cement performance similar to those of Phase 1, but with particular emphasis on gypsum requirements, blended cements, and water-reducing admixtures. This task will also include preparation of sufficient CPSD cements for use in all Phase 2 work. Task 2 will be a comprehensive examination of the properties of concretes made with CPSD cements. This will include optimization of concrete mix designs to obtain the best possible performance for practical applications of both portland and blended cements. The effects of chemical admixtures and curing temperature variations will also be determined.

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  12. Can the Carbonated Layer Protect Wellbore Cement During Geologic CO2 Sequestration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Jun, Y. S.; Steefel, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and improving the integrity of wellbores are crucial to prevent CO2 leakage during geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). With advanced knowledge, cement deterioration caused by injected CO2 can be minimized. We have experimentally analyzed the chemical and mechanical property changes of Portland cement paste samples after 10 days of exposure to 0.5 M NaCl brine saturated with 100 bar CO2 at 95 oC. After exposure, the 3 mm thick cement samples had a total CO2-attacked depth of 1220 μm from both sides, including a 960 μm thick portlandite-depleted region next to the intact core, a 100 μm thick carbonated layer, and a 170 μm surface layer. The portlandite-depleted zone developed abundant micro-cracks and showed a decreased hardness. A hard carbonated layer which developed near the sample surface could not protect the cement due to formation of this portlandite-depleted zone, where abundant micro-cracks accounted for a 90% decrease in strength of the bulk sample. Using the reactive transport code CrunchTope, we further investigated the mechanism of portlandite-depleted zone formation. The cement deterioration process was simulated with a 1-D continuum model that captured the dissolution of the portlandite and the formation of a calcite zone closer to the sample edge. Modeling results highlighted that the apparent bypass of CO2 through the carbonated layer is critical for the evolution of the portlandite-depleted zone, since otherwise the 1-D model predicts complete clogging of the porosity. Defects within the carbonated zone could be due to reaction-induced fractures or to the heterogeneity of the cement. We also incorporated nucleation kinetics for secondary calcite precipitation using previously obtained thermodynamic parameters. We found that the nucleation energy barrier does not suppress calcite formation and thus cannot explain the absence of calcite in the portlandite-depleted zone. The findings from our study help further our understanding of CO2

  13. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  14. Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-09-23

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  15. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono-and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  17. Preferential adsorption of polycarboxylate superplasticizers on cement and silica fume in ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Schroefl, Ch.; Gruber, M.; Plank, J.

    2012-11-15

    UHPC is fluidized particularly well when a blend of MPEG- and APEG-type PCEs is applied. Here, the mechanism for this behavior was investigated. Testing individual cement and micro silica pastes revealed that the MPEG-PCE disperses cement better than silica whereas the APEG-PCE fluidizes silica particularly well. This behavior is explained by preferential adsorption of APEG-PCE on silica while MPEG-PCEs exhibit a more balanced affinity to both cement and silica. Adsorption data obtained from individual cement and micro silica pastes were compared with those found for the fully formulated UHPC containing a cement/silica blend. In the UHPC formulation, both PCEs still exhibit preferential and selective adsorption similar as was observed for individual cement and silica pastes. Preferential adsorption of PCEs is explained by their different stereochemistry whereby the carboxylate groups have to match with the steric position of calcium ions/atoms situated at the surfaces of cement hydrates or silica.

  18. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  20. In-situ Mechanical Manipulation of Wellbore Cements as a Solution to Leaky Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupresan, D.; Radonjic, M.; Heathman, J.

    2013-12-01

    mechanical manipulation (shear stress). The main advantage of this methodology is that mechanical manipulation of cement can induce healing of existing fractures, channels and microannulus seal in a wellbore without introducing new materials (e.g. cement squeeze jobs). Furthermore, this methodology is less sensitive to the influence of downhole conditions such as pressure, temperature and formation fluids, since it uses cement pore water as a medium to alter cement sheath. Based on lab experiments observation, it is possible to perceive that once tested at the industrial scale and if successful, the implementation of this method in the field can potentially mitigate leaky wells in CO2 sequestration projects, wellbores completed for hydraulic-fracturing and other conventional oil and gas producing wells. Key words: Wellbore cement integrity; Leaky wells; Cement microstructures; Casing expansion effect on cement mineralogy alterations.

  1. Cement and concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  2. Stage cementing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Blamford, D.M.; Easter, J.H.

    1988-06-21

    A stage cementing apparatus for selectively passing cement from the interior passage of a casing to the annulus between the exterior of the casing and borehole, the casing having an upper portion and a lower portion, is described comprising: a barrel secured to the upper portion of the casing; a mandrel secured to the lower portion of the casing, and a stage cementing tool having a generally cylindrical configuration adapted for attachment to the lower end of the barrel about a portion of the mandrel.

  3. Bone cement implantation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Razuin, R; Effat, O; Shahidan, M N; Shama, D V; Miswan, M F M

    2013-06-01

    Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac arrest. It is a known cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cemented orthopaedic surgeries. The rarity of the condition as well as absence of a proper definition has contributed to under-reporting of cases. We report a 59-year-old woman who sustained fracture of the neck of her left femur and underwent an elective hybrid total hip replacement surgery. She collapsed during surgery and was revived only to succumb to death twelve hours later. Post mortem findings showed multiorgan disseminated microembolization of bone marrow and amorphous cement material. PMID:23817399

  4. Mixed Convective Flow of an Elastico-Viscous Fluid Past a Vertical Plate in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Chemical Reaction with an Induced Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Utpal Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the steady, two-dimensional, hydromagnetic, mixed convection heat and mass transfer of a conducting, optically thin, incompressible, elastico-viscous fluid (characterized by the Walters' B' model) past a permeable, stationary, vertical, infinite plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction with account for an induced magnetic field. The governing equations of the flow are solved by the series method, and expressions for the velocity field, induced magnetic field, temperature field, and the skin friction are obtained.

  5. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  6. White spot formation under orthodontic bands cemented with glass ionomer with or without Fluor Protector.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, R P; Dermaut, L R

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an additional application of Fluor Protector before band cementation with glass ionomer cement reduces white spot formation compared with band cementation with glass ionomer cement. In the in vitro study, 80 premolars were divided in half, creating a control and a test group. All specimens were divided into four different groups to simulate different clinical situations and stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot formation. In the in vivo investigation, 18 orthodontic patients were incorporated in the study. One lower and one upper first molar band (randomly selected) were coated with Fluor Protector and then cemented with a glass ionomer cement (test group). The other two uncoated first molars were cemented with glass ionomer cement and served as the control group. The application of Fluor Protector in combination with Aquacem did not contribute to a reduction of white spot formation underneath molar bands compared with the use of Aquacem for banding.

  7. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  8. Cement-aggregate compatibility and structure property relationships including modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Y.

    1993-07-15

    The role of aggregate, and its interface with cement paste, is discussed with a view toward establishing models that relate structure to properties. Both short (nm) and long (mm) range structure must be considered. The short range structure of the interface depends not only on the physical distribution of the various phases, but also on moisture content and reactivity of aggregate. Changes that occur on drying, i.e. shrinkage, may alter the structure which, in turn, feeds back to alter further drying and shrinkage. The interaction is dynamic, even without further hydration of cement paste, and the dynamic characteristic must be considered in order to fully understand and model its contribution to properties. Microstructure and properties are two subjects which have been pursued somewhat separately. This review discusses both disciplines with a view toward finding common research goals in the future. Finally, comment is made on possible chemical reactions which may occur between aggregate and cement paste.

  9. Radiation-Induced Defects in Kaolinite as Tracers of Past Occurrence of Radionuclides in a Natural Analogue of High Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, T.; Fourdrin, C.; Calas, G.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling migrations of radioelements at the Earth's surface is an important issue for the long-term safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repositories (HLNWR). Evidence of past occurrence and transfer of radionuclides can be found using radiation-induced defects in minerals. Clay minerals are particularly relevant because of their widespread occurrence at the Earth's surface and their finely divided nature which provides high contact area with radioactive fluids. Owing to its sensitivity to radiations, kaolinite can be used as natural, in situ dosimeter. Kaolinite is known to contain radiation-induced defects which are detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. They are differentiated by their nature, their production kinetics and their thermal stability. One of these defects is stable at the scale of geological periods and provides a record of past radionuclide occurrence. Based on artificial irradiations, a methodology has been subsequently proposed to determine paleodose cumulated by kaolinite since its formation. The paleodose can be used to derive equivalent radioelement concentrations, provided that the age of kaolinite formation can be constrained. This allows quantitative reconstruction of past transfers of radioelements in natural systems. An example is given for the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuahua, Mexico), hosted in hydrothermally altered volcanic tufs and considered as analogue of the Yucca Mountain site. The paleodoses experienced by kaolinites were determined from the concentration of defects and dosimetry parameters of experimental irradiations. Using few geochemical assumption, a equivalent U-content responsible for defects in kaolinite was calculated from the paleodose, a dose rate balance and model ages of kaolinites constrained by tectonic phases. In a former study, the ages were assumptions derived from regional tectonic events. In thepresent study, ages of mineralization events are measured from U

  10. Modeling and simulation of cement hydration kinetics and microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Biernacki, Joseph J.; Bullard, Jeffrey W.; Bishnoi, Shashank; Dolado, Jorge S.; Scherer, George W.; Luttge, Andreas

    2011-12-15

    Efforts to model and simulate the highly complex cement hydration process over the past 40 years are reviewed, covering different modeling approaches such as single particle models, mathematical nucleation and growth models, and vector and lattice-based approaches to simulating microstructure development. Particular attention is given to promising developments that have taken place in the past few years. Recent applications of molecular-scale simulation methods to understanding the structure and formation of calcium-silicate-hydrate phases, and to understanding the process of dissolution of cement minerals in water are also discussed, as these topics are highly relevant to the future development of more complete and fundamental hydration models.

  11. Performance of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement under load-bearing conditions: an in vivo evaluation and FE simulation.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schröder, Christian; Heinemann, Sascha; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2016-09-01

    In the past, bioactive bone cement was investigated in order to improve the durability of cemented arthroplasties by strengthening the bone-cement interface. As direct bone-cement bonding may theoretically lead to higher stresses within the cement, the question arises, whether polymethylmethacrylate features suitable mechanical properties to withstand altered stress conditions? To answer this question, in vivo experiments and finite element simulations were conducted. Twelve rabbits were divided into two groups examining either bioactive polymethylmethacrylate-based cement with unchanged mechanical properties or commercially available polymethylmethacrylate cement. The cements were tested under load-bearing conditions over a period of 7 months, using a spacer prosthesis cemented into the femur. For the finite element analyses, boundary conditions of the rabbit femur were simulated and analyses were performed with respect to different loading scenarios. Calculations of equivalent stress distributions within the cements were applied, with a completely bonded cement surface for the bioactive cement and with a continuously interfering fibrous tissue layer for the reference cement. The bioactive cement revealed good in vivo bioactivity. In the bioactive cement group two failures (33 %), with complete break-out of the prosthesis occurred, while none in the reference group. Finite element analyses of simulated bioactive cement fixation showed an increase in maximal equivalent stress by 49.2 to 109.4 % compared to the simulation of reference cement. The two failures as well as an increase in calculated equivalent stress highlight the importance of fatigue properties of polymethylmethacrylate in general and especially when developing bioactive cements designated for load-bearing conditions. PMID:27530301

  12. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  13. System for radioactive waste cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Barinov, A.S.; Varlakov, A.P.; Volkov, A.S.; Karlin, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    NPP, research reactors and radiochemical enterprises produce a great amount of liquid radioactive waste (LRW). One of the methods of LRW solidification is cementation. The recent investigations demonstrated possible inclusion of sufficient amount of waste in the cement matrix (up to 20--30 mass% on dry residue). In this case the cementation process becomes competitive with bituminization process, where the matrix can include 40--50 mass% and the solidified product volume is equal to the volume, obtained by cementation. Additionally, the cement matrix in contrast with the bituminous one is unburnable. Many countries are investigating the cementation process. The main idea governing technological process is the waste and cement mixing method and type of mixer. In world practice some principal types of cementation systems are used. The paper describes the SIA Radon industrial plant in Moscow.

  14. The hydration of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Paddon, J M; Crisp, S

    1979-03-01

    A study was made of the hydration of dental cements, water being classified as "non-evaporable" and "evaporable". The ratio of these two types of water was found to vary greatly among different cement types, being lesser in zinc oxide and ionic polymer cements and greater in ion-leachable glass and phosphoric acid cements. The cement with the least "non-evaporable" water, i.e., showing least hydration (the zinc polycarboxylate cement), had the lowest strength and modulus and the greatest deformation at failure. A linear relationship was found to exist between strength and the degree of hydration of dental cements. All the cements were found to become more highly hydrated and stronger as they aged. PMID:284040

  15. Imaging wellbore cement degradation by carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions using X-ray computed microtomography.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle; Um, Wooyong

    2013-01-01

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm(3), porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm(3), porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO(2)-saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm(3), porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO(2) attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO(2) leakage.

  16. Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X-ray Computed Microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle; Um, Wooyong

    2013-01-02

    ABSTRACT: X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm3, porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm3, porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO2- saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm3, porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO2 attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO2 leakage.

  17. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  18. Impact of Wellbore Cement Degradation on CO2 Storage Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutchko, B.; Strazisar, B.; Lowry, G.; Dzombak, D.; Thaulow, N.

    2007-12-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in underground geologic formations requires a thorough evaluation of potential leakage of the sequestered CO2 through the numerous existing wellbores which penetrate them. Leakage rates of less than 1% per 100 years have been deemed necessary for geologic sequestration to be viable. Well bores are of particular interest because the cement used to line and/or plug the well, may be vulnerable to acid attack. Injected CO2 will dissolve, becoming carbonic acid, which can readily react with calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate, key components in hardened cement. Laboratory experiments have been performed in order to determine the physical and chemical changes, as well as the rate of degradation of the cement under simulated sequestration reservoir conditions, including both aqueous and supercritical CO2. Upon exposure to aqueous CO2, hardened cement formed well-defined reaction zones by a 2-step process. The first step is the dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 (s) and subsequent precipitation of CaCO3 (s). The formation of CaCO3 (s) has been reported to decrease cement permeability and increase its compressive strength. The second step is the dissolution of CaCO3 (s) resulting in a leaching of calcium from the cement matrix. The resulting cement paste has a significant increase in porosity, is primarily composed of amorphous silica gel, and lacks structural integrity. Although it is clear that cement is degraded, the results of this study suggest that the reactions involved are slow. In fact, long term experiments show that the rate of degradation decreases over time, likely due to the precipitation of CaCO3 (s) within the pore space of the cement. This phenomenon should limit the negative impact that chemical degradation will have on well bores. Supercritical CO2 exposure (saturated with water vapor) led to a very different process by which CaCO3 (s) was deposited throughout the matrix and on the surface, rather than within an isolated reaction

  19. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  20. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  1. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  2. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  3. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  4. Retention of posts cemented with various dentinal bonding cements.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, D B; Eakle, W S

    1994-12-01

    This investigation evaluated the retention of preformed posts with four different cements: C & B Metabond, Panavia, All-Bond 2, and Ketac-Cem. Sixty intact maxillary canines were selected for the study. The clinical crowns were removed and endodontic therapy done on each root, which was then prepared to receive prefabricated posts. The 60 samples were divided into four groups of 15, and the posts in each group were cemented with one of the four cements. The roots were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and the posts were separated from the canals with an Instron testing machine. Analysis of the forces needed to dislodge the posts with analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls test disclosed that C & B Metabond cement was the most retentive (p < 0.05). No difference in retention was recorded between Ketac-Cem and Panavia cements. All-Bond 2 cement was the least retentive of cements. PMID:7853255

  5. Trabecular bone response to injectable calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cement.

    PubMed

    Ooms, E M; Wolke, J G C; van der Waerden, J P C M; Jansen, J A

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the physicochemical, biological, and handling properties of a new developed calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cement when implanted in trabecular bone. Ca-P cement consisting of a powder and a liquid phase was implanted as a paste into femoral trabecular bone of goats for 3 days and 2, 8, 16, and 24 weeks. The cement was tested using three clinically relevant liquid-to-powder ratios. Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement, routinely used in orthopedics, was used as a control. The Ca-P cement was easy to handle and was fast setting with good cohesion when in contact with body fluids. X-ray diffraction at the different implantation periods showed that the cement had set as an apatite and remained stable over time. Histological evaluation after 2 weeks, performed on 10 microm un-decalcified sections, showed abundant bone apposition on the cement surface without any inflammatory reaction or fibrous encapsulation. At later time points, the Ca-P cement implants were totally covered by a thin layer of bone. Osteoclast-like cells, as present at the interface, had resorbed parts of the cement mass. At locations where Ca-P cement was resorbed, new bone was formed without loss of integrity between the bone bed and the cement. This demonstrated the osteotransductive property of the cement, i.e., resorption of the material by osteoclast-like cells, directly followed by the formation of new bone. Histological and histomorphometrical evaluation did not show any significant differences between the Ca-P cement implanted at the three different liquid/powder ratios. The results indicate that the investigated Ca-P cement is biocompatible, osteoconductive, as well as osteotransductive and is a candidate material for use as a bone substitute.

  6. Hydration study of limestone blended cement in the presence of hazardous wastes containing Cr(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Trezza, M.A.; Ferraiuelo, M.F

    2003-07-01

    Considering the increasing use of limestone cement manufacture, the present paper tends to characterize limestone behavior in the presence of Cr(VI). The research reported herein provides information regarding the effect of Cr(VI) from industrial wastes in the limestone cement hydration. The cementitious materials were ordinary Portland cement, as reference, and limestone blended cement. The hydration and physicomechanical properties of cementitious materials and the influence of chromium at an early age were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), conductimetric and mechanical tests. Portland cement pastes with the addition of Cr(VI) were examined and leaching behavior with respect to water and acid solution were investigated. This study indicates that Cr(VI) modifies the rate and the components obtained during the cement hydration.

  7. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hajime; Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire; Carro-Mateo, Beatriz; Collier, Nick; Milestone, Neil

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  8. Osteotransductive bone cements.

    PubMed

    Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Boltong, M G; Khairoun, I; Ginebra, M P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPBCs) are osteotransductive, i.e. after implantation in bone they are transformed into new bone tissue. Furthermore, due to the fact that they are mouldable, their osteointegration is immediate. Their chemistry has been established previously. Some CPBCs contain amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and set by a sol-gel transition. The others are crystalline and can give as the reaction product dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), carbonated apatite (CA) or hydroxyapatite (HA). Mixed-type gypsum-DCPD cements are also described. In vivo rates of osteotransduction vary as follows: gypsum-DCPD > DCPD > CDHA approximately CA > HA. The osteotransduction of CDHA-type cements may be increased by adding dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP) and/or CaCO3 to the cement powder. CPBCs can be used for healing of bone defects, bone augmentation and bone reconstruction. Incorporation of drugs like antibiotics and bone morphogenetic protein is envisaged. Load-bearing applications are allowed for CHDA-type, CA-type and HA-type CPBCs as they have a higher compressive strength than human trabecular bone (10 MPa).

  9. Gentamicin in bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y.; Tai, C-L.; Hsieh, P-H.; Ueng, S. W. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study is to determine an optimal antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) for infection prophylaxis in total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Methods We evaluated the antibacterial effects of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cements loaded with vancomycin, teicoplanin, ceftazidime, imipenem, piperacillin, gentamicin, and tobramycin against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Standardised cement specimens made from 40 g PMMA loaded with 1 g antibiotics were tested for elution characteristics, antibacterial activities, and compressive strength in vitro. Results The ALBC containing gentamicin provided a much longer duration of antibiotic release than those containing other antibiotic. Imipenem-loading on the cement had a significant adverse effect on the compressive strength of the ALBC, which made it insufficient for use in prosthesis fixation. All of the tested antibiotics maintained their antibacterial properties after being mixed with PMMA. The gentamicin-loaded ALBC provided a broad antibacterial spectrum against all the test organisms and had the greatest duration of antibacterial activity against MSSA, CoNS, P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Conclusion When considering the use of ALBC as infection prophylaxis in TJA, gentamicin-loaded ALBC may be a very effective choice. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:220–6. PMID:24128666

  10. Equatorially asymmetric convection inducing a hemispherical magnetic field in rotating spheres and implications for the past martian dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeau, Maylis; Aubert, Julien

    2011-04-01

    The convective instability in a rapidly rotating, self-graviting sphere sets up in the form of equatorially symmetric, non-axisymmetric columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, carrying heat away in the cylindrical radial direction. In this study, we present numerical simulations of thermal convection and dynamo action driven by internal heating (intended to model a planetary core subject to uniform secular cooling) in a rotating sphere where, from the classical columnar convection regime, we find a spontaneous transition towards an unexpected and previously unobserved flow regime in which an equatorially antisymmetric, axisymmetric (EAA) mode strongly influences the flow. This EAA mode carries heat away along the rotation axis and is the nonlinear manifestation of the first linearly unstable axisymmetric mode. When the amplitude of the EAA mode reaches high enough values, we obtain hemispherical dynamos with one single hemisphere bearing more than 75% of the total magnetic energy at the surface of the rotating sphere. We perform the linear analysis of the involved convective modes and the nonlinear study of this hydrodynamic transition, with and without dynamo action, to obtain scaling laws for the regime boundaries. As secular cooling in a full sphere (i.e. without inner core) is a configuration which has probably been widespread in the early solar system in planetary cores, including the core of Mars, we discuss the possible implications of our results for the past martian dynamo.

  11. Advantages of using glycolic acid as a retardant in a brushite forming cement.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Faleh Tamimi; Torres, Jesús; Hamdan, Mohammad; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2007-11-01

    In this study we have compared the effect of using acetic, glycolic, and citric acids on the brushite cement setting reaction and the properties of the resultant cement. The cement solid phase was made by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium dihydrogen phosphate anhydrate (MCPA), and sodium pyrophosphate, whereas the cement liquid phase consisted of aqueous solutions of carboxy acids at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.5M. Cements were prepared by mixing the solid phase with the liquid phase to form a workable paste. The cement setting time was longer for glycolic and citric acids. The best mechanical properties in dry environments were obtained using glycolic and citric acid liquid phases. In a wet environment at 37 degrees C, the cement set with glycolic acid was the strongest one. Brushite cement diametral tensile strength seems to be affected by the calcium-carboxyl phase produced in the setting reaction. The acceptable setting time and mechanical properties of cements set in glycolic acid solutions are attributed to the additional hydrophilic groups in the carboxylic acid and the low solubility in water of the calcium salt produced in the reaction. Moreover, at high concentrations, carboxylic acids add chemically to the cement matrix becoming reactants themselves.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Shock-Induced Combustion Past Blunt Bodies Using Shock-Fitting Technique. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Kumar, A.; Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A finite-difference, shock-fitting method is used to solve the complete set of Navier Stokes and species conservation equations. In this approach, the bow shock represents a boundary of the computational domain and is treated as a discontinuity across which Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are applied. All interior details of the flow such as compression waves, reaction front, and the wall boundary layer are captured automatically in the solution. Since shock-fitting approach reduces the amount of artificial dissipation, all the intricate details of the flow are captured much more clearly than has been possible with the shock-capturing approach. This has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one dimensional wave-interaction model than before.

  13. Orbital pacing and ocean circulation-induced collapses of the Mesoamerican monsoon over the past 22,000 y

    PubMed Central

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Asmerom, Yemane; Bernal, Juan Pablo; Polyak, Victor J.; Vazquez-Selem, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The dominant controls on global paleomonsoon strength include summer insolation driven by precession cycles, ocean circulation through its influence on atmospheric circulation, and sea-surface temperatures. However, few records from the summer North American Monsoon system are available to test for a synchronous response with other global monsoons to shared forcings. In particular, the monsoon response to widespread atmospheric reorganizations associated with disruptions of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the deglacial period remains unconstrained. Here, we present a high-resolution and radiometrically dated monsoon rainfall reconstruction over the past 22,000 y from speleothems of tropical southwestern Mexico. The data document an active Last Glacial Maximum (18–24 cal ka B.P.) monsoon with similar δ18O values to the modern, and that the monsoon collapsed during periods of weakened AMOC during Heinrich stadial 1 (ca. 17 ka) and the Younger Dryas (12.9–11.5 ka). The Holocene was marked by a trend to a weaker monsoon that was paced by orbital insolation. We conclude that the Mesoamerican monsoon responded in concert with other global monsoon regions, and that monsoon strength was driven by variations in the strength and latitudinal position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which was forced by AMOC variations in the North Atlantic Ocean. The surprising observation of an active Last Glacial Maximum monsoon is attributed to an active but shallow AMOC and proximity to the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The emergence of agriculture in southwestern Mexico was likely only possible after monsoon strengthening in the Early Holocene at ca. 11 ka. PMID:23690596

  14. The effect of carbonic acid on well cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguid, Andrew

    Sequestration in abandoned petroleum fields has the potential to reduce atmospheric emissions of CO2 if adopted on a large scale. When CO2 comes in contact with brine in the sequestration formation, it will form carbonic acid. The acid may damage cement that is used to construct and abandon wells in the sequestration formation, allowing the wells to leak. CO2 release from a sequestration formation through abandoned wells to the vadose zone and then from the vadose zone into a residence could cause exposure to high levels of CO2. This study presents the results of two types of experiments that were conducted in order to understand how CO2 will affect well cements. This dissertation also presents a hypothetical risk assessment that examines the risks that a sequestration site may pose. The experiments examine how well cements react when exposed to carbonated brines at 20° and 50°C. Month-long flow-through experiments were conducted on samples made from Class H neat paste and Class H cement containing 6% bentonite under conditions that simulated sandstone (pH 2.4 and 3.7) and limestone (pH 5) sequestration formations. Year-long batch experiments were conducted on composite samples made from Class H well cement and either sandstone or limestone in order to determine how carbonated brine affects the cement-stone interface. The results of the flow-through experiments showed that calcium-containing phases in cement may be completely degraded and the formation of the calcium carbonate layer acts to slow, but not stop, degradation. The results of the batch experiments showed that carbonated brines can degrade cement and damage the integrity of the cement-stone interface. The damage to the cement at the cement-stone interface caused an order-of-magnitude increase in permeability in the sandstone-cement samples. The risk assessment identifies two potential screening levels. The assessment then uses a semianalytical wellfield model coupled with analytical models of diffusion

  15. Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

  16. Active iron-rich belite sulfoaluminate cements: clinkering and hydration.

    PubMed

    Cuberos, Antonio J M; De la Torre, Angeles G; Alvarez-Pinazo, G; Martín-Sedeño, M Carmen; Schollbach, Katrin; Pöllmann, Herbert; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2010-09-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is an environmentally contentious material, as for every ton of OPC produced, on average, 0.97 tons of CO2 are released. Conversely, belite sulfoaluminate (BSA) cements are promising eco-friendly building materials, as their production may deplete CO2 emissions up to 35% (compared to OPC). However, the hydration rate of belite is slow. Here, we report the clinkering of iron-rich BSA materials, their activation with B2O3, and establishing a methodology to measure their improved reactivities. Nonactivated BSA clinker contained only beta belite phase, 52 wt %. Meanwhile, BSA clinkers activated with 1 and 2 wt % of B2O3 contained 28 wt % of beta and 25 wt % of alpha'H; and 54 wt % of alpha'H phase, respectively. Therefore, activation of BSA has been proved as alpha'H-belite is stabilized. The hydration of the cements has been studied by laboratory and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (using Rietveld method and chemical constraints), calorimetry, and environmental scanning electron microscopy. Cement pastes have different hydration rates. For nonactivated BSA cement, 20 and 48% of the belite reacted after one and three months, respectively. Conversely, 37-49% after one month and 52-62% after three months of overall belite reactivities have been measured for BSA cements activated with B2O3. PMID:20701316

  17. Early hydration and setting of oil well cement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jie; Weissinger, Emily A.; Peethamparan, Sulapha; Scherer, George W.

    2010-07-15

    A broad experimental study has been performed to characterize the early hydration and setting of cement pastes prepared with Class H oil well cement at water-to-cement ratios (w/c) from 0.25 to 0.40, cured at temperatures from 10 to 60 {sup o}C, and mixed with chemical additives. Chemical shrinkage during hydration was measured by a newly developed system, degree of hydration was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, and setting time was tested by Vicat and ultrasonic velocity measurements. A Boundary Nucleation and Growth model provides a good fit to the chemical shrinkage data. Temperature increase and accelerator additions expedite the rate of cement hydration by causing more rapid nucleation of hydration products, leading to earlier setting; conversely, retarder and viscosity modifying agents delay cement nucleation, causing later setting times. Lower w/c paste needs less hydration product to form a percolating solid network (i.e., to reach the initial setting point). However, for the systems evaluated, at a given w/c, the degree of hydration at setting is a constant, regardless of the effects of ambient temperature or the presence of additives.

  18. Fundamental investigations related to the mitigation of volume changes in cement-based materials at early ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, Gaurav Niteen

    The increased use of high-performance, low water-to-cement (w/c) ratio concretes has led to increased occurrences of early-age shrinkage cracking in civil engineering structures. To reduce the magnitude of early-age shrinkage and the potential for cracking, mitigation strategies using shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs), saturated lightweight aggregates, expansive cements and extended moist curing durations in construction have been recommended. However, to appropriately utilize these strategies, it is important to have a complete understanding of the driving forces of early-age volume change and how these methods work from a materials perspective to reduce shrinkage. This dissertation uses a first-principles approach to understand the mechanism of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) to generate an expansion and mitigate shrinkage at early-ages, quantify the influence of a CaO-based expansive additive in reducing unrestrained shrinkage, residual stress development and the cracking potential at early-ages and quantify the influence of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) and cement hydration (pore structure refinement) on the reduction induced in the fluid transport properties of the material. The effects of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) are described in terms of inducing autogenous expansions in cement pastes at early ages. An evaluation comprising measurements of autogenous deformation, x-ray diffraction (Rietveld analysis), pore solution and thermogravimetric analysis and electron microscopy is performed to understand the chemical nature and physical effects of the expansion. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the measured liquid-phase compositions indicate the SRA produces elevated Portlandite super-saturations in the pore solution which results in crystallization stress driven expansions. The thermodynamic calculations are supported by deformation measurements performed on cement pastes mixed in solutions saturated with Portlandite or containing

  19. Study of deformation of resin cements used in fixing of root posts through fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, C. A.; Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Gomes, O. M. M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage "in situ" in resin cements inside the root canal during the fixation of glass fiber posts. For cementation teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups according to the resin cement used: Group1 - resin cement dual Relyx ARC (3M/ESPE), and Group 2 - resin cement dual Relyx U200 (3M/ESPE). Before inserting the resin cement into the root canal, two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and pasted in the region without contact with the canal, one at the apical and other at the coronal thirds of the post. The sensors measured the deformation of the resin cements in coronal and apical root thirds to obtain the values in micro-strain (μɛ).

  20. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  1. Effect of calcium carbonate on clinical compliance of apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Khairoun, I; Boltong, M G; Driessens, F C; Planell, J A

    1997-01-01

    Clinical requirements for calcium phosphate bone cements were formulated in terms of the initial setting time, the final setting time, the cohesion time, and the ultimate compressive strength. Two cement formulations were tested. Biocement F was made of a powder containing alpha-tertiary calcium phosphate, precipitated hydroxyapatite, and monetite. Biocement D powder also contained CaCO3. The liquid/powder (L/P) ratio of the cement paste and the accelerator concentrations (% Na2HPO4) in the cement liquid were varied. For Biocement F there was a small area of combinations of L/P ratio and percent Na2HPO4 for which all clinical requirements were satisfied. This area covered only pastes that could be applied as doughs. However, Biocement D showed a much larger area of full compliance and it covered both doughlike and injectable pastes.

  2. Galvanic corrosion of Mg-Zr fuel cladding and steel immobilized in Portland cement and geopolymer at early ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooses, Adrien; Lambertin, David; Chartier, David; Frizon, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Galvanic corrosion behaviour of Mg-Zr alloy fuel cladding and steel has been studied in Ordinary Portland cement and Na-geopolymer. Portland cements implied the worse magnesium corrosion performances due to the negative effects of cement hydrates, grinding agents and gypsum on the galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion in Na-geopolymer paste remains very low. Silicates and fluoride from the geopolymer activation solution significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy while coupling with a cathode.

  3. US cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    Patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process suffer from severe hearing loss caused by lack of continuity of the ossicular chain. This study is a retrospective evaluation of the hearing results using two different surgical procedures. Since January 1993, 12 consecutive patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a group of 20 historical controls who underwent surgery in 1991 and 1992 using incus autograft interposition. Among the 12 index patients, 7 (58%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 3 there was no difference and in 2 a slight decline. Among the 20 controls, 14 (70%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy to perform, presents less risk of damage to the stapes and cochlea, requires less extensive surgery and does not exclude other surgical methods in cases of reoperation. PMID:10909000

  5. Influence of nano-dispersive modified additive on cement activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Natalya; Badenikov, Artem; Skripnikova, Nelli; Ivanova, Elizaveta

    2016-01-01

    In the work the influence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the cement activity and the processes of structure formation of the hardened cement paste in different periods of hydration are studied. The changes in the kinetic curves of the sample strength growth modified with SWCNT in amount of 0.01 and 0.0005 % are stipulated by the results of differential scanning colorimetry, scanning electronic and ionic microscopy, X-ray-phase analysis. It was found that the nano-modified additive may increase in the axis compressive strength of the system by 1.4-6.3 fold relatively to the reference samples and may reach 179.6 MPa. It may intensify the hydration process of calcium silicates as well as influence on the matrix of hardened cement paste. The studies are conducted on the structural changes in the hardened cement paste, the time periods of increase and decrease of the compressive strength of the samples, the amount of the calcium hydroxide and tobermorite-like gel as well as the degree of hydration C3S and β-C2S.

  6. Structure, properties and animal study of a calcium phosphate/calcium sulfate composite cement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Luen; Chen, Chang-Keng; Lee, Jing-Wei; Lee, Yu-Ling; Ju, Chien-Ping; Lin, Jiin-Huey Chern

    2014-04-01

    In-vitro and in-vivo studies have been conducted on an in-house-developed tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP)/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA)/calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH)-derived composite cement. Unlike most commercial calcium-based cement pastes, the investigated cement paste can be directly injected into water and harden without dispersion. The viability value of cells incubated with a conditioned medium of cement extraction is >90% that of Al2O3 control and >80% that of blank medium. Histological examination reveals excellent bonding between host bone and cement without interposition of fibrous tissues. At 12 weeks-post implantation, significant remodeling activities are found and a new bone network is developed within the femoral defect. The 26-week samples show that the newly formed bone becomes more mature, while the interface between residual cement and the new bone appears less identifiable. Image analysis indicates that the resorption rate of the present cement is much higher than that of TTCP or TTCP/DCPA-derived cement under similar implantation conditions.

  7. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement.

  8. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  9. Mineral of the month: cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic cement is a virtually ubiquitous construction material that, when mixed with water, serves as the binder in concrete and most mortars. Only about 13 percent of concrete by weight is cement (the rest being water and aggregates), but the cement contributes all of the concrete’s compressional strength. The term “hydraulic” refers to the cement’s ability to set and harden underwater through the hydration of the cement’s components.

  10. Influence of Plasticizer Amount on Rheological and Hydration Properties of CEM II Type Portland Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šeputytė-Juciké, J.; Pundienė, I.; Kičaitė, A.; Pranckevičienė, J.

    2015-11-01

    The article analyzes the effect of plasticizer (based on polycarboxilates) amount (0.3 - 1.2% wt. of cement) on the rheological and hydration properties of two Portland cements pastes: CEM II/A-S 42.5N and CEM II/A-LL 42.5N. Increase of plasticizer amount reduces viscosity of CEM II/A-LL 42.5N cement paste from 3 to 12 times, where viscosity of CEM II/A-S 42.5N cement paste reduces from 5 to 20 times. The optimum plasticizer dose (0.3%) in case of CEM II/A-S 42.5N and (1.2%) in case of CEM II/A-LL 42.5N was established. Calorimetry studies have shown that plasticizer reduces the wetting heat release rate in CEM II/A-LL 42.5N cement twice and in CEM II/A-S 42.5N cement - by 25%. Plasticizer prolongs the maximum heat release rate time by 16 h in CEM II/A-LL 42.5N samples and reduces heat release rate by 19%. In CEM II/A-S 42.5N cement samples plasticizer prolongs maximum heat release rate time by 14.5 h and increases heat release rate by 15%. The goal of this study is to analyze the effect of the dosage of the most widely used plasticizer on solubility characteristics, rheological and hydration properties of two cements CEM II/A-S 42.5N and CEM II/A-LL 42.5N to establish the optimum dose of plasticizer in cements pastes.

  11. Role of Substrate on Quartz Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farver, J. R.; Winslow, D.; Onasch, C.

    2010-12-01

    Quartz cementation in quartz aggregates has been experimentally investigated. The starting material was disaggregated detrital quartz grains from the well-sorted, mature St. Peter Sandstone. The ‘as-is’ grains have patches of iron oxide coatings and some have euhedral overgrowths that contain iron oxide dust rims. In addition a set of experiments was run using grains that were cleaned by soaking in sodium hydrosulfite and sodium bisulfate solutions to remove exposed iron oxide coatings. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (≈30 mg) to provide a source of silica for the quartz cement, AlCl3 powder (≈3 mg) to provide a tracer for Cathodoluminescence (CL) identification of cement formed during the experiment, 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (≈25 mg) to increase the silica solubility and to better mimic oil field brines, and the natural quartz grains (100-130 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in Au capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 250°C to 450°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 8 weeks. After the experiments, the samples were vacuum impregnated with a low viscosity epoxy containing a blue dye. After curing, the sample charge was sawn in half along its long axis and one half was polished (to 1 micron diamond paste) for analysis. The nature and amount of quartz cement in the samples were determined by a combination of CL, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Photomosaics of the samples were created and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement formed during the experiment was easily recognized from the quartz grains (and previous overgrowths) by the difference in luminescence. The results indicate the amorphous silica powder provides a ready source for silica for quartz cementation due to its greater solubility than the quartz. The cementation rates are rapid (>14% cement formed in 2 weeks at 450°C and >7% in 8 weeks at 250°C). Compared to

  12. Effect of physicochemical properties of a cement based on silicocarnotite/calcium silicate on in vitro cell adhesion and in vivo cement degradation.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Julia Lucas; Rueda, Carmen; Manchón, Ángel; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2016-01-01

    A silicon calcium phosphate cement (Si-CPC) was developed to produce a composite of calcium phosphate and calcium silicate. The silicon cements prepared with low silicon (Si) content were composed of crystalline phases of brushite and silicocarnotite. However, the cements prepared with high Si content were mainly composed of amorphous phases of silicocarnotite, hydroxyapatite and calcium silicate. The cement porosity was about 40% with a shift of the average pore diameter to the nanometric range with increasing Si content. Interestingly, this new cement system provides a matrix with a high specific surface area of up to 29 m(2) g(-1). The cytocompatibility of the new Si-doped cements was tested with a human osteoblast-like cell line (MG-63) showing an enhancement of cell proliferation (up to threefold) when compared with unsubstituted material. Cements with a high silica content also improved the cell attachment. The in vivo results indicated that Si-CPCs induce the formation of new bone tissue, and modify cement resorption. We conclude that this cement provides an optimal environment to enhance osteoblast growth and proliferation that could be of interest in bone engineering. PMID:27481549

  13. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  14. A Novel Injectable Borate Bioactive Glass Cement as an Antibiotic Delivery Vehicle for Treating Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xu; Gu, Yi-Fei; Jia, Wei-Tao; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Wang, Yang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background A novel injectable cement composed of chitosan-bonded borate bioactive glass (BG) particles was evaluated as a carrier for local delivery of vancomycin in the treatment of osteomyelitis in a rabbit tibial model. Materials and Methods The setting time, injectability, and compressive strength of the borate BG cement, and the release profile of vancomycin from the cement were measured in vitro. The capacity of the vancomycin-loaded BG cement to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-induced osteomyelitis in rabbit tibiae in vivo was evaluated and compared with that for a vancomycin-loaded calcium sulfate (CS) cement and for intravenous injection of vancomycin. Results The BG cement had an injectability of >90% during the first 3 minutes after mixing, hardened within 30 minutes and, after hardening, had a compressive strength of 18±2 MPa. Vancomycin was released from the BG cement into phosphate-buffered saline for up to 36 days, and the cumulative amount of vancomycin released was 86% of the amount initially loaded into the cement. In comparison, vancomycin was released from the CS cement for up 28 days and the cumulative amount released was 89%. Two months post-surgery, radiography and microbiological tests showed that the BG and CS cements had a better ability to eradicate osteomyelitis when compared to intravenous injection of vancomycin, but there was no significant difference between the BG and CS cements in eradicating the infection. Histological examination showed that the BG cement was biocompatible and had a good capacity for regenerating bone in the tibial defects. Conclusions These results indicate that borate BG cement is a promising material both as an injectable carrier for vancomycin in the eradication of osteomyelitis and as an osteoconductive matrix to regenerate bone after the infection is cured. PMID:24427311

  15. Development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced monetite bionanocomposite cements for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansoori; Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we present results of our research on biodegradable monetite (DCPA, CaHPO4) cement with surface-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) as potential bone defect repair material. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties and possessed a suitable setting time for use in surgical setting. The incorporation of mMWCNTs shortened the setting time of DCPA and increased the compressive strength of DCPA cement from 11.09±1.85 MPa to 21.56±2.47 MPa. The cytocompatibility of the materials was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase of cell numbers was observed on both DCPA and DCPA-mMWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results also revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the cements. Based on these results, DCPA-mMWCNTs composite cements can be considered as potential bone defect repair materials.

  16. Chemistry of glass-ionomer cements: a review.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J W

    1998-03-01

    Studies of the setting of glass-ionomer cements have been carried out for over twenty years, and there is now a considerable body of information concerning the steps that lead to the conversion of a freshly mixed cement paste into a solid, durable dental restorative. This paper reviews these studies, paying particular attention to more recent work. The conclusion is that glass-ionomers consist of interpenetrating networks of inorganic and organic components forming a matrix in which particles of unreacted glass are embedded. However, there remain uncertainties over aspects of the setting chemistry, for example over the role of (+)-tartaric acid in the setting reaction, and over the nature of the fluoride species which form during the reaction. The chemistry of resin-modified glass-ionomers is also discussed and shown to be more complex than that of the simple cements. The presence of the resin component slows down the ionic cure reaction of the conventional cement, and leads to both a significant exotherm and a set material capable of absorbing water reversibly. The paper concludes that the microstructure of the set cement depends completely on chemical composition and the kinetics of the setting process, and that an understanding of the setting chemistry of these materials is thus important for optimal clinical use.

  17. Metal/cement interface strength in cemented stem fixation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A M; Raab, S; Miller, J E

    1984-01-01

    To characterize the strength of the interface between stem-type metal implants and bone cements, a fracture mechanics parameter was used. This parameter, the critical strain energy release rate (Gc), was determined from "push-out" tests of cylindrical specimens. The specimens, formed using molds of bone, were maintained and tested at body temperature. The strength of interfaces formed with cancellous bone surrounding the cement mantle was significantly less than the strength of those formed in apposition to cortical bone. A marked degradation of strength was found with saline immersion for SS316LVM/cement interfaces formed with Zimmer regular, Simplex-P, and Zimmer LVC cements. After 60 days of immersion the interface Gc was only 10-20% of the value for bulk cement. Interfaces formed with thin-film polymethylmethacrylate-precoated metals (SS316LVM, Co-Cr-Mo, and Ti-6A1-4V) yielded "dry" Gc values one order of magnitude greater than those measured with interfaces formed with uncoated metals. Moreover, the strength of precoated SS316LVM/cement interfaces formed with all three brands of cement did not change after saline immersion for 60 days. PMID:6491806

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zalzale, M.; McDonald, P.J.

    2012-12-15

    The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

  19. Anti-aggressive effect elicited by coca-paste in isolation-induced aggression of male rats: influence of accumbal dopamine and cortical serotonin.

    PubMed

    Meikle, María Noel; Prieto, José Pedro; Urbanavicius, Jessika; López, Ximena; Abin-Carriquiry, Juan Andrés; Prunell, Giselle; Scorza, María Cecilia

    2013-09-01

    Coca-paste (CP), an illicit drug of abuse, has been frequently associated with aggressive and impulsive behaviors in humans. However, preclinical studies have not been carried out in order to characterize CP effects on aggression. The acute effect of CP, cocaine and caffeine (the main adulterant present in seized samples) on aggression was assessed using the isolation-induced aggression paradigm in male rats. The dopaminergic (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and serotonergic (5-HT) activity in the frontal cortex were explored. CP and cocaine induced a similar anti-aggressive effect on isolated rats although CP-treated animals showed a shorter latency to the first attack. Aggressive behavior was not increased per se by caffeine. Social investigation time was slightly reduced only by cocaine while exploratory activity and time spent walking were increased by the three drugs. Accumbal DA levels were significantly augmented by CP, cocaine and caffeine, although differences in DOPAC and HVA levels were evidenced. A decrease in DA turnover was only observed after CP and cocaine administration. Increased cortical 5-HT levels with a concomitant decrease in 5-HT turnover were observed after CP and cocaine whereas caffeine did not alter it. As cocaine but not caffeine reduced aggression, it seems like cocaine content was mainly responsible for CP anti-aggressive action; however, the presence of caffeine in CP may have a role in the shorter latency to attack compared to cocaine. Despite the increase in NAcc DA, the enhancement of cortical 5-HT levels can likely underlie the anti-aggression observed in CP-treated animals.

  20. Drug-induced retroperitoneal fibrosis: short aetiopathogenetic note, from the past times of ergot-derivatives large use to currently applied bio-pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    ALBERTI, C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the secondary forms of retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF), that drug-induced shows very intriguing aspects given both the broad range of involved pharmaceuticals and the considerable interest arisen from the related pathogenetic mechanisms. The particular incidence, in the last four decades past century, of the RPF due to long-term use of ergot alkaloid derivatives (ergotamine, methysergide, pergolide, bromocriptine, cabergoline) and specific L-dopa derived agents, such as methyldopa, as well as to different analgesics, came progressively down given that their long-term use for either the prevention of migraine attacks or the therapy of chronic pathologies (Parkinson’s disease, prolactinoma, pain management, etc) has been, year after year, supplanted or even made unavailable in many countries. More recently, instead, the occurrence of the RPF has been sometimes identified with the use of antitumoral chemotherapeutics, such as carboplatin and methotrexate, and, just lately, as an unusual side-effect of certain biological agents, about which it is timely to go into specific pathogenetic problems in more depth. PMID:26712075

  1. Drug-induced retroperitoneal fibrosis: short aetiopathogenetic note, from the past times of ergot-derivatives large use to currently applied bio-pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Alberti, C

    2015-01-01

    Among the secondary forms of retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF), that drug-induced shows very intriguing aspects given both the broad range of involved pharmaceuticals and the considerable interest arisen from the related pathogenetic mechanisms. The particular incidence, in the last four decades past century, of the RPF due to long-term use of ergot alkaloid derivatives (ergotamine, methysergide, pergolide, bromocriptine, cabergoline) and specific L-dopa derived agents, such as methyldopa, as well as to different analgesics, came progressively down given that their long-term use for either the prevention of migraine attacks or the therapy of chronic pathologies (Parkinson's disease, prolactinoma, pain management, etc) has been, year after year, supplanted or even made unavailable in many countries. More recently, instead, the occurrence of the RPF has been sometimes identified with the use of antitumoral chemotherapeutics, such as carboplatin and methotrexate, and, just lately, as an unusual side-effect of certain biological agents, about which it is timely to go into specific pathogenetic problems in more depth. PMID:26712075

  2. Application of Bacillus subtilis 168 as a multifunctional agent for improvement of the durability of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Jong-Myong; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-11-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar. However, very few strains have been applied to crack remediation and strengthening of cementitious materials. In this study, we report the biodeposition of Bacillus subtilis 168 and its ability to enhance the durability of cement material. B. subtilis 168 was applied to the surface of cement specimens. The results showed a new layer of deposited organic-inorganic composites on the surface of the cement paste. In addition, the water permeability of the cement paste treated with B. subtilis 168 was lower than that of non-treated specimens. Furthermore, artificial cracks in the cement paste were completely remediated by the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168. The compressive strength of cement mortar treated with B. subtilis 168 increased by about 19.5% when compared with samples completed with only B4 medium. Taken together, these findings suggest that the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168 could be used as a sealing and coating agent to improve the strength and water resistance of concrete. This is the first paper to report the application of Bacillus subtilis 168 for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar through calcium carbonate precipitation.

  3. The effects of utilizing silica fume in Portland Cement Pervious Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Daniel Allen

    Silica fume has long been used as a supplementary cementing material to provide a high density, high strength, and durable building material. Silica fume has a particle size a fraction of any conventional cement, which allows it to increase concrete strength by decreasing the porosity especially near the aggregates surface. Because Portland Cement Pervious Concrete (PCPC) has a smaller bond area between aggregate and paste, silica fume has significant impacts on the properties of the PCPC. The research in this paper studies the workability of a cement paste containing silica fume in addition to analyzing the results of testing on Portland Cement Pervious Concrete mixtures that also contained silica fume. Testing conducted included a study of the effects of silica fume on cement's rheological properties at various dosage rates ranging from zero to ten percent by mass. It was determined that silica fume has negligible effects on the viscosity of cement paste until a dosage rate of five percent, at which point the viscosity increases rapidly. In addition to the rheological testing of the cement paste, trials were also conducted on the pervious concrete samples. Sample groups included mixes with river gravel and chipped limestone as aggregate, washed and unwashed, and two different void contents. Workability tests showed that mixtures containing a silica fume dosage rate of 5 percent or less had comparable or slightly improved workability when compared to control groups. Workability was found to decrease at a 7 percent dosage rate. Samples were tested for compressive strength at 7 and 28 days and splitting tensile strength at 28 days. It was found in most sample groups, strength increased with dosage rates of 3 to 5 percent but often decreased when the dosage reached 7 percent. Abrasion testing showed that both samples containing washed aggregate and samples containing silica fume exhibited a reduced mass loss.

  4. Stabilization of ZnCl2-containing wastes using calcium sulfoaluminate cement: cement hydration, strength development and volume stability.

    PubMed

    Berger, Stéphane; Cau Dit Coumes, Céline; Le Bescop, Patrick; Damidot, Denis

    2011-10-30

    The potential of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement was investigated to solidify and stabilize wastes containing large amounts of soluble zinc chloride (a strong inhibitor of Portland cement hydration). Hydration of pastes and mortars prepared with a 0.5 mol/L ZnCl(2) mixing solution was characterized over one year as a function of the gypsum content of the binder and the thermal history of the material. Blending the CSA clinker with 20% gypsum enabled its rapid hydration, with only very small delay compared with a reference prepared with pure water. It also improved the compressive strength of the hardened material and significantly reduced its expansion under wet curing. Moreover, the hydrates assemblage was less affected by a thermal treatment at early age simulating the temperature rise and fall occurring in a large-volume drum of cemented waste. Fully hydrated materials contained ettringite, amorphous aluminum hydroxide, strätlingite, together with AFm phases (Kuzel's salt associated with monosulfoaluminate or Friedel's salt depending on the gypsum content of the binder), and possibly C-(A)-S-H. Zinc was readily insolubilized and could not be detected in the pore solution extracted from cement pastes.

  5. Stabilization and solidification of waste phosphate sludge using Portland cement and fly ash as cement substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Vedat Pinarli; Gizem Karaca; Guray Salihoglu; Nezih Kamil Salihoglu

    2005-07-01

    Stabilization and solidification of the waste phosphate sludge (WPS) using Portland cement (PC) and fly ash (FA) were studied in the present work. The WPS content in the cement mortars varied from 5% to 15%. Setting times were measured, and unconfined compressive strengths (UCS) were determined for the mortars cured in water for 3, 7, 28, 56, and 90 days. Zinc and nickel leaching of the solidified products were measured according to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Setting times were extended as the WPS content in the paste samples increased. The UCS values of the mortar containing 5% WPS solidified by using 95% PC were similar to the reference sample. Use of 10% FA as cement substitute increased the UCS values by 10% at the end of curing period of 56 days. The WPS contained initially 130.2 mg L{sup -1} of zinc and 22.7 mg L{sup -1} of nickel. The zinc and nickel leached from the 5% WPS solidified by using 95% PC were measured as 3.8 mg L{sup -1} and 0.4 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. These metal concentrations were below the limits given by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for landfilling the solidified wastes.

  6. Use of ancient copper slags in Portland cement and alkali activated cement matrices.

    PubMed

    Nazer, Amin; Payá, Jordi; Borrachero, María Victoria; Monzó, José

    2016-02-01

    Some Chilean copper slag dumps from the nineteenth century still remain, without a proposed use that encourages recycling and reduces environmental impact. In this paper, the copper slag abandoned in landfills is proposed as a new building material. The slags studied were taken from Playa Negra and Púquios dumps, both located in the region of Atacama in northern Chile. Pozzolanic activity in lime and Portland cement systems, as well as the alkali activation in pastes with copper slag cured at different temperatures, was studied. The reactivity of the slag was measured using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrical conductivity and pH in aqueous suspension and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, copper slag-Portland cement mortars with the substitution of 25% (by weight) of cement by copper slag and alkali-activated slag mortars cured at 20 and 65 °C were made, to determine the compressive strength. The results indicate that the ancient copper slags studied have interesting binding properties for the construction sector.

  7. Stabilization and solidification of waste phosphate sludge using portland cement and fly ash as cement substitute.

    PubMed

    Pinarli, Vedat; Karaca, Gizem; Salihoglu, Guray; Salihoglu, Nezih Kamil

    2005-01-01

    Stabilization and solidification of the waste phosphate sludge (WPS) using Portland cement (PC) and fly ash (FA) were studied in the present work. The WPS content in the cement mortars varied from 5% to 15%. Setting times were measured, and unconfined compressive strengths (UCS) were determined for the mortars cured in water for 3, 7, 28, 56, and 90 days. Zinc and nickel leaching of the solidified products were measured according to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Setting times were extended as the WPS content in the paste samples increased. The UCS values of the mortar containing 5% WPS solidified by using 95% PC were similar to the reference sample. Use of 10% FA as cement substitute increased the UCS values by 10% at the end of curing period of 56 days. The WPS contained initially 130.2 mg L(-1) of zinc and 22.7 mg L(-1) of nickel. The zinc and nickel leached from the 5% WPS solidified by using 95% PC were measured as 3.8 mg L(-1) and 0.4 mg L(-1), respectively. These metal concentrations were below the limits given by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for landfilling the solidified wastes.

  8. Use of ancient copper slags in Portland cement and alkali activated cement matrices.

    PubMed

    Nazer, Amin; Payá, Jordi; Borrachero, María Victoria; Monzó, José

    2016-02-01

    Some Chilean copper slag dumps from the nineteenth century still remain, without a proposed use that encourages recycling and reduces environmental impact. In this paper, the copper slag abandoned in landfills is proposed as a new building material. The slags studied were taken from Playa Negra and Púquios dumps, both located in the region of Atacama in northern Chile. Pozzolanic activity in lime and Portland cement systems, as well as the alkali activation in pastes with copper slag cured at different temperatures, was studied. The reactivity of the slag was measured using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrical conductivity and pH in aqueous suspension and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, copper slag-Portland cement mortars with the substitution of 25% (by weight) of cement by copper slag and alkali-activated slag mortars cured at 20 and 65 °C were made, to determine the compressive strength. The results indicate that the ancient copper slags studied have interesting binding properties for the construction sector. PMID:26615227

  9. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  10. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  11. Physical and microstructural aspects of sulfate attack on ordinary and limestone blended Portland cements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Thomas; Lothenbach, Barbara; Romer, Michael; Neuenschwander, Juerg; Scrivener, Karen

    2009-12-15

    The consequences of external sulfate attack were investigated by traditional test methods, i.e. length and mass change, as well as by a newly developed, surface sensitive ultrasonic method, using Leaky Rayleigh waves (1 MHz). The macroscopic changes are discussed and compared with thermodynamic calculations and microstructural findings (SEM/EDS). The results show that the main impact of limestone additions on resistance to sulfate degradation are physical - i.e. addition of a few percent in Portland cement reduces the porosity and increases the resistance of Portland cement systems to sulfate; but higher addition of 25% increase porosity and lower resistance to sulfate. The kinetics of degradation were dramatically affected by the solution concentration (4 or 44 g Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/l) and the higher concentration also resulted in the formation of gypsum, which did not occur at the low concentration. However the pattern of cracking was similar in both cases and it appears that gypsum precipitates opportunistically in pre-formed cracks so it is not considered as making a significant contribution to the degradation. At 8 deg. C limited formation of thaumasite occurred in the surface region of the samples made from cement with limestone additions. This thaumasite formation led to loss of cohesion of the paste and loss of material from the surface of the samples. However thaumasite formation was always preceded by expansion and cracking of the samples due to ettringite formation and given the very slow kinetics of thaumasite formation it was probably facilitated by the opening up of the structure due to ettringite induced cracking. The expansion of the samples showed a steady stage, followed by a rapidly accelerating stage, with destruction of the samples. The onset of the rapidly accelerating stage occurred when the thickness of the cracked surface layer reached about 1-1.5 mm-10-15% of the total specimen thickness (10 mm).

  12. Rate of CO2 attack on hydrated Class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions.

    PubMed

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2008-08-15

    Experiments were conducted to study the degradation of hardened cement paste due to exposure to CO2 and brine under geologic sequestration conditions (T = 50 degrees C and 30.3 MPa). The goal was to determine the rate of reaction of hydrated cement exposed to supercritical CO2 and to CO2-saturated brine to assess the potential impact of degradation in existing wells on CO2 storage integrity. Two different forms of chemical alteration were observed. The supercritical CO2 alteration of cement was similar in process to cement in contact with atmospheric CO2 (ordinary carbonation), while alteration of cement exposed to CO2-saturated brine was typical of acid attack on cement. Extrapolation of the hydrated cement alteration rate measured for 1 year indicates a penetration depth range of 1.00 +/- 0.07 mm for the CO2-saturated brine and 1.68 +/- 0.24 mm for the supercritical CO2 after 30 years. These penetration depths are consistent with observations of field samples from an enhanced oil recovery site after 30 years of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under similar temperature and pressure conditions. These results suggest that significant degradation due to matrix diffusion of CO2 in intact Class H neat hydrated cement is unlikely on time scales of decades. PMID:18767693

  13. Long-term performance of the steel-cement interface in CO2 sequestration wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Han, J.

    2011-12-01

    Long-term performance of CO2 storage reservoirs will require that wells (injection, monitoring, and pre-existing) continue to provide isolation of the buoyant CO2 plume. Short-term leakage concerns are driven by the quality of the well completions, particularly placement of Portland cement. However, operational and CO2-injection induced stresses in the reservoir may introduce small defects in the well isolation system, allowing migration of small quantities of CO2 and brine. Evidence for such leaks has been observed in a CO2-enhanced oil recovery well (Carey et al. 2007) and in a natural CO2 reservoir (Crow et al. 2010). The key question in long-term performance is whether these leaks will grow as wellbore materials degrade or whether carbonate precipitation reactions will self-heal the defects. In this study, we focus on the interface between steel casing and Portland cement. In a properly completed well, Portland cement provides a protective, alkaline environment for carbon steel that precludes the possibility of external corrosion. The protective cement can be damaged either by the formation of small gaps at the interface, known as microannuli, or by the carbonation of cement which eliminates cement alkalinity. To investigate these issues, we conducted experiments on cement-steel composites at conditions ranging from atmospheric to high-pressure to determine the susceptibility of steel to corrosion in the presence of well-bonded cement, carbonated cement, and cement separated from the steel by varying gap distances. The presence of cement greatly reduces corrosion rates of steel because an iron carbonate scale forms rapidly and provides a mass-transfer barrier. Similarly, a small gap at the cement-steel interface provides a mass-transfer barrier. Our results show that scale formation provides a more significant barrier to corrosion and that even small gaps (<100 um) do not enhance protection in the cement-steel system. For steel embedded in cement, corrosion

  14. Simulation of chloride penetration in cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, M.; Colella, D.; Radaelli, G.; Bertolini, L.

    1997-10-01

    Corrosion of reinforcement in concrete can initiate when chloride ion concentration in contact with steel bars exceeds a threshold value. It is then of crucial importance to describe Cl{sup {minus}} penetration through models based on fundamental physico-chemical relationships avoiding the use of empirical parameters. Here, the multicomponent diffusional process was simulated by means of the percolation concepts. Furthermore, the adsorption of chloride within hardened cement paste was also considered. General relationships were derived to calculate binding coefficients and effective diffusivity of ions as a function of technological concrete parameters. The model explains experimental trends in a wide range of operating conditions (e.g., with and without superimposed current) both for cement paste and concrete.

  15. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0-10mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic.

  16. In vitro and in vivo evaluation on the bioactivity of ZnO containing nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhang; Yubao, Li; Yi, Zuo; Lan, Wu; Jansen, John A

    2010-04-01

    A ZnO containing nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan (n-HA/CS) cement was developed and its bone formation ability was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The physico-chemical properties of the cement were determined in terms of pH variation during and after setting, injectability and wettability. The results indicated that, the pH varied from 7.04 to 7.12 throughout the soaking of the cement in distilled water. The injectability was excellent during the first 4 min, but the cement became less injectable or even not injectable at all after 7 min setting. The static contact angle of the cement against water was 53.5 +/- 2.7 degrees . The results of immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) indicated that the cement exhibited excellent bone-like apatite forming ability. In vivo studies, involving the installation of the cement of tibial-bone defects in rabbit tibia revealed an inflammatory response around the cement at 3 days of implantation. After 4 weeks, the inflammation began to disappear and the cement had bound to the surrounding host bone. Radiological examination also confirmed that the ZnO containing n-HA/CS cement significantly induced new bone formation. These results suggest that the ZnO containing n-HA/CS cement may be beneficial to enhance bone regeneration in osseous defect sites.

  17. Physicochemical properties of newly developed bioactive glass cement and its effects on various cells.

    PubMed

    Washio, Ayako; Nakagawa, Aika; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Maeda, Hidefumi; Kitamura, Chiaki

    2015-02-01

    Biomaterials used in dental treatments are expected to have favorable properties such as biocompatibility and an ability to induce tissue formation in dental pulp and periapical tissue, as well as sealing to block external stimuli. Bioactive glasses have been applied in bone engineering, but rarely applied in the field of dentistry. In the present study, bioactive glass cement for dental treatment was developed, and then its physicochemical properties and effects on cell responses were analyzed. To clarify the physicochemical attributes of the cement, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and pH measurement were carried out. Cell attachment, morphology, and viability to the cement were also examined to clarify the effects of the cement on odontoblast-like cells (KN-3 cells), osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 cells), human periodontal ligament stem/progenitor cells and neuro-differentiative cells (PC-12 cells). Hydroxyapatite-like precipitation was formed on the surface of the hardened cement and the pH level changed from pH10 to pH9, then stabilized in simulate body fluid. The cement had no cytotxic effects on these cells, and particulary induced process elongation of PC-12 cells. Our results suggest that the newly developed bioactive glass cement have capability of the application in dental procedures as bioactive cement.

  18. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  19. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up.

  20. Respiratory conditions in Malaysian asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Lim, H H; Rampal, K G; Joginder, S; Bakar, C M Abu; Chan, K H; Vivek, T N

    2002-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and type of respiratory conditions including asbestos-related diseases among Malaysian asbestos cement workers. The study population consisted of 1164 workers who had undergone medical surveillance from 1995 to 1997, including full history, physical examination, chest radiography and spirometry. More than half the male workers were smokers or ex-smokers, with smokers having more respiratory symptoms and signs, and reduced FEV1 compared with non smokers. The five most common respiratory conditions diagnosed were bronchial asthma, chronic bronchitis, pulmonary tuberculosis, upper respiratory tract infections and allergic rhinitis. On follow-up, there were also two cases of asbestosis and one case of bronchial carcinoma. The asbestosis cases were probably related to heavy occupational exposure to asbestos fibres in the past, before governmental regulations were gazetted in 1986. Further follow-up is essential for continued monitoring of the health status of asbestos workers. PMID:12440274

  1. Physico-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of synthesized cement based on plasma- and wet technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Natalya; Skripnikova, Nelli

    2016-01-01

    In this work we studied the influence of plasma-chemical technology of cement clinker synthesis under conditions of high-concentrated heat streams on the properties of cement on fixing such factors as raw-material type (chemical and mineralogical composition), fraction composition, homogenization and module characters of the raw-material mixture. In this connection the sludge of the cement plant in town Angarsk, based on which the cement clinker synthesis using the wet- and plasma-chemical technologies was performed, was used in the studies. The results of chemical X-ray-phase analysis, petrography of cement clinkers, differential scanning colorimetry of hardened cement paste are represented in this work. The analysis of building-technical properties of inorganic viscous substances was performed. It was found that in using the identical raw-material mixture the cement produced with temperature higher by 1650 °C than the traditional one may indicate the higher activity. The hardened cement paste compressive strength at the age of 28 days was higher than the strength of the reference samples by 40.8-41.4 %.

  2. Acrylic bone cements: the role of nanotechnology in improving osteointegration and tunable mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Lissarrague, María H; Fascio, Mirta L; Goyanes, Silvia; D'Accorso, Norma B

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology is an extremely powerful emerging technology, which is expected to have a substantial impact on biomedical technology, especially in tissue engineering and drug delivery. The use of nanocompounds and nanoparticles in the synthesis of improved bone cements to be applied in vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty and arthroplasty, is of great interest due to the increasing incidence of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. This review reports new advances in the development of acrylic bone cements, using different radio-opalescent nanomaterials taking into consideration their influence on the mechanical behavior and biocompatibility of the resulting acrylic bone cement. Furthermore, other non-radiopaque nanoparticles capable of mechanically reinforcing the bone cement as well as induce osteointegration, are also reviewed. Additionally, nanoparticles used to improve the controlled release of antibiotics contained in acrylic bone cements are briefly described. PMID:26000369

  3. Effect of sepiolite on the flocculation of suspensions of fibre-reinforced cement

    SciTech Connect

    Jarabo, Rocio; Fuente, Elena; Moral, Ana; Blanco, Angeles; Negro, Carlos

    2010-10-15

    Sepiolite is used to increase thixotropy of cement slurries for easier processing, to prevent sagging and to provide a better final quality in the manufacture of fibre-reinforced cement products. However, the effect of sepiolite on flocculation and its interactions with the components of fibre cement are yet unknown. The aim of this research is to study the effects of sepiolite on the flocculation of different fibre-reinforced cement slurries induced by anionic polyacrylamides (A-PAMs). Flocculation and floc properties were studied by monitoring the chord size distribution in real time employing a focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) probe. The results show that sepiolite increases floc size and floc stability in fibre-cement suspensions. Sepiolite competes with fibres and clay for A-PAMs adsorption and its interaction with A-PAM improves flocculation of mineral particles.

  4. Studies with narrow cement thickness lead to improved CBL in concentric casings

    SciTech Connect

    Jutten, J.J. , Dallas, TX ); Corrigall, E. , Dallas, TX )

    1989-11-01

    The authors show that formation characteristics affect the cement bond log (CBL) signal in most wells, prove that high-amplitude CBL's obtained in concentric casing-string configurations are often an artifact resulting paradoxically from the excellent quality of the cement job, and propose procedures for running CBL's in concentric casings to eliminate this artifact. Experiments performed to study the influence of the cement/formation or cement/external-casing interface show that, in all cases, these interfaces induce perturbations on the received waveform. The strength of these perturbations depends mainly on the impedance contrast at the interface. Field logs confirm the laboratory results and clearly show that high CBL amplitudes in well cemented concentric casings are an artifact that could easily be eliminated by appropriate setting of the measurement windows.

  5. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Weiwei; Sun, Tao; Li, Xinping; Sun, Mian; Lu, Yani

    2016-08-01

    Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm-1 after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  6. Inducible displacements of the cup and the femoral head during active range of motion: dynamic RSA studies of cemented total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Digas, Georgios; Johansson, Per-Erik; Kärrholm, Johan

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated changes in position of the femoral head relative to the cup and of the cup relative to the pelvis in total hip replacement patients during hip motion 2 years postoperatively. Two patient groups with nine patients in each group were studied. Hip motions, translations of the femoral head center, and cup displacements were recorded with dynamic radiostereometric examination (RSA, 2 exposures/s) during abduction in Group 1 and with use of static RSA exposures at increasing flexion of the hip in Group 2. Conventional radiographic examinations were used to evaluate any radiolucent lines around the cups at 2 years. During active abduction the femoral head center moved medially (median 0.04 mm) and the cup tilted anteriorly (median 0.09 mm). Increments in radiolucent lines at 2 years correlated to medial femoral head penetration, posterior tilt, and retroversion of the cup at 20° of abduction. The extension of radiolucent lines at 2 years showed a positive correlation with proximal inducible displacement of the cup and posterior translation of the femoral head center at maximum hip flexion. Our observations may be of value in understanding the pathogenesis of the loosening process and may be used to facilitate the development of prosthetic designs that optimize hip kinematics.

  7. Application of antifungal CFB to increase the durability of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Myong; Park, Sung-Jin; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-07-01

    Antifungal cement mortar or microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation on cement surface has been investigated as functional concrete research. However, these research concepts have never been fused with each other. In this study, we introduced the antifungal calciteforming bacteria (CFB) Bacillus aryabhattai KNUC205, isolated from an urban tunnel (Daegu, South Korea). The major fungal deteriogens in urban tunnel, Cladosporium sphaerospermum KNUC253, was used as a sensitive fungal strain. B. aryabhattai KNUC205 showed CaCO3 precipitation on B4 medium. Cracked cement mortar pastes were made and neutralized by modified methods. Subsequently, the mixture of B. aryabhattai KNUC205, conidiospore of C. sphaerospermum KNUC253, and B4 agar was applied to cement cracks and incubated at 18 degrees C for 16 days. B. aryabhattai KNUC205 showed fungal growth inhibition against C. sphaerospermum. Furthermore, B. aryabhattai KNUC205 showed crack remediation ability and water permeability reduction of cement mortar pastes. Taken together, these results suggest that the CaCO3 precipitation and antifungal properties of B. aryabhattai KNUC205 could be used as an effective sealing or coating material that can also prevent deteriorative fungal growth. This study is the first application and evaluation research that incorporates calcite formation with antifungal capabilities of microorganisms for an environment-friendly and more effective protection of cement materials. In this research, the conception of microbial construction materials was expanded.

  8. Acoustic probing of elastic behavior and damage in weakly cemented granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, V.; Jia, X.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the elastic behavior and damage of weakly cemented granular media under external load with ultrasound. The cementation controlled experiments are performed by freezing the capillary liquid at the bead contact in a dense glass or polymeric [poly(methyl methacrylate)] bead pack wet by tetradecane of volume fraction ϕ = 0.1%-4%. When the pendular rings are solidified, an abrupt increase by a factor of 2 in the compressional wave velocity is observed. We interpret the data in terms of effective medium models in which the contact stiffnesses are derived by either a bonded contact model [P. J. Digby, J. Appl. Mech. 48, 803 (1981), 10.1115/1.3157738] or a cemented contact model [J. Dvorkin, A. Nur, and H. Yin, Mech. Mater. 18, 351 (1994), 10.1016/0167-6636(94)90044-2]. The former fails to quantitatively account for the results with a soft cement relative to the grain, whereas the latter considering the mechanical properties of the cement does apply. Moreover, we monitor the irreversible behavior of the cemented granular packs under moderate uniaxial loading (<1.3 MPa) with the correlation method of ultrasound scattering. The damage of the cemented materials is accompanied by a compressional wave velocity decrease up to 60%, likely due to the fractures induced at the grain-cement interfaces.

  9. Acoustic probing of elastic behavior and damage in weakly cemented granular media.

    PubMed

    Langlois, V; Jia, X

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the elastic behavior and damage of weakly cemented granular media under external load with ultrasound. The cementation controlled experiments are performed by freezing the capillary liquid at the bead contact in a dense glass or polymeric [poly(methyl methacrylate)] bead pack wet by tetradecane of volume fraction ϕ = 0.1%-4%. When the pendular rings are solidified, an abrupt increase by a factor of 2 in the compressional wave velocity is observed. We interpret the data in terms of effective medium models in which the contact stiffnesses are derived by either a bonded contact model [P. J. Digby, J. Appl. Mech. 48, 803 (1981)] or a cemented contact model [J. Dvorkin, A. Nur, and H. Yin, Mech. Mater. 18, 351 (1994)]. The former fails to quantitatively account for the results with a soft cement relative to the grain, whereas the latter considering the mechanical properties of the cement does apply. Moreover, we monitor the irreversible behavior of the cemented granular packs under moderate uniaxial loading (1.3 MPa) with the correlation method of ultrasound scattering. The damage of the cemented materials is accompanied by a compressional wave velocity decrease up to 60%, likely due to the fractures induced at the grain-cement interfaces. PMID:25353594

  10. Liquid-solid phase transition alloy as reversible and rapid molding bone cement.

    PubMed

    Yi, Liting; Jin, Chao; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Acrylic bone cement has been an essential non-metallic implant used as fixing agent in the cemented total joint arthroplasty (THA). However, the currently available materials based mainly on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) still encounter certain limitations, such as time-consuming polymerization, thermal and chemical necrosis and troublesome revision procedure. Here from an alternative way, we proposed for the first time to adopt the injectable alloy cement to address such tough issues through introducing its unique liquid-solid phase transition mechanism. A typical cement along this way is thus made of an alloy Bi/In/Sn/Zn with a specifically designed low melting point 57.5 °C, which enables its rapid molding into various desired shapes with high plasticity and ultimate metallic behaviors. The fundamental characteristics including the mechanical strength, biocompatibility and phase transition-induced thermal effects have been clarified to demonstrate the importance of such alloy as unconventional cement with favorable merits. In addition, we also disclosed its advantage as an excellent contrast agent for radiation imaging on the bone interior structure which is highly beneficial for guiding the surgery and monitoring the therapeutic effects. Particularly, the proposed alloy cement with reversible phase transition feature significantly simplifies the revision of the cement and prosthesis. This study opens the way for employing the injectable alloy materials as reversible bone cement to fulfill diverse clinical needs in the coming time. PMID:25239039

  11. A 3-D view of field-scale fault-zone cementation from geologically ground-truthed electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, H.; Spinelli, G. A.; Mozley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Fault-zones are an important control on fluid flow, affecting groundwater supply, hydrocarbon/contaminant migration, and waste/carbon storage. However, current models of fault seal are inadequate, primarily focusing on juxtaposition and entrainment effects, despite the recognition that fault-zone cementation is common and can dramatically reduce permeability. We map the 3D cementation patterns of the variably cemented Loma Blanca fault from the land surface to ~40 m depth, using electrical resistivity and induced polarization (IP). The carbonate-cemented fault zone is a region of anomalously low normalized chargeability, relative to the surrounding host material. Zones of low-normalized chargeability immediately under the exposed cement provide the first ground-truth that a cemented fault yields an observable IP anomaly. Low-normalized chargeability extends down from the surface exposure, surrounded by zones of high-normalized chargeability, at an orientation consistent with normal faults in the region; this likely indicates cementation of the fault zone at depth, which could be confirmed by drilling and coring. Our observations are consistent with: 1) the expectation that carbonate cement in a sandstone should lower normalized chargeability by reducing pore-surface area and bridging gaps in the pore space, and 2) laboratory experiments confirming that calcite precipitation within a column of glass beads decreases polarization magnitude. The ability to characterize spatial variations in the degree of fault-zone cementation with resistivity and IP has exciting implications for improving predictive models of the hydrogeologic impacts of cementation within faults.

  12. Processing of Sugarcane Bagasse ash and Reactivity of Ash-blended Cement Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA), a sugar-mill waste, has the potential of a partial cement replacement material if processed and obtained under controlled conditions. This paper discusses the reactivity of SCBA obtained by control burning of sugarcane bagasse procured from Punjab province of India. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to ascertain the amorphousness and morphology of the minerals ash particles. Destructive and non-destructive tests were conducted on SCBA-blended mortar specimens. Ash-blended cement paste specimens were analyzed by XRD, thermal analysis, and SEM methods to evaluate the hydration reaction of SCBA with cement. Results showed that the SCBA processed at 600°C for 5 hours was reactive as ash-blended mortar specimens with up to 15% substitution of cement gave better strength than control specimens.

  13. A MODIFIED PMMA CEMENT (SUB-CEMENT) FOR ACCELERATED FATIGUE TESTING OF CEMENTED IMPLANT CONSTRUCTS USING CADAVERIC BONE

    PubMed Central

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A.; Mann, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25 ± 19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models. PMID:18774136

  14. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    PubMed

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models.

  15. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie; Wang, Jiecheng; Liu, Xiaochen; Ma, Jian; Liu, Changsheng; Fang, Jing; Wei, Shicheng

    2011-06-01

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H 3PO 4) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  16. Influence of calcium sulfoaluminate cement on the pullout performance of reinforcing fibers: An evaluation of the micro-mechanical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Robert Benjamin

    The objective of this research was to determine the influence of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement on reinforcing fibers by evaluating the fiber pullout behavior, and bonding characteristics, of a single fiber embedded in a cementitious paste matrix. Four types of fibers commonly used in industry were evaluated: 1) Polyvinyl alcohol; 2) Polypropylene; 3) Coated Steel; and 4) Plain Steel. Upward trends in energy costs and potential greenhouse gas regulations favor an increased use of construction materials that require lower energy and lower CO2 emissions to fabricate, such as CSA cement, as opposed to the production of ordinary portland cement (OPC), which is more energy intensive and produces more CO2 emissions. However, widespread use of CSA cement requires a more in-depth understanding of the engineering characteristics that govern its performance, including interaction with reinforcing fibers. The overarching objective of this research was to provide the engineering base needed for the utilization of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement-based construction materials. The aims of the research were (1) to develop an ettringite-rich calcium sulfoaluminate cement, and (2) evaluate the pullout characteristics of reinforcing fibers embedded in a CSA-cement matrix. Key elements of the strategy included (1) Compare the performance of a laboratory-fabricated CSA cement to a commercial CSA cement and OPC, (2) Evaluate the peak load, and toughness of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement and OPC, (3) Evaluate the debonding-energy density and multiple-cracking behavior of fibers in CSA cement and OPC, and (4) Evaluate the shear bond strength of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement and OPC. Based on the findings of this PhD dissertation, calcium sulfoaluminate cement has a significant influence on the characteristics and behavior of embedded reinforcing fibers. An important factor contributing to the bond strength between fiber and matrix was the ability to transfer interfacial

  17. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  18. Hydration kinetics, ion-release and antimicrobial properties of white Portland cement blended with zirconium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu; Coleman, Nichola J

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of 20 wt% zirconium oxide nanoparticles on the early hydration kinetics of white Portland cement by isothermal conduction calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy. The findings confirm that the nano-ZrO2 particles do not directly participate in the chemical reactions during cement hydration; although, they do divert the normal hydration processes and accelerate the initial setting reactions. The rate of heat evolution and the extent of the exotherm associated with these reactions are reduced in the presence of nano-ZrO2. The incorporation of nano-ZrO2 into the cement also decreases the solubility of the silicate phases but does not compromise its capacity to release hydroxide ions. There was no observed difference in the antimicrobial activity of the nano-ZrO2-blended and unblended cement pastes against S. aureus and E. coli; however, a modest reduction in this property was noted against P. aeruginosa for the blended cement.

  19. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further

  20. Development of an injectable bioactive bone filler cement with hydrogen orthophosphate incorporated calcium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Sony, Sandhya; Suresh Babu, S; Nishad, K V; Varma, Harikrishna; Komath, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Calcium sulfate cement (CSC) has emerged as a potential bone filler material mainly because of the possibility of incorporating therapeutic agents. Delivery of the cement through a needle or cannula will make it more useful in clinical applications. However, it was not possible to make CSC injectable because of the inherent lack of viscosity. The present work demonstrates the design development of a viscous and fully-injectable CSC by incorporating hydrogen orthophosphate ions, which does not hamper the biocompatibility of the material. The effect of addition of hydrogen orthophosphate on the rheological properties of the CSC paste was studied using a custom made capillary rheometer. The physicochemical changes associated with cement setting process were examined using X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the thermal changes were measured through isothermal differential scanning calorimetry. Micromorphological features of different compositions were observed in environmental scanning electron microscopy and the presence of phosphate ions was identified with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. The results indicated that HPO4 (2-) ions have profound effects on the rheological properties and setting of the CSC paste. Significant finding is that the HPO4 (2-) ions are getting substituted in the calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals during setting. The variations of setting time and compressive strength of the cement with the additive concentration were investigated. An optimum concentration of 2.5 % w/w gave a fully-injectable cement with clinically relevant setting time (below 20 min) and compressive strength (12 MPa). It was possible to inject the optimised cement paste from a syringe through an 18-gauge needle with thumb pressure. This cement will be useful both as bone filler and as a local drug delivery medium and it allows minimally invasive bone defect management.

  1. Development of an injectable bioactive bone filler cement with hydrogen orthophosphate incorporated calcium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Sony, Sandhya; Suresh Babu, S; Nishad, K V; Varma, Harikrishna; Komath, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Calcium sulfate cement (CSC) has emerged as a potential bone filler material mainly because of the possibility of incorporating therapeutic agents. Delivery of the cement through a needle or cannula will make it more useful in clinical applications. However, it was not possible to make CSC injectable because of the inherent lack of viscosity. The present work demonstrates the design development of a viscous and fully-injectable CSC by incorporating hydrogen orthophosphate ions, which does not hamper the biocompatibility of the material. The effect of addition of hydrogen orthophosphate on the rheological properties of the CSC paste was studied using a custom made capillary rheometer. The physicochemical changes associated with cement setting process were examined using X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the thermal changes were measured through isothermal differential scanning calorimetry. Micromorphological features of different compositions were observed in environmental scanning electron microscopy and the presence of phosphate ions was identified with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. The results indicated that HPO4 (2-) ions have profound effects on the rheological properties and setting of the CSC paste. Significant finding is that the HPO4 (2-) ions are getting substituted in the calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals during setting. The variations of setting time and compressive strength of the cement with the additive concentration were investigated. An optimum concentration of 2.5 % w/w gave a fully-injectable cement with clinically relevant setting time (below 20 min) and compressive strength (12 MPa). It was possible to inject the optimised cement paste from a syringe through an 18-gauge needle with thumb pressure. This cement will be useful both as bone filler and as a local drug delivery medium and it allows minimally invasive bone defect management

  2. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  3. Adsorption of superplasticizer admixtures on alkali-activated slag pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, M. Houst, Y.F.; Bowen, P.; Puertas, F.

    2009-08-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) binders are obtained by a manufacturing process less energy-intensive than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and involves lower greenhouse gasses emission. These alkaline cements allow the production of high mechanical strength and durable concretes. In the present work, the adsorption of different superplasticizer admixtures (naphthalene-based, melamine-based and a vinyl copolymer) on the slag particles in AAS pastes using alkaline solutions with different pH values have been studied in detail. The effect of the superplasticizers on the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the AAS and OPC pastes have been also evaluated. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the adsorption of the superplasticizers on AAS pastes is independent of the pH of the alkaline solutions used and lower than on OPC pastes. However, the effect of the admixtures on the rheological parameters depends directly on the type and dosage of the superplasticizer as well as of the binder used and, in the case of the AAS, on the pH of the alkaline activator solution. In 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes the dosages of the superplasticizers required to attain similar reduction in the yield stress are ten-fold lower than for Portland cement. In this case the superplasticizers studied show a fluidizing effect considerably higher in 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes than in OPC pastes. In 13.6-pH NaOH-AAS pastes, the only admixture observed to affect the rheological parameters is the naphthalene-based admixture due to its higher chemical stability in such extremely alkaline media.

  4. Considerations for proper selection of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Simon, James F; Darnell, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Selecting the proper cement for sufficient bond strength has become progressively complicated as the number of different materials for indirect restorations has increased. The success of any restoration is highly dependent on the proper cement being chosen and used. The function of the cement is not only to seal the restoration on the tooth but also, in some cases, to support the retention of the restoration. This ability to strengthen retention varies by the cement chosen by the clinician; therefore, careful consideration must precede cement selection.

  5. Injectability, microstructure and release properties of sodium fusidate-loaded apatitic cement as a local drug-delivery system.

    PubMed

    Noukrati, Hassan; Cazalbou, Sophie; Demnati, Imane; Rey, Christian; Barroug, Allal; Combes, Christèle

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of an antibiotic, sodium fusidate (SF), into the liquid phase of calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate (CaCO3-CaP) bone cement was evaluated, considering the effect of the liquid to powder ratio (L/P) on the composition and microstructure of the set cement and the injectability of the paste. In all cases, we obtained set cements composed mainly of biomimetic carbonated apatite analogous to bone mineral. With this study, we evi-denced a synergistic effect of the L/P ratio and SF presence on the injectability (i.e., the filter-pressing pheno-menon was suppressed) and the setting time of the SF-loaded cement paste compared to reference cement (without SF). In addition, the in vitro study of SF release, according to the European Pharmacopoeia recommendations, showed that, regardless of the L/P ratio, the cement allowed a sustained release of the antibiotic over 1month in sodium chloride isotonic solution at 37°C and pH7.4; this release is discussed considering the microstructure characteristics of SF-loaded cements (i.e., porosity, pore-size distribution) before and after the release test. Finally, modelling antibiotic release kinetics with several models indicated that the SF release was controlled by a diffusion mechanism. PMID:26652362

  6. Acetabular liner fixation by cement.

    PubMed

    Jiranek, William A

    2003-12-01

    Many situations in revision THA require the exchange of a PE liner in the setting of a well-fixed cementless acetabular shell. Unfortunately, a replacement liner is not always available, the locking mechanism of the metal shell may be damaged or incompatible with the desired liner, or the shell is malpositioned. Revision of a well-fixed cementless acetabular shell has been associated with considerable morbidity. This raises several questions: can a new PE liner be fixed in the existing shell using bone cement, and if so, which techniques can improve the end result, and in which patients should they be used? Biomechanical testing of cemented PE liners has shown initial fixation strengths that exceed conventional locking mechanisms. It is not known during what period this initial fixation will fail, but clinical reports with followup of as many as 6 years have shown survival in approximately 90% of cases. These studies have shown the importance of proper patient selection, accurate sizing of the PE liner, careful preparation of the substrate of the liner and the shell, and good cement technique. The potential advantages of this technique are less surgical morbidity, more rapid surgery and patient recovery, the ability to incorporate antibiotics in the cement, and more liner options.

  7. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Eilers, Louis H.

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  8. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  9. Solar induced long- and short-term variations of the cosmic ray intensity in the past, and predictions and opportunities for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, K. G.; McDonald, F. B.; Beer, J.

    2009-12-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclide data from the past 10,000 years, and the instrumental cosmic ray data since 1936 provide detailed information on the possible consequences of the present long and deep solar minimum. Furthermore, the cosmic ray transport equation has been used to estimate the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) throughout the past 10,000 years. This paper presents a series of figures that document the behavior of both the cosmic radiation and the IMF at Earth in the past. In particular, the 11-year cycles in both quantities for the past 600 years are displayed; and estimates given of the cosmic ray spectrum at Earth for situations that history tells us may occur in the near future. Over the longer term, a minimum of the Hallstatt cycle (2200 yr periodicity) of solar activity occurred ~500 years ago and the Sun is now on a steadily rising plane of activity. The historic record shows that the cosmic ray intensity has decreased extremely rapidly after earlier prolonged deep minima and this suggests rapid and large changes in the heliospheric conditions that we may see replicated. The paper will also display data from the deep, isolated solar minimum of 1956 that exhibited unusual low energy cosmic ray fluxes, and a highly anomalous cosmic ray gradient in the inner heliosphere. Paleo-cosmic ray evidence will also be displayed of an episode of intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events in the interval of reduced solar activity, 1892-1900, that may possibly be repeated. If the present long, deep solar minimum is a precursor to a “Grand Minimum” such as the Dalton minimum, it will provide a much improved insight into the spectrum of the cosmic radiation in interstellar space, and to the cosmic ray modulation process in the heliosphere. With this in mind, the paper suggests key measurements, and speculates on experimental conditions that may be markedly different from those encountered in the instrumental era.

  10. CBL evaluation of foam-cemented and synthetic-cemented casings

    SciTech Connect

    Burckdorfer, R.; Jacobs, W.R.; Masson, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    Cement Bond Log (CBL) studies on foam-cemented and synthetic-cemented wells were initiated to determine the feasibility of, as well as to develop technologies for, evaluating these novel cementing services. Early CBL's on these cementing systems showed little effect on the log amplitude curve. Hence, CBL evaluations were difficult to obtain and interpret. A special sonde with a 1.3-ft (0.4-m) transmitter-to-receiver spacing was developed for this study. Sonic signal amplitudes were determined using cemented short-casing test sections. Sonic attenuation rates were correlated to compressive strengths for a range of cement densities. Experimental details of the cementing operation and logging studies are discussed. Data relating attenuation rates to compressive strengths and cement densities are also presented. Field results are discussed.

  11. Geochemistry of Wellbore Integrity in CO2 Sequestration: Portland Cement-Steel-Brine-CO2 Interactions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Effective geologic sequestration of CO2 requires long-term storage with very low leak rates. Numerous studies have identified wells as one of the key risk factors for CO2 leakage including purpose-built injection and monitoring wells in addition to older wells in and above the storage reservoir. All wells have the potential to leak due to faulty construction or other defects. However, geochemical reactions induced by CO2 could result in damage to Portland cement and steel that are used in the well to isolate reservoir fluids from underground drinking water sources and the surface. This concern is based on the thermodynamic incompatibility of CO2-saturated aqueous fluids with Portland cement and steel, which leads to relatively rapidly reactions that form, principally, calcium carbonate and iron carbonate. Despite this thermodynamic fate, wellbore materials perform and maintain zonal isolation in field and experimental observations. This is understood as a consequence of coupled behavior between flow of reactants (CO2-water) and the rate of dissolution and precipitation of cement or corrosion of steel. In the restricted flow environments found in wellbore systems, cements are carbonated but do not suffer significant deterioration of hydrologic or mechanical properties. In fact, cement carbonation often results in reduced permeability and enhanced mechanical strength. While steel is susceptible to corrosion, wellbore environments allow development of protective iron carbonate scale. In addition, the presence of Portland cement, even carbonated cement, provides protection against significant rates of corrosion. The impact of geochemical reactions in the wellbore environment cannot be separated from coupled flow, thermal and mechanical processes. CO2-induced chemical reactions migrating upward from a storage reservoir will not result in the creation of defects or the wholesale dissolution of cement or steel. Defects must exist that allow CO2×brine to flow and to come

  12. [Utilizing the wastewater treatment plant sludge for the production of eco-cement].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Ming; Zhou, Shao-Qi; Zhou, De-Jun; Wu, Yan-Yu

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect on cement property by using of municipal sewage as additive in the process of clinker burning. Based on the standard sample P. 042. 5 from cement plant, the properties of eco-cement samples adding municipal sewage to unit raw material by 0%, 0.50%, 1.00%, 1.50%, 2.00%, 2.50% respectively and the standard sample from the cement plant were compared. According to the analysis of X-ray diffraction, microstructure, the particles size determination material change, the setting time, specific surface area, leaching toxicity and strength of cement mortar of the cement, respectively, it showed that the strength of the productions were similar to the P. 042.5 standard sample. The metal ion concentrations of Al, Fe, Ba, Mn and Ti in clinkers and raw material decreased, the initial and setting time increased, as well as the strength of the paste within the curing time of 3 days decreased with the increase of municipal sewage ratio. However, after the curing of 7 days, the strength was similar to non-sludge-mortar or even higher.

  13. An ultrasonic through-transmission technique for monitoring the setting of injectable calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Rajzer, Izabella; Piekarczyk, Wojciech; Castaño, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    An ultrasound through-transmission method to monitor the setting process of injectable calcium phosphate bone cements in body fluids is presented. This method can be used to determine the acoustic properties of the bone cement as it sets, which are linked to its material properties and provide some information about changes occurring within the cement. The development of the methodology of ultrasonic testing and execution of velocity measurements of the longitudinal and transverse waves using the through-transmission method made it possible to determine the material constants of samples during the setting and hardening process of an injectable cement paste in physiological fluids (i.e. the Young's modulus (E), the Poisson ratio (ν) and the shear modulus (G)), and to determine the degree of anisotropy of wave velocity in the samples. A strong advantage of the proposed method is that it is non-destructive, and the same sample can be used to monitor the whole process of the cement setting. The testing was performed on premixed and injectable calcium phosphate (CPC)/chitosan blend, where glycerol was used as a liquid phase. Comparisons between ultrasonic velocity and empirical tests such as compressive strength, porosity measurement, FTIR, SEM and XRD analysis at different days of immersion in Ringer's solutions showed that the ultrasonic velocity can be very useful to provide in situ information about changes occurring within the cement.

  14. An ultrasonic through-transmission technique for monitoring the setting of injectable calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Rajzer, Izabella; Piekarczyk, Wojciech; Castaño, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    An ultrasound through-transmission method to monitor the setting process of injectable calcium phosphate bone cements in body fluids is presented. This method can be used to determine the acoustic properties of the bone cement as it sets, which are linked to its material properties and provide some information about changes occurring within the cement. The development of the methodology of ultrasonic testing and execution of velocity measurements of the longitudinal and transverse waves using the through-transmission method made it possible to determine the material constants of samples during the setting and hardening process of an injectable cement paste in physiological fluids (i.e. the Young's modulus (E), the Poisson ratio (ν) and the shear modulus (G)), and to determine the degree of anisotropy of wave velocity in the samples. A strong advantage of the proposed method is that it is non-destructive, and the same sample can be used to monitor the whole process of the cement setting. The testing was performed on premixed and injectable calcium phosphate (CPC)/chitosan blend, where glycerol was used as a liquid phase. Comparisons between ultrasonic velocity and empirical tests such as compressive strength, porosity measurement, FTIR, SEM and XRD analysis at different days of immersion in Ringer's solutions showed that the ultrasonic velocity can be very useful to provide in situ information about changes occurring within the cement. PMID:27287094

  15. Polymeric additives to enhance the functional properties of calcium phosphate cements

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Roman A; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of materials used in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are based on calcium phosphates due to their similarity with the mineral phase of natural bone. Among them, calcium phosphate cements, which are composed of a powder and a liquid that are mixed to obtain a moldable paste, are widely used. These calcium phosphate cement pastes can be injected using minimally invasive surgery and adapt to the shape of the defect, resulting in an entangled network of calcium phosphate crystals. Adding an organic phase to the calcium phosphate cement formulation is a very powerful strategy to enhance some of the properties of these materials. Adding some water-soluble biocompatible polymers in the calcium phosphate cement liquid or powder phase improves physicochemical and mechanical properties, such as injectability, cohesion, and toughness. Moreover, adding specific polymers can enhance the biological response and the resorption rate of the material. The goal of this study is to overview the most relevant advances in this field, focusing on the different types of polymers that have been used to enhance specific calcium phosphate cement properties. PMID:22511991

  16. Release of cetyl pyridinium chloride from fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Andrew; Coleman, Nichola J.; Tüzüner, Tamer; Bagis, Bora; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Nicholson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether the antimicrobial nature of a fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement can be enhanced by the addition of 5% cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC). Materials and methods The temporary cement, Cavex Temporary was employed, and additions of CPC were made to either the base or the catalyst paste prior to mixing the cement. Release of CPC from set cement specimens was followed using reverse-phase HPLC for a period of up to 2 weeks following specimen preparation. Potential interactions between Cavex and CPC were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and antimicrobial effects were determined using zone of inhibition measurements after 24 h with disc-shaped specimens in cultured Streptococcus mutans. Results FTIR showed no interaction between CPC and the components of the cement. CPC release was found to follow a diffusion mechanism for the first 6 h or so, and to equilibrate after approximately 2 weeks, with no significant differences between release profiles when the additive was incorporated into the base or the catalyst paste. Diffusion was rapid, and had a diffusion coefficient of approximately 1 × 10−9 m2 s−1 in both cases. Total release was in the range 10–12% of the CPC loading. Zones of inhibition around discs containing CPC were significantly larger than those around the control discs of CPC-free cement. Conclusions The antimicrobial character of this temporary cement can be enhanced by the addition of CPC. Such enhancement is of potential clinical value, though further in vivo work is needed to confirm this. PMID:27335898

  17. Modern marine dolomite cement in a north Jamaican fringing reef

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.T.; Land, L.S.; Miser, D.E.

    1987-06-01

    Minor quantities of ordered dolomite (..delta../sup 18/O = +2.0 per thousand PDB; composition = Ca/sub 1.22/Mg/sub 0.78/ (CO/sub 3/)/sub 2/) have formed from near-normal seawater in a subtidal hardground as part of a modern fringing coral reef. Crystals 5 ..mu..m in diameter precipitated within the past 1.8 ka in the form of syntaxial fringes on Mg-calcite marine cements and skeletal allochems. The crystals have a fine modulated microstructure and c reflections, both apparently formed during crystal growth

  18. Properties of Injectable Apatite-Forming Premixed Cements.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yashushi; Chow, Laurence C; Takagi, Shozo; Tagami, Junji

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies reported premixed calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) that were stable in the package and form hydroxyapatite (HA) as the product after exposure to an aqueous environment. These cements had setting times of greater than 60 min, which are too long to be useful for some clinical applications. The present study investigated properties of fast-setting HA-forming premixed CPCs that initially consisted of two separate premixed pastes: (1) finely ground (1.0 μm in median size) dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) mixed with an aqueous NaH(2)PO(4) solution, 1.5 mol/L or 3.0 mol/L in concentration, and (2) tetracalcium phosphate consisting of combinations of particles of two different size distributions, 5 μm (TTCP5) and 17 μm (TTCP17) in median size, mixed with glycerin. Equal volume of Pastes 1 and 2 were injected with the use of atwo-barrel syringe fitted with a static mixer into sample molds. The molar Ca/P ratio of combined paste was approximately 1.5. Cements were characterized in terms of setting time (Gilmore needle), diametral tensile strength (DTS), and phase composition (powder x-ray diffraction, XRD). Setting times were found to range from (4.3 ± 0.6 to 68 ± 3) min (mean ± sd; n = 3), and 1-d and 7-d DTS values were from (0.89 ± 0.08 to 2.44 ± 0.16) MPa (mean ± sd; n = 5). Both the NaH(2)PO(4) concentration and TTCP particle size distribution had significant (p < 0.01) effects on setting time and DTS. Powder XRD analysis showed that low crystallinity HA and unreacted DCPA were present in the 1-day specimens, and the extent of HA formation increased with increasing amount of TTCP5 in the TTCP paste. CONCLUSION: Injectable HA-forming premixed CPCs with setting times from 4 to 70 min can be prepared by using DCPA and TTCP as the ingredients. Compared to the conventional powder liquid cements, these premixed CPCs have the advantages of being easy to use and having a range of hardening times. PMID:21479133

  19. Microwave nondestructive detection of chloride in cement based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benally, Aaron D.; Bois, Karl J.; Zoughi, Reza; Nowak, Paul S.

    1999-12-02

    Preliminary results pertaining to the near-field microwave nondestructive detection and evaluation of chloride in cement paste and mortar specimens are presented. The technique used for this purpose utilizes an open-ended rectangular waveguide at the aperture of which the reflection properties of the specimens are measured. It is shown that the magnitude of reflection coefficient is a useful parameter for detecting chloride in these specimens. Furthermore, the difference in the amount of chloride present in these various specimens, at the time of mixing, can also be determined. Reflection property measurements were conducted in S-band (2.6 GHz-3.95 GHz) and X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) for two sets of four mortar specimens with 0.50 and 0.60 water-to-cement ratio and varying salt (NaCl) contents added to the mixing water used in producing these specimens. It is shown that the reflection properties of these materials vary considerably as a function of their chloride content. Also, by monitoring the daily variation in the reflection coefficient of each specimen during the curing period, the effect of chloride on curing can be nondestructively ascertained. Finally, it is shown that the detection and evaluation of chloride content in cement based materials can be performed using a simple comparative process with respect to a non-contaminated specimen.

  20. Cement bond log evaluation of foam- and synthetic-cemented casings

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckdorfer, R.A.; Jacobs, W.R.; Masson, J.P.

    1984-11-01

    Cement bond log (CBL /SUP TM/ ) studies on foam- and synthetic-cemented wells were initiated to determine the feasibility of, as well as to develop technologies for, evaluating these novel cementing services. Early CBL's on these cementing systems showed little effect on the log amplitude curve. Hence, CBL evaluations were difficult to obtain and interpret. A special sonde with a 1.3-ft (0.4-m) transmitter-toreceiver spacing was developed for this study. Sonic signal amplitudes were determined by using cemented shortcasing test sections. Sonic attenuation rates were correlated to compressive strengths for a range of cement densities. Experimental details of the cementing operation and logging studies are discussed. Data relating attenuation rates to compressive strengths and cement densities also are presented. Field results are discussed.

  1. How to obtain good primary cement jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Kundert, D.P. ); Vacca, H.L. ); Smink, D.E

    1990-04-01

    A review of 23 primary cementing jobs performed over an 11-year period in four states has shown improved success with attention having been directed to low- cost means of improving displacement of drilling muds by cement slurries. The most important factors appear to be placement of centralizers and scratchers, conditioning of the drilling mud and pipe movement (reciprocation) while conditioning mud and while placing cement. Confidence gained in the use of these methods has resulted in a job technique wherein the top cementing plug is pumped down with 10% acetic acid or other desired perforating fluid followed by 2% KCI water. This technique permits lower-cost completions. The theory and application of cement bond logging is reviewed with five example CBL-VDL logs presented and discussed. Several examples are shown under applied surface pressure conditions. An example of a CBL-VDL log for an offset well where the principles of primary cementing were not observed is shown for comparison.

  2. Sustainable cement production-present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Romer, M.; Tschudin, M.; Bolio, H.

    2011-07-15

    Cement will remain the key material to satisfy global housing and modern infrastructure needs. As a consequence, the cement industry worldwide is facing growing challenges in conserving material and energy resources, as well as reducing its CO{sub 2} emissions. According to the International Energy Agency, the main levers for cement producers are the increase in energy efficiency and the use of alternative materials, be it as fuel or raw materials. Accordingly, the use of alternative fuels has already increased significantly in recent years, but potential for further increases still exists. In cement, the reduction of the clinker factor remains a key priority: tremendous progress has already been made. Nevertheless, appropriate materials are limited in their regional availability. New materials might be able to play a role as cement constituents in the future. It remains to be seen to what extent they could substitute Portland cement clinker to a significant degree.

  3. Structure and mechanical properties of aluminosilicate geopolymer composites with Portland cement and its constituent minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Tailby, Jonathan; MacKenzie, Kenneth J.D.

    2010-05-15

    The compressive strengths and structures of composites of aluminosilicate geopolymer with the synthetic cement minerals C{sub 3}S, beta-C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and commercial OPC were investigated. All the composites showed lower strengths than the geopolymer and OPC paste alone. X-ray diffraction, {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and SEM/EDS observations indicate that hydration of the cement minerals and OPC is hindered in the presence of geopolymer, even though sufficient water was present in the mix for hydration to occur. In the absence of SEM evidence for the formation of an impervious layer around the cement mineral grains, the poor strength development is suggested to be due to the retarded development of C-S-H because of the preferential removal from the system of available Si because geopolymer formation is more rapid than the hydration of the cement minerals. This possibility is supported by experiments in which the rate of geopolymer formation is retarded by the substitution of potassium for sodium, by the reduction of the alkali content of the geopolymer paste or by the addition of borate. In all these cases the strength of the OPC-geopolymer composite was increased, particularly by the combination of the borate additive with the potassium geopolymer, producing an OPC-geopolymer composite stronger than hydrated OPC paste alone.

  4. Assessment of Pb-slag, MSWI bottom ash and boiler and fly ash for using as a fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Nabajyoti; Cornelis, Geert; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Balen, Koenraad; Van Gerven, Tom; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2008-06-15

    Three types of wastes, metallurgical slag from Pb production (SLG), the sand-sized (0.1-2 mm) fraction of MSWI bottom ash from a grate furnace (SF), and boiler and fly ash from a fluidised bed incinerator (BFA), were characterized and used to replace the fine aggregate during preparation of cement mortar. The chemical and mineralogical behaviour of these wastes along with the reactivities of the wastes with lime and the hydration behaviour of ordinary Portland cement paste with and without these wastes added were evaluated by various chemical and instrumental techniques. The compressive strengths of the cement mortars containing waste as a partial substitution of fine aggregates were also assessed. Finally, leaching studies of the wastes and waste containing cement mortars were conducted. SLG addition does not show any adverse affect during the hydration of cement, or on the compressive strengths behaviours of mortars. Formation of expansive products like ettringite, aluminium hydroxide and H2 gas due to the reaction of some constituents of BFA and SF with alkali creates some cracks in the paste as well as in the cement mortars, which lower the compressive strength of the cement mortars. However, utilization of all materials in cement-based application significantly improves the leaching behaviour of the majority of the toxic elements compared to the waste as such. PMID:18068299

  5. Assessment of Pb-slag, MSWI bottom ash and boiler and fly ash for using as a fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Nabajyoti; Cornelis, Geert; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Balen, Koenraad; Van Gerven, Tom; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2008-06-15

    Three types of wastes, metallurgical slag from Pb production (SLG), the sand-sized (0.1-2 mm) fraction of MSWI bottom ash from a grate furnace (SF), and boiler and fly ash from a fluidised bed incinerator (BFA), were characterized and used to replace the fine aggregate during preparation of cement mortar. The chemical and mineralogical behaviour of these wastes along with the reactivities of the wastes with lime and the hydration behaviour of ordinary Portland cement paste with and without these wastes added were evaluated by various chemical and instrumental techniques. The compressive strengths of the cement mortars containing waste as a partial substitution of fine aggregates were also assessed. Finally, leaching studies of the wastes and waste containing cement mortars were conducted. SLG addition does not show any adverse affect during the hydration of cement, or on the compressive strengths behaviours of mortars. Formation of expansive products like ettringite, aluminium hydroxide and H2 gas due to the reaction of some constituents of BFA and SF with alkali creates some cracks in the paste as well as in the cement mortars, which lower the compressive strength of the cement mortars. However, utilization of all materials in cement-based application significantly improves the leaching behaviour of the majority of the toxic elements compared to the waste as such.

  6. Zirconia: cementation of prosthetic restorations. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; GLORIA, F.; NAPOLI, E.; PUJIA, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim of the work Aim of the work was to execute a review of the international literature about the cementation of zirconia restorations, analyzing the properties of the cements most commonly used in clinical activities. Materials and methods It was performed, through PubMed, a bibliographic search on the international literature of the last 10 years using the following limits: studies in English, in vitro studies, randomized clinical trial, reviews, meta-analysis, guide-lines. Were excluded from the search: descriptive studies, case reports, discussion articles, opinion’s leader. Results From studies results that common surface treatments (silanization, acid etching) are ineffective on zirconia because it has an inert surface without glassy component (on which this surface treatments act primarily), instead the sandblasting at 1atm with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) results significantly effective for the resulting roughening that increase the surface energy and the wettability of the material. Furthermore it has been shown that zinc phosphate-based cements, Bis-GMA-based and glass-ionomer cements can’t guarantee a stable long-term adhesion, instead resin cements containing phosphate monomer 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown higher adhesion and stability values than the other cements. In particular, it has seen that bond strength of zirconia copings on dentin, using MDP-based cement, is about 6,9MPa; this value is comparable to that obtained with gold copings cementation. Conclusions Analyzed studies have led to the following conclusions: sandblasting with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) is the best surface treatment to improve adhesion between resin cements and zirconia; resin cements containing phosphate ester monomers 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown in the studies an higher bond strength and stability after ageing treatment; the best procedure for cementing zirconia restorations results the combination of

  7. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  8. Cryptic intertidal microbialites in beachrock, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef: implications for the origin of microcrystalline beachrock cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Gregory E.; Jell, John S.; Baker, Julian C.

    1999-07-01

    Microbialites with microcolumnar growth morphology occur on the surfaces of solution-enlarged crypts in modern beachrock on Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The microbialites consist predominantly of felted aragonite, but blocky Mg-calcite and fringes of acicular aragonite also occur. A variety of microbial bodies and filaments occur within, and on the surface of, the microbialites. Although most Heron beachrock is cemented by isopachous fringes of acicular aragonite, irregular micritic cement is common adjacent to the microbialites. The micritic cement consists predominantly of felted aragonite and contains microbial filaments and organic matter similar to those in the microbialites. Both the microbialite and the micritic cement are interpreted to be biologically induced. Although physico-chemical models, including CO 2 degassing and evaporation, are commonly held to be sufficient to promote the formation of beachrock, the similarity of Heron cryptic beachrock microbialite with micritic beachrock cements supports the contention that some beachrock cements are biologically induced. Additionally, the primary difference between fringes of acicular aragonite and the `felts' of aragonite in microbialites appears to be that the former nucleated on a well defined surface of organic matter, whereas the latter nucleated within a framework of organic matter that contained irregularly disposed nucleation sites. Hence aragonite fringe cements may also be localized and/or induced by films of organic matter.

  9. Pressurization of bioactive bone cement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Iida, H; Kawanabe, K; Okada, Y; Oka, M; Masuda, T; Kitamura, Y; Nakamura, T

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a bioactive bone cement consisting of MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramic powder (AW glass-ceramic powder), silica glass powder as an inorganic filler, and bisphenol-a-glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) based resin as an organic matrix. The efficacy of this bioactive bone cement was investigated by evaluating its pressurization in a 5-mm hole and small pores using a simulated acetabular cavity. Two types of acetabular components were used (flanged and unflanged sockets) and a commercially available polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement (CMW 1 Radiopaque Bone Cement) was selected as a comparative control. Bioactive bone cement exerted greater intrusion volume in 5-mm holes than PMMA bone cement in both the flanged and unflanged sockets 10 minutes after pressurization (p < 0.05). In the small pores the bioactive and PMMA bone cements exerted almost identical intrusion volumes in flanged and unflanged sockets 10 min after pressurization. The intrusion volume in the flanged socket 10 minutes after pressurization was greater than that in the unflanged socket in all groups (p < 0.05). These results show that bioactive bone cement intrudes deeper into anchor holes than PMMA bone cement.

  10. Proper selection of contemporary dental cements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Run; Cheng, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Today proper selection of dental cements is a key factor to achieve a successful restoration and will greatly increase the chances of long-term success of the restoration. In recent years, many newly formulated dental cements have been developed with the claim of better performance compared to the traditional materials. Unfortunately, selection of suitable dental cement for a specific clinical application has become increasingly complicated, even for the most experienced dentists. The purpose of this article is to review the currently existing dental cements and to help the dentists choose the most suitable materials for clinical applications.

  11. A study on the sealing ability and antibacterial activity of Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Chang, Jiang; Hu, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability and antibacterial activity of Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement. Fifty maxillary anterior teeth were instrumented according to step-back technique and filled with experimental and control materials. To evaluate the sealing ability, a fluid transport model using glucose was employed for quantitative analysis of endodontic microleakage. To evaluate antibacterial activity, E. colias (ATCC 25922) was cultivated on agar plates. Results showed that the sealing ability of Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement and cortisomol paste were higher than that of zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement, and that no significant difference was observed between Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement and cortisomol paste. On antibacterial activity, Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cements composed of varying amounts of CaCl2 (0-15%) exhibited similar levels of activity against E. coliasas calcium hydroxide cement, whereas cortisomol paste had little effect on E. colias. All these results suggested that Ca3SiO5/CaCl2 composite cement demonstrated good potential for root canal treatment applications.

  12. Dynamic void behavior in polymerizing polymethyl methacrylate cement.

    PubMed

    Muller, Scott D; McCaskie, Andrew W

    2006-02-01

    Cement mantle voids remain controversial with respect to survival of total hip arthroplasty. Void evolution is poorly understood, and attempts at void manipulation can only be empirical. We induced voids in a cement model simulating the constraints of the proximal femur. Intravoid pressure and temperature were recorded throughout polymerization, and the initial and final void volumes were measured. Temperature-dependent peak intravoid pressures and void volume increases were observed. After solidification, subatmospheric intravoid pressures were observed. The magnitude of these observations could not be explained by the ideal gas law. Partial pressures of the void gas at peak pressures demonstrated a dominant effect of gaseous monomer, thereby suggesting that void growth is a pressure-driven phenomenon resulting from temperature-dependent evaporation of monomer into existing trapped air voids. PMID:16520219

  13. Topical Treatment with Xiaozheng Zhitong Paste (XZP) Alleviates Bone Destruction and Bone Cancer Pain in a Rat Model of Prostate Cancer-Induced Bone Pain by Modulating the RANKL/RANK/OPG Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Du, Maobo; Hou, Wei; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Zheng, Honggang; Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effects and mechanisms of Xiaozheng Zhitong Paste (XZP) on bone cancer pain, Wistar rats were inoculated with vehicle or prostate cancer PC-3 into the tibia bone and treated topically with inert paste, XZP at 15.75, 31.5, or 63 g/kg twice per day for 21 days. Their bone structural damage, nociceptive behaviors, bone osteoclast and osteoblast activity, and the levels of OPG, RANL, RNAK, PTHrP, IGF-1, M-CSF, IL-8, and TNF-α were examined. In comparison with that in the placebo group, significantly reduced numbers of invaded cancer cells, decreased levels of bone damage and mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal latency, lower levels of serum TRACP5b, ICTP, PINP, and BAP, and less levels of bone osteoblast and osteoclast activity were detected in the XZP-treated rats (P<0.05). Moreover, significantly increased levels of bone OPG but significantly decreased levels of RANL, RNAK, PTHrP, IGF-1, M-CSF, IL-8, and TNF-α were detected in the XZP-treated rats (P<0.05 for all). Together, XZP treatment significantly mitigated the cancer-induced bone damage and bone osteoclast and osteoblast activity and alleviated prostate cancer-induced bone pain by modulating the RANKL/RANK/OPG pathway and bone cancer-related inflammation in rats. PMID:25691907

  14. SCM Paste Samples Exposed To Aggressive Solutions. Cementitious Barriers Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, T.

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed by SIMCO Technologies Inc. (SIMCO) as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project. The test series followed an experimental program dedicated to the study of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydrated cement pastes exposed to aggressive solutions. In the present study, the scope is extended to hydrated cement pastes incorporating supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) such as fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). Also, the range of aggressive contact solutions was expanded. The experimental program aimed at testing aggressive contact solutions that more closely mimic the chemical composition of saltstone pore solution. Five different solutions, some of which incorporated high levels of carbonate and nitrate, were placed in contact with four different hydrated cement paste mixes. In all solutions, 150 mmol/L of SO42– (14 400 ppm) were present. The solutions included different pH conditions and different sodium content. Two paste mixes were equivalent to Vault 1/4 and Vault 2 concrete mixes used at SRS in storage structures. Two additional paste mixes, cast at the same water-to-cement ratio and using the same cements but without SCMs, were also tested. The damage evolution in samples was monitored using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and mass measurements. After three and twelve months of exposure conditions, samples were taken out of solution containers and analyzed to perform migration tests and porosity measurements. Globally, results were in line with the previous study and confirmed that high pH may limit the formation of some deleterious phases like gypsum. In this case, ettringite may form but is not necessarily associated with damage. However, the high concentration of sodium may be associated with the formation of an AFm-like mineral called U-phase. The most significant evidences of damage were all associated with the Vault 2 paste analog. This

  15. Quartz cement in sandstones: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Earle F.

    Quartz cement as syntaxial overgrowths is one of the two most abundant cements in sandstones. The main factors that control the amount of quartz cement in sandstones are: framework composition; residence time in the "silica mobility window"; and fluid composition, flow volume and pathways. Thus, the type of sedimentary basin in which a sand was deposited strongly controls the cementation process. Sandstones of rift basins (arkoses) and collision-margin basins (litharenites) generally have only a few percent quartz cement; quartzarenites and other quartzose sandstones of intracratonic, foreland and passive-margin basins have the most quartz cement. Clay and other mineral coatings on detrital quartz grains and entrapment of hydrocarbons in pores retard or prevent cementation by quartz, whereas extremely permeable sands that serve as major fluid conduits tend to sequester the greatest amounts of quartz cement. In rapidly subsiding basins, like the Gulf Coast and North Sea basins, most quartz cement is precipitated by cooling, ascending formation water at burial depths of several kilometers where temperatures range from 60° to 100° C. Cementation proceeds over millions of years, often under changing fluid compositions and temperatures. Sandstones with more than 10% imported quartz cement pose special problems of fluid flux and silica transport. If silica is transported entirely as H 4SiO 4, convective recycling of formation water seems to be essential to explain the volume of cement present in most sandstones. Precipitation from single-cycle, upward-migrating formation water is adequate to provide the volume of cement only if significant volumes of silica are transported in unidentified complexes. Modeling suggests that quartz cementation of sandstones in intracratonic basins is effected by advecting meteoric water, although independent petrographic, isotopic or fluid inclusion data are lacking. Silica for quartz cement comes from both shale and sandstone beds within

  16. Use of coir pith particles in composites with Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, Gisela Azevedo Menezes; Vieira, Jhonatas Augusto Rocha; Barreto, Ledjane Silva

    2013-12-15

    Brazil is the fourth largest world's producer of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.). Coconut crops generate several wastes, including, coir pith. Coir pith and short fibers are the byproducts of extracting the long fibers and account for approximately 70% of the mature coconut husk. The main use of coir pith is as an agricultural substrate. Due to its shape and small size (0.075-1.2 mm), this material can be considered as a particulate material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of coir pith as an aggregate in cementitious composites and to evaluate the effect of the presence of sand in the performance of these composites. Some composites were produced exclusively with coir pith particles and other composites with coir pith partially substituting the natural sand. The cementitious composites developed were tested for their physical and mechanical properties and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the effect of coir pith particles addition in cement paste and sand-cement-mortar. The statistical significance of the results was evaluated by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by multiple comparisons of the means by Tukey's test that showed that the composites with coir pith particles, with or without natural sand, had similar mechanical results, i.e., means were not statistically different at 5% significance level. There was a reduction in bulk density and an improved post-cracking behavior in the composites with coir pith particles compared to conventional mortar and to cement paste. These composites can be used for the production of lightweight, nonstructural building materials, according to the values of compressive strength (3.97-4.35 MPa) and low bulk density (0.99-1.26 g/cm(3)).

  17. Patch microstructure in cement-based materials: Fact or artefact?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.S. . E-mail: hong.wong@imperial.ac.uk; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2006-05-15

    The appearance of patch microstructure, i.e. broad dense and porous regions separated by sharp and distinct boundaries and occurring randomly in bulk and interfacial transition zones, has been reported previously in various site- and laboratory-mixed concretes and mortars. In this paper, evidence is presented to show that patch microstructure is an artefact of sample preparation and does not reflect the true nature of the hydrated cement paste. The appearance of dense patches comes from paste areas that have been ground and polished beyond the epoxy resin intrusion depth. In a backscattered electron image, pores not filled with epoxy are not visible because the signal is generated from the base or side walls of the pores. A modified method for epoxy impregnation, which can achieve a much deeper epoxy penetration than conventional vacuum impregnation, is presented.

  18. Stabilization of geothermal residues by encapsulation in portland cement-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.P.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1988-05-01

    Presented are the results from a laboratory test program conducted to identify and evaluate materials for converting hazardous geothermal residues to a non-hazardous and potentially usable form. Results indicate that the residues can be effectively incorporated, as a fine aggregate, into portland cement-based composites. Five geothermal residues obtained from sites in the Salton Sea area of California were evaluated. Three of these were classified as hazardous. After mixing with cement, the leach rates were all well below specified levels. Although structural-grade composites were produced, gradual reductions in properties with time up to 1 yr were noted. This indicates ongoing chemical reactions between the cement paste and the constituents of the residues. Further research is necessary before the composites could be considered for use in structural applications. 3 refs., 8 tabs.

  19. Friedel's salt formation in sulfoaluminate cements: A combined XRD and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, G.; Boccaleri, E.; Buzzi, L.; Canonico, F.; Gastaldi, D.

    2015-01-15

    Four different binders based on calcium sulfoaluminate cements have been submitted to accelerated chlorination through ionic exchange on hydrated pastes, in order to investigate their ability to chemically bind chloride ions that might reduce chloride penetration. The composition of hydrated cements before and after the treatment was evaluated by means of an X-Ray Diffraction–{sup 27}Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy combined study, allowing to take into account even partially amorphous phases and to make quantitative assumption on the relative abundance of the different aluminium-containing phases. It was found that low SO{sub 3} Sulfoaluminate–Portland ternary systems are the most effective in binding chloride ions and the active role played by different members of the AFm family in chloride uptake was confirmed. Moreover, a peculiar behavior related to the formation of Friedel's salt in different pH conditions was also established for the different cements.

  20. {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry as an indicator of setting and water depletion during cement hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Biyun; Faure, Paméla; Thiéry, Mickaël; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique

    2013-03-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been used to detect setting and microstructure evolution during cement hydration. NMR measurements were performed since casting, during setting and until hardening (from 0 to 3 days). The mobility of water molecules was assessed by an analysis focused on the diagram of longitudinal relaxation time T{sub 1} generated by an Inversion Recovery sequence. The initial stiffening of the solid network was identified by an analysis of the relaxation rate 1/T{sub 1}. The kinetics of water depletion was investigated by using a simple one-pulse acquisition sequence. In parallel, conventional techniques (Vicat needle and temperature monitoring), as well as numerical simulations of hydration, were used to complement and validate these NMR results. Cement pastes and mortars with different water-to-cement ratios made of grey or white OPCs were tested. Furthermore, the effects of the addition of sand, super-plasticizer and silica fume on the hydration kinetics were investigated.

  1. Microstructure of amorphous aluminum hydroxide in belite-calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Fei; Yu, Zhenglei; Yang, Fengling; Lu, Yinong Liu, Yunfei

    2015-05-15

    Belite-calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement is a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cement. Herein, aluminum hydroxide (AH{sub 3}), the main amorphous hydration product of BCSA cement, was investigated in detail. The microstructure of AH{sub 3} with various quantities of gypsum was investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The AH{sub 3} with various morphologies were observed and confirmed in the resulting pastes. Particular attention was paid to the fact that AH{sub 3} always contained a small amount of Ca according to the results of EDS analysis. The AH{sub 3} was then characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results of HRTEM indicated that Ca arose from nanosized tricalcium aluminate hexahydrate which existed in the AH{sub 3}.

  2. Past Tense Route Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R.; Balota, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined whether lexical (whole word) or more rule-based (morphological constituent) processes can be locally biased by experimental list context in past tense verb inflection. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed a past tense inflection task in which list context was manipulated across blocks containing regular…

  3. Past Is Prologue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Behavior-based interviewing (BBI) has been used in the business world for decades as a way to select new hires whose past behaviors indicate future success. Behavior-based interviews are based on the premise that past behavior is the best predictor of future performance and that interview questions should evaluate the knowledge, skills, and…

  4. Microbial analysis of biofilms on cement surfaces: An investigation in cement-associated peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Obst, Ursula

    2014-09-05

    The cementation of implant-supported restorations always poses the risk of excess cement retained in the peri-implant sulcus despite careful clinical control. Excess cement can become the basis of colonization by oral microorganisms. As a result of the biofilm formation peri-mucositis or peri-implantitis may develop. Complications were observed in the routine prosthetic restoration of implants when a methacrylate-based cement was used. These developed a few weeks after cementation of the suprastructure and caused bleeding on probing as well as suppuration from the peri-implant tissue. In the revision therapy, excess cement in the peri-implant sulcus was found in many cases. This excess cement was sampled from ten patients and investigated for biofilm formation. For this purpose, the cement samples were collected and analyzed for bacterial in situ colonization by 16S rDNA-based methods. In laboratory experiments, the methacrylate-based cement and two other dental cements were then investigated for their proneness to form biofilm. The results of the in situ and in vitro investigations revealed a strong tendency towards bacterial invasion of the methacrylate-based cement by opportunistic species and pathogens.

  5. Hydration products and thermokinetic properties of cement-bentonite and cement-chalk mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Klyusov, A.A.

    1988-08-20

    Bentonite and chalk are the most popular auxiliary additives to portland cement for borehole cementation. The authors studied by physicochemical analysis methods (x-ray phase, derivatographic, and scanning and electron microscopy in combination with microdiffraction) the newly formed solid-phase composition of cement-bentonite and cement-chalk mortars (binder-additive ratio 9:1) prepared from portland cement for cold boreholes and 8% calcium chloride solution at a water-mixing ratio of 0.9. The mechanism of the influence of Ca-bentonite and chalk additives on the portland cement hydration rate was ascertained from the heat evolution rate curves. It was found that the phase compositions of the hydration products are represented in the studied systems by newly formed substances typical for portland cement. It has been noted that Ca-bentonite interacts with the calcium hydroxide of hydrated cement with the formation of hexagonal and cubic calcium hydroaluminates. Unlike Ca-bentonite, chalk does not react with portland cement at normal and reduced temperatures, does not block hydrated cement particles, which, in turn, ensures all other conditions remaining equal, a higher initial rate of hydration of cement-chalk mortar.

  6. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    PubMed Central

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases. PMID:27357449

  7. Water permeability and chloride ion diffusion in portland cement mortars: Relationship to sand content and critical pore diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Halamickova, P.; Detwiler, R.J.; Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.

    1995-05-01

    The pore structure of hydrated cement in mortar and concrete is quite different from that of neat cement paste. The porous transition zones formed at the aggregate-paste interfaces affect the pore size distribution. The effect of the sand content on the development of pore structure, the permeability to water, and the diffusivity of chloride ions was studied on portland cement mortars. Mortars of two water-to-cement ratios and three sand volume fractions were cast together with pastes and tested at degrees of hydration ranging from 45 to 70%. An electrically-accelerated concentration cell test was used to determine the coefficient of chloride ion diffusion while a high pressure permeability cell was employed to assess liquid permeability. The coefficient of chloride ion diffusion varied linearly with the critical pore radius as determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry while permeability was found to follow a power-law relationship vs. this critical radius. The data set provides an opportunity to directly examine the application of the Katz-Thompson relationship to cement-based materials.

  8. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample.

    PubMed

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases. PMID:27357449

  9. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  10. Formation of aragonite cement by nannobacteria in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Vicki A.; Folk, Robert L.

    1996-08-01

    Brine-shrimp egg cases in growth cavities in modern stromatolites in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, are replaced by aragonite and cemented together by aragonite cement. The fabric of the cement changes dramatically as the distance from the egg case increases. The cement within 50 to 70 μm of the egg case exhibits a random fabric of 10 to 20 μm equant crystals. The surface of the cement is covered by bead-like bumps, 0.1 μm in diameter, interpreted as nannobacteria. Overlying the random, “beaded” fabric with a relatively abrupt transition are epitaxial, prismatic aragonite crystals that have smooth crystal surfaces lacking bead-like bodies. The smooth-surfaced prismatic aragonite crystals are interpreted to be “normal” abiotic precipitates, whereas the “beaded” microspar is interpreted to result from biotic processes, where the nannobacteria serve as catalysts for creation of the cement. A population explosion of bacteria occurs as the organic material of egg case rots, which alters the microchemical environment and induces a rapid precipitation of aragonite, enclosing tens of thousands of nannobacteria. As the organic material is destroyed, reproduction of bacteria slows and epitaxial, prismatic aragonite crystals nucleate and grow abiotically on the structureless, “biotic” layer.

  11. Defining the Brittle Failure Envelopes of Individual Reaction Zones Observed in CO2-Exposed Wellbore Cement.

    PubMed

    Hangx, Suzanne J T; van der Linden, Arjan; Marcelis, Fons; Liteanu, Emilia

    2016-01-19

    To predict the behavior of the cement sheath after CO2 injection and the potential for leakage pathways, it is key to understand how the mechanical properties of the cement evolves with CO2 exposure time. We performed scratch-hardness tests on hardened samples of class G cement before and after CO2 exposure. The cement was exposed to CO2-rich fluid for one to six months at 65 °C and 8 MPa Ptotal. Detailed SEM-EDX analyses showed reaction zones similar to those previously reported in the literature: (1) an outer-reacted, porous silica-rich zone; (2) a dense, carbonated zone; and (3) a more porous, Ca-depleted inner zone. The quantitative mechanical data (brittle compressive strength and friction coefficient) obtained for each of the zones suggest that the heterogeneity of reacted cement leads to a wide range of brittle strength values in any of the reaction zones, with only a rough dependence on exposure time. However, the data can be used to guide numerical modeling efforts needed to assess the impact of reaction-induced mechanical failure of wellbore cement by coupling sensitivity analysis and mechanical predictions. PMID:26690239

  12. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  13. A note on cement in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalbegović, G.

    2016-09-01

    Cement mineral tobermorite was formed in hydrothermal experiments on alternation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Unidentified bands at 14 μm were measured for CAIs and the matrix of the Allende meteorite sample, as well as for Hektor and Agamemnon asteroids. The presence of cement nanoparticles may explain the feature at 14 μm.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1)...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1)...

  16. Tires fuel oil field cement manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Caveny, B.; Ashford, D.; Garcia, J.G.; Hammack, R.

    1998-08-31

    In a new process, waste automobile tires added to the fuel mix of gas, coal, and coke help fire kilns to produce API-quality oil field cement. Capital Cement uses this process in its cement-manufacturing plant in San Antonio, in which it also produces construction cement. The tires provide a lower-cost fuel and boost the temperature at a critical stage in the kiln burn process. Also, steel-belted tires add iron content to the mix. According to lab results, tire-burned cement slurries will perform the same as conventionally burned cement slurries. Actual field applications have proven that cement produced by burning tires performs no different than conventionally produced slurries. Capital`s plant uses both dry and wet processes, with separate kilns running both processes at the same time. Cement clinker is partially fired by waste tires in both kiln processes. The tires represent 12% of the fuel consumed by the plant, a number that is expected to increase. Capital burns about 200 tires/hr, or about 1.6 million tires/year.

  17. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  18. Climate induced changes as registered in inorganic and organic sediment components from Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina) during the past 51 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.; Rosén, P.; Pasado Science Team

    2013-07-01

    Total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, biogenic silica content and total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratios of the Laguna Potrok Aike lacustrine sediment record are used to reconstruct the environmental history of south-east Patagonia during the past 51 ka in high resolution. High lake level conditions are assumed to have prevailed during the Last Glacial, as sediments are carbonate-free. Increased runoff linked to permafrost and reduced evaporation due to colder temperatures and reduced influence of Southern Hemispheric Westerlies (SHW) may have caused these high lake levels with lake productivity being low and organic matter mainly of algal or cyanobacterial origin. Aquatic moss growth and diatom blooms occurred synchronously with southern hemispheric glacial warming events such as the Antarctic A-events, the postglacial warming following the LGM and the Younger Dryas chronozone. During these times, a combination of warmer climatic conditions with related thawing permafrost could have increased the allochthonous input of nutrients and in combination with warmer surface waters increased aquatic moss growth and diatom production. The SHW were not observed to affect southern Patagonia during the Last Glacial. The Holocene presents a completely different lacustrine system because (a) permafrost no longer inhibits infiltration nor emits meltwater pulses and (b) the positioning of the SHW over the investigated area gives rise to strong and dry winds. Under these conditions total organic carbon, total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratios and biogenic silica cease to be first order productivity indicators. On the one hand, the biogenic silica is influenced by dissolution of diatoms due to higher salinity and pH of the lake water under evaporative stress characterizing low lake levels. On the other hand, total organic carbon and total organic carbon/total nitrogen profiles are influenced by reworked macrophytes from freshly exposed lake level terraces during

  19. Rheological Characterization of Oil Cement Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, Mellak; Moh-Amokrane, Aitouche

    2015-04-01

    This study is a contribution to the study of the rheological behavior of cement suspensions. An oil well is drilled, cased, cemented and set completion. The well drilling is done in several phases then at various diameters to isolate the following problems like land fragile subsidence and poorly consolidated aquifer formations, loss of the movement in the porous and permeable formations. Therefore, it would go down a casing and cementing to work safely. The materials studied were chosen to satisfy the requirements and the problems encountered in real applications in the oil field (casing cementing wells). So it was used an oil hydraulic binder "G". This systematic study of rheological properties of cement Class "G" standardized API (American Petroleum Institute) deal with a formulation which is compatible with the surrounding environment taking account an optimal efficiency.

  20. RECYCLED WASTE-BASED CEMENT COMPOSITE PATCH MATERIALS FOR RAPID/PERMANENT ROAD RESTORATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2001-07-31

    Over the past year, KeySpan Energy sponsored a research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) aimed at recycling boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) byproducts generated from Keyspan's power stations into potentially useful materials, and at reducing concurrent costs for their disposal. Also, KeySpan has an interest in developing strategies to explicitly integrate industrial ecology and green chemistry. From our collaborative efforts with Keyspan (Diane Blankenhom Project Manager, and Kenneth Yager), we succeeded in recycling them into two viable products; Pb-exchange adsorbents (PEAs), and high-performance cements (HpCs). These products were made from chemically bonded cement and ceramic (CBC) materials that were synthesized through two-step chemical reaction pathways, acid-base and hydration. Using this synthesis technology, both the WWTS and BA served in acting as solid base reactants, and sodium polyphosphate, [-(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}], known as an intermediator of fertilizer, was employed as the acid solution reactant. In addition, two commercial cement additives, Secar No. 51 calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and Type I calcium silicate cement (CSC), were used to improve mechanical behavior and to promote the rate of acid-base reaction of the CBC materials.

  1. Recycling of porcelain tile polishing residue in portland cement: hydration efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pelisser, Fernando; Steiner, Luiz Renato; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-02-21

    Ceramic tiles are widely used by the construction industry, and the manufacturing process of ceramic tiles generates as a major residue mud derived from the polishing step. This residue is too impure to be reused in the ceramic process and is usually discarded as waste in landfills. But the analysis of the particle size and concentration of silica of this residue shows a potential use in the manufacture of building materials based on portland cement. Tests were conducted on cement pastes and mortars using the addition of 10% and 20% (mass) of the residue. The results of compressive strength in mortars made up to 56 days showed a significant increase in compressive strength greater than 50%. The result of thermogravimetry shows that portlandite is consumed by the cement formed by the silica present in the residue in order to form calcium silicate hydrate and featuring a pozzolanic reaction. This effect improves the performance of cement, contributes to research and application of supplementary cementitious materials, and optimizes the use of portland cement, reducing the environmental impacts of carbon dioxide emissions from its production.

  2. Waste brick's potential for use as a pozzolan in blended Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kae-Long; Chen, Bor-Yann; Chiou, Chyow-San; An Cheng

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the pozzolanic reactions and engineering properties of waste brick-blended cements in relation to various replacement ratios (0-50%). The waste brick consisted of SiO(2) (63.21%), Al(2)O(3) (16.41%), Fe(2)O(3) (6.05%), Na(2)O (1.19%), K(2)O (2.83%) and MgO (1.11%), and had a pozzolanic activity index of 107%. The toxic characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results demonstrate that the heavy-metal content in waste bricks met the Environmental Protection Agency regulatory limits. Experimental results indicate that 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50% of cement can be replaced by waste brick, which causes the initial and final setting times to increase. Compressive strength development was slower in waste brick-blended cement (WBBC) pastes in the early ages; however, strength at the later ages increased significantly. Species analyses demonstrate that the hydrates in WBBC pastes primarily consisted of Ca(OH)(2) and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel, like those found in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste. Pozzolanic reaction products formed in the WBBC pastes, in particular, various reaction products, including hydrates of calcium silicates (CSH), aluminates (CAH) and aluminosilicates (CASH), formed as expected, resulting in consumption of Ca(OH)(2) during the late ages of curing. The changes in the properties of WBBC pastes were significant as blend ratio increased, due to the pores of C-S-H gels and CAH filling via pozzolanic reactions. This filling of gel pores resulted in densification and subsequently enhanced the gel/space ratio and degree of hydration. Experimental results demonstrate waste brick can be supplementary cementitious material.

  3. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: a novel solution to the exothermicity problem.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-10-01

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions.

  4. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: a novel solution to the exothermicity problem.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-10-01

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions. PMID:23910345

  5. Cements with low Clinker Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lodeiro, I.; Fernández-Jiménez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid alkaline cements are multi-component systems containing a high percentage of mineral additions (fly ash, blast furnace slag), low proportions (<30%) of Portland clinker and scarce amounts of alkaline activators. The substantially lower amount of clinker needed to manufacture these binders in comparison to ordinary Portland cement is both economically and ecologically beneficial. Their enormous versatility in terms of the raw materials used has made them the object of considerable interest. The present study explored the mechanical strength of binary blends mixes; B1= 20% clinker (CK) + 80% fly ash (FA) and B2=20% clinker + 80% blast furnace slag (BFS), both hydrated in the presence and absence of an alkaline activator specifically designed for this purpose. The use of the activator enhanced the development of early age strength considerably. All the hydrated matrices were characterised with XRD, SEM/EDX and (29Si and 27Al) NMR. The use of the alkaline activator generated reaction products consisting primarily of a mix of gels ((N,C)-A-S-H and C-A-S-H) whose respective proportions were found to depend upon system composition and initial reactivity.

  6. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  7. Source to sink element geochemistry and clay mineralogy in Lake Towuti, Indonesia: understanding climate-induced controls on sediment composition during the past 60 kyr BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlock, Marina; Vogel, Hendrik; Nigg, Valentin; Hasberg, Ascelina; Melles, Martin; Russell, James M.; Bijaksana, Satria

    2016-04-01

    Al and high Mg concentrations and exerts a dominant control on the present-day sediment composition of Towuti's northern basin. This indicates that the Mahalona River and its tributaries cut deep into the laterite soils, transporting relatively unweathered material to the lake. In the past 60,000 years, the Al/Mg ratio is lowest between 35,000 and 15,000 years BP, and kaolinite is the dominant clay mineral during this period. During most of the Holocene and >35,000 years BP, Al/Mg is comparable to today and smectites (Holocene) and illites (MIS 3) are the most abundant clay minerals. The clay mineralogy suggests deeper soil erosion during wet interglacials and more surficial erosion during dry glacial climate conditions. These findings imply that erosion and element cycling are mainly driven by changes in precipitation amount and terrestrial runoff in Towuti's catchment. The Al/Mg ratio on the other hand points to a stronger (lesser) contribution of relatively unweathered sediments sourced from the Mahalona River catchment during dry (wet) phases, likely as a result of lake-level changes and associated changes in shoreline proximity to our coring sites.

  8. Cheonggukjang, a soybean paste fermented with B. licheniformis-67 prevents weight gain and improves glycemic control in high fat diet induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joo-Hee; Pichiah, P.B.Tirupathi; Kim, Min-Jung; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effects of soybean paste—Cheonggukjang, fermented with poly gamma glutamic acid producing Bacillus licheniformis-67 in diet induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Forty male C57BL/6J mice aged 4 weeks were divided into four dietary groups; normal diet control, high fat diet control, high fat diet containing 30% of unfermented soybean and high fat diet containing 30% Cheonggukjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis-67. After 13 weeks of dietary intervention the mice were sacrificed; serum and tissue samples were examined. Serum and hepatic lipid profile, blood glucose, insulin, leptin level were lower (<0.05) along with the body weight and epididymal fat pad weight in the 30% Cheonggukjang supplemented group compared with the high fat diet control group. The expression level of lipid anabolic gene was significantly decreased; whereas the expression level of lipid catabolic genes were significantly increased in the 30% Cheonggukjang supplemented group compared to the high fat diet control group. Collectively, these results suggested that intake of Cheonggukjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis-67 significantly prevents obesity related parameters. PMID:27499576

  9. Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An; Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu

    2013-10-15

    Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: • We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. • Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. • The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. • The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. • XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

  10. Calcium phosphate cements: study of the beta-tricalcium phosphate--monocalcium phosphate system.

    PubMed

    Mirtchi, A A; Lemaitre, J; Terao, N

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of making cements based on beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), a promising bone graft material, was investigated. Upon admixture with water, beta-TCP/monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) mixtures were found to set and harden like conventional hydraulic cements. Beta-TCP powders with larger particle size, obtained by sintering at higher temperatures, increased the ultimate strength of the cement. Results show that setting occurs after dissolution of MCPM, as a result of the precipitation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) in the paste. The ultimate tensile strength of the hardened cement is proportional to the amount of DCPD formed. Upon ageing above 40 degrees C, DCPD transforms progressively into anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (DCP), thereby decreasing the strength. Ageing of the pastes in 100% r.h. results in a decay of the mechanical properties. This can be ascribed to an intergranular dissolution of the beta-TCP aggregates as a result of the pH lowering brought about by the MCPM to DCPD conversion.

  11. The Effect of Temperature on Compressive and Tensile Strengths of Commonly Used Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, MC Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    Background: The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. Materials and Methods: In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. Results: All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. Conclusion: An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures. PMID:25859100

  12. Cement oscillation increases interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, with commentary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Han, Pengfei; Gu, Wenguang; Shi, Zuowei; Li, Dabin; Wang, Changli

    2009-05-01

    Modern cementing techniques aim to improve the interlock between bone and cement and to establish a durable interface. Cement penetration is generally believed to influence interface failure, but current methods for improving the cement-bone interface are inadequate. Oscillation is the reciprocated movement of an object through its balanced position, or the quantum physics of systematic fluctuation back and forth near an average value (or trimmed value). To increase the interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, we designed a cement oscillator according to the principles of vibrational mechanics. To evaluate the effect of oscillation on the quality of interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, we randomly divided 156 femoral bones of adult pigs into 2 groups, oscillated and control, and performed mechanical tests to assess interlock strength at the cement-bone interface. The filling effect of bone cement was observed and analyzed under a stereomicroscope, and then each oscillated femur was compared with a control femur. The interlock strength at the cement-bone interface in the oscillated group was significantly greater than in the control group (P<.05), and the filling effect in the oscillated group was also better than that in the control group (P<.05). Our findings show that oscillation of bone cement significantly increases interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, point the way for clinicians to develop a high-performance and pragmatic fixation technique for prostheses to increase interlock strength, and will be of considerable practical importance in helping to prevent aseptic loosening of cemented prostheses.

  13. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements.

  14. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements. PMID:27479343

  15. Thermal diffusivity of glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Tay, W M; Braden, M

    1987-05-01

    Thermal diffusivity, a property related to the thermal insulative efficiency of a material, was measured in nine glass-ionomer cements and compared with results from a silicate and a polycarboxylate cement. Each cement was mixed at various powder-liquid ratios (P/L) and moulded into a rectangular prism of approximate dimensions 2 cm cube with a thermocouple embedded in it. The prism was immersed in a constant-temperature bath at 1 degree C, and the fall in temperature was observed over a period of three min. Except for the initial and later stages, the plot of the logarithmic difference between external and internal temperatures of each block of cement against time showed a straight line in accord with theoretical prediction. From the slope, the thermal diffusivity of the material was calculated. The values for the silicate, polycarboxylate, and glass-ionomer-metal (cermet) showed a marked rise with increasing P/L, whereas at higher P/L, glass ionomer cements showed gradual change, with values being only slightly higher than the thermal diffusivity of dentin. Glass-ionomer cements are good thermal insulators over a wide range of P/L, and close agreement between experimental and theoretical data shows that glass-ionomer cements are homogenous isotropic materials.

  16. Thermal diffusivity of glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Tay, W M; Braden, M

    1987-05-01

    Thermal diffusivity, a property related to the thermal insulative efficiency of a material, was measured in nine glass-ionomer cements and compared with results from a silicate and a polycarboxylate cement. Each cement was mixed at various powder-liquid ratios (P/L) and moulded into a rectangular prism of approximate dimensions 2 cm cube with a thermocouple embedded in it. The prism was immersed in a constant-temperature bath at 1 degree C, and the fall in temperature was observed over a period of three min. Except for the initial and later stages, the plot of the logarithmic difference between external and internal temperatures of each block of cement against time showed a straight line in accord with theoretical prediction. From the slope, the thermal diffusivity of the material was calculated. The values for the silicate, polycarboxylate, and glass-ionomer-metal (cermet) showed a marked rise with increasing P/L, whereas at higher P/L, glass ionomer cements showed gradual change, with values being only slightly higher than the thermal diffusivity of dentin. Glass-ionomer cements are good thermal insulators over a wide range of P/L, and close agreement between experimental and theoretical data shows that glass-ionomer cements are homogenous isotropic materials. PMID:3475320

  17. Calcite cements in the modern Floridan aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes, U.; Budd, D.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Calcite cements in the Ocala (Eocene) and Suwannee (Oligocene) formations, southwestern Floridan aquifer have been studied to determine updip to downdip variations in cement chemistries and cathodoluminescence within a modern regional confined aquifer. Interparticle, intraparticle, and fracture-fill cements comprise 5-15% of the limestones. Five different calcite cement morphologies are distinguishable and occur throughout the aquifer: (1) circumgranular microspar, (2) fine- to medium-crystalline rhombs, (3) medium-crystalline syntaxial overgrowths on echinoderms, (4) fine-crystalline pore-filling mosaics, and (5) micrite. Type 5 occurs only below former exposure surfaces. Volumetrically, type 3 is the most important and type 4 is the least. Cathodoluminescence observations reveal only nonluminescent cements updip and an increase in luminescent zones and luminescent intensity downdip. Updip nonluminescent cements have very low Fe and Mn concentrations, but high Mg and Sr concentrations. These relations are interpreted to reflect oxidizing conditions and high rock/water interaction. Fe and Mn concentrations increase and Sr and Mg contents decrease downdip. These trends are interpreted to reflect reducing conditions, cross-formational flow, and slower rock/water interaction. Downdip cathodoluminescence zonations consist of a broad nonluminescent zone, followed by a thin bright orange zone, and then a dull luminescence zone. These geochemical and luminescent patterns along a regional flow line in the confined Floridan aquifer have many similarities to those observed in calcite cements described from ancient aquifers.

  18. Chemical Reactions of Portland Cement with Aqueous CO2 and Their Impacts on Cement's Mechanical Properties under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Lim, Yun Mook; Flores, Katharine M; Kranjc, Kelly; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-19

    To provide information on wellbore cement integrity in the application of geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), chemical and mechanical alterations were analyzed for cement paste samples reacted for 10 days under GCS conditions. The reactions were at 95 °C and had 100 bar of either N2 (control condition) or CO2 contacting the reaction brine solution with an ionic strength of 0.5 M adjusted by NaCl. Chemical analyses showed that the 3.0 cm × 1.1 cm × 0.3 cm samples were significantly attacked by aqueous CO2 and developed layer structures with a total attacked depth of 1220 μm. Microscale mechanical property analyses showed that the hardness and indentation modulus of the carbonated layer were 2-3 times greater than for the intact cement, but those in the portlandite-dissolved region decreased by ∼50%. The strength and elastic modulus of the bulk cement samples were reduced by 93% and 84%, respectively. The properties of the microscale regions, layer structure, microcracks, and swelling of the outer layers combined to affect the overall mechanical properties. These findings improve understanding of wellbore integrity from both chemical and mechanical viewpoints and can be utilized to improve the safety and efficiency of CO2 storage.

  19. Chemical Reactions of Portland Cement with Aqueous CO2 and Their Impacts on Cement's Mechanical Properties under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Lim, Yun Mook; Flores, Katharine M; Kranjc, Kelly; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-19

    To provide information on wellbore cement integrity in the application of geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), chemical and mechanical alterations were analyzed for cement paste samples reacted for 10 days under GCS conditions. The reactions were at 95 °C and had 100 bar of either N2 (control condition) or CO2 contacting the reaction brine solution with an ionic strength of 0.5 M adjusted by NaCl. Chemical analyses showed that the 3.0 cm × 1.1 cm × 0.3 cm samples were significantly attacked by aqueous CO2 and developed layer structures with a total attacked depth of 1220 μm. Microscale mechanical property analyses showed that the hardness and indentation modulus of the carbonated layer were 2-3 times greater than for the intact cement, but those in the portlandite-dissolved region decreased by ∼50%. The strength and elastic modulus of the bulk cement samples were reduced by 93% and 84%, respectively. The properties of the microscale regions, layer structure, microcracks, and swelling of the outer layers combined to affect the overall mechanical properties. These findings improve understanding of wellbore integrity from both chemical and mechanical viewpoints and can be utilized to improve the safety and efficiency of CO2 storage. PMID:25893278

  20. Holocene cemented beach deposits in Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischler, Eberhard; Lomando, Anthony J.

    1997-06-01

    Two types of cemented beach deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can be distinguished on the basis of differences in composition, texture, geographical position, and age. Whereas the composition of beachrock is similar to that of the adjacent marginal reef sediments, cayrock is enriched in benthic foraminifera. Intertidal beachrock is moderately to well sorted and well cemented, while supratidal cayrock is very well sorted, poorly cemented and friable. Beachrock occurs preferentially on windward beaches of sand-shingle Gays on the middle and southern barrier reefs and on the isolated platforms Glovers and Lighthouse Reefs. Cayrock only occurs on larger mangrove-sand Gays of the isolated platforms Turneffe Islands, Lighthouse Reef, and the northern barrier reef. 14C-dating of ten whole-rock and mollusk shell samples produced calibrated dates between AD 345 and AD 1435 for beachrock and between BC 1085 and AD 1190 for cayrock. The large-scale distribution of beachrock in Belize supports the contention that physical processes such as water agitation rather than biological processes control beachrock formation and distribution. Only on windward sides of cays that are close to the reef crest, where large amounts of seawater flush the beaches, considerable amounts of cements can be precipitated to produce beachrock. Cayrock forms due to cementation in the vadose zone and is only preserved on larger, stable mangrove-sand cays.

  1. Effect of aging on temporary cement retention in vitro.

    PubMed

    Millstein, P L; Hazan, E; Nathanson, D

    1991-06-01

    Retention of restorations cemented with temporary cement varies. Some cements are adhesive and others are weak in retention. In addition, cement retention may vary over time. This study determined (1) the retentive properties of four temporary cements, and (2) the effects of aging on temporary cement retention. Cylindrical amalgam cores and mated stainless steel retainers with a 0.05 mm cement space were used in the study. Cores were cemented into the retainers and stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C until tested. Retention was measured by applying a compressive force to the cores through a rod in an Instron machine. Half the samples were tested after 1 week and half were tested after 6 weeks. The results indicate a significant difference in retentive value among the four cements, including a significant decrease in retention for one cement over the 6-week aging period.

  2. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  3. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  4. Reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, P; Peter, B; Beluze, L; Lemaître, J

    1999-08-01

    The fixation of osteosynthesis screws remains a severe problem for fracture repair among osteoporotic patients. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is routinely used to improve screw fixation, but this material has well-known drawbacks such as monomer toxicity, exothermic polymerization, and nonresorbability. Calcium phosphate cements have been developed for several years. Among these new bone substitution materials, brushite cements have the advantage of being injectable and resorbable. The aim of this study is to assess the reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement. Polyurethane foams, whose density is close to that of cancellous bone, were used as bone model. A hole was tapped in a foam sample, then brushite cement was injected. Trabecular osteosynthesis screws were inserted. After 24 h of aging in water, the stripping force was measured by a pull-out test. Screws (4.0 and 6.5 mm diameter) and two foam densities (0.14 and 0.28 g/cm3) were compared. Cements with varying solid/liquid ratios and xanthan contents were used in order to obtain the best screw reinforcement. During the pull-out test, the stripping force first increases to a maximum, then drops to a steady-state value until complete screw extraction. Both maximum force and plateau value increase drastically in the presence of cement. The highest stripping force is observed for 6.5-mm screws reinforced with cement in low-density foams. In this case, the stripping force is multiplied by 3.3 in the presence of cement. In a second experiment, cements with solid/liquid ratio ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 g/mL were used with 6.5-mm diameter screws. In some compositions, xanthan was added to improve injectability. The best results were obtained with 2.5 g/mL cement containing xanthan and with 3.0 g/mL cements without xanthan. A 0.9-kN maximal stripping force was observed with nonreinforced screws, while 1.9 kN was reached with reinforced screws. These first results are very promising regarding screw

  5. A novel, multi-barrier, drug eluting calcium sulfate/biphasic calcium phosphate biodegradable composite bone cement for treatment of experimental MRSA osteomyelitis in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Surajit; Roy, Subhasis; Maitra, Nilendu Jyoti; Kundu, Biswanath; Chanda, Abhijit; Datta, Someswar; Joy, Mathew

    2016-10-10

    This article discloses the development of an effective and versatile technology to prepare a novel antibiotics-loaded biodegradable composite bone cement to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal (MRSA) osteomyelitis and reports its detail in vitro characterization, drug loading efficiency, physico-mechanical properties, drug elution in simulated body fluid (SBF) and human plasma, merits and demerits over poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement. Chronic osteomyelitis in rabbit tibia (42) was induced by MRSA and composite cement was implanted to evaluate its safety and efficacy over PMMA cement and parenteral treated animals with histopathology, radiographs, bone/plasma drugs concentration, and SEM for 90days. The composite cement showed higher setting time, degradability, pH rise, injectability, in vitro drug elution but lesser mechanical strength than PMMA cement. Antibiotics release from cement beads was faster in SBF than plasma. Further, in vivo antibiotics elution from composite (42days) showed effective concentration against MRSA without eliciting drug-toxicity. Platelets activation by composite was an extraordinary feature. The in vivo studies also proved the superiority of composite cement than other treatment methods in terms of faster infection control and osteosynthesis. Based particularly on drug elution and in vivo results, this newly developed cement can successfully be used in clinical cases of chronic osteomyelitis.

  6. A novel, multi-barrier, drug eluting calcium sulfate/biphasic calcium phosphate biodegradable composite bone cement for treatment of experimental MRSA osteomyelitis in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Surajit; Roy, Subhasis; Maitra, Nilendu Jyoti; Kundu, Biswanath; Chanda, Abhijit; Datta, Someswar; Joy, Mathew

    2016-10-10

    This article discloses the development of an effective and versatile technology to prepare a novel antibiotics-loaded biodegradable composite bone cement to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal (MRSA) osteomyelitis and reports its detail in vitro characterization, drug loading efficiency, physico-mechanical properties, drug elution in simulated body fluid (SBF) and human plasma, merits and demerits over poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement. Chronic osteomyelitis in rabbit tibia (42) was induced by MRSA and composite cement was implanted to evaluate its safety and efficacy over PMMA cement and parenteral treated animals with histopathology, radiographs, bone/plasma drugs concentration, and SEM for 90days. The composite cement showed higher setting time, degradability, pH rise, injectability, in vitro drug elution but lesser mechanical strength than PMMA cement. Antibiotics release from cement beads was faster in SBF than plasma. Further, in vivo antibiotics elution from composite (42days) showed effective concentration against MRSA without eliciting drug-toxicity. Platelets activation by composite was an extraordinary feature. The in vivo studies also proved the superiority of composite cement than other treatment methods in terms of faster infection control and osteosynthesis. Based particularly on drug elution and in vivo results, this newly developed cement can successfully be used in clinical cases of chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27582374

  7. 76 FR 24519 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... order on imports of gray portland cement and cement clinker from Japan (56 FR 21658). Following first... clinker from Japan (71 FR 34892). The Commission is now conducting a third review to determine whether... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review...

  8. Past Tense Route Priming

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R.; Balota, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined whether lexical (whole word) or more rule-based (morphological constituent) processes can be locally biased by experimental list context in past tense verb inflection. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed a past tense inflection task in which list context was manipulated across blocks containing regular past tense verbs (e.g. REACH-REACHED) or irregular past tense verbs (TEACH-TAUGHT). Critical targets, consisting of half regular and half irregular verbs, were embedded within blocks and participants' inflection response latency and accuracy were assessed. The results yielded a cross-over interaction in response latencies. In the regular context there was a robust regularity effect: regular target verbs were conjugated faster than irregular target verbs. In contrast, in the irregular context, irregular target verbs were conjugated faster than regular target verbs. Experiment 2 used the same targets but in the context of either standard nonwords or nonwords ending in “-ED” to test the possibility of a phonological basis for the effect. The effect of context was eliminated. The results support the notion that distinct processes in past tense verb production can be locally biased by list context and, as shown in Experiment 2, this route priming effect was not due to phonological priming. PMID:23291293

  9. Foamed cement for squeeze cementing low-pressure, highly permeable reservoirs; Design and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chmllowski, W. ); Kondratoff, L.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Four different cement squeezing techniques have been used on wells producing from the Keg River formation in the Rainbow Lake area of Alberta, Canada. This paper evaluates 151 cement squeeze treatments performed at 96 wellsites and compares the use of foam cement vs. conventional squeeze treatments and techniques. Discussion includes key aspects, such as candidate selection, slurry design, treatment design, economic evaluation, and operational considerations.

  10. Chemical stability of seven years aged cement-PET composite waste form containing radioactive borate waste simulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, H. M.; Tawfik, M. E.; Bayoumi, T. A.

    2011-04-01

    Different samples of radioactive borate waste simulate [originating from pressurized water reactors (PWR)] have been prepared and solidified after mixing with cement-water extended polyester composite (CPC). The polymer-cement composite samples were prepared from recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste and cement paste (water/cement ratio of 40%). The prepared samples were left to set at room temperature (25 °C ± 5) under humid conditions. After 28 days curing time the obtained specimens were kept in their molds to age for 7 years under ambient conditions. Cement-polymer composite waste form specimens (CPCW) have been subjected to leach tests for both 137Cs and 60Co radionuclides according to the method proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Leaching tests were justified under various factors that may exist within the disposal site (e.g. type of leachant, surrounding temperature, leachant behavior, the leachant volume to CPCW surface area…). The obtained data after 260 days of leaching revealed that after 7 years of aging the candidate cement-polymer composite (CPC) containing radioactive borate waste samples are characterized by adequate chemical stability required for the long-term disposal process.

  11. Radiopacity evaluation of contemporary luting cements by digitization of images.

    PubMed

    Reis, José Maurício Dos Santos Nunes; Jorge, Erica Gouveia; Ribeiro, João Gustavo Rabelo; Pinelli, Ligia Antunes Pereira; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of two conventional cements (Zinc Cement and Ketac Cem Easymix), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX Luting 2) and six resin cements (Multilink, Bistite II DC, RelyX ARC, Fill Magic Dual Cement, Enforce and Panavia F) by digitization of images. Methods. Five disc-shaped specimens (10 × 1.0 mm) were made for each material, according to ISO 4049. After setting of the cements, radiographs were made using occlusal films and a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 1.0 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized, and the radiopacity of the cements was compared with the aluminum stepwedge using the software VIXWIN-2000. Data (mmAl) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results. The Zinc Cement was the most radiopaque material tested (P < 0.05). The resin cements presented higher radiopacity (P < 0.05) than the conventional (Ketac Cem Easymix) or resin-modified glass ionomer (RelyX Luting 2) cements, except for the Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce. The Multilink presented the highest radiopacity (P < 0.05) among the resin cements. Conclusion. The glass ionomer-based cements (Ketac Cem Easymix and RelyX Luting 2) and the resin cements (Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce) showed lower radiopacity values than the minimum recommended by the ISO standard. PMID:23008777

  12. Fluid-Structure Interactions for Micro-interlocked Regions of the Cement-Bone Interface

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Kenneth A.; Miller, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Experimental tests and computational modeling were used to explore the fluid dynamics at the trabeculae-cement interlock regions found in the tibial component of total knee replacements (TKR). A cement-bone construct of the proximal tibia was created to simulate the immediate post-operative condition. Gap distributions along nine trabeculae-cement regions ranged from 0 to 50.4µm (mean=12 µm). Micro-motions ranged from 0.56 to 4.7µm with a 1 MPa compressive load to the cement. Fluid-structure analysis between trabeculae and cement used idealized models with parametric evaluation of loading direction, gap closing fraction, gap thickness, loading frequency, and fluid viscosity. The highest fluid shear stresses (926 Pa) along the trabecular surface were found for conditions with very thin gaps and large closing fractions; much larger than reported physiological levels (~ 1–5 Pa). A second fluid-structure model was created with provision for bone resorption using a constitutive model with resorption velocity proportional to fluid shear rate. A lower cut-off was used, below which bone resorption would not occur (50 1/s). Results showed that there was initially high shear rates (> 1000 1/s) that diminished after initial trabecular resorption. Resorption continued in high shear rate regions, resulting in a final shape with bone left deep in the cement layer, and is consistent with morphology found in postmortem retrievals. Small gaps between the trabecular surface and cement in the immediate post-operative state, produce fluid flow conditions that appear to be supra-physiologic; these may cause fluid induced lysis of trabeculae in the micro-interlock regions. PMID:23480611

  13. Characterization and utilization of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) as partial replacements of Portland cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Om Shervan

    mineralogical phases within CKDs. It was found that CKDs can contain significant amounts of amorphous material (>30%) and clinker compounds (>20%) and small amounts of slag and/or flyash (<5%) and calcium langbeinite (<5%). The dissolution of ionic species and composition of the liquid phase play an important role in PC hydration. The dissolved ion contributions from CKDs were compared to PC using dilute stirred suspensions at 10 minutes and it was found that the ion contributions from CKDs are qualitatively the same as the ion contributions from PC, with the exception of chloride ions. The second objective was to utilize the material characterization analysis to determine the relationships among the composition properties of CKD-PC blends and their effects on fresh and hardened properties. The study found that CKDs from preheater/precalciner kilns have different effects on workability and heat evolution than CKDs from wet and long-dry kilns due to the presence of very reactive and high free lime contents (>20%). The blends with the two CKDs from preheater/precalciner plants had higher paste water demand, lower mortar flows, and higher heat generation during initial hydrolysis in comparison to all other CKD-PC blends and control cements. The hardened properties of CKD as a partial substitute of PC appear to be governed by the sulfate content of the CKD-PC blend (the form of the CKD sulfate is not significant). According to analysis of the ASTM expansion in limewater test results, the CKD-PC blend sulfate content should be less than ˜0.40% above the optimum sulfate content of the PC. It was also found that the sulfate contribution of CKD behaves similar to gypsum. Therefore, CKD-PC blends could be optimized for sulfate content by using CKD as a partial substitute of gypsum during the grinding process to control the early hydration of C3A. The wet and long-dry kiln CKDs contain significant amounts of calcium carbonate (>20%) which could also be used as partial replacement of

  14. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  15. Development and Characterization of Biphasic Hydroxyapatite/β-TCP Cements

    PubMed Central

    Gallinetti, Sara; Canal, Cristina; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Ferreira, J

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) have relevant properties as synthetic bone grafts, such as tunable resorption, bioactivity, and intrinsic osteoinduction. However, they have some limitations associated to their condition of high-temperature ceramics. In this work self-setting Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Cements (BCPCs) with different HA/β-TCP ratios were obtained from self-setting α-TCP/β-TCP pastes. The strategy used allowed synthesizing BCPCs with modulated composition, compressive strength, and specific surface area. Due to its higher solubility, α-TCP was fully hydrolyzed to a calcium-deficient HA (CDHA), whereas β-TCP remained unreacted and completely embedded in the CDHA matrix. Increasing amounts of the non-reacting β-TCP phase resulted in a linear decrease of the compressive strength, in association to the decreasing amount of precipitated HA crystals, which are responsible for the mechanical consolidation of apatitic cements. Ca2+ release and degradation in acidic medium was similar in all the BCPCs within the timeframe studied, although differences might be expected in longer term studies once β-TCP, the more soluble phase was exposed to the surrounding media. PMID:25866411

  16. Study of leaching mechanisms of caesium ions incorporated in Ordinary Portland Cement.

    PubMed

    Papadokostaki, Kyriaki G; Savidou, Anastasia

    2009-11-15

    In this work, a study of the leaching kinetics of Cs(+) ions from cement paste solids, containing inactive Cs(2)SO(4), is presented, involving (i) the parallel performance of leaching experiments at two temperatures (30 degrees C and 70 degrees C); (ii) the performance of leaching tests with intermediate changes in temperature between 30 degrees C and 70 degrees C; (iii) the use of specimens of two different thicknesses and (iv) the determination of the distribution of Cs(+) in the cement specimen at various stages of the leaching test. The results of leaching studies at 30 degrees C with cement solids simulating the composition of real radioactive wastes, containing NaNO(3), small amounts of inactive CsNO(3) and traces of (137)Cs(+) are also reported. Concentration profiles of Cs(+) in inactive specimens showed that part of the Cs(+) (20-30%) tends to be immobilized in the matrix, while elution of the readily leachable portion follows Fick's law reasonably well. No immobilized Cs(+) was detected in the samples containing considerable amounts of NaNO(3). Long-term leaching experiments (up to 8 years) revealed acceleration of the elution process (not detectable in short-term tests), attributable to increase in porosity caused by erosion of the cement matrix. Sorption experiments of Cs(+) ions by cement granules indicated that adsorption on cement pore surfaces is not significant. On the other hand, the leaching tests at two different temperatures or with intermediate changes in temperature between 30 degrees C and 70 degrees C, yielded activation energies that indicated a more complicated kinetic behavior.

  17. Microwave radiometry for cement kiln temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D; Wang, Lingyun; Ryza, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The maximum temperature inside a cement kiln is a critical operating parameter, but is often difficult or impossible to measure. We present here the first data that show a correlation between cement kiln temperature measured using a microwave radiometer and product chemistry over an eight-hour period. The microwave radiometer senses radiation in the 12-13 GHz range and has been described previously [Stephan and Pearce (2002), JMPEE 37: 112-124].

  18. Is the Past Irrelevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banowsky, William S.

    1972-01-01

    Author sees a cultish emphasis on the new and the now" sweeping this country and believes we must avoid the cut-flower syndrome of being beautiful but rootless by not severing ties with the past. History is germane and so are many areas of the high school curriculum now under attack for their irrelevance. (Editor/RB)

  19. Rate of CO2 Attack on Hydrated Class H Well Cement under Geologic Sequestration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kutchko, Barbara G.; Strazisar, Brian R.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Dzombak, David A.; Thaulow, Niels

    2008-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the degradation of hardened cement paste due to exposure to CO2 and brine under geologic sequestration conditions (T = 50 degrees C and 30.3 MPa). The goal was to determine the rate of reaction of hydrated cement exposed to supercritical CO2 and to CO2-saturated brine to assess the potential impact of degradation in existing wells on CO2 storage integrity. Two different forms of chemical alteration were observed. The supercritical CO2 alteration of cement was similar in process to cement in contact with atmospheric CO2 (ordinary carbonation), while alteration of cement exposed to CO2-saturated brine was typical of acid attack on cement. Extrapolation of the hydrated cement alteration rate measured for I year indicates a penetration depth range of 1.00 +/- 0.07 mm for the CO2-saturated brine and 1.68 +/- 0.24 mm for the supercritical CO2 after 30 years. These penetration depths are consistent with observations of field samples from an enhanced oil recovery site after 30 years of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under similar temperature and pressure conditions. These results suggest that significant degradation due to matrix diffusion of CO2 in intact Class H neat hydrated cement is unlikely on time scales of decades.

  20. A new method to analyze copolymer based superplasticizer traces in cement leachates.

    PubMed

    Guérandel, Cyril; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Krier, Gabriel; De Lanève, Michel; Guillot, Xavier; Pierre, Christian; Muller, Jean François

    2011-03-15

    Enhancing the flowing properties of fresh concrete is a crucial step for cement based materials users. This is done by adding polymeric admixtures. Such additives have enabled to improve final mechanicals properties and the development of new materials like high performance or self compacting concrete. Like this, the superplasticizers are used in almost cement based materials, in particular for concrete structures that can have a potential interaction with drinking water. It is then essential to have suitable detection techniques to assess whether these organic compounds are dissolved in water after a leaching process or not. The main constituent of the last generation superplasticizer is a PolyCarboxylate-Ester copolymer (PCE), in addition this organic admixture contains polyethylene oxide (free PEO) which constitutes a synthesis residue. Numerous analytical methods are available to characterize superplasticizer content. Although these techniques work well, they do not bring suitable detection threshold to analyze superplasticizer traces in solution with high mineral content such as leachates of hardened cement based materials formulated with superplasticizers. Moreover those techniques do not enable to distinguish free PEO from PCE in the superplasticizer. Here we discuss two highly sensitive analytical methods based on mass spectrometry suitable to perform a rapid detection of superplasticizer compounds traces in CEM I cement paste leachates: MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, is used to determine the free PEO content in the leachate. However, industrial copolymers (such as PCE) are characterized by high molecular weight and polymolecular index. These two parameters lead to limitation concerning analysis of copolymers by MALDI-TOFMS. In this study, we demonstrate how pyrolysis and a Thermally assisted Hydrolysis/Methylation coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, provides good results for the detection of PCE copolymer traces in CEM I cement paste

  1. OPC Paste Samples Exposed To Aggressive Solutions. Cementitious Barriers Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2014-11-01

    The study presented in this report focused on a low-activity wasteform containing a high-pH pore solution with a significant level of sulfate. The purpose of the study was to improve understanding of the complex concrete/wasteform reactive transport problem, in particular, the role of pH in sulfate attack. Paste samples prepared at three different water-to-cement ratios were tested. The mixtures were prepared with ASTM Type I cement, without additional admixtures. The samples were exposed to two different sodium sulfate contact solutions. The first solution was prepared at 0.15M Na2SO4. The second solution also incorporated 0.5M NaOH, to mimic the high pH conditions found in Saltstone. The data collected indicated that, in Na2SO4 solution, damage occurs to the pastes. In the case of the high-pH sulfate solution (Na2SO4 + NaOH), no signs of damage were observed on any of the paste mixtures. These results indicate that the high sulfate content found in the wasteform pore solution will not necessarily lead to severe damage to concrete. Good-quality mixtures could thus prove durable over the long term, and act as an effective barrier to prevent radionuclides from reaching the environment.

  2. Respiratory effects of portland cement dust

    SciTech Connect

    Abrons, H.L.; Sanderson, W.T.; Petersen, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the respiratory effects of Portland cement dust was conducted. The cohort consisted of 2,736 cement workers at 16 facilities in the United States. The comparisons consisted of 2,213 individuals in activities not involving dust exposure. Spirometry testing was performed. Respiratory-symptom questionnaires were administered. Chest x-rays were taken and examined. Personal sampling for total and respirable dust, quartz, and oxides of sulfur and nitrogen was performed. Cement workers had a significantly elevated adjusted-odds ratio for dyspnea, rounded and irregular small x-ray opacities, and pleural abnormalities. None of the ventilatory-function variables were significantly different between cement workers and the comparisons. The authors conclude that cement dust exerts little adverse effect on respiratory symptoms and ventilatory function. To determine whether the increase in x-ray abnormalities represents pneumoconiosis or another pathological process would require histological study. There is insufficient evidence to suggest a change in the exposure limit for cement dust.

  3. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

  4. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  5. Thermal Analysis of the Tibial Cement Interface with Modern Cementing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vertullo, Christopher J.; Zbrojkiewicz, David; Vizesi, Frank; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The major cause of cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) failure is aseptic loosening of the tibial component necessitating revision surgery. Recently, multiple techniques have been described to maximize cement penetration depth and density in the proximal tibia during TKA to potentially avoid early loosening. While cement polymerisation is an exothermic reaction, minimal investigation into the proximal tibial thermal safety margin during cement polymerisation has been undertaken. In animal models osseous injury occurs at temperatures greater than 47 °C when applied for one minute. The aim of this study was to investigate the cement bone interface temperatures in TKA using modern tibial cementing techniques with a cadaveric tibial tray model. Methods: Eight adult cadavers were obtained with the proximal tibial surface prepared by a fellowship trained arthroplasty surgeon. Third generation cementation techniques were used and temperatures during cement polymerization on cadaveric knee arthroplasty models were recorded using thermocouples. Results: The results showed that no tibial cement temperature exceeded 44 °C for more than 1 minute. Two of the eight cadaveric tibias recorded maximum temperatures greater than 44 °C for 55 seconds and 33 seconds, just less than the 60 seconds reported to cause thermal injury. Average maximum polymerization temperatures did not correlate with deeper cement penetration or tray material. Maximum mantle temperatures were not statistically different between metal and all polyethylene tibial trays. Conclusion: Our investigation suggests that modern cementing techniques result in maximum mantle temperatures that are less than previously recorded temperatures required to cause thermal osseous injury, although this thermal injury safety margin is quite narrow at an average of 4.95 °C (95% confidence interval ± 4.31). PMID:27073585

  6. Effect of calcium chloride on the hydration and leaching of lead-retarded cement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheeseman, C.R.; Asavapisit, S. )

    1999-06-01

    The effect of adding CaCl[sub 2] to ordinary portland cement containing 10% (by weight) of a synthetic lead hydroxide waste has been investigated using differential thermal analysis, conduction calorimetry, and by analyzing solutions extracted from mixes during the early stages of hydration. Lead wastes are known to retard initial cement hydration reactions, and for the waste loading used in these experiments the peak in the heat of hydration curve was delayed from 8.7 to 172 h. The addition of CaCl[sub 2] reduced this retarding effect but was associated with a decrease in the overall extent of cement hydration, particularly at high CaCl[sub 2] concentrations. The acceleration induced is associated with lower concentrations of hydroxyl ions in solution. This reduces dissolution and subsequent adsorption of Pb(OH)[sub 3][sup [minus

  7. Quantitative sensing of corroded steel rebar embedded in cement mortar specimens using ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Le, Viet; Tang, Qixiang; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcing bars (rebars) is the primary cause for the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Traditional corrosion monitoring methods such as half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance can only detect the presence of corrosion but cannot quantify it. This study presents an experimental investigation of quantifying degree of corrosion of steel rebar inside cement mortar specimens using ultrasonic testing (UT). A UT device with two 54 kHz transducers was used to measure ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of cement mortar, uncorroded and corroded reinforced cement mortar specimens, utilizing the direct transmission method. The results obtained from the study show that UPV decreases linearly with increase in degree of corrosion and corrosion-induced cracks (surface cracks). With respect to quantifying the degree of corrosion, a model was developed by simultaneously fitting UPV and surface crack width measurements to a two-parameter linear model. The proposed model can be used for predicting the degree of corrosion of steel rebar embedded in cement mortar under similar conditions used in this study up to 3.03%. Furthermore, the modeling approach can be applied to corroded reinforced concrete specimens with additional modification. The findings from this study show that UT has the potential of quantifying the degree of corrosion inside reinforced cement mortar specimens.

  8. Cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, M.; Rossen, J.; Martirena, F.; Scrivener, K.

    2012-12-15

    This study investigates the coupled substitution of metakaolin and limestone in Portland cement (PC). The mechanical properties were studied in mortars and the microstructural development in pastes by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and isothermal calorimetry. We show that 45% of substitution by 30% of metakaolin and 15% of limestone gives better mechanical properties at 7 and 28 days than the 100% PC reference. Our results show that calcium carbonate reacts with alumina from the metakaolin, forming supplementary AFm phases and stabilizing ettringite. Using simple mass balance calculations derived from thermogravimetry results, we also present the thermodynamic simulation for the system, which agrees fairly well with the experimental observations. It is shown that gypsum addition should be carefully balanced when using calcined clays because it considerably influences the early age strength by controlling the very rapid reaction of aluminates.

  9. Structural evolution of an alkali sulfate activated slag cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of sodium sulfate content and curing duration (from fresh paste up to 18 months) on the binder structure of sodium sulfate activated slag cements was evaluated. Isothermal calorimetry results showed an induction period spanning the first three days after mixing, followed by an acceleration-deceleration peak corresponding to the formation of bulk reaction products. Ettringite, a calcium aluminium silicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) phase, and a hydrotalcite-like Mg-Al layered double hydroxide have been identified as the main reaction products, independent of the Na2SO4 dose. No changes in the phase assemblage were detected in the samples with curing from 1 month up to 18 months, indicating a stable binder structure. The most significant changes upon curing at advanced ages observed were growth of the AFt phase and an increase in silicate chain length in the C-A-S-H, resulting in higher strength.

  10. Investigation of Possible Wellbore Cement Failures During Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-11-01

    We model and assess the possibility of shear failure, using the Mohr-Coulomb model ? along the vertical well by employing a rigorous coupled flow-geomechanic analysis. To this end, we vary the values of cohesion between the well casing and the surrounding cement to representing different quality levels of the cementing operation (low cohesion corresponds to low-quality cement and/or incomplete cementing). The simulation results show that there is very little fracturing when the cement is of high quality.. Conversely, incomplete cementing and/or weak cement can causes significant shear failure and the evolution of long fractures/cracks along the vertical well. Specifically, low cohesion between the well and cemented areas can cause significant shear failure along the well, but the same cohesion as the cemented zone does not cause shear failure. When the hydraulic fracturing pressure is high, low cohesion of the cement can causes fast propagation of shear failure and of the resulting fracture/crack, but a high-quality cement with no weak zones exhibits limited shear failure that is concentrated near the bottom of the vertical part of the well. Thus, high-quality cement and complete cementing along the vertical well appears to be the strongest protection against shear failure of the wellbore cement and, consequently, against contamination hazards to drinking water aquifers during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  11. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... review. Background The Commission instituted this review on May 2, 2011 (76 FR 24519) and determined on August 5, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 50252, August 12, 2011). The Commission... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record...

  12. Low fluid leakoff cementing compositions and filtration control additive for cement

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, G.T.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described, for cementing oil or gas wells penetrating subterranean formations, capable of forming a fluid slurry when mixed with water comprising: dry hydraulic cement; and a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh. In a process for cementing a casing in an oil or gas well penetrating a subterranean formation wherein a cement slurry, formed by mixing water and hydraulic cement, is pumped down the well to flow upwardly between the casing and the subterranean formation, the improvement is described comprising: utilizing as a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, and utilizing finely ground peanut hulls wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh.

  13. Analysis of CCRL proficiency cements 151 and 152 using the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Jeffrey W. . E-mail: jeffrey.bullard@nist.gov; Stutzman, Paul E.

    2006-08-15

    To test the ability of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software to predict cement hydration properties, characterization of mineralogy and phase distribution is necessary. Compositional and textural characteristics of Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) cements 151 and 152 were determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis followed by computer modeling of hydration properties. The general procedure to evaluate a cement is as follows: (1) two-dimensional SEM backscattered electron and X-ray microanalysis images of the cement are obtained, along with a measured particle size distribution (PSD); (2) based on analysis of these images and the measured PSD, three-dimensional microstructures of various water-to-cement ratios are created and hydrated using VCCTL, and (3) the model predictions for degree of hydration under saturated conditions, heat of hydration (ASTM C186), setting time (ASTM C191), and strength development of mortar cubes (ASTM C109) are compared to experimental measurements either performed at NIST or at the participating CCRL proficiency sample evaluation laboratories. For both cements, generally good agreement is observed between the model predictions and the experimental data.

  14. Angiocardiography - Past and present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.

    1976-01-01

    Angiocardiography is defined as an X-ray procedure which uses an intravascularly injected contrast material for visualization of the internal anatomy of the heart and great vessels. Past and present efforts in angiocardiography technology and methodology are reviewed, with special emphasis on qualitative and quantitative measurements of heart and vessel geometry. One of the more recent applications of angiographic image analysis has been for pattern recognition of margin motions over a cardiac cycle, termed contourography. Angiocardiography will continue to serve, as it has served in the past, as the principal standard of reference for calibration and/or comparison of newer methods for determining volume or dimensional change, depending on further technologic advances in X-ray equipment and means for displaying computer-processed information.

  15. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  16. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  17. [Burns caused by cement mortar (based on expert opinion)].

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, D

    1984-01-01

    A 35-year-old farmer with scars on his right arm, following erosion obviously due to wet cement (case of an expert opinion), was examined. Cement water had continuously soaked his shirt while he was planing a freshly applied wet cement ceiling with his right arm upwards. The cement did not contain special additives, so the normal alkalinity of wet cement and occlusion effects caused the erosion. The farmer sued the manufacturer of the cement for damages because of missing warning notices. The court decided in his favor.

  18. Multi-scale Performance and Durability of Carbon Nanofiber/Cement Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, F.; Zhang, L.; Ince, C.

    This paper reports on recent work that is directed at understanding the fundamental controlling mechanisms of multi-scale, environmental weathering of nano-structured cement-based materials through an integrated experimental and computational program. The effect of surface treatment and admixture addition on the incorporation of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) in cement composites was studied. Silica fume and surface treatment with nitric acid facilitated CNF dispersion. The CNFs were found as individual fibers anchored in the hydration products throughout the cement pastes and as entangled networks in cavities. The presence of the CNFs did not modify the compressive or tensile strength of the composite but did provide it with a fair level of mechanical integrity post testing. Preliminary results on durability indicated a residual effect of the CNFs after decalcification of the composites as manifested by a slow load dissipation after peak load under compression. Molecular dynamics modeling of the reinforcing structure-cement phase interface demonstrated that manipulation of the interface characteristics may provide a method to control the composite properties.

  19. Strain sensitivity of carbon nanotube cement-based composites for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonella; Ubertini, Filippo; Laflamme, Simon; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, Annibale L.; Kenny, Josè M.

    2016-04-01

    Cement-based smart sensors appear particularly suitable for monitoring applications, due to their self-sensing abilities, their ease of use, and their numerous possible field applications. The addition of conductive carbon nanofillers into a cementitious matrix provides the material with piezoresistive characteristics and enhanced sensitivity to mechanical alterations. The strain-sensing ability is achieved by correlating the variation of external loads or deformations with the variation of specific electrical parameters, such as the electrical resistance. Among conductive nanofillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for the fabrication of self-monitoring composites. However, some issues related to the filler dispersion and the mix design of cementitious nanoadded materials need to be further investigated. For instance, a small difference in the added quantity of a specific nanofiller in a cement-matrix composite can substantially change the quality of the dispersion and the strain sensitivity of the resulting material. The present research focuses on the strain sensitivity of concrete, mortar and cement paste sensors fabricated with different amounts of carbon nanotube inclusions. The aim of the work is to investigate the quality of dispersion of the CNTs in the aqueous solutions, the physical properties of the fresh mixtures, the electromechanical properties of the hardened materials, and the sensing properties of the obtained transducers. Results show that cement-based sensors with CNT inclusions, if properly implemented, can be favorably applied to structural health monitoring.

  20. Steel foundry electric arc furnace dust management: stabilization by using lime and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat

    2008-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate treatment for steel foundry electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) prior to permanent disposal. Lime and Portland cement (PC)-based stabilization was applied to treat the EAFD that contains lead and zinc above the landfilling limits, and is listed by USEPA as hazardous waste designation K061 and by EU as 10 02 07. Three types of paste samples were prepared with EAFD content varying between 0 and 90%. The first type contained the EAFD and Portland cement, the second contained the EAFD, Portland cement, and lime, and the third contained the EAFD and lime. All the samples were subjected to toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) after an air-curing period of 28 days. pH changes were monitored and acid neutralization capacity of the samples were examined. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated in terms of reducing the heavy metal leachability to the levels below the USEPA landfilling criteria. An optimum composition for the EAFD stabilization was formulated as 30% EAFD +35% lime +35% Portland cement to achieve the landfilling criteria. The pH interval, where the solubility of the heavy metals in the EAFD was minimized, was found to be between 8.2 and 9.4.

  1. Effect of calcium carbonate on the compliance of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Khairoun, I; Boltong, M G; Driessens, F C; Planell, J A

    1997-12-01

    Clinical requirements for calcium phosphate bone cements were formulated in terms of the initial setting time, the final setting time, the cohesion time and the ultimate compressive strength. Three cement formulations were tested. The previously developed Biocement H was made of a powder containing alpha-tertiary calcium phosphate and precipitated hydroxyapatite. Biocement B2 powder was made by adding some CaCO3 to Biocement H, whereas Biocement B1 was made by adding some CaCO3 but with simultaneous adjustment of the amount of precipitated hydroxyapatite.The liquid/ powder ratio of the cement paste and the accelerator concentrations (percentage Na2HPO4) in cement liquid were varied. For Biocement H there was no combination of L/P ratio and percentage Na2HPO4 for which all clinical requirements were satisfied. However, there was an area of full compliance for Biocements B1 and B2, of which that for B1 was the largest. Therefore, Biocement B1 may be applied in clinical situations as those in orthopaedics, plastic and reconstructive surgery and oral and maxillofacial surgery, even when early contact with blood is inevitable.

  2. Abyssal seep site cementation: west Florida escarpment

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C.; Gardemal, M.; Trumbull, W.; Showers, W.

    1988-02-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways. Bulk /delta//sup 13/C values of the carbonates are low, ranging from /minus/ 2.4 to /minus/ 48.5 /per thousand/ (PDB) and implicating as the carbonate source the biogenic methane that occurs in high concentrations at the seeps. The interaction of methane and sulfate in these cement reactions is still unclear. The presence of course mollusk-fragment hardgrounds overlying an eroded limestone and covered by hemipelagics, if encountered elsewhere, could be mistaken for a much shallower setting. The erosion of limestone scarps and the concurrent development of deep hardgrounds containing a fossil chemosynthetic fauna at the unconformity is a scenario that needs to be included in the growing list of limestone facies interpretations.

  3. Influence of Curing Light Attenuation Caused by Aesthetic Indirect Restorative Materials on Resin Cement Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Pick, Bárbara; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Junior, Washington Steagall; Kawano, Yoshio; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To verify the effect of interposing different indirect restorative materials on degree of conversion (DC), hardness, and flexural strength of a dual-cure resin cement. Methods: Discs (2 mm-thick, n=5) of four indirect restorative materials were manufactured: a layered glass-ceramic (GC); a heat-pressed lithium disilicate-based glass-ceramic veneered with the layered glass-ceramic (LD); a micro-hybrid (MH); and a micro-filled (MF) indirect composite resin. The light transmittance of these materials was determined using a double-beam spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Bar-shaped specimens of a dual-cure resin cement (Nexus 2/SDS Kerr), with (dual-cure mode) and without the catalyst paste (light-cure mode), were photoactivated through the discs using either a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) or a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. As a control, specimens were photoactivated without the interposed discs. Specimens were stored at 37ºC for 24h before being submitted to FT-Raman spectrometry (n=3), Knoop microhardness (n=6) and three-point bending (n=6) tests. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: MH presented the highest transmittance. The DC was lower in light-cure mode than in dual-cure mode. All restorative materials reduced the cement microhardness in light-cure mode. GC and LD with QTH and GC with LED decreased the strength of the cement for both activation modes compared to the controls. Curing units did not affect DC or microhardness, except when the dual-cure cement was photoactivated through LD (LED>QTH). Flexural strength was higher with QTH compared to LED. Conclusions: Differences in transmittance among the restorative materials significantly influenced cement DC and flexural strength, regardless of the activation mode, as well as the microhardness of the resin cement tested in light-cure mode. Microhardness was not impaired by the interposed materials when the resin cement was used in dual-cure mode. PMID:20613921

  4. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels of Cements and Cement Composites in the Slovak Republic

    PubMed Central

    Eštoková, Adriana; Palaščáková, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices) of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in the cements ranged from 8.58–19.1 Bq·kg−1, 9.78–26.3 Bq·kg−1 and 156.5–489.4 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The radiological parameters in cement samples were calculated as follows: mean radium equivalent activity Raeq = 67.87 Bq·kg−1, gamma index Iγ = 0.256, alpha index Iα = 0.067, the absorbed gamma dose rate D = 60.76 nGy·h−1, external hazard index Hex = 0.182 and internal hazard index Hin was 0.218. The radionuclide activity in composites ranged from 6.84–10.8 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 13.1–20.5 Bq·kg−1 for 232Th and 250.4–494.4 Bq·kg−1 for 40K. The calculated radiological parameters of cements were lower than calculated radiological parameters of cement composites. PMID:24351739

  5. Plug cementing: Horizontal to vertical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, D.G.; Heathman, J.F.; Griffith, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an in-depth study of cement plug placement that was conducted with large-scale models for the improvement of plug cementing practices and plug integrity. Common hole and workstring geometries were examined with various rheology and density ratios between the drilling fluid and cement. The critical conditions dictating the difference between success and failure for various wellbore angles and conditions were explored, and the mechanisms controlling slurry movement before and after placement are now better understood. An understanding of these mechanisms allows the engineer to better tailor a design to specific hole conditions. Controversial concepts regarding plug-setting practices have been examined and resolved. The cumulative effects of density, rheology, and hole angle are major factors affecting plug success. While the Boycott effect and an extrusion effect were observed to be predominant in inclined wellbores, a spiraling or {open_quotes}roping{close_quotes} effect controls slurry movement in vertical wellbores. Ultimate success of a cement plug can be obtained if allowances are made for these effects in the job design, provided all other previously published recommended placement practices are followed. Results of this work can be applied to many sidetracking and plug-to-abandon operations. Additionally, the understanding of the fluid movement (creep) mechanisms holds potential for use in primary and remedial cementing work, and in controlling the placement of noncementitious fluids in the wellbore.

  6. New technology improves cement-slurry design

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A promising geothermal concession is located in a tea plantation on the island of Java. A drilling project was undertaken to evaluate and harness this resource for geothermal electricity generation. The program used two slimhole rigs to drill appraisal wells to establish the potential of the field. Geothermal wells present the most severe conditions to which cements are exposed. As a result, their performance requirements are among the most stringent. Geothermal cements are usually designed to provide at least 1,000 psi compressive strength and no more than 1.0-md water permeability. While casings with tight annular clearances require that good cementing practices be observed, they also create conditions that demand much greater care and control in slurry and procedure design than regular casing cementation. Free-water and thickening-time requirements are similar for geothermal and slimhole conditions, but the use of perlite and silica flour complicate the rheology required for geothermal wells. The paper describes liquid-cement premix, applications, laboratory testing, field pilot testing, and field operations.

  7. Sulfate attack on cement-stabilized sand

    SciTech Connect

    Rollings, R.S.; Burkes, J.P.; Rollings, M.P.

    1999-05-01

    A 3.5-km (2.2 mi) section of a road in Georgia developed unexpected transverse bumps within 6 months after construction. The source of the bumps appeared to be expansion within the cement-stabilized base course. Laboratory examination of samples from areas showing distress revealed the presence of ettringite, a calcium sulfoaluminate the formation of which can be accompanied by severe expansion. This expansive materials was the probable cause of the volume changes causing the transverse bumps. The calcium and alumina needed to form ettringite ware available from the portland cement and the stabilized soil`s clay minerals. The source of the sulfur was identified as the well water that was mixed with the cement-stabilized base. Sulfate attack of cement-stabilized soils is a relatively infrequent problem, but it is highly destructive when it occurs. Currently, there are no firm criteria for identifying when sulfate attack of a cement-stabilized soil is a potential problem nor are there established methods of preventing the attack.

  8. Pulmonary Artery Cement Embolism after a Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nooh, Anas; Abduljabbar, Fahad H.; Abduljabbar, Ahmed H.; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Context. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure most commonly used for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Although it is relatively safe, complications have been reported over time. Among those complications, massive cement pulmonary embolism is considered a rare complication. Here we report a case of massive diffuse cement pulmonary embolism following percutaneous vertebroplasty for a vertebral compression fracture. Study Design. Case report. Methods. This is a 70-year-old female who underwent vertebroplasty for T11 and T12 vertebral compression fracture. Results. CT-scan revealed an incidental finding of cement embolism in the pulmonary trunk and both pulmonary arteries. Since the patient was asymptomatic, she was monitored closely and she did not need any intervention. Conclusion. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure used for treatment of vertebral compression fracture. Despite the low rate of complications, a pulmonary cement embolism can occur. The consequences of cement embolism range widely from being asymptomatic to embolism that can cause paralysis, radiculopathy, or a fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:26221556

  9. Application of solvlent change techniques to blended cements used to immobilize low-level radioactive liquid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A.A.

    1996-07-01

    The microstructures of hardened portland and blended cement pastes, including those being considered for use in immobilizing hazardous wastes, have a complex pore structure that changes with time. In solvent exchange, the pore structure is examined by immersing a saturated sample in a large volume of solvent that is miscible with the pore fluid. This paper reports the results of solvent replacement measurements on several blended cements mixed at a solution:solids ratio of 1.0 with alkaline solutions from the simulation of the off- gas treatment system in a vitrification facility treating low-level radioactive liquid wastes. The results show that these samples have a lower permeability than ordinary portland cement samples mixed at a water:solids ratio of 0.70, despite having a higher volume of porosity. The microstructure is changed by these alkaline solutions, and these changes have important consequences with regard to durability.

  10. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  11. Influence of cementation and cement type on the fracture load testing methodology of anterior crowns made of different materials.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Beuer, Florian; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Wimmer, Timea

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of cementation on fracture load of anterior crowns made of CAD/CAM-resin-blocks (ART), leucite-reinforced glass-ceramics (LRG), lithium disilicate ceramics (LIT), veneered zirconia (ZRO) and veneered alloy (DEG). Each crown group (n=15/subgroup) was cemented on the metal abutment as follows: i. using glass ionomer, ii. using self-adhesive resin cement, and iii. not cemented. Crowns were tested and analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVA (Scheffé test), and Weibull statistics (p<0.05). Within LRG, self-adhesive cemented subgroup showed higher fracture load compared to other groups (p<0.001). Among DEG, lower results were measured for non-cemented crowns than for cemented (p<0.001). For ART, LIT and ZRO no influence of cementation was observed. For fracture load test methodology, metal ceramic crowns should be generally cemented. Glass-ceramic crowns should be cemented using adhesive cement. Cementation and cement type did not have an influence on the fracture load results for resin, zirconia or lithium disilicate crowns.

  12. The importance of a thick cement mantle depends on stem geometry and stem-cement interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Caruana, J; Janssen, D; Verdonschot, N; Blunn, G W

    2009-04-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of different thicknesses. Opinion is divided on whether a thick mantle enhances implant longevity. This study investigates the effect of cement mantle thickness on accumulated damage in the cement, and how this is influenced by the presence or absence of a proximal collar and on whether the stem-cement interface remains bonded. Three-dimensional finite element simulations incorporating creep and non-linear damage accumulation were performed to investigate cracking in the cement mantles around Stanmore Hips under physiologically informed stair-climbing and gait loads. Cement mantle thickness, stem-cement interfacial bonding, and collar design were varied to assess the interactive effects of these parameters. In all cases, damage levels were three to six times higher when the stem-cement interface remained bonded. Cement mantle thickness had little effect on cement damage accumulation around debonded collared stems but was critical in both bonded and collarless cases, where a thicker mantle reduced cement cracking. Damage around a smooth debonded stem with a collar is thus much less sensitive to cement thickness than around bonded or collarless stems.

  13. 3. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, north facade. Loading ramp on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, north facade. Loading ramp on the right. Utility building, intrusion, on the far right. - Curtis Wharf, Cement & Plaster Warehouse, O & Second Streets, Anacortes, Skagit County, WA

  14. 6. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, interior. View looking south. Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, interior. View looking south. Original wood roof truss can be seen at upper left. - Curtis Wharf, Cement & Plaster Warehouse, O & Second Streets, Anacortes, Skagit County, WA

  15. 4. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, southeast corner, showing alterations; pent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, southeast corner, showing alterations; pent roof, window and door openings, siding, brick foundation sheathing. - Curtis Wharf, Cement & Plaster Warehouse, O & Second Streets, Anacortes, Skagit County, WA

  16. Microemulsions for use as spaces in well cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Carriay, J.; De Lautrec, J.

    1980-09-23

    New application of microemulsions as buffers between the slurry and the cement in the cementation of oil wells. The microemulsions contain an amphoteric surfactant selected from the group of alkyl dimethyl betaines.

  17. Cortical bone screw fixation in ionically modified apatite cements.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Duncan, C O; Dover, M S; Bassett, D C; Nishikawa, H; Monaghan, A; Gbureck, U

    2005-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite cements are used in reconstruction of the face; usually in well-defined cavities where the cement can be stabilized without the need for internal fixation. A hydroxyapatite cement that could enable screw fixation and some loading therefore has considerable potential in maxillofacial reconstruction. It has been demonstrated recently that water demand of calcium phosphate cements can be reduced by ionically modifying the liquid component. This study investigated the capacity of an ionically modified precompacted apatite cement to retain self-tapping cortical bone screws. Screw pullout forces were determined in the direction of the screw long axis and perpendicular to it, using cortical bone and polymethylmethacrylate cement as a control. In bending pullout tests, measured forces to remove screws from ionically modified precompacted cement were insignificantly different from cortical bone. However, pullout forces of bone screws from hydroxyapatite cement decreased with aging time in vitro.

  18. Injection biomechanics of bone cements used in vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Baroud, G; Bohner, M; Heini, P; Steffen, T

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic bone fractures is growing exponentially as the western population ages and as life expectancy increases. Vertebroplasty, where acrylic or calcium phosphate cement is injected into the weakened vertebrae to augment them, is an emerging procedure for treating spinal fragility fractures. However, cement injection is currently limited because there are no clear standards for a safe, reproducible and predictable procedure. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role that bone cements play in the underlying bio-mechanisms that affect the outcomes of cement injection. Our most important finding after combining clinical, laboratory and theoretical research is that the process of cement injection poses conflicting demands on bone cements. The cements are required to be more viscous and less viscous at the same time. The challenge therefore is to develop biomaterials, techniques and/or devices that can overcome or manage the conflicting demands on cement viscosity.

  19. Magnesia-Based Cements: A Journey of 150 Years, and Cements for the Future?

    PubMed

    Walling, Sam A; Provis, John L

    2016-04-13

    This review examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 150 years of work worldwide on magnesium-based inorganic cements, with a focus on both scientific and patent literature. Magnesium carbonate, phosphate, silicate-hydrate, and oxysalt (both chloride and sulfate) cements are all assessed. Many such cements are ideally suited to specialist applications in precast construction, road repair, and other fields including nuclear waste immobilization. The majority of MgO-based cements are more costly to produce than Portland cement because of the relatively high cost of reactive sources of MgO and do not have a sufficiently high internal pH to passivate mild steel reinforcing bars. This precludes MgO-based cements from providing a large-scale replacement for Portland cement in the production of steel-reinforced concretes for civil engineering applications, despite the potential for CO2 emissions reductions offered by some such systems. Nonetheless, in uses that do not require steel reinforcement, and in locations where the MgO can be sourced at a competitive price, a detailed understanding of these systems enables their specification, design, and selection as advanced engineering materials with a strongly defined chemical basis.

  20. Magnesia-Based Cements: A Journey of 150 Years, and Cements for the Future?

    PubMed

    Walling, Sam A; Provis, John L

    2016-04-13

    This review examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 150 years of work worldwide on magnesium-based inorganic cements, with a focus on both scientific and patent literature. Magnesium carbonate, phosphate, silicate-hydrate, and oxysalt (both chloride and sulfate) cements are all assessed. Many such cements are ideally suited to specialist applications in precast construction, road repair, and other fields including nuclear waste immobilization. The majority of MgO-based cements are more costly to produce than Portland cement because of the relatively high cost of reactive sources of MgO and do not have a sufficiently high internal pH to passivate mild steel reinforcing bars. This precludes MgO-based cements from providing a large-scale replacement for Portland cement in the production of steel-reinforced concretes for civil engineering applications, despite the potential for CO2 emissions reductions offered by some such systems. Nonetheless, in uses that do not require steel reinforcement, and in locations where the MgO can be sourced at a competitive price, a detailed understanding of these systems enables their specification, design, and selection as advanced engineering materials with a strongly defined chemical basis. PMID:27002788

  1. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  2. Microleakage of cements for stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, K; White, S N

    1997-01-01

    Microleakage is related to recurrent decay, inflammation of vital pulps, and reinfection of previously treated root canals. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the abilities of new adhesive cements and conventional nonadhesive controls to prevent microleakage under stainless steel crowns on primary anterior teeth. Standardized preparations were made, and stainless steel crowns were adapted. Specimens were assigned randomly to cement groups: zinc phosphate (ZP), polycarboxylate (PC), glass-ionomer (GI), resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI), RMGI with a dentin bonding agent (RMGI + DBA), adhesive composite resin (ACR) and zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE). Specimens were stored in water, aged artificially, stained, embedded, and sectioned, and the microleakage was measured. Group means and standard errors were calculated. ANOVA discerned differences among groups (P < 0.0001), and Turkey's multiple comparisons testing (P < 0.05) ranked the groups from least to most microleakage as follows: [RMGI + DBA, RMGI, ACR, GI], [ZP], and [PC, ZOE]. The adhesive cements significantly reduced microleakage.

  3. Development of fluidized bed cement sintering technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Katsuji

    1994-12-31

    In the new system presented in this paper, the cement clinker is sintered, not in a rotary kiln, but in two different furnaces: a spouted bed kiln and a fluidized bed kiln. The heat generated in the process of cooling the cement clinker is recovered by a fluidized bed cooler and a packed bed cooler, which are more efficient than the conventional coolers. Compared with the rotary kiln system, the new technology significantly reduces NO{sub x} emissions, appreciably cuts energy consumption, and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions as well. Thus, the new system is an efficient cement sintering system that is friendly to the global environment. In this paper, we describe this new technology as one of the applied technologies at an industrial level that is being developed in the Clean Coal Technology Project, and we present the results from test operations at our pilot plant.

  4. High temperature expanding cement composition and use

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Erik B.; Eilers, Louis H.

    1982-01-01

    A hydratable cement composition useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expanding cement at temperatures above about 150.degree. C. comprising a water soluble sodium salt of a weak acid, a 0.1 molar aqueous solution of which salt has a pH of between about 7.5 and about 11.5, a calcium source, and a silicon source, where the atomic ratio of sodium to calcium to silicon ranges from about 0.3:0.6:1 to about 0.03:1:1; aqueous slurries prepared therefrom and the use of such slurries for plugging subterranean cavities at a temperature of at least about 150.degree. C. The invention composition is useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expansive cement having about 0.2 to about 2 percent expansion, by volume, when cured at at least 150.degree. C.

  5. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Barekatain, Behnaz; Naseri, Roohollah; Zarezadeh, Hossein; Askari, Navid; Nasiri, Saman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ultrasonic vibrations are used to remove a cemented post from a root canal requiring endodontic retreatment. Various results have been reported from the studies that evaluated the effect of ultrasonic instruments in removing the posts cemented with resin cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic energy on the retention of prefabricated metal post cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty eight extracted single root premolars were decoronated with a diamond disc leaving a 13 mm long root and endodontically treated. The root canals were obturated by gutta-percha up to 5 mm with vertical condensation method and the 8 mm post-space was prepared to receive a no. 2 long Dentorama post. The roots were placed in an incubator for 48 h in 37°C and 100% humidity. After mounting the teeth in acrylic blocks, posts were cemented in the root canals using Panavia F2.0 in 24 specimens and Maxcem Elite in 24 others. For half of the specimens in each subgroup, an ultrasonic device was applied for 4 min. Universal testing machine was used to measure the force needed to remove the posts with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the post came out of the canal. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis at 5% level of significance. Results: The removal force was not significantly different among the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia) and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite) resin cements. PMID:24379864

  6. Revision of hemiarthroplasty to total hip arthroplasty using the cement-in-cement technique.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, E J; Williams, D H; Howell, J R; Hubble, M J

    2015-12-01

    Revision of a cemented hemiarthroplasty of the hip may be a hazardous procedure with high rates of intra-operative complications. Removing well-fixed cement is time consuming and risks damaging already weak bone or perforating the femoral shaft. The cement-in-cement method avoids removal of intact cement and has shown good results when used for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). The use of this technique for the revision of a hemiarthroplasty to THA has not been previously reported. A total of 28 consecutive hemiarthroplasties (in 28 patients) were revised to a THA using an Exeter stem and the cement-in-cement technique. There were four men and 24 women; their mean age was 80 years (35 to 93). Clinical and radiographic data, as well as operative notes, were collected prospectively and no patient was lost to follow-up. Four patients died within two years of surgery. The mean follow up of the remainder was 70 months (25 to 124). Intra-operatively there was one proximal perforation, one crack of the femoral calcar and one acetabular fracture. No femoral components have required subsequent revision for aseptic loosening or are radiologically loose. Four patients with late complications (14%) have since undergone surgery (two for a peri-prosthetic fracture, and one each for deep infection and recurrent dislocation) resulting in an overall major rate of complication of 35.7%. The cement-in-cement technique provides reliable femoral fixation in this elderly population and may reduce operating time and rates of complication. PMID:26637675

  7. Nano-modified cement composites and its applicability as concrete repair material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Tanvir

    Nanotechnology or Nano-science, considered the forth industrial revolution, has received considerable attention in the past decade. The physical properties of a nano-scaled material are entirely different than that of bulk materials. With the emerging nanotechnology, one can build material block atom by atom. Therefore, through nanotechnology it is possible to enhance and control the physical properties of materials to a great extent. Composites such as concrete materials have very high strength and Young's modulus but relatively low toughness and ductility due to their covalent bonding between atoms and lacking of slip systems in the crystal structures. However, the strength and life of concrete structures are determined by the microstructure and mass transfer at nano scale. Cementitious composites are amenable to manipulation through nanotechnology due to the physical behavior and size of hydration products. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are nearly ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. So there is a great potential to utilize CNT in producing new cement based composite materials. It is evident from the review of past literature that mechanical properties of nanotubes reinforced cementitious composites have been highly variable. Some researches yielded improvement in performance of CNT-cement composites as compared to plain cement samples, while other resulted in inconsequential changes in mechanical properties. Even in some cases considerable less strengths and modulus were obtained. Another major difficulty of producing CNT reinforced cementitious composites is the attainment of homogeneous dispersion of nanotubes into cement but no standard procedures to mix CNT within the cement is available. CNT attract more water to adhere to their surface due to their high aspect ratio which eventually results in less workability of the cement mix. Therefore, it is extremely important to develop a suitable mixing technique and an

  8. Experimental and computational micromechanics at the tibial cement-trabeculae interface.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Priyanka; Miller, Mark A; Verdonschot, Nico; Mann, Kenneth A; Janssen, Dennis

    2016-06-14

    Aseptic loosening of the tibial component in cemented total knee arthroplasty remains a major concern. We hypothesize that micromotion between the cement and trabeculae leads to increased circulation of interstitial fluid which in turn causes fluid-induced resorption of the trabeculae. Another mechanism for implant loosening is trabecular strain shielding. Using a newly developed experimental setup and digital image correlation (DIC) methods we were able to measure micromotion and strains in lab-prepared cement-trabeculae interface specimens (n=4). Finite element (FE) models of these specimens were developed to determine whether differences in micromotion and strain in morphologically varying specimens could be simulated accurately. Results showed that the measured micromotion and strains correlated well with FE model predictions (r(2)=0.59-0.85; r(2)=0.66-0.90). Global specimen strains measured axially matched well with the FE model strains (r(2)=0.87). FE model cement strains showed an increasing trend with distance from the cement border. The influence of loss of trabecular connectivity at the specimen edges was studied using our FE model results. Micromotion values at the outer edge of the specimens were higher than the specimen interior when considering a very thin outer edge (0.1mm). When the outer edge thickness was increased to about one trabecular length (0.8mm), there was a drop in the median and peak values. Using the experimental and modelling approach outlined in this study, we can further study the mechanisms that lead to loss of interlock between cement and trabeculae at the tibial interface.

  9. A cost effective cultivation medium for biocalcification of Bacillus pasteurii KCTC 3558 and its effect on cement cubes properties.

    PubMed

    Yoosathaporn, S; Tiangburanatham, P; Bovonsombut, S; Chaipanich, A; Pathom-Aree, W

    2016-01-01

    Application of carbonate precipitation induced by Bacillus pasteurii for improving some properties of cement has been reported. However, it is not yet successful in commercial scale due to the high cost of cultivation medium. This is the first report on the application of effluent from chicken manure bio-gas plant, a high protein content agricultural waste, as an alternative growth medium for carbonate precipitation by B. pasteurii KCTC3558. Urease activity of B. pasteurii KCTC3558 cultured in chicken manure effluent medium and other three standard media were examined using phenate method. The highest urease production was achieved in chicken manure effluent medium (16.756Umg(-1) protein). Cost per liter of chicken manure effluent medium is up to 88.2% lower than other standard media. The most effective cultivation media was selected for carbonate precipitation study in cement cubes. Water absorption, voids, apparent density and compressive strength of cement cubes were measured according to the ASTM standard. The correlation between the increasing density and compressive strength of bacterial added cement cube was evident. The density of bacterial cement cube is 5.1% higher than control while the compressive strength of cement mixed with bacterial cells in chicken manure effluent medium increases up to 30.2% compared with control. SEM and XRD analysis also found the crystalline phase of calcium carbonate within bacterial cement which confirmed that the increasing density and compressive strength were resulted from bacterial carbonate precipitation. This study indicated that the effluent from chicken manure bio-gas plant could be used as an alternative cost effective culture medium for cultivation and biocalcification of B. pasteurii KCTC3558 in cement. PMID:27242150

  10. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  11. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  12. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  13. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  14. LEACHING BOUNDARY IN CEMENT-BASED WASTE FORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cement-based fixation systems are among the most commonly employed stabilization/solidification techniques. These cement haste mixtures, however, are vulnerable to ardic leaching solutions. Leaching of cement-based waste forms in acetic acid solutions with different acidic streng...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device... use in arthroplastic procedures of the hip, knee, and other joints for the fixation of polymer...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device... use in arthroplastic procedures of the hip, knee, and other joints for the fixation of polymer...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device... use in arthroplastic procedures of the hip, knee, and other joints for the fixation of polymer...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device... use in arthroplastic procedures of the hip, knee, and other joints for the fixation of polymer...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device... use in arthroplastic procedures of the hip, knee, and other joints for the fixation of polymer...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1608 - Well casing and cementing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart, the several casing strings in order of normal installation are: (i) Drive or structural, (ii... lessee shall case and cement all wells with a sufficient number of strings of casing cemented in a manner... cap rock and lapped a minimum of 100 feet into the previous casing string. (2) Sufficient cement...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1608 - Well casing and cementing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... casing strings in order of normal installation are: (i) Drive or structural, (ii) Conductor, (iii) Cap... shall case and cement all wells with a sufficient number of strings of casing cemented in a manner... cap rock and lapped a minimum of 100 feet into the previous casing string. (2) Sufficient cement...

  2. 30 CFR 250.1608 - Well casing and cementing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... casing strings in order of normal installation are: (i) Drive or structural, (ii) Conductor, (iii) Cap... shall case and cement all wells with a sufficient number of strings of casing cemented in a manner... cap rock and lapped a minimum of 100 feet into the previous casing string. (2) Sufficient cement...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1608 - Well casing and cementing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... casing strings in order of normal installation are: (i) Drive or structural, (ii) Conductor, (iii) Cap... shall case and cement all wells with a sufficient number of strings of casing cemented in a manner... cap rock and lapped a minimum of 100 feet into the previous casing string. (2) Sufficient cement...

  4. 21 CFR 888.4230 - Cement ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement ventilation tube. 888.4230 Section 888.4230...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4230 Cement ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A cement ventilation tube is a tube-like device usually made of plastic intended to be inserted...

  5. 21 CFR 888.4230 - Cement ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cement ventilation tube. 888.4230 Section 888.4230...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4230 Cement ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A cement ventilation tube is a tube-like device usually made of plastic intended to be inserted...

  6. 21 CFR 888.4230 - Cement ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cement ventilation tube. 888.4230 Section 888.4230...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4230 Cement ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A cement ventilation tube is a tube-like device usually made of plastic intended to be inserted...

  7. 21 CFR 888.4230 - Cement ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement ventilation tube. 888.4230 Section 888.4230...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4230 Cement ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A cement ventilation tube is a tube-like device usually made of plastic intended to be inserted...

  8. 21 CFR 888.4230 - Cement ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cement ventilation tube. 888.4230 Section 888.4230...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4230 Cement ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A cement ventilation tube is a tube-like device usually made of plastic intended to be inserted...

  9. Nano- and mesoscale modeling of cement matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zechuan; Lau, Denvid

    2015-04-01

    Atomistic simulations of cementitious material can enrich our understanding of its structural and mechanical properties, whereas current computational capacities restrict the investigation length scale within 10 nm. In this context, coarse-grained simulations can translate the information from nanoscale to mesoscale, thus bridging the multi-scale investigations. Here, we develop a coarse-grained model of cement matrix using the concept of disk-like building block. The objective is to introduce a new method to construct a coarse-grained model of cement, which could contribute to the scale-bridging issue from nanoscale to mesoscale. PAC codes: 07.05.Tp, 62.25.-g, 82.70.Dd

  10. Nano- and mesoscale modeling of cement matrix.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zechuan; Lau, Denvid

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of cementitious material can enrich our understanding of its structural and mechanical properties, whereas current computational capacities restrict the investigation length scale within 10 nm. In this context, coarse-grained simulations can translate the information from nanoscale to mesoscale, thus bridging the multi-scale investigations. Here, we develop a coarse-grained model of cement matrix using the concept of disk-like building block. The objective is to introduce a new method to construct a coarse-grained model of cement, which could contribute to the scale-bridging issue from nanoscale to mesoscale. PAC codes: 07.05.Tp, 62.25.-g, 82.70.Dd.

  11. Delayed bone cement displacement following balloon kyphoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hee Sun; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Seok Won

    2008-04-01

    We report a rare case of delayed cement displacement after balloon kyphoplasty in patient with Kümmell's desease. A 78-year-old woman with Kümmell's desease at T12 level received percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty. Two months after surgery, the patient complained of progressive severe back pain. Computed tomographic scans revealed a breakdown of the anterior cortex and anterior displacement of bone cement. Although this complication is very rare, it is likely to occur in treatment of Kümmell's desease accompanying anterior cortical defect. PMID:19096648

  12. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  13. Cement As a Waste Form for Nuclear Fission Products: The Case of (90)Sr and Its Daughters.

    PubMed

    Dezerald, Lucile; Kohanoff, Jorge J; Correa, Alfredo A; Caro, Alfredo; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Ulm, Franz J; Saúl, Andrés

    2015-11-17

    One of the main challenges faced by the nuclear industry is the long-term confinement of nuclear waste. Because it is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, cement is the material of choice to store large volumes of radioactive materials, in particular the low-level medium-lived fission products. It is therefore of utmost importance to assess the chemical and structural stability of cement containing radioactive species. Here, we use ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) to study the effects of (90)Sr insertion and decay in C-S-H (calcium-silicate-hydrate) in order to test the ability of cement to trap and hold this radioactive fission product and to investigate the consequences of its β-decay on the cement paste structure. We show that (90)Sr is stable when it substitutes the Ca(2+) ions in C-S-H, and so is its daughter nucleus (90)Y after β-decay. Interestingly, (90)Zr, daughter of (90)Y and final product in the decay sequence, is found to be unstable compared to the bulk phase of the element at zero K but stable when compared to the solvated ion in water. Therefore, cement appears as a suitable waste form for (90)Sr storage.

  14. Cement As a Waste Form for Nuclear Fission Products: The Case of (90)Sr and Its Daughters.

    PubMed

    Dezerald, Lucile; Kohanoff, Jorge J; Correa, Alfredo A; Caro, Alfredo; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Ulm, Franz J; Saúl, Andrés

    2015-11-17

    One of the main challenges faced by the nuclear industry is the long-term confinement of nuclear waste. Because it is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, cement is the material of choice to store large volumes of radioactive materials, in particular the low-level medium-lived fission products. It is therefore of utmost importance to assess the chemical and structural stability of cement containing radioactive species. Here, we use ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) to study the effects of (90)Sr insertion and decay in C-S-H (calcium-silicate-hydrate) in order to test the ability of cement to trap and hold this radioactive fission product and to investigate the consequences of its β-decay on the cement paste structure. We show that (90)Sr is stable when it substitutes the Ca(2+) ions in C-S-H, and so is its daughter nucleus (90)Y after β-decay. Interestingly, (90)Zr, daughter of (90)Y and final product in the decay sequence, is found to be unstable compared to the bulk phase of the element at zero K but stable when compared to the solvated ion in water. Therefore, cement appears as a suitable waste form for (90)Sr storage. PMID:26513644

  15. A ten-year retrospective analysis of cement burns in a tertiary burns center.

    PubMed

    Alexander, William; Coghlan, Patrick; Greenwood, John

    2014-01-01

    Cement is extensively used both in the professional construction and "do-it-yourself" industries. Despite a number of small published series during the past 80 years highlighting its potential for harm, little seems to have been done to make consumers aware of its risks of causing serious burn injuries. The authors present 10 years of a tertiary adult burn center's experience with these burns, and highlight the significance of these burns on the active, working sector of society. Both professionals and part-time enthusiasts are affected, with burns of significant depth and subsequent impairment of normal functioning. The authors propose a better education system to highlight the risks and, in time, reduce the incidence of cement burns.

  16. Study of the dehydration of Portland Cement by Mössbauer spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassaan, M. Y.; Salah, S. H.; Eissa, N. A.

    1989-03-01

    Egyptian Portland Cement in the form of one inch cube was hydrated at different times of hydration. Nine cubes of each period of hydration were heated for five minutes 200, 300, 400 up to 1000°C then were quenched in air. The compressive strength was measured for these samples and related to unheated ones. These cubes were ground and measured by Mössbauer spectrometry to correlate the effect of dehydration of cement pastes on the states of iron, with the decrease of compressive strength. It was observed that starting from 400°C the central doublet characteristic of the hydration process decreased as the dehydration temperature was increased. At 1000°C the dehydration process was complete, the central doublet disappeared and the compressive strength vanished. The hydration process was found to be reversible. The application of Mössbauer spectrometry to estimate the degree of fire in concrete building was demonstrated.

  17. Periodontology: past, present, perspectives.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that affects the tooth-supporting tissues and exhibits a wide range of clinical, microbiological and immunological manifestations. The disease is associated with and is probably caused by a multifaceted dynamic interaction of specific infectious agents, host immune responses, harmful environmental exposure and genetic susceptibility factors. This volume of Periodontology 2000 covers key subdisciplines of periodontology, ranging from etiopathogeny to therapy, with emphasis on diagnosis, classification, epidemiology, risk factors, microbiology, immunology, systemic complications, anti-infective therapy, reparative treatment, self-care and affordability issues. Learned and unlearned concepts of periodontitis over the past 50 years have shaped our current understanding of the etiology of the disease and of clinical practice.

  18. Water Past and Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of sulfate and water ice deposits in the Olympia Undae region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 2213 UTC on October 2, 2006 (6:13 p.m. EDT) near 81.6 degrees north latitude, 188.9 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Olympia Undae is a large dune field that stretches some 1,100 kilometers (684 miles) across the northern polar region of Mars, just south of the ice cap. The region holds a vast expanse of complex, shifting dunes and is best described as a sand sea or erg similar to the Sahara.

    The two images above provide interesting clues into Mars' history by revealing the planet's wet past and frozen present. The left image is an infrared, false-color image that reveals dark-colored dunes overlying a lighter substrate. Spectral data from CRISM and its sister instrument OMEGA suggest similar compositions of these dunes and the dark basal, or lowermost, unit of the north polar layered deposits. HIRISE images revealed cross-bedding (crossed layers that are oriented at a different angle to the main layer) in this dark unit. On Earth, cross-bedded sediments can form in both windy and watery environments. The dark polar basal unit on Mars is interpreted as a sand sheet underlying and pre-dating the ice, and now being eroded to dunes by the Martian winds.

    The mineralogy of the Olympia Undae region holds a record of past water. CRISM spectral data (right image) shows that the darker dunes are rich in polyhydrated sulfate (sulfates with more than one water molecule incorporated into each molecule of the mineral). The mineral gypsum is a polyhydrated sulfate, and the most likely constituent in these dunes. The gypsum probably formed by evaporation of ancient, saline water or by aqueous alteration of the silicate portion of the dune material. Areas shaded in red are cover by

  19. Weird past tense forms.

    PubMed

    Xu, F; Pinker, S

    1995-10-01

    It is often assumed that children go through a stage in which they systematically overapply irregular past tense patterns to inappropriate verbs, as in wipe-wope, bring-brang, trick-truck, walk-has walken. Such errors have been interpreted both as reflecting over-use of minor grammatical rules (e.g. 'change i to a'), and as reflecting the operation of a connectionist pattern associator network that superimposes and blends patterns of various degrees of generality. But the actual rate, time course, and nature of these errors have never been documented. We analysed 20,000 past tense and participle usages from nine children in the CHILDES database, looking for overapplications of irregular vowel-change patterns, as in brang, blends, as in branged, productive suffixations of -en, as in walken, gross distortions, as in mail-membled, and double-suffixation, as in walkeded. These errors were collectively quite rare; children made them in about two tenths of one per cent of the opportunities, and with few stable patterns: the errors were not predominantly word-substitutions, did not occur predominantly with irregular stems, showed no consistency across verbs or ages, and showed no clear age trend. Most (though not all) of the errors were based closely on existing irregular verbs; gross distortions never occurred. We suggest that both rule-theories and connectionist theories have tended to overestimate the predominance of such errors. Children master irregular forms quite accurately, presumably because irregular forms are just a special case of the arbitrary sound-meaning pairings that define words, and because children are good at learning words.

  20. Natural and accelerated CO{sub 2} binding kinetics in cement paste at different relative humidities

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Castellote, Marta

    2013-07-15

    Natural carbonation and accelerated carbonation are compared in terms of CO{sub 2} combination. Thermogravimetrical analysis, neutron diffraction and weight measurements were used to quantify the amounts of CO{sub 2} in samples exposed to different CO{sub 2} and relative humidity (RH) conditions. An exponential equation is proposed to describe temporal evolution: combination rates and maximum values are obtained both for natural and accelerated processes. The influence of RH in these parameters is analyzed. At 100% CO{sub 2} an increase of RH from 53 to 75% diminishes the combination rate considerably, but increases slightly the maximum CO{sub 2} binding. At 0.5% CO{sub 2} both the rate and the maximum are higher for intermediate RH, with a linear relation between both variables. Equivalences between the different processes have been calculated: the amount of CO{sub 2} combined in 1 h at 100% CO{sub 2} and 65% RH carbonation is equivalent to approximately 36 days of natural exposure outside and 54 days inside.